WorldWideScience

Sample records for metabolite signal identification

  1. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. GPCR-Mediated Signaling of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Anna Sofie; Trauelsen, Mette; Rudenko, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In addition to their bioenergetic intracellular function, several classical metabolites act as extracellular signaling molecules activating cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), similar to hormones and neurotransmitters. "Signaling metabolites" generated from nutrients or by gut...... microbiota target primarily enteroendocrine, neuronal, and immune cells in the lamina propria of the gut mucosa and the liver and, through these tissues, the rest of the body. In contrast, metabolites from the intermediary metabolism act mainly as metabolic stress-induced autocrine and paracrine signals...... in adipose tissue, the liver, and the endocrine pancreas. Importantly, distinct metabolite GPCRs act as efficient pro- and anti-inflammatory regulators of key immune cells, and signaling metabolites may thus function as important drivers of the low-grade inflammation associated with insulin resistance...

  3. Metabolite identification and molecular fingerprint prediction through machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Markus; Shen, Huibin; Zamboni, Nicola; Rousu, Juho

    2012-09-15

    Metabolite identification from tandem mass spectra is an important problem in metabolomics, underpinning subsequent metabolic modelling and network analysis. Yet, currently this task requires matching the observed spectrum against a database of reference spectra originating from similar equipment and closely matching operating parameters, a condition that is rarely satisfied in public repositories. Furthermore, the computational support for identification of molecules not present in reference databases is lacking. Recent efforts in assembling large public mass spectral databases such as MassBank have opened the door for the development of a new genre of metabolite identification methods. We introduce a novel framework for prediction of molecular characteristics and identification of metabolites from tandem mass spectra using machine learning with the support vector machine. Our approach is to first predict a large set of molecular properties of the unknown metabolite from salient tandem mass spectral signals, and in the second step to use the predicted properties for matching against large molecule databases, such as PubChem. We demonstrate that several molecular properties can be predicted to high accuracy and that they are useful in de novo metabolite identification, where the reference database does not contain any spectra of the same molecule. An Matlab/Python package of the FingerID tool is freely available on the web at http://www.sourceforge.net/p/fingerid. markus.heinonen@cs.helsinki.fi.

  4. Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) has been looked upon as a carrier of energy from liver to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB also signals via extracellular receptors and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). These recent findings support a model in which βOHB functions to link the environment, in this case the diet, and gene expression via chromatin modifications. Here, we review the regulation and functions of keton...

  5. The WEIZMASS spectral library for high-confidence metabolite identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahaf, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Heinig, Uwe; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Battat, Maor; Wyner, Hilary; Zheng, Shuning; Wehrens, Ron; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-08-30

    Annotation of metabolites is an essential, yet problematic, aspect of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics assays. The current repertoire of definitive annotations of metabolite spectra in public MS databases is limited and suffers from lack of chemical and taxonomic diversity. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of the data prevents the development of universally applicable metabolite annotation tools. Here we present a combined experimental and computational platform to advance this key issue in metabolomics. WEIZMASS is a unique reference metabolite spectral library developed from high-resolution MS data acquired from a structurally diverse set of 3,540 plant metabolites. We also present MatchWeiz, a multi-module strategy using a probabilistic approach to match library and experimental data. This strategy allows efficient and high-confidence identification of dozens of metabolites in model and exotic plants, including metabolites not previously reported in plants or found in few plant species to date.

  6. Automated de novo metabolite identification with mass spectrometry and cheminformatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely Miguel, Julio Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis new algorithms and methods that enable the de novo identification of metabolites have been developed. The aim was to find methods to propose candidate structures for unknown metabolites using MSn data as starting point. These methods have been integrated into a semi-automated pipeline

  7. Profiling and Identification of the Metabolites of Evodiamine in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap) method to profile and identify the metabolites of evodiamine in ... Keywords: Evodiamine, Ultra–performance liquid chromatography with linear ion trap-Orbitrap,. Hydroxyevodiamine ..... janthinellum and its application for metabolite identification in rat urine.

  8. Characterization and identification of in vitro metabolites of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization and identification of in vitro metabolites of (-)-epicatechin using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rui Jun Cai, Xiao Ling Yin, Jing Liu, Da Xu Qin, Gui Zhen Zhao ...

  9. Isolation and identification of two galangin metabolites from rat urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and identification of two galangin metabolites from rat urine and determination of their in vitro hypolipidemic activity. Xuguang Zhang, Shouqian Cheng, Hailong Li, Xiaopo Zhang, Feng Chen, Youbin Li, Junqing Zhang, Yinfeng Tan ...

  10. Identification of drug metabolites in human plasma or serum integrating metabolite prediction, LC-HRMS and untargeted data processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.L.; Ridder, L.; Ruijken, M.; Rosing, H.; Jager, N.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Bas, R.R.; Dongen, W.D. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Comprehensive identification of human drug metabolites in first-in-man studies is crucial to avoid delays in later stages of drug development. We developed an efficient workflow for systematic identification of human metabolites in plasma or serum that combines metabolite prediction,

  11. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory. PMID:22041989

  12. Nontargeted Identification of Reactive Metabolite Protein Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeming, Michael G; Donald, William A; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2017-06-06

    Metabolic bioactivation of many different chemicals results in the formation of highly reactive compounds (chemically reactive metabolites, CRMs) that can lead to toxicity via binding to macromolecular targets (e.g., proteins or DNA). There is a need to develop robust, rapid, and nontargeted analytical techniques to determine the identity of the protein targets of CRMs and their sites of modification. Here, we introduce a nontargeted methodology capable of determining both the identity of a CRM formed from an administered compound as well as the protein targets modified by the reactive metabolite in a single experiment without prior information. Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) and 13 C 6 -APAP were incubated with rat liver microsomes, which are known to bioactivate APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Global tryptic digestion followed by liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) analysis was used to locate "twin" ion peaks of peptides adducted by NAPQI and for shotgun proteomics via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). By the development of blended data analytics software called Xenophile, the identity of the amino acid residue that was adducted can be established, which eliminates the need for specific parametrization of protein database search algorithms. This combination of experimental design and data analysis software allows the identity of a CRM, the protein target, and the amino acid residues that are modified to be rapidly established directly from experimental data. Xenophile is freely available from https://github.com/mgleeming/Xenophile .

  13. Towards automated identification of metabolites using mass spectral trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojas-Chertó, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    The detailed description of the chemical compounds present in organisms, organs/tissues, biofluids and cells is the key to understand the complexity of biological systems. The small molecules (metabolites) are known to be very diverse in structure and function. However, the identification of the

  14. Signal trend identification with fuzzy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Tsoukalas, L. H.; Wang, X.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    1999-01-01

    A fuzzy-logic-based methodology for on-line signal trend identification is introduced. Although signal trend identification is complicated by the presence of noise, fuzzy logic can help capture important features of on-line signals and classify incoming power plant signals into increasing, decreasing and steady-state trend categories. In order to verify the methodology, a code named PROTREN is developed and tested using plant data. The results indicate that the code is capable of detecting transients accurately, identifying trends reliably, and not misinterpreting a steady-state signal as a transient one

  15. Emerging technologies, recent developments, and novel applications for drug metabolite identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenjie; Xu, Youzhi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Drug metabolite identification and metabolic characteristics analysis play a crucial role in new drug research and development, because they can lead to varied efficacy, severe adverse reactions, and even toxicity. Classical methodologies for metabolite identification have mainly been based on mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC), and some other techniques are used as complementary approaches, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Over the past decade, more and more newly emerging techniques or technologies have been applied to metabolite identification, and are making the procedure easier and more robust, such as LC-NMR-MS, ion mobility MS, ambient ionization techniques, and imaging MS. A novel application of drug metabolite identification based on "omics" known as pharmacometabonomics is discussed, which is an interdisciplinary field that combines pre-dose metabolite profiling and chemometrics methods for data analysis and modeling, aiming to predict the responses of individuals to drugs.

  16. Rapid identification of herbal compounds derived metabolites using zebrafish larvae as the biotransformation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Yin, Ying-Hao; Wei, Ying-Jie; Shi, Zi-Qi; Liu, Jian-Qun; Liu, Li-Fang; Xin, Gui-Zhong

    2017-09-15

    Metabolites derived from herbal compounds are becoming promising sources for discovering new drugs. However, the rapid identification of metabolites from biological matrixes is limited by massive endogenous interference and low abundance of metabolites. Thus, by using zebrafish larvae as the biotransformation system, we herein proposed and validated an integrated strategy for rapid identification of metabolites derived from herbal compounds. Two pivotal steps involved in this strategy are to differentiate metabolites from herbal compounds and match metabolites with their parent compounds. The differentiation step was achieved by cross orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. Automatic matching analysis was performed on R Project based on a self-developed program, of which the number of matched ionic clusters and its corresponding percentage between metabolite and parent compound were taken into account to assess their similarity. Using this strategy, 46 metabolites screened from incubation water samples of zebrafish treated with total Epimedium flavonoids (EFs) could be matched with their corresponding parent compounds, 37 of them were identified and validated by the known metabolic pathways and fragmentation patterns. Finally, 75% of the identified EFs metabolites were successfully detected in urine samples of rats treated with EFs. These experimental results indicate that the proposed strategy using zebrafish larvae as the biotransformation system will facilitate the rapid identification of metabolites derived from herbal compounds, which shows promising perspectives in providing additional resources for pharmaceutical developments from natural products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An empirical Bayes model using a competition score for metabolite identification in gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seongho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS based metabolite profiling has been increasingly popular for scientific and biomedical studies, primarily due to recent technological development such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOF-MS. Nevertheless, the identifications of metabolites from complex samples are subject to errors. Statistical/computational approaches to improve the accuracy of the identifications and false positive estimate are in great need. We propose an empirical Bayes model which accounts for a competing score in addition to the similarity score to tackle this problem. The competition score characterizes the propensity of a candidate metabolite of being matched to some spectrum based on the metabolite's similarity score with other spectra in the library searched against. The competition score allows the model to properly assess the evidence on the presence/absence status of a metabolite based on whether or not the metabolite is matched to some sample spectrum. Results With a mixture of metabolite standards, we demonstrated that our method has better identification accuracy than other four existing methods. Moreover, our method has reliable false discovery rate estimate. We also applied our method to the data collected from the plasma of a rat and identified some metabolites from the plasma under the control of false discovery rate. Conclusions We developed an empirical Bayes model for metabolite identification and validated the method through a mixture of metabolite standards and rat plasma. The results show that our hierarchical model improves identification accuracy as compared with methods that do not structurally model the involved variables. The improvement in identification accuracy is likely to facilitate downstream analysis such as peak alignment and biomarker identification. Raw data and result matrices can be found at http

  18. [Identification of saponins from Panax notoginseng in metabolites of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yin; Qiu, Shou-Bei; Zhu, Fen-Xia; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Tang, Dao-Quan; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-01

    UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS was used to identify metabolites in rat blood, urine and feces after the administration of n-butanol extract derived from steamed notoginseng. The metabolic process of saponins came from steamed notoginseng was analyzed. The metabolites were processed by PeakView software, and identified according to the structural characteristics of prototype compounds and the accurate qualitative and quantitative changes of common metabolic pathways. Four saponins metabolites were identified based on MS/MS information of metabolites, namely ginsenoside Rh₄, Rk₃, Rk₁, Rg₅,and their 15 metabolites were verified. The metabolic pathways of the four ginsenosides in n-butanol extract included glucuronidation, desugar, sulfation, dehydromethylation, and branch loss. The metabolites of main active saponin components derived from steamed Panax notoginseng were analyzed from the perspective of qualitative analysis. And the material basis for the efficacy of steamed notoginseng was further clarified. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Isolation and identification of two galangin metabolites from rat urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment of obesity and diabetes [3-4]. Natural products such as ... rat urine. In addition, the effects of these two metabolites on lipid ..... its five metabolites using ultra-fast liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to investigate influence of multiple-dose and food. J Chromatogr A 2014; 1358: ...

  1. The WEIZMASS spectral library for high-confidence metabolite identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahaf, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Heinig, Uwe; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Battat, Maor; Wyner, Hilary; Zheng, Shuning; Wehrens, Ron; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of metabolites is an essential, yet problematic, aspect of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics assays. The current repertoire of definitive annotations of metabolite spectra in public MS databases is limited and suffers from lack of chemical and taxonomic diversity. Furthermore,

  2. Metabolites of alectinib in human: their identification and pharmacological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Sato-Nakai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two metabolites (M4 and M1b in plasma and four metabolites (M4, M6, M1a and M1b in faeces were detected through the human ADME study following a single oral administration of [14C]alectinib, a small-molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, to healthy subjects. In the present study, M1a and M1b, which chemical structures had not been identified prior to the human ADME study, were identified as isomers of a carboxylate metabolite oxidatively cleaved at the morpholine ring. In faeces, M4 and M1b were the main metabolites, which shows that the biotransformation to M4 and M1b represents two main metabolic pathways for alectinib. In plasma, M4 was a major metabolite and M1b was a minor metabolite. The contribution to in vivo pharmacological activity of these circulating metabolites was assessed from their in vitro pharmacological activity and plasma protein binding. M4 had a similar cancer cell growth inhibitory activity and plasma protein binding to that of alectinib, suggesting its contribution to the antitumor activity of alectinib, whereas the pharmacological activity of M1b was insignificant.

  3. MSM, an Efficient Workflow for Metabolite Identification Using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Robert; Huang, Yingying; Schwartz, Jae C.; Chen, Yan; Carlson, Timothy J.; Ma, Ji

    2012-05-01

    Identification of drug metabolites can often yield important information regarding clearance mechanism, pharmacologic activity, or toxicity for drug candidate molecules. Additionally, the identification of metabolites can provide beneficial structure-activity insight to help guide lead optimization efforts towards molecules with optimal metabolic profiles. There are challenges associated with detecting and identifying metabolites in the presence of complex biological matrices, and new LC-MS technologies have been developed to meet these challenges. In this report, we describe the development of an experimental approach that applies unique features of the hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer to streamline in vitro and in vivo metabolite identification experiments. The approach, referred to as MSM, utilizes multiple collision cells, dissociation methods, mass analyzers, and detectors. With multiple scan types and different dissociation modes built into one experimental method, along with flexible post-acquisition analysis options, the MSM workflow offers an attractive option to fast and reliable identification of metabolites in different kinds of in vitro and in vivo samples. The MSM workflow was successfully applied to metabolite identification analysis of verapamil in both in vitro rat hepatocyte incubations and in vivo rat bile samples.

  4. Identification, synthesis and pharmacological activity of moxonidine metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, David D; He, Minxia M; Czeskis, Boris A; Zimmerman, Karen M; Roettig, Ulrike; Stenzel, Wolfgang; Steinberg, Mitchell I

    2002-01-01

    The metabolism of moxonidine, 4-chloro-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-methoxy-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinamine, LY326869, in rats, mice, dogs, and humans has been examined. At least 17 metabolites were identified or tentatively identified in the different species by HPLC, LC/MS and LC/MS/MS. The identities of seven of the major metabolites have been verified by independent synthesis. The metabolites are generally derived from oxidation and conjugation pathways. Oxidation occurred at the imidazolidine ring as well as the methyl at the 2 position of the pyrimidine ring. All seven metabolites were examined in the spontaneously hypertensive rats (3 mg kg(-1), i.v.) for pressure and heart rate. Only one, 2-hydroxymethyl-4-chloro-5-(imidazolidin-2-ylidenimino)-6-methoxypyrimidine, exerted a short-lasting decrease in blood pressure, albeit attenuated in magnitude compared to moxonidine.

  5. Identification of Unique Metabolites of the Designer Opioid Furanyl Fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Melissa M; Nguyen, An; Janis, Gregory C

    2017-06-01

    The illicit drug market has seen an increase in designer opioids, including fentanyl and methadone analogs, and other structurally unrelated opioid agonists. The designer opioid, furanyl fentanyl, is one of many fentanyl analogs clandestinely synthesized for recreational use and contributing to the fentanyl and opioid crisis. A method has been developed and validated for the analysis of furanyl fentanyl and furanyl norfentanyl in urine specimens from pain management programs. Approximately 10% of samples from a set of 500 presumptive heroin-positive urine specimens were found to contain furanyl fentanyl, with an average concentration of 33.8 ng/mL, and ranging from 0.26 to 390 ng/mL. Little to no furanyl norfentanyl was observed; therefore, the furanyl fentanyl specimens were further analyzed by untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify other metabolites. Multiple metabolites, including a dihydrodiol metabolite, 4-anilino-N-phenethyl-piperidine (4-ANPP) and a sulfate metabolite were identified. The aim of the presented study was to identify the major metabolite(s) of furanyl fentanyl and estimate their concentrations for the purpose of toxicological monitoring. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  7. Biotransformation of cannabidiol in mice. Identification of new acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B R; Harvey, D J; Paton, W D

    1977-01-01

    The in vivo metabolism of cannabidiol (CBD) was investigated in mice. Following the ip administration of CBD to mice, livers were removed and metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate prior to partial purification on Sephadex LH-20 columns. Fractions from the columns were converted into trimethylsilyl, d9-trimethylsilyl, and methylester-trimethylsilyl derivatives for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, metabolites containing carboxylic acid and ketone functional groups were reduced to alcohols with lithium aluminum deuteride before trimethylsilation. A total of 22 metabolites were characterized, 14 of which had not been reported previously. The metabolites could be categorized as follows: monohydroxylated (N=2), dihydroxylated (N=3), CBD-7-oic acid, side chain hydroxy-GBD-7-oic acids (N=3), side-chain acids (N=3), 7-hydroxy-side-chain acids (N=4), 6-oxo-side-chain acids (N=3) and glucuronide conjugates (N=3). The most significant biotransformations were glucuronide conjugation and, to a lesser extent, formation of CBD-7-oic acid.

  8. Identification of Microbial Metabolites Elevating Vitamin Contents in Barley Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-08-19

    The current investigation analyzes metabolites of Acetobacter aceti to explore chemical compounds responsible for the induction of vitamins in barley seeds. A bioactivity guided assay of bacterial extracts and chromatographic analyses of barley produce revealed 13 chemical compounds, which were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA determined four chemical compounds (i.e., quinolinic acid, pyridoxic acid, p-aminobenzoate, and α-oxobutanoic acid) highly associated with increased quantities of vitamins. Further experimentations confirmed that quinolinic acid and p-aminobenzoate were the most efficient vitamin inducers. The results indicated chloroform/ethanol (4:1) as the best solvent system for the extraction of active compounds from crude metabolites of A. aceti. Significant quantities of mevalonic acid were detected in the extracted fraction, indicating the possible induction of the isoprenoid pathway. Altogether, the current investigation broadens the frontiers in plant-microbe interaction.

  9. LC-MS-MS identification of drug metabolites obtained by metalloporphyrin mediated oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurin Andrea J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the application of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS to the identification of the products formed by oxidation of albendazole and disopyramide with metalloporphyrins in dichloroethane, using iodosylbenzene as an oxygen donor. Our results show that LC-MS-MS is a powerful tool to study the in vitro metabolism of drugs, allowing the identification of known and unknown metabolites. In addition, it was observed that the catalyst system used resulted in the formation of the same metabolites as obtained in vivo, although for disopyramide other products were also observed.

  10. Automated pathway and reaction prediction facilitates in silico identification of unknown metabolites in human cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quell, Jan D; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Colombo, Marco; Krumsiek, Jan; Evans, Anne M; Mohney, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; de Faire, Ulf; Groop, Leif C; Agakov, Felix; Looker, Helen C; McKeigue, Paul; Colhoun, Helen M; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2017-12-15

    Identification of metabolites in non-targeted metabolomics continues to be a bottleneck in metabolomics studies in large human cohorts. Unidentified metabolites frequently emerge in the results of association studies linking metabolite levels to, for example, clinical phenotypes. For further analyses these unknown metabolites must be identified. Current approaches utilize chemical information, such as spectral details and fragmentation characteristics to determine components of unknown metabolites. Here, we propose a systems biology model exploiting the internal correlation structure of metabolite levels in combination with existing biochemical and genetic information to characterize properties of unknown molecules. Levels of 758 metabolites (439 known, 319 unknown) in human blood samples of 2279 subjects were measured using a non-targeted metabolomics platform (LC-MS and GC-MS). We reconstructed the structure of biochemical pathways that are imprinted in these metabolomics data by building an empirical network model based on 1040 significant partial correlations between metabolites. We further added associations of these metabolites to 134 genes from genome-wide association studies as well as reactions and functional relations to genes from the public database Recon 2 to the network model. From the local neighborhood in the network, we were able to predict the pathway annotation of 180 unknown metabolites. Furthermore, we classified 100 pairs of known and unknown and 45 pairs of unknown metabolites to 21 types of reactions based on their mass differences. As a proof of concept, we then looked further into the special case of predicted dehydrogenation reactions leading us to the selection of 39 candidate molecules for 5 unknown metabolites. Finally, we could verify 2 of those candidates by applying LC-MS analyses of commercially available candidate substances. The formerly unknown metabolites X-13891 and X-13069 were shown to be 2-dodecendioic acid and 9

  11. An evolutionarily young defense metabolite influences the root growth of plants via the ancient TOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Thomsen, Marie-Louise F; Nintemann, Sebastian J; Jagd, Lea Møller; Bourgine, Baptiste; Burow, Meike; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2017-12-12

    To optimize fitness a plant should monitor its metabolism to appropriately control growth and defense. Primary metabolism can be measured by the universally conserved TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway to balance growth and development with the available energy and nutrients. Recent work suggests that plants may measure defense metabolites to potentially provide a strategy ensuring fast reallocation of resources to coordinate plant growth and defense. There is little understanding of mechanisms enabling defense metabolite signaling. To identify mechanisms of defense metabolite signaling, we used glucosinolates, an important class of plant defense metabolites. We report novel signaling properties specific to one distinct glucosinolate, 3-hydroxypropylglucosinolate across plants and fungi. This defense metabolite, or derived compounds, reversibly inhibits root growth and development. 3-hydroxypropylglucosinolate signaling functions via genes in the ancient TOR pathway. If this event is not unique, this raises the possibility that other evolutionarily new plant metabolites may link to ancient signaling pathways.

  12. Unambiguous metabolite identification in high-throughput metabolomics by hybrid 1D 1 H NMR/ESI MS 1 approach: Hybrid 1D 1 H NMR/ESI MS 1 metabolomics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lawrence R. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hoyt, David W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Walker, S. Michael [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS 66045 USA; Ward, Joy K. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS 66045 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Bingol, Kerem [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-09-16

    We present a novel approach to improve accuracy of metabolite identification by combining direct infusion ESI MS1 with 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy. The new approach first applies standard 1D 1H NMR metabolite identification protocol by matching the chemical shift, J-coupling and intensity information of experimental NMR signals against the NMR signals of standard metabolites in metabolomics library. This generates a list of candidate metabolites. The list contains false positive and ambiguous identifications. Next, we constrained the list with the chemical formulas derived from high-resolution direct infusion ESI MS1 spectrum of the same sample. Detection of the signals of a metabolite both in NMR and MS significantly improves the confidence of identification and eliminates false positive identification. 1D 1H NMR and direct infusion ESI MS1 spectra of a sample can be acquired in parallel in several minutes. This is highly beneficial for rapid and accurate screening of hundreds of samples in high-throughput metabolomics studies. In order to make this approach practical, we developed a software tool, which is integrated to Chenomx NMR Suite. The approach is demonstrated on a model mixture, tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana metabolite extracts, and human urine.

  13. Lipidomic Analysis of Endocannabinoid Signaling: Targeted Metabolite Identification and Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantana Keereetaweep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamide (or anandamide, AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG belong to the larger groups of N-acylethanolamines (NAEs and monoacylglycerol (MAG lipid classes, respectively. They are biologically active lipid molecules that activate G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors found in various organisms. After AEA and 2-AG were discovered in the 1990s, they have been extensively documented to have a broad range of physiological functions. Along with AEA, several NAEs, for example, N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA, N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA, and N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA are also present in tissues, usually at much larger concentrations than AEA. Any perturbation that involves the endocannabinoid pathway may subsequently alter basal level or metabolism of these lipid mediators. Further, the altered levels of these molecules often reflect pathological conditions associated with tissue damage. Robust and sensitive methodologies to analyze these lipid mediators are essential to understanding how they act as endocannabinoids. The recent advances in mass spectrometry allow researchers to develop lipidomics approaches and several methodologies have been proposed to quantify endocannabinoids in various biological systems.

  14. Lipidomic Analysis of Endocannabinoid Signaling: Targeted Metabolite Identification and Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keereetaweep, Jantana; Chapman, Kent D.

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamide (or anandamide, AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) belong to the larger groups of N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) and monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipid classes, respectively. They are biologically active lipid molecules that activate G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors found in various organisms. After AEA and 2-AG were discovered in the 1990s, they have been extensively documented to have a broad range of physiological functions. Along with AEA, several NAEs, for example, N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA), and N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) are also present in tissues, usually at much larger concentrations than AEA. Any perturbation that involves the endocannabinoid pathway may subsequently alter basal level or metabolism of these lipid mediators. Further, the altered levels of these molecules often reflect pathological conditions associated with tissue damage. Robust and sensitive methodologies to analyze these lipid mediators are essential to understanding how they act as endocannabinoids. The recent advances in mass spectrometry allow researchers to develop lipidomics approaches and several methodologies have been proposed to quantify endocannabinoids in various biological systems. PMID:26839710

  15. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Krauser

    Full Text Available Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14C or (3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  16. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector. PMID:22723932

  17. Signal-to-Signal Ratio Independent Speaker Identification for Co-channel Speech Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeidi, Rahim; Mowlaee, Pejman; Kinnunen, Tomi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider speaker identification for the co-channel scenario in which speech mixture from speakers is recorded by one microphone only. The goal is to identify both of the speakers from their mixed signal. High recognition accuracies have already been reported when an accurately...

  18. Towards the identification and quantification of candidate metabolites of tebuconazole fungicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azhari, Najoi; Dermou, Eftychia; Botteri, Lucio; Lucini, Luigi; Karas, Panagiotis; Karpouzas, Dimitris; Tsiamis, George; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Trevisan, Marco; Rossi, Riccardo; Ferrari, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Tebuconazole belongs to the family of triazole fungicides, used for crop protection and human health applications. In the environment, the dissipation of the parent molecule leads to the formation of metabolites that are of unknown identity or toxicity. In order to identify and determine the putative identity of those metabolites and their po- tential toxicity, a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) approach is often used. Q-SAR ap- proaches help to predict their toxicity by comparing them to a known database of mole- cules with known properties. All together the information on the candidate by-products may help to select relevant sub-set of metabolites for further quantification by LC or GC coupled with MS. It is thereby possible to select putative toxic compounds for further quanti- fication using chemical analysis. Previous work allowed the identification of potential metabolites of tebuconazole. Triazole, triazolyl acetic acid and p-chlorophenol were suspected to result from the decomposition of tebuconazole. Tebuconazole degradation kinetics was followed for 125 days by quanti- fying the dissipation of the parent molecule and the emergence of the three candidate metabolites by LC/MS for tebuconazole, triazol and triazolyl acetate and by GC/MS for p- chlorophenol. The data allowed the proposition of several metabolic pathways.

  19. Development and In silico Evaluation of Large-Scale Metabolite Identification Methods using Functional Group Detection for Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Mitchell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale identification of metabolites is key to elucidating and modeling metabolism at the systems level. Advances in metabolomics technologies, particularly ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry enable comprehensive and rapid analysis of metabolites. However, a significant barrier to meaningful data interpretation is the identification of a wide range of metabolites including unknowns and the determination of their role(s in various metabolic networks. Chemoselective (CS probes to tag metabolite functional groups combined with high mass accuracy provide additional structural constraints for metabolite identification and quantification. We have developed a novel algorithm, Chemically Aware Substructure Search (CASS that efficiently detects functional groups within existing metabolite databases, allowing for combined molecular formula and functional group (from CS tagging queries to aid in metabolite identification without a priori knowledge. Analysis of the isomeric compounds in both Human Metabolome Database (HMDB and KEGG Ligand demonstrated a high percentage of isomeric molecular formulae (43% and 28% respectively, indicating the necessity for techniques such as CS-tagging. Furthermore, these two databases have only moderate overlap in molecular formulae. Thus, it is prudent to use multiple databases in metabolite assignment, since each major metabolite database represents different portions of metabolism within the biosphere. In silico analysis of various CS-tagging strategies under different conditions for adduct formation demonstrate that combined FT-MS derived molecular formulae and CS-tagging can uniquely identify up to 71% of KEGG and 37% of the combined KEGG/HMDB database versus 41% and 17% respectively without adduct formation. This difference between database isomer disambiguation highlights the strength of CS-tagging for non-lipid metabolite identification. However, unique identification of complex lipids still needs

  20. Post-acquisition data mining techniques for LC-MS/MS-acquired data in drug metabolite identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurjad, Pooja Sukhdev; Marothu, Vamsi Krishna; Rathod, Rajeshwari

    2017-08-01

    Metabolite identification is a crucial part of the drug discovery process. LC-MS/MS-based metabolite identification has gained widespread use, but the data acquired by the LC-MS/MS instrument is complex, and thus the interpretation of data becomes troublesome. Fortunately, advancements in data mining techniques have simplified the process of data interpretation with improved mass accuracy and provide a potentially selective, sensitive, accurate and comprehensive way for metabolite identification. In this review, we have discussed the targeted (extracted ion chromatogram, mass defect filter, product ion filter, neutral loss filter and isotope pattern filter) and untargeted (control sample comparison, background subtraction and metabolomic approaches) post-acquisition data mining techniques, which facilitate the drug metabolite identification. We have also discussed the importance of integrated data mining strategy.

  1. LC-MS/MS identification of the one-carbon cycle metabolites in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lidia A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Groover, Chassidy J; Hartzes, Anastasia; Yates, Charles R; Zucker-Levin, Audrey R; Bloom, Leonard; Levin, Michael C

    2013-06-01

    The one-carbon cycle is composed of four major biologically important molecules: methionine (L-Met), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and homocysteine (Hcy). In addition to these key metabolites, there are multiple enzymes, vitamins, and cofactors that play essential roles in the cascade of the biochemical reactions that convert one metabolite into another in the cycle. Simultaneous quantitative measurement of four major metabolites can be used to detect possible aberrations in this vital cycle. Abnormalities in the one-carbon cycle might lead to hyper- or hypomethylation, homocystinemia, liver dysfunction, and accumulation of white-matter hyperintensities in the human brain. Previously published methods describe evaluation of several components of the one-carbon cycle, but none to our knowledge demonstrated simultaneous measurement of all four key molecules (L-Met, SAM, SAH, and Hcy). We describe a novel analytical method suitable for simultaneous identification and quantification of L-Met, SAM, SAH, and Hcy with LC-MS/MS. Moreover, we tested this method to identify these metabolites in human plasma collected from patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy individuals. In a pilot feasibility study, our results indicate that patients with multiple sclerosis showed abnormalities in the one-carbon cycle. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The use of LC predicted retention times to extend metabolites identification with SWATH data acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, Tobias; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2017-12-15

    The application of predicted LC retention time to support metabolite identification was evaluated for a metabolomics MS/MS database containing 532 compounds representative for the major human metabolite classes. LC retention times could be measured for two C18 type columns using a mobile phase of pH=3.0 for positive ESI mode (n=337, 228) and pH=8.0 for negative ESI mode (n=410, 233). A QSRR modelling was applied with a small set of model compound selected based on the Kennard-Stone algorithm. The models were implemented in the R environment and can be applied to any library. The prediction model was built with two molecular descriptors, LogD2 and the molecular volume. A limited set of model compounds (LC CalMix, n=16) could be validated on two different C18 reversed phase LC columns and with comparable prediction accuracy. The CalMix can be used to compensate for different LC systems. In addition, LC retention prediction was found, in combination with SWATH-MS, to be attractive to eliminate false positive identification as well as for ranking purpose different metabolite isomeric forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Literal readout of identification signals in Morse code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, C. W., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Instrument, designed for mounting in aircraft instrument panels, decodes identification signals received in Morse from VOR or ILS transmitters as they are received and displays the literal equivalent. Without elaboration it cannot decode numbers.

  4. Determination of the psychoactive drugs carbamazepine and diazepam in hospital effluent and identification of their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Carlos A A; Oliveira, Maurício S; Mallmann, Carlos A; Martins, Ayrton F

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the occurrence of carbamazepine and diazepam and their metabolites in the wastewater of the University Hospital (HUSM) of the Federal University of Santa Maria, RS-Brazil. Samples were collected from three sampling points of the sewage treatment system: point A ('emergency effluent'), point B ('general effluent') and point C ('water course-receptor'). Eight metabolites were identified: carbamazepine-10-11-epoxide, 10-dihydro-carbamazepine, 2-OH-carbamazepine, iminoquinone, acridone, nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam. The mean concentrations in the emergency, general effluent and water course-receptor were as follows: 433.0 ± 4.7, 349.0 ± 5.0 and 485.0 ± 5.6 ng L(-1), for carbamazepine and 550.0 ± 4.3, 441.0 ± 7.9 and 586.6 ± 9.3 ng L(-1), for diazepam, respectively. Liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqLIT-MS) proved to be a method fit-to-purpose. The determination of carbamazepine and diazepam, and the identification of active metabolites showing environmental persistence (carbamazepine-10-11-epoxide, nordiazepam and oxazepam) revealed the need for a more effective treatment of the HUSM effluent. As far as we know, no similar study has been carried out on the wastewater of Brazilian hospitals.

  5. In vivo metabolite identification of bakuchiol in rats by UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao; Liang, Qiande; Tang, Xianglin; Wang, Yuguang; Ma, Zengchun; Xiao, Chengrong; Tan, Hongling; Gao, Yue; Huang, Xianju

    2015-10-01

    Psoralea corylifolia L. is a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of various skin diseases such as psoriasis, vitiligo and chronic graft-versus-host. Bakuchiol, isolated from the seeds of P. corylifolia L., is one of the most important active compounds. To study the metabolic fate of bakuchiol in rats, an ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-photo diode array-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS) combined with MetaboLynx XS software was used, peak area-time curves of major metabolites in plasma from bakuchiol were determined. A total of 11 metabolites were identified after a single oral administration of bakuchiol, including 6 in plasma, 10 in bile, 8 in urine and 2 in feces, the metabolic transformation pathways of bakuchiol in rats included oxidation, hydroxylation, methylation, O-glucuronide conjugation and O-sulfate conjugation. In conclusion, this study expands our knowledge about the metabolism of bakuchiol which will be conducive to reveal its in vivo pharmacological and toxicological material basis, in addition, UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS coupled with MetaboLynx XS software can be adopted as a useful tool for quick detection and identification of metabolites from medicine in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Grains colonised by moulds: fungal identification and headspace analysis of produced volatile metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Tampieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to verify if the headspace analysis of fungal volatile compounds produced by some species of Fusarium can be used as a marker of mould presence on maize. Eight samples of maize (four yellow maize from North Italy and four white maize from Hungary, naturally contaminated by Fusarium and positive for the presence of fumonisins, were analyzed to detect moisture content, Aw, volatile metabolites and an enumeration of viable moulds was performed by means of a colony count technique. Headspace samples were analysed using a gas-chromatograph equipped with a capillary column TR-WAX to detect volatile metabolites of moulds. Furthermore macro and microscopic examination of the colonies was performed in order to distinguish, according to their morphology, the genera of the prevalent present moulds. Prevalent mould of eight samples was Fusarium, but other fungi, like Aspergillus, Penicillum and Mucoraceae, were observed. The metabolites produced by F.graminearum and F. moniliforme were Isobutyl-acetate, 3-Methyl-1-butanol and, only at 8 days, 3-Octanone. The incubation time can affect off flavour production in consequence of the presence of other moulds. Further studies on maize samples under different conditions are needed in order to establish the presence of moulds using the count technique and through the identification of volatile compounds.

  7. In vitro metabolic and mitogenic signaling of insulin glargine and its metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Sommerfeld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin glargine (Lantus is a long-acting basal insulin analog that demonstrates effective day-long glycemic control and a lower incidence of hypoglycemia than NPH insulin. After subcutaneous injection insulin glargine is partly converted into the two main metabolites M1 ([Gly(A21]insulin and M2 ([Gly(A21,des-Thr(B30]insulin. The aim of this study was to characterize the glargine metabolites in vitro with regard to their insulin receptor (IR and IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R binding and signaling properties as well as their metabolic and mitogenic activities. METHODS: The affinity of human insulin, insulin glargine and its metabolites to the IR isoforms A and B or IGF1R was analyzed in a competitive binding assay using SPA technology. Receptor autophosphorylation activities were studied via In-Cell Western in CHO and MEF cells overexpressing human IR-A and IR-B or IGF1R, respectively. The metabolic response of the insulins was studied as stimulation of lipid synthesis using primary rat adipocytes. Thymidine incorporation in Saos-2 cells was used to characterize the mitogenic activity. CONCLUSIONS: The binding of insulin glargine and its metabolites M1 and M2 to the IR were similar and correlated well with their corresponding autophosphorylation and metabolic activities in vitro. No differences were found towards the two IR isoforms A or B. Insulin glargine showed a higher affinity for IGF1R than insulin, resulting in a lower EC(50 value for autophosphorylation of the receptor and a more potent stimulation of thymidine incorporation in Saos-2 cells. In contrast, the metabolites M1 and M2 were significantly less active in binding to and activation of the IGF1R and their mitogenicity in Saos-2 cells was equal to human insulin. These findings strongly support the idea that insulin glargine metabolites contribute with the same potency as insulin glargine to blood glucose control but lead to significantly reduced growth-promoting activity.

  8. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, D.; Nieselt, K.; Hu, W.-S.; Breitling, R.; Takano, E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, gamma-butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor,

  9. A Nontargeted UHPLC-HRMS Metabolomics Pipeline for Metabolite Identification: Application to Cardiac Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Simard, Gilles; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Bonneau, Dominique; Procaccio, Vincent; Prunier, Fabrice; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal

    2017-02-07

    In recent years, the number of investigations based on nontargeted metabolomics has increased, although often without a thorough assessment of analytical strategies applied to acquire data. Following published guidelines for metabolomics experiments, we report a validated nontargeted metabolomics strategy with pipeline for unequivocal identification of metabolites using the MSMLS molecule library. We achieved an in-house database containing accurate m/z values, retention times, isotopic patterns, full MS, and MS/MS spectra. A UHPLC-HRMS Q-Exactive method was developed, and experimental variations were determined within and between 3 experimental days. The extraction efficiency as well as the accuracy, precision, repeatability, and linearity of the method were assessed, the method demonstrating good performances. The methodology was further blindly applied to plasma from remote ischemic pre-conditioning (RIPC) rats. Samples, previously analyzed by targeted metabolomics using completely different protocol, analytical strategy, and platform, were submitted to our analytical pipeline. A combination of multivariate and univariate statistical analyses was employed. Selection of putative biomarkers from OPLS-DA model and S-plot was combined to jack-knife confidence intervals, metabolites' VIP values, and univariate statistics. Only variables with strong model contribution and highly statistical reliability were selected as discriminated metabolites. Three biomarkers identified by the previous targeted metabolomics study were found in the current work, in addition to three novel metabolites, emphasizing the efficiency of the current methodology and its ability to identify new biomarkers of clinical interest, in a single sequence. The biomarkers were identified to level 1 according to the metabolomics standard initiative and confirmed by both RPLC and HILIC-HRMS.

  10. The application of NMR-based milk metabolite analysis in milk authenticity identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiangqiang; Yu, Zunbo; Zhu, Dan; Meng, Xianghe; Pang, Xiumei; Liu, Yue; Frew, Russell; Chen, He; Chen, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Milk is an important food component in the human diet and is a target for fraud, including many unsafe practices. For example, the unscrupulous adulteration of soymilk into bovine and goat milk or of bovine milk into goat milk in order to gain profit without declaration is a health risk, as the adulterant source and sanitary history are unknown. A robust and fit-for-purpose technique is required to enforce market surveillance and hence protect consumer health. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique for characterization of food products based on measuring the profile of metabolites. In this study, 1D NMR in conjunction with multivariate chemometrics as well as 2D NMR was applied to differentiate milk types and to identify milk adulteration. Ten metabolites were found which differed among milk types, hence providing characteristic markers for identifying the milk. These metabolites were used to establish mathematical models for milk type differentiation. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of adulteration was 2% (v/v) for soymilk in bovine milk, 2% (v/v) for soymilk in goat milk and 5% (v/v) for bovine milk in goat milk, with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 10%, which can meet the needs of daily inspection. The NMR method described here is effective for milk authenticity identification, and the study demonstrates that the NMR-based milk metabolite analysis approach provides a means of detecting adulteration at expected levels and can be used for dairy quality monitoring. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Signal Analysis for Radiation Event Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Wallace

    2004-12-30

    The method of digitizing the scintillation output signals from a lithiated sol-gel based glass is described. The design considerations for using the lithiated scintillator for the detection of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is presented.

  12. MetaboHunter: an automatic approach for identification of metabolites from 1H-NMR spectra of complex mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Culf Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy is widely used for high-throughput characterization of metabolites in complex biological mixtures. However, the accurate identification of individual compounds is still a challenging task, particularly in spectral regions with higher peak densities. The need for automatic tools to facilitate and further improve the accuracy of such tasks, while using increasingly larger reference spectral libraries becomes a priority of current metabolomics research. Results We introduce a web server application, called MetaboHunter, which can be used for automatic assignment of 1H-NMR spectra of metabolites. MetaboHunter provides methods for automatic metabolite identification based on spectra or peak lists with three different search methods and with possibility for peak drift in a user defined spectral range. The assignment is performed using as reference libraries manually curated data from two major publicly available databases of NMR metabolite standard measurements (HMDB and MMCD. Tests using a variety of synthetic and experimental spectra of single and multi metabolite mixtures show that MetaboHunter is able to identify, in average, more than 80% of detectable metabolites from spectra of synthetic mixtures and more than 50% from spectra corresponding to experimental mixtures. This work also suggests that better scoring functions improve by more than 30% the performance of MetaboHunter's metabolite identification methods. Conclusions MetaboHunter is a freely accessible, easy to use and user friendly 1H-NMR-based web server application that provides efficient data input and pre-processing, flexible parameter settings, fast and automatic metabolite fingerprinting and results visualization via intuitive plotting and compound peak hit maps. Compared to other published and freely accessible metabolomics tools, MetaboHunter implements three efficient methods to search for metabolites in manually curated

  13. Identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids by liquid chromatography-ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalet, Clément; Hollebrands, Boudewijn; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Augustijns, Patrick; Duchateau, Guus

    2018-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of natural compounds with a broad range of potentially beneficial health properties. They are subjected to an extensive intestinal phase-II metabolism, i.e., conjugation to glucuronic acid, sulfate, and methyl groups. Flavonoids and their metabolites can interact with drug transporters and thus interfere with drug absorption, causing food-drug interactions. The site of metabolism plays a key role in the activity, but the identification of the various metabolites remains a challenge. Here, we developed an analytical method to identify the phase-II metabolites of structurally similar flavonoids. We used liquid chromatography-ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) analysis to identify phase-II metabolites of flavonols, flavones, and catechins produced by HT29 cells. We showed that IMS could bring valuable structural information on the different positional isomers of the flavonols and flavones. The position of the glucuronide moiety had a strong influence on the collision cross section (CCS) of the metabolites, with only minor contribution of hydroxyl and methyl moieties. For the catechins, fragmentation data obtained from MS/MS analysis appeared more useful than IMS to determine the structure of the metabolites, mostly due to the high number of metabolites formed. Nevertheless, CCS information as a molecular fingerprint proved to be useful to identify peaks from complex mixtures. LC-IMS-MS thus appears as a valuable tool for the identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids. Graphical abstract Structural identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids using LC-IMS-MS.

  14. Metabolite transport and associated sugar signalling systems underpinning source/sink interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Cara A; Paul, Matthew J; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-10-01

    Metabolite transport between organelles, cells and source and sink tissues not only enables pathway co-ordination but it also facilitates whole plant communication, particularly in the transmission of information concerning resource availability. Carbon assimilation is co-ordinated with nitrogen assimilation to ensure that the building blocks of biomass production, amino acids and carbon skeletons, are available at the required amounts and stoichiometry, with associated transport processes making certain that these essential resources are transported from their sites of synthesis to those of utilisation. Of the many possible posttranslational mechanisms that might participate in efficient co-ordination of metabolism and transport only reversible thiol-disulphide exchange mechanisms have been described in detail. Sucrose and trehalose metabolism are intertwined in the signalling hub that ensures appropriate resource allocation to drive growth and development under optimal and stress conditions, with trehalose-6-phosphate acting as an important signal for sucrose availability. The formidable suite of plant metabolite transporters provides enormous flexibility and adaptability in inter-pathway coordination and source-sink interactions. Focussing on the carbon metabolism network, we highlight the functions of different transporter families, and the important of thioredoxins in the metabolic dialogue between source and sink tissues. In addition, we address how these systems can be tailored for crop improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, D.M.; Spiesser, L.; Garnier, M.; Roo, de N.; Dorsten, van F.; Hollebrands, B.; Velzen, van E.; Draijer, R.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has

  16. Retrograde signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario Michael

    2016-01-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids...... of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde...

  17. Brain metabolites of lindane and related isomers: identification by negative ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, F; Martínez, E; Camón, L; Gelpí, E; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1988-04-01

    The application of a new method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to the study of some aspects of the metabolism of hexachlorocyclohexanes is presented. Instead of the classical mode of ionization (Electron Impact, EI), this method uses chemical ionization, recording only the negative ions produced. This enables a tremendous enhancement of the signal when chlorinated compounds elute from the chromatographic column. The mass spectra obtained consist generally in the ions corresponding to the molecular weight of the compound analyzed. The sensitivity of the method is higher than any other GC method described: the limit of detection of several organochlorine compounds can be as low as 60 femtograms. Using this method we have been able to identify several Lindane metabolites (tetra-, penta- and hexachlorocyclohexenes, tetra- and pentachlorobenzene) in rat brain homogenates without any purification step. Using this method, a quantitative study of the main metabolites found in brain after treatment with 4 different HCH isomers has been performed. This study reveals that the HCH isomers are cleared from the brain via different metabolic pathways, with a rate of production of metabolites which is inversely correlated to their half lives in brain.

  18. Eddy current signal comparison for tube identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S. W.; Vojvodic, R.

    2015-03-01

    Inspection of nuclear power plant steam generator tubes is required to justify continued safe plant operation. The steam generators consist of thousands of tubes with nominal diameters of 15 to 22mm, approximately 1mm wall thickness, and 20 to 30m in length. The tubes are inspected by passing an eddy current probe through the tubes from tube end to tube end. It is critical to know exactly which tube identification (row and column) is associated with each tube's data. This is controlled by a precision manipulator that provides the tube ID to the eddy current system. Historically there have been some instances where the manipulator incorrectly reported the tube ID. This can have serious consequences including lack of inspection of a tube, or if a pluggable indication is detected, the tube is likely to be mis-plugged thereby risking a primary to secondary leak.

  19. Identification and quantification of bio-actives and metabolites in physiological matrices by automated HPLC-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Platerink, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Identification and quantification of bio-actives and metabolites in physiological matrices by automated HPLC-MS > Food plays an important role in human health. Nowadays there is an increasing interest in the health effects of so-calles functional foods, e.g. effects on blood pressure, cholesterol

  20. Target identification of volatile metabolites to allow the differentiation of lactic acid bacteria by gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Janneth; Arce, Cristina; Jordano, Rafael; Arce, Lourdes; Medina, Luis M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the potential of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) to differentiate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through target identification and fingerprints of volatile metabolites. The LAB selected were used as reference strains for their influence in the flavour of cheese. The four strains of LAB can be distinguished by the fingerprints generated by the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted. 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified as relevant VOCs for Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei. 2-Butanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactococcus cremoris subsp. cremoris. The IMS signals monitoring during a 24-30h period showed the growth of the LAB in vitro. The results demonstrated that GC-IMS is a useful technology for bacteria recognition and also for screening the aromatic potential of new isolates of LAB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of metabolites from phenanthrene oxidation by phenoloxidases and dioxygenases of Polyporus sp. S133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Tachibana, Sanro; Askari, Muhamad

    2011-03-01

    Phenanthrene degradation by Polyporus sp. S133, a new phenanthrene-degrading strain, was investigated in this work. The analysis of degradation was performed by calculation of the remaining phenanthrene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When cells were grown in phenanthrene culture after 92 h, all but 200 and 250 mg/l of the phenanthrene had been degraded. New metabolic pathways of phenanthrene and a better understanding of the phenoloxidases and dioxygenase mechanism involved in degradation of phenanthrene were explored in this research. The mechanism of degradation was determined through identification of the several metabolites; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2,2'-diphenic acid, salicylic acid, and catechol. 9,10-Oxidation and ring cleavage to give 9,10-phenanthrenequinone is the major fate of phenanthrene in ligninolytic Polyporus sp. S133. The identification of 2,2'-diphenic acid in culture extracts indicates that phenanthrene was initially attacked through dioxigenation at C9 and C10 to give cis-9,10-dihydrodiol. Dehydrogenation of phenanthrene-cis-9,10-dihydrodiol to produce the corresponding diol, followed by ortho-cleavage of the oxygenated ring, produced 2,2'-diphenic acid. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase, and 2,3-dioxygenase) produced by Polyporus sp. S133 was detected during the incubation. The highest level of activity was shown at 92 h of culture.

  2. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. PMID:27519550

  3. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-11-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Identification and quantification of predominant metabolites of synthetic cannabinoid MAB-CHMINACA in an authentic human urine specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koutaro; Minakata, Kayoko; Gonmori, Kunio; Nozawa, Hideki; Yamagishi, Itaru; Watanabe, Kanako; Suzuki, Osamu

    2018-02-01

    An autopsy case in which the cause of death was judged as drug poisoning by two synthetic cannabinoids, including MAB-CHMINACA, was investigated. Although unchanged MAB-CHMINACA could be detected from solid tissues, blood and stomach contents in the case, the compound could not be detected from a urine specimen. We obtained six kinds of reference standards of MAB-CHMINACA metabolites from a commercial source. The MAB-CHMINACA metabolites from the urine specimen of the abuser were extracted using a QuEChERS method including dispersive solid-phase extraction, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with or without hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase. Among the six MAB-CHMINACA metabolites tested, two predominant metabolites could be identified and quantified in the urine specimen of the deceased. After hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase, an increase of the two metabolites was not observed. The metabolites detected were a 4-monohydroxycyclohexylmethyl metabolite M1 (N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)methyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide) and a dihydroxyl (4-hydroxycyclohexylmethyl and tert-butylhydroxyl) metabolite M11 (N-(1-amino-4-hydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)methyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide). Their concentrations were 2.17 ± 0.15 and 10.2 ± 0.3 ng/mL (n = 3, each) for M1 and M11, respectively. Although there is one previous in vitro study showing the estimation of metabolism of MAB-CHMINACA using human hepatocytes, this is the first report dealing with in vivo identification and quantification of MAB-CHMINACA metabolites in an authentic human urine specimen. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. In vivo brain macromolecule signals in healthy and glioblastoma mouse models: 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, post-processing and metabolite quantification at 14.1 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craveiro, Mélanie; Clément-Schatlo, Virginie; Marino, Denis; Gruetter, Rolf; Cudalbu, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    In (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, macromolecule signals underlay metabolite signals, and knowing their contribution is necessary for reliable metabolite quantification. When macromolecule signals are measured using an inversion-recovery pulse sequence, special care needs to be taken to correctly remove residual metabolite signals to obtain a pure macromolecule spectrum. Furthermore, since a single spectrum is commonly used for quantification in multiple experiments, the impact of potential macromolecule signal variability, because of regional differences or pathologies, on metabolite quantification has to be assessed. In this study, we introduced a novel method to post-process measured macromolecule signals that offers a flexible and robust way of removing residual metabolite signals. This method was applied to investigate regional differences in the mouse brain macromolecule signals that may affect metabolite quantification when not taken into account. However, since no significant differences in metabolite quantification were detected, it was concluded that a single macromolecule spectrum can be generally used for the quantification of healthy mouse brain spectra. Alternatively, the study of a mouse model of human glioma showed several alterations of the macromolecule spectrum, including, but not limited to, increased mobile lipid signals, which had to be taken into account to avoid significant metabolite quantification errors. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Identification of glucuronides as in vivo liver conjugates of seven cannabinoids and some of their hydroxy and acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D J; Martin, B R; Paton, W D

    1977-02-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of cannabidiol (CBD), 7-hydroxy-CBD, propyl-CBD, cannabinol (CBN), 7-hydroxy-CBN, CBN-7-oic acid, propyl CBN and cannabichromene have been identified as major metabolites of CBD, CBN and their propyl homologues and of cannabichromene in mouse liver. Trace amounts of the glucuronide conjugates of delta1- and delta1(6)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were also detected. Identification was made by combined gas-liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric studies of the trimethylsilyl (TMS), d9-TMS and methyl ester-TMS derivatives of the glucuronides and the TMS derivatives of the product of the reduction of the metabolites with lithium aluminium deuteride.

  7. THz-TDS Signal Analysis and Substance Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Weixin; Li Jing; Pei Jihong

    2011-01-01

    The terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging system can obtain high-dimensional signals of the substance fingerprint information. It is necessary to process properly to use some signal processing techniques especially for high dimensional signals. As a mathematical description language, geometric algebra (GA) provides not only a powerful algebraic framework for the multi-dimensional vector analysis and computing, but also a unified measurement and geometrical description for different geometric models. On the basis of the GA theories, a new signal analysis method of the THz-TDS is presented. Based on the characteristics of THz-TDS signals, signals are mapped into vectors in the high-dimensional real vector space. The vectors are represented with hyper-complex numbers. We can analyze the vectors using theories of GA. Based on the physical mechanism of the THz-TDS signal analysis, geometric distribution properties and algebraic relationships of THz-TDS signals are deduced. It is demonstrated that every complex refractive index of the sample relates to a unique 2-blade B 2 , all vectors corresponding to the samples of the same substance are collinear and belong to the intrinsic 2-blade of the substance. In projective interpretation, the 2-blade B 2 represents a fixed line and all vectors related to the same substance are along that line. Accordingly, a novel substance identification method based on the relative THz-TDS is presented. In the method, two THz-TDS signals through the samples of the same substance but different thickness are measured. The intrinsic 2-blade B 2 of the substance is then determined by the outer product of these two corresponding vectors. Using the conformal split by the fixed bivector B 2 , each vector corresponding to THz-TDS signals in the vector space V n can be linearly splitted into vectors in vector spaces V 2 and V n-2 . Since that 2-dimensional subspace V 2 is the support of B 2 , the subspace is also a label for substances

  8. Identification of Volatile Secondary Metabolites from an Endophytic Microfungus Aspergillus Nomius KUB105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateef Adebola Azeez; Lateef Adebola Azeez; Sepiah Muid; Bolhassan Mohamad Hasnul

    2016-01-01

    Microfungi are a highly diverse group of micro-organisms and important components of the ecosystem with great potential for diverse metabolite production. During a survey of microfungi on leaves in a National Park in Sarawak, an uncommon endophytic microfungus Aspergillus nomius was encountered. The metabolite production of this microfungus was investigated by growing it in a liquid basal medium for 2 weeks. Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) profiling of the secondary metabolites produced by this microfungus in the liquid medium revealed the presence of 46 different secondary metabolites. The metabolites include saturated hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and an unsaturated hydrocarbon. Majority of the metabolites produced were saturated hydrocarbons. Tetracosane, Icosane and 10-Methylicosane were the most abundant metabolites identified while heptadecane and 2,4-dimethylundecane were the least abundant respectively. This study is the first GC-MS and FTIR report of secondary metabolites from A. nomius. The results from this study confirm the ability of microfungi to produce diverse metabolites, including saturated hydrocarbons. (author)

  9. Compound to Extract to Formulation: a knowledge-transmitting approach for metabolites identification of Gegen-Qinlian Decoction, a traditional Chinese medicine formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Wang, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Miao, Wen-juan; Li, Yan-jiao; Xiang, Cheng; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines usually contain a large group of chemical components, which may be transformed into more complex metabolites in vivo. In this study, we proposed a knowledge-transmitting strategy for metabolites identification of compound formulas. Gegen-Qinlian Decoction (GQD) is a classical formula in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is widely used to treat diarrhea and diabetes in clinical practice. However, only tens of metabolites could be detected using conventional approaches. To comprehensively identify the metabolites of GQD, a “compound to extract to formulation” strategy was established in this study. The metabolic pathways of single representative constituents in GQD were studied, and the metabolic rules were transmitted to chemically similar compounds in herbal extracts. After screening diversified metabolites from herb extracts, the knowledge was summarized to identify the metabolites of GQD. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn), fragment-based scan (NL, PRE), and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) were employed to identify, screen, and monitor the metabolites, respectively. Using this strategy, we detected 131 GQD metabolites (85 were newly generated) in rats biofluids. Among them, 112 metabolites could be detected when GQD was orally administered at a clinical dosage (12.5 g/kg). This strategy could be used for systematic metabolites identification of complex Chinese medicine formulas. PMID:27996040

  10. In silico fragmentation for computer assisted identification of metabolite mass spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller-Hannemann Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry has become the analytical method of choice in metabolomics research. The identification of unknown compounds is the main bottleneck. In addition to the precursor mass, tandem MS spectra carry informative fragment peaks, but the coverage of spectral libraries of measured reference compounds are far from covering the complete chemical space. Compound libraries such as PubChem or KEGG describe a larger number of compounds, which can be used to compare their in silico fragmentation with spectra of unknown metabolites. Results We created the MetFrag suite to obtain a candidate list from compound libraries based on the precursor mass, subsequently ranked by the agreement between measured and in silico fragments. In the evaluation MetFrag was able to rank most of the correct compounds within the top 3 candidates returned by an exact mass query in KEGG. Compared to a previously published study, MetFrag obtained better results than the commercial MassFrontier software. Especially for large compound libraries, the candidates with a good score show a high structural similarity or just different stereochemistry, a subsequent clustering based on chemical distances reduces this redundancy. The in silico fragmentation requires less than a second to process a molecule, and MetFrag performs a search in KEGG or PubChem on average within 30 to 300 seconds, respectively, on an average desktop PC. Conclusions We presented a method that is able to identify small molecules from tandem MS measurements, even without spectral reference data or a large set of fragmentation rules. With today's massive general purpose compound libraries we obtain dozens of very similar candidates, which still allows a confident estimate of the correct compound class. Our tool MetFrag improves the identification of unknown substances from tandem MS spectra and delivers better results than comparable commercial software. MetFrag is available through a web

  11. Blind identification and separation of complex-valued signals

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Blind identification consists of estimating a multi-dimensional system only through the use of its output, and source separation, the blind estimation of the inverse of the system. Estimation is generally carried out using different statistics of the output. The authors of this book consider the blind identification and source separation problem in the complex-domain, where the available statistical properties are richer and include non-circularity of the sources - underlying components. They define identifiability conditions and present state-of-the-art algorithms that are based on algebraic methods as well as iterative algorithms based on maximum likelihood theory. Contents 1. Mathematical Preliminaries. 2. Estimation by Joint Diagonalization. 3. Maximum Likelihood ICA. About the Authors Eric Moreau is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Toulon, France. His research interests concern statistical signal processing, high order statistics and matrix/tensor decompositions with applic...

  12. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    KAUST Repository

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  13. Application of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry in identification of three isoflavone glycosides and their corresponding metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiafen; Li, Xinhui; Liang, Xianrui

    2018-02-15

    Metabolites of isoflavones have attracted much attention in recent years due to their potential bioactivities. However, the complex constituents of the metabolic system and the low level of metabolites make them difficult to analyze. A mass spectrometry (MS) method was applied in our identification of metabolites and study of their fragmentation pathways due to the advantages of rapidity, sensitivity, and low level of sample consumption. Three isoflavone glycosides and their metabolites were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOF-MS). These metabolites were obtained by anaerobically incubating three isoflavone glycosides with human intestinal flora. The characteristic fragments of isoflavone glycosides and their metabolites were used for the identification work. Two metabolites from ononin, three metabolites from irilone-4'-O-β-D-glucoside, and five metabolites from sissotrin were identified respectively by the retention time (RT), accurate mass, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns. The losses of the glucosyl group, CO from the [M+H] + ion were observed for all the three isoflavone glycosides. The characteristic retro-Diels-Alder (RDA) fragmentation patterns were used to differentiate the compounds. The metabolic pathways of the three isoflavone glycosides were proposed according to the identified chemical structures of the metabolites. A selective, sensitive and rapid method was established for detecting and identifying three isoflavone glycosides and their metabolites using UPLC/QTOF-MS. The established method can be used for further rapid structural identification studies of metabolites and natural products. Furthermore, the proposed metabolic pathways will be helpful for understanding the in vivo metabolic process of isoflavone. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. [Volatile metabolites analysis and molecular identification of endophytic fungi bn12 from Cinnamomum camphora chvar. borneol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Yang, Li; Li, Qin; Shen, Ye; Shao, Aijuan; Lin, Shufang; Huang, Luqi

    2011-12-01

    To identify endophytic fungi bn12 from Cinnamomum camphora chvar, borneol and analysis its volatile metabolites. The endophytic fungi bn12 was identified by morphological observation. volatile metabolites of endophytic fungi bn12 was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrography (GC-MS). Volatile metabolites of endophytic fungi bn12 contain borneol and much indoles. The ITS sequence of endophytic fungi bnl2 is most similar to the ITS sequence of pleosporaceae fungus, particularly C. nisikadoi. Endophytic fungi bn12 is belong to pleosporaceae fungus. It has the ability of producing broneol.

  15. Targeted and non-targeted metabolite identification of MAM-2201 in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kong, Tae Yeon; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Kyung Ho; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Kang, Han Chang; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Hye Suk

    2018-04-02

    MAM-2201 is a fluorinated naphthoylindole synthetic cannabinoid with potent psychoactive properties that has been detected as an active ingredient in herbal incense blends. To gain a greater understanding of MAM-2201 metabolism and to compare the metabolic fate in humans with those in animals, the metabolism of MAM-2201 in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes was investigated using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with targeted and non-targeted metabolite profiling approaches. Nineteen phase I metabolites (M1-M19) reported previously in human liver microsomes and 13 novel metabolites were identified in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes: one phase I metabolite (M20) and 12 phase II metabolites including six glucuronides (G1-G6), one sulfate (S1), and five glutathione (GSH) conjugates (GS1-GS5) of MAM-2201 metabolites. G3 was human-specific, but M20, G1, G2, and 5 GSH conjugates were rat-specific, indicating species-related differences in MAM-2201 metabolism. The findings in the present study can be useful for the experimental design and assessment of metabolism-mediated toxic risk of MAM-2201. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. NMR-Based Identification of Metabolites in Polar and Non-Polar Extracts of Avian Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Fariba; Brun, Antonio; Rott, Katherine H; Falco Cobra, Paulo; Tonelli, Marco; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H; Markley, John L

    2017-11-16

    Metabolites present in liver provide important clues regarding the physiological state of an organism. The aim of this work was to evaluate a protocol for high-throughput NMR-based analysis of polar and non-polar metabolites from a small quantity of liver tissue. We extracted the tissue with a methanol/chloroform/water mixture and isolated the polar metabolites from the methanol/water layer and the non-polar metabolites from the chloroform layer. Following drying, we re-solubilized the fractions for analysis with a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer equipped with a 1.7 mm cryogenic probe. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this protocol for metabolomics studies, we analyzed the metabolic profile of livers from house sparrow ( Passer domesticus ) nestlings raised on two different diets: livers from 10 nestlings raised on a high protein diet (HP) for 4 d and livers from 12 nestlings raised on the HP diet for 3 d and then switched to a high carbohydrate diet (HC) for 1 d. The protocol enabled the detection of 52 polar and nine non-polar metabolites in ¹H NMR spectra of the extracts. We analyzed the lipophilic metabolites by one-way ANOVA to assess statistically significant concentration differences between the two groups. The results of our studies demonstrate that the protocol described here can be exploited for high-throughput screening of small quantities of liver tissue (approx. 100 mg wet mass) obtainable from small animals.

  17. A non-invasive identification of hormone metabolites, gonadal event and reproductive status of captive female tigers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERI DWI PUTRANTO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Putranto HD (2011 A non-invasive identification of hormone metabolites, gonadal event and reproductive status of captive female tigers. Biodiversitas 12: 131-135. As a non-invasive method, fecal sample provides some advantage for animal and collector. The purpose of the present study were to monitor the reproductive status of female Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica by assessing changes in fecal during natural ovarian activity and pregnancy and to identify whether progesterone (P4 exists and what kinds of P4 metabolites excreted into the feces. Two female tigers were fed a diet consisting of meat. Drinking water was available ad libitum. Feces were collected ones to twice a week. The fecal contents of P4 and estradiol-17β (E2 were determined by EIA and P4 metabolites were separated by a modified HPLC. The EIA results shown that during its natural ovarian activitythe E2 contents showed cyclic changes at the average of 27.0 d interval, however, no distinct cycles were shown in fecal P4 contents of non-pregnant tiger. In contrary, the fecal P4 contents in pregnant tiger increased remarkably after copulation approximately 2- to 6-fold higher than the mean value. The HPLC results indicated that two peaks were primarily detected fraction 63- 64 min (identified metabolites and fraction 85 min (not identified metabolite in feces of pregnant tiger. However, P4 detected only small amount in feces. It is possible to assess non-invasively gonadal events such as luteal or follicular activity or ovulation of Siberian tigers by endocrine monitoring based on fecal P4 and E2 to understand reproductive status.

  18. Identification of Urinary Polyphenol Metabolite Patterns Associated with Polyphenol-Rich Food Intake in Adults from Four European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwayoung Noh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We identified urinary polyphenol metabolite patterns by a novel algorithm that combines dimension reduction and variable selection methods to explain polyphenol-rich food intake, and compared their respective performance with that of single biomarkers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. The study included 475 adults from four European countries (Germany, France, Italy, and Greece. Dietary intakes were assessed with 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR and dietary questionnaires (DQ. Thirty-four polyphenols were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS-MS in 24-h urine. Reduced rank regression-based variable importance in projection (RRR-VIP and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO methods were used to select polyphenol metabolites. Reduced rank regression (RRR was then used to identify patterns in these metabolites, maximizing the explained variability in intake of pre-selected polyphenol-rich foods. The performance of RRR models was evaluated using internal cross-validation to control for over-optimistic findings from over-fitting. High performance was observed for explaining recent intake (24-HDR of red wine (r = 0.65; AUC = 89.1%, coffee (r = 0.51; AUC = 89.1%, and olives (r = 0.35; AUC = 82.2%. These metabolite patterns performed better or equally well compared to single polyphenol biomarkers. Neither metabolite patterns nor single biomarkers performed well in explaining habitual intake (as reported in the DQ of polyphenol-rich foods. This proposed strategy of biomarker pattern identification has the potential of expanding the currently still limited list of available dietary intake biomarkers.

  19. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  20. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Safety Signals of Nephrotoxicity through Plasma Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Mattes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing safety concerns such as drug-induced kidney injury (DIKI early in the drug pharmaceutical development process ensures both patient safety and efficient clinical development. We describe a unique adjunct to standard safety assessment wherein the metabolite profile of treated animals is compared with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database in order to predict the potential for a wide variety of adverse events, including DIKI. To examine this approach, a study of five compounds (phenytoin, cyclosporin A, doxorubicin, captopril, and lisinopril was initiated by the Technology Evaluation Consortium under the auspices of the Drug Safety Executive Council (DSEC. The metabolite profiles for rats treated with these compounds matched established reference patterns in the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database indicative of each compound’s well-described clinical toxicities. For example, the DIKI associated with cyclosporine A and doxorubicin was correctly predicted by metabolite profiling, while no evidence for DIKI was found for phenytoin, consistent with its clinical picture. In some cases the clinical toxicity (hepatotoxicity, not generally seen in animal studies, was detected with MetaMap Tox. Thus metabolite profiling coupled with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database offers a unique and powerful approach for augmenting safety assessment and avoiding clinical adverse events such as DIKI.

  1. Rapid identification of phase I and II metabolites of artemisinin antimalarials using LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in combination with online hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Du, Fuying; Wan, Yakun; Zhu, Fanping; Xing, Jie

    2011-08-01

    Artemisinin drugs have become the first-line antimalarials in areas of multi-drug resistance. However, monotherapy with artemisinin drugs results in comparatively high recrudescence rates. Autoinduction of CYP-mediated metabolism, resulting in reduced exposure, has been supposed to be the underlying mechanism. To better understand the autoinduction of artemisinin drugs, we evaluated the biotransformation of artemisinin, also known as Qing-hao-su (QHS), and its active derivative dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in vitro and in vivo, using LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange high-resolution (HR)-LC/MS (mass spectrometry) for rapid structural characterization. The LC separation was improved allowing the separation of QHS parent drugs and their metabolites from their diastereomers. Thirteen phase I metabolites of QHS have been identified in liver microsomal incubates, rat urine, bile and plasma, including six deoxyhydroxylated metabolites, five hydroxylated metabolites, one dihydroxylated metabolite and deoxyartemisinin. Twelve phase II metabolites of QHS were detected in rat bile, urine and plasma. DHA underwent similar metabolic pathways, and 13 phase I metabolites and 3 phase II metabolites were detected. Accurate mass data were obtained in both full-scan and MS/MS mode to support assignments of metabolite structures. Online H/D exchange LC-HR/MS experiments provided additional evidence in differentiating deoxydihydroxylated metabolites from mono-hydroxylated metabolites. The results showed that the main phase I metabolites of artemisinin drugs are hydroxylated and deoxyl products, and they will undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation processes. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of online H/D exchange LC-HR/MS(n) technique in rapid identification of drug metabolites. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Automatic untargeted metabolic profiling analysis coupled with Chemometrics for improving metabolite identification quality to enhance geographical origin discrimination capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Zhang, Yue-Ming; Song, Jing-Jing; Fan, Mei-Juan; Yu, Yong-Jie; Liu, Ping-Ping; Zheng, Qing-Xia; Chen, Qian-Si; Bai, Chang-Cai; Sun, Tao; She, Yuan-Bin

    2018-03-16

    Untargeted metabolic profiling analysis is employed to screen metabolites for specific purposes, such as geographical origin discrimination. However, the data analysis remains a challenging task. In this work, a new automatic untargeted metabolic profiling analysis coupled with a chemometric strategy was developed to improve the metabolite identification results and to enhance the geographical origin discrimination capability. Automatic untargeted metabolic profiling analysis with chemometrics (AuMPAC) was used to screen the total ion chromatographic (TIC) peaks that showed significant differences among the various geographical regions. Then, a chemometric peak resolution strategy is employed for the screened TIC peaks. The retrieved components were further analyzed using ANOVA, and those that showed significant differences were used to build a geographical origin discrimination model by using two-way encoding partial least squares. To demonstrate its performance, a geographical origin discrimination of flaxseed samples from six geographical regions in China was conducted, and 18 TIC peaks were screened. A total of 19 significant different metabolites were obtained after the peak resolution. The accuracy of the geographical origin discrimination was up to 98%. A comparison of the AuMPAC, AMDIS, and XCMS indicated that AuMPACobtained the best geographical origin discrimination results. In conclusion, AuMPAC provided another method for data analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of hyperoside metabolites in rat using ultra performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianming; Xue, Caifu; Shang, Er-xin; Duan, Jin-ao; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Dawei

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF) with automated data analysis software (Metabolynx™) were applied for fast analysis of hyperoside metabolites in rat after intravenous administration. MS(E) was used for simultaneous acquisition of precursor ion information and fragment ion data at high and low collision energy in one analytical run, which facilitated the fast structural characterization of 12 metabolites in rat plasma, urine and bile. The results indicated that methylation, sulfation and glucuronidation were the major metabolic pathways of hyperoside in vivo, and among them, 3'-O-methyl-hyperoside was confirmed by matching its fragmentation patterns with standard compound. The present study provided important information about the metabolism of hyperoside which will be helpful for fully understanding the mechanism of this compound's action. Furthermore, this work demonstrated the potential of the UPLC/QTOFMS approach using Metabolynx for fast and automated identification of metabolites of natural product. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Encryption and validation of multiple signals for optical identification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Cabre, E [Universitat PoliteGcnica de Catalunya, Department Optica i Optometria, Violinista Vellsola 37, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Millan, M S [Universitat PoliteGcnica de Catalunya, Department Optica i Optometria, Violinista Vellsola 37, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Javidi, B [University of Connecticut, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, 371 Fairfield Road, CT 06269 Storrs (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Multifactor encryption-authentication technique reinforces optical security by allowing the simultaneous A N D-verification of more than one primary image. Instead of basing the identification on a unique signature or piece of information, our goal is to authenticate a given person, object, vehicle by the simultaneous recognition of several factors. Some of them are intrinsic to the person and object or vehicle under control. Other factors, act as keys of the authentication step. Such a system is proposed for situations such as the access control to restricted areas, where the demand of security is high. The multifactor identification method involves double random-phase encoding, fully phase-based encryption and a combined nonlinear joint transform correlator and a classical 4f-correlator for simultaneous recognition and authentication of multiple images. The encoded signal fulfils the general requirements of invisible content, extreme difficulty in counterfeiting and real-time automatic verification. Four reference double-phase encoded images are compared with the retrieved input images obtained in situ from the person or the vehicle whose authentication is wanted and from a database. A recognition step based on the correlation between the signatures and the stored references determines the authentication or rejection of the person and object under surveillance.

  5. Reconsidering the nature and mode of action of metabolite retrograde signals from the chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martín Estavillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant organelles produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression in order to coordinate their biogenesis, maintain homeostasis or optimize their performance under adverse conditions. Many signals of different chemical nature have been described in the past decades, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species and adenosine derivatives. While the effects of retrograde signalling on gene expression are well understood, the initiation and transport of the signals and their mode of action have either not been resolved, or are a matter of speculation. Moreover, retrograde signalling should be consider as part of a broader cellular network, instead of as separate pathways, required to adjust to changing physiologically relevant conditions. Here we summarize current plastid retrograde signalling models in plants, with a focus on new signalling pathways, SAL1-PAP, MEcPP and β- cyclocitral, and outline missing links or future areas of research that we believe need to be addressed to have a better understanding of plant intracellular signalling networks.

  6. Comparative study of radio gas-chromatography and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry coupling in the identification of metabolites of estrogens and progesterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adessi, G.; Nhuan, T.Q.; Jayle, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    Radio-gas chromatography (RGC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to identify estrogen and progesterone metabolites. The RGC enables the identification of metabolites of labelled precursors ( 3 H)-estradiol-17β and ( 14 C)-progesterone were used as precursors. The GC-MS analytical technique with mass fragmentography, offers the interest of using unlabelled precursors at physiological levels. The identification of metabolites was based on obtaining the mass spectrum or the compiled fragmentogram on the basis of the most characteristic fragment ions. More over, several metabolites can be quantified on the same fragmentogram. Results on the metabolism of estradiol-17β and progesterone by the hepatic tissue of guinea pigs are given. (Auth.)

  7. Primary and secondary metabolites production in signal grass around the year under nitrogen fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Syeda Maryam Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a number of substances and products and primary and secondary metabolites (SM) are amongst them with many benefits but limitation as well. Usually, the fodder are not considered toxic to animals or as a source having higher SM. The Brachiaria decumbens has a considerable nutritional value, but it is considered as a toxic grass for causing photosensitization in animals, if the grass is not harvested for more than 30 days or solely. The absence of detailed information in the lite...

  8. Evolutionary Adaptive Discovery of Phased Array Sensor Signal Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Milos Manic

    2011-05-01

    Tomography, used to create images of the internal properties and features of an object, from phased array ultasonics is improved through many sophisiticated methonds of post processing of data. One approach used to improve tomographic results is to prescribe the collection of more data, from different points of few so that data fusion might have a richer data set to work from. This approach can lead to rapid increase in the data needed to be stored and processed. It also does not necessarily lead to have the needed data. This article describes a novel approach to utilizing the data aquired as a basis for adapting the sensors focusing parameters to locate more precisely the features in the material: specifically, two evolutionary methods of autofocusing on a returned signal are coupled with the derivations of the forumulas for spatially locating the feature are given. Test results of the two novel methods of evolutionary based focusing (EBF) illustrate the improved signal strength and correction of the position of feature using the optimized focal timing parameters, called Focused Delay Identification (FoDI).

  9. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. [16,16(-2)H2]Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize [2H5]testosterone to [2H4]estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine

  10. Identification of metabolites involved in heat stress response in different tomato genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paupière, Marine J.

    2017-01-01

    Tomato production is threatened by climate change. High temperatures lead to a decrease of fruit set which correlates with a decrease of pollen fertility. The low viability of tomato pollen under heat stress was previously shown to be associated with alterations in specific metabolites. In this

  11. Identification of two main urinary metabolites of (/sup 14/C)omeprazole in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renberg, L.; Simonsson, R.; Hoffmann, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The excretion and metabolism of (/sup 14/C)omeprazole given orally as a suspension was studied in 10 healthy male subjects. An average of 79% of the dose was recovered in the urine in 96 hr, with most of the radioactivity (76% of dose) being eliminated in the first 24 hr. Pooled urine (0-2 hr) from five subjects, containing about 47% of the dose, was analyzed by reverse phase gradient elution LC with radioisotope detection. Omeprazole was completely metabolized to at least six metabolites. The two major metabolites were extensively purified by LC and their structures were determined by MS with derivatization and use of stable isotopes, 1H NMR, and comparison with synthetic references. They were formed by hydroxylation of a methyl group in the pyridine ring, followed by further oxidation of the alcohol to the corresponding carboxylic acid. Both metabolites retained the sulfoxide group of omeprazole, rendering them as unstable as the parent compound at pH less than 7. They accounted for approximately 28% (hydroxyomeprazole) and 23% (omeprazole acid) of the amount excreted in the 0-2-hr collection interval. Based on in vitro studies with the synthetic metabolites in isolated gastric glands, it is unlikely that M1 and M2 will contribute to the pharmacological effect of omeprazole in humans.

  12. Biotransformation of the citrus flavone tangeretin in rats. Identification of metabolites with intact flavane nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Breinholt, V.; Cornett, Claus

    2000-01-01

    The present study mas carried out in order to investigate the in vivo biotransformation and excretion of the flavone, tangeretin, found in citrus fruits, by analysing urine and faeces samples from rats after repeated administration of 100 mg/kg body weight/day tangeretin. The formed metabolites...

  13. Identification of metabolites involved in heat stress response in different tomato genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paupière, Marine J.

    2017-01-01

    Tomato production is threatened by climate change. High temperatures lead to a decrease of fruit set which correlates with a decrease of pollen fertility. The low viability of tomato pollen under heat stress was previously shown to be associated with alterations in specific metabolites. In this

  14. The simultaneous identification of metoprolol and its major acidic and basic metabolites in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Feng; Cooper, S.F. [Universite du Quebec, Pointe-Claire (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    A novel gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed to confirm and identify metoprolol and its metabolites by double derivatization with S-(-)menthyl chloroformate [(-)-MCF] and N-methyl(trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide) (MSTFA). This is the first report, which describes the simultaneous identification of metoprolol, its one major acidc and other basic metabolites in human urine based on solid-phase extraction with C{sub 18} reversed-phase cartridges. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Identification of six new Alternaria sulfoconjugated metabolites by high-resolution neutral loss filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Megan J; Renaud, Justin B; Seifert, Keith A; Mack, Jonathan; Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Yeung, Ken K-C; Sumarah, Mark W

    2015-10-15

    Many species of Alternaria damage important agricultural crops, including small grains and tomatoes. These fungi can produce a variety of secondary metabolites, some of which are toxic to humans and animals. Interest in screening for conjugated or 'modified' mycotoxins has increased because of their tendency to evade traditional analytical screening methods. Two sulfoconjugated Alternaria toxins have been reported and the potential exists for many more. One hundred and forty-eight Canadian strains of Alternaria spp., about half of them isolated from grain, were grown on Potato Dextrose Agar in Petri dishes for 7 days. Plugs of each strain were removed, extracted and screened by a rapid liquid chromatography (LC)/data-dependent tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)) method in negative electrospray ionization mode. Data generated on an Orbitrap Q-Exactive mass spectrometer was processed by post-acquisition neutral loss filtering (NLF). Seven isolates that produced sulfoconjugates of known Alternaria toxins were selected for growth on three additional types of fermentation media. Collision-induced dissociation of sulfoconjugated ions displayed a distinctive neutral loss of SO3 (79.957 Da) that was detected in the MS(2) datasets using post-acquisition NLF. A total of 108 of the 148 isolates screened produced sulfoconjugated metabolites on agar plates. Analysis of the seven isolates grown in liquid culture, on rice and Cheerios, led to the discovery of six new, two previously reported and 30 unidentified sulfoconjugated compounds. NLF of HRMS(2) data from an Orbitrap Q-Exactive is a powerful tool for the rapid discovery of sulfoconjugated fungal metabolites. This technique could also be applied to the detection of other important conjugated mycotoxins such as glucosides. The majority of the Canadian isolates of Alternaria spp. studied produced sulfoconjugated metabolites, some of which had no known 'free' Alternaria precursor metabolite, indicating that they are possibly new

  16. Dual labeling of metabolites for metabolome analysis (DLEMMA): A new approach for the identification and relative quantification of metabolites by means of dual isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldberg, Liron; Venger, Ilya; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2009-11-15

    Advanced metabolomics technologies are anticipated to permit the identification and quantification of metabolites at the whole-metabolome scale. Yet, most of the metabolites either remain unknown or cannot be identified unambiguously. Moreover, the present approaches suffer from inaccuracies in relative quantification because of sample preparation and matrix effects. Here we present Dual Labeling of Metabolites for Metabolome Analysis (DLEMMA) as a valuable tool, which with analogy to DNA array assays enables the identification and relative quantification of differential metabolites in a single sample. DLEMMA was demonstrated as an efficient method for reducing the number of possible chemical structures assigned that exhibit the same elemental composition. Its strength was exemplified by the discovery of 10 novel Tryptophan derivatives. Furthermore, employing DLEMMA by feeding two Phenylalanine-labeled precursors, we could detect differential metabolites between transgenic and control plants. The accuracy of relative quantification is also enhanced since DLEMMA provides identical matrixes for both samples, thus avoiding the effects of different complex biological matrixes on electrospray ionization. Hence, DLEMMA will complement and contribute to the advancement of metabolomics technologies and boost metabolic pathway discovery in diverse organisms.

  17. Dereplication of Natural Products Using GC-TOF Mass Spectrometry: Improved Metabolite Identification By Spectral Deconvolution Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Carnevale Neto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dereplication based on hyphenated techniques has been extensively applied in plant metabolomics, avoiding re-isolation of known natural products. However, due to the complex nature of biological samples and their large concentration range, dereplication requires the use of chemometric tools to comprehensively extract information from the acquired data. In this work we developed a reliable GC-MS-based method for the identification of non-targeted plant metabolites by combining the Ratio Analysis of Mass Spectrometry deconvolution tool (RAMSY with Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System software (AMDIS. Plants species from Solanaceae, Chrysobalanaceae and Euphorbiaceae were selected as model systems due to their molecular diversity, ethnopharmacological potential and economical value. The samples were analyzed by GC-MS after methoximation and silylation reactions. Dereplication initiated with the use of a factorial design of experiments to determine the best AMDIS configuration for each sample, considering linear retention indices and mass spectral data. A heuristic factor (CDF, compound detection factor was developed and applied to the AMDIS results in order to decrease the false-positive rates. Despite the enhancement in deconvolution and peak identification, the empirical AMDIS method was not able to fully deconvolute all GC-peaks, leading to low MF values and/or missing metabolites. RAMSY was applied as a complementary deconvolution method to AMDIS to peaks exhibiting substantial overlap, resulting in recovery of low-intensity co-eluted ions. The results from this combination of optimized AMDIS with RAMSY attested to the ability of this approach as an improved dereplication method for complex biological samples such as plant extracts.

  18. Identification of methylated metabolites of oat avenanthramides in human plasma using UHPLC QToF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jason; Haddock, Jordan; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; McKay, Diane L; Wei, Xiaoyong; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2018-05-01

    Oat avenanthramides (AVAs) are a group of phenolic alkaloids, consisting of an anthranilic acid and a hydroxycinnamic acid linked by a pseudo-peptide bond. Bioavailability of AVA is poor in humans, suggesting transformations for rapid excretion. Thus, we aim to identify metabolites of AVA isomers in plasma of humans after consuming AVA-enriched oats. After lipid removal, AVA and their metabolites in plasma were extracted with ethyl acetate and analysed using an Agilent UHPLC-QToF-MS. Pharmacokinetics of AVA-O showed a bimodal distribution with C max 1 and 2 for AVA-O at 5.9 ± 5.2 and 7.9 ± 7.0 ng/mL and T max 1 and 2 at 1.7 ± 0.7 and 3.1 ± 1.2 h, respectively. Only the methyl-AVA-O showed a single C max at 14 ± 9.9 ng/mL AVA-O equivalents and a T max of 2.4 ± 2.7 h. This analysis is the first to identify methylated metabolites of AVAs and AVA aglycones in human blood after acute AVA consumption.

  19. Identification and validation of urinary metabolite biomarkers for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Wang, Ying; Chen, Liang; Yang, Deyu; Meng, Huaqing; Zhou, Dezhi; Zhong, Jiaju; Lei, Yang; Melgiri, N D; Xie, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a widespread and debilitating mental disorder. However, there are no biomarkers available to aid in the diagnosis of this disorder. In this study, a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic approach was employed to profile urine samples from 82 first-episode drug-naïve depressed subjects and 82 healthy controls (the training set) in order to identify urinary metabolite biomarkers for MDD. Then, 44 unselected depressed subjects and 52 healthy controls (the test set) were used to independently validate the diagnostic generalizability of these biomarkers. A panel of five urinary metabolite biomarkers-malonate, formate, N-methylnicotinamide, m-hydroxyphenylacetate, and alanine-was identified. This panel was capable of distinguishing depressed subjects from healthy controls with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.81 in the training set. Moreover, this panel could classify blinded samples from the test set with an AUC of 0.89. These findings demonstrate that this urinary metabolite biomarker panel can aid in the future development of a urine-based diagnostic test for MDD.

  20. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight analysis for the identification and the determination of resveratrol and its metabolites in mouse plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menet, M.C.; Cottart, C.H.; Taghi, M.; Nivet-Antoine, V.; Dargère, D.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Simultaneous identification and determination of new resveratrol metabolites in mice by UHPLC-Q-TOF in full scan mode. Highlights: ► Fast method to quantify resveratrol and its main metabolites in the mouse plasma. ► Isotope-labeled standards to build a linear calibration curve. ► Linear calibration curve on a wide range of concentrations. ► Simultaneous identification and quantification of metabolites by using full scan mode. ► Detection of uncommon metabolites not yet described in mice. - Abstract: Resveratrol is a polyphenol that has numerous interesting biological properties, but, per os, it is quickly metabolized. Some of its metabolites are more concentrated than resveratrol, may have greater biological activities, and may act as a kind of store for resveratrol. Thus, to understand the biological impact of resveratrol on a physiological system, it is crucial to simultaneously analyze resveratrol and its metabolites in plasma. This study presents an analytical method based on UHPLC-Q-TOF mass spectrometry for the quantification of resveratrol and of its most common hydrophilic metabolites. The use of 13 C- and D-labeled standards specific to each molecule led to a linear calibration curve on a larger concentration range than described previously. The use of high resolution mass spectrometry in the full scan mode enabled simultaneous identification and quantification of some hydrophilic metabolites not previously described in mice. In addition, UHPLC separation, allowing run times lower than 10 min, can be used in studies that requiring analysis of many samples.

  1. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight analysis for the identification and the determination of resveratrol and its metabolites in mouse plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menet, M.C., E-mail: marie-claude.menet@parisdescartes.fr [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cite, EA 4463, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, Paris 75270 (France); Cottart, C.H. [APHP, Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Charles Foix, Service de Biochimie, 7 avenue de la Republique, Ivry sur Seine 94205 (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cite, EA 4466, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, Paris 75270 (France); Taghi, M. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cite, EA 4463, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, Paris 75270 (France); Nivet-Antoine, V. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cite, EA 4466, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, Paris 75270 (France); APHP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service de Biochimie, 20 rue Leblanc, Paris 75015 (France); Dargere, D. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris cite, EA 4463, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, Paris 75270 (France); and others

    2013-01-25

    Graphical abstract: Simultaneous identification and determination of new resveratrol metabolites in mice by UHPLC-Q-TOF in full scan mode. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fast method to quantify resveratrol and its main metabolites in the mouse plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope-labeled standards to build a linear calibration curve. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear calibration curve on a wide range of concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous identification and quantification of metabolites by using full scan mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of uncommon metabolites not yet described in mice. - Abstract: Resveratrol is a polyphenol that has numerous interesting biological properties, but, per os, it is quickly metabolized. Some of its metabolites are more concentrated than resveratrol, may have greater biological activities, and may act as a kind of store for resveratrol. Thus, to understand the biological impact of resveratrol on a physiological system, it is crucial to simultaneously analyze resveratrol and its metabolites in plasma. This study presents an analytical method based on UHPLC-Q-TOF mass spectrometry for the quantification of resveratrol and of its most common hydrophilic metabolites. The use of {sup 13}C- and D-labeled standards specific to each molecule led to a linear calibration curve on a larger concentration range than described previously. The use of high resolution mass spectrometry in the full scan mode enabled simultaneous identification and quantification of some hydrophilic metabolites not previously described in mice. In addition, UHPLC separation, allowing run times lower than 10 min, can be used in studies that requiring analysis of many samples.

  2. Krebs cycle metabolite profiling for identification and stratification of pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas due to succinate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Susan; Peitzsch, Mirko; Rapizzi, Elena; Lenders, Jacques W; Qin, Nan; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Schiavi, Francesca; Rao, Jyotsna U; Beuschlein, Felix; Quinkler, Marcus; Timmers, Henri J; Opocher, Giuseppe; Mannelli, Massimo; Pacak, Karel; Robledo, Mercedes; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2014-10-01

    Mutations of succinate dehydrogenase A/B/C/D genes (SDHx) increase susceptibility to development of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs), with particularly high rates of malignancy associated with SDHB mutations. We assessed whether altered succinate dehydrogenase product-precursor relationships, manifested by differences in tumor ratios of succinate to fumarate or other metabolites, might aid in identifying and stratifying patients with SDHx mutations. PPGL tumor specimens from 233 patients, including 45 with SDHx mutations, were provided from eight tertiary referral centers for mass spectrometric analyses of Krebs cycle metabolites. Diagnostic performance of the succinate:fumarate ratio for identification of pathogenic SDHx mutations. SDH-deficient PPGLs were characterized by 25-fold higher succinate and 80% lower fumarate, cis-aconitate, and isocitrate tissue levels than PPGLs without SDHx mutations. Receiver-operating characteristic curves for use of ratios of succinate to fumarate or to cis-aconitate and isocitrate to identify SDHx mutations indicated areas under curves of 0.94 to 0.96; an optimal cut-off of 97.7 for the succinate:fumarate ratio provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 93% at a specificity of 97% to identify SDHX-mutated PPGLs. Succinate:fumarate ratios were higher in both SDHB-mutated and metastatic tumors than in those due to SDHD/C mutations or without metastases. Mass spectrometric-based measurements of ratios of succinate:fumarate and other metabolites in PPGLs offer a useful method to identify patients for testing of SDHx mutations, with additional utility to quantitatively assess functionality of mutations and metabolic factors responsible for malignant risk.

  3. Identification and quantification of metabolites of the fungicide tebuconazole in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, R; Polledri, E; Scurati, S; Moretto, A; Fustinoni, S

    2014-11-17

    Tebuconazole (TEB) is a fungicide used in agriculture; the objective of this work was to identify and quantify TEB metabolites in human urine. Samples from seven vineyard workers exposed to TEB were submitted to liquid chromatography interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, equipped with an electron spray source, and a linear ion trap to gain a profile of candidate metabolites. Based on the presence of the ion m/z 70 in the MS/MS spectra, which corresponds to protonated triazole (a specific moiety of TEB), and the isotopic pattern of the molecular ions, typical of molecules with one chlorine atom, hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives of TEB, that is, TEB-OH and TEB-COOH, were identified as major metabolites, both as free molecules and as glucuronide (Glc) conjugates. The mean molar fractions were 0.67, 0.13, 0.13, and 0.07 for TEB-O-Glc, TEB-OH, TEB-COO-Glc, and TEB-COOH. Urine samples were submitted to hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase, and the free compounds were quantified in the presence of deuterated TEB (TEB-d6) as the internal standard (IS), by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The assay was linear in the ranges of 0.2-600 μg/L and 0.1-240 μg/L for TEB-OH and TEB-COOH, respectively; precision, accuracy, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were <3.1%, 98-103%, and 0.3 μg/L for both analytes. An evaluation of matrix effects showed that the use of TEB-d6 controlled these sources of bias. The urinary levels of TEB-OH and TEB-COOH in specimens collected from farmers exposed to TEB ranged from 10 to 473 and from 3 to 159 μg/L, respectively.

  4. Use of Hybrid Capillary Tube Apparatus on 400 MHz NMR for Quantitation of Crucial Low-Quantity Metabolites Using aSICCO Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ranjeet; Ahire, Deepak; Kumar, Hemantha; Sinha, Sarmistha; Chauthe, Siddheshwar Kisan; Subramanian, Murali; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Sarabu, Ramakanth; Bajpai, Lakshmikant

    2017-12-01

    Metabolites of new chemical entities can influence safety and efficacy of a molecule and often times need to be quantified in preclinical studies. However, synthetic standards of metabolites are very rarely available in early discovery. Alternate approaches such as biosynthesis need to be explored to generate these metabolites. Assessing the quantity and purity of these small amounts of metabolites with a nondestructive analytical procedure becomes crucial. Quantitative NMR becomes the method of choice for these samples. Recent advances in high-field NMR (>500 MHz) with the use of cryoprobe technology have helped to improve sensitivity for analysis of small microgram quantity of such samples. However, this type of NMR instrumentation is not routinely available in all laboratories. To analyze microgram quantities of metabolites on a routine basis with lower-resolution 400 MHz NMR instrument fitted with a broad band fluorine observe room temperature probe, a novel hybrid capillary tube setup was developed. To quantitate the metabolite in the sample, an artificial signal insertion for calculation of concentration observed (aSICCO) method that introduces an internally calibrated mathematical signal was used after acquiring the NMR spectrum. The linearity of aSICCO signal was established using ibuprofen as a model analyte. The limit of quantification of this procedure was 0.8 mM with 10 K scans that could be improved further with the increase in the number of scans. This procedure was used to quantify three metabolites-phenytoin from fosphenytoin, dextrophan from dextromethorphan, and 4-OH-diclofenac from diclofenac-and is suitable for minibiosynthesis of metabolites from in vitro systems. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Identification of urine metabolites associated with 5-year changes in biomarkers of glucose homoeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, N.; Skaaby, T.; Pietzner, M.

    2017-01-01

    of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index values. Methods: Urine metabolites in 3986 participants at both baseline and 5-year follow-up of the population-based Inter99 study were analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Linear regression and analyses of covariance models were used to detect associations between urine...... associated with a decrease in HbA1c over time. Analyses of 5-year changes in fasting glucose and HOMA-IR index showed similar findings, with high baseline levels of lactic acid, beta-d-glucose, creatinine, alanine and 1-methylnicotinamide associated with increases in both parameters. Conclusion: Several...

  6. Identification and characterization of novel long-term metabolites of oxymesterone and mesterolone in human urine by application of selected reaction monitoring GC-CI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Geldof, Lore; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The search for metabolites with longer detection times remains an important task in, for example, toxicology and doping control. The impact of these long-term metabolites is highlighted by the high number of positive cases after reanalysis of samples that were stored for several years, e.g. samples of previous Olympic Games. A substantial number of previously alleged negative samples have now been declared positive due to the detection of various long-term steroid metabolites the existence of which was unknown during the Olympic Games of 2008 and 2012. In this work, the metabolism of oxymesterone and mesterolone, two anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), was investigated by application of a selected reaction monitoring gas chromatography-chemical ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CI-MS/MS) protocol for metabolite detection and identification. Correlations between AAS structure and GC-CI-MS/MS fragmentation behaviour enabled the search for previously unknown but expected AAS metabolites by selection of theoretical transitions for expected metabolites. Use of different hydrolysis protocols allowed for evaluation of the detection window of both phase I and phase II metabolites. For oxymesterone, a new metabolite, 18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methyl-4-hydroxy-androst-4,13-diene-3-one, was identified. It was detectable up to 46 days by using GC-CI-MS/MS, whereas with a traditional screening (detection of metabolite 17-epioxymesterone with electron ionization GC-MS/MS) oxymesterone administration was only detectable for 3.5 days. A new metabolite was also found for mesterolone. It was identified as 1α-methyl-5α-androstan-3,6,16-triol-17-one and its sulfate form after hydrolysis with Helix pomatia resulted in a prolonged detection time (up to 15 days) for mesterolone abuse. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Identification and characterization of vilazodone metabolites in rats and microsomes by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Balasaheb B; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Tiwari, Shristy; Nimbalkar, Rakesh D; Garg, Prabha; Srinivas, R; Talluri, M V N Kumar

    2017-12-15

    Vilazodone is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) used for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). An extensive literature search found few reports on the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of vilazodone. Therefore, we report a comprehensive in vivo and in vitro metabolic identification and structural characterization of vilazodone using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF/MS/MS) and in silico toxicity study of the metabolites. To identify in vivo metabolites of vilazodone, blood, urine and faeces samples were collected at different time intervals starting from 0 h to 48 h after oral administration of vilazodone to Sprague-Dawley rats. The in vitro metabolism study was conducted with human liver microsomes (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM). The samples were prepared using an optimized sample preparation approach involving protein precipitation followed by solid-phase extraction. The metabolites have been identified and characterized by using LC/ESI-MS/MS. A total of 12 metabolites (M1-M12) were identified in in vivo and in vitro matrices and characterized by LC/ESI-MS/MS. The majority of the metabolites were observed in urine, while a few metabolites were present in faeces and plasma. Two metabolites were observed in the in vitro study. A semi-quantitative study based on percentage counts shows that metabolites M11, M6 and M8 were observed in higher amounts in urine, faeces and plasma, respectively. The structures of all the 12 metabolites were elucidated by using LC/ESI-MS/MS. The study suggests that vilazodone was metabolized via hydroxylation, dihydroxylation, glucuronidation, oxidative deamination, dealkylation, dehydrogenation and dioxidation. All the metabolites were screened for toxicity using an in silico tool. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Definitive Metabolite Identification Coupled with Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) Technology: A Novel Approach to Uncover Structure-Activity Relationships and Guide Drug Design in a Factor IXa Inhibitor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yong; Yang, Xianshu; Martin, Gary E; Yao, Huifang; Shang, Jackie; Bugianesi, Randal M; Ellsworth, Kenneth P; Sonatore, Lisa M; Nizner, Peter; Sherer, Edward C; Hill, Susan E; Knemeyer, Ian W; Geissler, Wayne M; Dandliker, Peter J; Helmy, Roy; Wood, Harold B

    2016-03-10

    A potent and selective Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitor was subjected to a series of liver microsomal incubations, which generated a number of metabolites. Using automated ligand identification system-affinity selection (ALIS-AS) methodology, metabolites in the incubation mixture were prioritized by their binding affinities to the FIXa protein. Microgram quantities of the metabolites of interest were then isolated through microisolation analytical capabilities, and structurally characterized using MicroCryoProbe heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques. The isolated metabolites recovered from the NMR experiments were then submitted directly to an in vitro FIXa enzymatic assay. The order of the metabolites' binding affinity to the Factor IXa protein from the ALIS assay was completely consistent with the enzymatic assay results. This work showcases an innovative and efficient approach to uncover structure-activity relationships (SARs) and guide drug design via microisolation-structural characterization and ALIS capabilities.

  9. Identification of seeds based on molecular markers and secondary metabolites in Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Renjun; Xia, Pengguo; He, Zhigui; Liu, Yan; Liu, Fenghua; Zhao, Hongguang; Han, Ruilian; Liang, Zongsuo

    2017-11-02

    Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis (Leguminosae), whose seeds have similar appearance and chemical constituents, are easily confused in using their seeds. To elucidate the similarities and differences between S. obtusifolia seeds and S. occidentalis seeds, three molecular markers and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were employed to evaluate the seeds characteristics of these two medicinal herbs. The results showed that selected 3 ISSR and 7 SCoT primers could distinguish S. obtusifolia seeds from S. occidentalis seeds based on the specific band and UPGMA dendrogram. ITS2 sequence indicated that the intra-specific similarity of 20 S. obtusifolia and 16 S. occidentalis was 99.79 and 100.0%, respectively, while the inter-specific similarity between S . obtusifolia and S. occidentalis was 89.58%. Although phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two species had a close relationship, they were assigned to different branches. HPLC fingerprint results showed that seeds of S. obtusifolia and S. occidentalis shared some secondary metabolites, but aurantio-obtusin was not detected in S. occidentalis seeds which could differentiate S. obtusifolia seeds from S. occidentalis seeds. The present study not only compared the seeds characters of S. obtusifolia and S. occidentalis from molecular and secondary metabolites levels, but also provided a convenient method to identify S. obtusifolia seeds and S. occidentalis seeds effectively.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION OF AN ELASTO-MECHANICAL MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM-SYSTEM USING STOCHASTIC SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schleiter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of dynamic parameters are the central points of the system identification of civil engineering structures under dynamic loading. This paper first gives a brief summary of the recent developments of the system identification methods in civil engineering and describes mathematical models, which enable the identification of the necessary parameters using only stochastic input signals. Relevant methods for this identification use Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD, Autoregressive Moving Average Models (ARMA and the Autoregressive Models with eXogenous input (ARX. In a first step an elasto-mechanical mdof-system is numerically modeled using FEM and afterwards tested numerically by above mentioned identification methods using stochastic signals. During the second campaign, dynamic measurements are conducted experimentally on a real 7-story RC-building with ambient signal input using sensors. The results are successfully for the relevant system identification methods.

  11. Comparison of trapping profiles between d-peptides and glutathione in the identification of reactive metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana E. Laine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative trapping profile of reactive metabolites arising from six structurally different compounds was tested with three different d-peptide isomers (Peptide 1, gly–tyr–pro–cys–pro–his-pro; Peptide 2, gly–tyr–pro–ala–pro–his–pro; Peptide 3, gly–tyr–arg–pro–cys–pro–his–lys–pro and glutathione (GSH using mouse and human liver microsomes as the biocatalyst. The test compounds were classified either as clinically “safe” (amlodipine, caffeine, ibuprofen, or clinically as “risky” (clozapine, nimesulide, ticlopidine; i.e., associated with severe clinical toxicity outcomes. Our working hypothesis was as follows: could the use of short different amino acid sequence containing d-peptides in adduct detection confer any add-on value to that obtained with GSH? All “risky” agents’ resulted in the formation of several GSH adducts in the incubation mixture and with at least one peptide adduct with both microsomal preparations. Amlodipine did not form any adducts with any of the trapping agents. No GSH and peptide 2 and 3 adducts were found with caffeine, but with peptide 1 one adduct with human liver microsomes was detected. Ibuprofen produced one Peptide 1-adduct with human and mouse liver microsomes but not with GSH. In conclusion, GSH still remains the gold trapping standard for reactive metabolites. However, targeted d-peptides could provide additional information about protein binding potential of electrophilic agents, but their clinical significance needs to be clarified using a wider spectrum of chemicals together with other safety estimates.

  12. Climate change impact on the PAH photodegradation in soils: Characterization and metabolites identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquès, Montse; Mari, Montse; Audí-Miró, Carme; Sierra, Jordi; Soler, Albert; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are airborne pollutants that are deposited on soils. As climate change is already altering temperature and solar radiation, the global warming is suggested to impact the environmental fate of PAHs. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of climate change on the PAH photodegradation in soils. Samples of Mediterranean soils were subjected to different temperature and light radiation conditions in a climate chamber. Two climate scenarios were considered according to IPCC projections: 1) a base (B) scenario, being temperature and light intensity 20°C and 9.6W/m(2), respectively, and 2) a climate change (CC) scenario, working at 24°C and 24W/m(2), respectively. As expected, low molecular weight PAHs were rapidly volatilized when increasing both temperature and light intensity. In contrast, medium and high molecular weight PAHs presented different photodegradation rates in soils with different texture, which was likely related to the amount of photocatalysts contained in both soils. In turn, the hydrogen isotopic composition of some of the PAHs under study was also investigated to verify any degradation process. Hydrogen isotopes confirmed that benzo(a)pyrene is degraded in both B and CC scenarios, not only under light but also in the darkness, revealing unknown degradation processes occurring when light is lacking. Potential generation pathways of PAH photodegradation by-products were also suggested, being a higher number of metabolites formed in the CC scenario. Consequently, in a more or less near future, although humans might be less exposed to PAHs, they could be exposed to new metabolites of these pollutants, which might be even more toxic. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Activation of astroglial calcium signaling by endogenous metabolites succinate and gamma-hydroxybutyrate in the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tünde eMolnár

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that different energy metabolites play a role not only in neuronal but also in glial signalling. Recently, astroglial Ca2+ transients evoked by the major citric acid cycle metabolite succinate (SUC and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB that enters the citric acid cycle via SUC have been described in the brain reward area, the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Cells responding to SUC by Ca2+ transient constitute a subset of ATP-responsive astrocytes that are activated in a neuron-independent way. In this study we show that GHB-evoked Ca2+ transients were also found to constitute a subset of ATP-responsive astrocytes in the NAc. Repetitive Ca2+ dynamics evoked by GHB suggested that Ca2+ was released from internal stores. Similarly to SUC, the GHB-response was also characterized by an effective concentration of 50 µM. We observed that the number of ATP-responsive cells decreased with increasing concentration of either SUC or GHB. Moreover, the concentration dependence of the number of ATP-responsive cells were highly identical as a function of both [SUC] and [GHB], suggesting a mutual receptor for SUC and GHB, therefore implying the existence of a distinct GHB-recognizing astroglial SUC receptor in the brain. The SUC-evoked Ca2+ signal remained in mice lacking GABAB receptor type 1 subunit in the presence and absence of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist (2R-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, indicating action mechanisms independent of the GABAB or NMDA receptor subtypes. By molecular docking calculations we found that residues R99, H103, R252 and R281 of the binding crevice of the kidney SUC-responsive membrane receptor SUCNR1 (GPCR91 also predict interaction with GHB, further implying similar GHB and SUC action mechanisms. We conclude that the astroglial action of SUC and GHB may represent a link between brain energy states and Ca2+ signalling in astrocytic networks.

  14. Terpene metabolic engineering via nuclear or chloroplast genomes profoundly and globally impacts off-target pathways through metabolite signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasoreck, Elise K; Su, Jin; Silverman, Ian M; Gosai, Sager J; Gregory, Brian D; Yuan, Joshua S; Daniell, Henry

    2016-09-01

    The impact of metabolic engineering on nontarget pathways and outcomes of metabolic engineering from different genomes are poorly understood questions. Therefore, squalene biosynthesis genes FARNESYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (FPS) and SQUALENE SYNTHASE (SQS) were engineered via the Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast (C), nuclear (N) or both (CN) genomes to promote squalene biosynthesis. SQS levels were ~4300-fold higher in C and CN lines than in N, but all accumulated ~150-fold higher squalene due to substrate or storage limitations. Abnormal leaf and flower phenotypes, including lower pollen production and reduced fertility, were observed regardless of the compartment or level of transgene expression. Substantial changes in metabolomes of all lines were observed: levels of 65-120 unrelated metabolites, including the toxic alkaloid nicotine, changed by as much as 32-fold. Profound effects of transgenesis on nontarget gene expression included changes in the abundance of 19 076 transcripts by up to 2000-fold in CN; 7784 transcripts by up to 1400-fold in N; and 5224 transcripts by as much as 2200-fold in C. Transporter-related transcripts were induced, and cell cycle-associated transcripts were disproportionally repressed in all three lines. Transcriptome changes were validated by qRT-PCR. The mechanism underlying these large changes likely involves metabolite-mediated anterograde and/or retrograde signalling irrespective of the level of transgene expression or end product, due to imbalance of metabolic pools, offering new insight into both anticipated and unanticipated consequences of metabolic engineering. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Carbazole degradation by Pseudomonas sp. LD2: metabolic characteristics and the identification of some metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, L.M.; Otter, A.; Fedorak, P.M. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Depts. of Biological Sciences and Chemistry

    1996-02-01

    A carbazole-degrading bacterium was isolated by enrichment from a creosote-contaminated soil. This organism, designated Pseudomonas sp. LD2, utilized carbazole as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. When isolate LD2 was grown in nitrogen-free mineral medium with {sup 14}C labeled carbazole, 43% was recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} after 3 days of incubation. Numerous aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were tested as growth substrates for isolate LD2, but few supported the growth of this bacterium. Anthranilic acid and catechol served as growth substrates and were positively identified as intermediates of carbazole degradation by isolate LD2. In addition, 10 nitrogen-containing metabolites were observed in acidified extracts of LD2 culture supernatants, four of which were unequivocally identified. These included indole-3-acetic acid, 5-(2-aminophenyl)-5-oxopentanoic acid, and the cyclized products of 5-(2-aminophenyl)-5-oxopent-3-enoic acid and 6-(2-aminophenyl)-2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoic acid. 63refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Polyamine metabolism in ripening tomato fruit. I. Identification of metabolites of putrescine and spermidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, R.; Davies, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The metabolism of [1,4- 14 C]putrescine and [terminal methylene- 3 H]spermidine was studied in the fruit pericarp (breaker stage) discs of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cv Rutgers, and the metabolites identified by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The metabolism of both putrescine and spermidine was relatively slow; in 24 hours about 15% of each amine was metabolized. The 14 C label from putrescine was incorporated into spermidine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid, and a polar fraction eluting with sugars and organic acids. In the presence of gabaculine, a specific inhibitor of GABA:pyruvate transminase, the label going into glutamic acid, sugars and organic acids decreased by 80% while that in GABA increased about twofold, indicating that the transamination reaction is probably a major fate of GABA produced from putrescine in vivo. [ 3 H]Spermidine was catabolized into putrescine and β-alanine. The conversion of putrescine into GABA, and that of spermidine into putrescine, suggests the presence of polyamine oxidizing enzymes in tomato pericarp tissues. The possible pathways of putrescine and spermidine metabolism are discussed

  17. Maternal Metabolomic Profile and Fetal Programming of Offspring Adiposity: Identification of Potentially Protective Lipid Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmuth, Christian; Lindsay, Karen L; Uhl, Olaf; Buss, Claudia; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Koletzko, Berthold; Entringer, Sonja

    2018-04-30

    The fetal programming paradigm posits that the origins of obesity can be traced, in part, to the intrauterine period of life. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal programming are not well understood, and few studies have measured offspring adiposity in the neonatal period. The aim of this study was to identify maternal metabolites, and their determinants, that are associated with neonatal adiposity. We applied a targeted metabolomics approach to analyze plasma samples collected across gestation from a well-characterized cohort of 253 pregnant women participating in a prospective study at the University of California, Irvine. Whole-body Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) imaging of body composition was obtained in N = 121 newborns. Statistical models were adjusted for potential confounders and multiple testing. We identified six alkyl-linked phosphatidylcholines (PCae), containing fatty acid 20:4, that were significantly and negatively associated with neonatal body fat percentage. Factors indicating higher socioeconomic status, non-Hispanic ethnicity and higher non-esterified fatty acid percentages were positively associated with these PCae. The polyunsaturated fatty acid 20:4 contained in PCae may exert a beneficial effect with respect to future propensity for obesity development. Pre- and early-pregnancy factors are determinants of these PCae, highlighting the importance of addressing pre-conceptional conditions for fetal programming of newborn adiposity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Proposal of 5-methoxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine consumption biomarkers through identification of in vivo metabolites from mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Safont, D; Barneo-Muñoz, M; Martinez-Garcia, F; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Ibáñez, M

    2017-07-28

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are a new breed of synthetically produced substances designed to mimic the effects of traditional illegal drugs. Synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones are the two most common groups, which try to mimic the effects of the natural compounds 9 Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol and cathinone, respectively. Similarly, synthetic tryptamines are designer compounds which are based on the compounds psilocin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine found in some mushrooms. One of the most important tryptamine compounds found in seizures is 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine, which has been placed as controlled substance in USA and some European countries. The control of this compound has promoted the rising of another tryptamine, the 5-methoxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine, which at the time of writing this article has not been banned yet. So, it is undeniable that this new substance should be monitored. 5-methoxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine has been reported by the Spanish Early Warning System and detected in our laboratory in two pill samples purchased in a local smart shop. This has promoted the need of stablishing consumption markers for this compound in consumers' urine. In the present work, the metabolism and pharmacokinetic of 5-methoxy-N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine has been studied by an in vivo approach, using adult male mice of the inbred strain C57BLJ/6. The use of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry allowed the identification of four metabolites. After the pharmacokinetic study in serum and urine, the O-demethylated metabolite and the non-metabolised parent compound are proposed as consumption markers in hydrolysed urine. Data reported in this work will help hospitals and forensic laboratories to monitor the consumption and potential intoxication cases related to this tryptamine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A high-resolution accurate mass (HR/AM) approach to identification, profiling and characterization of in vitro nefazodone metabolites using a hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap (Q-Exactive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Simon J; Nász, Szilárd; Saeed, Mansoor

    2015-09-15

    This paper describes a strategy for the profiling and identification of metabolites based on chemical group classification using high-resolution accurate mass (HR/AM) full scan mass spectrometry (MS) and All-Ion fragmentation (AIF) MS 2 data. The proposed strategy uses a hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap (Q-Exactive) employing stepped normalised collision energy (NCE) at 35% and 80% to produce key chemically diagnostic product ions from full coverage of the product ion spectrum. This approach allows filtering of high-resolution AIF MS 2 data in order to identify parent-related compounds produced following incubation in rat liver microsomes (RLMs). An antidepressant drug, nefazodone (NEF), was selected as the model test compound to demonstrate the proposed workflow for metabolite profiling. This resulted in the identification of three indicative chemical groups within NEF: triazolone, phenoxy and chlorophenylpiperazine. High-resolution mass spectrometry provides increased specificity to distinguish between two characteristic product ion masses m/z 154.0975 (C 7 H 12 N 3 O) and 154.0419 (C 8 H 9 NCl), which are not fully resolved by spectrometers operating at nominal mass resolution, indicative of compounds containing the triazolone and chlorophenylpiperazine moieties, respectively. This post-acquisition processing strategy provides comprehensive detection and identification of high- and low-level metabolites from an 'all-in-one' analysis. This enables functional groups to be systematically traced across a wide range of metabolites, leading to the successful identification of 28 in vitro NEF-related metabolites. In our hands this approach has been applied to agrochemical environmental fate and dietary metabolism studies, as well as metabolomics and biomarker analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. HPLC-DAD-MS identification of bioactive secondary metabolites from Ferula communis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Lolita; Ballero, Mauro; Fuzzati, Nicola; Maxia, Andrea; Mercalli, Enrico; Pagni, Luca

    2004-06-01

    A simple HPLC method was developed to distinguish between 'poisonous' and 'non-poisonous' chemotypes of Ferula communis. The method was performed on a C8 reverse phase analytical column using a binary eluent (aqueous TFA 0.01%-TFA 0.01% in acetonitrile) under gradient condition. The two chemotypes showed different fingerprints. The identification of five coumarins and eleven daucane derivatives by HPLC-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-MS is described. A coumarin, not yet described, was detected. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Herbivory-induced jasmonates constrain plant sugar accumulation and growth by antagonizing gibberellin signaling and not by promoting secondary metabolite production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo A R; Baldwin, Ian T; Erb, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Plants respond to herbivory by reconfiguring hormonal networks, increasing secondary metabolite production and decreasing growth. Furthermore, some plants display a decrease in leaf energy reserves in the form of soluble sugars and starch, leading to the hypothesis that herbivory-induced secondary metabolite production and growth reduction may be linked through a carbohydrate-based resource trade-off. In order to test the above hypothesis, we measured leaf carbohydrates and plant growth in seven genetically engineered Nicotiana attenuata genotypes that are deficient in one or several major herbivore-induced, jasmonate-dependent defensive secondary metabolites and proteins. Furthermore, we manipulated gibberellin and jasmonate signaling, and quantified the impact of these phytohormones on secondary metabolite production, sugar accumulation and growth. Simulated herbivore attack by Manduca sexta specifically reduced leaf sugar concentrations and growth in a jasmonate-dependent manner. These effects were similar or even stronger in defenseless genotypes with intact jasmonate signaling. Gibberellin complementation rescued carbohydrate accumulation and growth in induced plants without impairing the induction of defensive secondary metabolites. These results are consistent with a hormonal antagonism model rather than a resource-cost model to explain the negative relationship between herbivory-induced defenses, leaf energy reserves and growth. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Residues of Ractopamine and Identification of its Glucuronide Metabolites in Plasma, Urine, and Tissues of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chaohua; Liang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Qingyu; Meng, Qingshi; Zhang, Junmin

    2016-11-01

    Ractopamine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use as a growth promoter on cattle a decade ago is still banned by the European Union and most Asian countries. While, ractopamine residues in living samples and some organs (besides liver, muscle and kidney) of cattle under the recommended feed condition (10-30 mg/kg in dry matter, 28-42 days) remains unclear. In this study, nine cattle (246.22 ± 18.17 kg) were fed 0.67 mg/kg body weight (equivalent to 30 mg/kg in dry matter) of ractopamine for 28 days to investigate the residues of ractopamine in plasma, urine and organs. Plasma and urine were sampled during treatment and withdrawal period. Three cattle were slaughtered on withdrawal days 0 and 3 for organs collection. Ractopamine was determined by LC-MS/MS and its glucuronide metabolites were identified by Q-TOF/MS. Ractopamine concentrations in plasma and urine reached highest on treatment day 14 (2.88 ng/mL) and day 7 (4713.25 ng/mL), respectively. On withdrawal day 28, ractopamine concentrations in plasma and urine and were undetectable (limit of quantitation, 0.2 ng/mL) and 4.21 ng/mL, respectively. On withdrawal day 0, ractopamine residue in tissues were as follows: liver > eye > lung > spleen > aqueous fluid > heart > bile > kidney > gluteus > rib eye muscle. Compared with those on withdrawal day 0, ractopamine contents in most tissues that sampled on withdrawal day 3 were lower (P ractopamine approved countries and monitoring of the illegal usage in countries that ban ractopamine. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Dansyl glutathione as a trapping agent for the quantitative estimation and identification of reactive metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Harper, Timothy W; Hsueh, Mei-Mann; Qu, Qinling; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2005-05-01

    A sensitive and quantitative method was developed for the estimation of reactive metabolite formation in vitro. The method utilizes reduced glutathione (GSH) labeled with a fluorescence tag as a trapping agent and fluorescent detection for quantitation. The derivatization of GSH was accomplished by reaction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) with dansyl chloride to form dansylated GSSG. Subsequent reduction of the disulfide bond yielded dansylated GSH (dGSH). Test compounds were incubated with human liver microsomes in the presence of dGSH and NADPH, and the resulting mixtures were analyzed by HPLC coupled with a fluorescence detector and a mass spectrometer for the quantitation and mass determination of the resulting dGSH adducts. The comparative chemical reactivity of dGSH vs GSH was investigated by monitoring the reaction of each with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or R-(+)-pulegone after bioactivation. dGSH was found to be equivalent to GSH in chemical reactivity toward both thiol reactive molecules. dGSH did not serve as a cofactor for glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation of 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene in incubations with either human liver S9 fractions or a recombinant GST, GSTM1-1. Reference compounds were tested in this assay, including seven compounds that have been reported to form GSH adducts along with seven drugs that are among the most prescribed in the current U.S. market and have not been reported to form GSH adducts. dGSH adducts were detected and quantitated in incubations with all seven positive reference compounds; however, there were no dGSH adducts observed with any of the widely prescribed drugs. In comparison with existing methods, this method is sensitive, quantitative, cost effective, and easy to implement.

  4. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-correlation method is applied to detect the location of the shaft crack. The finite element method is used to build the model of the cracked rotor, and the crack depth is identified by comparing the vibration response of experiment and simulation. The experimental results show that the AE signal is effective and convenient to locate the shaft crack, and the vibration signal is feasible to determine the depth of shaft crack.

  5. Identification and characterization of in vivo metabolites of asulacrine using advanced mass spectrophotometry technique in combination with improved data mining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Attia; Zhong, Yunxi; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Peng, Ying; Sheng, Longsheng; Wu, Zimei; Sun, Jianguo; Wang, Guangji

    2016-04-29

    Asulacrine (ASL) is a broad-spectrum, antitumor drug whose data are promising for the treatment of breast and lung cancers; however, a high incidence of phlebitis hampered its further development. Phlebitis is associated with generation of reactive species. Asulacrine donates electrons and produces oxidative stress in chemical reactions. It was expected that ASL would actively metabolize to oxidized products through reactive intermediates and produce more products in vivo than reported and thus cause phlebitis. A comprehensive study was planned to investigate in vivo metabolism of ASL, using high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IT-TOF MS in positive mode. Metabolites were detected by different software by applying annotated detection strategy. The possible metabolites and their product ions were simultaneously detected by segmented data acquisition to get accurate mass values. Segmented data acquisition improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which was helpful to detect metabolites and their fragments even when present in trace amounts. A total of 21 metabolites were detected in gender-based biological fluids and characterized by comparing their accurate mass values, fragmentation patterns, and relative retention times with that of ASL. Among previously reported glucuronosylation metabolites, some oxidation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, demethylation, hydrogenation, glutamination, and acetylcysteine conjugation were detected for the first time. Twenty metabolites were tentatively identified by using the annotated strategy for data acquisition and post-data mining. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Identification of Minor Secondary Metabolites from the Latex of Croton lechleri (Muell-Arg and Evaluation of Their Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Iorizzi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dragon’s blood (Sangre de drago, a viscous red sap derived from Croton lechleri Muell-Arg (Euphorbiaceae, is extensively used by indigenous cultures of the Amazonian basin for its wound healing properties. The aim of this study was to identify the minor secondary metabolites and test the antioxidant activity of this sustance. A bioguided fractionation of the n-hexane, chloroform, n-butanol, and aqueous extracts led to the isolation of 15 compounds: three megastigmanes, four flavan-3-ols, three phenylpropanoids, three lignans, a clerodane, and the alkaloid taspine. In addition to these known molecules, six compounds were isolated and identified for the first time in the latex: blumenol B, blumenol C, 4,5-dihydroblumenol A, erythro-guaiacyl-glyceryl-β-O-4’- dihydroconiferyl ether, 2-[4-(3-hydroxypropyl-2-methoxyphenoxy]-propane-1,3-diol and floribundic acid glucoside. Combinations of spectroscopic methods (1H-, 13C- NMR and 2D-NMR experiments, ESI-MS, and literature comparisons were used for compound identification. In vitro antioxidant activities were assessed by DPPH, total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation assays. Flavan-3-ols derivatives (as major phenolic compounds in the latex exhibited the highest antioxidant activity.

  7. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wenxiu; Chu, Fulei

    2011-01-01

    The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE) signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-cor...

  8. Polydopamine-Coated Magnetic Molecularly Imprinted Polymers with Fragment Template for Identification of Pulsatilla Saponin Metabolites in Rat Feces with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhou, Lian-Di; Zhang, Qi-Hui; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2018-01-24

    In this work, a modified pretreatment method using magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) was successfully applied to study the metabolites of an important botanical with ultraperformance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). The MMIPs for glucoside-specific adsorption was used to identify metabolites of Pulsatilla chinensis in rat feces. Polymers were prepared by using Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles as the supporting matrix, d-glucose as fragment template, and dopamine as the functional monomer and cross-linker. Results showed that MMIPs exhibited excellent extraction performance, large adsorption capacity (5.65 mg/g), fast kinetics (60 min), and magnetic separation. Furthermore, the MMIPs coupled with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS were successfully utilized for the identification of 17 compounds including 15 metabolites from the Pulsatilla saponin metabolic pool. This study provides a reliable protocol for the separation and identification of saponin metabolites in a complex biological sample, including those from herbal medicines.

  9. Identification of polybrominated diphenyl ether metabolites based on calculated boiling points from COSMO-RS, experimental retention times, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Gross, Michael S; Olson, James R; Zurek, Eva; Aga, Diana S

    2015-02-17

    The COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the boiling points of several polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methylated derivatives (MeO-BDEs) of monohydroxylated BDE (OH-BDE) metabolites. The linear correlation obtained by plotting theoretical boiling points calculated by COSMO-RS against experimentally determined retention times from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of PBDEs and OH-BDEs. This paper demonstrates the applicability of COSMO-RS in identifying unknown PBDE metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100). Metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-100 were formed through individual incubations of each PBDE with recombinant cytochrome P450 2B6. Using calculated boiling points and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the MeO-BDE positional isomers, the identities of the unknown monohydroxylated metabolites were proposed to be 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66) from BDE-47, and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-119) and 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-91) from BDE-100. The collective use of boiling points predicted with COSMO-RS, and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns provided a valuable tool toward the identification of isobaric compounds.

  10. Identification of tanshinones and their metabolites in rat bile after oral administration of TTE-50, a standardized extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza by HPLC-ESI-DAD-MSn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang-Hao; Yang, Min; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Man; Liu, Ai-Hua; Guo, De-An

    2007-06-28

    TTE-50 is a standardized extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza which mainly consisted of tanshinones. A sensitive and specific method using liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap mass spectrometry was established for the study of the constituents and metabolites of TTE-50 in rat bile sample after oral administration. The bile samples were extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc) of three-fold volume for three times. The chromatographic separation was carried out on a Zorbax Extend-C18 column with a gradient elution program whereas acetonitrile-water was used as mobile phase. Mass spectra were acquired in positive ionization mode and data-dependant scan was used for the identification of the tanshinones and metabolites in the bile samples. Identification and structural elucidation of the tanshinones and their metabolites in bile samples were performed by comparing their retention-times and full scan MS(n) spectra with those of reference compounds and data in the literatures. Sixteen tanshinones in TTE-50 along with seventeen phase I metabolites were identified simultaneously. The metabolic modification could take place in the C-4 side chain of tanshinone IIA, from methyl to primary alcohol, then to aldehyde group was proposed for the first time. The established method was valuable for the study of the metabolism of complex system such as herbal extracts or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula.

  11. Particle identification in phoswich detectors by signal width measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, L.; Hoefman, M.; Seip, M.; Wilschut, H.W.E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Particle identification based on pulse shape information has been investigated. The standard method entails integration with different time windows to sample various parts of the pulse shape, As an alternative, we propose to combine a single integration over the pulse shape with a measurement of the

  12. Contact-Free Heartbeat Signal for Human Identification and Forensics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    on the subject’s body. Though it might be possible to use touch-based sensors in applications like patient monitoring, it won’t be that easy to use them in identification and forensics applications, espe- cially if subjects are not cooperative. To deal with this problem, recently computer vision techniques have...

  13. Systems and methods for remote long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for remote, long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals are provided. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for remote biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals, the method including generating and directing first microwave energy in a direction of a person, receiving microwave energy reflected from the person, the reflected microwave energy indicative of cardiac characteristics of the person, segmenting a signal indicative of the reflected microwave energy into a waveform including a plurality of heart beats, identifying patterns in the microwave heart beats waveform, and identifying the person based on the identified patterns and a stored microwave heart beats waveform.

  14. Identification and characterization of pesticide metabolites in Brassica species by liquid chromatography travelling wave ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TWIMS-QTOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anna; Luetjohann, Jens; Hanschen, Franziska S; Schreiner, Monika; Kuballa, Jürgen; Jantzen, Eckard; Rohn, Sascha

    2018-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric method for evaluating metabolite formation of the pesticides thiacloprid, azoxystrobin, and difenoconazole was developed for the Brassica species pak choi and broccoli. Both, distribution and transformation kinetics of the active compounds and their metabolites were analyzed by UPLC-TWIMS-QTOF-MS. Additionally, HR-MS analysis and structure elucidation tools such as diagnostic ions, isotopic matches, and collision cross sections were applied for metabolites identification. Following the application of two plant protection products (containing the above-mentioned active compounds) in a greenhouse study plant material was cryo-milled and extracted with water/methanol. The residual levels of active compounds were identified at certain timepoints during pre-harvest intervals and in the final products. Different phase I and phase II metabolites of the pesticides were identified in different plant organs such as leaves, stems, (broccoli) heads, and roots. Three individual degradation pathways and distribution profiles are suggested including eight thiacloprid, eleven azoxystrobin and three difenoconazole metabolites. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The testosterone metabolism of the estuarine invertebrate Neomysis integer (Crustacea: Mysidacea): Identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous vertebrate-type steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Verslycke, T.; De Wasch, K.; De Brabander, H.F.; Janssen, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Testosterone metabolism by Neomysis integer (Crustacea; Mysidacea) was assessed to obtain initial data on its metabolic capacity. N. integer were exposed to both testosterone and [14]testosterone. Identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous steroids was performed using thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography with multiple mass spectrometry. Endogenous production of testosterone in mysids was detected for the first time. N. integer were exposed to testosterone and met...

  16. Signal Identification and Isolation Utilizing Radio Frequency Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    the drawings, specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to...burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson...identification and isolation are important to applications such as radio astronomy. Radio frequency (RF) photonics can provide solutions to these areas. Spectrum

  17. Approaches, Challenges, and Advances in Metabolism of New Synthetic Cannabinoids and Identification of Optimal Urinary Marker Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, X; Huestis, M A

    2017-02-01

    We review approaches for determining metabolism of new synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), and challenges and advances in identifying optimal urinary marker metabolites of SC intake. Metabolic patterns of different SC generations are evaluated, and a practical strategy offered for selecting SC urinary marker metabolites. Novel SCs are incubated with human hepatocytes, the most abundant and characteristic metabolites are identified with high-resolution mass spectrometry, and proposed hepatocyte marker metabolites are confirmed in authentic positive urine samples. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Bunch-Crossing Identification for saturated calorimeter signals

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Ullrich

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm, which will be implemented in the Preprocessor ASIC of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter trigger. Its purpose is to identify the corresponding Bunch-Crossing in time for saturated trigger tower signals from the calorimeters (saturated BCID). Results presented here are combined from simulations with a PSPICE model of the Liquid Argon trigger tower electronics and the digital signal processing inside the Preprocessor. The PSPICE model describes saturation of analogue pulses in a realistic way. The digital processing allows to investigate noise effects and shifts of the digitization strobe of the FADC against the pulse position.

  19. Continuous degradation of a mixture of sulfonamides by Trametes versicolor and identification of metabolites from sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E.; Jesús García-Galán, Ma.; Blánquez, Paqui; Díaz-Cruz, M. Silvia; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Degradation of sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole by Trametes versicolor was evaluated. ► The role of laccase and cytochrome P450 was determined. ► Degradation metabolites were identified for sulfapyridine (8) and sulfathiazole (5). ► A mixture of three sulfonamides was degraded in a continuous fluidized bed reactor. - Abstract: In this study, we assessed the degradation of the sulfonamides sulfapyridine (SPY) and sulfathiazole (STZ) by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Complete degradation was accomplished in fungal cultures at initial pollutant concentrations of approximately 10 mg L −1 , although a longer period of time was needed to completely remove STZ in comparison to SPY. When cytochrome P450 inhibitors were added to the fungal cultures, STZ degradation was partially suppressed, while no additional effect was observed for SPY. Experiments with purified laccase and laccase mediators caused the removal of greater than 75% of each antibiotic. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QqTOF-MS) analyses allowed the identification of a total of eight degradation intermediates of SPY in both the in vivo and the laccase experiments, being its desulfonated moiety the commonly detected product. For STZ, a total of five products were identified. A fluidized bed reactor with T. versicolor pellets degraded a mixture of sulfonamides (SPY, STZ and sulfamethazine, SMZ) by greater than 94% each at a hydraulic residence time of 72 h. Because wastewater contains many diverse pollutants, these results highlight the potential of T. versicolor as a bioremediation agent not only for the removal of antibiotics but also for the elimination of a wide range of contaminants.

  20. Continuous degradation of a mixture of sulfonamides by Trametes versicolor and identification of metabolites from sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Carlos E., E-mail: CarlosEsteban.Rodriguez@uab.cat [Unitat asociada de Biocatalisi Aplicada IQAC-CSIC, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion en Contaminacion Ambiental, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Jose (Costa Rica); Jesus Garcia-Galan, Ma. [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Blanquez, Paqui [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Diaz-Cruz, M. Silvia [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, Damia [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Parc Cientific i Tecnologic de la Universitat de Girona, C/Emili Grahit, 101 Edifici H2O, E-17003 Girona (Spain); Caminal, Gloria [Unitat asociada de Biocatalisi Aplicada IQAC-CSIC, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Vicent, Teresa [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole by Trametes versicolor was evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of laccase and cytochrome P450 was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation metabolites were identified for sulfapyridine (8) and sulfathiazole (5). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of three sulfonamides was degraded in a continuous fluidized bed reactor. - Abstract: In this study, we assessed the degradation of the sulfonamides sulfapyridine (SPY) and sulfathiazole (STZ) by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Complete degradation was accomplished in fungal cultures at initial pollutant concentrations of approximately 10 mg L{sup -1}, although a longer period of time was needed to completely remove STZ in comparison to SPY. When cytochrome P450 inhibitors were added to the fungal cultures, STZ degradation was partially suppressed, while no additional effect was observed for SPY. Experiments with purified laccase and laccase mediators caused the removal of greater than 75% of each antibiotic. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QqTOF-MS) analyses allowed the identification of a total of eight degradation intermediates of SPY in both the in vivo and the laccase experiments, being its desulfonated moiety the commonly detected product. For STZ, a total of five products were identified. A fluidized bed reactor with T. versicolor pellets degraded a mixture of sulfonamides (SPY, STZ and sulfamethazine, SMZ) by greater than 94% each at a hydraulic residence time of 72 h. Because wastewater contains many diverse pollutants, these results highlight the potential of T. versicolor as a bioremediation agent not only for the removal of antibiotics but also for the elimination of a wide range of contaminants.

  1. An unsupervised subject identification technique using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-08-01

    In this work, EEG spectral features of different subjects are uniquely mapped into a 2D feature space. Such distinctive 2D features pave the way to identify subjects from their EEG spectral characteristics in an unsupervised manner without any prior knowledge. First, we extract power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands. Next, we use t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding to map data points from high dimensional space in a visible 2D space. Such non-linear data embedding method visualizes different subjects' data points as well-separated islands in two dimensions. We use a fuzzy c-means clustering technique to identify different subjects without any prior knowledge. The experimental results show that our proposed method efficiently (precision greater than 90%) discriminates 10 subjects using only the spectral information within their EEG signals.

  2. Frequency Identification of Vibration Signals Using Video Camera Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system.

  3. Identification, quantification, spatiotemporal distribution and genetic variation of major latex secondary metabolites in the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Meret; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Reichelt, Michael; Heiling, Sven; Paetz, Christian; Chandran, Jima N; Bartram, Stefan; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The secondary metabolites in the roots, leaves and flowers of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) have been studied in detail. However, little is known about the specific constituents of the plant's highly specialized laticifer cells. Using a combination of liquid and gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, we identified and quantified the major secondary metabolites in the latex of different organs across different growth stages in three genotypes, and tested the activity of the metabolites against the generalist root herbivore Diabrotica balteata. We found that common dandelion latex is dominated by three classes of secondary metabolites: phenolic inositol esters (PIEs), triterpene acetates (TritAc) and the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G). Purification and absolute quantification revealed concentrations in the upper mgg(-1) range for all compound classes with up to 6% PIEs, 5% TritAc and 7% TA-G per gram latex fresh weight. Contrary to typical secondary metabolite patterns, concentrations of all three classes increased with plant age. The highest concentrations were measured in the main root. PIE profiles differed both quantitatively and qualitatively between plant genotypes, whereas TritAc and TA-G differed only quantitatively. Metabolite concentrations were positively correlated within and between the different compound classes, indicating tight biosynthetic co-regulation. Latex metabolite extracts strongly repelled D. balteata larvae, suggesting that the latex constituents are biologically active. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of imidacloprid metabolites in onion (Allium cepa L.) using high-resolution mass spectrometry and accurate mass tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Zavitsanos, Paul; Zweigenbaum, Jerry A

    2013-09-15

    Imidacloprid is a potent and widely used insecticide on vegetable crops, such as onion (Allium cepa L.). Because of possible toxicity to beneficial insects, imidacloprid and several metabolites have raised safety concerns for pollenating insects, such as honey bees. Thus, imidacloprid metabolites continue to be an important subject for new methods that better understand its dissipation and fate in plants, such as onions. One month after a single addition of imidacloprid to soil containing onion plants, imidacloprid and its metabolites were extracted from pulverized onion with a methanol/water-buffer mixture and analyzed by liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOF-MS) using a labeled imidacloprid internal standard and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Accurate mass tools were developed and applied to detect seven new metabolites of imidacloprid with the goal to better understand its fate in onion. The accurate mass tools include: database searching, diagnostic ions, chlorine mass filters, Mass Profiler software, and manual use of metabolic analogy. The new metabolites discovered included an amine reduction product (m/z 226.0854), and its methylated analogue (m/z 240.1010), and five other metabolites, all of unknown toxicity to insects. The accurate mass tools were combined with LC/QTOF-MS and were able to detect both known and new metabolites of imidacloprid using fragmentation studies of both parent and labeled standards. New metabolites and their structures were inferred from these MS/MS studies with accurate mass, which makes it possible to better understand imidacloprid metabolism in onion as well as new metabolite targets for toxicity studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis reveals new regulatory roles of Clp signaling in secondary-metabolite biosynthesis and surface motility in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yansheng; Zhao, Yuxin; Zhang, Juan; Zhao, Yangyang; Shen, Yan; Su, Zhenhe; Xu, Gaoge; Du, Liangcheng; Huffman, Justin M.; Venturi, Vittorio; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2014-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a bacterial biological-control agent emerging as a new source of antibiotic metabolites, such as HSAF (Heat-Stable Antifungal Factor) and the antibacterial factor WAP-8294A2. The regulatory mechanism(s) for antibiotic-metabolite biosynthesis remains largely unknown in L. enzymogenes. Clp, a cAMP-receptor-like protein, is shown to function as a global regulator in modulating biocontol-associated traits in L. enzymogenes. However, the genetic basis of Clp signaling remains unclear. Here, we utilized transcriptome/microarray analysis to determine the Clp regulon in L. enzymogenes. We showed that Clp is a global regulator in gene expression, as the transcription of 775 genes belonging to 19 functional groups was differentially controlled by Clp signaling. Analysis of the Clp regulon detected previously characterized Clp-modulated functions as well as novel loci. These include novel loci involved in antibiotic-metabolite biosynthesis and surface motility in L. enzymogenes. We further showed experimentally that Clp signaling played a positive role in regulating the biosynthesis of HSAF and WAP-8294A2, as well as surface motility which is a Type-IV-pilus-dependent trait. The regulation by Clp signaling of antibiotic (HSAF and WAP-8294A2) biosynthesis and surface motility was found to be independent. Importantly, we identified a factor Lat (Lysobacter acetyltransferase), a homologue of histone acetyltransferase Hpa2, which was regulated by Clp and involved in HSAF biosynthesis, but not associated with WAP-8294A2 production and surface motility. Overall, our study provided new insights into the regulatory role and molecular mechanism of Clp signaling in L. enzymogenes. PMID:25236801

  6. Transcriptomic analysis reveals new regulatory roles of Clp signaling in secondary metabolite biosynthesis and surface motility in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yansheng; Zhao, Yuxin; Zhang, Juan; Zhao, Yangyang; Shen, Yan; Su, Zhenhe; Xu, Gaoge; Du, Liangcheng; Huffman, Justin M; Venturi, Vittorio; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2014-11-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is a bacterial biological control agent emerging as a new source of antibiotic metabolites, such as heat-stable antifungal factor (HSAF) and the antibacterial factor WAP-8294A2. The regulatory mechanism(s) for antibiotic metabolite biosynthesis remains largely unknown in L. enzymogenes. Clp, a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-receptor-like protein, is shown to function as a global regulator in modulating biocontrol-associated traits in L. enzymogenes. However, the genetic basis of Clp signaling remains unclear. Here, we utilized transcriptome/microarray analysis to determine the Clp regulon in L. enzymogenes. We showed that Clp is a global regulator in gene expression, as the transcription of 775 genes belonging to 19 functional groups was differentially controlled by Clp signaling. Analysis of the Clp regulon detected previously characterized Clp-modulated functions as well as novel loci. These include novel loci involved in antibiotic metabolite biosynthesis and surface motility in L. enzymogenes. We further showed experimentally that Clp signaling played a positive role in regulating the biosynthesis of HSAF and WAP-8294A2, as well as surface motility which is a type-IV-pilus-dependent trait. The regulation by Clp signaling of antibiotic (HSAF and WAP-8294A2) biosynthesis and surface motility was found to be independent. Importantly, we identified a factor Lysobacter acetyltransferase (Lat), a homologue of histone acetyltransferase Hpa2, which was regulated by Clp and involved in HSAF biosynthesis, but not associated with WAP-8294A2 production and surface motility. Overall, our study provided new insights into the regulatory role and molecular mechanism of Clp signaling in L. enzymogenes.

  7. Identification of xenobiotic metabolites from biological fluids using flow injection analysis high-resolution mass spectrometry and post-acquisition data filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Paris, Alain; Bursztyka, Julian; Jaeg, Jean-Philippe; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Debrauwer, Laurent

    2014-12-30

    Concern for public health entails the need to evaluate the degree of exposure of population to toxicants. To do this, robust high-throughput approaches are required to be able to perform a large number of analyses in cohort studies. In this study, a data-filtering procedure was applied to mass spectral data acquired by direct analysis of biological fluids leading to rapid detection of metabolites in a model xenobiotic system. Flow injection analysis (FIA) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI)-LTQ Orbitrap Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to directly analyze urine of rats treated with vinclozolin. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were subsequently performed for confirmation of a new metabolite structure. The isotope filtering based on the difference between accurate masses of (35)Cl and (37)Cl was applied to the raw data for the specific detection of ions containing at least one chlorine atom. Seven metabolites of vinclozolin were manually identified thanks to the characteristic isotope pattern of dichlorinated compounds. A new metabolite of vinclozolin was detected for the first time and identified as a sulfate conjugate. The application of an isotope-filtering procedure allowed the selective extraction of pertinent signals from the data. The processed mass spectrum was greatly simplified, significantly facilitating the detection of the seven metabolites previously identified. The use of FIA-HRMS in combination with dedicated bio-informatics data processing is shown to be an efficient approach for the rapid detection of metabolites in biological fluids. This is a very promising high-throughput approach for rapid characterization of the exposure status to xenobiotics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Identification of race-associated metabolite biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Poto, Cristina; He, Shisi; Varghese, Rency S; Zhao, Yi; Ferrarini, Alessia; Su, Shan; Karabala, Abdullah; Redi, Mesfin; Mamo, Hassen; Rangnekar, Amol S; Fishbein, Thomas M; Kroemer, Alexander H; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Roy, Rabindra; Sherif, Zaki A; Kumar, Deepak; Ressom, Habtom W

    2018-01-01

    Disparities in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence and survival have been observed between ethnic groups including African-Americans (AA) and European-Americans (EA). The evaluation of the changes in the levels of metabolites in samples stratified by race could provide a snapshot of ethnically diverse disease related pathways and identify reliable biomarkers. In this study, we considered AA and EA to investigate metabolites that may be associated with HCC in a race-specific manner. The levels of 46 metabolites in plasma samples, collected from patients recruited at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, were analyzed by Agilent GC-qMS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. A least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression model was applied to select metabolites with significant changes in HCC vs. cirrhosis in three groups: (1) AA and EA combined; (2) AA separately; and (3) EA separately. In addition, metabolites that distinguish HCC cases from cirrhosis in these three groups were selected by excluding those without HCV infection. The performances of the metabolites selected by LASSO in each group were evaluated through a leave-one-out cross-validation. We identified race-specific metabolites that differentiated HCC cases from cirrhotic controls, yielding better area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) compared to alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), the serological marker widely used for the diagnosis of HCC. This study sheds light on metabolites that could potentially be used as biomarkers for HCC by monitoring their levels in high-risk population of cirrhotic patients in a race-specific manner.

  9. Identification of a new reactive metabolite of pyrrolizidine alkaloid retrorsine: (3H-pyrrolizin-7-yl)methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashe, Muluneh M; Juvonen, Risto O; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Rahnasto-Rilla, Minna; Auriola, Seppo; Soininen, Pasi; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Pasanen, Markku

    2014-11-17

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) such as retrorsine are common food contaminants that are known to be bioactivated by cytochrome P450 enzymes to putative hepatotoxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic metabolites known as dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPs). We compared how both electrochemical (EC) and human liver microsomal (HLM) oxidation of retrorsine could produce short-lived intermediate metabolites; we also characterized a toxicologically important metabolite, (3H-pyrrolizin-7-yl)methanol. The EC cell was coupled online or offline to a liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer (LC/MS), whereas the HLM oxidation was performed in 100 mM potassium phosphate (pH 7.4) in the presence of NADPH at 37 °C. The EC cell oxidation of retrorsine produced 12 metabolites, including dehydroretrorsine (m/z 350, [M + H(+)]), which was degraded to a new reactive metabolite at m/z 136 ([M + H(+)]). The molecular structure of this small metabolite was determined using high-resolution mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy followed by chemical synthesis. In addition, we also identified another minor but reactive metabolite at m/z 136, an isomer of (3H-pyrrolizin-7-yl)methanol. Both (3H-pyrrolizin-7-yl)methanol and its minor isomer were also observed after HLM oxidation of retrorsine and other hepatotoxic PAs such as lasiocarpine and senkirkin. In the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH), each isomer formed identical GSH conjugates at m/z 441 and m/z 730 in the negative ESI-MS. Because (3H-pyrrolizine-7-yl)methanol) and its minor isomer subsequently reacted with GSH, it is concluded that (3H-pyrrolizin-7-yl)methanol may be a common toxic metabolite arising from PAs.

  10. Applying human and pig hepatic in vitro experiments for sulfur mustard study: screening and identification of metabolites by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halme, Mia; Pesonen, Maija; Hakala, Ullastiina; Pasanen, Markku; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Vanninen, Paula

    2015-07-30

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent (CWA) with high toxicity and complex metabolism. This study aimed at identification of new metabolic biomarkers for sulfur mustard using in in vitro exposures and various mass spectrometric techniques. Human and pig liver subcellular fractions were used as biocatalysts. Metabolites were screened by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) using positive electrospray ionization (ESI). For structural identification, product ion scans (MS/MS, MS(3) ) and accurate mass measurements using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) were acquired. Sulfur mustard is metabolized in vitro by S-oxidation and glutathione (GSH) conjugations. One S-oxidized metabolite, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfoxide (m/z 175), was formed in both species only when liver microsomes were present in incubations, and it was the main metabolite if GSH was not added into the reaction mixture. However, conjugation with GSH was found to be a spontaneous reaction in physiological pH and buffered solution. Three GSH conjugates of sulfur mustard were detected and identified, among which two were novel; 2-((2-(S-glutathionyl)ethyl)thio)ethanol (m/z 412) and 2-((2-(S-glutathionyl)ethyl)thio)ethyl phosphate (m/z 492). To our knowledge, this was the first time that S-oxidized metabolites and GSH conjugates of sulfur mustard have been detected and identified from human samples in vitro by LC/MS/MS. The usefulness of the GSH conjugates to serve as biomarkers for sulfur mustard exposure in human samples requires further studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Device-Free Passive Identity Identification via WiFi Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiguang; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng

    2017-11-02

    Device-free passive identity identification attracts much attention in recent years, and it is a representative application in sensorless sensing. It can be used in many applications such as intrusion detection and smart building. Previous studies show the sensing potential of WiFi signals in a device-free passive manner. It is confirmed that human's gait is unique from each other similar to fingerprint and iris. However, the identification accuracy of existing approaches is not satisfactory in practice. In this paper, we present Wii, a device-free WiFi-based Identity Identification approach utilizing human's gait based on Channel State Information (CSI) of WiFi signals. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and low pass filter are applied to remove the noises in the signals. We then extract several entities' gait features from both time and frequency domain, and select the most effective features according to information gain. Based on these features, Wii realizes stranger recognition through Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and identity identification through a Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel. It is implemented using commercial WiFi devices and evaluated on a dataset with more than 1500 gait instances collected from eight subjects walking in a room. The results indicate that Wii can effectively recognize strangers and can achieves high identification accuracy with low computational cost. As a result, Wii has the potential to work in typical home security systems.

  12. Device-Free Passive Identity Identification via WiFi Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Lv

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Device-free passive identity identification attracts much attention in recent years, and it is a representative application in sensorless sensing. It can be used in many applications such as intrusion detection and smart building. Previous studies show the sensing potential of WiFi signals in a device-free passive manner. It is confirmed that human’s gait is unique from each other similar to fingerprint and iris. However, the identification accuracy of existing approaches is not satisfactory in practice. In this paper, we present Wii, a device-free WiFi-based Identity Identification approach utilizing human’s gait based on Channel State Information (CSI of WiFi signals. Principle Component Analysis (PCA and low pass filter are applied to remove the noises in the signals. We then extract several entities’ gait features from both time and frequency domain, and select the most effective features according to information gain. Based on these features, Wii realizes stranger recognition through Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM and identity identification through a Support Vector Machine (SVM with Radial Basis Function (RBF kernel. It is implemented using commercial WiFi devices and evaluated on a dataset with more than 1500 gait instances collected from eight subjects walking in a room. The results indicate that Wii can effectively recognize strangers and can achieves high identification accuracy with low computational cost. As a result, Wii has the potential to work in typical home security systems.

  13. Identification of the principal biliary metabolite of 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, D.D.; Cysyk, R.L.; Padmanabhan, S.; Bhat, H.B.; Malspeis, L.

    1982-01-01

    m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide] labeled in either the acridine or anilino portion was used to investigate the disposition of this antitumor agent in rats. The principal biliary metabolite, which accounts for approximately 80% of the total biliary radioactivity for 90 min after administration and greater than 50% of the administered dose by 180 min after administration, had both the acridine and the anilino portions intact. Isolation and purification of the principal metabolite was achieved by preparative thin-layer chromatography on silica gel and column chromatography on Amberlite XAD-2 resin. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the CID salt in D 2 O showed that the metabolite is the m-AMSA-glutathione conjugate in which the thioether linkage occurs at the 5'-position of the anilino ring. Synthesis of the metabolite was achieved by oxidizing m-AMSA with active MnO 2 to -methanesulfonyl - - (9-acridinyl)-3'-methoxy - 2',5' - cyclohexadiene-1',4'-diimine (m-AQDI) followed by reaction of m-AQDI with glutathione. The 1 H-NMR spectrum of the synthetic product proved identical with that of the isolated metabolite. The demonstration that the principal biliary metabolite on m-AMSA involves glutathione bound to the 9-anilino ring suggests that m-AMSA may be bioactivated in vivo to the quinoidal diimine, m-AQDI

  14. UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS based screening and identification of the metabolites in rat bile after oral administration of imperatorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gengshen; Jin, Miaomiao; Du, Yingfeng; Cao, Liang; Xu, Huijun

    2016-06-01

    The detection of drug metabolites, particularly for minor metabolites, continues to be a challenge owing to the complexity of biological samples. Imperatorin is an active natural furocoumarin ingredient originating from many traditional Chinese herbal medicines. In the present study, the metabolites of imperatorin after oral administration were qualitatively investigated, and possible metabolic pathways of it were subsequently proposed. Bile samples were collected after oral administration and pretreated by the application of Waters Ostro. The QTOF-MS/MS data was acquired using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time flight spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). Based on this analytical strategy, 32 metabolites (23 phase I and 9 phase II metabolites) were identified in rat bile. The results demonstrated that C5H8 could be easily eliminated from imperatorin forming the metabolite M1. It also indicated that imperatorin and M1 underwent extensive metabolic reactions including oxidation, hydrolysis, methylation, glucuronide conjugation, C2H5NO2S conjugation and C3H5NO2S conjugation. This is the first study of imperatorin metabolism in bile samples. The proposed metabolic pathways in this research will provide essential data for further pharmaceutical studies of other linear-type furocoumarins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acoustic Signals Processing at the Realization of Contact-Difference Method for Person Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Golubinskiy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The questions of speech and acoustic (registered on a human body at pronouncing by him of sounds signals processing are examined. The measure of a distinguish ability for identification at parameterization of a biometric image by an amplitude-frequency response of a human body is developed.

  16. Identification of an allosteric signaling network within Tec family kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Raji E; Xie, Qian; Andreotti, Amy H

    2010-10-22

    The Tec family kinases are tyrosine kinases that function primarily in hematopoietic cells. The catalytic activity of the Tec kinases is positively influenced by the regulatory domains outside of the kinase domain. The current lack of a full-length Tec kinase structure leaves a void in our understanding of how these positive regulatory signals are transmitted to the kinase domain. Recently, a conserved structure within kinases, the 'regulatory spine', which assembles and disassembles as a kinase switches between its active and inactive states, has been identified. Here, we define the residues that comprise the regulatory spine within Tec kinases. Compared to previously characterized systems, the Tec kinases contain an extended regulatory spine that includes a conserved methionine within the C-helix and a conserved tryptophan within the Src homology 2-kinase linker of Tec kinases. This extended regulatory spine forms a conduit for transmitting the presence of the regulatory domains of Tec kinases to the catalytic domain. We further show that mutation of the gatekeeper residue at the edge of the regulatory spine stabilizes the regulatory spine, resulting in a constitutively active kinase domain. Importantly, the regulatory spine is preassembled in this gatekeeper mutant, rendering phosphorylation on the activation loop unnecessary for its activity. Moreover, we show that the disruption of the conserved electrostatic interaction between Bruton's tyrosine kinase R544 on the activation loop and Bruton's tyrosine kinase E445 on the C-helix also aids in the assembly of the regulatory spine. Thus, the extended regulatory spine is a key structure that is critical for maintaining the activity of Tec kinases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bioavailability of hydroxycinnamates in an instant green/roasted coffee blend in humans. Identification of novel colonic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Juaristi, Miren; Martínez-López, Sara; Sarria, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura; Mateos, Raquel

    2018-01-24

    Roasting greatly reduces the phenolic content in green coffee beans. Considering the beneficial effects of coffee polyphenols, blends containing green coffee beans are being consumed as a healthier alternative to roasted coffee. This study was aimed at assessing the absorption and metabolism of hydroxycinnamates in an instant green/roasted (35/65) coffee blend in healthy humans. Twelve fasting men and women consumed a cup of coffee containing 269.5 mg (760.6 μmol) of chlorogenic acids. Blood and urine samples were taken before and after coffee consumption at different times and analyzed by LC-MS-QToF. Up to 25 and 42 metabolites were identified in plasma and urine, respectively, mainly in the form of sulfate and methyl derivatives, and to a lower extent as glucuronides. Un-metabolized hydroxycinnamate esters (caffeoyl-, feruloyl-, and coumaroylquinic acids), hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, ferulic and coumaric acids) and their phase II metabolites, in addition to phase II derivatives of lactones, represented a minor group of metabolites (16.3% of the metabolites excreted in urine) with kinetics compatible with small intestine absorption. Dihydrohydroxycinnamic acids and their phase II derivatives, in addition to feruloylglycine, showed delayed kinetics due to their colonic origin and represented the most abundant group of metabolites (75.7% of total urinary metabolites). Dihydrohydroxycinnamate esters (dihydroferuloyl-, dihydrocaffeoyl- and dihydrocoumaroylquinic acids) have been identified for the first time in both plasma and urine, with microbial origin (excreted 8-12 h after coffee intake) amounting to 8% of total urinary metabolites. In conclusion, coffee polyphenols are partially bioavailable and extensively metabolized, mainly by the colonic microbiota.

  18. Identification of human pathogens isolated from blood using microarray hybridisation and signal pattern recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presterl Elisabeth

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogen identification in clinical routine is based on the cultivation of microbes with subsequent morphological and physiological characterisation lasting at least 24 hours. However, early and accurate identification is a crucial requisite for fast and optimally targeted antimicrobial treatment. Molecular biology based techniques allow fast identification, however discrimination of very closely related species remains still difficult. Results A molecular approach is presented for the rapid identification of pathogens combining PCR amplification with microarray detection. The DNA chip comprises oligonucleotide capture probes for 25 different pathogens including Gram positive cocci, the most frequently encountered genera of Enterobacteriaceae, non-fermenter and clinical relevant Candida species. The observed detection limits varied from 10 cells (e.g. E. coli to 105 cells (S. aureus per mL artificially spiked blood. Thus the current low sensitivity for some species still represents a barrier for clinical application. Successful discrimination of closely related species was achieved by a signal pattern recognition approach based on the k-nearest-neighbour method. A prototype software providing this statistical evaluation was developed, allowing correct identification in 100 % of the cases at the genus and in 96.7 % at the species level (n = 241. Conclusion The newly developed molecular assay can be carried out within 6 hours in a research laboratory from pathogen isolation to species identification. From our results we conclude that DNA microarrays can be a useful tool for rapid identification of closely related pathogens particularly when the protocols are adapted to the special clinical scenarios.

  19. Identification of fentanyl metabolites in rat urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with stable-isotope tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goromaru, T.; Matsuura, H.; Furuta, T.; Baba, S.; Yoshimura, N.; Miyawaki, T.; Sameshima, T.

    The metabolites of fentanyl (l), which has been widely used as a neuroleptic analgesic agent, were identified in urine of rats by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with a stable-isotope tracer technique. After the oral administration of an equimolar mixture of l and deuterium-labeled l (l/l-d5), the urinary metabolites were extracted with chloroform at pH 9.0. Extracts were derivatized and analyzed by GC/MS. Metabolites were identified by the presence of doublet ion peaks separated by 5 amu, and chemical structures were established from analyses of fragmentation pathways. The metabolites were identified as 4-N-(N-propionylanilino)-piperidine, 4-N-(N-hydroxypropionylanilino)piperidine, 4-N-(N-propionylanilino) hydroxypiperidine, 1-(2-phenethyl)-4-N-(N-hydroxypropionylanilino)piperidine and 1-(2-phenethyl)-4-N-(N-propionylanilino)hydroxypiperidine. These metabolites, together with unchanged l, were also detected in urine of rats receiving l/l-d5 intravenously, by selected-ion monitoring of the specific cluster ions.

  20. A simple iterative independent component analysis algorithm for vibration source signal identification of complex structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sup Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent Component Analysis (ICA, one of the blind source separation methods, can be applied for extracting unknown source signals only from received signals. This is accomplished by finding statistical independence of signal mixtures and has been successfully applied to myriad fields such as medical science, image processing, and numerous others. Nevertheless, there are inherent problems that have been reported when using this technique: insta- bility and invalid ordering of separated signals, particularly when using a conventional ICA technique in vibratory source signal identification of complex structures. In this study, a simple iterative algorithm of the conventional ICA has been proposed to mitigate these problems. The proposed method to extract more stable source signals having valid order includes an iterative and reordering process of extracted mixing matrix to reconstruct finally converged source signals, referring to the magnitudes of correlation coefficients between the intermediately separated signals and the signals measured on or nearby sources. In order to review the problems of the conventional ICA technique and to vali- date the proposed method, numerical analyses have been carried out for a virtual response model and a 30 m class submarine model. Moreover, in order to investigate applicability of the proposed method to real problem of complex structure, an experiment has been carried out for a scaled submarine mockup. The results show that the proposed method could resolve the inherent problems of a conventional ICA technique.

  1. Identification of an Epoxide Metabolite of Lycopene in Human Plasma Using 13C-Labeling and QTOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan J. Cichon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoid lycopene is a bioactive component of tomatoes and is hypothesized to reduce risk of several chronic diseases, such as prostate cancer. The metabolism of lycopene is only beginning to be understood and some studies suggest that metabolites of lycopene may be partially responsible for bioactivity associated with the parent compound. The detection and characterization of these compounds in vivo is an important step in understanding lycopene bioactivity. The metabolism of lycopene likely involves both chemical and enzymatic oxidation. While numerous lycopene metabolites have been proposed, few have actually been identified in vivo following lycopene intake. Here, LC-QTOF-MS was used along with 13C-labeling to investigate the post-prandial oxidative metabolism of lycopene in human plasma. Previously reported aldehyde cleavage products were not detected, but a lycopene 1,2-epoxide was identified as a new candidate oxidative metabolite.

  2. Identification of di- and tri-substituted hydroxy and ketone metabolites of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D J; Martin, B R; Paton, W D

    1977-08-01

    In vivo liver metabolites of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta1-THC) were examined with a gas chromatograph--mass spectrometer--computer system as trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS and methyloxime-TMS derivatives. In addition to the reported monohydroxy, acid, and hydroxyacid metabolites, the following multiply substituted metabolites were identified: 2'',7-, 3'', 7-, and 6beta,7-dihydroxy-delta1-THC; 2'',6alpha,7-, and 3'',6alpha,7-trihydroxy-delta1-THC; 2''-, 3''-, and 7-hydroxy-6-oxo-delta1-THC, and 2'',7- and 3'',7-dihydroxy-6-oxo-delta1-THC. The ketones and hydroxyacids were reduced to common alcohols with lithium aluminium deuteride and the number of deuterium atoms in the product was used to distinguish the metabolic alcohols from those produced by reduction.

  3. A signal-detection-based diagnostic-feature-detection model of eyewitness identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixted, John T; Mickes, Laura

    2014-04-01

    The theoretical understanding of eyewitness identifications made from a police lineup has long been guided by the distinction between absolute and relative decision strategies. In addition, the accuracy of identifications associated with different eyewitness memory procedures has long been evaluated using measures like the diagnosticity ratio (the correct identification rate divided by the false identification rate). Framed in terms of signal-detection theory, both the absolute/relative distinction and the diagnosticity ratio are mainly relevant to response bias while remaining silent about the key issue of diagnostic accuracy, or discriminability (i.e., the ability to tell the difference between innocent and guilty suspects in a lineup). Here, we propose a signal-detection-based model of eyewitness identification, one that encourages the use of (and helps to conceptualize) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to measure discriminability. Recent ROC analyses indicate that the simultaneous presentation of faces in a lineup yields higher discriminability than the presentation of faces in isolation, and we propose a diagnostic feature-detection hypothesis to account for that result. According to this hypothesis, the simultaneous presentation of faces allows the eyewitness to appreciate that certain facial features (viz., those that are shared by everyone in the lineup) are non-diagnostic of guilt. To the extent that those non-diagnostic features are discounted in favor of potentially more diagnostic features, the ability to discriminate innocent from guilty suspects will be enhanced.

  4. Identification of phenolic metabolites in human urine after the intake of a functional food made from grape extract by a high resolution LTQ-Orbitrap-MS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasot, Gemma; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Mercader-Martí, Mercè; Estruch, Ramon; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2017-10-01

    Grape pomace (GP) is known to be a rich source of polyphenols with biological activity which may be used as functional ingredients for the development of new health-promoting products. Numerous studies have reported that bioactive compounds may act through multiple mechanisms. In order to verify the oral absorption and metabolism of grape polyphenols, we performed a prospective, randomised and cross-over acute study in 12 volunteers with two interventions: 500mL of a functional beverage enriched with 200mL of GP and 500mL of a control beverage without GP. In this work, liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization hybrid linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) technique has been used to accurately identify phenolics in GP and human urine. In GP, 41 phenolic compounds were identified mainly procyanidins, phenolic acids and flavonols, and in human urine over 70 metabolites of phenolic compounds including microbiota metabolites, glucuronides and sulfate derivatives were detected. Overall, high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) enhances the identification of a large variety of polyphenols and their metabolites with great mass accuracies for all molecular ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal Signal Pattern Recognition in Mass Spectrometry: A Method for Rapid Identification and Accurate Quantification of Biomarkers for Inborn Errors of Metabolism with Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBattista, Alicia; McIntosh, Nathan; Lamoureux, Monica; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomic initiatives that use conventional separation techniques are limited by low sample throughput and complicated data processing that contribute to false discoveries. Herein, we introduce a new strategy for unambiguous identification and accurate quantification of biomarkers for inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) from dried blood spots (DBS) with quality assurance. A multiplexed separation platform based on multisegment injection-capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MSI-CE-MS) was developed to provide comparable sample throughput to flow injection analysis-tandem MS (FIA-MS/MS) but with greater selectivity as required for confirmatory testing and discovery-based metabolite profiling of volume-restricted biospecimens. Mass spectral information is encoded temporally within a separation by serial injection of three or more sample pairs, each having a unique dilution pattern, alongside a quality control (QC) that serves as a reference in every run to facilitate between-sample comparisons and/or batch correction due to system drift. Optimization of whole blood extraction conditions on DBS filter paper cut-outs was first achieved to maximize recovery of a wide range of polar metabolites from DBS extracts. An interlaboratory comparison study was also conducted using a proficiency test and retrospective neonatal DBS that demonstrated good agreement between MSI-CE-MS and validated FIA-MS/MS methods within an accredited facility. Our work demonstrated accurate identification of various IEM based on reliable measurement of a panel of primary or secondary biomarkers above an upper cutoff concentration limit for presumptive screen-positive cases without stable isotope-labeled reagents. Additionally, nontargeted metabolite profiling by MSI-CE-MS with temporal signal pattern recognition revealed new biomarkers for early detection of galactosemia, such as N-galactated amino acids, that are a novel class of pathognomonic marker due to

  6. OPTIMAL REPRESENTATION OF MER SIGNALS APPLIED TO THE IDENTIFICATION OF BRAIN STRUCTURES DURING DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Darío Vargas Cardona

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of brain signals from microelectrode recordings (MER is a key procedure during deep brain stimulation (DBS applied in Parkinson’s disease patients. The main purpose of this research work is to identify with high accuracy a brain structure called subthalamic nucleus (STN, since it is the target structure where the DBS achieves the best therapeutic results. To do this, we present an approach for optimal representation of MER signals through method of frames. We obtain coefficients that minimize the Euclidean norm of order two. From optimal coefficients, we extract some features from signals combining the wavelet packet and cosine dictionaries. For a comparison frame with the state of the art, we also process the signals using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT with several mother functions. We validate the proposed methodology in a real data base. We employ simple supervised machine learning algorithms, as the K-Nearest Neighbors classifier (K-NN, a linear Bayesian classifier (LDC and a quadratic Bayesian classifier (QDC. Classification results obtained with the proposed method improves significantly the performance of the DWT. We achieve a positive identification of the STN superior to 97,6%. Identification outcomes achieved by the MOF are highly accurate, as we can potentially get a false positive rate of less than 2% during the DBS.

  7. Identification and measurement of illicit drugs and their metabolites in urban wastewater by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Sara; Zuccato, Ettore; Crisci, Elisabetta; Chiabrando, Chiara; Fanelli, Roberto; Bagnati, Renzo

    2006-12-15

    Residues of illicit drugs and their metabolites that are excreted by humans may flow into and through wastewater treatment plants. The aim of this study was to develop a method for the determination of cocaine, amphetamines, morphine, cannabinoids, methadone, and some of their metabolites in wastewater. Composite 24-h samples from urban treatment plants were enriched with deuterated internal standards before solid-phase extraction. High-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring was used for quantitation. Recoveries were generally higher than 80%, and limits of quantifications were in the low nanograms-per-liter range for untreated and treated wastewater. The overall variability of the method was lower than 10% for untreated and 5% for treated wastewater. The method was applied to wastewater samples coming from two treatment plants in Italy and Switzerland. Quantification ranges were found to be 0.2-1 microg/L for cocaine and its metabolite benzoylecgonine, 80-200 ng/L for morphine, 10 ng/L for 6-acetylmorphine, 60-90 ng/L for 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 10-90 ng/L for methadone and its main metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine, and lower than 20 ng/L for amphetamines. As previously reported for cocaine, this method could be useful to estimate and monitor drug consumption in the population in real time, helping social scientists and authorities to combat drug abuse.

  8. Identification of fipronil metabolites in rodents by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for application in a human exposure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide commonly used in residential and agricultural applications. To understand more about the potential risks associated with fipronil, dosed Long Evans rats were evaluated for metabolites to develop a set of biomarkers for use in human exposur...

  9. Identification of 4-hydroxyheptachlorostyrene in polar bear plasma and its binding affinity to transthyretin : a metabolite of octachlorostyrene?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Standau, C.D.; Meerts, I.A.T.M.; Letcher, R.J.; McAlees, A.J.; Chittim, B.; Brouwer, A.; Norstrom, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new compound, 4-hydroxyheptachlorostyrene (4-OH-HpCS), was identified as a major component in the chlorinated phenolic compound fraction of polar bear plasma. The structure was hypothesized to be 4-OH-HpCS based on mass spectral interpretation, the assumption that it was a metabolite of

  10. Identification of 4-hydroxyheptachlorostyrene in polar bear plasma and its binding affinity to transhyretin: a metabolite of octachlorostyrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandau, C.D.; Meerts, I.A.T.M.; Letcher, R.J.; McAlee, A.J.; Chittim, B.; Brouwer, A.; Norstrom, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new compound, 4-hydroxyheptachlorostyrene (4-OH-HpCS), was identified as a major component in the chlorinated phenolic compound fraction of polar bear plasma. The structure was hypothesized to be 4-OH-HpCS based on mass spectral interpretation, the assumption that it was a metabolite of

  11. Effects of DEHP and its metabolite MEHP on insulin signalling and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Mangala Priya; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Chinnaiyan, Mayilvanan; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-07-01

    Di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the plasticizer used in variety of medical and consumer products to impart structural flexibility. DEHP and its primary metabolite mono-(2-ethyl hexyl)phthalate (MEHP) posed a considerable interest because of their contribution to insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and obesity. Experimental and epidemiological data have shown that DEHP affects blood glucose homeostasis. However, direct effect of DEHP and its metabolite MEHP on insulin signal transduction and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation remain obscure. The present study was delineated to decipher the direct effects of DEHP and MEHP on insulin signal transduction and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes, the rat skeletal muscle model. For this study we have exposed cells with 50 and 100μM DEHP and MEHP for 24h followed by insulin stimulation for 20min. GLUT4 level in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions were analysed by western blot analysis and found to be significantly decreased. Further, DEHP and MEHP treatment significantly altered the insulin signalling molecules and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation (Rab8A (Ras related proteins in skeletal muscle), insulin - regulated amino peptidase (IRAP), synaptosomal - associated protein 23 (SNAP23), Syntaxin4, Munc18c) from cytosol to plasma membrane. Impaired GLUT4 in the plasma membrane resulted in decreased 14 C-deoxy glucose uptake. 14 C-glucose oxidation and glycogen content were also significantly decreased in treated groups. In essence, the present study is first of its kind to show the direct adverse effects of DEHP and MEHP on insulin signal transduction and GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes. Further, MEHP is found to be more effective than DEHP as a result of its differential structure and physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Buried Objects in GPR Using Amplitude Modulated Signals Extracted from Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lihong; Qin, Yao; Ren, Xiaozhen; Wang, Qifu

    2015-12-04

    It is necessary to detect the target reflections in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images, so that surface metal targets can be identified successfully. In order to accurately locate buried metal objects, a novel method called the Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis (MMSA) system is applied in ground penetrating radar (GPR) images. This process includes four steps. First the image is decomposed by the MMSA to extract the amplitude component of the B-scan image. The amplitude component enhances the target reflection and suppresses the direct wave and reflective wave to a large extent. Then we use the region of interest extraction method to locate the genuine target reflections from spurious reflections by calculating the normalized variance of the amplitude component. To find the apexes of the targets, a Hough transform is used in the restricted area. Finally, we estimate the horizontal and vertical position of the target. In terms of buried object detection, the proposed system exhibits promising performance, as shown in the experimental results.

  13. Identification of Buried Objects in GPR Using Amplitude Modulated Signals Extracted from Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Qiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to detect the target reflections in ground penetrating radar (GPR images, so that surface metal targets can be identified successfully. In order to accurately locate buried metal objects, a novel method called the Multiresolution Monogenic Signal Analysis (MMSA system is applied in ground penetrating radar (GPR images. This process includes four steps. First the image is decomposed by the MMSA to extract the amplitude component of the B-scan image. The amplitude component enhances the target reflection and suppresses the direct wave and reflective wave to a large extent. Then we use the region of interest extraction method to locate the genuine target reflections from spurious reflections by calculating the normalized variance of the amplitude component. To find the apexes of the targets, a Hough transform is used in the restricted area. Finally, we estimate the horizontal and vertical position of the target. In terms of buried object detection, the proposed system exhibits promising performance, as shown in the experimental results.

  14. Metabolism of BYZX in human liver microsomes and cytosol: identification of the metabolites and metabolic pathways of BYZX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Sheng, Rong; Hu, Yongzhou; Zeng, Su

    2013-01-01

    BYZX, [(E)-2-(4-((diethylamino)methyl)benzylidene)-5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydroinden-one], belongs to a series of novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and has been synthesized as a new chemical entity for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease symptoms. When incubated with human liver microsomes (HLMs), BYZX was rapidly transformed into its metabolites M1, M2, and M3. The chemical structures of these metabolites were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, which indicated that M1 was an N-desethylated and C = C hydrogenation metabolite of BYZX. M2 and M3 were 2 precursor metabolites, which resulted from the hydrogenation and desethylation of BYZX, respectively. Further studies with chemical inhibitors and human recombinant cytochrome P450s (CYPs), and correlation studies were performed. The results indicated that the N-desethylation of BYZX and M2 was mediated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. The reduced form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate was involved in the hydrogenation of BYZX and M3, and this reaction occurred in the HLMs and in the human liver cytosol. The hydrogenation reaction was not inhibited by any chemical inhibitors of CYPs, but it was significantly inhibited by some substrates of α,β-ketoalkene C = C reductases and their inhibitors such as benzylideneacetone, dicoumarol, and indomethacin. Our results suggest that α,β-ketoalkene C = C reductases may play a role in the hydrogenation reaction, but this issue requires further clarification.

  15. Identification of phase I and II metabolites of the new designer drug α-pyrrolidinohexiophenone (α-PHP) in human urine by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Michael; Bleicher, Sergej; Guber, Susanne; Ippisch, Josef; Polettini, Aldo; Schultis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Pyrrolidinophenones represent one emerging class of newly encountered drugs of abuse, also known as 'new psychoactive substances', with stimulating psychoactive effects. In this work, we report on the detection of the new designer drug α-pyrrolidinohexiophenone (α-PHP) and its phase I and II metabolites in a human urine sample of a drug abuser. Determination and structural elucidation of these metabolites have been achieved by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QTOF-MS). By tentative identification, the exact and approximate structures of 19 phase I metabolites and nine phase II glucuronides were elucidated. Major metabolic pathways revealed the reduction of the ß-keto moieties to their corresponding alcohols, didesalkylation of the pyrrolidine ring, hydroxylation and oxidation of the aliphatic side chain leading to n-hydroxy, aldehyde and carboxylate metabolites, and oxidation of the pyrrolidine ring to its lactam followed by ring cleavage and additional hydroxylation, reduction and oxidation steps and combinations thereof. The most abundant phase II metabolites were glucuronidated ß-keto-reduced alcohols. Besides the great number of metabolites detected in this sample, α-PHP is still one of the most abundant ions together with its ß-keto-reduced alcoholic dihydro metabolite. Monitoring of these metabolites in clinical and forensic toxicology may unambiguously prove the abuse of the new designer drug α-PHP. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Metabolism of ticlopidine in rats: identification and quantitative determination of some its metabolites in plasma, urine and bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuong, A; Bouyssou, A; Paret, J; Cuong, T G

    1981-01-01

    The fate of Ticlopidine, a new inhibitor of platelet aggregation, has been studied in rats following single oral doses. The compound was quickly absorbed as evaluated by the time of the peak plasma concentration. The metabolism of Ticlopidine involved N-oxidation, cleavage of the N-C bond, oxidation of aliphatic carbon followed by glycine conjugation. Methods for quantitation of Ticlopidine and of its metabolites, Ticlopidine-N-oxide, Tetrahydrothienopyridine, 2-cloro-hippuric acid, and the metabolite named Ticlopidine-M, are reported. Urinary excretion took place essentially in the first 24 hours and biliary excretion was most pronounced in the hour following dosing. Small amounts of Ticlopidine were excreted unchanged. The major urinary metabolites were 2-chlorohippuric acid (16% of the dose) and tetrahydrothienopyridine (8%), while Ticlopidine-M predominated in the bile (2% in 0.5h). The peak plasma concentration of Ticlopidine occurred at 0.5 hour. The plasma concentration/time curve displayed a biphasic profile and the terminal half-life of Ticlopidine was tentatively estimated to be 6-10 h in the rat. Ticlopidine-N-oxide was also quantified in plasma: the levels were inferior to those of Ticlopidine throughout the experimental period.

  17. A signal-detection analysis of eyewitness identification across the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloff, Melissa F; Wade, Kimberley A; Wixted, John T; Maylor, Elizabeth A

    2017-05-01

    Middle-aged and older adults are frequently victims and witnesses of crime, but knowledge of how identification performance changes over the adult life span is sparse. The authors asked young (18-30 years), middle-aged (31-59 years), and older (60-95 years) adults (N = 2,670) to watch a video of a mock crime and to attempt to identify the culprit from a fair lineup (in which all of the lineup members matched the appearance of the suspect) or an unfair lineup (in which the suspect stood out). They also asked subjects to provide confidence ratings for their identification decisions. To examine identification performance, the authors used a standard response-type analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and signal-detection process modeling. The results revealed that, in fair lineups, aging was associated with a genuine decline in recognition ability-discriminability-and not an increased willingness to choose. Perhaps most strikingly, middle-aged and older adults were generally effective at regulating their confidence judgments to reflect the likely accuracy of their suspect identification decisions. Model-fitting confirmed that the older adults spread their decision criteria such that identifications made with high confidence were likely to be highly accurate, despite the substantial decline in discriminability with age. In unfair lineups, ability to discriminate between innocent and guilty suspects was poor in all age groups. The research enhances theoretical understanding of the ways in which identification behavior changes with age, and has important practical implications for how legal decision-makers should interpret identifications made by middle-aged and older eyewitnesses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. High resolution mass spectrometry-based methodologies for identification of Etravirine bioactivation to reactive metabolites: In vitro and in vivo approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Ana L A; Martins, Inês L; Nunes, João; Charneira, Catarina; Grilo, Jorge; Silva, Diogo M; Pereira, Sofia A; Soto, Karina; Conceição Oliveira, M; Matilde Marques, M; Jacob, Cristina C; Antunes, Alexandra M M

    2018-03-25

    Drug bioactivation to reactive metabolites capable of covalent adduct formation with bionucleophiles is a major cause of drug-induced adverse reactions. Therefore, elucidation of reactive metabolites is essential to unravel the toxicity mechanisms induced by drugs and thereby identify patient subgroups at higher risk. Etravirine (ETR) was the first second-generation Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI) to be approved, as a therapeutic option for HIV-infected patients who developed resistance to the first-generation NNRTIs. Additionally, ETR came into market aiming to overcome some adverse effects associated with the previously used efavirenz (neurotoxicity) and nevirapine (hepatotoxicity) therapies. Nonetheless, post-marketing reports of severe ETR-induced skin rash and hypersensitivity reactions have prompted the U.S. FDA to issue a safety alert on ETR. Taking into consideration that ETR usage may increase in the near future, due to the possible use of the drug for coinfection with malaria and HIV, the development of reliable prognostic tools for early risk/benefit estimations is urgent. In the current study, high resolution mass spectrometry-based methodologies were integrated with MS 3 experiments for the identification of reactive ETR metabolites/adducts: 1) in vitro incubation of the drug with human and rat liver S9 fractions in the presence of Phase I and II co-factors, including glutathione, as a trapping bionucleophile; and 2) in vivo, using urine samples from HIV-infected patients on ETR therapy. We obtained evidence for multiple bioactivation pathways leading to the formation of covalent adducts with glutathione and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These results suggest that similar reactions may occur with cysteine residues of proteins, supporting a role for ETR bioactivation in the onset of the toxic effects elicited by the drug. Additionally, ETR metabolites stemming from amine oxidation, with potential toxicological significance, were identified

  19. Frequency-plane analysis of normal and pathological ECG signals for disease identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Mitra, M; Chaudhuri, B B

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a frequency plane analysis of both normal and diseased ECG signals is performed specifically for disease identification. Image processing techniques are used to develop an automated data acquisition package of 12 lead ECG signals from paper records. A regeneration domain is also developed to check the captured pattern with the original wave shape. A QRS complex detector with an accuracy level approximately 98.4% in up to 30% signal to noise level is developed. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is performed to obtain the frequency spectrum of every ECG signal. Some interesting amplitude and phase response properties of chest lead V2, V3, V4, V6 and limb lead I, II, III, AVL, AVF are seen. Both amplitude and phase properties are different for normal and diseased subjects and can serve an important role in disease identification. A statistical analysis of amplitude property is carried out to show that this property is significantly different for normal and diseased subjects.

  20. PageRank-based identification of signaling crosstalk from transcriptomics data: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omranian, Nooshin; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2012-04-01

    The levels of cellular organization, from gene transcription to translation to protein-protein interaction and metabolism, operate via tightly regulated mutual interactions, facilitating organismal adaptability and various stress responses. Characterizing the mutual interactions between genes, transcription factors, and proteins involved in signaling, termed crosstalk, is therefore crucial for understanding and controlling cells' functionality. We aim at using high-throughput transcriptomics data to discover previously unknown links between signaling networks. We propose and analyze a novel method for crosstalk identification which relies on transcriptomics data and overcomes the lack of complete information for signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our method first employs a network-based transformation of the results from the statistical analysis of differential gene expression in given groups of experiments under different signal-inducing conditions. The stationary distribution of a random walk (similar to the PageRank algorithm) on the constructed network is then used to determine the putative transcripts interrelating different signaling pathways. With the help of the proposed method, we analyze a transcriptomics data set including experiments from four different stresses/signals: nitrate, sulfur, iron, and hormones. We identified promising gene candidates, downstream of the transcription factors (TFs), associated to signaling crosstalk, which were validated through literature mining. In addition, we conduct a comparative analysis with the only other available method in this field which used a biclustering-based approach. Surprisingly, the biclustering-based approach fails to robustly identify any candidate genes involved in the crosstalk of the analyzed signals. We demonstrate that our proposed method is more robust in identifying gene candidates involved downstream of the signaling crosstalk for species for which large transcriptomics data sets

  1. A New Position Location System Using DTV Transmitter Identification Watermark Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouinard Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new position location technique using the transmitter identification (TxID RF watermark in the digital TV (DTV signals is proposed in this paper. Conventional global positioning system (GPS usually does not work well inside buildings due to the high frequency and weak field strength of the signal. In contrast to the GPS, the DTV signals are received from transmitters at relatively short distance, while the broadcast transmitters operate at levels up to the megawatts effective radiated power (ERP. Also the RF frequency of the DTV signal is much lower than the GPS, which makes it easier for the signal to penetrate buildings and other objects. The proposed position location system based on DTV TxID signal is presented in this paper. Practical receiver implementation issues including nonideal correlation and synchronization are analyzed and discussed. Performance of the proposed technique is evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations and compared with other existing position location systems. Possible ways to improve the accuracy of the new position location system is discussed.

  2. Metabolite identification and pharmacokinetic profiling of PP242, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Md Mamunur; Lee, Hyunbeom; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2018-01-01

    PP242 is a second generation novel selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR that displayed promising anti-cancer activity over several cancer types by inhibiting both the complexes of mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2). The purpose of this study is to identify the possible metabolites and to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of PP242 after a single oral administration to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Two metabolites, including one phase I and one phase II, were identified by in vitro and in vivo studies using rat liver microsomes (RLMs) as well as rat plasma, urine and feces, respectively, through ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-linear ion trap quadrupole-orbitrap-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS). The major biotransformation pathways of PP242 were hydroxylation and glucuronide conjugation. Additionally, a simple and rapid quantification method was developed and validated. The method recovery was within 79.7-84.6%, whereas the matrix effect was 78.1-96.0% in all three quality control (QC) concentrations (low, medium and high) including the LLOQ. Other parameters showed acceptable results according to the US food and drug administration (FDA) guidelines for bioanalytical method validation. Afterwards, pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated in rat plasma by successfully applying the validated method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After a single oral administration at a dose of 5mg/kg, the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) of PP242 was 0.17±0.08μg/mL, while the elimination was moderately fast (T 1/2 : 172.18±45.54min). All of the obtained information on the metabolite identification and pharmacokinetic parameter elucidation could facilitate the further development of PP242. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Goebel, Neal C; Shaffer, Brenda T; Henkels, Marcella D; Zabriskie, T Mark; Loper, Joyce E

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Refinement of in vitro Methods for Identification of Aldehyde Oxidase Substrates Reveals Novel Metabolites of Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Ryan A

    2018-04-03

    An assay procedure was developed to identify AO substrates that leverages the capabilities of high resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously monitor parent loss and formation of hydroxylated metabolite over time in incubations with liver cytosol. By incorporating metabolite monitoring, false positives resulting from metabolism by other cytosolic enzymes or processes were decreased. A diverse set of 34 kinase inhibitors containing AO-substrate motifs was screened and 35% of the compounds were identified as human AO substrates. Confirmation was obtained through determination of the site of metabolism. Human AO substrates identified contained unsubstituted diazanaphthalene moieties (A77-01, INCB 28060, ML-347, LDN-193189 and SB-525334), 4-aminoquinazoline cores (lapatinib, lapatinib M1, and CL-387785) and terminal pyridine and pyrimidine groups (imatinib, bafetinib, and AMG 900). Rat and cynomolgus monkey AO displayed substrate specificities that overlapped moderately with human; rates of metabolism were often higher and lower for cynomolgus monkey and rat, respectively, when compared to human. A subset of novel AO substrates identified in this study was also subjected to two other methods for AO substrate determination: comparison of human liver microsome and hepatocyte stability; and the effect of hydralazine, an AO-specific inhibitor, on hepatocyte stability. These methods appeared to correlate and be capable of identifying AO substrates when more than one-third of metabolism in hepatocytes was AO-mediated; however significant limitations exist. Considering the sensitivity, efficiency and definitiveness of the cytosol assay with metabolite monitoring, it is recommended to be used as a primary screen for AO substrates. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Effect of several factors on the liver extract mediated mutagenicity of acrylonitrile and identification of four new in vitro metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger-Van Bogaert, M; Lambotte-Vandepaer, M; de Meester, C; Rollmann, B; Poncelet, F; Mercier, M

    1981-02-01

    The mutagenicity of acrylonitrile (ACN) was tested with Salmonella typhimurium TA1530 after a preincubation period of the chemical with a rat liver post-mitochondrial fraction in liquid medium. Several pretreatments were applied to the animals before the preparation of the liver fractions and different compounds added to the incubation mixture, which were shown to modify the liver mediated mutagenic activity of ACN. Four metabolites: cyanoacetic acid, cyanoethanol, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde were identified after incubation of ACN with the rat liver homogenate. From both sets of results, an in vitro metabolic scheme is proposed to ACN, which postulates the intermediate formation of a radical species and an epoxide.

  6. System identification by methods from the statistical signal theory, history and state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Palle; Gundersen, Vidar B.

    1999-01-01

    Condition monitoring is an important area in which the OECD Halden Reactor Project has developed several tools. This paper presents a general overview of methods utilised in diagnosis systems, signal validation systems and process optimisation systems such as EFD, Mocom, Aladdin and PEANO. An overview of lessons learned on diagnosis of technical systems with special reference to system identification is reported. The analysis of input-output behaviour by special, suitable methods may be used as a tool for diagnosis. An overview of methods for empirical modelling and data analysis and their major differences is presented. It is explained how system identification methods and transforms may be used to build models based on observed data from a system. According to the Webster dictionary diagnosis is 'Investigation or analysis of the cause or nature of a condition, situation or a problem.' By examining data collected from a process the aim is to detect abnormal conditions and if possible understand what has been the cause of the observed problem. Section 1 gives a retrospective view at the development in the field of system identification. Section 2 presents a classification of the methods, while section 3 provides some practical advice on how diagnosis can be carried out by means of system identification methods (author) (ml)

  7. Identification of signal transduction pathways used by orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnick, Janine N; Skynner, Heather A; Chapman, Kerry L; Jack, Andrew D; Zamiara, Elize; Negulescu, Paul; Beaumont, Kevin; Patel, Smita; McAllister, George

    2003-04-01

    The superfamily of GPCRs have diverse biological roles, transducing signals from a range of stimuli, from photon recognition by opsins to neurotransmitter regulation of neuronal function. Of the many identified genes encoding GPCRs, >130 are orphan receptors ( i.e., their endogenous ligands are unknown), and this subset represents putative novel therapeutic targets for pharmaceutical intervention in a variety of diseases. As an initial step toward drug discovery, determining a biological function for these newly identified receptors is of vital importance, and thus identification of a natural ligand(s) is a primary aim. There are several established methods for doing this, but many have drawbacks and usually require some in-depth knowledge about how the receptor functions. The technique described here utilizes a transcription-based reporter assay in live cells. This allows the determination of the signal transduction pathway any given oGPCR uses, without any prior knowledge of the endogenous ligand. This can therefore reduce the redundancy of effort involved in screening ligands at a given receptor in multiple formats (i.e., Galpha(s), Galpha(i/0), and Galpha(q) assays), as well as ensuring that the receptor targeted is capable of signaling if appropriately activated. Such knowledge is often laboriously obtained, and for almost all oGPCRs, this kind of information is not yet available. This technology can also be used to develop inverse agonist as well as agonist sensitive high throughput assays for oGPCRs. The veracity of this approach is demonstrated, using a number of known GPCRs. The likely signaling pathways of the GPR3, GPR12, GPR19, GPR21, and HG55 oGPCRs are shown, and a high throughput assay for GPR26 receptors developed. The methods outlined here for elucidation of the signal transduction pathways for oGPCRs and development of functional assays should speed up the process of identification of ligands for this potentially therapeutically useful group of

  8. Identification of Anisomerous Motor Imagery EEG Signals Based on Complex Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rensong; Zhang, Zhiwen; Duan, Feng; Zhou, Xin; Meng, Zixuan

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) electroencephalograph (EEG) signals are widely applied in brain-computer interface (BCI). However, classified MI states are limited, and their classification accuracy rates are low because of the characteristics of nonlinearity and nonstationarity. This study proposes a novel MI pattern recognition system that is based on complex algorithms for classifying MI EEG signals. In electrooculogram (EOG) artifact preprocessing, band-pass filtering is performed to obtain the frequency band of MI-related signals, and then, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) combined with wavelet threshold denoising (WTD) is used for EOG artifact preprocessing. We propose a regularized common spatial pattern (R-CSP) algorithm for EEG feature extraction by incorporating the principle of generic learning. A new classifier combining the K -nearest neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM) approaches is used to classify four anisomerous states, namely, imaginary movements with the left hand, right foot, and right shoulder and the resting state. The highest classification accuracy rate is 92.5%, and the average classification accuracy rate is 87%. The proposed complex algorithm identification method can significantly improve the identification rate of the minority samples and the overall classification performance.

  9. Identification of Anisomerous Motor Imagery EEG Signals Based on Complex Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rensong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI electroencephalograph (EEG signals are widely applied in brain-computer interface (BCI. However, classified MI states are limited, and their classification accuracy rates are low because of the characteristics of nonlinearity and nonstationarity. This study proposes a novel MI pattern recognition system that is based on complex algorithms for classifying MI EEG signals. In electrooculogram (EOG artifact preprocessing, band-pass filtering is performed to obtain the frequency band of MI-related signals, and then, canonical correlation analysis (CCA combined with wavelet threshold denoising (WTD is used for EOG artifact preprocessing. We propose a regularized common spatial pattern (R-CSP algorithm for EEG feature extraction by incorporating the principle of generic learning. A new classifier combining the K-nearest neighbor (KNN and support vector machine (SVM approaches is used to classify four anisomerous states, namely, imaginary movements with the left hand, right foot, and right shoulder and the resting state. The highest classification accuracy rate is 92.5%, and the average classification accuracy rate is 87%. The proposed complex algorithm identification method can significantly improve the identification rate of the minority samples and the overall classification performance.

  10. An intelligent signal processing and pattern recognition technique for defect identification using an active sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhongqing; Ye, Lin

    2004-08-01

    The practical utilization of elastic waves, e.g. Rayleigh-Lamb waves, in high-performance structural health monitoring techniques is somewhat impeded due to the complicated wave dispersion phenomena, the existence of multiple wave modes, the high susceptibility to diverse interferences, the bulky sampled data and the difficulty in signal interpretation. An intelligent signal processing and pattern recognition (ISPPR) approach using the wavelet transform and artificial neural network algorithms was developed; this was actualized in a signal processing package (SPP). The ISPPR technique comprehensively functions as signal filtration, data compression, characteristic extraction, information mapping and pattern recognition, capable of extracting essential yet concise features from acquired raw wave signals and further assisting in structural health evaluation. For validation, the SPP was applied to the prediction of crack growth in an alloy structural beam and construction of a damage parameter database for defect identification in CF/EP composite structures. It was clearly apparent that the elastic wave propagation-based damage assessment could be dramatically streamlined by introduction of the ISPPR technique.

  11. EEG signal classification using PSO trained RBF neural network for epilepsy identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Satapathy

    Full Text Available The electroencephalogram (EEG is a low amplitude signal generated in the brain, as a result of information flow during the communication of several neurons. Hence, careful analysis of these signals could be useful in understanding many human brain disorder diseases. One such disease topic is epileptic seizure identification, which can be identified via a classification process of the EEG signal after preprocessing with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT. To classify the EEG signal, we used a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN. As shown herein, the network can be trained to optimize the mean square error (MSE by using a modified particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The key idea behind the modification of PSO is to introduce a method to overcome the problem of slow searching in and around the global optimum solution. The effectiveness of this procedure was verified by an experimental analysis on a benchmark dataset which is publicly available. The result of our experimental analysis revealed that the improvement in the algorithm is significant with respect to RBF trained by gradient descent and canonical PSO. Here, two classes of EEG signals were considered: the first being an epileptic and the other being non-epileptic. The proposed method produced a maximum accuracy of 99% as compared to the other techniques. Keywords: Electroencephalography, Radial basis function neural network, Particle swarm optimization, Discrete wavelet transform, Machine learning

  12. Effect of surfactants and identification of metabolites on the biodegradation of fluoranthene by basidiomycetes fungal isolate Armillaria sp. F022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2014-04-01

    The effects of structure and concentration of surfactants on the biodegradation of fluoranthene, a three rings polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in the aqueous phase, as well as their effects on the biodegradation and enzyme activity were investigated. The toxicity ranking of studied surfactants is: non-ionic Tween 80 Armillaria sp. F022 (>4,500 mg/L) was showed by Tween 80 (10 mg/L) culture, manifesting that the non-ionic surfactant present in the culture were beneficial to the fungal growth. Laccase showed the highest enzymes activity in all surfactants culture. Non-ionic Tween 80 showed a significant result for laccase activity (1,902 U/L) in the Armillaria sp. F022 culture. The increased enzymes cumulative activity may stem directly from the rising fluoranthene biodegradability as addition of appropriate surfactants. The biotransformation of fluoranthene was greatly improved by Tween 80, and totally fluoranthene degradation was obtained as Tween 80 was 10 mg/L. Two fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from the culture medium and analyzed by a thin layer chromatography, UV visible spectrometer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The oxidation of fluoranthene is initiated by oxygenation at the C-2,3 positions resulting 9-fluorenone. At the end of experiment, one metabolite was detected in the culture extract and identified as phthalic acid. Evidently, Armillaria sp. F022 seems efficient, high effective and deserves further application on the enhanced bioremediation technologies for the treatment of fluoranthene-contaminated soil.

  13. The profiling and identification of chemical components, prototypes and metabolites of Run-zao-zhi-yang capsule in rat plasma, urine and bile by an UPLC-Q-TOF/MSE -based high throughput strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Yue, Xinyi; Ouyang, Danwei; Li, Quan; Yang, Peiming

    2018-04-12

    Run-zao-zhi-yang (RZZY) capsule, a traditional Chinese medicine formula (TCMF), has been popularly used for the treatment of dermatitis and eczema. However, few studies have been carried out on RZZY and its metabolites. In this study, we developed a three-step strategy to rapidly characterize the chemical constituents and metabolites of RZZY by using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 41 chemical components were characterized from RZZY. Among which, there are 11 flavonoids, six alkaloids, six stilbene glycosides, five anthraquinones and 13 other compounds. In addition, 18 prototypes and 35 metabolites were detected in rat plasma, urine and bile. This study offers an applicable approach for high throughput profiling and identification of chemical components and metabolites derived from TCMF in vivo, and also provides essential data for exploring bioactive ingredients and action mechanisms of RZZY. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The Pseudomonas secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol is a signal inducing rhizoplane expression of Azospirillum genes involved in plant-growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes-Meynet, Emeline; Pothier, Joël F; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2011-02-01

    During evolution, plants have become associated with guilds of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), which raises the possibility that individual PGPR populations may have developed mechanisms to cointeract with one another on plant roots. We hypothesize that this has resulted in signaling phenomena between different types of PGPR colonizing the same roots. Here, the objective was to determine whether the Pseudomonas secondary metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) can act as a signal on Azospirillum PGPR and enhance the phytostimulation effects of the latter. On roots, the DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 strain but not its phl-negative mutant enhanced the phytostimulatory effect of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245-Rif on wheat. Accordingly, DAPG enhanced Sp245-Rif traits involved in root colonization (cell motility, biofilm formation, and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production) and phytostimulation (auxin production). A differential fluorescence induction promoter-trapping approach based on flow cytometry was then used to identify Sp245-Rif genes upregulated by DAPG. DAPG enhanced expression of a wide range of Sp245-Rif genes, including genes involved in phytostimulation. Four of them (i.e., ppdC, flgE, nirK, and nifX-nifB) tended to be upregulated on roots in the presence of P. fluorescens F113 compared with its phl-negative mutant. Our results indicate that DAPG can act as a signal by which some beneficial pseudomonads may stimulate plant-beneficial activities of Azospirillum PGPR.

  15. Effectiveness of different solid-phase microextraction fibres for differentiation of selected Madeira island fruits based on their volatile metabolite profile--identification of novel compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, João; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S

    2011-01-15

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) procedure based on five commercialised fibres (85 μm polyacrylate - PA, 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane - PDMS, 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene - PDMS/DVB, 70 μm carbowax/divinylbenzene - CW/DVB and 85 μm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane - CAR/PDMS) is presented for the characterization of the volatile metabolite profile of four selected Madeira island fruit species, lemon (Citrus limon), kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa), papaya (Carica papaya L.) and Chickasaw plum (Prunus angustifolia). The isolation of metabolites was followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS) methodology. The performance of the target fibres was evaluated and compared. The SPME fibre coated with CW/DVB afforded the highest extraction efficiency in kiwi and papaya pulps, while in lemon and plum the same was achieved with PMDS/DVB fibre. This procedure allowed for the identification of 80 compounds, 41 in kiwi, 24 in plums, 23 in papaya and 20 in lemon. Considering the best extraction conditions, the most abundant volatiles identified in kiwi were the intense aldehydes and ethyl esters such as (E)-2-hexenal and ethyl butyrate, while in Chicasaw plum predominate 2-hexenal, 2-methyl-4-pentenal, hexanal, (Z)-3-hexenol and cyclohexylene oxide. The major compounds identified in the papaya pulp were benzyl isothiocyanate, linalool oxide, furfural, hydroxypropanone, linalool and acetic acid. Finally, lemon was shown to be the most divergent of the four fruits, being its aroma profile composed almost exclusively by terpens, namely limonene, γ-terpinene, o-cymene and α-terpinolene. Thirty two volatiles were identified for the first time in the fruit or close related species analysed and 14 volatiles are reported as novel volatile metabolites in fruits. This includes 5 new compounds in kiwi (2-cyclohexene-1,4-dione, furyl hydroxymethyl ketone, 4-hydroxydihydro-2(3H)-furanone, 5-acetoxymethyl-2-furaldehyde and

  16. compMS2Miner: An Automatable Metabolite Identification, Visualization, and Data-Sharing R Package for High-Resolution LC-MS Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, William M B; Petrick, Lauren; Barupal, Dinesh K; Scalbert, Augustin; Wilson, Mark J; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2017-04-04

    A long-standing challenge of untargeted metabolomic profiling by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) is efficient transition from unknown mass spectral features to confident metabolite annotations. The compMS 2 Miner (Comprehensive MS 2 Miner) package was developed in the R language to facilitate rapid, comprehensive feature annotation using a peak-picker-output and MS 2 data files as inputs. The number of MS 2 spectra that can be collected during a metabolomic profiling experiment far outweigh the amount of time required for pain-staking manual interpretation; therefore, a degree of software workflow autonomy is required for broad-scale metabolite annotation. CompMS 2 Miner integrates many useful tools in a single workflow for metabolite annotation and also provides a means to overview the MS 2 data with a Web application GUI compMS 2 Explorer (Comprehensive MS 2 Explorer) that also facilitates data-sharing and transparency. The automatable compMS 2 Miner workflow consists of the following steps: (i) matching unknown MS 1 features to precursor MS 2 scans, (ii) filtration of spectral noise (dynamic noise filter), (iii) generation of composite mass spectra by multiple similar spectrum signal summation and redundant/contaminant spectra removal, (iv) interpretation of possible fragment ion substructure using an internal database, (v) annotation of unknowns with chemical and spectral databases with prediction of mammalian biotransformation metabolites, wrapper functions for in silico fragmentation software, nearest neighbor chemical similarity scoring, random forest based retention time prediction, text-mining based false positive removal/true positive ranking, chemical taxonomic prediction and differential evolution based global annotation score optimization, and (vi) network graph visualizations, data curation, and sharing are made possible via the compMS 2 Explorer application. Metabolite identities and comments

  17. Online Monitoring System for Patients with Coronary Heart Disease Using ST Elevation Signal Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Adil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The coronary heart disease is one of desease leading to the sudden death. This is the reason why online monitoring system is urgently needed to monitor the patients with coronary heart disease. This paper proposse the system with an algorithm which is developed from signal identification of ST elevation. The medical record in this system is measured by a new wireless ECG development and followed Zigbee standard. If the system detects the possibility of disturbance in cardiac function, then soon, an alarm signal is send to the server at the hospital, in order that an intensive first aid can be given immediately. Based on the testing results, the level of success of an online monitoring system is possible to reach 100% if the patient does not make any moving around. It is expected that the application of this system will reduce the sudden death for patients at hospital with coronary heart disease.

  18. Identification of the Major Components of Buddleja officinalis Extract and Their Metabolites in Rat Urine by UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mohan; Luo, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ruirui; Lu, Lina; Yu, Guohua; Ma, Xiaoyun; Liu, Aoxue; Guo, Yafang; Zhao, Haiyu

    2016-10-01

    Buddleja officinalis Maxim, one of the most popular herbal medicines in China, is widely prescribed for curing eye diseases for centuries. In this study, the major components of B. officinalis extract (BOE) and their metabolites in rat urine were detected and identified by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap). A total of 19 compounds, including 8 flavonoids and 11 phenylethanoid glycosides, were confirmed or tentatively identified from BOE. In vivo, 33 components, including 3 prototypes and 30 metabolies, were confirmed or tentatively identified in rat urine samples. The metabolic pathways of different types of compounds were also proposed. This study would effectively narrow the range of potentially bioactive constituents of BOE and shed light to its action mechanism. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and identification of metabolites/transformation products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alexandra S; Ribeiro, Ana R; Amorim, Catarina L; Barreiro, Juliana C; Cass, Quezia B; Castro, Paula M L; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth

    2014-03-14

    Antibiotics are a therapeutic class widely found in environmental matrices and extensively studied due to its persistence and implications for multi-resistant bacteria development. This work presents an integrated approach of analytical multi-techniques on assessing biodegradation of fluorinated antibiotics at a laboratory-scale microcosmos to follow removal and formation of intermediate compounds. Degradation of four fluoroquinolone antibiotics, namely Ofloxacin (OFL), Norfloxacin (NOR), Ciprofloxacin (CPF) and Moxifloxacin (MOX), at 10 mg L(-1) using a mixed bacterial culture, was assessed for 60 days. The assays were followed by a developed and validated analytical method of LC with fluorescence detection (LC-FD) using a Luna Pentafluorophenyl (2) 3 μm column. The validated method demonstrated good selectivity, linearity (r(2)>0.999), intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD<2.74%) and accuracy. The quantification limits were 5 μg L(-1) for OFL, NOR and CPF and 20 μg L(-1) for MOX. The optimized conditions allowed picturing metabolites/transformation products formation and accumulation during the process, stating an incomplete mineralization, also shown by fluoride release. OFL and MOX presented the highest (98.3%) and the lowest (80.5%) extent of degradation after 19 days of assay, respectively. A representative number of samples was selected and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with triple quadrupole and the molecular formulas were confirmed by a quadruple time of flight analyzer (QqTOF). Most of the intermediates were already described as biodegradation and/or photodegradation products in different conditions; however unknown metabolites were also identified. The microbial consortium, even when exposed to high levels of FQ, presented high percentages of degradation, never reported before for these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding the magnitude of emergent contaminant releases through target screening and metabolite identification using high resolution mass spectrometry: Illicit drugs in raw sewage influents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuett, Nubia V; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R

    2015-01-23

    A QExactive Orbitrap was used for the identification of phase I and II transformation products (TPs) of illicit drugs in raw sewage influents. Two operating modes (targeted MS(2) and Data-dependent screening) were used for data acquisition. Even though, data-dependent scan is a faster route towards the potential identification of metabolites, it suffered from its limitation to provide enough data points across the chromatographic peak during the MS(2) cycle in contrast to targeted MS(2). Therefore, the later technique was implemented as the method of choice in this study for the positive confirmation and quantitation of TPs (n=54). The vast majority of the identified TPs were products of phase I transformation reactions, with the latter being more prevalent in the nature. Estimated mole fractions showed that for a large number of the analytes, TPs must also be monitored in order to fully understand their environmental fate and calculate potential consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of a tripartite import signal in the Ewing Sarcoma protein (EWS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Debra J.; Morse, Robert; Todd, Adrian G. [Clinical Neurobiology, IBCS, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter EX1 2LU (United Kingdom); Eggleton, Paul [Inflammation and Musculoskeletal Disease, IBCS, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter EX1 2LU (United Kingdom); MRC Immunochemistry Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Lorson, Christian L. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 Rollins Road, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Young, Philip J., E-mail: philip.young@pms.ac.uk [Clinical Neurobiology, IBCS, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter EX1 2LU (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-25

    The Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) protein is a ubiquitously expressed RNA processing factor that localises predominantly to the nucleus. However, the mechanism through which EWS enters the nucleus remains unclear, with differing reports identifying three separate import signals within the EWS protein. Here we have utilized a panel of truncated EWS proteins to clarify the reported nuclear localisation signals. We describe three C-terminal domains that are important for efficient EWS nuclear localization: (1) the third RGG-motif; (2) the last 10 amino acids (known as the PY-import motif); and (3) the zinc-finger motif. Although these three domains are involved in nuclear import, they are not independently capable of driving the efficient import of a GFP-moiety. However, collectively they form a complex tripartite signal that efficiently drives GFP-import into the nucleus. This study helps clarify the EWS import signal, and the identification of the involvement of both the RGG- and zinc-finger motifs has wide reaching implications.

  2. Genome-wide identification of phospho-regulators of Wnt signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Sharan; Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-04-15

    Evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathways regulate embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in metazoans. The precise control of the state and amplitude of signaling pathways is achieved in part through the kinase- and phosphatase-mediated reversible phosphorylation of proteins. In this study, we performed a genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that regulate the Wnt pathway under physiological conditions in the Drosophila wing disc. Our analyses have identified 54 high-confidence kinases and phosphatases capable of modulating the Wnt pathway, including 22 novel regulators. These candidates were also assayed for a role in the Notch pathway, and numerous phospho-regulators were identified. Additionally, each regulator of the Wnt pathway was evaluated in the wing disc for its ability to affect the mechanistically similar Hedgehog pathway. We identified 29 dual regulators that have the same effect on the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways. As proof of principle, we established that Cdc37 and Gilgamesh/CK1γ inhibit and promote signaling, respectively, by functioning at analogous levels of these pathways in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. The Wnt and Hedgehog pathways function in tandem in multiple developmental contexts, and the identification of several shared phospho-regulators serve as potential nodes of control under conditions of aberrant signaling and disease. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Identification of a tripartite import signal in the Ewing Sarcoma protein (EWS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Debra J.; Morse, Robert; Todd, Adrian G.; Eggleton, Paul; Lorson, Christian L.; Young, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    The Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) protein is a ubiquitously expressed RNA processing factor that localises predominantly to the nucleus. However, the mechanism through which EWS enters the nucleus remains unclear, with differing reports identifying three separate import signals within the EWS protein. Here we have utilized a panel of truncated EWS proteins to clarify the reported nuclear localisation signals. We describe three C-terminal domains that are important for efficient EWS nuclear localization: (1) the third RGG-motif; (2) the last 10 amino acids (known as the PY-import motif); and (3) the zinc-finger motif. Although these three domains are involved in nuclear import, they are not independently capable of driving the efficient import of a GFP-moiety. However, collectively they form a complex tripartite signal that efficiently drives GFP-import into the nucleus. This study helps clarify the EWS import signal, and the identification of the involvement of both the RGG- and zinc-finger motifs has wide reaching implications.

  4. Effects of rasagiline, its metabolite aminoindan and selegiline on glutamate receptor mediated signalling in the rat hippocampus slice in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rasagiline, a new drug developed to treat Parkinson's disease, is known to inhibit monoamine oxidase B. However, its metabolite R-(-)-aminoindan does not show this kind of activity. The present series of in vitro experiments using the rat hippocampal slice preparation deals with effects of both compounds on the pyramidal cell response after electric stimulation of the Schaffer Collaterals in comparison to selegiline, another MAO B inhibitor. Method Stimulation of the Schaffer Collaterals by single stimuli (SS) or theta burst stimulation (TBS) resulted in stable responses of pyramidal cells measured as population spike amplitude (about 1 mV under control SS conditions or about 2 mV after TBS). Results During the first series, this response was attenuated in the presence of rasagiline and aminoindan-to a lesser degree of selegiline-in a concentration dependent manner (5-50 μM) after single stimuli as well as under TBS. During oxygen/glucose deprivation for 10 min the amplitude of the population spike breaks down by 75%. The presence of rasagiline and aminoindan, but rarely the presence of selegiline, prevented this break down. Following glutamate receptor mediated enhancements of neuronal transmission in a second series of experiments very clear differences could be observed in comparison to the action of selegiline: NMDA receptor, AMPA receptor as well as metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated increases of transmission were concentration dependently (0,3 - 2 μM) antagonized by rasagiline and aminoindan, but not by selegiline. On the opposite, only selegiline attenuated kainate receptor mediated increases of excitability. Thus, both monoamino oxidase (MAO) B inhibitors show attenuation of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus but interfere with different receptor mediated excitatory modulations at low concentrations. Conclusions Since aminoindan does not induce MAO B inhibition, these effects must be regarded as being independent from MAO B

  5. Identification of Buctopamine and Mebuctopamine, a β2Receptor Agonist and Its Metabolite, in Swine Hair and Feed Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Heng; Yang, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Chih Wen; Lin, Yi-Ying; Kuo, Su Lien; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2017-05-17

    4-[2-(t-Butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]phenol (buctopamine, 4), a new β 2 receptor agonist (β 2 -agonist), was found to be an adulterant in feed additives for swine in Taiwan, where using β 2 -agonists in food-production animals is prohibited. Buctopamine and its metabolite, 4-[2-(t-butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]-2-methoxyphenol (mebuctopamine, 2), were detected in swine hair specimens. Authentic compounds 2 and 4 were synthesized with 98.6% and 97.7% purity, respectively, as reference standards for analysis, and both compounds were more hydrophilic than ractopamine and clenbuterol. In a preliminary pharmacological evaluation, compounds 2 and 4 exhibited moderate human β 2 receptor binding affinity and did not show significant affinities for the human α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 3 receptors. After addition of compounds 2-4 into the β 2 -agonist library, a multiresidue analysis of 26 β 2 -agonists by using triple quadrupole LC/MS/MS for routine screening conducted by regulatory authorities was established, in which the common limits of quantification for the 26 β 2 -agonists in swine feed and hair are 10 and 25 ng/g, respectively. In addition, the illegal use of buctopamine (4) has been effectively prevented. The results of this study are also useful for controlling the illegal use of new β 2 -agonists in food-production animals.

  6. Identification and quantification of thymol metabolites in plasma, liver and duodenal wall of broiler chickens using UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarčíková, Jana; Oceľová, Vladimíra; Faix, Štefan; Plachá, Iveta; Calderón, Angela I

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, we aimed to develop a method for thymol sulfate and thymol glucuronide determination in plasma, liver and duodenal wall of broiler chickens after feeding with a Thymus vulgaris essential oil at the different concentrations (0.01, 0.05 and 0.1% w/w). UHPLC coupled with accurate-mass QTOF-MS was used for identification and quantification of thymol metabolites. Novel Waters Oasis Prime HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges were applied to sample clean-up with extraction recoveries ranged from 85 to 92%. The presence of thymol glucuronide was confirmed by MS software according to molecular formula, score, mass error and double bond equivalent. In terms of validation, calibration curves of thymol sulfate were constructed in matrix samples with linearity from 3.91 to 250.0 ng/mL and correlation coefficients were within the range of 0.9979-0.9995. Limits of detection were 0.97, 0.29 and 0.63 ng/mL and limits of quantification were 3.23, 0.97 and 2.09 ng/mL for plasma, liver and duodenal wall, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation were <4.35%. To highlight, thymol metabolites were directly detected for the first time in liver and duodenal wall and this method was shown to be successfully applicable for investigation of thymol metabolism in chickens after thyme essential oil ingestion. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. UV-B Irradiation Changes Specifically the Secondary Metabolite Profile in Broccoli Sprouts: Induced Signaling Overlaps with Defense Response to Biotic Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, Inga; Schreiner, Monika; Nguyen, Chau Nhi; Krumbein, Angelika; Ulrichs, Christian; Lohse, Marc; Zrenner, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Only a few environmental factors have such a pronounced effect on plant growth and development as ultraviolet light (UV). Concerns have arisen due to increased UV-B radiation reaching the Earth’s surface as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion. Ecologically relevant low to moderate UV-B doses (0.3–1 kJ m–2 d–1) were applied to sprouts of the important vegetable crop Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli), and eco-physiological responses such as accumulation of non-volatile secondary metabolites were related to transcriptional responses with Agilent One-Color Gene Expression Microarray analysis using the 2×204 k format Brassica microarray. UV-B radiation effects have usually been linked to increases in phenolic compounds. As expected, the flavonoids kaempferol and quercetin accumulated in broccoli sprouts (the aerial part of the seedlings) 24 h after UV-B treatment. A new finding is the specific UV-B-mediated induction of glucosinolates (GS), especially of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GS and 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl GS, while carotenoids and Chl levels remained unaffected. Accumulation of defensive GS metabolites was accompanied by increased expression of genes associated with salicylate and jasmonic acid signaling defense pathways and up-regulation of genes responsive to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Concomitantly, plant pre-exposure to moderate UV-B doses had negative effects on the performance of the caterpillar Pieris brassicae (L.) and on the population growth of the aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Moreover, insect-specific induction of GS in broccoli sprouts was affected by UV-B pre-treatment. PMID:22773681

  8. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  9. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T; Balatsky, Alexander V; Rehr, John J; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology. (paper)

  10. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Rehr, John J.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2014-03-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology.

  11. Determination and identification of synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites in different matrices by modern analytical techniques – a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Znaleziona, Joanna; Ginterová, Pavlína; Petr, Jan; Ondra, Peter; Válka, Ivo; Ševčík, Juraj; Chrastina, Jan; Maier, Vítězslav

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids from analytical point of view. • Determination and identification methods of synthetic cannabinoids in different matrices. • Analytical techniques used from thin layer chromatography to high resolution mass spectrometry. • Detailed survey of gas and liquid chromatography methods for synthetic cannabinoids analysis. - Abstract: Synthetic cannabinoids have gained popularity due to their easy accessibility and psychoactive effects. Furthermore, they cannot be detected in urine by routine drug monitoring. The wide range of active ingredients in analyzed matrices hinders the development of a standard analytical method for their determination. Moreover, their possible side effects are not well known which increases the danger. This review is focused on the sample preparation and the determination of synthetic cannabinoids in different matrices (serum, urine, herbal blends, oral fluid, hair) published since 2004. The review includes separation and identification techniques, such as thin layer chromatography, gas and liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, mostly coupled with mass spectrometry. The review also includes results by spectral methods like infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance or direct-injection mass spectrometry

  12. Determination and identification of synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites in different matrices by modern analytical techniques – a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Znaleziona, Joanna; Ginterová, Pavlína; Petr, Jan [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. Listopadu 12, Olomouc CZ-77146 (Czech Republic); Ondra, Peter; Válka, Ivo [Department of Forensic Medicine and Medical Law Faculty Hospital, Hněvotínská 3, Olomouc CZ-77146 (Czech Republic); Ševčík, Juraj [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. Listopadu 12, Olomouc CZ-77146 (Czech Republic); Chrastina, Jan [Institute of Special Education Studies, Faculty of Education, Palacký University, Žižkovo náměsti 5, Olomouc CZ-77146 (Czech Republic); Maier, Vítězslav, E-mail: vitezslav.maier@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. Listopadu 12, Olomouc CZ-77146 (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-18

    Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids from analytical point of view. • Determination and identification methods of synthetic cannabinoids in different matrices. • Analytical techniques used from thin layer chromatography to high resolution mass spectrometry. • Detailed survey of gas and liquid chromatography methods for synthetic cannabinoids analysis. - Abstract: Synthetic cannabinoids have gained popularity due to their easy accessibility and psychoactive effects. Furthermore, they cannot be detected in urine by routine drug monitoring. The wide range of active ingredients in analyzed matrices hinders the development of a standard analytical method for their determination. Moreover, their possible side effects are not well known which increases the danger. This review is focused on the sample preparation and the determination of synthetic cannabinoids in different matrices (serum, urine, herbal blends, oral fluid, hair) published since 2004. The review includes separation and identification techniques, such as thin layer chromatography, gas and liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, mostly coupled with mass spectrometry. The review also includes results by spectral methods like infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance or direct-injection mass spectrometry.

  13. UPLC-QTOF-MS identification of metabolites in rat biosamples after oral administration of Dioscorea saponins: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Na; Pang, Yu-Xin; He, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Jian-Ye; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Yi, Tao; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2015-05-13

    Among the 49 species of the genus Dioscorea distributed in China, Dioscorea nipponica Makino (DN), Dioscorea panthaica Prain et Burkill (DP), and Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright (DZ) possess more or less similar traditional therapeutic actions, such as activating blood, relieving pain, and dispersing swelling; they have been used as folk medicine in China since 1950s. The modern pharmaceutical industry has developed these three species as herbal medicines that have been used for decades for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, there is no available information in the literature explaining how their chemical components are converted and interrelated in vivo to support their efficacies. The present study aimed to a) compare the metabolic profiles of saponins from DN, DP and DZ, which are considered to be their bioactive components, and b) to compare the changes in sustained levels of metabolites from rat biosamples. Total saponins (TS) from each of the three species, and four individual saponins, namely protodioscin (PD), pseudoprotodioscin (PSD), dioscin (DC) and diosgenin (DG), were given to rats by oral administration. Chemical profiles of the rats' plasma, urine and feces were monitored 1-36 h. A UPLC-QTOF-MS based method was performed to identify the absorbed constituents and their metabolic products in rat biosamples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces); the ratio of peak area of major saponins to that of internal standard was calculated and plotted versus time to characterize the sustained levels of saponins in biosamples. Totally 10 saponin-related compounds were detected in rat plasma, 10 in rat urine and 18 in rat feces. The results indicated that formation of diosgenin by desugarization was the main pathway by which steroidal glycosides were metabolized. Other types of bio-transformation were found among glycosides and aglycones, such as ring cyclization through loss of 26-O-glucosyl, substitution of β-D-glucopyranosyl for

  14. Bioactive endophytic fungi isolated from Caesalpinia echinata Lam. (Brazilwood and identification of beauvericin as a trypanocidal metabolite from Fusarium sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Fraga Campos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to identify new sources of bioactive secondary metabolites, we isolated 82 endophytic fungi from stems and barks of the native Brazilian tree Caesalpinia echinata Lam. (Fabaceae. We tested their ethyl acetate extracts in several in vitro assays. The organic extracts from three isolates showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC 32-64 μg/mL]. One isolate inhibited the growth of Salmonella typhimurium (MIC 64 μg/mL and two isolates inhibited the growth of Klebsiella oxytoca (MIC 64 μg/mL, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis (MIC 64-128 μg/mL. Fourteen extracts at a concentration of 20 μg/mL showed antitumour activities against human breast cancer and human renal cancer cells, while two isolates showed anti-tumour activities against human melanoma cancer cells. Six extracts were able to reduce the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, indicating some degree of selective toxicity. Four isolates were able to inhibit Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis and one isolate inhibited Trypanosoma cruzi by at least 40% at 20 μg/mL. The trypanocidal extract obtained from Fusarium sp. [KF611679] culture was subjected to bioguided fractionation, which revealed beauvericin as the compound responsible for the observed toxicity of Fusarium sp. to T. cruzi. This depsipeptide showed a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.9 μg/mL (2.43 μM in a T. cruzi cellular culture assay.

  15. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  16. A novel two-component signaling system facilitates uropathogenic Escherichia coli's ability to exploit abundant host metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentong Cai

    Full Text Available Two-component signaling systems (TCSs are major mechanisms by which bacteria adapt to environmental conditions. It follows then that TCSs would play important roles in the adaptation of pathogenic bacteria to host environments. However, no pathogen-associated TCS has been identified in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Here, we identified a novel TCS, which we termed KguS/KguR (KguS: α-ketoglutarate utilization sensor; KguR: α-ketoglutarate utilization regulator in UPEC CFT073, a strain isolated from human pyelonephritis. kguS/kguR was strongly associated with UPEC but was found only rarely among other E. coli including commensal and intestinal pathogenic strains. An in vivo competition assay in a mouse UTI model showed that deletion of kguS/kguR in UPEC CFT073 resulted in a significant reduction in its colonization of the bladders and kidneys of mice, suggesting that KguS/KguR contributed to UPEC fitness in vivo. Comparative proteomics identified the target gene products of KguS/KguR, and sequence analysis showed that TCS KguS/KguR and its targeted-genes, c5032 to c5039, are encoded on a genomic island, which is not present in intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Expression of the target genes was induced by α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. These genes were further shown to be involved in utilization of α-KG as a sole carbon source under anaerobic conditions. KguS/KguR contributed to the regulation of the target genes with the direct regulation by KguR verified using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, oxygen deficiency positively modulated expression of kguS/kguR and its target genes. Taken altogether, this study describes the first UPEC-associated TCS that functions in controlling the utilization of α-ketoglutarate in vivo thereby facilitating UPEC adaptation to life inside the urinary tract.

  17. Combined use of immunoassay and two-dimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of metabolites from biotherapeutic pharmacokinetic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert E; Kinhikar, Arvind G; Shields, Michael J; Del Rosario, Joselyn; Preston, Ryan; Levin, Nancy; Ward, Gary H

    2010-11-02

    Peptides and monoclonal antibodies have both emerged as important therapeutic modalities, but each has challenges which limit their use. Non-recombinant chemical conjugation of peptides onto antibodies has the potential to minimize or eliminate altogether many of these limitations. Once such approach, pioneered by CovX has created the possibility for rapid stoichiometric fusion of pharmacophores to a single antibody platform. These molecules, called CovX-Bodies, maintain both the pharmacologic properties of a given peptide and the pharmacokinetic properties of a monoclonal antibody. The result is a new class of molecules wherein each component contributes desirable traits. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of immunoassay and two-dimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (2DLC/MS) in combination to investigate the antibody conjugates of Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and analogs for intact protein metabolite identification directly from mouse serum. The information gained from combining these approaches has helped guide and expedite the optimization of our drug product development efforts. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of liver protein targets modified by tienilic acid metabolites using a two-dimensional Western blot-mass spectrometry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methogo, Ruth Menque; Dansette, Patrick M.; Klarskov, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    A combined approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis-immuno-blotting and nanoliquid chromatography coupled on-line with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins modified by a reactive intermediate of tienilic acid (TA). Liver homogenates from rats exposed to TA were fractionated using ultra centrifugation; four fractions were obtained and subjected to 2D electrophoresis. Following transfer to PVDF membranes, modified proteins were visualized after India ink staining, using an anti-serum raised against TA and ECL detection. Immuno-reactive spots were localized on the PVDF membrane by superposition of the ECL image, protein spots of interest were excised, digested on the membrane with trypsin followed by nLC-MS/MS analysis and protein identification. A total of 15 proteins were identified as likely targets modified by a TA reactive metabolite. These include selenium binding protein 2, senescence marker protein SMP-30, adenosine kinase, Acy1 protein, adenosylhomocysteinase, capping protein (actin filament), protein disulfide isomerase, fumarylacetoacetase, arginase chain A, ketohexokinase, proteasome endopeptidase complex, triosephosphate isomerase, superoxide dismutase, dna-type molecular chaperone hsc73 and malate dehydrogenase.

  19. Organophosphorous pesticide metabolite (DEDTP) induces changes in the activation status of human lymphocytes by modulating the interleukin 2 receptor signal transduction pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel-Senties, M.S.; Barrera, I.; Ortega, A.; Vega, L.

    2010-01-01

    Diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP) is a metabolite formed by biotransformation of organophosphorous (OP) compounds that has a longer half-life than its parental compound. Here we evaluate the effects of DEDTP on human CD4+ T lymphocytes. In vitro exposure to DEDTP (1-50 μM) decreased [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation in resting cells and increased CD25 surface expression without altering cell viability. DEDTP treatment inhibited anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation-induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation determined by CFSE dilution. Decreased CD25 expression and intracellular IL-2 levels were correlated with this defect in cell proliferation. IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion were also reduced while IL-4 secretion was not altered. Increased phosphorylation of SOCS3 and dephosphorylation of STAT5 were induced by DEDTP after as little as 5 min of exposure. In addition, DEDTP induced phosphorylation of ERK, JNK and p38 and NFAT nuclear translocation. These results suggest that DEDTP can modulate phosphorylation of intracellular proteins such as SOCS3, which functions as a negative regulator of cytokine signalling, and that DEDTP exposure may thus cause T cells to fail to respond to further antigen challenges.

  20. Continuous degradation of a mixture of sulfonamides by Trametes versicolor and identification of metabolites from sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; García-Galán, M A Jesús; Blánquez, Paqui; Díaz-Cruz, M Silvia; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2012-04-30

    In this study, we assessed the degradation of the sulfonamides sulfapyridine (SPY) and sulfathiazole (STZ) by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Complete degradation was accomplished in fungal cultures at initial pollutant concentrations of approximately 10 mg L(-1), although a longer period of time was needed to completely remove STZ in comparison to SPY. When cytochrome P450 inhibitors were added to the fungal cultures, STZ degradation was partially suppressed, while no additional effect was observed for SPY. Experiments with purified laccase and laccase mediators caused the removal of greater than 75% of each antibiotic. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QqTOF-MS) analyses allowed the identification of a total of eight degradation intermediates of SPY in both the in vivo and the laccase experiments, being its desulfonated moiety the commonly detected product. For STZ, a total of five products were identified. A fluidized bed reactor with T. versicolor pellets degraded a mixture of sulfonamides (SPY, STZ and sulfamethazine, SMZ) by greater than 94% each at a hydraulic residence time of 72 h. Because wastewater contains many diverse pollutants, these results highlight the potential of T. versicolor as a bioremediation agent not only for the removal of antibiotics but also for the elimination of a wide range of contaminants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC/ESI-MS/MS Study for the Identification and Characterization of In Vivo Metabolites of Cisplatin in Rat Kidney Cancer Tissues: Online Hydrogen/Deuterium (H/D Exchange Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Bandu

    Full Text Available In vivo rat kidney tissue metabolites of an anticancer drug, cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [II] (CP which is used for the treatment of testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, esophageal, small cell lung, head and neck cancers, have been identified and characterized by using liquid chromatography positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS in combination with on line hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX experiments. To identify in vivo metabolites, kidney tissues were collected after intravenous administration of CP to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 3 per group. The tissue samples were homogenized and extracted using newly optimized metabolite extraction procedure which involves liquid extraction with phosphate buffer containing ethyl acetate and protein precipitation with mixed solvents of methanol-water-chloroform followed by solid-phase clean-up procedure on Oasis HLB 3cc cartridges and then subjected to LC/ESI-HRMS analysis. A total of thirty one unknown in vivo metabolites have been identified and the structures of metabolites were elucidated using LC-MS/MS experiments combined with accurate mass measurements. Online HDX experiments have been used to further support the structural characterization of metabolites. The results showed that CP undergoes a series of ligand exchange biotransformation reactions with water and other nucleophiles like thio groups of methionine, cysteine, acetylcysteine, glutathione and thioether. This is the first research approach focused on the structure elucidation of biotransformation products of CP in rats, and the identification of metabolites provides essential information for further pharmacological and clinical studies of CP, and may also be useful to develop various effective new anticancer agents.

  2. delta 9-THC metabolites in meconium: identification of 11-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC, and 11-nor-delta 9-THC-9-COOH as major metabolites of delta 9-THC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSohly, M A; Feng, S

    1998-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of meconium specimens screening positive for cannabinoids by the EMIT 20 Assay showed a low confirmation rate for 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). A study was designed to investigate the possible contribution of other delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolites, including glucuronides, to the overall response of the EIA. delta 9-THC-glucuronide was synthesized in order to develop the most efficient procedure for hydrolysis of glucuronides in meconium. Procedures were developed for the extraction and GC-MS analysis of delta 9-THC, 11-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 alpha- and 8 beta-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC, and THCCOOH, after enzymatic hydrolysis of meconium extracts. It is concluded that enzymatic hydrolysis of meconium extracts is necessary for efficient recovery of delta 9-THC metabolites; delta 9-THC and its 8-OH metabolite(s) are basically absent in meconium specimens; and 11-OH-delta 9-THC and 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC contribute significantly to the immunoassay response of meconium extracts. Analysis of several meconium specimens that screened positive for cannabinoids but failed to confirm for THCCOOH showed significant amounts of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC. Therefore, GC-MS confirmation of cannabinoids in meconium should include analysis for these two metabolites in addition to THCCOOH.

  3. Effective identification of bacterial type III secretion signals using joint element features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejun Wang

    Full Text Available Type III secretion system (T3SS plays important roles in bacteria and host cell interactions by specifically translocating type III effectors into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the bacterial type III effectors determine their specific secretion via type III secretion conduits. It is still unclear as to how the N-terminal sequences guide this specificity. In this work, the amino acid composition, secondary structure, and solvent accessibility in the N-termini of type III and non-type III secreted proteins were compared and contrasted. A high-efficacy mathematical model based on these joint features was developed to distinguish the type III proteins from the non-type III ones. The results indicate that secondary structure and solvent accessibility may make important contribution to the specific recognition of type III secretion signals. Analysis also showed that the joint feature of the N-terminal 6(th-10(th amino acids are especially important for guiding specific type III secretion. Furthermore, a genome-wide screening was performed to predict Salmonella type III secreted proteins, and 8 new candidates were experimentally validated. Interestingly, type III secretion signals were also predicted in gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. Experimental validation showed that two candidates from yeast can indeed be secreted through Salmonella type III secretion conduit. This research provides the first line of direct evidence that secondary structure and solvent accessibility contain important features for guiding specific type III secretion. The new software based on these joint features ensures a high accuracy (general cross-validation sensitivity of ∼96% at a specificity of ∼98% in silico identification of new type III secreted proteins, which may facilitate our understanding about the specificity of type III secretion and the evolution of type III secreted proteins.

  4. Immune regulation by microbiome metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H

    2018-03-22

    Commensal microbes and the host immune system have been co-evolved for mutual regulation. Microbes regulate the host immune system, in part, by producing metabolites. A mounting body of evidence indicates that diverse microbial metabolites profoundly regulate the immune system via host receptors and other target molecules. Immune cells express metabolite-specific receptors such as P2X 7 , GPR41, GPR43, GPR109A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor precursor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), TGR5 and other molecular targets. Microbial metabolites and their receptors form an extensive array of signals to respond to changes in nutrition, health and immunological status. As a consequence, microbial metabolite signals contribute to nutrient harvest from diet, and regulate host metabolism and the immune system. Importantly, microbial metabolites bidirectionally function to promote both tolerance and immunity to effectively fight infection without developing inflammatory diseases. In pathogenic conditions, adverse effects of microbial metabolites have been observed as well. Key immune-regulatory functions of the metabolites, generated from carbohydrates, proteins and bile acids, are reviewed in this article. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Metabolism is an important route of pentamidine elimination in the rat. Disposition of {sup 14}C-pentamidine and identification of metabolites in urine us liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronner, U.; Nordin, J.; Abdi, Y.A.; Gustafsson, L.L. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Karolinska Inst., Unit of Tropical Pharmacology, Div. of Clinical Pharmacology and Div. of Infectious Diseases, huddinge (Sweden); Ericsson, Oe.; Wikstroem, I. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy, Huddinge (Sweden); Hall, J.E. [Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dept. of Epidemiology, North Carolina (United States); Tidwell, R.R. [Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dept. of Pathology, North Carolina (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This study assesses the contribution of metabolism for the disposition of pentamidine in the rat. With the use of {sup 14}C-labelled compound, the excretion of radioactivity in urine and faeces has been studied in four rats during 44 days after a single intravenous injection of the drug. The urinary and faecal excretion of the radioactivity were of equal importance; 22{+-}2% (mean{+-}S.D.) and 25{+-}4% being detected in urine and faeces, respectively. The activity organs and tissues at 44 days after drug administration was also measured and amounted to 21{+-}5% of the administered dose. Using HPLC the proportion of metabolites in urine in relation to unchanged pentamidine increased with time after dose, being 76{+-}15% (mean{+-}S.D.) of the total excreted radioactivity on day 1 and 97{+-}1% on day 6. HPLC - tandem mass spectrometry was used for identification of metabolites in urine obtained from four rats given unlabelled pentamidine. Using synthetic reference compounds and the selective MS/MS mode four oxidized metabolites of pentamidine were identified either by direct injection into the system or by analyses of extracted urine. Thus, a substantial part of pentamidine is excreted as metabolites in urine. (au) 14 refs.

  6. Use of liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to study the degradation pathways of terbuthylazine (TER) by Typha latifolia in constructed wetlands: identification of a new TER metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikas, Evagelos; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Bazoti, Fotini N; Zalidis, Georgios; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony

    2012-01-30

    S-Triazines are used worldwide as herbicides for agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Although terbuthylazine (TER) is the second most frequently used S-triazine, there is limited information on its metabolism. For this reason, an analytical method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS) has been developed aiming at the identification of TER and its five major metabolites (desisopropyl-hydroxy-atrazine, desethyl-hydroxy-terbuthylazine, desisopropyl-atrazine, hydroxy-terbuthylazine and desethyl-terbuthylazine) in constructed wetland water samples. The separation of TER and its major metabolites was performed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C(8) column using a gradient elution of aqueous acetic acid 1% (solvent A) and acetonitrile (solvent B), followed by MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The data-depended analysis (DDA) scan approach has been employed and the main degradation pathways of both hydroxyl and chloro (dealkylated and alkylated) metabolites are elucidated through the tandem mass spectral (MS/MS) interpretation of triazine fragments under CID conditions. In addition, another major metabolite of TER, namely N2-tert-butyl-N4-ethyl-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, has been identified. This methodology can be further employed in biodegradation studies of TER, thus assisting the assessment of its environmental impact. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Identification of metabolites of Helicid in vivo using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Xinpeng; Liao, Man; Cheng, Xiaoye; Liang, Caijuan; Sun, Yupeng; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Lantong

    2018-04-18

    Helicid is an active natural aromatic phenolic glycoside ingredient originating from well-known traditional Chinese herb medicine and has the significant effects of sedative hypnosis, anti-inflammatory analgesia and antidepressant. In this study, we analyzed the potential metabolites of Helicid in rats by multiple mass defect filter (MMDF)and dynamic background subtraction (DBS)in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Moreover, we used a novel data processing method 'key product ions (KPIs)' to rapidly detect and identifymetabolites as an assistant tool. MetabolitePilot TM 2.0 software and PeakView TM 2.2 software were used for analyzing metabolites. Twenty metabolites of Helicid (including 15 phase I metabolites and 5 phase II metabolites) were detected by comparing with the blank samples, respectively. Thebiotransformationroute of Helicid was identified as demethylation, oxidation, dehydroxylation, hydrogenation, decarbonylation,glucuronide conjugation and methylation.This is the first study of simultaneously detecting and identifying Helicid metabolism in rats by employing UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS technology. This experiment not only proposed a method for rapidly detecting and identifying metabolites, but also provided useful information for further study of the pharmacology and mechanism of Helicid in vivo. Furthermore, it provided an effective method for the analysis of other aromatic phenolic glycosides metabolic components in vivo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Morphine metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    , morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are the major metabolites of morphine. The metabolism of morphine occurs not only in the liver, but may also take place in the brain and the kidneys. The glucuronides are mainly eliminated via bile and urine. Glucuronides as a rule...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...

  9. Identification of Loci Affecting Accumulation of Secondary Metabolites in Tomato Fruit of a Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum chmielewskii Introgression Line Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Ana-Rosa; Tikunov, Yury; Molthoff, Jos; Grandillo, Silvana; Viquez-Zamora, Marcela; de Vos, Ric; de Maagd, Ruud A; van Heusden, Sjaak; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2016-01-01

    Semi-polar metabolites such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, and alkaloids are very important health-related compounds in tomato. As a first step to identify genes responsible for the synthesis of semi-polar metabolites, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that influence the semi-polar metabolite content in red-ripe tomato fruit were identified, by characterizing fruits of a population of introgression lines (ILs) derived from a cross between the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum and the wild species Solanum chmielewskii . By analyzing fruits of plants grown at two different locations, we were able to identify robust metabolite QTLs for changes in phenylpropanoid glycoconjugation on chromosome 9, for accumulation of flavonol glycosides on chromosome 5, and for alkaloids on chromosome 7. To further characterize the QTLs we used a combination of genome sequencing, transcriptomics and targeted metabolomics to identify candidate key genes underlying the observed metabolic variation.

  10. Metabolites of the 1',2'-dimethylheptyl analogue of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol in the mouse and their identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D J; Brown, N K

    1990-10-01

    Metabolism of the 1,2-dimethylheptyl analogue of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8-DMHP) was studied in vitro using mouse hepatic microsomes and in vivo in mouse liver. Metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate, concentrated by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and examined by low-resolution mass spectrometry as trimethylsilyl (TMS), (2H9)TMS and methyl ester/TMS derivatives. Reduction of metabolites with lithium aluminium deuteride also provided structural information. The electron-impact-induced mass spectrum of the TMS derivative of DMHP differed from that of its unbranched side-chain analogues in that prominent ions were produced by fragmentation of the side-chain at the expense of the retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation that was prominent in the spectra of the latter compounds. This, however, was found to reduce the relative abundance of ions diagnostic of side-chain hydroxy substitution in the spectra of the metabolites. In vitro, the only significant metabolite was 11-hydroxy-delta-8-DMHP. This is in contrast with metabolism of the corresponding delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8-THC, n-C5-side-chain) where a number of other monohydroxy metabolites are produced. Fifteen metabolites were found in vivo, of which nine were identified. Mass spectral information was not sufficient to determine the position of one of the hydroxy groups in the other six metabolites. The major site of hydroxylation was at C-11 and the resulting hydroxy metabolite was oxidized to delta-8-DMHP-11-oic acid. In this respect metabolism paralleled that of delta-8-THC. Dihydroxylation of the double bond also occurred, presumably via the epoxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Identification of rotundic acid metabolites after oral administration to rats and comparison with the biotransformation by Syncephalastrum racemosum AS 3.264.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yang, Bao; Cao, Di; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Qing; Rong, Li; Zhou, Xinghong; Jin, Jing; Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2018-02-20

    The objective of this study was to identify the metabolites of rotundic acid after oral administration to rats and compare the similarities with its biotransformation by Syncephalastrum racemosum AS 3.264 using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry. A total of fourteen metabolites were determined based on the mass spectrometry and chromatographic behaviors, among which eleven (M1-M3, M7-M14) and six (M2, M4-M8) metabolites were identified in rats and S. racemosum, respectively. Three identical metabolites (M2, M7 and M8) were found in rats and S. racemosum, indicating that there were metabolic similarities. Moreover, to confirm the results of mass spectrometry, three (M2, M4 and M7) metabolites were obtained by the means of amplifying incubation and their structures were determined by various spectroscopic analyses, and M4 was proved to be a previously undescribed compound. This results showed that in vitro assisted preparation by microbial transformation is a feasible and effective method of obtaining metabolites which are in low amounts and difficult to be prepared in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of berberrubine metabolites in rats by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Qiao, Miao; Chai, Liwei; Cao, Shijie; Feng, Xinchi; Ding, Liqin; Qiu, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Berberrubine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from many medicinal plants, possesses diverse pharmacological activities, including glucose-lowering, lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor effects. This study aimed to investigate the metabolic profile of berberrubine in vivo. Therefore, a rapid and reliable method using the ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) and metabolynx™ software with mass defect filter (MDF) technique was developed. Plasma, bile, urine and feces samples were collected from rats after oral administration of berberrubine with a dose of 30.0mg/kg and analyzed to characterize the metabolites of berberrubine in vivo for the first time. A total of 57 metabolites were identified, including 54 metabolites in urine, 39 metabolites in plasma, 28 metabolites in bile and 18 metabolites in feces. The results indicated that demethylenation, reduction, hydroxylation, demethylation, glucuronidation, and sulfation were the major metabolic pathways of berberrubine in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolism of albendazole, ricobendazole and flubendazole in Haemonchus contortus adults: Sex differences, resistance-related differences and the identification of new metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Raisová Stuchlíková

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus (family Trichostrongylidae, Nematoda, a hematophagous gastrointestinal parasite found in small ruminants, has a great ability to develop resistance to anthelmintic drugs. We studied the biotransformation of the three benzimidazole anthelmintics: albendazole (ABZ, ricobendazole (albendazole S-oxide; RCB and flubendazole (FLU in females and males of H. contortus in both a susceptible ISE strain and resistant IRE strain. The ex vivo cultivation of living nematodes in culture medium with or without the anthelmintics was used. Ultrasensitive UHPLC/MS/MS analysis revealed 9, 7 and 12 metabolites of ABZ, RCB and FLU, respectively, with most of these metabolites now described in the present study for the first time in H. contortus. The structure of certain metabolites shows the presence of biotransformation reactions not previously reported in nematodes. There were significant qualitative and semi-quantitative differences in the metabolites formed by male and female worms. In most cases, females metabolized drugs more extensively than males. Adults of the IRE strain were able to form many more metabolites of all the drugs than adults of the ISE strain. Some metabolites were even found only in adults of the IRE strain. These findings suggest that increased drug metabolism may play a role in resistance to benzimidazole drugs in H. contortus. Keywords: Drug resistance, Drug metabolism, Anthelmintics, Benzimidazole, Nematode

  14. A MATLAB-based graphical user interface for the identification of muscular activations from surface electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Verdini, Federica; Burattini, Laura; Fioretti, Sandro; Di Nardo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a graphical user interface (GUI) built in MATLAB® environment is presented. This interactive tool has been developed for the analysis of superficial electromyography (sEMG) signals and in particular for the assessment of the muscle activation time intervals. After the signal import, the tool performs a first analysis in a totally user independent way, providing a reliable computation of the muscular activation sequences. Furthermore, the user has the opportunity to modify each parameter of the on/off identification algorithm implemented in the presented tool. The presence of an user-friendly GUI allows the immediate evaluation of the effects that the modification of every single parameter has on the activation intervals recognition, through the real-time updating and visualization of the muscular activation/deactivation sequences. The possibility to accept the initial signal analysis or to modify the on/off identification with respect to each considered signal, with a real-time visual feedback, makes this GUI-based tool a valuable instrument in clinical, research applications and also in an educational perspective.

  15. Prognostic Metabolite Biomarkers for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Discovered by Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sha; Balluff, Benjamin; Cleven, Arjen H. G.; Bovée, Judith V. M. G.; McDonnell, Liam A.

    2017-02-01

    Metabolites can be an important read-out of disease. The identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients is one of the main current research aspects. Mass spectrometry has become the technique of choice for metabolomics studies, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables their visualization in patient tissues. In this study, we used MSI to identify prognostic metabolite biomarkers in high grade sarcomas; 33 high grade sarcoma patients, comprising osteosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, myxofibrosarcoma, and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma were analyzed. Metabolite MSI data were obtained from sections of fresh frozen tissue specimens with matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization (MALDI) MSI in negative polarity using 9-aminoarcridine as matrix. Subsequent annotation of tumor regions by expert pathologists resulted in tumor-specific metabolite signatures, which were then tested for association with patient survival. Metabolite signals with significant clinical value were further validated and identified by high mass resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MSI. Three metabolite signals were found to correlate with overall survival ( m/z 180.9436 and 241.0118) and metastasis-free survival ( m/z 160.8417). FTICR-MSI identified m/z 241.0118 as inositol cyclic phosphate and m/z 160.8417 as carnitine.

  16. Identification of hepatic metabolites of two highly carcinogenic polycyclic aza-aromatic compounds, 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine and 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Duke, C C; Holder, G M

    1995-03-01

    The hepatic microsomal metabolites of the highly carcinogenic dimethylbenzacridines, 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine (7,9-DMBAC), and 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine (7,10-DMBAC) were obtained with preparations from 3-methylcholanthrene-pretreated rats. Metabolites were separated by reversed-phase HPLC and characterized using UV spectral data and chemical ionization-mass spectrometry after trimethylsilylation and GC. Comparisons with products formed in the presence of the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, 1,1,1-trichloropropane 2,3-oxide and with those formed from the three synthetic alcohol derivatives of each parent compound, aided the assignment of firm or tentative structures to 16 products from 7,9-DMBAC found in 22 reversed-phase chromatographic peaks, and for 17 products of 7,10-DMBAC found in 19 chromatographic peaks. The more abundant metabolites were derived from oxidation of the methyl groups. Other metabolites were dihydrodiols, epoxides, phenols and secondary metabolites. The 9-methyl group prevented dihydrodiol formation at the 8,9-position from 7,9-DMBAC, and for each carcinogen, the 3,4-dihydrodiol was formed. As well, 3,4-dihydrodiols of methyl oxidized compounds were found.

  17. Identification of acteoside and its major metabolites in rat urine by ultra-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meng; Xiong, Aizhen; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Qiming; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2013-12-01

    In this study, metabolites in the urine samples of rats orally administered with acteoside, a phenylethanoid glycoside compound, were detected and identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS) combined with an automated MS(E) technique. Up to 35 metabolites (19 metabolites of the parent drug and 16 metabolites of the degradation products) were observed, including processes of oxidization, glucuronidation, sulfation, and methyl conjugation. According to the metabolic pathways, acteoside mainly functioned as a prodrug and underwent hydrolysis before being absorbed into the blood. The degradation products, especially caffeic acid and hydroxytyrosol, were involved in further metabolism which was responsible for the low oral bioavailability but obvious pharmacological activities of acteoside. In summary, this work provided valuable information on acteoside metabolism through the rapid and reliable UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS technique, which could be widely used for the investigation of natural product metabolites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  19. In Vitro Transformation of Chlorinated Parabens by the Liver S9 Fraction: Kinetics, Metabolite Identification, and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Masanori; Wada, Takeshi; Nagashima, Satoshi; Makino, Masakazu; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the kinetics of in vitro transformation of a dichlorinated propyl paraben (2-propyl 3,5-dichloro-4-hydroxybenzoate; Cl2PP) by the rat liver S9 fraction and assessed the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activity of the metabolite products identified in HPLC and GC/MS analysis and by metabolite syntheses. The results indicated that the chlorination of Cl2PP reduced its degradation rate by approximately 40-fold. Two hydroxylated metabolite products showed AhR agonist activity of up to 39% of that of the parent Cl2PP when assessed in a yeast (YCM3) reporter gene assay. The determination of the metabolic properties of paraben bioaccumulation presented here provides further information on the value of risk assessments of chlorinated parabens as a means to ensure human health and environmental safety.

  20. Identification of Two Protein-Signaling States Delineating Transcriptionally Heterogeneous Human Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walderik W. Zomerman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The brain cancer medulloblastoma consists of different transcriptional subgroups. To characterize medulloblastoma at the phosphoprotein-signaling level, we performed high-throughput peptide phosphorylation profiling on a large cohort of SHH (Sonic Hedgehog, group 3, and group 4 medulloblastomas. We identified two major protein-signaling profiles. One profile was associated with rapid death post-recurrence and resembled MYC-like signaling for which MYC lesions are sufficient but not necessary. The second profile showed enrichment for DNA damage, as well as apoptotic and neuronal signaling. Integrative analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous transcriptional input converges on these protein-signaling profiles: all SHH and a subset of group 3 patients exhibited the MYC-like protein-signaling profile; the majority of the other group 3 subset and group 4 patients displayed the DNA damage/apoptotic/neuronal signaling profile. Functional analysis of enriched pathways highlighted cell-cycle progression and protein synthesis as therapeutic targets for MYC-like medulloblastoma. : Using peptide phosphorylation profiling, Zomerman et al. identify two medulloblastoma phosphoprotein-signaling profiles that have prognostic value and are potentially targetable. They find that these profiles extend across transcriptome-based subgroup borders. This suggests that diverse genetic information converges on common protein-signaling pathways and highlights protein-signaling as a unique information layer. Keywords: medulloblastoma, protein-signaling, protein synthesis, MYC, TP53, proteome, phosphoproteome

  1. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Jane E.; Loomis, Kent C.; Brudnoy, David M.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  2. Profiling and identification of (-)-epicatechin metabolites in rats using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhanpeng; Wang, Fei; Dai, Shengyun; Lu, Jianqiu; Wu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jiayu

    2017-08-01

    (-)-Epicatechin (EC), an optical antipode of (+)-catechin (C), possesses many potential significant health benefits. However, the in vivo metabolic pathway of EC has not been clarified yet. In this study, an efficient strategy based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer was developed to profile and characterize EC metabolites in rat urine, faeces, plasma, and various tissues. Meanwhile, post-acquisition data-mining methods including high-resolution extracted ion chromatogram (HREIC), multiple mass defect filters (MMDFs), and diagnostic product ions (DPIs) were utilized to screen and identify EC metabolites from HR-ESI-MS 1 to ESI-MS n stage. Finally, a total of 67 metabolites (including parent drug) were tentatively identified based on standard substances, chromatographic retention times, accurate mass measurement, and relevant drug biotransformation knowledge. The results demonstrated that EC underwent multiple in vivo metabolic reactions including methylation, dehydration, hydrogenation, glucosylation, sulfonation, glucuronidation, ring-cleavage, and their composite reactions. Among them, methylation, dehydration, glucosylation, and their composite reactions were observed only occurring on EC when compared with C. Meanwhile, the distribution of these detected metabolites in various tissues including heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and brain were respectively studied. The results demonstrated that liver and kidney were the most important organs for EC and its metabolites elimination. In conclusion, the newly discovered EC metabolites significantly expanded the understanding on its pharmacological effects and built the foundation for further toxicity and safety studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Characterisation of the appearance of radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma from the 5-HT1A receptor radioligand, [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 - explanation of high signal contrast in PET and an aid to biomathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Safiye; Lundkvist, Camilla; Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; McCarron, Julie A.; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Ginovart, Nathalie; Luthra, Sajinder K.; Gunn, Roger N.; Bench, Christopher J.; Sargent, Peter A.; Grasby, Paul M.

    1998-01-01

    N-(2-(4-(2-Methoxy-phenyl)-1-piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), labelled in its amido carbonyl group with 11 C (t 1/2 = 20.4 min), is a promising radioligand for the study of brain 5-HT 1A receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, in PET experiments in six cynomolgus monkeys and seven healthy male volunteers, [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 was taken up avidly by brain. Radioactivity was retained in regions rich in 5-HT 1A receptors, such as occipital cortex, temporal cortex and raphe nuclei, but cleared rapidly from cerebellum, a region almost devoid of 5-HT 1A receptors. [Carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 provides about 3- and 10-fold higher signal contrast (receptor-specific to nonspecific binding) than [O-methyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 in receptor-rich areas of monkey and human brain, respectively. To elucidate the effect of label position on radioligand behaviour and to aid in the future biomathematical interpretation of the kinetics of regional cerebral radioactivity uptake in terms of receptor-binding parameters, HPLC was used to measure [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and its radioactive metabolites in plasma at various times after intravenous injection. Radioactivity cleared rapidly from monkey and human plasma. Parent radioligand represented 19% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma at 47 min and 8% of the radioactivity in human plasma at 40 min. [Carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 was below detectable limits in monkey plasma and at most a very minor radioactive metabolite in human plasma. [ 11 C]Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was identified as a significant radioactive metabolite. In human plasma this maximally represented 21% of the radioactivity at 10 min after radioligand injection. All other major radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma were even more polar. No-carrier-added [carbonyl- 11 C]cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was prepared in the laboratory and after intravenous administration into cynomolgus monkey was

  4. Identification of the impact direction using the beat signals detected by piezoceramic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Linsheng; Li, Xu; Chen, Dongdong; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2017-08-01

    The beat phenomenon may be observed in a free vibration test with piezoceramic sensors. In contrast to exponential decay vibration, the beat signal is characterized as decreasing or increasing periodically. The beat phenomenon in the piezoelectric sensors is caused by the combination of signals of an oblique impact coming from two orthogonal directions of structures. An impact direction determination method based on the beat signal is proposed in this paper. The proposed method was verified through an impact test on a steel column specimen. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively identify the impact direction by using the envelope of the beat signal of the piezoelectric sensor.

  5. Identification and quantification of in vivo metabolites of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone in human urine associated with producing reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Miki; Kawai, Mio; Toyama, Takashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Chuesaard, Thanyarat; Tang, Ning; Kameda, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Toriba, Akira

    2014-01-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon quinones (PAHQs) are components in airborne particulate matter (PM) and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a redox cycling process. 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ) is a PAHQ found in diesel exhaust particulates and PM. When inhaled, it produces much more ROS than other PAHQs. We hypothesized that urinary metabolites of 9,10-PQ could serve as biomarkers of PAHQ exposure. Here, we describe methods for pretreating urine samples and analyzing 9,10-PQ metabolites by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In urine from rats intraperitoneally injected with 9,10-PQ, the monoglucuronide of 9,10-dihydroxyphenanthrene (9,10-PQHG) was found to be a major metabolite of 9,10-PQ. 9,10-PQHG was also identified in the urine of a nonoccupationally exposed human by its retention time and MS/MS spectra. Furthermore, the urine contained hardly any free (unmetabolized) 9,10-PQ, but treating it with hydrolytic enzymes released 9,10-PQ from conjugated metabolites such as 9,10-PQHG. The concentrations of 9,10-PQHG in urine samples from nonoccupationally exposed subjects who lived in a suburban area were 2.04-19.08 nmol/mol creatinine. This study is the first to demonstrate the presence of 9,10-PQHG in human urine. Determination of urinary 9,10-PQHG should be useful for determining 9,10-PQ exposure.

  6. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Takagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ktakagi@affrc.go.jp [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Kataoka, Ryota [Department of Environmental Science, University of Yamanashi, 41-4-37 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Kotake, Masaaki [Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Kiyota, Hiromasa [Graduate School of Environmental & Life Science, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kenichi [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Sakakibara, Futa [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JSPS), 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Okada, Sanae [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. -- Highlights: •A novel endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium was isolated and named strain S1-1. •Strain S1-1 degraded endosulfan sulfate into a novel metabolite endosulfan diol monosulfate. •Endosulfan diol monosulfate showed higher polarity than other known metabolites of endosulfan. •We proposed the plausible metabolic pathway of endosulfan in terms of organic chemistry.

  7. Metabolism of Genipin in Rat and Identification of Metabolites by Using Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography/Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo and in vitro metabolism of genipin was systematically investigated in the present study. Urine, plasma, feces, and bile were collected from rats after oral administration of genipin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight. A rapid and sensitive method using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q/TOF MS was developed for analysis of metabolic profile of genipin in rat biological samples (urine, plasma, feces, and bile. A total of ten metabolites were detected and identified by comparing their fragmentation patterns with that of genipin using MetaboLynx software tools. On the basis of the chromatographic peak area, the sulfated and glucuronidated conjugates of genipin were identified as major metabolites. And the existence of major metabolites G1 and G2 was confirmed by the in vitro enzymatic study further. Then, metabolite G1 was isolated from rat bile by semipreparative HPLC. Its structure was unambiguously identified as genipin-1-o-glucuronic acid by comparison of its UV, IR, ESI-MS, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR spectra with conference. In general, genipin was a very active compound that would transform immediately, and the parent form of genipin could not be observed in rats biological samples. The biotransformation pathways of genipin involved demethylated, ring-opened, cysteine-conjugated, hydroformylated, glucuronidated, and sulfated transformations.

  8. Physicochemical Characteristics Identification and Secondary Metabolite Analysis of Solid Herbal Waste as Source of Feed Rich Fiber and Supplement for Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Nindyo Kisworo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the potency, physicochemical characteristics, and analyzed the secondary metabolites content of solid herbal waste (SWH as a substitute source of feed rich fibre and feed supplements in ruminants. The first study includes an analysis of production potential, physical analysis, and chemical composition analysis of SWH. The second study was an analysis of secondary metabolites content of SWH. The results showed that SWH volume reached 6-8 m3/day or 4020-5360 kg/day, the chemical composition of herbal solid waste was similar to king grass with high lignin content (17.53%. SWH containing total phenols, flavonoids, tannins, saponins , alkaloids and essential oils which generally have antimicrobial activity. According to the potential availability, chemical composition and secondary metabolites content of SWH, it can be used as an alternative for substitute of feed rich fiber or feed supplements with attention to the content of secondary metabolites that can affect the process of fermentation and digestibility in the rumen. Further in vitro and in vivo research ore needed to determine the effect of SWH on rumen fermentation parameters and its application in the ration in ruminant livestock.

  9. The impact of compression of speech signal, background noise and acoustic disturbances on the effectiveness of speaker identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, K.; Dobrowolski, A. P.

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents the architecture and the results of optimization of selected elements of the Automatic Speaker Recognition (ASR) system that uses Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) in the classification process. Optimization was performed on the process of selection of individual characteristics using the genetic algorithm and the parameters of Gaussian distributions used to describe individual voices. The system that was developed was tested in order to evaluate the impact of different compression methods used, among others, in landline, mobile, and VoIP telephony systems, on effectiveness of the speaker identification. Also, the results were presented of effectiveness of speaker identification at specific levels of noise with the speech signal and occurrence of other disturbances that could appear during phone calls, which made it possible to specify the spectrum of applications of the presented ASR system.

  10. Energy measurement and fragment identification using digital signals from partially depleted Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.A.; Valdre, S. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Vient, E. [ENSICAEN et Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, Caen-Cedex (France); Ademard, G.; Borderie, B.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay cedex (France); Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Gruyer, D. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, B.P. 5027, Caen cedex (France); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Piantelli, S. [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [INFN-LNL Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Duenas, J.A. [FCCEE Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Huelva (Spain); Kordyasz, A. [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Kozik, T.; Twarog, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics IFJ-PAN, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Morelli, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ordine, A. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Parlog, M. [ENSICAEN et Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, Caen-Cedex (France); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D. [INFN-LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Collaboration: FAZIA Collaboration

    2014-05-15

    A study of identification properties of a Si-Si ΔE-E telescope exploiting an underdepleted residual-energy detector has been performed. Five different bias voltages have been used, one corresponding to full depletion, the others associated with a depleted layer ranging from 90% to 60% of the detector thickness. Fragment identification has been performed using either the ΔE-E technique or the Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA). Both detectors are reverse mounted: particles enter from the low field side, to enhance the PSA performance. The achieved charge and mass resolution has been quantitatively expressed using a Figure of Merit (FoM). Charge collection efficiency has been evaluated and the possibility of energy calibration corrections has been considered. We find that the ΔE-E performance is not affected by incomplete depletion even when only 60% of the wafer is depleted. Isotopic separation capability improves at lower bias voltages with respect to full depletion, though charge identification thresholds are higher than at full depletion. Good isotopic identification via PSA has been obtained from a partially depleted detector, whose doping uniformity is not good enough for isotopic identification at full depletion. (orig.)

  11. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl(-) efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca(2+) from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner.

  12. Comparative Proteome Bioinformatics: Identification of Phosphotyrosine Signaling Proteins in the Unicellular Protozoan Ciliate Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Steen; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Joachimiak, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahymena, bioinformatics, cilia, evolution, signaling, TtPTK1, PTK, Grb2, SH-PTP 2, Plcy, Src, PTP, PI3K, SH2, SH3, PH......Tetrahymena, bioinformatics, cilia, evolution, signaling, TtPTK1, PTK, Grb2, SH-PTP 2, Plcy, Src, PTP, PI3K, SH2, SH3, PH...

  13. Automated identification system for seizure EEG signals using tunable-Q wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ravi Shankar Reddy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, EEG signals of different classes are analysed in tunable-Q wavelet transform (TQWT framework. The TQWT decomposes the EEG signals into subbands and arrange them into decreasing order of frequency. The nonlinearity of the EEG signals is assessed by computing the centered correntropy (CCE from the obtained subbands, which is further used as a feature for classifying the different categories of EEG signals. In this work, EEG signals are categorised in two different classification problems. First category is seizure free and seizure (NF-S classes, and the other one is the normal, seizure free and seizure (ZO-NF-S classes. Features obtained from the EEG signals of these classes are fed to the input of three different classifiers namely, random forest classifier (RF, multilayer perceptron (MLP classifier, and logistic regression (LR classifier. For NF-S classes, we achieved 98.3% classification accuracy with RF classifier for signal length of 1000 samples. The obtained accuracy of classification is 98.2% for ZO-NF-S classes using MLP classifier when features are extracted from signal length of 1000 samples.

  14. Identification of a novel Gnao-mediated alternate olfactory signaling pathway in murine OSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eScholz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl- efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII, the recruitment of Ca2+ from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner.

  15. Identification and characterization of novel defence and PCD signalling components in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Wenjun

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens by activating a defence signalling network. The Arabidopsis double mutant syp121 syp122 is dwarfed and mimics a response as if it was attacked by pathogens. Using EMS as mutagen on syp121 syp122, a suppressor screen was performed. More than 200 partially...... for topology studies of membrane proteins, and SSD6 was found to be an ER membrane-anchored cytosolic protein. The position of SSD6 in the defence signalling network was studied using syp121 syp122 ssd6 ssdy quadruple mutants, which suggested that SSD6 is not involved in any known signalling pathway. All...... pathogens to test the involvement in defence. The position of PRLIP2 in the defence signalling network was studied like in the case of SSD6, and the result suggested that PRLIP2 is neither involved in any known signalling pathway....

  16. A Readout IC Using Two-Step Fastest Signal Identification for Compact Data Acquisition of PET Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Jin; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2016-10-20

    A readout integrated circuit (ROIC) using two-step fastest signal identification (FSI) is proposed to reduce the number of input channels of a data acquisition (DAQ) block with a high-channel reduction ratio. The two-step FSI enables the proposed ROIC to filter out useless input signals that arise from scattering and electrical noise without using complex and bulky circuits. In addition, an asynchronous fastest signal identifier and a self-trimmed comparator are proposed to identify the fastest signal without using a high-frequency clock and to reduce misidentification, respectively. The channel reduction ratio of the proposed ROIC is 16:1 and can be extended to 16 × N :1 using N ROICs. To verify the performance of the two-step FSI, the proposed ROIC was implemented into a gamma photon detector module using a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode with a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate array. The measured minimum detectable time is 1 ns. The difference of the measured energy and timing resolution between with and without the two-step FSI are 0.8% and 0.2 ns, respectively, which are negligibly small. These measurement results show that the proposed ROIC using the two-step FSI reduces the number of input channels of the DAQ block without sacrificing the performance of the positron emission tomography (PET) systems.

  17. Application of stacked convolutional and long short-term memory network for accurate identification of CAD ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jen Hong; Hagiwara, Yuki; Pang, Winnie; Lim, Ivy; Oh, Shu Lih; Adam, Muhammad; Tan, Ru San; Chen, Ming; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2018-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of heart disease globally. This is because there is no symptom exhibited in its initial phase until the disease progresses to an advanced stage. The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely accessible diagnostic tool to diagnose CAD that captures abnormal activity of the heart. However, it lacks diagnostic sensitivity. One reason is that, it is very challenging to visually interpret the ECG signal due to its very low amplitude. Hence, identification of abnormal ECG morphology by clinicians may be prone to error. Thus, it is essential to develop a software which can provide an automated and objective interpretation of the ECG signal. This paper proposes the implementation of long short-term memory (LSTM) network with convolutional neural network (CNN) to automatically diagnose CAD ECG signals accurately. Our proposed deep learning model is able to detect CAD ECG signals with a diagnostic accuracy of 99.85% with blindfold strategy. The developed prototype model is ready to be tested with an appropriate huge database before the clinical usage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Kinetic Study of the Main Guaco Metabolites Using Syrup Formulation and the Identification of an Alternative Route of Coumarin Metabolism in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetto, João Cleverson; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; de Francisco, Thais Martins Guimarães; Cerqueira, Letícia Bonâncio; Campos, Francinete Ramos; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    For decades guaco species have been empirically used for the treatment of respiratory diseases. However, studies have shown that the toxic and therapeutic effects of the main guaco metabolites are dose-dependent, and none clinical study was done to evaluate the behavior of these substances in humans. In this work, a pilot study measuring the kinetic profile of the main guaco metabolites was performed leading to the knowledge of an alternative route of coumarin metabolism in humans. Initial screenings demonstrated that the administration of 60 mL of guaco syrup (single dose) did not provide sufficient levels of coumarin (COU), 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HCOU), o-coumaric acid (OCA) and kaurenoic acid (KAU). The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by orally administering 60 mL of guaco syrup spiked with 1500 mg of COU. The kinetic study demonstrated that the plasmatic levels of 7-HCOU (considered the main metabolite of COU) were 10 times lower than the levels of COU, and the kinetic profile of 7-HCOU suggests sequential metabolism in the liver with low access of 7-HCOU to the systemic circulation. The study also demonstrated that OCA is one of the main bioavailable metabolites of COU. Therefore, the hydrolysis of the lactone ring forming a carboxylated compound is one of the possible routes of COU metabolism in humans. The half-lives of COU, 7-HCOU and OCA were approximately 4.0, 1.0 and 3.0 h, respectively and there was evidence that the recommended dosage of guaco syrup did not provide sufficient levels of COU, 7-HCOU or OCA to obtain a bronchodilation effect. Clinical studies are necessary to prove the efficacy and safety of products based on guaco. PMID:25757073

  19. Quantitative analysis of volatile metabolites released in vitro by bacteria of the genus Stenotrophomonas for identification of breath biomarkers of respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shestivska, Violetta; Dryahina, Kseniya; Nunvář, J.; Sovová, Kristýna; Elhottová, Dana; Nemec, A.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2015), č. článku 027104. ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14534S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-15771P Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : volatile metabolites * stenotrophomonas * cystic fibrosis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2015

  20. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  1. Classification Identification of Acoustic Emission Signals from Underground Metal Mine Rock by ICIMF Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawback that fuzzy classifier was sensitive to noises and outliers, Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm was developed, in which bilateral Gaussian membership function parameters were set as constraint conditions and the indexes of fuzzy classification effectiveness and number of correct samples of fuzzy classification as the subgoal of fitness function. Moreover, Iris database was used for simulation experiment, classification, and recognition of acoustic emission signals and interference signals from stope wall rock of underground metal mines. The results showed that Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm could effectively improve the prediction accuracy of classification of data sets with noises and outliers and the classification accuracy of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines was 90.00%. It was obvious that the improved chaos immune Mamdani fuzzy (ICIMF classifier was useful for accurate diagnosis of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines.

  2. Hydrolysis is the dominating in vivo metabolism pathway for arctigenin: identification of novel metabolites of arctigenin by LC/MS/MS after oral administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Zhang, Yufeng; Wo, Siukwan; Zuo, Zhong

    2013-04-01

    The phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan arctigenin, a key component found in Arctium lappa, or burdock, has been reported with a variety of therapeutic effects including anticancer, anti-inflammation, and antivirus effects. Using LC/MS/MS, three novel metabolites of arctigenin, namely, arctigenic acid, arctigenin-4-O'-glucuronide, and 4-O-demethylarctigenin were identified after oral administration of arctigenin in rats for the first time. Another potential metabolite of arctigenin, arctigenin-4'-O-sulfate, was identified in vitro but not in vivo. Structure of arctigenic acid, the major metabolite of arctigenin, was confirmed by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR. Rapid hydrolysis in plasma was identified as the major metabolic pathway of arctigenin after its oral administration, with Vmax, Km, and Clint in rat plasma determined to be 2.21 ± 0.12 nmol/min/mg, 89.12 ± 9.44 µM, and 24.74 µL/min/mg, respectively. Paraoxonase 1 was further confirmed to be the enzyme responsible for arctigenin hydrolysis, with Vmax, Km, and Clint determined to be 55.39 ± 1.49 nmol/min/mg, 300.3 ± 10.86 µM, and 184.45 µL/min/mg, respectively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Identification of Plasma and Urinary Metabolites and Catabolites Derived from Orange Juice (Poly)phenols: Analysis by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Caro, Gema; Ludwig, Iziar A; Polyviou, Thelma; Malkova, Dalia; García, Ada; Moreno-Rojas, José Manuel; Crozier, Alan

    2016-07-20

    Orange juice is a rich source of (poly)phenols, in particular, the flavanones hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside and naringenin-7-O-rutinoside. Following the acute consumption of 500 mL of orange juice containing 398 μmol of (poly)phenols by 12 volunteers, 0-24 h plasma and urine samples were analyzed by targeted high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry in order to identify flavanone metabolites and phenolic acid and aromatic catabolites. A total of 19 flavanone metabolites-comprising di-O-glucuronide, O-glucuronide, O-glucuronyl-sulfate, and sulfate derivatives of hesperetin, naringenin, and eriodictyol-and 65 microbial-derived phenolic catabolites, such as phenylpropanoid, phenylpropionic, phenylacetic, benzoic, and hydroxycarboxylic acids and benzenetriol and benzoylglycine derivatives, including free phenolics and phase II sulfate, glucuronide, and methyl metabolites, were identified or partially identified in plasma and/or urine samples. The data obtained provide a detailed evaluation of the fate of orange juice (poly)phenols as they pass through the gastrointestinal tract and are absorbed into the circulatory system prior to renal excretion. Potential pathways for these conversions are proposed.

  4. Rapid Screening and Identification of Daidzein Metabolites in Rats Based on UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Data-Mining Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Daidzein, the main bioactive soy isoflavone in Nature, has been found to possess many biological functions. It has been investigated in particular as a phytoestrogen owing to the similarity of its structure with that of the human hormone estrogen. Due to the lack of comprehensive studies on daidzein metabolism, further research is still required to clarify its in vivo metabolic fate and intermediate processes. In this study, an efficient strategy was established using UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry to profile the metabolism of daidzein in rats. Meanwhile, multiple data-mining methods including high-resolution extracted ion chromatogram (HREIC, multiple mass defect filtering (MMDF, neutral loss fragment (NLF, and diagnostic product ion (DPI were utilized to investigate daidzein metabolites from the HR-ESI-MS1 to ESI-MSn stage in both positive and negative ion modes. Consequently, 59 metabolites, including prototype compounds, were positively or tentatively elucidated based on reference standards, accurate mass measurements, mass fragmentation behaviors, chromatographic retention times, and corresponding calculated ClogP values. As a result, dehydration, hydrogenation, methylation, dimethylation, glucuronidation, glucosylation, sulfonation, ring-cleavage, and their composite reactions were ascertained to interpret its in vivo biotransformation. Overall, our results not only revealed the potential pharmacodynamics forms of daidzein, but also aid in establishing a practical strategy for rapid screening and identifying metabolites of natural compounds.

  5. A Phytase-Based Reporter System for Identification of Functional Secretion Signals in Bifidobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Osswald

    Full Text Available Health-promoting effects have been attributed to a number of Bifidobacterium sp. strains. These effects as well as the ability to colonise the host depend on secreted proteins. Moreover, rational design of protein secretion systems bears the potential for the generation of novel probiotic bifidobacteria with improved health-promoting or therapeutic properties. To date, there is only very limited data on secretion signals of bifidobacteria available. Using in silico analysis, we demonstrate that all bifidobacteria encode the major components of Sec-dependent secretion machineries but only B. longum strains harbour Tat protein translocation systems. A reporter plasmid for secretion signals in bifidobacteria was established by fusing the coding sequence of the signal peptide of a sialidase of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 to the phytase gene appA of E. coli. The recombinant strain showed increased phytase activity in spent culture supernatants and reduced phytase levels in crude extracts compared to the control indicating efficient phytase secretion. The reporter plasmid was used to screen seven predicted signal peptides in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum E18. The tested signal peptides differed substantially in their efficacy to mediate protein secretion in different host strains. An efficient signal peptide was used for expression and secretion of a therapeutically relevant protein in B. bifidum S17. Expression of a secreted cytosine deaminase led to a 100-fold reduced sensitivity of B. bifidum S17 to 5-fluorocytosine compared to the non-secreted cytosine deaminase suggesting efficient conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to the cytotoxic cancer drug 5-fluorouracil by cytosine deaminase occurred outside the bacterial cell. Selection of appropriate signal peptides for defined protein secretion might improve therapeutic efficacy as well as probiotic properties of bifidobacteria.

  6. Global identification of genes regulated by estrogen signaling and demethylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnik, Milica; Zhao, Chunyan; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estrogen signaling and demethylation can both control gene expression in breast cancers. ► Cross-talk between these mechanisms is investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ► 137 genes are influenced by both 17β-estradiol and demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ► A set of genes is identified as targets of both estrogen signaling and demethylation. ► There is no direct molecular interplay of mediators of estrogen and epigenetic signaling. -- Abstract: Estrogen signaling and epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are involved in regulation of gene expression in breast cancers. Here we investigated a potential regulatory cross-talk between these two pathways by identifying their common target genes and exploring underlying molecular mechanisms in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the expression of approximately 140 genes was influenced by both 17β-estradiol (E2) and a demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggests that these genes are involved in intracellular signaling cascades, regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Based on previously reported association with breast cancer, estrogen signaling and/or DNA methylation, CpG island prediction and GO analysis, we selected six genes (BTG3, FHL2, PMAIP1, BTG2, CDKN1A and TGFB2) for further analysis. Tamoxifen reverses the effect of E2 on the expression of all selected genes, suggesting that they are direct targets of estrogen receptor. Furthermore, DAC treatment reactivates the expression of all selected genes in a dose-dependent manner. Promoter CpG island methylation status analysis revealed that only the promoters of BTG3 and FHL2 genes are methylated, with DAC inducing demethylation, suggesting DNA methylation directs repression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. In a further analysis of the potential interplay between estrogen signaling and DNA methylation, E2 treatment

  7. Experimental Lamb mode identification in a plate containing a hole using dual signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grondel, Sébastien; Assaad, Jamal; Youbi, Faysal El; Moulin, Emmanuel; Leyla, Najib Abou

    2008-01-01

    The identification of Lamb mode amplitude variation as a function of the damage evolution is still the most difficult step in the process of damage monitoring using embedded Lamb wave-based systems. The aim of this paper is to propose a simple system based on the generation of two different frequencies in order to better identify Lamb mode amplitude and to avoid false data interpretation in plates containing a hole of variable diameter. This identification is based on a simple relation between the short-time Fourier transform and the two-dimensional Fourier transform. Experimentally, a 3 mm thick aluminium plate is used and the two frequencies have been chosen equal to 400 kHz and 600 kHz in order to generate the two first fundamental Lamb waves

  8. Auto-identification of engine fault acoustic signal through inverse trigonometric instantaneous frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayong Ning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic signals of internal combustion engines contain valuable information about the condition of engines. These signals can be used to detect incipient faults in engines. However, these signals are complex and composed of a faulty component and other noise signals of background. As such, engine conditions’ characteristics are difficult to extract through wavelet transformation and acoustic emission techniques. In this study, an instantaneous frequency analysis method was proposed. A new time–frequency model was constructed using a fixed amplitude and a variable cycle sine function to fit adjacent points gradually from a time domain signal. The instantaneous frequency corresponds to single value at any time. This study also introduced instantaneous frequency calculation on the basis of an inverse trigonometric fitting method at any time. The mean value of all local maximum values was then considered to identify the engine condition automatically. Results revealed that the mean of local maximum values under faulty conditions differs from the normal mean. An experiment case was also conducted to illustrate the availability of the proposed method. Using the proposed time–frequency model, we can identify engine condition and determine abnormal sound produced by faulty engines.

  9. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-03-18

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets.

  10. Protein social behavior makes a stronger signal for partner identification than surface geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells are interactive living systems where proteins movements, interactions and regulation are substantially free from centralized management. How protein physico‐chemical and geometrical properties determine who interact with whom remains far from fully understood. We show that characterizing how a protein behaves with many potential interactors in a complete cross‐docking study leads to a sharp identification of its cellular/true/native partner(s). We define a sociability index, or S‐index, reflecting whether a protein likes or not to pair with other proteins. Formally, we propose a suitable normalization function that accounts for protein sociability and we combine it with a simple interface‐based (ranking) score to discriminate partners from non‐interactors. We show that sociability is an important factor and that the normalization permits to reach a much higher discriminative power than shape complementarity docking scores. The social effect is also observed with more sophisticated docking algorithms. Docking conformations are evaluated using experimental binding sites. These latter approximate in the best possible way binding sites predictions, which have reached high accuracy in recent years. This makes our analysis helpful for a global understanding of partner identification and for suggesting discriminating strategies. These results contradict previous findings claiming the partner identification problem being solvable solely with geometrical docking. Proteins 2016; 85:137–154. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27802579

  11. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  12. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1–17 and 18–36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  13. Identification of selected in vitro generated phase-I metabolites of the steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagojda, Andreas; Kuehne, Dirk; Krug, Oliver; Thomas, Andreas; Wigger, Tina; Karst, Uwe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Research into developing anabolic agents for various therapeutic purposes has been pursued for decades. As the clinical utility of anabolic-androgenic steroids has been found to be limited because of their lack of tissue selectivity and associated off-target effects, alternative drug entities have been designed and are commonly referred to as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). While most of these SARMs are of nonsteroidal structure, the drug candidate MK-0773 comprises a 4-aza-steroidal nucleus. Besides the intended therapeutic use, SARMs have been found to be illicitly distributed and misused as doping agents in sport, necessitating frequently updated doping control analytical assays. As steroidal compounds reportedly undergo considerable metabolic transformations, the phase-I metabolism of MK-0773 was simulated using human liver microsomal (HLM) preparations and electrochemical conversion. Subsequently, major metabolic products were identified and characterized employing liquid chromatography-high-resolution/high- accuracy tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. MK-0773 produced numerous phase-I metabolites under the chosen in vitro incubation reactions, mostly resulting from mono- and bisoxygenation of the steroid. HLM yielded at least 10 monooxygenated species, while electrochemistry-based experiments resulted predominantly in three monohydroxylated metabolites. Elemental composition data and product ion mass spectra were generated for these analytes, ESI/APCI measurements corroborated the formation of at least two N-oxygenated metabolites, and NMR data obtained from electrochemistry-derived products supported structures suggested for three monohydroxylated compounds. Hereby, the hydroxylation of the A-ring located N- bound methyl group was found to be of particular intensity. In the absence of controlled elimination studies, the

  14. Identification of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecule of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Cuiping; Lyu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Shuwen; Liu, Lu; Lu, Jing; Ma, Changlu; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-12-14

    Many bacteria in nature use quorum sensing (QS) to regulate gene expression. The quorum sensing system plays critical roles in the adaptation of bacteria to the surrounding environment. Previous studies have shown that during high-density fermentation, the autolysis of lactic acid bacteria was regulated by the QS system, and the two-component system (TCS, LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110) is involved in the autolysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. However, the QS signal molecule, which regulates this pathway, has not been identified. In this study, we compared the genome of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 with the locus of seven lactobacillus QS systems; the position of the QS signal molecule of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 was predicted by bioinformatics tool. Its function was identified by in vitro experiments. Construction of TCS mutant by gene knockout of LBUL_RS00115 confirmed that the signal molecule regulates the density of the flora by the TCS (LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110). This study indicated that quorum quenching and inhibition based on the signal molecule might serve as an approach to reduce the rate of autolysis of LAB and increase the number of live bacteria in fermentation.

  15. Toward quantifying metrics for rail-system resilience : Identification and analysis of performance weak resilience signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regt, A. de; Siegel, A.W.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to enhance tangibility of the resilience engineering concept by facilitating understanding and operationalization of weak resilience signals (WRSs) in the rail sector. Within complex socio-technical systems, accidents can be seen as unwanted outcomes emerging from uncontrolled

  16. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyositis (PM is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  17. The Profiling and Identification of the Absorbed Constituents and Metabolites of Guizhi Decoction in Rat Plasma and Urine by Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography Combined with Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Guizhi decoction (GZD, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM prescription consisting of Ramulus Cinnamomi, Radix Paeoniae Alba, Radix Glycyrrhizae, Fructus Jujubae and Rhizoma Zingiberis Recens, is usually used for the treatment of common colds, influenza, and other pyretic conditions in the clinic. However, the absorbed ingredients and metabolic compounds of GZD have not been reported. In this paper, a method incorporating rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS was used to identify ingredients after oral administration of GZD. Identification of the primary components in GZD, drug-containing serum and urine samples was carried out in order to investigate the assimilation and metabolites of the decoction in vivo. By comparing the total ion chromatograms (TICs of GZD, a total of 71 constituents were detected or characterized. By comparing TICs of blank and dosed rat plasma, a total of 15 constituents were detected and identified as prototypes according to their retention time (tR and MS, MS/MS data. Based on this, neutral loss scans of 80 and 176 Da in samples of rat plasma and urine helped us to identify most of the metabolites. Results showed that the predominant metabolic pathways of (epi catechin and gallic acid were sulfation, methylation, glucuronidation and dehydroxylation; the major metabolic pathways of flavone were hydrolysis, sulfation and glucuronidation. Furthermore, degradation, oxidation and ring fission were found to often occur in the metabolism process of GZD in vivo.

  18. Combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data reveals extensive differences between black and brown nearly-isogenic soybean (Glycine max) seed coats enabling the identification of pigment isogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovinich, Nik; Saleem, Ammar; Arnason, John T; Miki, Brian

    2011-07-29

    The R locus controls the color of pigmented soybean (Glycine max) seeds. However information about its control over seed coat biochemistry and gene expressions remains limited. The seed coats of nearly-isogenic black (iRT) and brown (irT) soybean (Glycine max) were known to differ by the presence or absence of anthocyanins, respectively, with genes for only a single enzyme (anthocyanidin synthase) found to be differentially expressed between isolines. We recently identified and characterized a UDP-glycose:flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase (UGT78K1) from the seed coat of black (iRT) soybean with the aim to engineer seed coat color by suppression of an anthocyanin-specific gene. However, it remained to be investigated whether UGT78K1 was overexpressed with anthocyanin biosynthesis in the black (iRT) seed coat compared to the nearly-isogenic brown (irT) tissue.In this study, we performed a combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data to elucidate the control of the R locus over seed coat biochemistry and to identify pigment biosynthesis genes. Two differentially expressed late-stage anthocyanin biosynthesis isogenes were further characterized, as they may serve as useful targets for the manipulation of soybean grain color while minimizing the potential for unintended effects on the plant system. Metabolite composition differences were found to not be limited to anthocyanins, with specific proanthocyanidins, isoflavones, and phenylpropanoids present exclusively in the black (iRT) or the brown (irT) seed coat. A global analysis of gene expressions identified UGT78K1 and 19 other anthocyanin, (iso)flavonoid, and phenylpropanoid isogenes to be differentially expressed between isolines. A combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression data enabled the assignment of putative functions to biosynthesis and transport isogenes. The recombinant enzymes of two genes were validated to catalyze late-stage steps in anthocyanin biosynthesis in vitro and expression

  19. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhern, Vernon; Hairston, W David; Robbins, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG) data as an additional illustration.

  20. Contribution to automatic speech recognition. Analysis of the direct acoustical signal. Recognition of isolated words and phoneme identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupeyrat, Benoit

    1981-01-01

    This report deals with the acoustical-phonetic step of the automatic recognition of the speech. The parameters used are the extrema of the acoustical signal (coded in amplitude and duration). This coding method, the properties of which are described, is simple and well adapted to a digital processing. The quality and the intelligibility of the coded signal after reconstruction are particularly satisfactory. An experiment for the automatic recognition of isolated words has been carried using this coding system. We have designed a filtering algorithm operating on the parameters of the coding. Thus the characteristics of the formants can be derived under certain conditions which are discussed. Using these characteristics the identification of a large part of the phonemes for a given speaker was achieved. Carrying on the studies has required the development of a particular methodology of real time processing which allowed immediate evaluation of the improvement of the programs. Such processing on temporal coding of the acoustical signal is extremely powerful and could represent, used in connection with other methods an efficient tool for the automatic processing of the speech.(author) [fr

  1. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Lawhern

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG data as an additional illustration.

  2. Identification of the signals for glucose-induced insulin secretion in INS1 (832/13) β-cells using metformin-induced metabolic deceleration as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Julien; Al-Mass, Anfal; Nolan, Christopher J; Corkey, Barbara E; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Prentki, Marc

    2017-11-24

    Metabolic deceleration in pancreatic β-cells is associated with inhibition of glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), but only in the presence of intermediate/submaximal glucose concentrations. Here, we used acute metformin treatment as a tool to induce metabolic deceleration in INS1 (832/13) β-cells, with the goal of identifying key pathways and metabolites involved in GIIS. Metabolites and pathways previously implicated as signals for GIIS were measured in the cells at 2-25 mm glucose, with or without 5 mm metformin. We defined three criteria to identify candidate signals: 1) glucose-responsiveness, 2) sensitivity to metformin-induced inhibition of the glucose effect at intermediate glucose concentrations, and 3) alleviation of metformin inhibition by elevated glucose concentrations. Despite the lack of recovery from metformin-induced impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism (glucose oxidation, O 2 consumption, and ATP production), insulin secretion was almost completely restored at elevated glucose concentrations. Meeting the criteria for candidates involved in promoting GIIS were the following metabolic indicators and metabolites: cytosolic NAD + /NADH ratio (inferred from the dihydroxyacetone phosphate:glycerol-3-phosphate ratio), mitochondrial membrane potential, ADP, Ca 2+ , 1-monoacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, malonyl-CoA, and HMG-CoA. On the contrary, most of the purine and nicotinamide nucleotides, acetoacetyl-CoA, H 2 O 2 , reduced glutathione, and 2-monoacylglycerol were not glucose-responsive. Overall these results underscore the significance of mitochondrial energy metabolism-independent signals in GIIS regulation; in particular, the candidate lipid signaling molecules 1-monoacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and malonyl-CoA; the predominance of K ATP /Ca 2+ signaling control by low ADP·Mg 2+ rather than by high ATP levels; and a role for a more oxidized state (NAD + /NADH) in the cytosol during GIIS that favors high glycolysis rates. © 2017 by

  3. Identification of G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway proteins in marine diatoms using comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Jesse A; Parker, Micaela S; Kodner, Robin B; Wallace, James C; Armbrust, E Virginia; Faustman, Elaine M

    2013-07-24

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway plays an essential role in signal transmission and response to external stimuli in mammalian cells. Protein components of this pathway have been characterized in plants and simpler eukaryotes such as yeast, but their presence and role in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes have not been determined. We use a comparative genomics approach using whole genome sequences and gene expression libraries of four diatoms (Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Fragilariopsis cylindrus) to search for evidence of GPCR signaling pathway proteins that share sequence conservation to known GPCR pathway proteins. The majority of the core components of GPCR signaling were well conserved in all four diatoms, with protein sequence similarity to GPCRs, human G protein α- and β-subunits and downstream effectors. There was evidence for the Gγ-subunit and thus a full heterotrimeric G protein only in T. pseudonana. Phylogenetic analysis of putative diatom GPCRs indicated similarity but deep divergence to the class C GPCRs, with branches basal to the GABAB receptor subfamily. The extracellular and intracellular regions of these putative diatom GPCR sequences exhibited large variation in sequence length, and seven of these sequences contained the necessary ligand binding domain for class C GPCR activation. Transcriptional data indicated that a number of the putative GPCR sequences are expressed in diatoms under various stress conditions in culture, and that many of the GPCR-activated signaling proteins, including the G protein, are also expressed. The presence of sequences in all four diatoms that code for the proteins required for a functional mammalian GPCR pathway highlights the highly conserved nature of this pathway and suggests a complex signaling machinery related to environmental perception and response in these unicellular organisms. The lack of evidence for some GPCR pathway

  4. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine metabolite...

  5. Identification of ractopamine glucuronides and determination of bioactive ractopamine residues and its metabolites in food animal urine by ELISA, LC-MS/MS and GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Fei; Zhu, Yue-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Ractopamine glucuronides have been identified in cattle urine sampled by LC-MS/MS. An ELISA method, which was capable of specifically determining (1R, 3R)-ractopamine stereoisomer and its glucuronide metabolites, had more than 100% recovery with an acceptable coefficient of variation in the inter- and intra-assay variation tests for RR-ractopamine. The concentration levels of parent ractopamine and ractopamine glucuronide metabolites as the main components of total ractopamine in cattle and sheep urine showed similar depletion trends, in which the concentration curves increased and reached a climax during the feeding period, and then dropped quickly when entering the withdrawal period. Data from the three methods had very good pair-wise correlations. In the cattle urine samples, the correlation coefficient (R(2)) for parent ractopamine between the ELISA and the LC-MS/MS or GC-MS results were 0.93 or 0.92; R(2) values for parent ractopamine and total ractopamine data measured by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS were 0.9651 and 0.9677, respectively. All R(2) values for data gained from sheep urine samples were >0.95. The study indicated that the close levels of RR-ractopamine stereoisomer in cattle and sheep urine samples may imply the presence of a similar depletion pattern in other livestock, and thus would facilitate an accurate detection and management of ractopamine usage in food safety.

  6. Identification of Two Sulfated Cholesterol Metabolites Found in the Urine of a Patient with Niemann-Pick Disease Type C as Novel Candidate Diagnostic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Masamitsu; Omura, Kaoru; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Iida, Takashi; Saigusa, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Mano, Nariyasu

    2016-01-01

    In the urine of a Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patient, we have identified three characteristic intense peaks that have not been observed in the urine of a 3β-hydroxysteroid- Δ 5 -C 27 -steroid dehydrogenase deficiency patient or a healthy infant and adult. Based on accurate masses of the protonated molecules, we focused on two of them as candidate NPC diagnostic markers. Two synthesized authentic preparations agreed with the two compounds found in NPC patient urine in regard to both chromatographic behavior and accurate masses of the deprotonated molecules. Moreover, the isotopic patterns of the deprotonated molecules, twin peaks unique to the sulfur-containing compounds appearing in their second isotope positions, and accurate masses of product ions observed at m / z 97 also agreed between the target compounds and authentic preparations. We identified the two compounds as the sulfated cholesterol metabolites as 3β-sulfooxy-7β-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oic acid and 3β-sulfooxy-7-oxo-5-cholen-24-oic acid. These two compounds represent more promising candidate diagnostic markers for NPC diagnosis than three other candidates that are multiple conjugates of cholesterol metabolites, 3β-sulfooxy-7β- N -acetylglucosaminyl-5-cholen-24-oic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates, although we have reported an analytical method for determining the urinary levels of these compounds using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, because of their lack of N -acetylglucosamine conjugation.

  7. CYP450 phenotyping and metabolite identification of quinine by accurate mass UPLC-MS analysis: a possible metabolic link to blackwater fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcsisin, Sean R; Jin, Xiannu; Bettger, Theresa; McCulley, Nicholas; Sousa, Jason C; Shanks, G Dennis; Tekwani, Babu L; Sahu, Rajnish; Reichard, Gregory A; Sciotti, Richard J; Melendez, Victor; Pybus, Brandon S

    2013-06-21

    The naturally occurring alkaloid drug, quinine is commonly used for the treatment of severe malaria. Despite centuries of use, its metabolism is still not fully understood, and may play a role in the haemolytic disorders associated with the drug. Incubations of quinine with CYPs 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were conducted, and the metabolites were characterized by accurate mass UPLC-MS(E) analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation was also measured in human erythrocytes incubated in the presence of quinine with and without microsomes. The metabolites 3-hydroxyquinine, 2'-oxoquininone, and O-desmethylquinine were observed after incubation with CYPs 3A4 (3-hydroxyquinine and 2'-oxoquininone) and 2D6 (O-desmethylquinine). In addition, multiple hydroxylations were observed both on the quinoline core and the quinuclidine ring system. Of the five primary abundance CYPs tested, 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 2C19 all demonstrated activity toward quinine, while 1A2 did not. Further, quinine produced robust dose-dependent oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in the presence of microsomes. Taken in context, these data suggest a CYP-mediated link between quinine metabolism and the poorly understood haemolytic condition known as blackwater fever, often associated with quinine ingestion.

  8. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Ryota; Kotake, Masaaki; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Futa; Okada, Sanae

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolite Profiling of Diverse Rice Germplasm and Identification of Conserved Metabolic Markers of Rice Roots in Response to Long-Term Mild Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Myung Hee; Bang, Eunjung; Kwon, Taek Yun; Kim, Yuran; Kim, Eun Hee; Cho, Kyungwon; Park, Woong June; Kim, Beom-Gi; Yoon, In Sun

    2015-09-11

    The sensitivity of rice to salt stress greatly depends on growth stages, organ types and cultivars. Especially, the roots of young rice seedlings are highly salt-sensitive organs that limit plant growth, even under mild soil salinity conditions. In an attempt to identify metabolic markers of rice roots responding to salt stress, metabolite profiling was performed by ¹H-NMR spectroscopy in 38 rice genotypes that varied in biomass accumulation under long-term mild salinity condition. Multivariate statistical analysis showed separation of the control and salt-treated rice roots and rice genotypes with differential growth potential. By quantitative analyses of ¹H-NMR data, five conserved salt-responsive metabolic markers of rice roots were identified. Sucrose, allantoin and glutamate accumulated by salt stress, whereas the levels of glutamine and alanine decreased. A positive correlation of metabolite changes with growth potential and salt tolerance of rice genotypes was observed for allantoin and glutamine. Adjustment of nitrogen metabolism in rice roots is likely to be closely related to maintain the growth potential and increase the stress tolerance of rice.

  10. Oral Administration of the Japanese Traditional Medicine Keishibukuryogan-ka-yokuinin Decreases Reactive Oxygen Metabolites in Rat Plasma: Identification of Chemical Constituents Contributing to Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Matsubara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient detoxification and/or overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS induce cellular and tissue damage, and generated reactive oxygen metabolites become exacerbating factors of dermatitis. Keishibukuryogan-ka-yokuinin (KBGY is a traditional Japanese medicine prescribed to treat dermatitis such as acne vulgaris. Our aim was to verify the antioxidant properties of KBGY, and identify its active constituents by blood pharmacokinetic techniques. Chemical constituents were quantified in extracts of KBGY, crude components, and the plasma of rats treated with a single oral administration of KBGY. Twenty-three KBGY compounds were detected in plasma, including gallic acid, prunasin, paeoniflorin, and azelaic acid, which have been reported to be effective for inflammation. KBGY decreased level of the diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs in plasma. ROS-scavenging and lipid hydroperoxide (LPO generation assays revealed that gallic acid, 3-O-methylgallic acid, (+-catechin, and lariciresinol possess strong antioxidant activities. Gallic acid was active at a similar concentration to the maximum plasma concentration, therefore, our findings indicate that gallic acid is an important active constituent contributing to the antioxidant effects of KBGY. KBGY and its active constituents may improve redox imbalances induced by oxidative stress as an optional treatment for skin diseases.

  11. Metabolite Profiling of Diverse Rice Germplasm and Identification of Conserved Metabolic Markers of Rice Roots in Response to Long-Term Mild Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Hee Nam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of rice to salt stress greatly depends on growth stages, organ types and cultivars. Especially, the roots of young rice seedlings are highly salt-sensitive organs that limit plant growth, even under mild soil salinity conditions. In an attempt to identify metabolic markers of rice roots responding to salt stress, metabolite profiling was performed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy in 38 rice genotypes that varied in biomass accumulation under long-term mild salinity condition. Multivariate statistical analysis showed separation of the control and salt-treated rice roots and rice genotypes with differential growth potential. By quantitative analyses of 1H-NMR data, five conserved salt-responsive metabolic markers of rice roots were identified. Sucrose, allantoin and glutamate accumulated by salt stress, whereas the levels of glutamine and alanine decreased. A positive correlation of metabolite changes with growth potential and salt tolerance of rice genotypes was observed for allantoin and glutamine. Adjustment of nitrogen metabolism in rice roots is likely to be closely related to maintain the growth potential and increase the stress tolerance of rice.

  12. Rationalization and prediction of in vivo metabolite exposures: The role of metabolite kinetics, clearance predictions and in vitro parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.; Fujioka, Yasushi; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Due to growing concerns over toxic or active metabolites, significant efforts have been focused on qualitative identification of potential in vivo metabolites from in vitro data. However, limited tools are available to quantitatively predict their human exposures. Areas covered in this review Theory of clearance predictions and metabolite kinetics is reviewed together with supporting experimental data. In vitro and in vivo data of known circulating metabolites and their parent drugs was collected and the predictions of in vivo exposures of the metabolites were evaluated. What the reader will gain The theory and data reviewed will be useful in early identification of human metabolites that will circulate at significant levels in vivo and help in designing in vivo studies that focus on characterization of metabolites. It will also assist in rationalization of metabolite-to-parent ratios used as markers of specific enzyme activity. Take home message The relative importance of a metabolite in comparison to the parent compound as well as other metabolites in vivo can only be predicted using the metabolites in vitro formation and elimination clearances, and the in vivo disposition of a metabolite can only be rationalized when the elimination pathways of that metabolite are known. PMID:20557268

  13. Identification of the sorting signal motif within pro-opiomelanocortin for the regulated secretory pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cool, D R; Fenger, M; Snell, C R

    1995-01-01

    amino acid residues (Asp10-Leu11-Glu14-Leu1). Thus the sorting signal for POMC to the regulated secretory pathway appears to be encoded by a specific conformational motif comprised of a 13-amino acid amphipathic loop structure stabilized by a disulfide bridge, located at the NH2 terminus of the molecule.......The NH2-terminal region of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is highly conserved across species, having two disulfide bridges that cause the formation of an amphipathic hairpin loop structure between the 2nd and 3rd cysteine residues (Cys8 to Cys20). The role that the NH2-terminal region of pro......-opiomelanocortin plays in acting as a molecular sorting signal for the regulated secretory pathway was investigated by using site-directed mutagenesis either to disrupt one or more of the disulfide bridges or to delete the amphipathic loop entirely. When POMC was expressed in Neuro-2a cells, ACTH immunoreactive material...

  14. Radar target identification by natural resonances: Evaluation of signal processing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarakos, Gregory A.

    1991-09-01

    When a radar pulse impinges upon a target, the resultant scattering process can be solved as a linear time-invariant (LTI) system problem. The system has a transfer function with poles and zeros. Previous work has shown that the poles are independent on the target's structure and geometry. This thesis evaluates the resonance estimation performance of two signal processing techniques: the Kumaresan-Tufts algorithm and the Cadzow-Solomon algorithm. Improvements are made to the Cadzow-Solomon algorithm. Both algorithms are programmed using MATLAB. Test data used to evaluate these algorithms includes synthetic and integral equation generated signals, with and without additive noise, in addition to new experimental scattering data from a thin wire, aluminum spheres, and scale model aircraft.

  15. First stage identification of syntactic elements in an extra-terrestrial signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John

    2011-02-01

    By investigating the generic attributes of a representative set of terrestrial languages at varying levels of abstraction, it is our endeavour to try and isolate elements of the signal universe, which are computationally tractable for its detection and structural decipherment. Ultimately, our aim is to contribute in some way to the understanding of what 'languageness' actually is. This paper describes algorithms and software developed to characterise and detect generic intelligent language-like features in an input signal, using natural language learning techniques: looking for characteristic statistical "language-signatures" in test corpora. As a first step towards such species-independent language-detection, we present a suite of programs to analyse digital representations of a range of data, and use the results to extrapolate whether or not there are language-like structures which distinguish this data from other sources, such as music, images, and white noise.

  16. High constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor--identification of a potent inverse agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Cygankiewicz, Adam; Jensen, Tine Halkjaer

    2003-01-01

    Ghrelin is a GH-releasing peptide that also has an important role as an orexigenic hormone-stimulating food intake. By measuring inositol phosphate turnover or by using a reporter assay for transcriptional activity controlled by cAMP-responsive elements, the ghrelin receptor showed strong, ligand......-independent signaling in transfected COS-7 or human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Ghrelin and a number of the known nonpeptide GH secretagogues acted as agonists stimulating inositol phosphate turnover further. In contrast, the low potency ghrelin antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-substance P was surprisingly...... found to be a high potency (EC50 = 5.2 nm) full inverse agonist as it decreased the constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor down to that observed in untransfected cells. The homologous motilin receptor functioned as a negative control as it did not display any sign of constitutive activity...

  17. Identification of DreI as an antiviral factor regulated by RLR signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs had been demonstrated to prime interferon (IFN response against viral infection via the conserved RLR signaling in fish, and a novel fish-specific gene, the grass carp reovirus (GCRV-induced gene 2 (Gig2, had been suggested to play important role in host antiviral response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we cloned and characterized zebrafish Gig2 homolog (named Danio rerio Gig2-I, DreI, and revealed its antiviral role and expressional regulation signaling pathway. RT-PCR, Western blot and promoter activity assay indicate that DreI can be induced by poly I:C, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV and recombinant IFN (rIFN, showing that DreI is a typical ISG. Using the pivotal signaling molecules of RLR pathway, including RIG-I, MDA5 and IRF3 from crucian carp, it is found that DreI expression is regulated by RLR cascade and IRF3 plays an important role in this regulation. Furthermore, promoter mutation assay confirms that the IFN-stimulated regulatory elements (ISRE in the 5' flanking region of DreI is essential for its induction. Finally, overexpression of DreI leads to establish a strong antiviral state against SVCV and Rana grylio virus (RGV infection in EPC (Epithelioma papulosum cyprinid cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that DreI is an antiviral protein, which is regulated by RLR signaling pathway.

  18. Identification of T cell-signaling pathways that stimulate latent HIV in primary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David G.; Arlen, Philip A.; Gao, Lianying; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2003-01-01

    Eradication of HIV infection depends on the elimination of a small, but stable population of latently infected T cells. After the discontinuation of therapy, activation of latent virus can rekindle infection. To purge this reservoir, it is necessary to define cellular signaling pathways that lead to activation of latent HIV. We used the SCID-hu (Thy/Liv) mouse model of HIV latency to analyze a broad array of T cell-signaling pathways and show in primary, quiescent cells that viral induction depends on the activation of two primary intracellular signaling pathways, protein kinase C or nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT). In contrast, inhibition or activation of other important T cell stimulatory pathways (such as mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium flux, or histone deacetylation) do not significantly induce virus expression. We found that the activation of NF-κB is critical to viral reactivation; however, all pathways that stimulate NF-κBdonot reactivate latent virus. Our studies further show that inhibition of NF-κB does not prevent activation of HIV by NF-AT, indicating that these pathways can function independently to activate the HIV LTR. Thus, we define several molecular pathways that trigger HIV reactivation from latency and provide evidence that latent HIV infection is maintained by the functional lack of particular transcription factors in quiescent cells. PMID:14569007

  19. Identification of Spurious Signals from Permeable Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonard V.; Boyd, David D., Jr.; Nark, Douglas M.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    2017-01-01

    Integral forms of the permeable surface formulation of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) equation often require an input in the form of a near field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solution to predict noise in the near or far field from various types of geometries. The FW-H equation involves three source terms; two surface terms (monopole and dipole) and a volume term (quadrupole). Many solutions to the FW-H equation, such as several of Farassat's formulations, neglect the quadrupole term. Neglecting the quadrupole term in permeable surface formulations leads to inaccuracies called spurious signals. This paper explores the concept of spurious signals, explains how they are generated by specifying the acoustic and hydrodynamic surface properties individually, and provides methods to determine their presence, regardless of whether a correction algorithm is employed. A potential approach based on the equivalent sources method (ESM) and the sensitivity of Formulation 1A (Formulation S1A) is also discussed for the removal of spurious signals.

  20. Magnetic identification of climatic signals in turbiditic sediments of the Galician Bank, NW Iberian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed-Falcon, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Galician Bank, on the NW Iberian margin, receives a limited supply of local continental sediments due to the existence of the Galician Interior basin, which traps most of the local detrital sediments discharged in the area, potentially allowing the preservation of signals of global or regional significance. High resolution magnetic analyses of a suite of gravity cores recovered from the flanks of the Galician bank indicate that these sediments are composed of three main sources; local turbiditic sequences, which comprise most of the sedimentary record, hemipelagic sediments dominated by biogenic carbonates, and ice-rafted debris with magnetic characteristics compatible with Heinrich events. Combination of the magnetic properties with geochemical data confirms the preservation of a climatic signal carried by detrital sediments in the hemipelagic facies. The transport time of these sediments, as determined by the departure from secular equilibrium of the 234U/238U ratio caused by α-recoil ejection 234U confirms a remote origin for the detrital particles in these hemipelagites, whereas shorter transport time in the turbidites is consistent with a local origin. These results confirm the utility of magnetic properties, in combination with geochemical analyses as a rapid and sensitive tool to identify climatic signals in turbiditic sediments.

  1. Novel signal-dependent filter bank method for identification of multiple basal ganglia nuclei in Parkinsonian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Morales, R. D.; Orozco-Gutierrez, A. A.; Castellanos-Dominguez, G.

    2011-06-01

    Microelectrode recordings are a valuable tool for assisting localization targets during deep brain stimulation procedures in Parkinson's disease neurosurgery. Attempts to automate and standardize this process have been limited by variability in patient neurophysiology and strong dynamics of microelectrode recordings. In this paper, a methodology for the identification of basal ganglia nuclei is presented that is based on a signal-dependent filter bank method using microelectrode recordings. The method is a customized realization of the discrete wavelet transform via the lifting scheme that is optimally tuned by genetic algorithms. Using this method, unique mother wavelet functions that exhibit an adaptable spectrum to the microelectrode recording dynamic are generated. Additionally, by extracting morphological features from the space-transformed microelectrode recording, it is possible to integrate them into three-dimensional (3D) feature spaces with maximum class separability. Finally, high discriminant feature spaces are fed into basic classifiers to recognize up to four basal nuclei. Comparison with several existing wavelets highlights the characteristics of new mother wavelets. Additionally, classification results show that identification of addressed nuclei in the basal ganglia can be performed with 95% confidence.

  2. CAMS prototype extension: Integration of data acquisition, signal validation, tracking simulator, predictive simulator, state identification, and probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, Paolo; Iguchi, Yukihiro; Meyer, Geir; Soerensen, Aimar; Van Dyck, Claude

    1996-04-01

    CAMS (Computerized Accident Management Support) is a system that will provide assistance to the staff in the control room, in the technical support centre, and in a national safety centre. These three groups of users do not need the same type of support. Support is offered in identification of the plant state, in assessment of the future development of the accident, and in planning of accident mitigation strategies. Last year the predictive part of the system was tested at a safety exercise arranged by the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate, and found to be a useful tool, with potential for further development. Now, new methods are added in signal validation, state identification, tracking simulation, predictive simulation, risk monitoring, and man-machine interface design. A prototype will be demonstrated at Loen in May 1996. This prototype is still under development. The purpose of this prototype is to test those methods in a simulated environment to verify that the developed functions, using different techniques, can work together producing the desired result in an efficient way. The plan is to test these techniques at power plants. During the CAMS design, a considerable effort has been given to maintain the generality of the CAMS concept; although the referenced process has been so far a BWR nuclear plant, the use of this structure and design can be applied to other processes, including non-nuclear processes. The research programme is carried out in close cooperation with member organizations (author)

  3. Identification of a functional, CRM-1-dependent nuclear export signal in hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified.We show here that the aa(109-133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1-173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication.Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  4. Identification of the amino acid residues essential for proteolytic activity in an archaeal signal peptide peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2006-04-14

    Signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are enzymes involved in the initial degradation of signal peptides after they are released from the precursor proteins by signal peptidases. In contrast to the eukaryotic enzymes that are aspartate peptidases, the catalytic mechanisms of prokaryotic SPPs had not been known. In this study on the SPP from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (SppA(Tk)), we have identified amino acid residues that are essential for the peptidase activity of the enzyme. DeltaN54SppA(Tk), a truncated protein without the N-terminal 54 residues and putative transmembrane domain, exhibits high peptidase activity, and was used as the wild-type protein. Sixteen residues, highly conserved among archaeal SPP homologue sequences, were selected and replaced by alanine residues. The mutations S162A and K214A were found to abolish peptidase activity of the protein, whereas all other mutant proteins displayed activity to various extents. The results indicated the function of Ser(162) as the nucleophilic serine and that of Lys(214) as the general base, comprising a Ser/Lys catalytic dyad in SppA(Tk). Kinetic analyses indicated that Ser(184), His(191) Lys(209), Asp(215), and Arg(221) supported peptidase activity. Intriguingly, a large number of mutations led to an increase in activity levels of the enzyme. In particular, mutations in Ser(128) and Tyr(165) not only increased activity levels but also broadened the substrate specificity of SppA(Tk), suggesting that these residues may be present to prevent the enzyme from cleaving unintended peptide/protein substrates in the cell. A detailed alignment of prokaryotic SPP sequences strongly suggested that the majority of archaeal enzymes, along with the bacterial enzyme from Bacillus subtilis, adopt the same catalytic mechanism for peptide hydrolysis.

  5. Logistic regression analysis for the identification of the metastasis-associated signaling pathways of osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun; Hao, Yuedong; Liu, Gang; Hu, Xiaohui; Shang, Houlai; Wu, Pengfei; Zhao, Zexue; Liu, Weidong

    2018-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common histological type of primary bone cancer. The present study was designed to identify the key genes and signaling pathways involved in the metastasis of OS. Microarray data of GSE39055 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 19 OS biopsy specimens before metastasis (control group) and 18 OS biopsy specimens after metastasis (case group). After the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Analysis package, hierarchical clustering analysis and unsupervised clustering analysis were performed separately, using orange software and the self-organization map method. Based upon the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tool and Cytoscape software, enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis were conducted, respectively. After function deviation scores were calculated for the significantly enriched terms, hierarchical clustering analysis was performed using Cluster 3.0 software. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis was used to identify the terms that were significantly different. Those terms that were significantly different were validated using other independent datasets. There were 840 DEGs in the case group. There were various interactions in the PPI network [including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1), transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1), TGFB1-platelet-derived growth factor subunit B (PDGFB) and PDGFB-platelet‑derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRB)]. Regulation of cell migration, nucleotide excision repair, the Wnt signaling pathway and cell migration were identified as the terms that were significantly different. ICAM1, PDGFB, PDGFRB and TGFB1 were identified to be enriched in cell migration and regulation of cell migration. Nucleotide excision repair and the Wnt signaling pathway were the metastasis-associated pathways of OS. In addition, ICAM1, PDGFB, PDGFRB

  6. Proteomic Identification of DNA-PK Involvement within the RET Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle J Burdine

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET proto-oncogene leads to the development of MEN2A medullary thyroid cancer (MTC. The relatively clear genotype/phenotype relationship seen with RET mutations and the development of MEN2A is unusual in the fact that a single gene activity can drive the progression towards metastatic disease. Despite knowing the oncogene responsible for MEN2A, MTC, like most tumors of neural crest origin, remains largely resistant to chemotherapy. Constitutive activation of RET in a SK-N-MC cell line model reduces cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In an attempt to identify components of the machinery responsible for the observed RET induced chemoresistance, we performed a proteomic screen of histones and associated proteins in cells with a constitutively active RET signaling pathway. The proteomic approach identified DNA-PKcs, a DNA damage response protein, as a target of the RET signaling pathway. Active DNA-PKcs, which is phosphorylated at site serine 2056 and localized to chromatin, was elevated within our model. Treatment with the RET inhibitor RPI-1 significantly reduced s2056 phosphorylation in RET cells as well as in a human medullary thyroid cancer cell line. Additionally, inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity diminished the chemoresistance observed in both cell lines. Importantly, we show that activated DNA-PKcs is elevated in medullary thyroid tumor samples and that expression correlates with expression of RET in thyroid tumors. These results highlight one mechanism by which RET signaling likely primes cells for rapid response to DNA damage and suggests DNA-PKcs as an additional target in MTC.

  7. Systems-level identification of PKA-dependent signaling in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Kiyoshi; Jung, Hyun Jun; Yang, Chin-Rang; Claxton, J'Neka; Sandoval, Pablo; Burg, Maurice B; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Knepper, Mark A

    2017-10-17

    G protein stimulatory α-subunit (G αs )-coupled heptahelical receptors regulate cell processes largely through activation of protein kinase A (PKA). To identify signaling processes downstream of PKA, we deleted both PKA catalytic subunits using CRISPR-Cas9, followed by a "multiomic" analysis in mouse kidney epithelial cells expressing the G αs -coupled V2 vasopressin receptor. RNA-seq (sequencing)-based transcriptomics and SILAC (stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture)-based quantitative proteomics revealed a complete loss of expression of the water-channel gene Aqp2 in PKA knockout cells. SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics identified 229 PKA phosphorylation sites. Most of these PKA targets are thus far unannotated in public databases. Surprisingly, 1,915 phosphorylation sites with the motif x-(S/T)-P showed increased phosphooccupancy, pointing to increased activity of one or more MAP kinases in PKA knockout cells. Indeed, phosphorylation changes associated with activation of ERK2 were seen in PKA knockout cells. The ERK2 site is downstream of a direct PKA site in the Rap1GAP, Sipa1l1, that indirectly inhibits Raf1. In addition, a direct PKA site that inhibits the MAP kinase kinase kinase Map3k5 (ASK1) is upstream of JNK1 activation. The datasets were integrated to identify a causal network describing PKA signaling that explains vasopressin-mediated regulation of membrane trafficking and gene transcription. The model predicts that, through PKA activation, vasopressin stimulates AQP2 exocytosis by inhibiting MAP kinase signaling. The model also predicts that, through PKA activation, vasopressin stimulates Aqp2 transcription through induction of nuclear translocation of the acetyltransferase EP300, which increases histone H3K27 acetylation of vasopressin-responsive genes (confirmed by ChIP-seq).

  8. Identification of a functional, CRM-1-dependent nuclear export signal in hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cerutti

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS, but no nuclear export signal (NES has yet been identified.We show here that the aa(109-133 region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126 in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1-173 significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication.Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  9. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  10. Identification of a novel gene, anorexia, regulating feeding activity via insulin signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryuda, Masasuke; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Oda, Yasunori; Tanimura, Teiichi; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2011-11-04

    Feeding activities of animals, including insects, are influenced by various signals from the external environment, internal energy status, and physiological conditions. Full understanding of how such signals are integrated to regulate feeding activities has, however, been hampered by a lack of knowledge about the genes involved. Here, we identified an anorexic Drosophila melanogaster mutant (GS1189) in which the expression of a newly identified gene, Anorexia (Anox), is mutated. In Drosophila larvae, Anox encodes an acyl-CoA binding protein with an ankyrin repeat domain that is expressed in the cephalic chemosensory organs and various neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Loss of its expression or disturbance of neural transmission in Anox-expressing cells decreased feeding activity. Conversely, overexpression of Anox in the CNS increased food intake. We further found that Anox regulates expression of the insulin receptor gene (dInR); overexpression and knockdown of Anox in the CNS, respectively, elevated and repressed dInR expression, which altered larval feeding activity in parallel with Anox expression levels. Anox mutant adults also showed significant repression of sugar-induced nerve responses and feeding potencies. Although Anox expression levels did not depend on the fasting and feeding states cycle, stressors such as high temperature and desiccation significantly repressed its expression levels. These results strongly suggest that Anox is essential for gustatory sensation and food intake of Drosophila through regulation of the insulin signaling activity that is directly regulated by internal nutrition status. Therefore, the mutant strain lacking Anox expression cannot enhance feeding potencies even under starvation.

  11. Identification of two-phase flow pattern by using specific spatial frequency of differential pressure signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bin; Tong Yunxian; Wu Shaorong

    1992-11-01

    It is a classical method by using analysis of differential pressure fluctuation signal to identify two-phase flow pattern. The method which uses trait peak in the frequency-domain will result confusion between bubble flow and intermittent flow due to the influence of gas speed. Considering the spatial geometric significance of two-phase slow patterns and using the differential pressure gauge as a sensor, the Strouhal number 'Sr' is taken as the basis for distinguishing flow patterns. Using Strouhal number 'Sr' to identify flow pattern has clear physical meaning. The experimental results using the spatial analytical technique to measure the flow pattern are also given

  12. Combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data reveals extensive differences between black and brown nearly-isogenic soybean (Glycine max seed coats enabling the identification of pigment isogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnason John T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The R locus controls the color of pigmented soybean (Glycine max seeds. However information about its control over seed coat biochemistry and gene expressions remains limited. The seed coats of nearly-isogenic black (iRT and brown (irT soybean (Glycine max were known to differ by the presence or absence of anthocyanins, respectively, with genes for only a single enzyme (anthocyanidin synthase found to be differentially expressed between isolines. We recently identified and characterized a UDP-glycose:flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase (UGT78K1 from the seed coat of black (iRT soybean with the aim to engineer seed coat color by suppression of an anthocyanin-specific gene. However, it remained to be investigated whether UGT78K1 was overexpressed with anthocyanin biosynthesis in the black (iRT seed coat compared to the nearly-isogenic brown (irT tissue. In this study, we performed a combined analysis of transcriptome and metabolite data to elucidate the control of the R locus over seed coat biochemistry and to identify pigment biosynthesis genes. Two differentially expressed late-stage anthocyanin biosynthesis isogenes were further characterized, as they may serve as useful targets for the manipulation of soybean grain color while minimizing the potential for unintended effects on the plant system. Results Metabolite composition differences were found to not be limited to anthocyanins, with specific proanthocyanidins, isoflavones, and phenylpropanoids present exclusively in the black (iRT or the brown (irT seed coat. A global analysis of gene expressions identified UGT78K1 and 19 other anthocyanin, (isoflavonoid, and phenylpropanoid isogenes to be differentially expressed between isolines. A combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression data enabled the assignment of putative functions to biosynthesis and transport isogenes. The recombinant enzymes of two genes were validated to catalyze late-stage steps in anthocyanin

  13. Biosynthesis of Sesterterpenes, Head-to-Tail Triterpenes, and Sesquarterpenes in Bacillus clausii: Identification of Multifunctional Enzymes and Analysis of Isoprenoid Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Daijiro; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Mizuki; Totsuka, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sato, Tsutomu

    2015-06-15

    We performed functional analysis of recombinant enzymes and analysis of isoprenoid metabolites in Bacillus clausii to gain insights into the biosynthesis of rare terpenoid groups of sesterterpenes, head-to-tail triterpenes, and sesquarterpenes. We have identified an (all-E)-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (E-IDS) homologue as a trifunctional geranylfarnesyl diphosphate (GFPP)/hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP)/heptaprenyl diphosphate (HepPP) synthase. In addition, we have redefined the function of a tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue as that of a trifunctional sesterterpene/triterpene/sesquarterpene synthase. This study has revealed that GFPP, HexPP, and HepPP, intermediates of two isoprenoid pathways (acyclic terpenes and menaquinones), are biosynthesized by one trifunctional E-IDS. In addition, GFPP/HexPP and HepPP are the primary substrates for the biosynthesis of acyclic terpenes and menaquinone-7, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Nonanthocyanin secondary metabolites of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) fruits: identification by HPLC-DAD, NMR, HPLC-ESI-MS, and ESI-MS/MS analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Liladhar; Wyzgoski, Faith J; Scheerens, Joseph C; Chanon, Ann M; Reese, R Neil; Smiljanic, Danijela; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Blakeslee, Joshua J; Riedl, Kenneth M; Rinaldi, Peter L

    2013-12-11

    Nonanthocyanin secondary metabolites potentially contributing to the antiproliferative bioactivity of black raspberry ( Rubus occidentalis L.) fruits were extracted in ethyl acetate and isolated by semipreparative and analytical HPLC and analyzed by NMR, HPLC-ESI-MS, and ESI-MS/MS techniques. Here we present complete and partial structures of a variety of the chemical entities such as quercetin 3-glucoside, quercetin 3-rutinoside, myricetin glucoside, dihydrokaempferol glucoside, benzoic acid β-d-glucopyranosyl ester, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, epicatechin, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-coumaryl glucoside, p-coumaryl sugar ester, ellagic acid, methyl ellagic acid acetylpentose, methyl ellagic acid valerylpentose, trans-piceid, phloretin glucoside (phloridzin), dihydrosinapic acid, salicylic acid β-d-glucopyranosyl ester, a salicylic acid derivative without attached sugar, p-alkylphenyl glucoside, and a citric acid derivative. To our knowledge, 15 of these compounds were not previously reported in black raspberry fruits.

  15. Identification of the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-MEG2 as an antagonist of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Charles Y; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Wang, Yan; Callaway, Scott; Hedrick, Susan; Mak, Puiying A; Orth, Anthony P; Peters, Eric C; Saez, Enrique; Montminy, Marc; Schultz, Peter G; Chanda, Sumit K

    2006-05-01

    Insulin resistance is a primary defect in type 2 diabetes characterized by impaired peripheral glucose uptake and insufficient suppression of hepatic glucose output. Insulin signaling inhibits liver glucose production by inducing nuclear exclusion of the gluconeogenic transcription factor FOXO1 in an Akt-dependent manner. Through the concomitant application of genome-scale functional screening and quantitative image analysis, we have identified PTP-MEG2 as a modulator of insulin-dependent FOXO1 subcellular localization. Ectopic expression of PTP-MEG2 in cells inhibited insulin-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, while RNAi-mediated reduction of PTP-MEG2 transcript levels enhanced insulin action. Additionally, adenoviral-mediated depletion of PTP-MEG2 in livers of diabetic (db/db) mice resulted in insulin sensitization and normalization of hyperglycemia. These data implicate PTP-MEG2 as a mediator of blood glucose homeostasis through antagonism of insulin signaling, and suggest that modulation of PTP-MEG2 activity may be an effective strategy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  16. Identification of Major Signaling Pathways in Prion Disease Progression Using Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalique Newaz

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that arise due to conformational change of normal, cellular prion protein (PrPC to protease-resistant isofrom (rPrPSc. Deposition of misfolded PrpSc proteins leads to an alteration of many signaling pathways that includes immunological and apoptotic pathways. As a result, this culminates in the dysfunction and death of neuronal cells. Earlier works on transcriptomic studies have revealed some affected pathways, but it is not clear which is (are the prime network pathway(s that change during the disease progression and how these pathways are involved in crosstalks with each other from the time of incubation to clinical death. We perform network analysis on large-scale transcriptomic data of differentially expressed genes obtained from whole brain in six different mouse strain-prion strain combination models to determine the pathways involved in prion diseases, and to understand the role of crosstalks in disease propagation. We employ a notion of differential network centrality measures on protein interaction networks to identify the potential biological pathways involved. We also propose a crosstalk ranking method based on dynamic protein interaction networks to identify the core network elements involved in crosstalk with different pathways. We identify 148 DEGs (differentially expressed genes potentially related to the prion disease progression. Functional association of the identified genes implicates a strong involvement of immunological pathways. We extract a bow-tie structure that is potentially dysregulated in prion disease. We also propose an ODE model for the bow-tie network. Predictions related to diseased condition suggests the downregulation of the core signaling elements (PI3Ks and AKTs of the bow-tie network. In this work, we show using transcriptomic data that the neuronal dysfunction in prion disease is strongly related to the immunological pathways. We conclude that

  17. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated...... a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to mediate GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH...... as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (i) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (ii...

  18. Identification of alternatively translated Tetherin isoforms with differing antiviral and signaling activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J Cocka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin (BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 is an IFN induced transmembrane protein that restricts release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Important features required for Tetherin activity and regulation reside within the cytoplasmic domain. Here we demonstrate that two isoforms, derived by alternative translation initiation from highly conserved methionine residues in the cytoplasmic domain, are produced in both cultured human cell lines and primary cells. These two isoforms have distinct biological properties. The short isoform (s-Tetherin, which lacks 12 residues present in the long isoform (l-Tetherin, is significantly more resistant to HIV-1 Vpu-mediated downregulation and consequently more effectively restricts HIV-1 viral budding in the presence of Vpu. s-Tetherin Vpu resistance can be accounted for by the loss of serine-threonine and tyrosine motifs present in the long isoform. By contrast, the l-Tetherin isoform was found to be an activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling whereas s-Tetherin does not activate NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB requires a tyrosine-based motif found within the cytoplasmic tail of the longer species and may entail formation of l-Tetherin homodimers since co-expression of s-Tetherin impairs the ability of the longer isoform to activate NF-κB. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for control of Tetherin antiviral and signaling function and provide insight into Tetherin function both in the presence and absence of infection.

  19. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Huh, Sun-Hyung; Sung, Boreum; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. ► Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. ► CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif ( 125 MQELSNILNL 134 ) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-ΔNLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  20. Identification of a mutant α1 Na/K-ATPase that pumps but is defective in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Madan, Namrata; Ye, Qiqi; Duan, Qiming; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Shaomeng; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Zijian

    2013-05-10

    It has not been possible to study the pumping and signaling functions of Na/K-ATPase independently in live cells. Both cell-free and cell-based assays indicate that the A420P mutation abolishes the Src regulatory function of Na/K-ATPase. A420P mutant has normal pumping but not signaling function. Identification of Src regulation-null mutants is crucial for addressing physiological role of Na/K-ATPase. The α1 Na/K-ATPase possesses both pumping and signaling functions. However, it has not been possible to study these functions independently in live cells. We have identified a 20-amino acid peptide (Ser-415 to Gln-434) (NaKtide) from the nucleotide binding domain of α1 Na/K-ATPase that binds and inhibits Src in vitro. The N terminus of NaKtide adapts a helical structure. In vitro kinase assays showed that replacement of residues that contain a bulky side chain in the helical structure of NaKtide by alanine abolished the inhibitory effect of the peptide on Src. Similarly, disruption of helical structure by proline replacement, either single or in combination, reduced the inhibitory potency of NaKtide on Src. To identify mutant α1 that retains normal pumping function but is defective in Src regulation, we transfected Na/K-ATPase α1 knockdown PY-17 cells with expression vectors of wild type or mutant α1 carrying Ala to Pro mutations in the region of NaKtide helical structure and generated several stable cell lines. We found that expression of either A416P or A420P or A425P mutant fully restored the α1 content and consequently the pumping capacity of cells. However, in contrast to A416P, either A420P or A425P mutant was incapable of interacting and regulating cellular Src. Consequently, expression of these two mutants caused significant inhibition of ouabain-activated signal transduction and cell growth. Thus we have identified α1 mutant that has normal pumping function but is defective in signal transduction.

  1. Integrating a Linear Signal Model with Groundwater and Rainfall time-series on the Characteristic Identification of Groundwater Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Yetmen; Chang, Liang-Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater resources play a vital role on regional supply. To avoid irreversible environmental impact such as land subsidence, the characteristic identification of groundwater system is crucial before sustainable management of groundwater resource. This study proposes a signal process approach to identify the character of groundwater systems based on long-time hydrologic observations include groundwater level and rainfall. The study process contains two steps. First, a linear signal model (LSM) is constructed and calibrated to simulate the variation of underground hydrology based on the time series of groundwater levels and rainfall. The mass balance equation of the proposed LSM contains three major terms contain net rate of horizontal exchange, rate of rainfall recharge and rate of pumpage and four parameters are required to calibrate. Because reliable records of pumpage is rare, the time-variant groundwater amplitudes of daily frequency (P ) calculated by STFT are assumed as linear indicators of puamage instead of pumpage records. Time series obtained from 39 observation wells and 50 rainfall stations in and around the study area, Pintung Plain, are paired for model construction. Second, the well-calibrated parameters of the linear signal model can be used to interpret the characteristic of groundwater system. For example, the rainfall recharge coefficient (γ) means the transform ratio between rainfall intention and groundwater level raise. The area around the observation well with higher γ means that the saturated zone here is easily affected by rainfall events and the material of unsaturated zone might be gravel or coarse sand with high infiltration ratio. Considering the spatial distribution of γ, the values of γ decrease from the upstream to the downstream of major rivers and also are correlated to the spatial distribution of grain size of surface soil. Via the time-series of groundwater levels and rainfall, the well-calibrated parameters of LSM have

  2. Identification of angular naphthopyrones from the Philippine echinoderm Comanthus species as inhibitors of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovolou, Yvonni; Ebada, Sherif Saeed; Wätjen, Wim; Proksch, Peter

    2011-04-25

    The redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is an important cellular pathway often misregulated in various cancer cells. Therefore, blockade of NF-κB signaling in cancer cells presents a promising strategy and enormous effort has been invested to identify potent and specific inhibitors. The aim of this study was the identification of new compounds derived from marine organisms that act as NF-κB inhibitors and to identify their mechanism of action. In the present work a bioassay-guided investigation of a Philippine specimen of the marine echinoderm Comanthus sp. yielded ten compounds evenly divided into anthraquinones and naphthopyrones. From these compounds only two naphthopyrones, comaparvin and 6-methoxycomaparvin exhibited noteworthy inhibitory activity against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) induced NF-κB activation in rat hepatoma cells and human breast cancer cells. Comaparvin at concentrations between 50μM and 100μM reduces chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity, blocks nuclear translocation of NF-κB and effectively inhibits TNF-α induced IκB phosphorylation suggesting a role of this compound in targeting IκB kinase (IKK). Furthermore, comaparvin sensitized cancer cells to apoptotic effects mediated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. These results correlate with downregulation of TNF-α induced expression of protective NF-κB target genes like MnSOD, XIAP or A20. In conclusion we identified the naphthopyrone comaparvin isolated from the marine echinoderm Comanthus sp. as a new inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway acting by targeting both proteasome function and IκB phosphorylation likely by direct inhibitory effect on IKKβ activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Secondary metabolite profiling of Alternaria dauci, A. porri, A. solani, and A. tomatophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Dongo, Anita; Pryor, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    Chemotaxonomy (secondary metabolite profiling) has been shown to be of great value in the classification and differentiation in Ascomycota. However, few studies have investigated the use of metabolite production for classification and identification purposes of plant pathogenic Alternaria species...

  4. Electrosynthesis methods and approaches for the preparative production of metabolites from parent drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gül, Turan; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    Identification of potentially toxic metabolites is important for drug discovery and development. Synthesis of drug metabolites is typically performed by organic synthesis or enzymatic methods, but is not always straightforward. Electrochemical (EC) methods are increasingly used to study drug

  5. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal within the human USP22 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Jianjun; Wang, Yaqin; Gong, Zhen; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • USP22 was accumulated in nucleus. • We identified of a functional USP22 NLS. • The KRRK amino acid residues are indispensable in NLS. • The KRRK motif is conserved in USP22 homologues. - Abstract: Ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22), a member of the deubiquitinase family, is over-expressed in most human cancers and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Because it is an enzymatic subunit of the human SAGA transcriptional cofactor, USP22 deubiquitylates histone H2A and H2B in the nucleus, thus participating in gene regulation and cell-cycle progression. However, the mechanisms regulating its nuclear translocation have not yet been elucidated. It was here demonstrated that USP22 is imported into the nucleus through a mechanism mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS). The bipartite NLS sequence KRELELLKHNPKRRKIT (aa152–168), was identified as the functional NLS for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, a short cluster of basic amino acid residues KRRK within this bipartite NLS plays the primary role in nuclear localization and is evolutionarily conserved in USP22 homologues. In the present study, a functional NLS and the minimal sequences required for the active targeting of USP22 to the nucleus were identified. These findings may provide a molecular basis for the mechanism underlying USP22 nuclear trafficking and function

  6. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal within the human USP22 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Jianjun [Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for the Systems Bio-Medicine, Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province 332000 (China); College of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province 332000 (China); Wang, Yaqin [Reproductive Medical Center, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430060 (China); Gong, Zhen [Key Laboratory of Jiangxi Province for the Systems Bio-Medicine, Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province 332000 (China); Liu, Jianyun [College of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province 332000 (China); Li, Weidong, E-mail: lwd626518@163.com [College of Basic Medical Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province 332000 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • USP22 was accumulated in nucleus. • We identified of a functional USP22 NLS. • The KRRK amino acid residues are indispensable in NLS. • The KRRK motif is conserved in USP22 homologues. - Abstract: Ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22), a member of the deubiquitinase family, is over-expressed in most human cancers and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Because it is an enzymatic subunit of the human SAGA transcriptional cofactor, USP22 deubiquitylates histone H2A and H2B in the nucleus, thus participating in gene regulation and cell-cycle progression. However, the mechanisms regulating its nuclear translocation have not yet been elucidated. It was here demonstrated that USP22 is imported into the nucleus through a mechanism mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS). The bipartite NLS sequence KRELELLKHNPKRRKIT (aa152–168), was identified as the functional NLS for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, a short cluster of basic amino acid residues KRRK within this bipartite NLS plays the primary role in nuclear localization and is evolutionarily conserved in USP22 homologues. In the present study, a functional NLS and the minimal sequences required for the active targeting of USP22 to the nucleus were identified. These findings may provide a molecular basis for the mechanism underlying USP22 nuclear trafficking and function.

  7. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Western University, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON, Canada N6A 4L6 (Canada); Yousef, Ahmed F. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Masdar Institute, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Zhang, Zhiying [College of Animal Science and Technologies, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Mymryk, Joe S., E-mail: jmymryk@uwo.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Western University, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON, Canada N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON, Canada N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  8. Metabolite profiling using liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of a suitable marker and target matrix of griseofulvin use in bovines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbin, J A; Fussell, R J

    2013-06-30

    Griseofulvin is an antifungal agent with potential for misuse in food-producing animals. Little is known about its metabolism in ruminants and hence what are suitable marker residues and target matrices for monitoring purposes. Tissues harvested from cattle treated with the antifungal agent griseofulvin were screened using liquid chromatography coupled to positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (qToFMS) operated in ToF mode. Twenty-five possible metabolites were detected across all tissue types, but two isomeric compounds with accurate masses corresponding to loss of a methyl group from parent griseofulvin were considered to be the best candidate markers. Data from fragmentation experiments enabled a tentative assignment of the structures of the two compounds as 4-demethylgriseofulvin and 6-demethylgriseofulvin. These assignments were confirmed by matching the product ion spectra of incurred residues to those of custom synthesized reference standards. 4-Demethyl- and 6-demethylgriseofulvin have been identified as potential marker compounds of griseofulvin use in cattle. Liver was identified as the target matrix. Hair was shown to have potential for non-invasive testing. © Crown copyright 2013. Reproduced with the permission of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of Advanced Signal Processing Techniques to Improve Detection and Identification of Embedded Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santos-Villalobos, Hector J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baba, Justin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    , or an improvement in contrast over conventional SAFT reconstructed images. This report documents our efforts in four fronts: 1) Comparative study between traditional SAFT and FBD SAFT for concrete specimen with and without Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) damage, 2) improvement of our Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) for thick reinforced concrete [5], 3) development of a universal framework for sharing, reconstruction, and visualization of ultrasound NDE datasets, and 4) application of machine learning techniques for automated detection of ASR inside concrete. Our comparative study between FBD and traditional SAFT reconstruction images shows a clear difference between images of ASR and non-ASR specimens. In particular, the left first harmonic shows an increased contrast and sensitivity to ASR damage. For MBIR, we show the superiority of model-based techniques over delay and sum techniques such as SAFT. Improvements include elimination of artifacts caused by direct arrival signals, and increased contrast and Signal to Noise Ratio. For the universal framework, we document a format for data storage based on the HDF5 file format, and also propose a modular Graphic User Interface (GUI) for easy customization of data conversion, reconstruction, and visualization routines. Finally, two techniques for ASR automated detection are presented. The first technique is based on an analysis of the frequency content using Hilbert Transform Indicator (HTI) and the second technique employees Artificial Neural Network (ANN) techniques for training and classification of ultrasound data as ASR or non-ASR damaged classes. The ANN technique shows great potential with classification accuracy above 95%. These approaches are extensible to the detection of additional reinforced, thick concrete defects and damage.

  10. Identification of esg, a genetic locus involved in cell-cell signaling during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downard, J; Ramaswamy, S V; Kil, K S

    1993-12-01

    JD258, a Tn5 insertion mutant of Myxococcus xanthus, was shown to have major defects in three development-associated properties: expression of the developmentally regulated tps gene, spore formation, and production of multicellular fruiting bodies. The defects in tps gene expression and sporulation could be substantially corrected, at the phenotypic level, by mixing JD258 with wild-type cells (extracellular complementation). By this criterion, JD258 appeared to be a new member of a group of conditional developmental mutants that were previously characterized and placed in four extracellular complementation groups (A to D) based on the ability of mutants in one group to stimulate development in mutants belonging to a different group (D. C. Hagen, A. P. Bretscher, and D. Kaiser, Dev. Biol. 64:284-296, 1978). Mutants from groups A, B, C, and D all displayed extracellular complementation activity when mixed with JD258. These results, and other aspects of the phenotype of JD258, indicate that this mutant defines a fifth extracellular complementation group, group E. The M. xanthus esg locus identified by the Tn5 insertion in JD258 was cloned in Escherichia coli and used for further genetic analysis of the locus. These studies indicated that the esg locus resides within a 2.5-kb region of the M. xanthus chromosome and that the locus contains at least two genetic complementation groups. Our results are consistent with a model in which the esg locus controls the production of a previously unrecognized extracellular signal that must be transmitted between cells for the completion of M. xanthus development.

  11. Identification of a Calcium Signalling Pathway of S-[6]-Gingerol in HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium signals in hepatocytes control cell growth, proliferation, and death. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily are candidate calcium influx channels. NFκB activation strictly depends on calcium influx and often induces antiapoptotic genes favouring cell survival. Previously, we reported that S-[6]-gingerol is an efficacious agonist of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1 in neurones. In this study, we tested the effect of S-[6]-gingerol on HuH-7 cells using the Fluo-4 calcium assay, RT-qPCR, transient cell transfection, and luciferase measurements. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i in HuH-7 cells. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by S-[6]-gingerol was abolished by preincubation with EGTA and was also inhibited by the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine. Expression of TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells was confirmed by mRNA analysis as well as a test for increase of [Ca2+]i by TRPV1 agonist capsaicin and its inhibition by capsazepine. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced rapid NFκB activation through TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, S-[6]-gingerol-induced NFκB activation was dependent on the calcium gradient and TRPV1. The rapid NFκB activation by S-[6]-gingerol was associated with an increase in mRNA levels of NFκB-target genes: cIAP-2, XIAP, and Bcl-2 that encode antiapoptotic proteins.

  12. Developmental Risk Signals as a Screening Tool for Early Identification of Sensory Processing Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Cristina; Gomez, M Marlene; Ramos, Gregorio; Rios Del Rio, Janina

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine if the indicators of risk included in the Indicators of Developmental Risk Signals (INDIPCD-R) could differentiate between children at risk of sensory processing disorders (SPDs) from those with normal development and if the SPD indicators correlated with a delay or altered development. A retrospective, descriptive, correlational design was used with a sample of 51 children, 36 referred because of clinical sensory processing indicators and 15 with non-clinical indicators. Participants were assessed with a developmental scale Revised Profile of Developmental Behaviors (PCD-R), the Sensory Profile, play and clinical observations. The INDIPCD-R showed a high correlation with developmental areas of PCD-R and a sensitivity and specificity of 100%, when compared with the Sensory Profile. T-test results for independent samples showed significant differences at p ≤ 0.01 level between the children with SPD indicators and those with no clinical signs in the PCD-R. The Mann-Whitney U-test was conducted for unpaired samples, to verify if there were significant differences between children with apparent SPD indicators and children with no apparent difficulties. The Spearman's rho was used to identify the correlations between the INDIPCD-R, with different areas of development. This study supports the use of the INDIPCD-R as a screening instrument that could be used by occupational therapists to discriminate children with and without indicators of SPD. The limitation of this study was that it did not cover all the ages of the INDIPCD-R. Additional studies are required to determine the utility of this instrument for outcome studies and whether it is valid and reliable to identify children at risk of different pathologies. The INDIPCD-R is a low-cost instrument that allows the occupational therapist to make a quick review of the different components that could be involved in SPD and therefore guide the more in

  13. Identification of Carboxylate, Phosphate, and Phenoxide Functionalities in Deprotonated Molecules Related to Drug Metabolites via Ion-Molecule Reactions with water and Diethylhydroxyborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanyu; Ma, Xin; Kong, John Y.; Zhang, Minli; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2017-10-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ion-molecule reactions has emerged as a powerful tool for structural elucidation of ionized analytes. However, most currently used reagents were designed to react with protonated analytes, making them suboptimal for acidic analytes that are preferentially detected in negative ion mode. In this work we demonstrate that the phenoxide, carboxylate, and phosphate functionalities can be identified in deprotonated molecules by use of a combination of two reagents, diethylmethoxyborane (DEMB) and water. A novel reagent introduction setup that allowed DEMB and water to be separately introduced into the ion trap region of the mass spectrometer was developed to facilitate fundamental studies of this reaction. A new reagent, diethylhydroxyborane (DEHB), was generated inside the ion trap by hydrolysis of DEMB on introduction of water. Most carboxylates and phenoxides formed a DEHB adduct, followed by addition of one water molecule and subsequent ethane elimination (DEHB adduct +H2O - CH3CH3) as the major product ion. Phenoxides with a hydroxy group adjacent to the deprotonation site and phosphates formed a DEHB adduct, followed by ethane elimination (DEHB adduct - CH3CH3). Deprotonated molecules with strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds or without the aforementioned functionalities, including sulfates, were unreactive toward DEHB/H2O. Reaction mechanisms were explored via isotope labeling experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The mass spectrometry method allowed the differentiation of phenoxide-, carboxylate-, phosphate-, and sulfate-containing analytes. Finally, it was successfully coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of a mixture containing hymecromone, a biliary spasm drug, and its three possible metabolites. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Bioinformatic identification of FGF, p38-MAPK, and calcium signalling pathways associated with carcinoma in situ in the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbsleb, Malene; Christensen, Ole F; Thykjaer, Thomas; Wiuf, Carsten; Borre, Michael; Ørntoft, Torben F; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is believed to be a precursor of invasive bladder cancer. Identification of CIS is a valuable prognostic factor since radical treatment strategies can be offered these patients before the disease becomes invasive. We developed a pathway based classifier approach to predict presence or absence of CIS in patients suffering from non muscle invasive bladder cancer. From Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we considered four canonical signalling pathways (p38 MAPK, FGF, Calcium, and cAMP pathways) with most coherent expression of transcription factors (TFs) across samples in a set of twenty-eight non muscle invasive bladder carcinomas. These pathways contained twelve TFs in total. We used the expression of the TFs to predict presence or absence of CIS in a Leave-One-Out Cross Validation classification. We showed that TF expression levels in three pathways (FGF, p38 MAPK, and calcium signalling) or the expression of the twelve TFs together could be used to predict presence or absence of concomitant CIS. A cluster analysis based on expression of the twelve TFs separated the samples in two main clusters: one branch contained 11 of the 15 patients without concomitant CIS and with the majority of the genes being down regulated; the other branch contained 10 of 13 patients with concomitant CIS, and here genes were mostly up regulated. The expression in the CIS group was comparable to the expression of twenty-three patients suffering from muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma. Finally, we validated our results in an independent test set and found that prediction of CIS status was possible using TF expression of the p38 MAPK pathway. We conclude that it is possible to use pathway analysis for molecular classification of bladder tumors

  15. Spatio-Temporal Metabolite Profiling of the Barley Germination Process by MALDI MS Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Gorzolka

    Full Text Available MALDI mass spectrometry imaging was performed to localize metabolites during the first seven days of the barley germination. Up to 100 mass signals were detected of which 85 signals were identified as 48 different metabolites with highly tissue-specific localizations. Oligosaccharides were observed in the endosperm and in parts of the developed embryo. Lipids in the endosperm co-localized in dependency on their fatty acid compositions with changes in the distributions of diacyl phosphatidylcholines during germination. 26 potentially antifungal hordatines were detected in the embryo with tissue-specific localizations of their glycosylated, hydroxylated, and O-methylated derivates. In order to reveal spatio-temporal patterns in local metabolite compositions, multiple MSI data sets from a time series were analyzed in one batch. This requires a new preprocessing strategy to achieve comparability between data sets as well as a new strategy for unsupervised clustering. The resulting spatial segmentation for each time point sample is visualized in an interactive cluster map and enables simultaneous interactive exploration of all time points. Using this new analysis approach and visualization tool germination-dependent developments of metabolite patterns with single MS position accuracy were discovered. This is the first study that presents metabolite profiling of a cereals' germination process over time by MALDI MSI with the identification of a large number of peaks of agronomically and industrially important compounds such as oligosaccharides, lipids and antifungal agents. Their detailed localization as well as the MS cluster analyses for on-tissue metabolite profile mapping revealed important information for the understanding of the germination process, which is of high scientific interest.

  16. RSSsite: a reference database and prediction tool for the identification of cryptic Recombination Signal Sequences in human and murine genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merelli, Ivan; Guffanti, Alessandro; Fabbri, Marco; Cocito, Andrea; Furia, Laura; Grazini, Ursula; Bonnal, Raoul J; Milanesi, Luciano; McBlane, Fraser

    2010-07-01

    Recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking V, D and J gene segments are recognized and cut by the VDJ recombinase during development of B and T lymphocytes. All RSSs are composed of seven conserved nucleotides, followed by a spacer (containing either 12 +/- 1 or 23 +/- 1 poorly conserved nucleotides) and a conserved nonamer. Errors in V(D)J recombination, including cleavage of cryptic RSS outside the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor loci, are associated with oncogenic translocations observed in some lymphoid malignancies. We present in this paper the RSSsite web server, which is available from the address http://www.itb.cnr.it/rss. RSSsite consists of a web-accessible database, RSSdb, for the identification of pre-computed potential RSSs, and of the related search tool, DnaGrab, which allows the scoring of potential RSSs in user-supplied sequences. This latter algorithm makes use of probability models, which can be recasted to Bayesian network, taking into account correlations between groups of positions of a sequence, developed starting from specific reference sets of RSSs. In validation laboratory experiments, we selected 33 predicted cryptic RSSs (cRSSs) from 11 chromosomal regions outside the immunoglobulin and TCR loci for functional testing.

  17. Hybrid EEG—Eye Tracker: Automatic Identification and Removal of Eye Movement and Blink Artifacts from Electroencephalographic Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik M. Naeem Mannan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of eye movement and blink artifacts in Electroencephalogram (EEG recording makes the analysis of EEG data more difficult and could result in mislead findings. Efficient removal of these artifacts from EEG data is an essential step in improving classification accuracy to develop the brain-computer interface (BCI. In this paper, we proposed an automatic framework based on independent component analysis (ICA and system identification to identify and remove ocular artifacts from EEG data by using hybrid EEG and eye tracker system. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated using experimental and standard EEG datasets. The proposed algorithm not only removes the ocular artifacts from artifactual zone but also preserves the neuronal activity related EEG signals in non-artifactual zone. The comparison with the two state-of-the-art techniques namely ADJUST based ICA and REGICA reveals the significant improved performance of the proposed algorithm for removing eye movement and blink artifacts from EEG data. Additionally, results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower relative error and higher mutual information values between corrected EEG and artifact-free EEG data.

  18. Metabolite production by species of Stemphylium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Rossman, Amy; Andersen, Birgitte

    Morphology and phylogeny have been used to distinguish members of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Stemphylium. A third method for distinguishing species of fungi is by chemotaxonomy. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium via HPLC-UV-MS analysis, while also exploring the potential of chemotaxonomy as a robust identification method for Stemphylium. Several species were found to have species-specific metabolites, while other species were distinguishable by a broader metabolic profile rather than specific metabolites. Many previously described metabolites were found to be important for distinguishing species, while some unknown metabolites were also determined to have important roles in distinguishing species of Stemphylium. This study is the first of its kind to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium across the whole genus. Copyright © 2018 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IDENTIFICACIÓN DE ALGUNOS METABOLITOS SECUNDARIOS DEL EXTRACTO EN ACETATO DE ETILO DE Muricea sp.I IDENTIFICATION OF SOME SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM THE ETHYL- ACETATE-EXTRACT OF THE OCTOCORAL, Muricea sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Camacho

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Some chromatographic fractions obtained from the ethyl-acetate-extract of the unidentified octocoral species of the genus, Muricea , showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli , Salmonella enteritidis , Citrobacter freundii , Staphylococcus aureus , and Bacillus subtlis , which indicates the presence of bioactive compounds in it. The GC/MS analysis of some fractions obtained by continuous chromatographic separation, allowed identification of metabolites, such that: ( Z -9-octadecenoic acid methyl ester, octadecenoic acid methyl ester, 1-methyl-4-ethoxy-δ(3-pyrrolin-2-one, endo-1-bourbonanol, dibutylphtalate, 4,5-epoxy-1-isopropyl-4-methyl- 1-cyclohexene, 1,3,3-trimethyl-7-oxabcyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid ethyl ester, 2,6-dimethyl-2-trans- 6-octadiene, farnesol, 3β-cholesta-5,22-dien-3-ol, cholesterol, (3β,22 E ,24S-ergosta-5,22-dien-3-ol, (3β,5α-2- methylenecholestan-3-ol, 3-hidroxylongifolol, by comparison with the WILEY and NIST databases and the study of the fragmentation patterns of their mass spectra.

  20. Increasing the availability of threonine, isoleucine, valine, and leucine relative to lysine while maintaining an ideal ratio of lysine:methionine alters mammary cellular metabolites, mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X; Zhou, Z; Wang, L; Saremi, B; Helmbrecht, A; Wang, Z; Loor, J J

    2018-03-14

    Amino acids not only serve as precursors for protein synthesis but also function as signaling molecules that can regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Methionine and Lys are the most-limiting AA for milk production and a ratio of ∼3:1 Lys:Met in the metabolizable protein has been determined to be ideal. Besides Met and Lys, recent studies have evaluated Ile, Leu, Val, and Thr as potentially limiting for milk protein synthesis. The objective of this experiment was to determine if varying the ratio of Lys:Thr, Lys:Ile, Lys:Val, and Lys:Leu while maintaining an ideal ratio of Lys:Met and fixed ratio of other essential AA (IPAA) elicits changes in intracellular metabolites, gene transcription related to protein synthesis, and phosphorylation status of mTOR pathway proteins. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line (MAC-T) cells were incubated for 12 h (n = 5 replicates/treatment) with IPAA (2.9:1 Lys:Met; 1.8:1 Lys:Thr; 2.38:1 Lys:His; 1.23:1 Lys:Val; 1.45:1 Lys:Ile; 0.85:1 Lys:Leu; 2.08:1 Lys:Arg) or IPAA supplemented with Thr, Ile, Val, and Leu to achieve a Lys:Thr 1.3:1 (LT1.3), Lys:Ile 1.29:1 (LI1.29), Lys:Val 1.12:1 (LV1.12), or Lys:Leu 0.78:1 (LL0.78). Compared with IPAA, metabolomics via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that increases in availability of Thr, Ile, Val, and Leu led to greater concentrations of essential AA (Leu, Ile, Thr), nonessential AA (Gly, Glu, Gln, Ser, Pro, Asp), and various metabolites including uric acid, phosphoric acid, N-acetylglutamic acid, and intermediates of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Compared with other treatments, LV1.12 led to greater phosphorylation status of serine/threonine kinase B (Akt), mTORC1, and ribosomal protein S6 and lower phosphorylation of α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2. In addition, LV1.12 upregulated abundance of CSN2 and both the abundance and promoter methylation of CSN1S1. Although LI1.29 led to the second highest response

  1. Eight hours of nocturnal 915 MHz radiofrequency identification (RFID) exposure reduces urinary levels of melatonin and its metabolite via pineal arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Sun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Lee, Yu Hee; Lee, Yun-Sil; Choi, Hyung Do; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Ahn, Young Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of whole-body exposure to the 915 MHz radiofrequency identification (RFID) on melatonin biosynthesis and the activity of rat pineal arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). Rats were exposed to RFID (whole-body specific absorption rate, 4 W/kg) for 8 h/day, 5 days/week, for weeks during the nighttime. Total volume of urine excreted during a 24-h period was collected after RFID exposure. Urinary melatonin and 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. AANAT enzyme activity was measured using liquid biphasic dif-13 fusion assay. Protein levels and mRNA expression of AANAT was 14 measured by Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase 15 chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, respectively. Eight hours of nocturnal RFID exposure caused a significant reduction in both urinary melatonin (p = 0. 003) and 6-OHMS (p = 0. 026). Activity, protein levels, and mRNA expression of AANAT were suppressed by exposure to RFID (p RFID exposure can cause reductions in the levels of both urinary melatonin and 6-OHMS, possibly due to decreased melatonin biosynthesis via suppression of Aanat gene transcription in the rat pineal gland.

  2. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... The aims of this study were the analysis of the secondary metabolites and evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal activity of Alternaria alternata. Twenty six bioactive compounds were identified in methanolic extract of Alternaria alternata. The identification of bioactive chemical compounds is based on ...

  3. Organic metabolites produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification and action of several antibacterial metabolites produced by a fish pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3 from marine ecosystem of Goa has been demonstrated. Antibacterial activity of the crude cell extract of the test bacterium has been evaluated against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains such as ...

  4. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this study were the analysis of the secondary metabolites and evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal activity of Alternaria alternata. Twenty six bioactive compounds were identified in methanolic extract of Alternaria alternata. The identification of bioactive chemical compounds is based on the peak area, ...

  5. Identification of Combined Power Quality Disturbances Using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD and Total Least Squares-Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques (TLS-ESPRIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaishuo Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify various kinds of combined power quality disturbances, the singular value decomposition (SVD and the improved total least squares-estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (TLS-ESPRIT are combined as the basis of disturbance identification in this paper. SVD is applied to identify the catastrophe points of disturbance intervals, based on which the disturbance intervals are segmented. Then the improved TLS-ESPRIT optimized by singular value norm method is used to analyze each data segment, and extract the amplitude, frequency, attenuation coefficient and initial phase of various kinds of disturbances. Multi-group combined disturbance test signals are constructed by MATLAB and the proposed method is also tested by the measured data of IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES Database. The test results show that the new method proposed has a relatively higher accuracy than conventional TLS-ESPRIT, which could be used in the identification of measured data.

  6. Selected Secondary Plant Metabolites for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant metabolites reveal numerous biological activities making them attractive as resource for drug development of human diseases. As the majority of cancer drugs clinically established during the past half century is derived from nature, cancer researchers worldwide try to identify novel natural products as lead compounds for cancer therapy. Natural products are considered as promising cancer therapeutics, either as single agents or in combination protocols, to enhance the antitumor activity of additional therapeutic modalities. Most natural compounds exert pleotrophic effects and modulate various signal transduction pathways. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of action of natural products is expected to open new perspectives in coming years for their use alone or in combination therapies in oncology. Two major strategies to identify novel drug candidates from nature are the bioactivity-guided fractionation of medicinal plant extracts to isolate cytotoxic chemicals and the identification of small molecules inhibiting specific targets in cancer cells. In the present review, we report on our own efforts to unravel the molecular modes of action of phytochemicals in cancer cells and focus on resveratrol, betulinic acid, artesunate, dicentrine and camptothecin derivatives.

  7. Metabolite profiling of human amniotic fluid by hyphenated nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Gonçalo; Duarte, Iola F; J Goodfellow, Brian; Carreira, Isabel M; Couceiro, Ana Bela; Domingues, Maria do Rosário; Spraul, Manfred; Tseng, Li-Hong; Gil, Ana M

    2008-08-01

    The metabolic profiling of human amniotic fluid (HAF) is of potential interest for the diagnosis of disorders in the mother or the fetus. In order to build a comprehensive metabolite database for HAF, hyphenated NMR has been used, for the first time, for systematic HAF profiling. Experiments were carried out using reverse-phase (RP) and ion-exchange liquid chromatography (LC), in order to detect less and more polar compounds, respectively. RP-LC conditions achieved good separation of amino acids, some sugars, and xanthines. Subsequent NMR and MS analysis enabled the rapid identification of 30 compounds, including 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate and 4-aminohippurate identified in HAF for the first time, to our knowledge. Under ion-exchange LC conditions, a different set of 30 compounds was detected, including sugars, organic acids, several derivatives of organic acids, and amino acids. In this experiment, five compounds were identified for the first time in HAF: D-xylitol, amino acid derivatives (N-acetylalanine, N-acetylglycine, 2-oxoleucine), and isovalerate. The nonendogenous nature of some metabolites (caffeine, paraxanthine, D-xylitol, sorbitol) is discussed. Hyphenated NMR has allowed the rapid detection of approximately 60 metabolites in HAF, some of which are not detectable by standard NMR due to low abundance (microM) and signal overlap thus enabling an extended metabolite database to be built for HAF.

  8. Identification of some Bioactive Metabolites in a Fractionated Methanol Extract from Ipomoea aquatica (Aerial Parts) through TLC, HPLC, UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and LC-SPE-NMR Fingerprints Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefny Gad, Mahmoud; Tuenter, Emmy; El-Sawi, Nagwa; Younes, Sabry; El-Ghadban, El-Mewafy; Demeyer, Kristiaan; Pieters, Luc; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Mangelings, Debby

    2018-01-01

    The plant species Ipomoea aquatica contains various bioactive constituents, e.g. phenols and flavonoids, which have several medical uses. All previous studies were executed in Asia; however, no reports are available from Africa, and the secondary metabolites of this plant species from Africa are still unknown. The present study aims finding suitable conditions to identify the bioactive compounds from different fractions. Chromatographic fingerprint profiles of different fractions were developed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then these conditions were transferred to thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Subsequently, the chemical structure of some bioactive compounds was elucidated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS) and liquid chromatography-solid phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-SPE-NMR) spectroscopy. The HPLC fingerprints, developed on two coupled Chromolith RP-18e columns, using a gradient mobile phase (methanol/water/trifluoroacetic acid, 5:95:0.05, v/v/v), showed more peaks than the TLC profile. The TLC fingerprint allows the identification of the types of chemical constituents, e.g. flavonoids. Two flavonoids (nicotiflorin and ramnazin-3-O-rutinoside) and two phenolic compounds (dihydroxybenzoic acid pentoside and di-pentoside) were tentatively identified by QTOF-MS, while NMR confirmed the structure of rutin and nicotiflorin. The HPLC and TLC results showed that HPLC fingerprints give more and better separated peaks, but TLC helped in determining the class of the active compounds in some fractions. Bioactive constituents were identified as well using MS and NMR analyses. Two flavonoids and two phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in this species for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Metabolite production by species of Stemphylium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Rossman, Amy; Andersen, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    Morphology and phylogeny has been used to distinguish members of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Stemphylium. A third method for distinguishing species is by chemotaxonomy. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium via HPLC-UV-MS analysis, while...... also exploring the potential of chemotaxonomy as a robust identification method for Stemphylium. Several species were found to have species-specific metabolites, while other species were distinguishable by a broader metabolic profile rather than specific metabolites. Many previously described...

  10. A Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method for output-only element-level system identification and input estimation from earthquake response signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new output-only element-level system identification and input estimation technique, towards the simultaneous identification of modal parameters, input excitation time history and structural features at the element-level by adopting earthquake-induced structural response signals. The method, named Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method (FDCIM), releases strong assumptions of earlier element-level techniques, by working with a two-stage iterative algorithm. Jointly, a Statistical Average technique, a modification process and a parameter projection strategy are adopted at each stage to achieve stronger convergence for the identified estimates. The proposed method works in a deterministic way and is completely developed in State-Space form. Further, it does not require continuous- to discrete-time transformations and does not depend on initialization conditions. Synthetic earthquake-induced response signals from different shear-type buildings are generated to validate the implemented procedure, also with noise-corrupted cases. The achieved results provide a necessary condition to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed identification method.

  11. Development of a systematic strategy for the global identification and classification of the chemical constituents and metabolites of Kai-Xin-San based on liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multiple data-processing approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jing; Yang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Qing; Bi, Kaishun

    2018-03-30

    To rapidly identify and classify complicated components and metabolites for traditional Chinese medicines, a liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method combined with multiple data-processing approaches was established. In this process, Kai-Xin-San, a widely used classic traditional Chinese medicine preparation, was chosen as a model prescription. Initially, the fragmentation patterns, diagnostic product ions and neutral loss of each category of compounds were summarized by collision-induced dissociation analysis of representative standards. In vitro, the multiple product ions filtering technique was utilized to identify the chemical constituents for globally covering trace components. With this strategy, 108 constituents were identified and compounds database was successfully established. In vivo, the prototype compounds were extracted based on the established database, and the neutral loss filtering technique combined with the drug metabolism reaction rules was employed to identify metabolites. Overall, 69 constituents including prototype and metabolites were characterized in rat plasma and nine constituents were firstly characterized in rat brain, which may be the potential active constituents resulting in curative effects by synergistic interaction. In conclusion, this study provided a generally applicable strategy to global metabolite identification for the complicated components in complex matrix and a chemical basis for further pharmacological research of Kai-Xin-San. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of lineage-specifying cytokines that signal all CD8+-cytotoxic-lineage-fate 'decisions' in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzensperger, Ruth; Kadakia, Tejas; Tai, Xuguang; Alag, Amala; Guinter, Terry I; Egawa, Takeshi; Erman, Batu; Singer, Alfred

    2017-11-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling in the thymus initiates positive selection, but the CD8 + -lineage fate is thought to be induced by cytokines after TCR signaling has ceased, although this remains controversial and unproven. We have identified four cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, TSLP and TGF-β) that did not signal via the common γ-chain (γ c ) receptor but that, like IL-7 and IL-15, induced expression of the lineage-specifying transcription factor Runx3d and signaled the generation of CD8 + T cells. Elimination of in vivo signaling by all six of these 'lineage-specifying cytokines' during positive selection eliminated Runx3d expression and completely abolished the generation of CD8 + single-positive thymocytes. Thus, this study proves that signaling during positive selection by lineage-specifying cytokines is responsible for all CD8 + -lineage-fate 'decisions' in the thymus.

  13. Adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition for studying movement-related activity in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Bianchi, Anna M.; Priori, Alberto; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method that combines adaptive autoregressive (AAR) identification and spectral power decomposition for the study of movement-related spectral changes in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials (LFPs). This approach introduces the concept of movement-related poles, allowing one to study not only the classical event-related desynchronizations (ERD) and synchronizations (ERS), which correspond to modulations of power, but also event-related modulations of frequency. We applied the method to analyze movement-related EEG signals and LFPs contemporarily recorded from the sensorimotor cortex, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in a patient with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic neurosurgery for the implant of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. In the AAR identification we compared the whale and the exponential forgetting factors, showing that the whale forgetting provides a better disturbance rejection and it is therefore more suitable to investigate movement-related brain activity. Movement-related power modulations were consistent with previous studies. In addition, movement-related frequency modulations were observed from both scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia LFPs. The method therefore represents an effective approach to the study of movement-related brain activity.

  14. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2013-01-01

    report of a GHB glucuronide detected in biological samples. Given that glucuronides generally have longer half-life values than their corresponding free drugs, GHB-GLUC should theoretically be a biomarker of GHB intoxication. It is also proposed that the hitherto unexplained reports of elevated GHB......-GLUC and a deuterated analogue for chromatography were synthesized. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry were used for targeted analysis in anonymous clinical urine samples (n = 50). GHB-GLUC was found in concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 5.0 µg/mL (mean: 1.3 ± 1.2 µg/mL). Thus far, this is the first...... concentrations in some biological samples, which has caused the setting of a relatively high cutoff value (10 µg/mL), represent total GHB measurements (sum of free GHB and actively chemically hydrolyzed GHB-GLUC). To address these challenges, the present study must be followed by comprehensive pharmacokinetic...

  15. Screening and identification of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids in inhibiting inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in fat stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Diana; So, Shui-Ping

    2012-08-31

    The molecular mechanisms of dietary oils (such as fish oil) and unsaturated fatty acids, which are widely used by the public for anti-inflammation and vascular protection, have not been settled yet. In this study, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-mediated calcium signaling was used to screen dietary oils and eight unsaturated fatty acids for identification of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Isolated fat/stromal cells expressing endogenous PGE(2) receptors and an HEK293 cell line specifically expressing the recombinant human PGE(2) receptor subtype-1 (EP(1)) were cultured and used in live cell calcium signaling assays. The different dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids were used to affect cell signaling under the specific stimulation of a pathological amount of inflammatory PGE(2). It was identified that fish oil best inhibited the PGE(2) signaling in the primary cultured stromal cells. Second, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), found in abundance in fish oil, was identified as a key factor of inhibition of PGE(2) signaling. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), another major fatty acid found in fish oil and tested in this study was found to have small effect on EP(1) signaling. The study suggested one of the four PGE(2) subtype receptors, EP(1) as the key target for the fish oil and DHA target. These findings were further confirmed by using the recombinant EP(1) expressed in HEK293 cells as a target. This study demonstrated the new mechanism behind the positive effects of dietary fish oils in inhibiting inflammation originates from the rich concentration of DHA, which can directly inhibit the inflammatory EP(1)-mediated PGE(2) receptor signaling, and that the inflammatory response stimulated by PGE(2) in the fat stromal cells, which directly related to metabolic diseases, could be down regulated by fish oil and DHA. These findings also provided direct evidence to support the use of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids for protection against heart disease, pain, and cancer

  16. Bioinformatic identification of FGF, p38-MAKP, and calcium signalling pathways associated with carcinoma in situ in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbsleb, Malene; Christensen, Ole F; Thykjaer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is believed to be a precursor of invasive bladder cancer. Identification of CIS is a valuable prognostic factor since radical treatment strategies can be offered these patients before the disease becomes invasive. Methods We developed a pathway based classifier...... approach to predict presence or absence of CIS in patients suffering from non muscle invasive bladder cancer. From Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we considered four canonical signalling pathways (p38 MAPK, FGF, Calcium, and cAMP pathways) with most coherent expression of transcription factors (TFs) across...

  17. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  18. Enhanced metabolite generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan [Middle Island, NY

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  19. Signal transduction profile of chemical sensitisers in dendritic cells: An endpoint to be included in a cell-based in vitro alternative approach to hazard identification?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Bruno Miguel; Goncalo, Margarida; Figueiredo, Americo; Duarte, Carlos B.; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The development of non-animal testing methods for the assessment of skin sensitisation potential is an urgent challenge within the framework of existing and forthcoming legislation. Efforts have been made to replace current animal tests, but so far no alternative methods have been developed. It is widely recognised that alternatives to animal testing cannot be accomplished with a single approach, but rather will require the integration of results obtained from different in vitro and in silico assays. The argument subjacent to the development of in vitro dendritic cell (DC)-based assays is that sensitiser-induced changes in the DC phenotype can be differentiated from those induced by irritants. This assumption is derived from the unique capacity of DC to convert environmental signals encountered at the skin into a receptor expression pattern (MHC class II molecules, co-stimulatory molecules, chemokine receptors) and a soluble mediator release profile that will stimulate T lymphocytes. Since signal transduction cascades precede changes in surface marker expression and cytokine/chemokine secretion, these phenotypic modifications are a consequence of a signal transduction profile that is specifically triggered by sensitisers and not by irritants. A limited number of studies have addressed this subject and the present review attempts to summarise and highlight all of the signalling pathways modulated by skin sensitisers and irritants. Furthermore, we conclude this review by focusing on the most promising strategies suitable for inclusion into a cell-based in vitro alternative approach to hazard identification.

  20. Digital Receiver-based Electronic Intelligence System Configuration for the Detection and Identification of Intrapulse Modulated Radar Signals

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Singh; K. Subba Rao

    2014-01-01

    An optimum electronic intelligence system configuration incorporating the state of the art technologies and achieving the highest parameter accuracies while processing the complex intrapulse modulated radar signals is presented in this paper. The system is based on the quad digital receiver, a state of the art single board solution for the detection and analysis of modern radar signals. The system consists of base line interferometry  configuration for high accuracy direction finding measurem...

  1. The fusion protein signal-peptide-coding region of canine distemper virus: a useful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction and lineage identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Sarute

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages.

  2. Hardware-efficient robust biometric identification from 0.58 second template and 12 features of limb (Lead I) ECG signal using logistic regression classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahadat, Md Nazmus; Jacobs, Eddie L; Morshed, Bashir I

    2014-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG), widely known as a cardiac diagnostic signal, has recently been proposed for biometric identification of individuals; however reliability and reproducibility are of research interest. In this paper, we propose a template matching technique with 12 features using logistic regression classifier that achieved high reliability and identification accuracy. Non-invasive ECG signals were captured using our custom-built ambulatory EEG/ECG embedded device (NeuroMonitor). ECG data were collected from healthy subjects (10), between 25-35 years, for 10 seconds per trial. The number of trials from each subject was 10. From each trial, only 0.58 seconds of Lead I ECG data were used as template. Hardware-efficient fiducial point detection technique was implemented for feature extraction. To obtain repeated random sub-sampling validation, data were randomly separated into training and testing sets at a ratio of 80:20. Test data were used to find the classification accuracy. ECG template data with 12 extracted features provided the best performance in terms of accuracy (up to 100%) and processing complexity (computation time of 1.2ms). This work shows that a single limb (Lead I) ECG can robustly identify an individual quickly and reliably with minimal contact and data processing using the proposed algorithm.

  3. The fusion protein signal-peptide-coding region of canine distemper virus: a useful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction and lineage identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages.

  4. Production of unusual dispiro metabolites in Pestalotiopsis virgatula endophyte cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Julie Regitze; Olsen, Lars; Stærk, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis virgatula, derived from the plant Terminalia chebula and previously found to produce a large excess of a single metabolite when grown in the minimal M1D medium, was induced to produce a variety of unusual metabolites by growing in potato dextrose broth medium....... Analysis of the fermentation medium extract was performed using an HPLC-PDA-MS-SPE-NMR hyphenated system, which led to the identification of a total of eight metabolites (1-8), six of which are new. Most of the metabolites are structurally related and are derivatives of benzo[c]oxepin, rare among natural...... supported by time-dependent density-functional theory calculations (B3LYP/TZVP level). This work demonstrates that a largely complete structure elucidation of numerous metabolites present in a raw fermentation medium extract can be performed by the HPLC-SPE-NMR technique using only a small amount...

  5. Concentrations of insulin glargine and its metabolites during long-term insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients and comparison of effects of insulin glargine, its metabolites, IGF-I, and human insulin on insulin and IGF-I receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Varewijck (Aimee); H. Yki-Jarvinen (Hannele); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); N. Tennagels (Norbert); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated 1) the ability of purified glargine (GLA), metabolites 1 (M1) and 2 (M2), IGF-I, and NPH insulin to activate the insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) in vitro; 2) plasma concentrations of GLA, M1, and M2 during longterm insulin therapy in type 2

  6. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. - Highlights: • Multiple regions on the Arabidopsis Raptor protein were found to be involved in substrate binding. • N-terminal end of the Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) was responsible for interacting with AtRaptor1. • The Raptor-interacting fragment of AtS6K1 could be utilized as an effective inhibitor of plant TOR signaling.

  7. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. - Highlights: • Multiple regions on the Arabidopsis Raptor protein were found to be involved in substrate binding. • N-terminal end of the Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) was responsible for interacting with AtRaptor1. • The Raptor-interacting fragment of AtS6K1 could be utilized as an effective inhibitor of plant TOR signaling.

  8. Automatic Frequency Identification under Sample Loss in Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation Signals Using an Iterative Autocorrelation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Said

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a simple algorithm to calculate automatically the Fourier spectrum of a Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation Signal (SPWM. Modulated voltage signals of this kind are used in industry by speed drives to vary the speed of alternating current motors while maintaining a smooth torque. Nevertheless, the SPWM technique produces undesired harmonics, which yield stator heating and power losses. By monitoring these signals without human interaction, it is possible to identify the harmonic content of SPWM signals in a fast and continuous manner. The algorithm is based in the autocorrelation function, commonly used in radar and voice signal processing. Taking advantage of the symmetry properties of the autocorrelation, the algorithm is capable of estimating half of the period of the fundamental frequency; thus, allowing one to estimate the necessary number of samples to produce an accurate Fourier spectrum. To deal with the loss of samples, i.e., the scan backlog, the algorithm iteratively acquires and trims the discrete sequence of samples until the required number of samples reaches a stable value. The simulation shows that the algorithm is not affected by either the magnitude of the switching pulses or the acquisition noise.

  9. PROSPECT: Profiling of Resistance Patterns Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Evaluation of Cancers of the Thorax and Therapeutic Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    resistance and into the relationship of resistance mechanisms to factors innately affecting tumor growth rate and prognosis 4. Identification of readily...B–D). The cells were harvested by trypsinization from subconfluent stock cultures and seeded in 96-well plates at a density of 3,000 per wellCancer...associated with a shorter latency , more frequent metastasis, and accelerated pul- monary tumorigenesis.22 Also, in support of these observations are

  10. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  11. Identification of transcriptional signals in Encephalitozoon cuniculi widespread among Microsporidia phylum: support for accurate structural genome annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wincker Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsporidia are obligate intracellular eukaryotic parasites with genomes ranging in size from 2.3 Mbp to more than 20 Mbp. The extremely small (2.9 Mbp and highly compact (~1 gene/kb genome of the human parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi has been fully sequenced. The aim of this study was to characterize noncoding motifs that could be involved in regulation of gene expression in E. cuniculi and to show whether these motifs are conserved among the phylum Microsporidia. Results To identify such signals, 5' and 3'RACE-PCR experiments were performed on different E. cuniculi mRNAs. This analysis confirmed that transcription overrun occurs in E. cuniculi and may result from stochastic recognition of the AAUAAA polyadenylation signal. Such experiments also showed highly reduced 5'UTR's (E. cuniculi genes presented a CCC-like motif immediately upstream from the coding start. To characterize other signals involved in differential transcriptional regulation, we then focused our attention on the gene family coding for ribosomal proteins. An AAATTT-like signal was identified upstream from the CCC-like motif. In rare cases the cytosine triplet was shown to be substituted by a GGG-like motif. Comparative genomic studies confirmed that these different signals are also located upstream from genes encoding ribosomal proteins in other microsporidian species including Antonospora locustae, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Anncaliia algerae (syn. Brachiola algerae and Nosema ceranae. Based on these results a systematic analysis of the ~2000 E. cuniculi coding DNA sequences was then performed and brings to highlight that 364 translation initiation codons (18.29% of total CDSs had been badly predicted. Conclusion We identified various signals involved in the maturation of E. cuniculi mRNAs. Presence of such signals, in phylogenetically distant microsporidian species, suggests that a common regulatory mechanism exists among the microsporidia. Furthermore

  12. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P.L.; Stagni, L.; Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Manfredi, P.F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.

    1995-01-01

    Charged particle (π/K) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of the preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented. (orig.)

  13. Identification of metabolites in urine and feces from rats dosed with the heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H.; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeAalphaC) is a proximate mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amine formed during ordinary cooking. In model systems, MeAalphaC can be formed by pyrolyses of either tryptophan or proteins of animal or vegetable origin. In the present study, the in vivo....... Conjugated metabolites were characterized by enzymatic hydrolyzes with beta-glucuronidase or arylsulfatase. The data showed that the metabolic pattern of MeAalphaC was similar in all rats. About 65% of the dose was excreted in urine and feces, and the major amount of MeAalphaC-metabolites was excreted during...

  14. A neural network method for identification of prokaryotic and eukaryotic signal peptides and prediction of their cleavage sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the identication of signal peptides and their cleavage sites based on neural networks trained on separate sets of prokaryotic and eukaryotic sequences. The method performs signicantly better than previous prediction schemes, and can easily be applied to genome...

  15. Analysis of EEG signal by flicker-noise spectroscopy: identification of right-/left-hand movement imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniec, A

    2016-12-01

    Flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS) is a general phenomenological approach to analyzing dynamics of complex nonlinear systems by extracting information contained in chaotic signals. The main idea of FNS is to describe an information hidden in correlation links, which are present in the chaotic component of the signal, by a set of parameters. In the paper, FNS is used for the analysis of electroencephalography signal related to the hand movement imagination. The signal has been parametrized in accordance with the FNS method, and significant changes in the FNS parameters have been observed, at the time when the subject imagines the movement. For the right-hand movement imagination, abrupt changes (visible as a peak) of the parameters, calculated for the data recorded from the left hemisphere, appear at the time corresponding to the initial moment of the imagination. In contrary, for the left-hand movement imagination, the meaningful changes in the parameters are observed for the data recorded from the right hemisphere. As the motor cortex is activated mainly contralaterally to the hand, the analysis of the FNS parameters allows to distinguish between the imagination of the right- and left-hand movement. This opens its potential application in the brain-computer interface.

  16. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and Classification of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) Signals Used in Next Generation Wireless Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    added flexibility allows for increased freedom in user scheduling, increased multiuser diversity, and many other subtle but significant...beamforming and multiuser diversity. This scheme was chosen to be simulated in this thesis because it, in conjunction with the DL PUSC, represents two types...extraction for OFDM signal detection and classification include frame preamble cyclostationary signature extraction, embedded cyclostationary signature

  18. Identification of ATF-7 and the insulin signaling pathway in the regulation of metallothionein in C. elegans suggests roles in aging and reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwee, Matthew K.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that aging results from the lifelong accumulation of intracellular damage via reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metallothioneins are conserved cysteine-rich proteins that function as efficient ROS scavengers and may affect longevity. To better understand mechanisms controlling metallothionein expression, the regulatory factors and pathways that controlled cadmium-inducible transcription of the C. elegans metallothionein gene, mtl-1, were identified. The transcription factor ATF-7 was identified in both ethylmethanesulfonate mutagenesis and candidate gene screens. PMK-1 and members of the insulin signaling pathway, PDK-1 and AKT-1/2, were also identified as mtl-1 regulators. Genetic and previous results support a model for the regulation of cadmium-inducible mtl-1 transcription based on the derepression of the constitutively active transcription factor ELT-2. In addition, knockdown of the mammalian homologs of PDK1 and ATF7 in HEK293 cells resulted in changes in metallothionein expression, suggesting that this pathway was evolutionarily conserved. The insulin signaling pathway is known to influence the aging process; however, various factors responsible for affecting the aging phenotype are unknown. Identification of portions of the insulin signaling pathway as regulators of metallothionein expression supports the hypothesis that longevity is affected by the expression of this efficient ROS scavenger. PMID:28632756

  19. Structured assessment for prospective identification of safety signals in electronic medical records: evaluation in the health improvement network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederholm, S; Hill, G; Asiimwe, A; Bate, A; Bhayat, F; Persson Brobert, G; Bergvall, T; Ansell, D; Star, K; Norén, G N

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance signal detection largely relies on individual case reports, but longitudinal health data are being explored as complementary information sources. Research to date has focused on the ability of epidemiological methods to distinguish established adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from unrelated adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate a process for structured clinical and epidemiological assessment of temporally associated drugs and medical events in electronic medical records. Pairs of drugs and medical events were selected for review on the basis of their temporal association according to a calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis in The Health Improvement Network. Six assessors trained in pharmacovigilance and/or epidemiology evaluated seven drugs each, with up to 20 medical events per drug. A pre-specified questionnaire considered aspects related to the nature of the temporal pattern, demographic features of the cohort, concomitant medicines, earlier signs and symptoms, and possible confounding by underlying disease. This informed a classification of drug-event pairs as known ADRs, meriting further evaluation, or dismissed. The number of temporally associated medical events per drug ranged from 11 to 307 (median 50) for the 42 selected drugs. Out of the 509 relevant drug-event combinations subjected to the assessment, 127 (25 %) were classified as known ADRs. Ninety-one (24 %) of the remaining pairs were classified as potential signals meriting further evaluation and 291 (76 %) were dismissed. Suggestive temporal patterns and lack of clear alternative explanations were the most common reasons that drug-event pairs were classified as meriting further evaluation. Earlier signs and symptoms and confounding by the underlying disease were the most common reasons that drug-event pairs were dismissed. Exploratory analysis of electronic medical records can detect important potential safety signals. However, effective signal detection requires

  20. Screening and identification of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids in inhibiting inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in fat stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms of dietary oils (such as fish oil and unsaturated fatty acids, which are widely used by the public for anti-inflammation and vascular protection, have not been settled yet. In this study, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-mediated calcium signaling was used to screen dietary oils and eight unsaturated fatty acids for identification of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Isolated fat/stromal cells expressing endogenous PGE2 receptors and an HEK293 cell line specifically expressing the recombinant human PGE2 receptor subtype-1 (EP1 were cultured and used in live cell calcium signaling assays. The different dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids were used to affect cell signaling under the specific stimulation of a pathological amount of inflammatory PGE2. Results It was identified that fish oil best inhibited the PGE2 signaling in the primary cultured stromal cells. Second, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, found in abundance in fish oil, was identified as a key factor of inhibition of PGE2 signaling. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, another major fatty acid found in fish oil and tested in this study was found to have small effect on EP1 signaling. The study suggested one of the four PGE2 subtype receptors, EP1 as the key target for the fish oil and DHA target. These findings were further confirmed by using the recombinant EP1 expressed in HEK293 cells as a target. Conclusion This study demonstrated the new mechanism behind the positive effects of dietary fish oils in inhibiting inflammation originates from the rich concentration of DHA, which can directly inhibit the inflammatory EP1-mediated PGE2 receptor signaling, and that the inflammatory response stimulated by PGE2 in the fat stromal cells, which directly related to metabolic diseases, could be down regulated by fish oil and DHA. These findings also provided direct evidence to support the use of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids for protection against heart

  1. Selective capture and rapid identification of Panax notoginseng metabolites in rat faeces by the integration of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qizhi; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Xuemin; Hong, Junli

    2016-07-15

    In the present work, an advanced pretreatment method magnetic molecular imprinted polymers-dispersive solid phase extraction (MMIPs-DSPE) combined with the high sensitivity LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry was applied to the complicated metabolites analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) in complex matrices. The ginsenoside Rb1 magnetic molecular imprinted polymers (Rb1-MMIPs) were successfully synthesized for specific recognition and selective enrichment of Panax notoginseng saponin metabolites in rat faeces. The polymers were prepared by using Fe3O4@SiO2 as the supporting material, APTES as the functional monomer and TEOS as the cross-linker. The Rb1-MMIPs showed quick separation (10.8 emu/g), large adsorption capacity (636μmol/g), high selectivity and fast binding kinetics (25min). Dispersion solid-phase extraction using Rb1-MMIPs (Rb1-MMIPs-DSPE) integrated with LTQ-Orbitrap MS was applied to fish out and identify saponin metabolites from rat faeces, and totally 58 related compounds were detected within 20min, including 26 PPD-group and 32 PPT-group notoginsenoside metabolites. Parallel tests showed that Rb1-MMIPs-DSPE obtained the lowest matrix effects of 0.98-14.84% and captured the largest number of structural analogues compared with traditional pretreatment methods organic solvent extraction (OSE) and solid phase extraction (SPE). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of metabolites in urine and feces from rats dosed with the heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H; Frandsen, H

    2004-01-01

    , the in vivo metabolism of MeA alpha C in rats was investigated. Rats were dosed with tritium-labeled MeA alpha C, and urine and feces were collected over 3 days. The metabolites of MeA alpha C were identified by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantified by liquid scintillation...

  3. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Samudrala

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates--effector proteins--are not. We have used a novel computational approach to confidently identify new secreted effectors by integrating protein sequence-based features, including evolutionary measures such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, G+C content, amino acid composition, and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and validated on a set of effectors from the animal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. We show that this approach can predict known secreted effectors with high specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, by considering a large set of effectors from multiple organisms, we computationally identify a common putative secretion signal in the N-terminal 20 residues of secreted effectors. This signal can be used to discriminate 46 out of 68 total known effectors from both organisms, suggesting that it is a real, shared signal applicable to many type III secreted effectors. We use the method to make novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. Typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated. We also apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, identifying the majority of known secreted proteins in addition to providing a number of novel predictions. This approach provides a new way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  4. RSSsite: a reference database and prediction tool for the identification of cryptic Recombination Signal Sequences in human and murine genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Merelli, Ivan; Guffanti, Alessandro; Fabbri, Marco; Cocito, Andrea; Furia, Laura; Grazini, Ursula; Bonnal, Raoul J.; Milanesi, Luciano; McBlane, Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking V, D and J gene segments are recognized and cut by the VDJ recombinase during development of B and T lymphocytes. All RSSs are composed of seven conserved nucleotides, followed by a spacer (containing either 12 ? 1 or 23 ? 1 poorly conserved nucleotides) and a conserved nonamer. Errors in V(D)J recombination, including cleavage of cryptic RSS outside the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor loci, are associated with oncogenic translocations observe...

  5. Identification of a Signal That Mediates the Crosstalk Between Biosynthetic Gene Clusters for the Antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and Pyoluteorin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites with anti-microbial activity. The production of two of these metabolites, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin, is coordinately regulated. Our previous study indicated that phloroglucinol, an intermediate in t...

  6. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: indirect neutrino signals vis-a-vis direct detection recoil rates

    CERN Document Server

    Serpico, Pasquale D

    2010-01-01

    A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particle. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velo...

  8. Principal component and discriminant analyses as powerful tools to support taxonomic identification and their use for functional and phylogenetic signal detection of isolated fossil shark teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Marramà

    Full Text Available Identifying isolated teeth of fossil selachians only based on qualitative characters is sometimes hindered by similarity in their morphology, resulting often in heated taxonomic debates. On the other hand, the use of quantitative characters (i.e. measurements has been often neglected or underestimated in characterization and identification of fossil teeth of selachians. Here we show that, employing a robust methodological protocol based on principal component and discriminant analyses on a sample of 175 isolated fossil teeth of lamniform sharks, the traditional morphometrics can be useful to support and complement the classic taxonomic identification made on qualitative features. Furthermore, we show that discriminant analysis can be successfully useful to assign indeterminate isolated shark teeth to a certain taxon. Finally, the degree of separation of the clusters might be used to predict functional and probably also phylogenetic signals in lamniform shark teeth. However, this needs to be tested in the future employing teeth of more extant and extinct lamniform sharks and it must be pointed out that this approach does not replace in any way the qualitative analysis, but it is intended to complement and support it.

  9. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  10. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  11. Identification of a Novel TGFβ/PKA Signaling Transduceome in Mediating Control of Cell Survival and Metastasis in Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Ashwani; Teggart, Carol A.; Brattain, Lisa E.; Weber, Hannah R.; Chowdhury, Aparajita; Brattain, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding drivers for metastasis in human cancer is important for potential development of therapies to treat metastases. The role of loss of TGFβ tumor suppressor activities in the metastatic process is essentially unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing in vitro and in vivo techniques, we have shown that loss of TGFβ tumor suppressor signaling is necessary to allow the last step of the metastatic process - colonization of the metastatic site. This work demonstrates for the first time that TGFβ receptor reconstitution leads to decreased metastatic colonization. Moreover, we have identified a novel TGFβ/PKA tumor suppressor pathway that acts directly on a known cell survival mechanism that responds to stress with the survivin/XIAP dependent inhibition of caspases that effect apoptosis. The linkage between the TGFβ/PKA transduceome signaling and control of metastasis through induction of cell death was shown by TGFβ receptor restoration with reactivation of the TGFβ/PKA pathway in receptor deficient metastatic colon cancer cells leading to control of aberrant cell survival. Conclusion/Significance This work impacts our understanding of the possible mechanisms that are critical to the growth and maintenance of metastases as well as understanding of a novel TGFβ function as a metastatic suppressor. These results raise the possibility that regeneration of attenuated TGFβ signaling would be an effective target in the treatment of metastasis. Our work indicates the clinical potential for developing anti-metastasis therapy based on inhibition of this very important aberrant cell survival mechanism by the multifaceted TGFβ/PKA transduceome induced pathway. Development of effective treatments for metastatic disease is a pressing need since metastases are the major cause of death in solid tumors. PMID:21559296

  12. Identification of human and murine sulfotransferases able to activate hydroxylated metabolites of methyleugenol to mutagens in Salmonella typhimurium and detection of associated DNA adducts using UPLC-MS/MS methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Kristin; Engst, Wolfram; Appel, Klaus E; Monien, Bernhard H; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-07-01

    Methyleugenol, a secondary metabolite present in many herbal spices, is carcinogenic in various tissues of mice and rats but negative in standard in vitro mutagenicity tests. Several observations indicate that hydroxylation followed by sulfation is an important activation pathway in the carcinogenicity and DNA adduct formation by methyleugenol and other alkenylbenzenes in animal models. However, sulfation is not taken into account in standard in vitro tests. Therefore, we have studied whether expression of murine or human sulfotransferases (SULTs) in the target strain, Salmonella typhimurium TA100, leads to the activation of hydroxylated metabolites of methyleugenol [(+)-1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, (-)-1'-hydroxymethyleugenol and (E)-3'-hydroxymethylisoeugenol]. Human SULT1A1 (a form expressed at high levels in many tissues) and SULT1C2 (expressed primarily in foetal tissues) activated all three compounds even at very low substrate concentrations. At higher concentrations, activation was also observed with human SULT1A2 and SULT1E1. Murine Sult1a1 required higher substrate concentrations than its human orthologue. Other SULT forms (human 1A3, 1C1, 1C3, 2A1 and 2B1b as well as murine 1d1) did not activate any methyleugenol metabolites studied. Furthermore, we developed isotope-dilution mass-spectrometric methods for the sensitive and specific detection of DNA adducts formed by methyleugenol metabolites. All three hydroxylated metabolites formed the same DNA adducts in S. typhimurium TA100-hSULT1A1: high levels of N (2)-(trans-methylisoeugenol-3'-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine and modest levels of N (6)-(trans-methylisoeugenol-3'-yl)-2'-deoxyadenosine. Adduct levels correlated with the mutagenic effects induced. No adducts were formed by the test compounds in the SULT-deficient standard strain TA100. In conclusion, several methyleugenol metabolites are activated to DNA-reactive mutagens in S. typhimurium upon incorporation of appropriate sulfation capacity. We have identified

  13. Metabolite production by differnt Ulocladium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Hollensted, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Ulocladium, which is phylogenetically related to Alternaria, contains species that are food spoilers and plant pathogens, but also species that have potential as enzyme producers and bio-control agents. Ulocladium spp. are often found on dead vegetation, in soil, air and dust, but also on food...... metabolites was correlated to species identity and source of isolation (substratum). Chemical analyses corroborated the morphological identifications and showed the existence of several species species-specific metabolites, of which most were known Compounds. The production of curvularins was specific...... to Ulocladium atrum, while most species produced infectopyrones and derivatives of altertoxin I. None of the 52 Ulocladium strains produced alternariols, tenuazonic acid, altersolanols or macrosporin, which are common in species of Alternaria. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved...

  14. Identification of cyclin A2 as the downstream effector of the nuclear phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ka-Kei; Anderson, Alexandra A; Rosivatz, Erika; Lam, Eric W-F; Woscholski, Rüdiger; Mann, David J

    2008-02-29

    In addition to the well characterized phosphoinositide second messengers derived from the plasma membrane, increasing evidence supports the existence of a nuclear phosphoinositide signaling network. The aim of this investigation was to dissect the role played by nuclear phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) in cell cycle progression and to determine the cell cycle regulatory component(s) that are involved. A number of cytosolic/nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2-deficient Swiss 3T3 cell lines were established, and their G 0/G 1/S cell cycle phase transitions induced by defined mitogens were examined. Our results demonstrate that nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 down-regulation caused a delay in phorbol ester-induced S phase entry and that this was at least in part channeled through cyclin A2 at the transcriptional level. In summary, these data identify cyclin A2 as a downstream effector of the nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 signaling network and highlight the importance of nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the regulation of mammalian mitogenesis.

  15. LncRNAs in Secondary Hair Follicle of Cashmere Goat: Identification, Expression, and Their Regulatory Network in Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wen L; Zhao, Su J; Wang, Ze Y; Zhu, Yu B; Dang, Yun L; Cong, Yu Y; Xue, Hui L; Wang, Wei; Deng, Liang; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Zhu, Yan X; Yin, Rong H

    2018-07-03

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of eukaryotic transcripts. They are thought to act as a critical regulator of protein-coding gene expression. Herein, we identified and characterized 13 putative lncRNAs from the expressed sequence tags from secondary hair follicle of Cashmere goat. Furthermore, we investigated their transcriptional pattern in secondary hair follicle of Liaoning Cashmere goat during telogen and anagen phases. Also, we generated intracellular regulatory networks of upregulated lncRNAs at anagen in Wnt signaling pathway based on bioinformatics analysis. The relative expression of six putative lncRNAs (lncRNA-599618, -599556, -599554, -599547, -599531, and -599509) at the anagen phase is significantly higher than that at telogen. Compared with anagen, the relative expression of four putative lncRNAs (lncRNA-599528, -599518, -599511, and -599497) was found to be significantly upregulated at telogen phase. The network generated showed that a rich and complex regulatory relationship of the putative lncRNAs and related miRNAs with their target genes in Wnt signaling pathway. Our results from the present study provided a foundation for further elucidating the functional and regulatory mechanisms of these putative lncRNAs in the development of secondary hair follicle and cashmere fiber growth of Cashmere goat.

  16. Identification of a nuclear export signal in the KSHV latent protein LANA2 mediating its export from the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Fontela, C.; Collado, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia, M.A.; Alvarez-Barrientos, A.; Arroyo, J.; Nombela, C.; Rivas, C.

    2005-01-01

    LANA2 is a latent protein detected in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected B cells that inhibits p53-dependent transcriptional transactivation and apoptosis and PKR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. It has been reported that LANA2 localizes into the nucleus of both KSHV-infected B cells and transiently transfected HeLa cells. In this study, we show that LANA2 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that requires a Rev-type nuclear export signal located in the C-terminus to direct the protein to the cytoplasm, through an association with the export receptor CRM1. In addition, a functional protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt phosphorylation motif partially overlapping with the nuclear export signal was identified. Nuclear exclusion of LANA2 was negatively regulated by the phosphorylation of threonine 564 by Akt. The ability of LANA2 to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm has implications for the function of this viral protein

  17. From Hans Selye's discovery of biological stress to the identification of corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways: implication in stress-related functional bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Brunnhuber, Stefan

    2008-12-01

    Selye pioneered the concept of biological stress in 1936, culminating in the identification of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways by Vale's group in the last two decades. The characterization of the 41 amino-acid CRF and other peptide members of the mammalian CRF family, urocortin 1, urocortin 2, and urocortin 3, and the cloning of CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors, which display distinct affinity for CRF ligands, combined with the development of selective CRF receptor antagonists enable us to unravel the importance of CRF(1) receptor in the stress-related endocrine (activation of pituitary-adrenal axis), behavioral (anxiety/depression, altered feeding), autonomic (activation of sympathetic nervous system), and immune responses. The activation of CRF(1) receptors is also one of the key mechanisms through which various stressors impact the gut to stimulate colonic propulsive motor function and to induce hypersensitivity to colorectal distension as shown by the efficacy of the CRF(1) receptor antagonists in blunting these stress-related components. The importance of CRF(1) signaling pathway in the visceral response to stress in experimental animals provided new therapeutic approaches for treatment of functional bowel disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome, a multifactor functional disorder characterized by altered bowel habits and visceral pain, for which stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology and is associated with anxiety-depression in a subset of patients.

  18. The use of secondary metabolite profiling in chemotaxonomy of filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Andersen, Birgitte; Thrane, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    distribution throughout the fungal kingdom. However, this is the very quality that makes secondary metabolites so useful in classification and identification. Four groups of organisms are particularly good producers of secondary metabolites: plants, fungi, lichen fungi, and actinomycetes, whereas yeasts...... have been analysed for a wide array of terpenes, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and combinations of these. Fungal chemotaxonomy based on secondary metabolites has been used successfully in large ascomycete genera such as Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Hypoxylon, Penicillium, Stachybotrys...

  19. Screening and identification of metabolites of two kinds of main active ingredients and hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in rat after lavage Farfarae Flos extract by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoye; Liao, Man; Diao, Xinpeng; Sun, Yupeng; Zhang, Lantong

    2018-02-01

    Farfarae Flos, the dried flower buds of Tussilago farfara L., is usually used to treat coughs, bronchitic and asthmatic conditions as an important traditional Chinese medicine. Tussilagone and methl butyric acid tussilagin ester are seen as representatives of two kinds of active substances. In addition, the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, mainly senkirkine and senecionine, present in the herb can be hepatoxic. In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was successfully applied to identify the metabolites of tussilagone, methl butyric acid tussilagin ester, senkirkine and senecionine. A total of 35, 37, 18 and nine metabolites of tussilagone, methl butyric acid tussilagin ester, senkirkine and senecionine in rats were tentatively identified. Hydrolysis, oxidation, reduction and demethylation were the major metabolic reactions for tussilagone and methl butyric acid tussilagin ester. The main biotransformation routes of senkirkine and senecionine were identified as demethylation, N-methylation, oxidation and reduction. This study is the first reported analysis and characterization of the metabolites and the proposed metabolic pathways might provide further understanding of the metabolic fate of the chemical constituents after oral administration of Farfarae Flos extract in vivo. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Design and testing of the high speed signal densely populated ATLAS calorimeter trigger board dedicate to jet identification

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira De Souza, Julio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Abstract—The ATLAS experiment has planned a major upgrade in view of the enhanced luminosity of the beam delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2021. As part of this, the trigger at Level-1 based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit fine-granularity readout using a new system of Feature Extractors (three in total), which each uses different physics objects for the trigger selection. The contribution focusses on the jet Feature EXtractor (jFEX) prototype. Up to a data volume of 2 TB/s has to be processed to provide jet identification (including large area jets) and measurements of global variables within few hundred nanoseconds latency budget. Such requirements translate into the use of large Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) with the largest number of Multi Gigabit Transceivers (MGTs) available on the market. The jFEX board prototype hosts four large FPGAs from the Xilinx Ultrascale family with 120 MGTs each, connected to 24 opto-electrical devices, resulting in a densely populated hi...

  1. Identification of microRNAs in six solanaceous plants and their potential link with phosphate and mycorrhizal signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mian; Liu, Wei; Meng, Qi; Zhang, Wenqi; Chen, Aiqun; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    To date, only a limited number of solanaceous miRNAs have been deposited in the miRNA database. Here, genome-wide bioinformatic identification of miRNAs was performed in six solanaceous plants (potato, tomato, tobacco, eggplant, pepper, and petunia). A total of 2,239 miRNAs were identified following a range of criteria, of which 982 were from potato, 496 from tomato, 655 from tobacco, 46 from eggplant, 45 were from pepper, and 15 from petunia. The sizes of miRNA families and miRNA precursor length differ in all the species. Accordingly, 620 targets were predicted, which could be functionally classified as transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, RNA and protein processing proteins, and other proteins for plant growth and development. We also showed evidence for miRNA clusters and sense and antisense miRNAs. Additionally, five Pi starvation- and one arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM)-related cis-elements were found widely distributed in the putative promoter regions of the miRNA genes. Selected miRNAs were classified into three groups based on the presence or absence of P1BS and MYCS cis-elements, and their expression in response to Pi starvation and AM symbiosis was validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These results show that conserved miRNAs exist in solanaceous species and they might play pivotal roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Design and testing of the high speed signal densely populated ATLAS calorimeter trigger board dedicate to jet identification

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira De Souza, Julio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has planned a major upgrade in view of the enhanced luminosity of the beam delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2021. As part of this, the trigger at Level-1 based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit fine-granularity readout using a new system of Feature Extractors (three in total), which each uses different physics objects for the trigger selection. The contribution focusses on the jet Feature EXtractor (jFEX) prototype. Up to a data volume of 2 TB/s has to be processed to provide jet identification (including large area jets) and measurements of global variables within few hundred nanoseconds latency budget. Such requirements translate into the use of large Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) with the largest number of Multi Gigabit Transceivers (MGTs) available on the market. The jFEX board prototype hosts four large FPGAs from the Xilinx Ultrascale family with 120 MGTs each, connected to 24 opto-electrical devices, resulting in a densely populated high speed si...

  3. Isotopic identification using Pulse Shape Analysis of current signals from silicon detectors: Recent results from the FAZIA collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Gruyer, D.; Ottanelli, P.; Le Neindre, N.; Pasquali, G.; Alba, R.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The FAZIA apparatus exploits Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) to identify nuclear fragments stopped in the first layer of a Silicon-Silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescope. In this work, for the first time, we show that the isotopes of fragments having atomic number as high as Z∼20 can be identified. Such a remarkable result has been obtained thanks to a careful construction of the Si detectors and to the use of low noise and high performance digitizing electronics. Moreover, optimized PSA algorithms are needed. This work deals with the choice of the best algorithm for PSA of current signals. A smoothing spline algorithm is demonstrated to give optimal results without requiring too much computational resources.

  4. Isotopic identification using Pulse Shape Analysis of current signals from silicon detectors: Recent results from the FAZIA collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, G., E-mail: pastore@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gruyer, D. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ottanelli, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Le Neindre, N. [LPC Caen, Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, 14000 Caen (France); Pasquali, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Alba, R. [INFN LNS, Via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Barlini, S.; Bini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bonnet, E. [SUBATECH, EMN-IN2P3/CNRS-Université de Nantes, Nantes (France); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Borderie, B. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R. [LPC Caen, Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, 14000 Caen (France); Bruno, M. [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Casini, G. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); and others

    2017-07-11

    The FAZIA apparatus exploits Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) to identify nuclear fragments stopped in the first layer of a Silicon-Silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescope. In this work, for the first time, we show that the isotopes of fragments having atomic number as high as Z∼20 can be identified. Such a remarkable result has been obtained thanks to a careful construction of the Si detectors and to the use of low noise and high performance digitizing electronics. Moreover, optimized PSA algorithms are needed. This work deals with the choice of the best algorithm for PSA of current signals. A smoothing spline algorithm is demonstrated to give optimal results without requiring too much computational resources.

  5. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Novel IL-4 Receptor α Chain (IL-4Rα Antagonist to Inhibit IL-4 Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyar Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent times, allergy has become a financial, physical and psychological burden to the society as a whole. In allergic cascades, cytokine IL-4 binds to IL-4 receptor (IL-4R, consequently producing allergen-specific IgE antibodies by B cells. In addition, among other functions, IL-4 is also responsible for B and T cell proliferation and differentiation. Hence, characterization of novel antagonists that inhibit IL-4 signalling forms the overall aim of this study. Methods: Phage display was used to screen a random 12-mer synthetic peptide library with a human IL-4Rα to identify peptide candidates. Once identified, the peptides were commercially synthesized and used for in vitro immunoassays. Results: We have successfully used phage display to identify M13 phage clones that demonstrated specific binding to IL-4Rα. The peptide N1 was synthesized for use in ELISA, demonstrating significant binding to IL-4Rα and inhibiting interaction with cytokine IL-4. Furthermore, the peptide was tested in a transfected HEK-Blue IL-4 reporter cell line model, which produces alkaline phosphatase (AP. QUANTI-Blue, a substrate, breaks down in the presence of AP producing a blue coloration. Using this colorimetric analysis, >50% inhibition of IL-4 signalling was achieved. Conclusion: We have successfully identified and characterised a synthetic peptide antagonist against IL-4Rα, which effectively inhibits IL-4 interaction with the IL-4Rα in vitro. Since IL-4 interaction with IL-4Rα is a common pathway for many allergies, a prophylactic treatment can be devised by inhibiting this interaction for future treatment of allergies.

  7. Identification of H-Ras-Specific Motif for the Activation of Invasive Signaling Program in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression and/or activation of H-Ras are often associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. Previously, we showed that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces MCF10A human breast epithelial cell invasion and migration, whereas both H-Ras and N-Ras induce cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation. In an attempt to determine the sequence requirement directing the divergent phenotype induced by H-Ras and N-Ras with a focus on the induction of human breast cell invasion, we investigated the structural and functional relationships between H-Ras and N-Ras using domain-swap and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Here, we report that the hypervariable region (HVR, consisting of amino acids 166 to 189 in H-Ras, determines the invasive/migratory signaling program as shown by the exchange of invasive phenotype by swapping HVR sequences between H-Ras and N-Ras. We also demonstrate that the H-Ras-specific additional palmitoylation site at Cys184 is not responsible for the signaling events that distinguish between H-Ras and N-Ras. Importantly, this work identifies the C-terminal HVR, especially the flexible linker domain with two consecutive proline residues Pro173 and Pro174, as a critical domain that contributes to activation of H-Ras and its invasive potential in human breast epithelial cells. The present study sheds light on the structural basis for the Ras isoform-specific invasive program of breast epithelial cells, providing information for the development of agents that specifically target invasion-related H-Ras pathways in human cancer.

  8. Analytical Methods for the Quantification of Histamine and Histamine Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-01-01

    The endogenous metabolite histamine (HA) is synthesized in various mammalian cells but can also be ingested from exogenous sources. It is involved in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological processes. So far, four different HA receptors (H 1 R-H 4 R) have been described and numerous HAR antagonists have been developed. Contemporary investigations regarding the various roles of HA and its main metabolites have been hampered by the lack of highly specific and sensitive analytic methods for all of these analytes. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the method of choice for identification and sensitive quantification of many low-molecular weight endogenous metabolites. In this chapter, different methodological aspects of HA quantification as well as recommendations for LC-MS/MS methods suitable for analysis of HA and its main metabolites are summarized.

  9. Short communication: Practical issues in implementing volatile metabolite analysis for identifying mastitis pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, K.A.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Lam, T.

    2015-01-01

    Several parameters for improving volatile metabolite analysis using headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of volatile metabolites were evaluated in the framework of identification of mastitis-causing pathogens. Previous research showed that the results of such volatile

  10. Short communication : Practical issues in implementing volatile metabolite analysis for identifying mastitis pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Kasper A; de Bok, Frank A M; Lam, Theo J G M

    2015-01-01

    Several parameters for improving volatile metabolite analysis using headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of volatile metabolites were evaluated in the framework of identification of mastitis-causing pathogens. Previous research showed that the results of such volatile

  11. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  12. Identification of a PEAK1/ZEB1 signaling axis during TGFβ/fibronectin-induced EMT in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agajanian, Megan; Runa, Farhana; Kelber, Jonathan A., E-mail: jonathan.kelber@csun.edu

    2015-09-25

    Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) is the archetypal member of the TGFβ superfamily of ligands and has pleiotropic functions during normal development, adult tissue homeostasis and pathophysiological processes such as cancer. In epithelial cancers TGFβ signaling can either suppress tumor growth or promote metastasis via the induction of a well-characterized epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. We recently reported that PEAK1 kinase mediates signaling cross talk between TGFβ receptors and integrin/Src/MAPK pathways and functions as a critical molecular regulator of TGFβ-induced breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT and metastasis. Here, we examined the breast cancer cell contexts in which TGFβ induces both EMT and PEAK1, and discovered this event to be unique to oncogene-transformed mammary epithelial cells and triple-negative breast cancer cells. Using the Cancer BioPortal database, we identified PEAK1 co-expressors across multiple malignancies that are also common to the TGFβ response gene signature (TBRS). We then used the ScanSite database to identify predicted protein–protein binding partners of PEAK1 and the PEAK1-TBRS co-expressors. Analysis of the Cytoscape interactome and Babelomics-derived gene ontologies for a novel gene set including PEAK1, CRK, ZEB1, IL11 and COL4A1 enabled us to hypothesize that PEAK1 may be regulating TGFβ-induced EMT via its interaction with or regulation of these other genes. In this regard, we have demonstrated that PEAK1 is necessary for TGFβ to induce ZEB1-mediated EMT in the context of fibronectin/ITGB3 activation. These studies and future mechanistic studies will pave the way toward identifying the context in which TGFβ blockade may significantly improve breast cancer patient outcomes. - Highlights: • PEAK1 is upregulated in mammary epithelial cells during TGFβ-induced EMT. • TGFβ-induced EMT upregulates PEAK1 in triple negative breast cancer. • PEAK1 is necessary for TGF

  13. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhan, Qian [The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical Detection, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xu, Hongying [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili; Li, Chen [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: larissaxiang@163.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rengs726@126.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-10

    The KRAB–zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. -- Highlights: •Downregulated ZNF545 in MM tissues and cell lines and ectopic expression of ZNF545 suppresses tumor growth. •Tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 represents an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. •ZNF545 exerts its tumor suppressive effects via transcriptional activating p53 pathway.

  14. Identification of an Intracranial Pressure (ICP) Response Function from Continuously Acquired Electroencephalographic and ICP Signals in Burst-Suppressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark; Liou, Raymond; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) and electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring are used in the management of patients with brain injury. It is possible that these two signals could be related through neurovascular coupling. To explore this mechanism, we modeled the ICP response to brain activity by treating spontaneous burst activity in burst-suppressed patients as an impulse, and identified the ICP response function (ICPRF) as the subsequent change in ICP.Segments of ICP were filtered, classified as elevating or stable, and suitable ICPRFs were identified. After calibration, each ICPRF was convolved with the EEG to produce the estimated ICP. The mean error (ME) versus distance from the selected ICPRF was calculated and the elevating and stable ICP segments compared.Eighty-four ICPRFs were identified from 15 data segments. The ME of the elevating segments increased at an average rate of 57 mmHg/min, whereas the average ME of the stable segments increased at a rate of 0.05 mmHg/min.These findings demonstrate that deriving an ICPRF from a burst-suppressed patient is a suitable approach for stable segments. To completely model the ICP response to EEG activity, a more robust model should be developed.

  15. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yu; Zhan, Qian; Xu, Hongying; Li, Lili; Li, Chen; Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli; Xiang, Tingxiu; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB–zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. -- Highlights: •Downregulated ZNF545 in MM tissues and cell lines and ectopic expression of ZNF545 suppresses tumor growth. •Tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 represents an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. •ZNF545 exerts its tumor suppressive effects via transcriptional activating p53 pathway.

  16. Identification of Voxels Confounded by Venous Signals Using Resting-State fMRI Functional Connectivity Graph Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudius eKalcher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying venous voxels in fMRI datasets is important to increase the specificity of fMRI analyses to microvasculature in the vicinity of the neural processes triggering the BOLD response. This is, however, difficult to achieve in particular in typical studies where magnitude images of BOLD EPI are the only data available. In this study, voxelwise functional connectivity graphs were computed on minimally preprocessed low TR (333 ms multiband resting-state fMRI data, using both high positive and negative correlations to define edges between nodes (voxels. A high correlation threshold for binarization ensures that most edges in the resulting sparse graph reflect the high coherence of signals in medium to large veins. Graph clustering based on the optimization of modularity was then employed to identify clusters of coherent voxels in this graph, and all clusters of 50 or more voxels were then interpreted as corresponding to medium to large veins. Indeed, a comparison with SWI reveals that 75.6 ± 5.9% of voxels within these large clusters overlap with veins visible in the SWI image or lie outside the brain parenchyma. Some of the remainingdifferences between the two modalities can be explained by imperfect alignment or geometric distortions between the two images. Overall, the graph clustering based method for identifying venous voxels has a high specificity as well as the additional advantages of being computed in the same voxel grid as the fMRI dataset itself and not needingany additional data beyond what is usually acquired (and exported in standard fMRI experiments.

  17. In Vivo Identification and Induction of Articular Cartilage Stem Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wenxue; Geng, Yiyun; Huang, Yan; Shi, Yu; Xiang, Shengnan; Zhang, Ning; Qin, Ling; Shi, Qin; Chen, Qian; Dai, Kerong; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent and debilitating joint disorder characterized by the degeneration of articular cartilage. However, no effective medical therapy has been found yet for such condition. In this study, we directly confirmed the existence of articular cartilage stem cells (ACSCs) in vivo and in situ for the first time both in normal and OA articular cartilage, and explored their chondrogenesis in Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced inflammation environment and disclose whether the inhibition of NF-κB signaling can induce ACSCs activation thus improve the progression of experimental OA. We found an interesting phenomenon that ACSCs were activated and exhibited a transient proliferative response in early OA as an initial attempt for self-repair. During the in vitro mechanism study, we discovered IL-1β can efficiently activate the NF-κB pathway and potently impair the responsiveness of ACSCs, whereas the NF-κB pathway inhibitor rescued the ACSCs chondrogenesis. The final in vivo experiments further confirmed ACSCs' activation were maintained by NF-κB pathway inhibitor, which induced cartilage regeneration, and protected articular cartilage from injury in an OA animal model. Our results provided in vivo evidence of the presence of ACSCs, and disclosed their action in the early OA stage and gradual quiet as OA process, presented a potential mechanism for both cartilage intrinsic repair and its final degradation, and demonstrated the feasibility of inducing endogenous adult tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair and OA therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Identification of genes in the ovine endometrium regulated by interferon tau independent of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seokwoon; Choi, Youngsok; Bazer, Fuller W; Spencer, Thomas E

    2003-12-01

    Interferon tau (IFNtau), a type I IFN produced by the conceptus trophectoderm, increases many type I IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the ovine uterine endometrial stroma and glandular epithelium (GE) using signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-dependent pathways. Most ISGs are not induced or increased by IFNtau in the STAT1-negative endometrial luminal epithelium (LE). The objective was to identify genes regulated by IFNtau in a STAT1-independent manner using DNA microarray and human cell lines. The RNA from human 2fTGH and U3A (STAT1 null 2fTGH) cell lines, stimulated for 24 h with nothing or recombinant ovine IFNtau, was profiled using an Affymetrix human genome U95Av2 microarray. In 2fTGH cells, IFNtau increased the expression of 101 genes at least 2-fold, including IFN-inducible 56-kDa protein (IFI56), ISG12 or p27, and guanylate binding protein isoform I (GBP-2). In U3A cells, IFNtau increased expression of 66 genes at least 2-fold, including Wnt7a. Steady-state levels of IFI56, ISG12, GBP-2, and Wnt7a mRNAs increased in the ovine uterine endometrium between d 10 and 16 of pregnancy but not during the estrous cycle. GBP-2 and IFI56 mRNAs were expressed only in endometrial stroma, ISG12 in both LE and GE, and Wnt7a only in LE of the ovine uterus. Intrauterine infusion of ovine IFNtau increased expression of all four genes in the endometrium of cyclic ewes. Therefore, IFNtau does regulate genes independent of STAT1 in the endometrial LE and U3A cells and dependent on STAT1 in the endometrial stroma and 2fTGH cells. These IFNtau -stimulated genes may be important in establishment of uterine receptivity to the embryo and conceptus implantation given their stage-specificity in endometrium across diverse species.

  19. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. Copyright © 2016 Niu et al.

  20. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402 and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  1. Liquid chromatography-high resolution/ high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry-based identification of in vivo generated metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulator ACP-105 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Piper, Thomas; Krug, Oliver; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of therapeutics which have been prohibited in sport as anabolic agents according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) since 2008. Within the past three years, numerous adverse analytical findings with SARMs in routine doping control samples have been reported despite missing clinical approval of these substances. Hence, preventive doping research concerning the metabolism and elimination of new therapeutic entities of the class of SARMs are vital for efficient and timely sports drug testing programs as banned compounds are most efficiently screened when viable targets (for example, characteristic metabolites) are identified. In the present study, the metabolism of ACP-105, a novel SARM drug candidate, was studied in vivo in rats. Following oral administration, urine samples were collected over a period of seven days and analyzed for metabolic products by Liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. Samples were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior to liquid-liquid extraction and a total of seven major phase-I metabolites were detected, three of which were attributed to monohydroxylated and four to bishydroxylated ACP-105. The hydroxylation sites were assigned by means of diagnostic product ions and respective dissociation pathways of the analytes following positive or negative ionization and collisional activation as well as selective chemical derivatization. The identified metabolites were used as target compounds to investigate their traceability in a rat elimination urine samples study and monohydroxylated and bishydroxylated species were detectable for up to four and six days post-administration, respectively.

  2. Identification of known chemicals and their metabolites from Alpinia oxyphylla fruit extract in rat plasma using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Li, Hai-Long; Tan, Yin-Feng; Li, Yong-Hui; Lai, Wei-Yong; Guan, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Zhao, Yuan-Sheng; Qin, Zhen-Miao

    2014-08-01

    Alpinia oxyphylla (Yizhi) capsularfruits are commonly used in traditional medicine. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated that A. oxyphylla capsularfruits have some beneficial roles. Besides volatile oil, sesquiterpenes, diarylheptanoids and flavonoids are main bioactive constituents occurring in the Yizhi capsularfruits. The representative constituents include tectochrysin, izalpinin, chrysin, apigenin-4',7-dimethylether, kaempferide, yakuchinone A, yakuchinone B, oxyphyllacinol and nootkatone. Their content levels in the fruit and its pharmaceutical preparations have been reported by our group. The nine phytochemicals are also the major components present in the Yizhi alcoholic extracts, which have anti-diarrheal activities. However, the fates of these constituents in the body after oral or intravenous administration remain largely unknown. In the present study, we focus on these phytochemicals albeit other concomitant compounds. The chemicals and their metabolites in rat plasma were identified using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring mode after orally administered Yizhi extract to rats. Rat plasma samples were treated by methanol precipitation, acidic or enzymatic hydrolysis. This target analysis study revealed that: (1) low or trace plasma levels of parent chemicals were measured after p.o. administration of Yizhi extract, Suoquan capsules and pills to rats; (2) flavonoids and diarylheptanoids formed mainly monoglucuronide metabolites; however, diglucuronide metabolites for chrysin, izalpinin and kaempferide were also detected; (3) metabolic reduction of Yizhi diarylheptanoids occurred in rats. Yakuchinone B was reduced to yakuchinone A and then to oxyphyllacinol in a stepwise manner and subsequently glucuronidated by UDP-glucuronosyl transferase. Further research is needed to characterize the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and reductase involved in the biotransformation of Yizhi chemicals. Copyright © 2014

  3. Identification and analysis of absorbed components and their metabolites in rat plasma and tissues after oral administration of 'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' pill extracts by UPLC-DAD/Q-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xuhui; Liu, Mingying; Liang, Qionglin; Jiang, Min; Wang, Yiming; Huang, Fukai; Xie, Yuanyuan; Shao, Jie; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guoan

    2013-10-28

    'Ershiwuwei Shanhu' pill (ESP), a classical and famous prescription of traditional Tibetan medicine, has a long history of empirical clinical use for the treatment of cerebrovascular and neurological diseases, but the absence of scientific evidence for its effect restricted its clinical application and further development. The methodology of plasma pharmacochemistry was adopted to analyze the potentially bioactive components in ESP extracts. A method based on UPLC-DAD/Q-TOF-MS was established to identify herb components in ESP extracts and analyze the absorbed components of ESP and their metabolites in rat plasma, brain, heart, liver and kidney samples after oral administration of ESP extracts. A total of 61 herb components were detected and identified in ESP extracts, while 35 absorbed components-including 19 prototype compounds and 16 metabolites-were discovered as potentially bioactive components in rat plasma and tissues by comparative analysis of the UV and MS chromatograms of ESP extracts, blank biosamples and dosed biosamples. The potentially bioactive components of ESP extracts identified from rat plasma and tissues provide useful information for further study of the pharmacology and mechanism of action of ESP. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and analysis of chemical constituents and rat serum metabolites in Suan-Zao-Ren granule using ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multiple data processing approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiyang; He, Bosai; Li, Qing; He, Jiao; Wang, Di; Bi, Kaishun

    2017-07-01

    Suan-Zao-Ren granule is widely used to treat insomnia in China. However, because of the complexity and diversity of the chemical compositions in traditional Chinese medicine formula, the comprehensive analysis of constituents in vitro and in vivo is rather difficult. In our study, an ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and the PeakView® software, which uses multiple data processing approaches including product ion filter, neutral loss filter, and mass defect filter, method was developed to characterize the ingredients and rat serum metabolites in Suan-Zao-Ren granule. A total of 101 constituents were detected in vitro. Under the same analysis conditions, 68 constituents were characterized in rat serum, including 35 prototype components and 33 metabolites. The metabolic pathways of main components were also illustrated. Among them, the metabolic pathways of timosaponin AI were firstly revealed. The bioactive compounds mainly underwent the phase I metabolic pathways including hydroxylation, oxidation, hydrolysis, and phase II metabolic pathways including sulfate conjugation, glucuronide conjugation, cysteine conjugation, acetycysteine conjugation, and glutathione conjugation. In conclusion, our results showed that this analysis approach was extremely useful for the in-depth pharmacological research of Suan-Zao-Ren granule and provided a chemical basis for its rational. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Production of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  6. Prioritizing Candidate Disease Metabolites Based on Global Functional Relationships between Metabolites in the Context of Metabolic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haixiu; Xu, Yanjun; Han, Junwei; Li, Jing; Su, Fei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Dongguo; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Identification of key metabolites for complex diseases is a challenging task in today's medicine and biology. A special disease is usually caused by the alteration of a series of functional related metabolites having a global influence on the metabolic network. Moreover, the metabolites in the same metabolic pathway are often associated with the same or similar disease. Based on these functional relationships between metabolites in the context of metabolic pathways, we here presented a pathway-based random walk method called PROFANCY for prioritization of candidate disease metabolites. Our strategy not only takes advantage of the global functional relationships between metabolites but also sufficiently exploits the functionally modular nature of metabolic networks. Our approach proved successful in prioritizing known metabolites for 71 diseases with an AUC value of 0.895. We also assessed the performance of PROFANCY on 16 disease classes and found that 4 classes achieved an AUC value over 0.95. To investigate the robustness of the PROFANCY, we repeated all the analyses in two metabolic networks and obtained similar results. Then we applied our approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and found that a top ranked candidate was potentially related to AD but had not been reported previously. Furthermore, our method was applicable to prioritize the metabolites from metabolomic profiles of prostate cancer. The PROFANCY could identify prostate cancer related-metabolites that are supported by literatures but not considered to be significantly differential by traditional differential analysis. We also developed a freely accessible web-based and R-based tool at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/PROFANCY. PMID:25153931

  7. Drug and chemical metabolites in clinical toxicology investigations: the importance of ethylene glycol, methanol and cannabinoid metabolite analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Albert D; Coffin, Lawrence; Worth, David

    2002-10-01

    Metabolic pathways in humans have been elucidated for most therapeutic drugs, drugs of abuse, and various chemical/solvents. In most drug overdose cases and chemical exposures, laboratory analysis is directed toward identification and quantitation of the unchanged drug or chemical in a biologic fluid such as serum or whole blood. Specifically, most clinical laboratories routinely screen and quantitate unchanged methanol and/or ethylene glycol in suspected poisonings without toxic metabolite analysis. Martin-Amat established in 1978 that methanol associated toxicity to the optic nerve in human poisonings was due to the toxic metabolite formic acid found in methanol poisonings and not due to the direct action by unchanged methanol. Jacobsen reported in 1981 that ethylene glycol central nervous system and renal toxicity were primarily due to one acidic metabolite (glycolic acid) and not due to unchanged ethylene glycol. The first objective of this review is to describe clinical experience with formic acid and glycolic acid analysis in methanol and ethylene glycol human poisonings. Drug metabolite analysis also provides useful information in the assessment and monitoring of drug use in psychiatry and substance abusing populations. Drug analysis in substance abuse monitoring is focused on urine analysis of one or more major metabolites, and less frequently on the unchanged drug(s). Serial monitoring of the major urinary cannabinoid metabolite (delta(9)-THC-COOH) to creatinine ratios in paired urine specimens (collected at least 24 h apart) could differentiate new marijuana or hashish use from residual cannabinoid metabolite excretion in urine after drug use according to Huestis. The second objective is to demonstrate that creatinine corrected urine specimens positive for cannabinoids may help differentiate new marijuana use from the excretion of residual delta(9) -THC-COOH in chronic users of marijuana or hashish. Analysis of toxic chemical metabolites are helpful in

  8. Mutagenic azide metabolite is azidoalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Ronald, R.C.; Kleinhofs, A.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium axide produces high mutation rates in a number of species. Azide mutagenicity is mediated through a metabolite in barley and bacteria. Many studies showed that azide affects the L-cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Cell-free extracts of Salmonella typhimurium convert azide and O-acetylserine to the mutagenic metabolite. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the metabolite biosynthesis. To confirm the conclusion that the azide metabolite is formed through the β-substitution pathway of L-cysteine, we radioactively labeled the azide metabolite using 14 C-labeled precursors. Moreover, the mutagenic azide metabolite was purified and identified as azidoalanine based on mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. SyGMa: combining expert knowledge and empirical scoring in the prediction of metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Lars; Wagener, Markus

    2008-05-01

    Predictions of potential metabolites based on chemical structure are becoming increasingly important in drug discovery to guide medicinal chemistry efforts that address metabolic issues and to support experimental metabolite screening and identification. Herein we present a novel rule-based method, SyGMa (Systematic Generation of potential Metabolites), to predict the potential metabolites of a given parent structure. A set of reaction rules covering a broad range of phase 1 and phase 2 metabolism has been derived from metabolic reactions reported in the Metabolite Database to occur in humans. An empirical probability score is assigned to each rule representing the fraction of correctly predicted metabolites in the training database. This score is used to refine the rules and to rank predicted metabolites. The current rule set of SyGMa covers approximately 70 % of biotransformation reactions observed in humans. Evaluation of the rule-based predictions demonstrated a significant enrichment of true metabolites in the top of the ranking list: while in total, 68 % of all observed metabolites in an independent test set were reproduced by SyGMa, a large part, 30 % of the observed metabolites, were identified among the top three predictions. From a subset of cytochrome P450 specific metabolites, 84 % were reproduced overall, with 66 % in the top three predicted phase 1 metabolites. A similarity analysis of the reactions present in the database was performed to obtain an overview of the metabolic reactions predicted by SyGMa and to support ongoing efforts to extend the rules. Specific examples demonstrate the use of SyGMa in experimental metabolite identification and the application of SyGMa to suggest chemical modifications that improve the metabolic stability of compounds.

  10. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M.; Heussler, Sascha P.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2018-01-01

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment.

  11. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity.

  12. Secondary metabolites from bromeliaceae family

    OpenAIRE

    Manetti, Liliana Maria; Delaporte, Rosemeres Horwat; Laverde Jr., Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This review describes aspects of the Bromeliaceae family dealing the traditional applications, biological activities and distribution of secondary metabolites in distinct subfamilies. Some species are used with medicinal purposed in the treatment of respiratory, diabetes or inflammation diseases, and gastrointestinal disorders. Special emphasis on cycloartane triterpenoids and flavonoids, typical metabolites of this family, are presented. Bromeliaceae is unique amongst the monocotyledons in t...

  13. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Han

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in Aspergillus flavus has notbeen previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of nitrogen metabolite repression and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF THE POTENTIAL ACTIVE-SITE OF THE SIGNAL PEPTIDASE SIPS OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS - STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL SIMILARITIES WITH LEXA-LIKE PROTEASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJL, JM; DEJONG, A; VENEMA, G; BRON, S

    1995-01-01

    Signal peptidases remove signal peptides from secretory proteins. By comparing the type I signal peptidase, SipS, of Bacillus subtilis with signal peptidases from prokaryotes, mitochondria, and the endoplasmic reticular membrane, patterns of conserved amino acids were discovered. The conserved

  15. Global Prioritization of Disease Candidate Metabolites Based on a Multi-omics Composite Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qianlan; Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Haixiu; Shang, Desi; Zhang, Chunlong; Zhang, Yunpeng; Sun, Zeguo; Shi, Xinrui; Feng, Li; Han, Junwei; Su, Fei; Li, Chunquan; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The identification of disease-related metabolites is important for a better understanding of metabolite pathological processes in order to improve human medicine. Metabolites, which are the terminal products of cellular regulatory process, can be affected by multi-omic processes. In this work, we propose a powerful method, MetPriCNet, to predict and prioritize disease candidate metabolites based on integrated multi-omics information. MetPriCNet prioritized candidate metabolites based on their global distance similarity with seed nodes in a composite network, which integrated multi-omics information from the genome, phenome, metabolome and interactome. After performing cross-validation on 87 phenotypes with a total of 602 metabolites, MetPriCNet achieved a high AUC value of up to 0.918. We also assessed the performance of MetPriCNet on 18 disease classes and found that 4 disease classes achieved an AUC value over 0.95. Notably, MetPriCNet can also predict disease metabolites without known disease metabolite knowledge. Some new high-risk metabolites of breast cancer were predicted, although there is a lack of known disease metabolite information. A predicted disease metabolic landscape was constructed and analyzed based on the results of MetPriCNet for 87 phenotypes to help us understand the genetic and metabolic mechanism of disease from a global view. PMID:26598063

  16. Identification of acoustic wave propagation in a duct line and its application to detection of impact source location based on signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Woo; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2010-01-01

    For the detection of the impact location in a pipeline system, the correlation method has been the conventional method. For the application of the correlation method, the diameter of a duct should be small so that the acoustic wave inside the duct can propagate with nondispersive characteristics, in the form of, for example, a plane wave. This correlation method calculates the cross-correlation between acoustic waves measured at two acceleration sensors attached to a buried duct. It also gives information about the arrival time delay of an acoustic wave between two sensors. These arrival time delays are used for the estimation of the impact location. However, when the diameter of the duct is large, the acoustic waves inside the duct propagate with dispersive characteristics owing to the reflection of the acoustic wave off of the wall of the duct. This dispersive characteristic is related to the acoustic modes inside a duct. Therefore, the correlation method does not work correctly for the detection of the impact location. This paper proposes new methods of accurately measuring the arrival time delay between two sensors attached to duct line system. This method is based on the time-frequency analyses of the short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). These methods can discriminate direct waves (non-dispersive waves) and reflective waves (dispersive waves) from the measured wave signals through the time-frequency analysis. The direct wave or the reflective wave is used to estimate the arrival time delay. This delay is used for the identification of the impact location. This systematic method can predict the impact location due to the impact forces of construction equipment with more accuracy than the correlation method

  17. Identification of active compounds and their metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry from Xiao-xu-ming decoction (XXMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilin; Ding, Chunguang; Du, Kehe; Xiao, Yao; Wu, Caisheng; Zhang, Jinlan; Qin, Hailin; Du, Guanhua

    2009-09-01

    Xiao-xu-ming decoction (XXMD) prescription is a traditional Chinese prescription that has been widely used to treat theoplegia and the sequela of theoplegia. Modern pharmacological research has also indicated that the active fraction from XXMD is able to treat cardiovascular diseases and Alzheimer's disease. In the study reported here, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC/FTICR-MS) was developed to identify active compounds and their metabolites after oral administration of active fraction from Xiao-xu-ming decoction to rats, using parent mass list triggered data-dependent multiple-stage mass analysis at a resolving power of 100,000 in the external calibration mode. The mass accuracies obtained for full-scan MS were within 2 ppm in most cases. Fifteen constituents were identified in the active fraction from XXMD and the biological samples of rats. The fragmentation behaviors of these constituents were summarized which would be helpful for structural characterization. The profiles of the constituents in the active fraction and biological samples of rats were obtained which provided us with much information for a better understanding of the chemical basis of the pharmacologic actions of XXMD. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Analysis of Particulate and Dissolved Metabolite Pools at Station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, A.; Carlson, L.; Hmelo, L.; Ingalls, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomic studies focus on identifying and quantifying the small organic molecules that are the currency by which an organism lives and dies. Metabolite profiles of microorganisms have the potential to elucidate mechanisms of chemically mediated interactions that influence the success of microbial groups living in a complex environment. However, the chemical diversity of metabolites makes resolving a wide range of compounds analytically challenging. As such, metabolomics has lagged behind other genomic analyses. Here we conduct targeted analysis of over 200 primary and secondary metabolites present in the intracellular and extracellular metabolite pools at Station ALOHA using both reverse phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. We selected the metabolites in our method due to their known importance in primary metabolism, secondary metabolism, and interactions between marine microorganisms such as nutrient exchange, growth promotion, and cell signaling. Through these analyses we obtain a snapshot of microbial community status that, blended with other forms of genomic data, can further our understanding of microbial dynamics. We hypothesize that monitoring a large suite of important metabolites across environmental gradients and diurnal cycles can elucidate factors controlling the distribution and activity of important microbial groups.

  19. Bignoniaceae Metabolites as Semiochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Castillo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Bignoniaceae are mostly found in tropical and neo-tropical regions in America, Asia and Africa, although some of them are cultivated in other regions as ornamentals. Species belonging to this family have been extensively studied in regard to their pharmacological properties (as extracts and isolated compounds. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported scientific evidence about the chemical properties as well as that of the extracts and isolated compounds from species of this family, focusing mainly in insect-plant interactions. As it is known, this family is recognized for the presence of iridoids which are markers of oviposition and feeding preference to species which have became specialist feeders. Some herbivore species have also evolved to the point of been able to sequester iridoids and use them as defenses against their predators. However, iridoids also exhibit anti-insect properties, and therefore they may be good lead molecules to develop botanical pesticides. Other secondary metabolites, such as quinones, and whole extracts have also shown potential as anti-insect agents.

  20. Structural elucidation of in vitro and in vivo metabolites of emodin in rats by LC -ESI-MS/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Zhu, Q.; Chen, G.; Liu, B.; Chen, L.

    2013-01-01

    Emodin is a widely occurring natural product and has been studied extensively for its varieties of pharmacological activity. In attempt to know more deeply about its metabolism, this paper investigated the metabolites of emodin in rats, including its in vitro conversion product by intestinal microflora and urinary metabolites. The detection of emodin metabolites was performed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) with negative ion mode. By comparing the changes of metabolites in molecular masses (delta M), product ions and retention times with those of the parent drug, six metabolites (8-O-methylemodin, omega-hydroxyemodin, x-hydroxyemodin, emodin glucuronide, hydroxyemodin glucuronide and emodin sulfate) were observed,and what is more, the metabolite hydroxyemodin glucuronide was first reported in this article. For some metabolites, identification of their precise structure needs to be confirmed by other techniques such as the 1H and 13C NMR. (author)

  1. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, Deepa; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.

    2016-01-11

    Rapid acidification of the culture medium by the production of organic acids and the production of acid-induced proteases are key characteristics of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The D15 mutant of A. niger is non-acidifying mutant and used often for the expression of recombinant proteins in A. niger, because of its reduced production of extracellular proteases under non-acidic conditions. In this study, the D15 mutant is characterized in detail. Strongly reduced levels of citric and oxalic acid were observed in the D15 mutant both in shake flask cultures and in controlled batch cultivations. To identify the mutation in the D15 mutant, we successfully combined high-throughput sequencing (Illumina) with bulk segregant analysis. Because of the lack of a sexual cycle for A. niger, the parasexual cycle was used to generate a pool of segregants. From the 52 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the parental strains, three SNPs were homozygous in the genomic DNA of pool of segregants. These three SNPs mapped to all the right arm of chromosome II, indicating that this region contains the genetic locus affecting the phenotype related to acid production. Of the three SNPs, one mutation resulted in a missense mutation in the gene encoding the A. niger homologue of the A. nidulans methyltransferase gene laeA. Complementation analysis of the original mutant with the laeA gene and targeted disruption of laeA further confirmed that LaeA is involved in citric acid production in A. niger lab (N402) and citric acid production strains (ATCC 11414). Analysis of the secondary metabolite (SM) profile of the laeA mutants indicate that LaeA is required for the production of several SMs (asperrubrol, atromentin and JBIR86), but deletion of laeA also resulted in the presence of SMs (aspernigrin A/B and BMS-192548) that were not detected in the wild-type strain. The levels of ten other SMs were not strongly affected as a result of laeA deletion indicating that only a

  2. A Decade in the MIST: Learnings from Investigations of Drug Metabolites in Drug Development under the "Metabolites in Safety Testing" Regulatory Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, Simone; Bister, Bojan; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Funk, Christoph; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Humphreys, W Griffith; Igarashi, Fumihiko; James, Alexander D; Kagan, Mark; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Nedderman, Angus N R; Prakash, Chandra; Runge, Frank; Scheible, Holger; Spracklin, Douglas K; Swart, Piet; Tse, Susanna; Yuan, Josh; Obach, R Scott

    2018-06-01

    Since the introduction of metabolites in safety testing (MIST) guidance by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, major changes have occurred in the experimental methods for the identification and quantification of metabolites, ways to evaluate coverage of metabolites, and the timing of critical clinical and nonclinical studies to generate this information. In this cross-industry review, we discuss how the increased focus on human drug metabolites and their potential contribution to safety and drug-drug interactions has influenced the approaches taken by industry for the identification and quantitation of human drug metabolites. Before the MIST guidance was issued, the method of choice for generating comprehensive metabolite profile was radio chromatography. The MIST guidance increased the focus on human drug metabolites and their potential contribution to safety and drug-drug interactions and led to changes in the practices of drug metabolism scientists. In addition, the guidance suggested that human metabolism studies should also be accelerated, which has led to more frequent determination of human metabolite profiles from multiple ascending-dose clinical studies. Generating a comprehensive and quantitative profile of human metabolites has become a more urgent task. Together with technological advances, these events have led to a general shift of focus toward earlier human metabolism studies using high-resolution mass spectrometry and to a reduction in animal radiolabel absorption/distribution/metabolism/excretion studies. The changes induced by the MIST guidance are highlighted by six case studies included herein, reflecting different stages of implementation of the MIST guidance within the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Purification and H-1 NMR spectroscopic characterization of phase II metabolites of tolfenamic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, U. G.; Christiansen, E.; Krogh, L.

    1997-01-01

    acid; the study shows the applicability of H-1 NMR for the identification of drug metabolites in biological fluids. In addition to NMR analysis, two metabolites were also identified by mass spectrometry (MS), The glucuronides of the following parent compounds, N-(2-methyl-3-chlorophenyl...... samples obtained on days 7 to 10 from a human volunteer after oral administration of 200 mg of the drug three times per day (steady-state plasma concentration). The metabolites of tolfenamic acid were initially concentrated by preparative solid phase extraction (PSPE) chromatography, thereby removing......Tolfenamic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is metabolized in vivo to form several oxidative metabolites which are all conjugated with beta-D-glucuronic acid, In this study, the metabolites of tolfenamic acid were identified by H-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in urine...

  4. Identification of 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3[2H]-furanone beta-D-glucuronide as the major metabolite of a strawberry flavour constituent in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscher, R; Koch, H; Herderich, M; Schreier, P; Schwab, W

    1997-08-01

    2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3[2H]furanone (Furaneol, DMHF) [3658-77-3], an important flavour constituent of strawberry fruit, was administered to four male and two female volunteers using fresh strawberries as a natural DMHF source. The amount excreted was determined by measuring urinary levels of DMHF and DMHF glucuronide. DMHF glucuronide was synthesized and the structure elucidated by mens of 1H, 13C and two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, as well as mass spectral data. Identification and quantification of DMHF glucuronide in human urine were achieved after solid phase extraction on XAD-2 using reverse-phase reverse-phase HPLC with either on-line UV/VIS or electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection. Male and female volunteers excreted 59-69% and 81-94%, respectively, of the DMHF dose (total of free and glycosidically bound DMHF in strawberries) as DMHF glucuronide in urine within 24 hr. The amount of DMHF excretion was independent of the dose size and the ratio of free to glycosidically bound forms of DMHF in strawberry fruit. DMHF, DMHF glucoside and its 6'-O-malonyl derivative, naturally occurring in strawberries, were not detected in human urine.

  5. Multiplexed detection of metabolites of narcotic drugs from a single latent fingermark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Pompi; Jickells, Sue M; Wolff, Kim; Russell, David A

    2010-11-15

    An immunoassay based technique is used for the detection of psychoactive substances in the sweat deposited within fingermarks of a narcotic drug user. Magnetic particles functionalized with antimorphine and antibenzoylecgonine antibodies were used for the detection of a metabolite of heroin (morphine) and a metabolite of cocaine (benzoylecgonine), respectively. The drug metabolites were detected individually as well as simultaneously from a single fingermark. The images of the fingermarks obtained using brightfield and fluorescence microscopy were of high evidential quality with resolution to enable identification of an individual in addition to providing information on drug usage.

  6. [Systems biology applications to explore secondary metabolites in medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Luqi; Gao, Wei; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Ruiting

    2010-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are produced during the growth and development of plants along with the adaptation of outer environment, as a rule they are the main active ingredients in medicinal plants and ensure the quality of crude drugs. Since biogenesis is quite complex, the production and accumulation of secondary metabolites are influenced by various biotic and abiotic factors either from gene or environments, the complexity may affect quality control of crude drugs and utilization of the active ingredients. The thought and approach adopted in systems biology is a powerful tool to explore biology fully, along with the development of modern molecular biology and information biology, omics integration like genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics will bring new opportunities for the study of secondary metabolites of medicinal plant. It has great significance to apply this holistic and systematic method in researches on biosynthetic pathway, signal transduction, ecological environment and metabolic engineering of the formation of the secondary metabolites of medicinal plants, and in building secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene expression and regulation system model, in order to explain the origin of the active ingredients of medicinal plants, formation mechanism of the Chinese herbs, metabolic engineering effecting active ingredients of medicinal plants, and the rational exploitation and utilization of resources of medicinal plants systematically.

  7. Some Metabolites Act as Second Messengers in Yeast Chronological Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamat Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating the longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining cellular processes. The concentrations of the key metabolites that affect yeast chronological aging are controlled spatially and temporally. Here, we analyze mechanisms through which the spatiotemporal dynamics of changes in the concentrations of the key metabolites influence yeast chronological lifespan. Our analysis indicates that a distinct set of metabolites can act as second messengers that define the pace of yeast chronological aging. Molecules that can operate both as intermediates of yeast metabolism and as second messengers of yeast chronological aging include reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glycerol, trehalose, hydrogen peroxide, amino acids, sphingolipids, spermidine, hydrogen sulfide, acetic acid, ethanol, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerol. We discuss several properties that these second messengers of yeast chronological aging have in common with second messengers of signal transduction. We outline how these second messengers of yeast chronological aging elicit changes in cell functionality and viability in response to changes in the nutrient, energy, stress, and proliferation status of the cell.

  8. Identification of the excitation source of the pressure vessel vibration in a Soviet built WWER PWR with signal transmission path analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Mourtzanos, K.; Por, G.

    1996-01-01

    Signal transmission path analysis via multivariate auto-regressive modelling was applied at signals recorded at a WWER power reactor (Paks reactor, Hungary). The core is equipped with strings of self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs). Each string has seven SPNDs. The signals were high pass filtered with cut-off at 0.03 Hz and low pass-filtered with cut-off at 25 Hz. The analysis suggests that the source of excitation of all signals at 25 Hz is due to main coolant pump vibration. It was confirmed that there is vibration of main coolant pumps at this frequency due to a bearing problem. Signal transmission path analysis also suggests direct paths from outlet coolant to inlet coolant pressure and in-core neutron detectors at the upper part of the core. (author)

  9. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin

    2008-01-01

    ), and forsythoside B (18), and five flavone derivatives, luteolin (19), luteolin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (20), luteolin 7-O-(6''-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (21), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22), and apigenin 7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (23). The structures of the metabolites were...... elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis....

  10. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  11. The use of secondary metabolite profiling in chemotaxonomy of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisvad, Jens C; Andersen, Birgitte; Thrane, Ulf

    2008-02-01

    A secondary metabolite is a chemical compound produced by a limited number of fungal species in a genus, an order, or even phylum. A profile of secondary metabolites consists of all the different compounds a fungus can produce on a given substratum and includes toxins, antibiotics and other outward-directed compounds. Chemotaxonomy is traditionally restricted to comprise fatty acids, proteins, carbohydrates, or secondary metabolites, but has sometimes been defined so broadly that it also includes DNA sequences. It is not yet possible to use secondary metabolites in phylogeny, because of the inconsistent distribution throughout the fungal kingdom. However, this is the very quality that makes secondary metabolites so useful in classification and identification. Four groups of organisms are particularly good producers of secondary metabolites: plants, fungi, lichen fungi, and actinomycetes, whereas yeasts, protozoa, and animals are less efficient producers. Therefore, secondary metabolites have mostly been used in plant and fungal taxonomy, whereas chemotaxonomy has been neglected in bacteriology. Lichen chemotaxonomy has been based on few biosynthetic families (chemosyndromes), whereas filamentous fungi have been analysed for a wide array of terpenes, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and combinations of these. Fungal chemotaxonomy based on secondary metabolites has been used successfully in large ascomycete genera such as Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Hypoxylon, Penicillium, Stachybotrys, Xylaria and in few basidiomycete genera, but not in Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota.

  12. Metabolite profiling at the cellular and subcellular level reveals metabolites associated with salinity tolerance in sugar beet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Sazzad; Persicke, Marcus; ElSayed, Abdelaleim Ismail; Kalinowski, Jörn; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2017-12-16

    Sugar beet is among the most salt-tolerant crops. This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adaptation of sugar beet to salt stress at the cellular and subcellular levels. Seedlings were grown hydroponically and subjected to stepwise increases in salt stress up to 300 mM NaCl. Highly enriched fractions of chloroplasts were obtained by non-aqueous fractionation using organic solvents. Total leaf metabolites and metabolites in chloroplasts were profiled at 3 h and 14 d after reaching the maximum salinity stress of 300 mM NaCl. Metabolite profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) resulted in the identification of a total of 83 metabolites in leaves and chloroplasts under control and stress conditions. There was a lower abundance of Calvin cycle metabolites under salinity whereas there was a higher abundance of oxidative pentose phosphate cycle metabolites such as 6-phosphogluconate. Accumulation of ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate coincided with limitation of carbon fixation by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Increases in glycolate and serine levels indicated that photorespiratory metabolism was stimulated in salt-stressed sugar beet. Compatible solutes such as proline, mannitol, and putrescine accumulated mostly outside the chloroplasts. Within the chloroplast, putrescine had the highest relative level and probably assisted in the acclimation of sugar beet to high salinity stress. The results provide new information on the contribution of chloroplasts and the extra-chloroplast space to salinity tolerance via metabolic adjustment in sugar beet. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Kynurenines: Tryptophan's metabolites in exercise, inflammation, and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Igor; Agudelo, Leandro Z; Ruas, Jorge L

    2017-07-28

    Kynurenine metabolites are generated by tryptophan catabolism and regulate biological processes that include host-microbiome signaling, immune cell response, and neuronal excitability. Enzymes of the kynurenine pathway are expressed in different tissues and cell types throughout the body and are regulated by cues, including nutritional and inflammatory signals. As a consequence of this systemic metabolic integration, peripheral inflammation can contribute to accumulation of kynurenine in the brain, which has been associated with depression and schizophrenia. Conversely, kynurenine accumulation can be suppressed by activating kynurenine clearance in exercised skeletal muscle. The effect of exercise training on depression through modulation of the kynurenine pathway highlights an important mechanism of interorgan cross-talk mediated by these metabolites. Here, we discuss peripheral mechanisms of tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism and their effects on inflammatory, metabolic, oncologic, and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Prediction of metabolites of epoxidation reaction in MetaTox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudik, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Bezhentsev, V M; Lagunin, A A; Filimonov, D A; Poroikov, V V

    2017-10-01

    Biotransformation is a process of the chemical modifications which may lead to the reactive metabolites, in particular the epoxides. Epoxide reactive metabolites may cause the toxic effects. The prediction of such metabolites is important for drug development and ecotoxicology studies. Epoxides are formed by some oxidation reactions, usually catalysed by cytochromes P450, and represent a large class of three-membered cyclic ethers. Identification of molecules, which may be epoxidized, and indication of the specific location of epoxide functional group (which is called SOE - site of epoxidation) are important for prediction of epoxide metabolites. Datasets from 355 molecules and 615 reactions were created for training and validation. The prediction of SOE is based on a combination of LMNA (Labelled Multilevel Neighbourhood of Atom) descriptors and Bayesian-like algorithm implemented in PASS software and MetaTox web-service. The average invariant accuracy of prediction (AUC) calculated in leave-one-out and 20-fold cross-validation procedures is 0.9. Prediction of epoxide formation based on the created SAR model is included as the component of MetaTox web-service ( http://www.way2drug.com/mg ).

  15. Extensive alterations of blood metabolites in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchit Gupta

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria (CM presents as an encephalopathy and is due to infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Patients are comatose, often with fever, recurrent seizures and this condition is associated with a high mortality rate. The etiology of the coma and seizures are poorly understood. Circulating small molecules and lipids have bioactive functions and alterations in their concentrations have been implicated in seizure disorders and other forms of encephalopathy. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of blood metabolites during CM to explore a biochemical basis of this encephalopathy. A paired metabolomics analysis was performed on the plasma samples of Malawian children (n = 11 during CM and at convalescence thirty days later, to identify differentially abundant molecules associated with CM. We also report plasma molecules associated with CM mortality (n = 4 compared to survival (n = 19. Plasma metabolites were identified through ultra high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to maximize compound detection and accuracy and then compared to a library for identification. We detected a total of 432 small molecules in the plasma and 247 metabolites were significantly differentially abundant between CM and convalescence (p 1.2. These results highlight the broad changes in blood chemistry during CM. We have identified metabolites that may impact central nervous system physiology and disease outcomes and can be further explored for their mechanistic roles into the pathophysiology of CM.

  16. Identification of Mobile Phone and Analysis of Original Version of Videos through a Delay Time Analysis of Sound Signals from Mobile Phone Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min Gu; Har, Dong Hwan

    2017-11-01

    This study designs a method of identifying the camera model used to take videos that are distributed through mobile phones and determines the original version of the mobile phone video for use as legal evidence. For this analysis, an experiment was conducted to find the unique characteristics of each mobile phone. The videos recorded by mobile phones were analyzed to establish the delay time of sound signals, and the differences between the delay times of sound signals for different mobile phones were traced by classifying their characteristics. Furthermore, the sound input signals for mobile phone videos used as legal evidence were analyzed to ascertain whether they have the unique characteristics of the original version. The objective of this study was to find a method for validating the use of mobile phone videos as legal evidence using mobile phones through differences in the delay times of sound input signals. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Bioanalytical methods for determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunissen, S.F.; Rosing, H.; Schinkel, A.H.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is used in the treatment of early and advanced breast cancer and in selected cases for breast cancer prevention in high-risk subjects. The cytochrome P450 enzyme system and flavin-containing monooxygenase are responsible for the extensive metabolism of tamoxifen into several phase I metabolites that vary in toxicity and potencies towards estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ER beta. An extensive overview of publications on the determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in biological samples is presented. In these publications techniques were used such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid, gas and thin layer chromatography coupled with various detection techniques (mass spectrometry, ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, liquid scintillation counting and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). A trend is seen towards the use of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). State-of-the-art LC-MS equipment allowed for identification of unknown metabolites and quantification of known metabolites reaching lower limit of quantification levels in the sub pg mL -1 range. Although tamoxifen is also metabolized into phase II metabolites, the number of publications reporting on phase II metabolism of tamoxifen is scarce. Therefore the focus of this review is on phase I metabolites of tamoxifen. We conclude that in the past decades tamoxifen metabolism has been studied extensively and numerous metabolites have been identified. Assays have been developed for both the identification and quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites in an array of biological samples. This review can be used as a resource for method transfer and development of analytical methods used to support pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites.

  18. Bioanalytical methods for determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teunissen, S.F., E-mail: Bas.Teunissen@slz.nl [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Louwesweg 6, 1066 EC Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosing, H. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Louwesweg 6, 1066 EC Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schinkel, A.H. [Division of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schellens, J.H.M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Science Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beijnen, J.H. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Louwesweg 6, 1066 EC Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Science Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-12-17

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is used in the treatment of early and advanced breast cancer and in selected cases for breast cancer prevention in high-risk subjects. The cytochrome P450 enzyme system and flavin-containing monooxygenase are responsible for the extensive metabolism of tamoxifen into several phase I metabolites that vary in toxicity and potencies towards estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ER beta. An extensive overview of publications on the determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in biological samples is presented. In these publications techniques were used such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid, gas and thin layer chromatography coupled with various detection techniques (mass spectrometry, ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, liquid scintillation counting and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). A trend is seen towards the use of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). State-of-the-art LC-MS equipment allowed for identification of unknown metabolites and quantification of known metabolites reaching lower limit of quantification levels in the sub pg mL{sup -1} range. Although tamoxifen is also metabolized into phase II metabolites, the number of publications reporting on phase II metabolism of tamoxifen is scarce. Therefore the focus of this review is on phase I metabolites of tamoxifen. We conclude that in the past decades tamoxifen metabolism has been studied extensively and numerous metabolites have been identified. Assays have been developed for both the identification and quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites in an array of biological samples. This review can be used as a resource for method transfer and development of analytical methods used to support pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites.

  19. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    My program examines the plant secondary metabolites (i.e. phenolics) important for human health, and which impart the organoleptic properties that are quality indicators for fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions; a...

  20. Identification of EphrinB1 expression in prostatic mesenchyme and a role for EphB-EphrinB signalling in prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, George R; Grace, O Cathal; Vanpoucke, Griet; Thomson, Axel A

    2010-01-01

    Paracrine signalling from mesenchyme to epithelium plays a key role in regulating prostate organogenesis and it is important to identify the mesenchymally expressed molecules that regulate organ growth, though currently few such molecules are known. Tyrosine kinase signalling via EphB receptors has been characterised in many developmental processes, and EphB3 mRNA expression was detected in prostate inductive mesenchyme in previous gene profiling studies. This led us to examine the expression and function of EphrinB signalling in prostate development, to determine if EphrinB ligands might function as mesenchymal paracrine regulators of prostate growth. Using PCR, wholemount in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry we examined the expression of EphB receptors and EphrinB ligands in rat prostate during development to determine which showed mesenchymal expression. EphB3 and EphrinB1 transcripts and proteins were expressed in the mesenchyme of developing prostate and in female urogenital mesenchyme and smooth muscle. The function of EphrinB signalling was examined using in vitro organ culture assays of ventral prostate (VP), which were treated with EphB3-Fc and EphrinB1-Fc proteins to inhibit or augment Ephrin signalling. Addition of recombinant EphB3-Fc resulted in a significant decrease in VP organ size, while recombinant EphrinB1-Fc resulted in a significant increase in VP organ size and epithelial proliferation. Additionally, EphrinB1-Fc reduced the degree of epithelial branching in VP organs and increased ductal tip size, though without disrupting normal differentiation. We have identified expression of EphrinB1 in prostatic mesenchyme and suggest that the EphrinB signalling system acts as a regulator of prostate growth. EphrinB-EphB signalling may function as an autocrine regulator of mesenchyme and/or as a paracrine regulator of epithelia. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolite profiles of common Stemphylium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Solfrizzo, Michelle; Visconti, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-three isolates of Stemphylium spp. have been analysed for their metabolite profiles. Five metabolites, stemphylin, stemphyloxin II, stemphyperylenol, stemphol and a stemphol related compound, have been detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography...

  2. Nuclear calcium signaling controls expression of a large gene pool: identification of a gene program for acquired neuroprotection induced by synaptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Jia; Zou, Ming; Lu, Li; Lau, David; Ditzel, Désirée A W; Delucinge-Vivier, Celine; Aso, Yoshinori; Descombes, Patrick; Bading, Hilmar

    2009-08-01

    Synaptic activity can boost neuroprotection through a mechanism that requires synapse-to-nucleus communication and calcium signals in the cell nucleus. Here we show that in hippocampal neurons nuclear calcium is one of the most potent signals in neuronal gene expression. The induction or repression of 185 neuronal activity-regulated genes is dependent upon nuclear calcium signaling. The nuclear calcium-regulated gene pool contains a genomic program that mediates synaptic activity-induced, acquired neuroprotection. The core set of neuroprotective genes consists of 9 principal components, termed Activity-regulated Inhibitor of Death (AID) genes, and includes Atf3, Btg2, GADD45beta, GADD45gamma, Inhibin beta-A, Interferon activated gene 202B, Npas4, Nr4a1, and Serpinb2, which strongly promote survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. Several AID genes provide neuroprotection through a common process that renders mitochondria more resistant to cellular stress and toxic insults. Stereotaxic delivery of AID gene-expressing recombinant adeno-associated viruses to the hippocampus confers protection in vivo against seizure-induced brain damage. Thus, treatments that enhance nuclear calcium signaling or supplement AID genes represent novel therapies to combat neurodegenerative conditions and neuronal cell loss caused by synaptic dysfunction, which may be accompanied by a deregulation of calcium signal initiation and/or propagation to the cell nucleus.

  3. Nuclear calcium signaling controls expression of a large gene pool: identification of a gene program for acquired neuroprotection induced by synaptic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Jia Zhang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic activity can boost neuroprotection through a mechanism that requires synapse-to-nucleus communication and calcium signals in the cell nucleus. Here we show that in hippocampal neurons nuclear calcium is one of the most potent signals in neuronal gene expression. The induction or repression of 185 neuronal activity-regulated genes is dependent upon nuclear calcium signaling. The nuclear calcium-regulated gene pool contains a genomic program that mediates synaptic activity-induced, acquired neuroprotection. The core set of neuroprotective genes consists of 9 principal components, termed Activity-regulated Inhibitor of Death (AID genes, and includes Atf3, Btg2, GADD45beta, GADD45gamma, Inhibin beta-A, Interferon activated gene 202B, Npas4, Nr4a1, and Serpinb2, which strongly promote survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. Several AID genes provide neuroprotection through a common process that renders mitochondria more resistant to cellular stress and toxic insults. Stereotaxic delivery of AID gene-expressing recombinant adeno-associated viruses to the hippocampus confers protection in vivo against seizure-induced brain damage. Thus, treatments that enhance nuclear calcium signaling or supplement AID genes represent novel therapies to combat neurodegenerative conditions and neuronal cell loss caused by synaptic dysfunction, which may be accompanied by a deregulation of calcium signal initiation and/or propagation to the cell nucleus.

  4. Secondary Metabolites of Mangrove-Associated Strains of Talaromyces

    Directory of Open A