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Sample records for metabolite quinolinic acid

  1. Quinolinic Acid: An Endogenous Neurotoxin with Multiple Targets

    Rafael Lugo-Huitrón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (QUIN, a neuroactive metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is normally presented in nanomolar concentrations in human brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and is often implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human neurological diseases. QUIN is an agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, and it has a high in vivo potency as an excitotoxin. In fact, although QUIN has an uptake system, its neuronal degradation enzyme is rapidly saturated, and the rest of extracellular QUIN can continue stimulating the NMDA receptor. However, its toxicity cannot be fully explained by its activation of NMDA receptors it is likely that additional mechanisms may also be involved. In this review we describe some of the most relevant targets of QUIN neurotoxicity which involves presynaptic receptors, energetic dysfunction, oxidative stress, transcription factors, cytoskeletal disruption, behavior alterations, and cell death.

  2. Structure of Quinolinate Synthase from Pyrococcus horikoshii in the Presence of Its Product, Quinolinic Acid.

    Esakova, Olga A; Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L; Saunders, Allison H; McLaughlin, Martin I; Yennawar, Neela H; Booker, Squire J

    2016-06-15

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is a common intermediate in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its derivatives in all organisms that synthesize the molecule de novo. In most prokaryotes, it is formed from the condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and aspartate-enamine by the action of quinolinate synthase (NadA). NadA contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster cofactor with a unique, non-cysteinyl-ligated, iron ion (Fea), which is proposed to bind the hydroxyl group of a postulated intermediate in the last step of the reaction to facilitate a dehydration. However, direct evidence for this role in catalysis has yet to be provided. Herein, we present the structure of NadA in the presence of the product of its reaction, QA. We find that N1 and the C7 carboxylate group of QA ligate to Fea in a bidentate fashion, which is confirmed by Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy. This binding mode would place the C5 hydroxyl group of the postulated final intermediate distal to Fea and virtually incapable of coordinating to it. The structure shows that three strictly conserved amino acids, Glu198, Tyr109, and Tyr23, are in close proximity to the bound product. Substitution of these amino acids with Gln, Phe, and Phe, respectively, leads to complete loss of activity.

  3. OF MICE, RATS AND MEN: REVISITING THE QUINOLINIC ACID HYPOTHESIS OF HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE

    Schwarcz, R.; Guidetti, P.; Sathyasaikumar, K. V.; Muchowski, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease Huntington’s Disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the protein huntingtin (htt). Although the gene encoding htt was identified and cloned more than 15 years ago, and in spite of impressive efforts to unravel the mechanism(s) by which mutant htt induces nerve cell death, these studies have so far not led to a good understanding of pathophysiology or an effective therapy. Set against a historical background, we review data supporting the idea that metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation provide a critical link between mutant htt and the pathophysiology of HD. New studies in HD brain and genetic model organisms suggest that the disease may in fact be causally related to early abnormalities in KP metabolism, favoring the formation of two neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, over the related neuroprotective agent kynurenic acid. These findings not only link the excitotoxic hypothesis of HD pathology to an impairment of the KP but also define new drug targets and therefore have direct therapeutic implications. Thus, pharmacological normalization of the imbalance in brain KP metabolism may provide clinical benefits, which could be especially effective in the early stages of the disease. PMID:19394403

  4. Kynurenic Acid Prevents Cytoskeletal Disorganization Induced by Quinolinic Acid in Mixed Cultures of Rat Striatum.

    Pierozan, Paula; Biasibetti-Brendler, Helena; Schmitz, Felipe; Ferreira, Fernanda; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Wyse, Angela T S

    2018-06-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan known to modulate a number of mechanisms involved in neural dysfunction. Although its activity in the brain has been widely studied, the effect of KYNA counteracting the actions of quinolinic acid (QUIN) remains unknown. The present study aims at describing the ability of 100 μM KYNA preventing cytoskeletal disruption provoked by QUIN in astrocyte/neuron/microglia mixed culture. KYNA totally preserved cytoskeletal organization, cell morphology, and redox imbalance in mixed cultures exposed to QUIN. However, KYNA partially prevented morphological alteration in isolated primary astrocytes and failed to protect the morphological alterations of neurons caused by QUIN exposure. Moreover, KYNA prevented QUIN-induced microglial activation and upregulation of ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) and partially preserved tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level in mixed cultures. TNF-α level was also partially preserved in astrocytes. In addition to the mechanisms dependent on redox imbalance and microglial activation, KYNA prevented downregulation of connexin-43 and the loss of functionality of gap junctions (GJs), preserving cell-cell contact, cytoskeletal organization, and cell morphology in QUIN-treated cells. Furthermore, the toxicity of QUIN targeting the cytoskeleton of mixed cultures was not prevented by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK-801. We suggest that KYNA protects the integrity of the cytoskeleton of mixed cultures by complex mechanisms including modulating microglial activation preventing oxidative imbalance and misregulated GJs leading to disrupted cytoskeleton in QUIN-treated cells. This study contributed to elucidate the molecular basis of KYNA protection against QUIN toxicity.

  5. Synthesis of 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives

    Elhadi, S. A.

    2004-09-01

    Quinolin derivatives are a group of compounds known to possess a wide range of biological activities. The chemistry of quinolines together with their corresponding aldehydes were dealt with in chapter one of this study. Special emphasis was given to the chemistry of benzaldehyde. Twenty five 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives together with their corresponding intermediates were prepared in this work. Basically, the synthetic design of these compounds arise from the appropriate disconnections of the target 2-phenyl and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acids. The retro synthesis analysis of these compounds reveals pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde or phenyl pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde as possible logical precursors for 2-phenyl-and 2,3-diphenyl- quinoline-4-carboxylic acids respectively. The purity and identities of the synthesized compounds were elucidated through chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were heavily subjected to spectroscopic analysis (UV, IR, GC/MS, 1 H-and 13 C- NMR). The appropriate disconnections and the mechanisms of the corresponding reactions were given and discussed in chapter three. The spectral data were interpreted and correlated with the target structures. The prepared 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives were screened for their antibacterial activity. The compounds were tested against the standard bacterial organisms B. subtilis, S. aureus, E. coli and P. vulgaris. Some of these compounds were devoid of antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. vulgaris, while others showed moderate activity. All of the tested compounds showed an activity against B. subtilis and E. coli. 2,3-diphenyl -6-sulphanilamide-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid showed the highest activity against the four standard tested organisms.(Author)

  6. Synthesis of 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives

    Elhadi, S A [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Education, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2004-09-01

    Quinolin derivatives are a group of compounds known to possess a wide range of biological activities. The chemistry of quinolines together with their corresponding aldehydes were dealt with in chapter one of this study. Special emphasis was given to the chemistry of benzaldehyde. Twenty five 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives together with their corresponding intermediates were prepared in this work. Basically, the synthetic design of these compounds arise from the appropriate disconnections of the target 2-phenyl and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acids. The retro synthesis analysis of these compounds reveals pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde or phenyl pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde as possible logical precursors for 2-phenyl-and 2,3-diphenyl- quinoline-4-carboxylic acids respectively. The purity and identities of the synthesized compounds were elucidated through chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were heavily subjected to spectroscopic analysis (UV, IR, GC/MS, {sup 1}H-and {sup 13}C- NMR). The appropriate disconnections and the mechanisms of the corresponding reactions were given and discussed in chapter three. The spectral data were interpreted and correlated with the target structures. The prepared 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives were screened for their antibacterial activity. The compounds were tested against the standard bacterial organisms B. subtilis, S. aureus, E. coli and P. vulgaris. Some of these compounds were devoid of antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. vulgaris, while others showed moderate activity. All of the tested compounds showed an activity against B. subtilis and E. coli. 2,3-diphenyl -6-sulphanilamide-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid showed the highest activity against the four standard tested organisms.(Author)

  7. An experimental screen for quinoline/fumaric acid salts and co-crystals

    Beko, S. L.; Schmidt, M. U.; Bond, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    . Characterised products include the previously published 1 : 1 salt, C9H8N+center dot C4H3O4-, and a new 2 : 1 quinoline/fumaric acid co-crystal, (C9H7N)(2)center dot C4H4O4. Attempts to influence the crystallisation outcome by addition of 6-methylquinoline yielded a second co-crystal, also with an inherent 2......An experimental screen has been carried out for salts and co-crystals of quinoline (C9H7N) and fumaric acid (C4H4O4), including solution-based co-crystallisation from a variety of solvents, solvent-assisted and solvent-free co-grinding, and direct co-crystallisation of the starting materials...... : 1 quinoline/fumaric acid ratio, as a solid solution containing ca. 75% 6-methylquinoline and 25% quinoline. The corresponding co-crystal with pure 6-methylquinoline, (C10H9N)(2)center dot C4H4O4, was prepared, but the analogous structure with pure quinoline could not be obtained. Energy minimisation...

  8. The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Swathy, S S; Indira, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 microL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 microL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.

  9. Effects of Tranilast on the Urinary Excretion of Kynurenic and Quinolinic Acid under Conditions of L Tryptophan Loading

    Rowland R. Noakes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of morphea and other cutaneous sclerosing disorders remain poorly understood. Although they are considered to be autoimmune disorders, abnormal tryptophan metabolism may be involved. Current therapy is directed to supressing the autoimmune response. Demonstration of a therapeutic response to manipulation of the kynurenine pathway would both support a role for abnormal tryptophan metabolism and offer additional targets for therapy. Tranilast is a 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid derivative known to target the kynurenine pathway. The aim of this study was to see if tranilast lowered the urinary excretion of the kynurenine metabolites kynurenic and quinolinic acid under condition of L tryptophan loading in a volunteer. Mean baseline value for kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid were 1.1 and 2.1 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively. This rose to 5.6 and 3.8 mmol/mol creatinine respectively under conditions of L tryptophan loading 2 grams daily. Adding 1 g of tranilast daily lowered the values to 2.0 and 2.9 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively. These data suggest that tranilast acts as a competitive inhibitor of either indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO, tryptophan 2, 3 di-oxygenase (TDO or both. As it involved only 1 subject, the results may not be representative of the larger population and must be considered preliminary.

  10. Quinolinic Acid, an Endogenous Molecule Combining Excitotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Other Toxic Mechanisms

    Verónica Pérez-De La Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (QUIN, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca 2+ concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity.

  11. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Synthesis of Naphthyl-, Quinolin- and Anthracenyl Analogues of Clofibric Acid as PPARα Agonists.

    Giampietro, Letizia; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Bruno, Isabella; Carradori, Simone; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giancristofaro, Antonella; Maccallini, Cristina; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    PPARα is a ligand activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor subfamily, involved in fatty acid metabolism in tissues with high oxidative rates such as muscle, heart and liver. PPARα activation is important in steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis in preclinical models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease identifying a new potential therapeutic area. In this work, three series of clofibric acid analogues conjugated with naphthyl, quinolin, chloroquinolin and anthracenyl scaffolds were synthesized. In an effort to obtain new compounds active as PPARα agonists, these molecules were evaluated for PPARα transactivation activity. Naphthyl and quinolin derivatives showed a good activation of PPARα; noteworthy, optically active naphthyl derivatives activated PPARα better than corresponding parent compound. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Central Nervous System Infection with Borna Disease Virus Causes Kynurenine Pathway Dysregulation and Neurotoxic Quinolinic Acid Production.

    Formisano, Simone; Hornig, Mady; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Vasishtha, Mansi; Parsons, Loren H; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian; Williams, Brent L

    2017-07-15

    Central nervous system infection of neonatal and adult rats with Borna disease virus (BDV) results in neuronal destruction and behavioral abnormalities with differential immune-mediated involvement. Neuroactive metabolites generated from the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation have been implicated in several human neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we report that brain expression of key enzymes in the kynurenine pathway are significantly, but differentially, altered in neonatal and adult rats with BDV infection. Gene expression analysis of rat brains following neonatal infection showed increased expression of kynurenine amino transferase II (KATII) and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) enzymes. Additionally, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression was only modestly increased in a brain region- and time-dependent manner in neonatally infected rats; however, its expression was highly increased in adult infected rats. The most dramatic impact on gene expression was seen for KMO, whose activity promotes the production of neurotoxic quinolinic acid. KMO expression was persistently elevated in brain regions of both newborn and adult BDV-infected rats, with increases reaching up to 86-fold. KMO protein levels were increased in neonatally infected rats and colocalized with neurons, the primary target cells of BDV infection. Furthermore, quinolinic acid was elevated in neonatally infected rat brains. We further demonstrate increased expression of KATII and KMO, but not IDO, in vitro in BDV-infected C6 astroglioma cells. Our results suggest that BDV directly impacts the kynurenine pathway, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory responses in immunocompetent hosts. Thus, experimental models of BDV infection may provide new tools for discriminating virus-mediated from immune-mediated impacts on the kynurenine pathway and their relative contribution to neurodegeneration. IMPORTANCE BDV causes persistent, noncytopathic infection in vitro yet still elicits

  14. Effect of quinolinic acid in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis on cortical high-affinity choline uptake

    Metcalf, R.H.; Boegman, R.J.; Quirion, R.; Riopelle, R.J.; Ludwin, S.K.

    1987-08-01

    A transient 45% increase in cortical high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) was observed after an injection of quinolinic acid (QUIN) into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nbM) of the rat. This was followed by a steady decline in choline uptake, which resulted in a 46% decrease by day 7. Specific (/sup 3/H)hemicholinium-3 binding to coronal brain sections showed a similar pattern following injections of QUIN into the nbM. The increase in cortical HACU elicited by QUIN appeared to be dose dependent.

  15. Surface protection of mild steel in acidic chloride solution by 5-Nitro-8-Hydroxy Quinoline

    R. Ganapathi Sundaram

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of commercially available quinoline nucleus based pharmaceutically active compound 5-Nitro-8-Hydroxy Quinoline (NHQ against the corrosion of mild steel (MS in 1 M acidic chloride (HCl solution was investigated by chemical (weight loss – WL and electrochemical (Tafel polarization, Linear polarization and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. From all the four methods, it is inferred that the percentage of inhibition efficiency increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration from 50 to 300 ppm. The adsorption behavior of inhibitor obeyed through Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters were also calculated and predict that the process of inhibition is a spontaneous reaction. EIS technique exhibits one capacitive loop indicating that, the corrosion reaction is controlled by charge transfer process. Tafel polarization studies revealed that the investigated inhibitor is mixed type and the mode of adsorption is physical in nature. The surface morphologies were examined by FT-IR, SEM and EDX techniques. Theoretical quantum chemical calculations were performed to confirm the ability of NHQ to adsorb onto mild steel surface. Keywords: Acidic chloride solution, MS, NHQ, WL, SEM, FT-IR

  16. HIV, prospective memory, and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of quinolinic acid and phosphorylated Tau.

    Anderson, Albert M; Croteau, David; Ellis, Ronald J; Rosario, Debra; Potter, Michael; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J; Woods, Steven Paul; Letendre, Scott L

    2018-06-15

    There is mounting evidence that prospective memory (PM) is impaired during HIV infection despite treatment. In this prospective study, 66 adults (43 HIV+ and 23 HIV negative) underwent PM assessment and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination. HIV+ participants had significantly lower PM but significantly higher CSF concentrations of CXCL10 and quinolinic acid (QUIN). Higher CSF phosphorylated Tau (pTau) was associated with worse PM. In a secondary analysis excluding outliers, higher QUIN correlated with higher pTau. CSF QUIN is thus elevated during HIV infection despite antiretroviral therapy and could indirectly contribute to impaired PM by influencing the formation of pTau. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Uridine monophosphate synthetase enables eukaryotic de novo NAD+ biosynthesis from quinolinic acid.

    McReynolds, Melanie R; Wang, Wenqing; Holleran, Lauren M; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2017-07-07

    NAD + biosynthesis is an attractive and promising therapeutic target for influencing health span and obesity-related phenotypes as well as tumor growth. Full and effective use of this target for therapeutic benefit requires a complete understanding of NAD + biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for a conserved phosphoribosyltransferase in NAD + biosynthesis. Because a required quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is not encoded in its genome, Caenorhabditis elegans are reported to lack a de novo NAD + biosynthetic pathway. However, all the genes of the kynurenine pathway required for quinolinic acid (QA) production from tryptophan are present. Thus, we investigated the presence of de novo NAD + biosynthesis in this organism. By combining isotope-tracing and genetic experiments, we have demonstrated the presence of an intact de novo biosynthesis pathway for NAD + from tryptophan via QA, highlighting the functional conservation of this important biosynthetic activity. Supplementation with kynurenine pathway intermediates also boosted NAD + levels and partially reversed NAD + -dependent phenotypes caused by mutation of pnc-1 , which encodes a nicotinamidase required for NAD + salvage biosynthesis, demonstrating contribution of de novo synthesis to NAD + homeostasis. By investigating candidate phosphoribosyltransferase genes in the genome, we determined that the conserved uridine monophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (UMPS), which acts in pyrimidine biosynthesis, is required for NAD + biosynthesis in place of the missing QPRTase. We suggest that similar underground metabolic activity of UMPS may function in other organisms. This mechanism for NAD + biosynthesis creates novel possibilities for manipulating NAD + biosynthetic pathways, which is key for the future of therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to 32 P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca 2+ /calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca 2+ quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights:

  19. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil); Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya [Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  20. Neuroprotective Activity of Curcumin in Combination with Piperine against Quinolinic Acid Induced Neurodegeneration in Rats.

    Singh, Shamsher; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is an excitotoxin that induces Huntington's-like symptoms in animals and humans. Curcumin (CMN) is a well-known antioxidant but the major problem is its bioavailability. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of CMN in the presence of piperine against QA-induced excitotoxic cell death in rats. QA was administered intrastriatally at a dose of 200 nmol/2 µl saline, bilaterally. CMN (25 and 50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and combination of CMN (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and with piperine (2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered daily for the next 21 days. Body weight and behavioral parameters were observed on 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st day. On the 22nd day, animals were sacrificed and striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, nitrite and GSH), neuroinflammatory (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and neurochemical (dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, glutamate, 5-HT, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) estimation. CMN treatment showed beneficial effect against QA-induced motor deficit, biochemical and neurochemical abnormalities in rats. Combination of piperine (2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) with CMN (25 mg/kg/day, p.o.) significantly enhanced its protective effect as compared to treatment with CMN alone. This study has revealed that the combination of CMN and piperine showed strong antioxidant and protective effect against QA-induced behavioral and neurological alteration in rats. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Investigation of prototypal MOFs consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites for quinoline synthesis.

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Leng, Kunyue; Cash, Lindsay; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Stackhouse, Chavis A; Sun, Yinyong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-03-21

    A series of prototypal metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites, have been systematically investigated for Friedländer annulation reaction, a straightforward approach to synthesizing quinoline and its derivatives. Amongst them MMCF-2 demonstrates significantly enhanced catalytic activity compared with the benchmark MOFs, HKUST-1 and MOF-505, as a result of a high-density of accessible Cu(II) Lewis acid sites and large window size in the cuboctahedral cage-based nanoreactor of MMCF-2.

  2. Essential fatty acid-rich diets protect against striatal oxidative damage induced by quinolinic acid in rats.

    Morales-Martínez, Adriana; Sánchez-Mendoza, Alicia; Martínez-Lazcano, Juan Carlos; Pineda-Farías, Jorge Baruch; Montes, Sergio; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Martínez-Gopar, Pablo Eliasib; Tristán-López, Luis; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Castro, Nelly; Ríos, Camilo; Pérez-Severiano, Francisca

    2017-09-01

    Essential fatty acids have an important effect on oxidative stress-related diseases. The Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurologic disorder in which oxidative stress caused by free radicals is an important damage mechanism. The HD experimental model induced by quinolinic acid (QUIN) has been widely used to evaluate therapeutic effects of antioxidant compounds. The aim of this study was to test whether the fatty acid content in olive- or fish-oil-rich diet prevents against QUIN-related oxidative damage in rats. Rats were fed during 20 days with an olive- or a fish-oil-rich diet (15% w/w). Posterior to diet period, rats were striatally microinjected with QUIN (240 nmol/µl) or saline solution. Then, we evaluated the neurological damage, oxidative status, and gamma isoform of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) expression. Results showed that fatty acid-rich diet, mainly by fish oil, reduced circling behavior, prevented the fall in GABA levels, increased PPARγ expression, and prevented oxidative damage in striatal tissue. In addition none of the enriched diets exerted changes neither on triglycerides or cholesterol blood levels, nor or hepatic function. This study suggests that olive- and fish-oil-rich diets exert neuroprotective effects.

  3. Antiperoxidative and antiinflammatory effect of Sida cordifolia Linn. on quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity.

    Swathy, S S; Panicker, Seema; Nithya, R S; Anuja, M M; Rejitha, S; Indira, M

    2010-09-01

    Sida cordifolia is a plant belonging to the Malvaceae family used in many ayurvedic preparations. This study aimed at assessing the effects of ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia root on quinolinic acid (QUIN) induced neurotoxicity and to compare its effect with the standard drug deprenyl in rat brain. Rats were divided into six groups: (1) control group (2) QUIN (55 microg/100 g bwt/day) (3) 50% ethanolic plant extract treated group (50 mg/100 g bwt/day) (4) Deprenyl (100 microg/100 g bwt/day) (5) QUIN (55 microg/100 g bwt/day) + 50% ethanolic plant extract treated group (50 mg/100 g bwt/day) (6) QUIN (55 microg/100 g bwt/day) + Deprenyl (100 microg/100 g bwt/day). At the end of the experimental period a status of lipid peroxidation products, protein peroxidation product, activities of the scavenging enzymes and the activities of the inflammatory markers were analyzed. Results revealed that the lipid peroxidation products decreased and the activities of the scavenging enzymes increased significantly in the brain of the plant extract treated group, deprenyl treated group and also in the coadminstered groups. The activities of markers of inflammatory responses such as cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase were found to be significantly increased in the QUIN treated rats and this was decreased upon the administration of plant extract and deprenyl. In short, the study revealed that 50% ethanolic extract of Sida cordifolia has got potent antioxidant and antiinflammatory activity and the activity is comparable with the standard drug deprenyl.

  4. Specific reactions of different striatal neuron types in morphology induced by quinolinic acid in rats.

    Qiqi Feng

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurological degenerative disease and quinolinic acid (QA has been used to establish HD model in animals through the mechanism of excitotoxicity. Yet the specific pathological changes and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. We aimed to reveal the specific morphological changes of different striatal neurons in the HD model. Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were subjected to unilaterally intrastriatal injections of QA to mimic the HD model. Behavioral tests, histochemical and immunhistochemical stainings as well as Western blots were applied in the present study. The results showed that QA-treated rats had obvious motor and cognitive impairments when compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical detection showed a great loss of NeuN+ neurons and Darpp32+ projection neurons in the transition zone in the QA group when compared with the control group. The numbers of parvalbumin (Parv+ and neuropeptide Y (NPY+ interneurons were both significantly reduced while those of calretinin (Cr+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT+ were not changed notably in the transition zone in the QA group when compared to the controls. Parv+, NPY+ and ChAT+ interneurons were not significantly increased in fiber density while Cr+ neurons displayed an obvious increase in fiber density in the transition zone in QA-treated rats. The varicosity densities of Parv+, Cr+ and NPY+ interneurons were all raised in the transition zone after QA treatment. In conclusion, the present study revealed that QA induced obvious behavioral changes as well as a general loss of striatal projection neurons and specific morphological changes in different striatal interneurons, which may help further explain the underlying mechanisms and the specific functions of various striatal neurons in the pathological process of HD.

  5. Application of Heteropoly Acids as Heterogeneous and Recyclable Catalysts for Friedländer Synthesis of Quinolines

    Majid M. Heravi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New convenient conditions for the Friedländer synthesis of quinolines are described. Quinolines were readily prepared in the presence of heteropolyacids as heterogeneous and recyclable catalysts in good yields.

  6. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  7. Silica sulfuric acid and as an efficient catalyst for the Friedlander quinoline synthesis from simple ketones and ortho - amino aryl ketones under microwave irradiation

    Zolfigol, M. A.; Salehi, P.; Shiri, M.; Faal Rastegar, T.; Ghaderi, A.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of quinoline derivatives via Friedlander method from ortho-amino aryl ketones in the presence of a catalytic amount of silica sulfuric acid under solvent-free condition and microwave irradiation was described. A good range of simple ketones such as cyclohexanone and deoxybenzoin were used

  8. Studies on adsorption and corrosion inhibitive properties of quinoline derivatives on N80 steel in 15% hydrochloric acid

    K.R. Ansari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the N80 steel corrosion protection study in 15% HCl which was carried by three quinoline derivatives namely 3-acetyl-1-(4-methylbenzylideneamino quinolin-2-one (AQ-1, 3-acetyl-1-(4 hydroxy benzylideneamino quinolin-2-one (AQ-2, 3-acetyl-1-(3-nitrobenzylideneamino quinolin-2(1H-one (AQ-3 using gravimetric, electrochemical, and quantum chemical studies. Tafel polarization showed that AQs are mixed type inhibitors but dominantly affect cathodic reaction more. The observed results reveal that AQ-1 is the best inhibitor. All the three inhibitors were found to obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs supports the protection of the N80 steel by AQs. Quantum chemical study reveals that the inhibitors have a tendency to get protonated and this protonated form has greater tendency to get adsorbed onto the N80 steel surface.

  9. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  10. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Salgado, R.; Oehmen, A.; Carvalho, G.; Noronha, J.P.; Reis, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: ► Clofibric acid is biodegradable. ► Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. ► Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. ► The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L −1 ), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  11. Quinolinic Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Potential Multi-target Compounds for Neurodegeneration: Monoamine Oxidase and Cholinesterase Inhibition.

    Khan, Nehal A; Khan, Imtiaz; Abid, Syed M A; Zaib, Sumera; Ibrar, Aliya; Andleeb, Hina; Hameed, Shahid; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a debilitating and progressive disorder, is among the most challenging and devastating neurodegenerative diseases predominantly affecting the people over 60 years of age. To confront PD, an advanced and operational strategy is to design single chemical functionality able to control more than one target instantaneously. In this endeavor, for the exploration of new and efficient inhibitors of Parkinson's disease, we synthesized a series of quinoline carboxylic acids (3a-j) and evaluated their in vitro monoamine oxidase and cholinesterase inhibitory activities. The molecular docking and in silico studies of the most potent inhibitors were performed to identify the probable binding modes in the active site of the monoamine oxidase enzymes. Moreover, molecular properties were calculated to evaluate the druglikeness of the compounds. The biological evaluation results revealed that the tested compounds were highly potent against monoamine oxidase (A & B), 3c targeted both the isoforms of MAO with IC50 values of 0.51 ± 0.12 and 0.51 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. The tested compounds also demonstrated high and completely selective inhibitory action against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with IC50 values ranging from 4.36 to 89.24 µM. Among the examined derivatives, 3i was recognized as the most potent inhibitor of AChE with an IC50 value of 4.36 ± 0.12 ±µM. The compounds appear to be promising inhibitors and could be used for the future development of drugs targeting neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. NEW METABOLITES OF THE DRUG 5-AMINOSALICYLIC ACID .2. N-FORMYL-5-AMINOSALICYLIC ACID

    Tjornelund, J.; Hansen, S. H.; Cornett, Claus

    1991-01-01

    1. A new metabolite of the drug 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) has been found in urine from pigs and in plasma of humans. The metabolite has been isolated from pig urine using an XAD-2 column and purified using preparative h.p.l.c. 2. The metabolite has been identified as N-formyl-5-ASA (5-formami...

  13. Biotransformation of cannabidiol in mice. Identification of new acid metabolites.

    Martin, B R; Harvey, D J; Paton, W D

    1977-01-01

    The in vivo metabolism of cannabidiol (CBD) was investigated in mice. Following the ip administration of CBD to mice, livers were removed and metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate prior to partial purification on Sephadex LH-20 columns. Fractions from the columns were converted into trimethylsilyl, d9-trimethylsilyl, and methylester-trimethylsilyl derivatives for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, metabolites containing carboxylic acid and ketone functional groups were reduced to alcohols with lithium aluminum deuteride before trimethylsilation. A total of 22 metabolites were characterized, 14 of which had not been reported previously. The metabolites could be categorized as follows: monohydroxylated (N=2), dihydroxylated (N=3), CBD-7-oic acid, side chain hydroxy-GBD-7-oic acids (N=3), side-chain acids (N=3), 7-hydroxy-side-chain acids (N=4), 6-oxo-side-chain acids (N=3) and glucuronide conjugates (N=3). The most significant biotransformations were glucuronide conjugation and, to a lesser extent, formation of CBD-7-oic acid.

  14. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reactio...

  15. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites.

    Salgado, R; Oehmen, A; Carvalho, G; Noronha, J P; Reis, M A M

    2012-11-30

    Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration=2 mg L(-1)), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sertraline and venlafaxine improves motor performance and neurobehavioral deficit in quinolinic acid induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats: Possible neurotransmitters modulation.

    Gill, Jaskamal Singh; Jamwal, Sumit; Kumar, Puneet; Deshmukh, Rahul

    2017-04-01

    Huntington Disease is autosomal, fatal and progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which clinically available drugs offer only symptomatic relief. Emerging strides have indicated that antidepressants improve motor performance, restore neurotransmitters level, ameliorates striatal atrophy, increases BDNF level and may enhance neurogenesis. Therefore, we investigated sertraline and venlafaxine, clinically available drugs for depression with numerous neuroprotective properties, for their beneficial effects, if any, in quinolinic acid induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats. Rats were administered quinolinic acid (QA) (200 nmol/2μl saline) intrastriatal bilaterally on 0day. Sertraline and venlafaxine (10 and 20mg/kg, po) each were administered for 21days once a day. Motor performance was assessed using rotarod test, grip strength test, narrow beam walk test on weekly basis. On day 22, animals were sacrificed and rat striatum was isolated for biochemical (LPO, GSH and Nitrite), neuroinflammation (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and neurochemical analysis (GABA, glutamate, norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA). QA treatment significantly altered body weight, motor performance, oxidative defense (increased LPO, nitrite and decreased GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines levels (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β), neurochemical level (GABA, glutamate, nor-epinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, HVA, DOPAC, 5-HIAA). Sertraline and venlafaxine at selected doses significantly attenuated QA induced alterations in striatum. The present study suggests that modulation of monoamines level, normalization of GABA and glutamatergic signaling, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties could underlie the neuroprotective effect of sertraline and venlafaxine in QA induced Huntington's like symptoms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  17. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The high temperature, high pressure wet oxidation reaction of quinoline has been studied as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature. At neutral to acidic pH, it is effective in the oxidation of quinoline at 240 degrees C and above, whereas under alkaline conditions the reaction...... is markedly slowed down. The results indicate that the reaction is an auto-catalysed, free radical chain reaction transforming 99% of quinoline to other substances. Of the quinoline. 30-50% was oxidised to CO2 and H2O depending on the initial concentration. Wet oxidation of deuterium-labelled quinoline...

  18. Yeast Metabolites of Glycated Amino Acids in Beer.

    Hellwig, Michael; Beer, Falco; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Glycation reactions (Maillard reactions) during the malting and brewing processes are important for the development of the characteristic color and flavor of beer. Recently, free and protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) such as pyrraline, formyline, and maltosine were found in beer. Furthermore, these amino acid derivatives are metabolized by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via the Ehrlich pathway. In this study, a method was developed for quantitation of individual Ehrlich intermediates derived from pyrraline, formyline, and maltosine. Following synthesis of the corresponding reference material, the MRP-derived new Ehrlich alcohols pyrralinol (up to 207 μg/L), formylinol (up to 50 μg/L), and maltosinol (up to 6.9 μg/L) were quantitated for the first time in commercial beer samples by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. This is equivalent to ca. 20-40% of the concentrations of the parent glycated amino acids. The metabolites were almost absent from alcohol-free beers and malt-based beverages. Two previously unknown valine-derived pyrrole derivatives were characterized and qualitatively identified in beer. The metabolites investigated represent new process-induced alkaloids that may influence brewing yeast performance due to structural similarities to quorum sensing and metal-binding molecules.

  19. Quinolinic acid induced neurodegeneration in the striatum: a combined in vivo and in vitro analysis of receptor changes and microglia activation

    Moresco, R.M.; Lavazza, T.; Belloli, S.; Todde, S.; Matarrese, M.; Carpinelli, A.; Turolla, E.; Fazio, F.; Lecchi, M.; Pezzola, A.; Popoli, P.; Zimarino, V.; Malgaroli, A.

    2008-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterised by prominent neuronal cell loss in the basal ganglia with motor and cognitive disturbances. One of the most well-studied pharmacological models of HD is produced by local injection in the rat brain striatum of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA), which produces many of the distinctive features of this human neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we report a detailed analysis, obtained both in vivo and in vitro of this pharmacological model of HD. By combining emission tomography (PET) with autoradiographic and immunocytochemical confocal laser techniques, we quantified in the QA-injected striatum the temporal behavior (from 1 to 60 days from the excitotoxic insult) of neuronal cell density and receptor availability (adenosine A 2A and dopamine D 2 receptors) together with the degree of microglia activation. Both approaches showed a loss of adenosine A 2A and dopamine D 2 receptors paralleled by an increase of microglial activation. This combined longitudinal analysis of the disease progression, which suggested an impairment of neurotransmission, neuronal integrity and a reversible activation of brain inflammatory processes, might represent a more quantitative approach to compare the differential effects of treatments in slowing down or reversing HD in rodent models with potential applications to human patients. (orig.)

  20. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    Sharma, Amit; Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Levick, Scott P.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin). Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT. PMID:27213332

  1. Arachidonic acid metabolites and endothelial dysfunction of portal hypertension.

    Sacerdoti, David; Pesce, Paola; Di Pascoli, Marco; Brocco, Silvia; Cecchetto, Lara; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Increased resistance to portal flow and increased portal inflow due to mesenteric vasodilatation represent the main factors causing portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Endothelial cell dysfunction, defined as an imbalance between the synthesis, release, and effect of endothelial mediators of vascular tone, inflammation, thrombosis, and angiogenesis, plays a major role in the increase of resistance in portal circulation, in the decrease in the mesenteric one, in the development of collateral circulation. Reduced response to vasodilators in liver sinusoids and increased response in the mesenteric arterioles, and, viceversa, increased response to vasoconstrictors in the portal-sinusoidal circulation and decreased response in the mesenteric arterioles are also relevant to the pathophysiology of portal hypertension. Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites through the three pathways, cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and epoxygenase, are involved in endothelial dysfunction of portal hypertension. Increased thromboxane-A2 production by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) via increased COX-1 activity/expression, increased leukotriens, increased epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) (dilators of the peripheral arterial circulation, but vasoconstrictors of the portal-sinusoidal circulation), represent a major component in the increased portal resistance, in the decreased portal response to vasodilators and in the hyper-response to vasoconstrictors. Increased prostacyclin (PGI2) via COX-1 and COX-2 overexpression, and increased EETs/heme-oxygenase-1/K channels/gap junctions (endothelial derived hyperpolarizing factor system) play a major role in mesenteric vasodilatation, hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors, and hyper-response to vasodilators. EETs, mediators of liver regeneration after hepatectomy and of angiogenesis, may play a role in the development of regenerative nodules and collateral circulation, through stimulation of vascular endothelial

  2. Degradation of pyridine and quinoline in aqueous solution by gamma radiation

    Chu, Libing; Yu, Shaoqing; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-03-01

    In present work, the degradation of two N-heteroaromatic pollutants, i.e., pyridine and quinoline was investigated by gamma irradiation in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticle. The experimental results showed that quinoline has a higher degradation rate than pyridine. The removal efficiency of the pollutants, TOC and TN reached 93.0%, 11.9% and 12.0% for quinoline, 71.0%, 10.6% and 4.4% for pyridine, respectively at 7.0 kGy and initial concentration of 50 mg/L. Ammonium was detected for both pyridine and quinoline within the absorbed doses, suggesting that the organic nitrogen was transformed into ammonium. The degradation rate constant of pyridine and quinoline was increased by 1.1-1.5 times with addition of TiO2. TiO2 nanoparticles were especially effective to enhance the mineralization. The removal efficiency of TOC and TN was increased by 15-12% for pyridine and 23-25% for quinoline, respectively in the presence of 2.0 g/L TiO2. Following gamma irradiation, 2-hydroxypyridine, 3-hydroxypyridine, oxalic acid and formic acid were identified for pyridine and the hydroxyl quinoline and formic acid were detected for quinoline. Accordingly, the degradation mechanism of pyridine and quinoline by gamma irradiation was tentatively proposed.

  3. Effect of quinolinic acid-induced lesions of the nucleus accumbens core on performance on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement: implications for inter-temporal choice.

    Bezzina, G; Body, S; Cheung, T H C; Hampson, C L; Deakin, J F W; Anderson, I M; Szabadi, E; Bradshaw, C M

    2008-04-01

    The nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) is believed to contribute to the control of operant behaviour by reinforcers. Recent evidence suggests that it is not crucial for determining the incentive value of immediately available reinforcers, but is important for maintaining the values of delayed reinforcers. This study aims to examine the effect of AcbC lesions on performance on a progressive-ratio schedule using a quantitative model that dissociates effects of interventions on motor and motivational processes (Killeen 1994 Mathematical principles of reinforcement. Behav Brain Sci 17:105-172). Rats with bilateral quinolinic acid-induced lesions of the AcbC (n = 15) or sham lesions (n = 14) were trained to lever-press for food-pellet reinforcers under a progressive-ratio schedule. In Phase 1 (90 sessions) the reinforcer was one pellet; in Phase 2 (30 sessions), it was two pellets; in Phase 3, (30 sessions) it was one pellet. The performance of both groups conformed to the model of progressive-ratio performance (group mean data: r2 > 0.92). The motor parameter, delta, was significantly higher in the AcbC-lesioned than the sham-lesioned group, reflecting lower overall response rates in the lesioned group. The motivational parameter, a, was sensitive to changes in reinforcer size, but did not differ significantly between the two groups. The AcbC-lesioned group showed longer post-reinforcement pauses and lower running response rates than the sham-lesioned group. The results suggest that destruction of the AcbC impairs response capacity but does not alter the efficacy of food reinforcers. The results are consistent with recent findings that AcbC lesions do not alter sensitivity to reinforcer size in inter-temporal choice schedules.

  4. Severe depression is associated with increased microglial quinolinic acid in subregions of the anterior cingulate gyrus: Evidence for an immune-modulated glutamatergic neurotransmission?

    Mawrin Christian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune dysfunction, including monocytosis and increased blood levels of interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor α has been observed during acute episodes of major depression. These peripheral immune processes may be accompanied by microglial activation in subregions of the anterior cingulate cortex where depression-associated alterations of glutamatergic neurotransmission have been described. Methods Microglial immunoreactivity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA glutamate receptor agonist quinolinic acid (QUIN in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC, anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC of 12 acutely depressed suicidal patients (major depressive disorder/MDD, n = 7; bipolar disorder/BD, n = 5 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and compared with its expression in 10 healthy control subjects. Results Depressed patients had a significantly increased density of QUIN-positive cells in the sACC (P = 0.003 and the aMCC (P = 0.015 compared to controls. In contrast, counts of QUIN-positive cells in the pACC did not differ between the groups (P = 0.558. Post-hoc tests showed that significant findings were attributed to MDD and were absent in BD. Conclusions These results add a novel link to the immune hypothesis of depression by providing evidence for an upregulation of microglial QUIN in brain regions known to be responsive to infusion of NMDA antagonists such as ketamine. Further work in this area could lead to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and pave the way for novel NMDA receptor therapies or immune-modulating strategies.

  5. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor mapping with [18F]MK-9470 PET in the rat brain after quinolinic acid lesion: a comparison to dopamine receptors and glucose metabolism

    Casteels, Cindy; Martinez, Emili; Camon, Lluisa; Vera, Nuria de; Planas, Anna M.; Bormans, Guy; Baekelandt, Veerle; Laere, Koen van

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence imply early alterations in metabolic, dopaminergic and endocannabinoid neurotransmission in Huntington's disease (HD). Using [ 18 F]MK-9470 and small animal PET, we investigated cerebral changes in type 1 cannabinoid (CB 1 ) receptor binding in the quinolinic acid (QA) rat model of HD in relation to glucose metabolism, dopamine D 2 receptor availability and amphetamine-induced turning behaviour. Twenty-one Wistar rats (11 QA and 10 shams) were investigated. Small animal PET acquisitions were conducted on a Focus 220 with approximately 18 MBq of [ 18 F]MK-9470, [ 18 F]FDG and [ 11 C]raclopride. Relative glucose metabolism and parametric CB 1 receptor and D 2 binding images were anatomically standardized to Paxinos space and analysed voxel-wise using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2). In the QA model, [ 18 F]MK-9470 uptake, glucose metabolism and D 2 receptor binding were reduced in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 7, 35 and 77%, respectively (all p -5 ), while an increase for these markers was observed on the contralateral side (>5%, all p -4 ). [ 18 F]MK-9470 binding was also increased in the cerebellum (p = 2.10 -5 ), where it was inversely correlated to the number of ipsiversive turnings (p = 7.10 -6 ), suggesting that CB 1 receptor upregulation in the cerebellum is related to a better functional outcome. Additionally, glucose metabolism was relatively increased in the contralateral hippocampus, thalamus and sensorimotor cortex (p = 1.10 -6 ). These data point to in vivo changes in endocannabinoid transmission, specifically for CB 1 receptors in the QA model, with involvement of the caudate-putamen, but also distant regions of the motor circuitry, including the cerebellum. These data also indicate the occurrence of functional plasticity on metabolism, D 2 and CB 1 neurotransmission in the contralateral hemisphere. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis of 2-azetidinones substituted quinoline derivative

    Mashelkar Uday C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetanilide is converted into 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline by reacting with DMF-POCl3 at 80-90ºC and then condensed with aromatic primary amines to give Schiff bases (3a-3c. These Schiff bases are then reacted with acid chlorides in the presence of base in toluene to give 1, 3, 4-substituted 2-azetidinones.

  7. Linoleic acid participates in the response to ischemic brain injury through oxidized metabolites that regulate neurotransmission.

    Hennebelle, Marie; Zhang, Zhichao; Metherel, Adam H; Kitson, Alex P; Otoki, Yurika; Richardson, Christine E; Yang, Jun; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D; Zhang, Liang; Bazinet, Richard P; Taha, Ameer Y

    2017-06-28

    Linoleic acid (LA; 18:2 n-6), the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in the US diet, is a precursor to oxidized metabolites that have unknown roles in the brain. Here, we show that oxidized LA-derived metabolites accumulate in several rat brain regions during CO 2 -induced ischemia and that LA-derived 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, but not LA, increase somatic paired-pulse facilitation in rat hippocampus by 80%, suggesting bioactivity. This study provides new evidence that LA participates in the response to ischemia-induced brain injury through oxidized metabolites that regulate neurotransmission. Targeting this pathway may be therapeutically relevant for ischemia-related conditions such as stroke.

  8. Purification and H-1 NMR spectroscopic characterization of phase II metabolites of tolfenamic acid

    Sidelmann, U. G.; Christiansen, E.; Krogh, L.

    1997-01-01

    samples obtained on days 7 to 10 from a human volunteer after oral administration of 200 mg of the drug three times per day (steady-state plasma concentration). The metabolites of tolfenamic acid were initially concentrated by preparative solid phase extraction (PSPE) chromatography, thereby removing...... the endogenous polar compounds that are present in the urine. The individual metabolites were purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then identified using H-1 NMR, Both one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were performed to identify the phase II metabolites of tolfenamic......), and N-(2-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-anthranilic acid (11) were identified. The phase II metabolites (5-11) had not previously been identified in urine from humans administered tolfenamic acid. The phase I metabolites of the glucuronides 7, 8, 10, and 11 were identified here for the first time. An HPLC...

  9. Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor imaging with [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET in the rat brain after quinolinic acid lesion. Comparison with the dopamine receptor imaging

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ogi, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Nobutaka [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan). Positron Medical Center] [and others

    2002-11-01

    We proposed [{sup 11}C]KF18446 as a selective radioligand for mapping the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors being highly enriched in the striatum by positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, we investigated whether [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET can detect the change in the striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in the rat after unilateral injection of an excitotoxin quinolinic acid into the striatum, a Huntington's disease model, to demonstrate the usefulness of [{sup 11}C]KF18446. The extent of the striatal lesion was identified based on MRI, to which the PET was co-registered. The binding potential of [{sup 11}C]KF18446 significantly decreased in the quinolinic acid-lesioned striatum. The decrease was comparable to the decrease in the potential of [{sup 11}C] raclopride binding to dopamine D{sub 2} receptors in the lesioned striatum, but seemed to be larger than the decrease in the potential of [{sup 11}C]SCH23390 binding to dopamine D{sub 1} receptors. Ex vivo and in vitro autoradiography validated the PET signals. We concluded that [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET can detect change in the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in the rat model, and will provide a new diagnostic tool for characterizing post-synaptic striatopallidal neurons in the stratum. (author)

  10. Radioimmunoassay for abscisic acid: properties of cross-reacting polar metabolites

    Le Page-Degivry, M.; Bulard, C. (Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 06 - Nice (France))

    When the radioimmunoassay developed for abscisic acid (ABA) estimation was applied to a plant extract, results appeared overestimated. Purification by thin-layer chromatography established that ABA in its free and alkali-hydrolysable forms constituted only a small part of the immunoreactive material. The major source of the cross-reactivity was a group of polar metabolites, poorly soluble in ether and well recovered by ethyl acetate and butanol. These immunoreactive metabolites were compared with polar metabolites already described in experiments where (/sup 14/C)ABA was fed to plant tissue, particularly with recently identified glucosides of ABA and dihydrophaseic acid.

  11. A radioimmunoassay for abscisic acid: properties of cross-reacting polar metabolites

    Le Page-Degivry, M.; Bulard, C.

    1984-01-01

    When the radioimmunoassay developed for abscisic acid (ABA) estimation was applied to a plant extract, results appeared overestimated. Purification by thin-layer chromatography established that ABA in its free and alkali-hydrolysable forms constituted only a small part of the immunoreactive material. The major source of the cross-reactivity was a group of polar metabolites, poorly soluble in ether and well recovered by ethyl acetate and butanol. These immunoreactive metabolites were compared with polar metabolites already described in experiments wher e [ 14 C]ABA was fed to plant tissue, particularly with recently identified glucosides of ABA and dihydrophaseic acid

  12. Characterization of rhizobacteria associated to maize crop in IAA, siderophores and salicylic acid metabolite production

    Annia Hernández

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that rhizobacteria are able to produce metabolites having agricultural interest, including salicylic acid, the siderophores and phytohormones. Indol acetic acid (IAA is the most well-known and studied auxin, playing a governing role in culture growth. The object of this work was to characterise rhizobacteria associated with the maize crop in terms of producing IAA, siderophores and salicylic acid metabolites. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains previously isolated from maize Francisco variety rhizosphere were used. Colorimetric and chromatographic techniques for detecting these metabolites were studied; multi-variable analysis of hierarchic conglomerate and complete ligament were used for selecting the best strains for producing metabolites of interest. These results demonstrated that all rhizobacteria strains studied produced IAA, siderophores and salicylic acid metabolites. Burkholderia cepacia MBf21, MBp1, MBp2, MBf22, MBp3, MBf20, MBf 15 and Pseudomonas fluorescens MPp4strains have presented the greatest production of these metabolites, showing that these strains could be used in promoting vegetal growth in economically important cultures. Key words: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Burkholderia cepacia, IAA, siderophore, salicylic acid.

  13. Determination of the Cyanide Metabolite 2-Aminothiazoline-4-Carboxylic Acid in Urine and Plasma by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Logue, Brian A; Kirschten, Nicholas P; Petrikovics, Ilona; Moser, Matthew A; Rockwood, Gary A; Baskin, Steven I

    2005-01-01

    The cyanide metabolite 2-aminothiazoline.4-carboxylic acid (ATCA) is a promising biomarker for cyanide exposure because of its stability and the limitations of direct determination of cyanide and more abundant cyanide metabolites...

  14. Production of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells

    Oosthuizen, M.J.; Engels, F.; Van Esch, B.; Henricks, P.A.; Nijkamp, F.P.

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cells may be responsible for regulating airway smooth muscle function, in part by release of fatty acid-derived mediators. Incubation of isolated guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells with radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) leads to the production of 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5- and 15-HETE) and smaller amounts of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). Epithelial cells also are able to release linoleic acid (LA) metabolites. Incubation with radiolabeled linoleic acid leads to the formation of 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE). The biological significance of these mediators produced by epithelial cells is discussed

  15. Interactions between Plant Metabolites Affect Herbivores: A Study with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Chlorogenic Acid

    Liu, Xiaojie; Vrieling, Klaas; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L.

    2017-01-01

    The high structural diversity of plant metabolites suggests that interactions among them should be common. We investigated the effects of single metabolites and combinations of plant metabolites on insect herbivores. In particular we studied the interacting effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PAs), and chlorogenic acid (CGA), on a generalist herbivore, Frankliniella occidentalis. We studied both the predominantly occurring PA N-oxides and the less frequent PA free bases. We found antagonistic effects between CGA and PA free bases on thrips mortality. In contrast PA N-oxides showed synergistic interactions with CGA. PA free bases caused a higher thrips mortality than PA N-oxides while the reverse was through for PAs in combination with CGA. Our results provide an explanation for the predominate storage of PA N-oxides in plants. We propose that antagonistic interactions represent a constraint on the accumulation of plant metabolites, as we found here for Jacobaea vulgaris. The results show that the bioactivity of a given metabolite is not merely dependent upon the amount and chemical structure of that metabolite, but also on the co-occurrence metabolites in, e.g., plant cells, tissues and organs. The significance of this study is beyond the concerns of the two specific groups tested here. The current study is one of the few studies so far that experimentally support the general conception that the interactions among plant metabolites are of great importance to plant-environment interactions. PMID:28611815

  16. Interactions between Plant Metabolites Affect Herbivores: A Study with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Chlorogenic Acid

    Xiaojie Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The high structural diversity of plant metabolites suggests that interactions among them should be common. We investigated the effects of single metabolites and combinations of plant metabolites on insect herbivores. In particular we studied the interacting effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PAs, and chlorogenic acid (CGA, on a generalist herbivore, Frankliniella occidentalis. We studied both the predominantly occurring PA N-oxides and the less frequent PA free bases. We found antagonistic effects between CGA and PA free bases on thrips mortality. In contrast PA N-oxides showed synergistic interactions with CGA. PA free bases caused a higher thrips mortality than PA N-oxides while the reverse was through for PAs in combination with CGA. Our results provide an explanation for the predominate storage of PA N-oxides in plants. We propose that antagonistic interactions represent a constraint on the accumulation of plant metabolites, as we found here for Jacobaea vulgaris. The results show that the bioactivity of a given metabolite is not merely dependent upon the amount and chemical structure of that metabolite, but also on the co-occurrence metabolites in, e.g., plant cells, tissues and organs. The significance of this study is beyond the concerns of the two specific groups tested here. The current study is one of the few studies so far that experimentally support the general conception that the interactions among plant metabolites are of great importance to plant-environment interactions.

  17. PEG1000-Based Dicationic Acidic Ionic Liquid Catalyzed One-Pot Synthesis of 4-Aryl-3-Methyl-1-Phenyl-1H-Benzo[h]pyrazolo [3,4-b]quinoline-5,10-Diones via Multicomponent Reactions

    Yi-Ming Ren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel and green approach for efficient and rapid synthesis of 4-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-benzo[h]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline-5,10-diones has been accomplished by the one-pot condensation reaction of aromatic aldehydes, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-amine and 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione using PEG1000-based dicationic acidic ionic liquid (PEG1000-DAIL as a catalyst was reported. Recycling studies have shown that the PEG1000-DAIL can be readily recovered and reused several times without significant loss of activity. The key advantages are the short reaction time, high yields, simple workup, and recovered catalyst.

  18. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites.

  19. Quinoline-2-sulfonamide

    Joachim Kusz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C9H8N2O2S, the sulfamoyl –NH2 group is involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the sulfonamide O and quinoline N atoms. In the crystal, molecules are linked into dimers via pairs of N—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming an R22(10 motif. The dimers are further assembled into chains parallel to the b axis through N—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating a C(4 motif. The crystal packing is additionally stabilized by intermolecular C—H...O interactions. The crystal studied was a non-merohedral twin with a domain ratio of 0.938 (2:0.062 (2. Density functional theory (DFT calculations, at the B3LYP/6–31 G(d,p level of theory, were used to optimize the molecular structure and to determine interaction energies for the title compound. The resulting interaction energy is ∼4.4 kcal mol−1 per bridge for the C(4 chain and ∼5.9 kcal mol−1 per bridge for the R22(10 motif.

  20. Linoleic acid metabolite leads to steroid resistant asthma features partially through NF-?B

    Panda, Lipsa; Gheware, Atish; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Yadav, Manish K.; Jayaraj, B. S.; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Mahesh, Padukudru Anand; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2017-01-01

    Studies have highlighted the role of nutritional and metabolic modulators in asthma pathobiology. Steroid resistance is an important clinical problem in asthma but lacks good experimental models. Linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been linked to asthma and glucocorticoid sensitivity. Its 12/15?lipoxygenase metabolite, 13-S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) induces mitochondrial dysfunction, with severe airway obstruction and neutrophilic airway inflammation. Here we show that H...

  1. The structures of three metabolites of the algal hepatotoxin okadaic acid produced by oxidation with human cytochrome P450

    Liu, Li; Guoa, Fujiang; Crain, Sheila; Quilliam, Michael A.; Wang, Xiaotang; Rein, Kathleen S.

    2012-01-01

    Four metabolites of okadaic acid were generated by incubation with human recombinant cytochrome P450 3A4. The structures of two of the four metabolites have been determined by MS/MS experiments and 1D and 2D NMR methods using 94 and 133 μg of each metabolite. The structure of a third metabolite was determined by oxidation to a metabolite of known structure. Like okadaic acid, the metabolites are inhibitors of protein phosphatase PP2A. Although one of the metabolites does have an α,β unsaturated carbonyl with the potential to form adducts with an active site cysteine, all of the metabolites are reversible inhibitors of PP2A. PMID:22608922

  2. Synthesis of 2-Alkenylquinoline by Reductive Olefination of Quinoline N-Oxide under Metal-Free Conditions.

    Xia, Hong; Liu, Yuanhong; Zhao, Peng; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    Synthesis of 2-alkenylquinoline by reductive olefination of quinoline N-oxide under metal-free conditions is disclosed. Practically, the reaction could be performed with quinoline as starting material via a one-pot, two-step process. A possible mechanism is proposed that involves a sequential 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and acid-assisted ring opening followed by a dehydration process.

  3. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    Felipe Eng

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4 and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite.

  4. Role of amino acid metabolites in the formation of soil organic matter

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1972-01-01

    Carbon-14 labelled cellulose or glucose were added to a medium loam and two sandy soils. The soils were incubated at 20°C for about 6 yr under laboratory conditions. Six to 12 per cent of the labelled carbon added to the soils was transformed into metabolites hydrolysable to amino acids during th...

  5. NMR detected metabolites in complex natural fluids. Quinic acid in apple juice

    Ailiesei Gabriela Liliana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different types of 1D and 2D NMR experiments were used to completely characterize quinic acid and demonstrate its presence in complex mixtures. The identification of quinic acid in apple juice was done without any separation step. The NMR experiments presented in this study can be used to analyze other metabolites in different complex natural fluids, of vegetal or biological origin.

  6. Role of Lipoxygenase Metabolites of Arachidonic Acid in Enhanced Pulmonary Artery Contractions of Female Rabbits

    Pfister, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance. In women the incidence is 4 fold greater than that in men. Studies suggest sustained vasoconstriction is a factor in increased vascular resistance. Possible vasoconstrictor mediators include arachidonic acid-derived lipoxygenase metabolites. Our studies in rabbits showed enhanced endothelium-dependent contractions to arachidonic acid in pulmonary arteries from females compared to ma...

  7. Simultaneous quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their oxanilic and sulfonic acid metabolites in natural waters.

    Heberle, S A; Aga, D S; Hany, R; Müller, S R

    2000-02-15

    This paper describes a procedure for simultaneous enrichment, separation, and quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their major ionic oxanilic acid (OXA) and ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in groundwater and surface water using Carbopack B as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) material. The analytes adsorbed on Carbopack B were eluted selectively from the solid phase in three fractions containing the parent compounds (PCs), their OXA metabolites, and their ESA metabolites, respectively. The complete separation of the three compound classes allowed the analysis of the neutral PCs (acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor) and their methylated OXA metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The ESA compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The use of Carbopack B resulted in good recoveries of the polar metabolites even from large sample volumes (1 L). Absolute recoveries from spiked surface and groundwater samples ranged between 76 and 100% for the PCs, between 41 and 91% for the OXAs, and between 47 and 96% for the ESAs. The maximum standard deviation of the absolute recoveries was 12%. The method detection limits are between 1 and 8 ng/L for the PCs, between 1 and 7 ng/L for the OXAs, and between 10 and 90 ng/L for the ESAs.

  8. Gut microbiota metabolites, amino acid metabolites and improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism: the POUNDS Lost trial.

    Heianza, Yoriko; Sun, Dianjianyi; Li, Xiang; DiDonato, Joseph A; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2018-06-02

    Alterations in gut microbiota have been linked to host insulin resistance, diabetes and impaired amino acid metabolism. We investigated whether changes in gut microbiota-dependent metabolite of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and its nutrient precursors (choline and L-carnitine) were associated with improvements in glucose metabolism and diabetes-related amino acids in a weight-loss diet intervention. We included 504 overweight and obese adults who were randomly assigned to one of four energy-reduced diets varying in macronutrient intake. The 6-month changes (Δ) in TMAO, choline and L-carnitine levels after the intervention were calculated. Greater decreases in choline and L-carnitine were significantly (p<0.05) associated with greater improvements in fasting insulin concentrations and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) at 6 months. The reduction of choline was significantly related to 2-year improvements in glucose and insulin resistance. We found significant linkages between dietary fat intake and ΔTMAO for changes in fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR (p interaction <0.05); a greater increase in TMAO was related to lesser improvements in the outcomes among participants who consumed a high-fat diet. In addition, ΔL-carnitine and Δcholine were significantly related to changes in amino acids (including branched-chain and aromatic amino acids). Interestingly, the associations of ΔTMAO, Δcholine and ΔL-carnitine with diabetes-related traits were independent of the changes in amino acids. Our findings underscore the importance of changes in TMAO, choline and L-carnitine in improving insulin sensitivity during a weight-loss intervention for obese patients. Dietary fat intake may modify the associations of TMAO with insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. NCT00072995. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  9. Microbial diversity and metabolite composition of Belgian red-brown acidic ales.

    Snauwaert, Isabel; Roels, Sanne P; Van Nieuwerburg, Filip; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-03-16

    Belgian red-brown acidic ales are sour and alcoholic fermented beers, which are produced by mixed-culture fermentation and blending. The brews are aged in oak barrels for about two years, after which mature beer is blended with young, non-aged beer to obtain the end-products. The present study evaluated the microbial community diversity of Belgian red-brown acidic ales at the end of the maturation phase of three subsequent brews of three different breweries. The microbial diversity was compared with the metabolite composition of the brews at the end of the maturation phase. Therefore, mature brew samples were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer region (yeasts) and a broad range of metabolites was quantified. The most important microbial species present in the Belgian red-brown acidic ales investigated were Pediococcus damnosus, Dekkera bruxellensis, and Acetobacter pasteurianus. In addition, this culture-independent analysis revealed operational taxonomic units that were assigned to an unclassified fungal community member, Candida, and Lactobacillus. The main metabolites present in the brew samples were L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid, and ethanol, whereas acetic acid was produced in lower quantities. The most prevailing aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, which might be of impact on the aroma of the end-products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of gut-derived metabolites of maslinic acid, a bioactive compound from Olea europaea L.

    Lozano-Mena, Glòria; Sánchez-González, Marta; Parra, Andrés; Juan, M Emília; Planas, Joana M

    2016-09-01

    Maslinic acid has been described to exert a chemopreventive activity in colon cancer. Hereby, we determined maslinic acid and its metabolites in the rat intestine previous oral administration as a first step in elucidating whether this triterpene might be used as a nutraceutical. Maslinic acid was orally administered at 1, 2, and 5 mg/kg to male Sprague-Dawley for 2 days. At 24 h after the last administration, the content of the duodenum and jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon was collected and extracted with methanol 80% prior to LC-APCI-MS analysis. The developed method was validated providing suitable sensitivity (LOQ of 5 nM), good recovery (97.8 ± 3.6%), linear correlation, and appropriate precision (< 9%). Maslinic acid was detected in all the segments with higher concentrations in the distal part of the intestine. LC-APCI-LTQ-ORBITRAP-MS allowed the identification of 11 gut-derived metabolites that were formed by mono-, dihydroxylation, and dehydrogenation reactions. Maslinic acid undergoes phase I reactions resulting in a majority of monohydroxylated metabolites without the presence of phase II derivatives. The high concentration of maslinic acid achieved in the intestine suggests that it could exert a beneficial effect in the prevention of colon cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. [Quantitative determination of the main metabolites of acetylsalicylic acid/2nd communication: the concentrations of salicylic acid and its metabolites in patients with renal insufficiency (author's transl)].

    Daneels, R; Loew, D; Pütter, J

    1975-07-01

    Quantitative Determination of the Main Metabolites of Acetylsalicylic Acid / 2nd Communication: The concentrations of salicylic acid and its metabolies in patients with renal insufficiency 9 patients suffering from renal insufficiencies of varing degrees and treated regularly by hemodialysis were given 1.5 g Colfarit (microcapsulated acetyl salicylic acid) as a single dose. The concentrations of salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SU), further salicylic acid conjugates (SAC) and salicyluric acid conjugates (SUC) were determined in the blood plasma. Likewise urea and creatinine were determined. SA concentration decreased continually and, at the end of the trial (72 h after application), had vanished almost completely from the plasma of most patients. SU increased at first and decreased afterwards. With the exception of the dailysis time SAC and SUC increased during the trial. After 3 days the SUC level was more than 50% of total salicylate (SSS) in most patients. SSS (the sum of SA + SU + SAC + SUC) did not change very much before dialysis, but showed a rather high decrease during the first hours of dialysis. tafter dialysis the SSS levels rose again, apparently as a consequence of a redistribution and of the synthesis of conjugates with decreased tissue affinity. It could be shown that SSS in the blood plasma does not parallel SSS in the whole body. The interindividual variation of SA metabolism as well as the variation of the biological blank values was rather high. The results are discussed with regard to salicylate pharmacokinetics in renal insufficiency and to normal salicylate metabolism.

  12. Analysis of metabolites of mefenamic acid in urine of human volunteers

    Abbas, M.; Nawaz, R.; Mahmood, T.; Sani, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolites of mefenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, were studied in urine of human male and female volunteers. Urine samples were collected at pre-determined time intervals. The concentration of mefenamic acid as free drug was analyzed by spectrophotometry at 285 nm and the metabolites were separated by paper chromatography. The average plus minus SE values of the amount of mefenamic acid in urine of human male and female volunteers were found to be 4.484 plus minus 0.228 micro gram/mL and 4.057 plus minus micro g/mL respectively. The average R/sub f/values of mefenamic acid as free drug in male and female volunteers were found to be 0.76 and 0.77 respectively. And the average R/sub f/ values for the metabolites of mefenamic acid were found to be 0.47 and 0.45 respectively. The method of analysis is accurate, easy, handy and reproducible (author)

  13. Glycoconjugates of Quinolines: Application in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Oliveri, Valentina; Vecchio, Graziella

    2016-09-02

    Compounds with the quinoline scaffold are widely investigated and offer a variety of therapeutical properties. A number of quinoline derivatives have been synthesized and among these there are glycoconjugated derivatives. Based on the interest for this family of compounds, we reviewed the different biological activities (molecular probes, antiinfective, antiproliferative, antiaggregant and antioxidant) and the potential applications in medicinal chemistry of quinoline glycoconjugates. This review wants to show an example of the glycoconjugation strategy which arose not only to modify the water solubility of the quinolines but also to influence their activity and targeting properties.

  14. Inhibiting mitochondrial β-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain.

    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid β-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid β-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and β-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  15. Toxicity of the styrene metabolite, phenylglyoxylic acid, in rats after three months' oral dosing

    Ladefoged, Ole; Lam, Henrik Rye; Ostergaard, G.

    1998-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were dosed with 0, 1250, 3750 or 5000 mg/l of phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) (CAS no. 611-73-4) in the drinking water ad libitum for 3 months. During the entire treatment period, there were no gross signs of toxicity related to PGA. No changes in neurobehavior were found after using ....... Alternatively, the ototoxicity of styrene, like toluene, may be caused the parent compound itself and not by a metabolite like PGA. (C) 1998 Inter Press, inc....

  16. Modelling the influence of metabolite diffusion on non-starter lactic acid bacteria growth in ripening Cheddar cheese

    Czárán, Tamás; Rattray, Fergal P.; Møller, Cleide O.de A.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of metabolite diffusion within the cheese matrix on growth of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) during Cheddar cheese ripening was mathematically modelled. The model was calibrated at a realistic range of diffusion of metabolites and the decay and growth parameters...

  17. Methyl 3-(Quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate

    Roumaissa Belguedj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel compound, methyl 3-(quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate (2 has been synthesized by cycloaddition reaction of 1-(quinolin-2-ylmethylpyridinium ylide (1 with methyl propiolate in presence of sodium hydride in THF. The structure of this compound was established by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MS data

  18. Modelling the acid/base 1H NMR chemical shift limits of metabolites in human urine.

    Tredwell, Gregory D; Bundy, Jacob G; De Iorio, Maria; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the use of buffering agents the 1 H NMR spectra of biofluid samples in metabolic profiling investigations typically suffer from extensive peak frequency shifting between spectra. These chemical shift changes are mainly due to differences in pH and divalent metal ion concentrations between the samples. This frequency shifting results in a correspondence problem: it can be hard to register the same peak as belonging to the same molecule across multiple samples. The problem is especially acute for urine, which can have a wide range of ionic concentrations between different samples. To investigate the acid, base and metal ion dependent 1 H NMR chemical shift variations and limits of the main metabolites in a complex biological mixture. Urine samples from five different individuals were collected and pooled, and pre-treated with Chelex-100 ion exchange resin. Urine samples were either treated with either HCl or NaOH, or were supplemented with various concentrations of CaCl 2 , MgCl 2 , NaCl or KCl, and their 1 H NMR spectra were acquired. Nonlinear fitting was used to derive acid dissociation constants and acid and base chemical shift limits for peaks from 33 identified metabolites. Peak pH titration curves for a further 65 unidentified peaks were also obtained for future reference. Furthermore, the peak variations induced by the main metal ions present in urine, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , were also measured. These data will be a valuable resource for 1 H NMR metabolite profiling experiments and for the development of automated metabolite alignment and identification algorithms for 1 H NMR spectra.

  19. Effects of fluticasone propionate inhalation on levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Gert T. Verhoeven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In smoking COPD patients the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid contains high numbers of inflammatory cells. These cells might produce arachidonic acid (AA metabolites, which contribute to inflammation and an increased bronchomotor tone.

  20. Determination of tetrahydrophtalimide and 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, urinary metabolites of the fungicide captan, in rats and humans

    van Welie, R.T.H.; van Duyn, P; Lamme, E K; Jäger, P; van Baar, B L; Vermeulen, N P

    1991-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatographic (GC) methods using sulphur and mass selective detection for the qualitative and quantitative determination of tetrahydrophtalimide (THPI) and 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA), urinary metabolites of the fungicide captan in rat and humans, were developed.

  1. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    Escher, Beate I., E-mail: b.escher@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4108 (Australia); Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Straub, Juerg Oliver [F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Corporate Safety, Health and Environmental Protection, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  2. 2-Carboxy-6-(quinolin-1-ium-8-yloxybenzoate

    Jin Xie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the zwitterionic title compound, C17H11NO5, the dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings is 76.90 (7°. The dihedral angles between the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 64.02 (9 and 21.67 (9°, the larger angle being associated with an intramolecular N—H...Ocarboxyl hydrogen bond, resulting from proton transfer from the carboxylic acid group to the quinoline N atom and giving an S(9 ring motif. In the crystal, molecules are connected by O—H...O hydrogen bonds into chains extending along the b-axis direction. An overall two-dimensional network structure is formed through π–π interactions between the quinoline rings [minimum ring-centroid separation = 3.6068 (6 Å].

  3. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    Louisse, Jochem; Bai Yanqing; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH i ) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH i in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH i of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na + /H + -antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH i in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH i may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  4. Electrochemical mineralization pathway of quinoline by boron-doped diamond anodes.

    Wang, Chunrong; Ma, Keke; Wu, Tingting; Ye, Min; Tan, Peng; Yan, Kecheng

    2016-04-01

    Boron-doped diamond anodes were selected for quinoline mineralization, and the resulting intermediates, phenylpropyl aldehyde, phenylpropionic acid, and nonanal were identified and followed during quinoline oxidation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. The evolutions of formic acid, acetic acid, oxalic acid, NO2(-), NO3(-), and NH4(+) were quantified. A new reaction pathway for quinoline mineralization by boron-doped diamond anodes has been proposed, where the pyridine ring in quinoline is cleaved by a hydroxyl radical giving phenylpropyl aldehyde and NH4(+). Phenylpropyl aldehyde is quickly oxidized into phenylpropionic acid, and the benzene ring is cleaved giving nonanal. This is further oxidized to formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid. Finally, these organic intermediates are mineralized to CO2 and H2O. NH4(+) is also oxidized to NO2(-) and on to NO3(-). The results will help to gain basic reference for clearing intermediates and their toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous determination of acidic 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine metabolites and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Stroomer, A. E.; Overmars, H.; Abeling, N. G.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a simple and rapid quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine acid metabolites and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. After solvent extraction from acidified urine, the acids are analyzed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. For

  6. Synthesis and stability study of a new major metabolite of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    ¿-Hydroxybutanoic acid (GHB) is used as a date-rape drug, which renders the victims unconscious and defenceless. Intoxications are very difficult to detect for forensic scientists due to rapid metabolism to endogenous levels of GHB. We recently discovered a new major metabolite, 2, of GHB (1......, we have assessed the stability of GHB glucuronide 2 by mimicking the natural pH range for urine, which is of importance in the development of new analytical methods. Using NMR we show that GHB glucuronide 2 is highly stable towards aqueous hydrolysis within the pH range normally observed for urine...

  7. Preparation of 2H- and 3H-labeled phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid as standards for determination of abscisic acid metabolites in tomato fruit

    Kubik, M.; Buta, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    There have been reports that the level of abscisic acid (ABA) increases during the cold storage of tomatoes. However, the important ABA metabolites, phaseic acid (PA) and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) were never quantitatively determined in such a system. In order to obtain the labeled standards for quantitative determination of those compounds by GC-MS-SIM, we fed bean plants with 6,6,6-[ 2 H 3 ]-ABA (mean isotopic enrichment 60%) with addition of about 10 5 Bq per mg of [ 3 H]-ABA. After 100 hours the plants were harvested and extracted with acetone. The extract were purified by solvent partitioning and, Prep-Sep amino column and on an HPLC C 18 reverse phase column. Two major radioactive metabolites of ABA were obtained and identified by GC-MS as PA and DPA. Some results on the quantitation of ABA, PA and DPA in tomato fruit after cold storage will be presented

  8. Salicylic acid metabolites and derivatives inhibit CDK activity: Novel insights into aspirin's chemopreventive effects against colorectal cancer

    Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Callegari, Eduardo; Kesharwani, Siddharth S.; Sankaranarayanan, Ranjini; Seefeldt, Teresa; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin's potential as a drug continues to be evaluated for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). Although multiple targets for aspirin and its metabolite, salicylic acid, have been identified, no unifying mechanism has been proposed to clearly explain its chemopreventive effects. Our goal here was to investigate the ability of salicylic acid metabolites, known to be generated through cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, and its derivatives as cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors to gain new insights into aspirin's chemopreventive actions. Using in vitro kinase assays, for the first time, we demonstrate that salicylic acid metabolites, 2,3-dihydroxy-benzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA), as well as derivatives 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-DHBA), 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,6-DHBA), inhibited CDK1 enzyme activity. 2,3-DHBA and 2,6-DHBA did not inhibit CDK2 and 4; however, both inhibited CDK-6 activity. Interestingly, another derivative, 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4,6-THBA) was highly effective in inhibiting CDK1, 2, 4 and 6 activity. Molecular docking studies showed that these compounds potentially interact with CDK1. Immunoblotting experiments showed that aspirin acetylated CDK1, and pre-incubation with salicylic acid and its derivatives prevented aspirin-mediated CDK1 acetylation, which supported the data obtained from molecular docking studies. We suggest that intracellularly generated salicylic acid metabolites through CYP450 enzymes within the colonic epithelial cells, or the salicylic acid metabolites generated by gut microflora may significantly contribute to the preferential chemopreventive effect of aspirin against CRC through inhibition of CDKs. This novel hypothesis and mechanism of action in aspirin's chemopreventive effects opens a new area for future research. In addition, structural modification to salicylic acid derivatives may prove useful in the development of novel CDK inhibitors in cancer prevention and

  9. Role of dietary fatty acids in liver injury caused by vinyl chloride metabolites in mice

    Anders, Lisanne C [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Yeo, Heegook; Kaelin, Brenna R; Lang, Anna L; Bushau, Adrienne M; Douglas, Amanda N [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Cave, Matt [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Hepatobiology and Toxicology Program, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Robley Rex Louisville VAMC, Louisville, KY 40206 (United States); Arteel, Gavin E [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Hepatobiology and Toxicology Program, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); McClain, Craig J [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Hepatobiology and Toxicology Program, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Robley Rex Louisville VAMC, Louisville, KY 40206 (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    Background: Vinyl chloride (VC) causes toxicant-associated steatohepatitis at high exposure levels. Recent work by this group suggests that underlying liver disease may predispose the liver to VC hepatotoxicity at lower exposure levels. The most common form of underlying liver disease in the developed world is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is well-known that the type of dietary fat can play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. However, whether the combination of dietary fat and VC/metabolites promotes liver injury has not been studied. Methods: Mice were administered chloroethanol (CE - a VC metabolite) or vehicle once, 10 weeks after being fed diets rich in saturated fatty acids (HSFA), rich in poly-unsaturated fatty acids (HPUFA), or the respective low-fat control diets (LSFA; LPUFA). Results: In control mice, chloroethanol caused no detectable liver injury, as determined by plasma transaminases and histologic indices of damage. In HSFA-fed mice, chloroethanol increased HSFA-induced liver damage, steatosis, infiltrating inflammatory cells, hepatic expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, markers of inflammasome activation were increased, while markers of inflammasome inhibition were downregulated. In mice fed HPUFA all of these effects were significantly attenuated. Conclusions: Chloroethanol promotes inflammatory liver injury caused by dietary fatty acids. This effect is far more exacerbated with saturated fat, versus poly-unsaturated fat; and strongly correlates with a robust activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the saturated fed animals only. Taken together these data support the hypothesis that environmental toxicant exposure can exacerbate the severity of NAFLD/NASH. - Highlights: • CE promotes inflammatory liver injury caused by dietary fatty acids. • This effect is stronger with saturated than with unsaturated fatty acids. • Damage caused by saturated fat and CE

  10. Role of dietary fatty acids in liver injury caused by vinyl chloride metabolites in mice

    Anders, Lisanne C; Yeo, Heegook; Kaelin, Brenna R; Lang, Anna L; Bushau, Adrienne M; Douglas, Amanda N; Cave, Matt; Arteel, Gavin E; McClain, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vinyl chloride (VC) causes toxicant-associated steatohepatitis at high exposure levels. Recent work by this group suggests that underlying liver disease may predispose the liver to VC hepatotoxicity at lower exposure levels. The most common form of underlying liver disease in the developed world is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is well-known that the type of dietary fat can play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. However, whether the combination of dietary fat and VC/metabolites promotes liver injury has not been studied. Methods: Mice were administered chloroethanol (CE - a VC metabolite) or vehicle once, 10 weeks after being fed diets rich in saturated fatty acids (HSFA), rich in poly-unsaturated fatty acids (HPUFA), or the respective low-fat control diets (LSFA; LPUFA). Results: In control mice, chloroethanol caused no detectable liver injury, as determined by plasma transaminases and histologic indices of damage. In HSFA-fed mice, chloroethanol increased HSFA-induced liver damage, steatosis, infiltrating inflammatory cells, hepatic expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, markers of inflammasome activation were increased, while markers of inflammasome inhibition were downregulated. In mice fed HPUFA all of these effects were significantly attenuated. Conclusions: Chloroethanol promotes inflammatory liver injury caused by dietary fatty acids. This effect is far more exacerbated with saturated fat, versus poly-unsaturated fat; and strongly correlates with a robust activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the saturated fed animals only. Taken together these data support the hypothesis that environmental toxicant exposure can exacerbate the severity of NAFLD/NASH. - Highlights: • CE promotes inflammatory liver injury caused by dietary fatty acids. • This effect is stronger with saturated than with unsaturated fatty acids. • Damage caused by saturated fat and CE

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase

    Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Youn, Hyung-Seop; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Sung Hang; Kim, Yongseong; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    H. sapiens quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase has been expressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set has been collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is a key NAD-biosynthetic enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of quinolinic acid to 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, yielding nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Homo sapiens QPRTase (Hs-QPRTase) appeared as a hexamer during purification and the protein was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Native Hs-QPRTase crystals belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 76.2, b = 137.1, c = 92.7 Å, β = 103.8°. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient is 2.46 Å 3 Da −1 , which corresponds to a solvent content of 49.9%

  12. The Influence of Clay on the Rate of Decay of Amino Acid Metabolites Synthesized in Soils during Decomposition of Cellulose

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1975-01-01

    caused by the treatments in the different soils was, however, not related to the amount of silt + clay, and a high content of this material did not protect organic material against the effect of the treatments. is concluded that the silt + clay fraction ensures stabilization of amino acid metabolites...... produced during the period of intense biological activity that follows the addition of decomposable, energy rich material to the soil. The amount of amino acid metabolites stabilized increased with increasing concentration of silt + clay, but the rate of decay of the amino acid material during later stages......14C-labelled cellulose was added to seven different soils containing silt + clay (particles

  13. Secondary metabolites from the sponge Tedania anhelans: Isolation and characterization of two novel pyrazole acids and other metabolites

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Naik, C.G.; Hegde, V.R.

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the sponge Tedania anhelans yielded the two unusual heteroaromatic acids, pyrazole-3(5)-carboxylic acid (2) and 4-methylpyrazole-3(5)-carboxylic acid (3), which are reported for the first time...

  14. Protective Effects of Dihydrocaffeic Acid, a Coffee Component Metabolite, on a Focal Cerebral Ischemia Rat Model

    Kyungjin Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo rat model. The current study further investigated the protective effects of the metabolites of CGA and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA was selected for further study after screening using the same tMCAo rat model. In the current study, tMCAo rats (2 h of MCAo followed by 22 h of reperfusion were injected with various doses of DHCA at 0 and 2 h after onset of ischemia. We assessed brain damage, functional deficits, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier damage at 24 h after ischemia. For investigating the mechanism, in vitro zymography and western blotting analysis were performed to determine the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. DHCA (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p. dose-dependently reduced brain infarct volume, behavioral deficits, brain water content, and Evans Blue (EB leakage. DHCA inhibited expression and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Therefore, DHCA might be one of the important metabolites of CGA and of natural products, including coffee, with protective effects on ischemia-induced neuronal damage and brain edema.

  15. Arachidonic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids and some of their metabolites function as endogenous antimicrobial molecules: A review

    Undurti N. Das

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Our body is endowed with several endogenous anti-microbial compounds such as interferon, cytokines, free radicals, etc. However, little attention has been paid to the possibility that lipids could function as antimicrobial compounds. In this short review, the antimicrobial actions of various polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, mainly free acids and their putative mechanisms of action are described. In general, PUFAs kill microbes by their direct action on microbial cell membranes, enhancing generation of free radicals, augmenting the formation of lipid peroxides that are cytotoxic, and by increasing the formation of their bioactive metabolites, such as prostaglandins, lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins that enhance the phagocytic action of leukocytes and macrophages. Higher intakes of α-linolenic and cis-linoleic acids (ALA and LA respectively and fish (a rich source of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid might reduce the risk pneumonia. Previously, it was suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: linoleic, α-linolenic, γ-linolenic (GLA, dihomo-GLA (DGLA, arachidonic (AA, eicosapentaenoic (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA function as endogenous anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, and immunomodulating agents. A variety of bacteria are sensitive to the growth inhibitory actions of LA and ALA in vitro. Hydrolyzed linseed oil can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Both LA and AA have the ability to inactivate herpes, influenza, Sendai, and Sindbis virus within minutes of contact. AA, EPA, and DHA induce death of Plasmodium falciparum both in vitro and in vivo. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 and prostaglandin A (PGA, derived from DGLA, AA, and EPA inhibit viral replication and show anti-viral activity. Oral mucosa, epidermal cells, lymphocytes and macrophages contain and release significant amounts of PUFAs on stimulation. PUFAs stimulate NADPH-dependent superoxide production by

  16. Preservation of urine free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites with citric acid as an alternative to hydrochloric acid for LC-MS/MS-based analyses.

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Pelzel, Daniela; Lattke, Peter; Siegert, Gabriele; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of urinary fractionated metadrenalines provide a useful screening test to diagnose phaeochromocytoma. Stability of these compounds and their parent catecholamines during and after urine collection is crucial to ensure accuracy of the measurements. Stabilisation with hydrochloric acid (HCl) can promote deconjugation of sulphate-conjugated metadrenalines, indicating a need for alternative preservatives. Urine samples with an intrinsically acidic or alkaline pH (5.5-6.9 or 7.1-8.7, respectively) were used to assess stability of free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites over 7 days of room temperature storage. Stabilisation with HCl was compared with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/metabisulphite and monobasic citric acid. Catecholamines and metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Free catecholamines and their O-methylated metabolites were stable in acidic urine samples over 7 days of room temperature storage, independent of the presence or absence of any stabilisation method. In contrast, free catecholamines, but not the free O-methylated metabolites, showed rapid degradation within 24 h and continuing degradation over 7 days in urine samples with an alkaline pH. Adjustment of alkaline urine samples to a pH of 3-5 with HCl or 4.8-5.4 with citric acid completely blocked degradation of catecholamines. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/metabisulphite, although reducing the extent of degradation of catecholamines in alkaline urine, was largely ineffectual as a stabiliser. Citric acid is equally effective as HCl for stabilisation of urinary free catecholamines and minimises hazards associated with use of strong inorganic acids while avoiding deconjugation of sulphate-conjugated metabolites during simultaneous LC-MS/MS measurements of free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites.

  17. Mapping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolites in fermenting wheat straight-dough reveals succinic acid as pH-determining factor.

    Jayaram, Vinay B; Cuyvers, Sven; Lagrain, Bert; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2013-01-15

    Fermenting yeast does not merely cause dough leavening, but also contributes to the bread aroma and might alter dough rheology. Here, the yeast carbon metabolism was mapped during bread straight-dough fermentation. The concentration of most metabolites changed quasi linearly as a function of fermentation time. Ethanol and carbon dioxide concentrations reached up to 60 mmol/100g flour. Interestingly, high levels of glycerol (up to 10 mmol/100g flour) and succinic acid (up to 1.6 mmol/100g flour) were produced during dough fermentation. Further tests showed that, contrary to current belief, the pH decrease in fermenting dough is primarily caused by the production of succinic acid by the yeast instead of carbon dioxide dissolution or bacterial organic acids. Together, our results provide a comprehensive overview of metabolite production during dough fermentation and yield insight into the importance of some of these metabolites for dough properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and Synthesis of Some New Quinoline Based 1,2,3-Triazoles as Antimicrobial and Antimalarial Agents

    Parthasaradhi Y.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 6-bromo-2-chloro-3-(4-phenyl-[1,2,3]triazol-1-ylmethyl-quinoline and its derivatives (5a-j were synthesized in good yields from the intermediates (6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-yl-methanol (2, methanesulfonic acid (6-bromo-2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethyl methanesulfonate (3 and 3-azidomethyl-6-bromo-2-chloro-quinoline (4. The synthetic route leading to the title compounds is commenced from commercially available 6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-carbaldehyde (1. The chemical structures of the newly synthesized compounds were elucidated by their IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectral data and elemental analysis. Further, all the target compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms and antimalarial activity towards P. falciparum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.692 

  19. Quinoline Alkaloids in Suspension Cultures of Cinchona ledgeriana Treated with Various Substances

    DIAH RATNADEWI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinchona alkaloids are in extensive uses, not only for drugs but also for soft drink industries. They are harvested from the bark of trees Cinchona spp. after certain ages and therefore are available over a limited time. Cell culture is an alternative way to continuously produce such secondary metabolites in a much shorter time. Various substances were added in the normal growth media to promote quinoline alkaloids production by cell cultures of Cinchona ledgeriana. At the sixth week of culture, quinine and cinchonine contents were suppressed by paclobutrazol (PBZ, abscisic acid (ABA, or even by precursor tryptophan, while cinchonidine content was enhanced by 0.2 mg/l tryptophan to 43 fold of that produced by untreated cells (2.8% dry weight. At the seventh week of culture, the production of quinine and quinidine started to grow whereas the production of cinchonine and cinchonidine tended to decrease. An addition of 5 mg/l PBZ to culture media yielded the highest level of total quinine/quinidine after seven weeks, e.g. quinine 11 times more abundant and quinidine 23 fold higher compared to the untreated cells. Particularly the level of quinine which is the most demanded for medical and industrial purposes still need to be improved to approach to or even higher than that of extracted from the conventional source.

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetics of acetyl salicylic acid and its metabolites in children suffering from autoimmune diseases.

    Juárez Olguín, Hugo; Flores Pérez, Janett; Lares Asseff, Ismael; Loredo Abdalá, Arturo; Carbajal Rodríguez, Luis

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effect produced by juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) or rheumatic fever (RF) on the pharmacokinetics of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolites in children with autoimmune diseases (AD). A prospective, open labelled study was performed in 17 children with JRA and 17 with RF who received a single dose of 25 mg ASA/kg orally. The pharmacokinetics of ASA and its metabolites were determined. The blood and urine levels of each salicylate collected during 24 h were measured by HPLC. A group of 15 healthy teenage volunteers was included as a control group. The maximum plasma concentration, half-life time, area under the curve and the amount of salicylates excreted were statistically different between the JRA and the RF groups, as well as between the RF group and the controls, however, there were no significant differences between the JRA group and the controls. Dosage schemes must be adjusted for JRA patients, since the half life in these patients is longer than in RF patients. However, due to ample variability of pharmacokinetic parameters it is recommended that dose schemes are individualized on the type of autoimmune disease considered. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    Mario O. Carignan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR. Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism.

  2. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    Carreto, Jose I.; Carignan, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism. PMID:21556168

  3. Synthesis and stability study of a new major metabolite of γ-hydroxybutyric acid

    Ida Nymann Petersen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available γ-Hydroxybutanoic acid (GHB is used as a date-rape drug, which renders the victims unconscious and defenceless. Intoxications are very difficult to detect for forensic scientists due to rapid metabolism to endogenous levels of GHB. We recently discovered a new major metabolite, 2, of GHB (1 that could potentially extend the analytical detection window for GHB intoxications. Herein we disclose synthetic procedures based on a Koenigs–Knorr glucuronidation approach that provides GHB glucuronide 2 and a deuterium-labelled analogue d4-2 of high purity suitable for analytical chemistry. In addition, we have assessed the stability of GHB glucuronide 2 by mimicking the natural pH range for urine, which is of importance in the development of new analytical methods. Using NMR we show that GHB glucuronide 2 is highly stable towards aqueous hydrolysis within the pH range normally observed for urine even at elevated temperature.

  4. Metabolite profile of koji amazake and its lactic acid fermentation product by Lactobacillus sakei UONUMA.

    Oguro, Yoshifumi; Nishiwaki, Toshikazu; Shinada, Ryota; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Kurahashi, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    The koji amazake is a traditional sweet Japanese beverage. It has been consumed for over a thousand years in Japan; nonetheless, little is yet known of the ingredients in koji amazake. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the metabolites of koji amazake using a metabolomics approach. Additionally, we reformed the flavor of koji amazake by lactic acid fermentation (LAF-amazake) using Lactobacillus sakei UONUMA, which was isolated from snow caverns. The purpose of this article is to identify the ingredients in these beverages. In LAF-amazake and koji amazake, sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and vitamin B complex were determined in the two beverages, and over 300 compounds were detected in total. Thirteen saccharides were identified including two unknown trisaccharides, and there were no differences in these between the two beverages. In LAF-amazake, lactic acid, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (nicotinic acid and nicotinamide), and B6 (pyridoxine) were significantly increased as compared to koji amazake, whereas malate and glutamine decreased. These results suggested that LAF, malolactic fermentation, and glutamine deamidation occurred simultaneously in LAF-amazake. L. sakei UONUMA strains produced these vitamins. Moreover, it was surprising that acetylcholine, a well-known neurotransmitter, was newly generated in LAF-amazake. Here, we have succeeded in reforming the flavor of koji amazake and obtained these metabolic data on the two beverages. The present study could provide useful basic information for promoting functional analyses of koji amazake and LAF-amazake for human health. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rewiring a secondary metabolite pathway towards itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    Hossain, Abeer H; Li, An; Brickwedde, Anja; Wilms, Lars; Caspers, Martien; Overkamp, Karin; Punt, Peter J

    2016-07-28

    The industrially relevant filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely used in industry for its secretion capabilities of enzymes and organic acids. Biotechnologically produced organic acids promise to be an attractive alternative for the chemical industry to replace petrochemicals. Itaconic acid (IA) has been identified as one of the top twelve building block chemicals which have high potential to be produced by biotechnological means. The IA biosynthesis cluster (cadA, mttA and mfsA) has been elucidated in its natural producer Aspergillus terreus and transferred to A. niger to enable IA production. Here we report the rewiring of a secondary metabolite pathway towards further improved IA production through the overexpression of a putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB in a A. niger strain carrying the IA biosynthesis cluster. We have previously shown that expression of cadA from A. terreus results in itaconic acid production in A. niger AB1.13, albeit at low levels. This low-level production is boosted fivefold by the overexpression of mttA and mfsA in itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD background strains. Controlled batch cultivations with AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains showed increased production of itaconic acid compared with AB1.13 CAD strain. Moreover, preliminary RNA-Seq analysis of an itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD strain has led to the identification of the putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB which was induced in an IA producing strain. We have overexpressed citB in a AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strain and by doing so hypothesize to have targeted itaconic acid production to the cytosolic compartment. By overexpressing citB in AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains in controlled batch cultivations we have achieved highly increased titers of up to 26.2 g/L IA with a productivity of 0.35 g/L/h while no CA was produced. Expression of the IA biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger AB1.13 strain enables IA production. Moreover, in the AB1.13 CAD

  6. The omega-3 fatty acid DHA dose-dependently reduces atherosclerosis: a putative role for F4-neuroprostanes a specific class of peroxidized metabolites

    Objective. Consumption of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease but the role of their oxygenated metabolites remains unclear. We hypothesized that peroxidized metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) could play a role in ...

  7. In situ proteo-metabolomics reveals metabolite secretion by the acid mine drainage bio-indicator, Euglena mutabilis

    Halter, David; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Gallien, Sébastien; Casiot, Corinne; Hamelin, Jérôme; Gilard, Françoise; Heintz, Dimitri; Schaeffer, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-01-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protist found in acidic aquatic environments such as peat bogs, volcanic lakes and acid mine drainages (AMDs). Through its photosynthetic metabolism, this protist is supposed to have an important role in primary production in such oligotrophic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of E. mutabilis in organic matter synthesis remains unclear and no evidence of metabolite secretion by this protist has been established so far. Here we combined in situ proteo-metabolomic approaches to determine the nature of the metabolites accumulated by this protist or potentially secreted into an AMD. Our results revealed that the secreted metabolites are represented by a large number of amino acids, polyamine compounds, urea and some sugars but no fatty acids, suggesting a selective organic matter contribution in this ecosystem. Such a production may have a crucial impact on the bacterial community present on the study site, as it has been suggested previously that prokaryotes transport and recycle in situ most of the metabolites secreted by E. mutabilis. Consequently, this protist may have an indirect but important role in AMD ecosystems but also in other ecological niches often described as nitrogen-limited. PMID:22237547

  8. Role of lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid in enhanced pulmonary artery contractions of female rabbits.

    Pfister, Sandra L

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance. In women the incidence is 4-fold greater than that in men. Studies suggest that sustained vasoconstriction is a factor in increased vascular resistance. Possible vasoconstrictor mediators include arachidonic acid-derived lipoxygenase (LO) metabolites. Our studies in rabbits showed enhanced endothelium-dependent contractions to arachidonic acid in pulmonary arteries from females compared with males. Because treatment with a nonspecific LO inhibitor reduced contractions in females but not males, the present study identified which LO isoform contributes to sex-specific pulmonary artery vasoconstriction. The 15- and 5- but not 12-LO protein expressions were greater in females. Basal and A23187-stimulated release of 15-, 5-, and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) from females and males were measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Only 15-HETE synthesis was greater in females compared with males under both basal and stimulated conditions. Vascular contractions to 15-HETE were enhanced in females compared with males (maximal contraction: 44±6%versus 25±3%). The specific 15-LO inhibitor PD146176 (12 μmol/L) decreased arachidonic acid-induced contractions in females (maximal contraction: 93±4% versus 57±10%). If male pulmonary arteries were incubated with estrogen (1 μmol/L, 18 hours), protein expression of 15-LO and 15-HETE production increased. Mechanisms to explain the increased incidence of pulmonary hypertension in women are not known. Results suggest that the 15-LO pathway is different between females and males and is regulated by estrogen. Understanding this novel sex-specific mechanism may provide insight into the increased incidence of pulmonary hypertension in females.

  9. Long-chain fatty acid combustion rate is associated with unique metabolite profiles in skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Erin L Seifert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA beta-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream of the insulin receptor. Recent evidence supports a causal link between mitochondrial LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance. We have used unbiased metabolite profiling of mouse muscle mitochondria with the aim of identifying candidate metabolites within or effluxed from mitochondria and that are shifted with LCFA combustion rate.Large-scale unbiased metabolomics analysis was performed using GC/TOF-MS on buffer and mitochondrial matrix fractions obtained prior to and after 20 min of palmitate catabolism (n = 7 mice/condition. Three palmitate concentrations (2, 9 and 19 microM; corresponding to low, intermediate and high oxidation rates and 9 microM palmitate plus tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and electron transport chain inhibitors were each tested and compared to zero palmitate control incubations. Paired comparisons of the 0 and 20 min samples were made by Student's t-test. False discovery rate were estimated and Type I error rates assigned. Major metabolite groups were organic acids, amines and amino acids, free fatty acids and sugar phosphates. Palmitate oxidation was associated with unique profiles of metabolites, a subset of which correlated to palmitate oxidation rate. In particular, palmitate oxidation rate was associated with distinct changes in the levels of TCA cycle intermediates within and effluxed from mitochondria.This proof-of-principle study establishes that large-scale metabolomics methods can be applied to organelle-level models to discover metabolite patterns reflective of LCFA combustion, which may lead to identification of molecules linking muscle fat metabolism and insulin signaling. Our results suggest that

  10. In vivo effects of naproxen, salicylic acid, and valproic acid on the pharmacokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in rats.

    Rouhou, Mouna Cheikh; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Haddad, Sami

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that some drugs modulate in vitro metabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humans and rats. The objective was to assess in vivo interactions between TCE and three drugs: naproxen (NA), valproic acid (VA), and salicylic acid (SA). Animals were exposed to TCE by inhalation (50 ppm for 6 h) and administered a bolus dose of drug by gavage, equivalent to 10-fold greater than the recommended daily dose. Samples of blood, urine, and collected tissues were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector for TCE and metabolites (trichloroethanol [TCOH] and trichloroacetate [TCA]) levels. Coexposure to NA and TCE significantly increased (up to 50%) total and free TCOH (TCOHtotal and TCOHfree, respectively) in blood. This modulation may be explained by an inhibition of glucuronidation. VA significantly elevated TCE levels in blood (up to 50%) with a marked effect on TCOHtotal excretion in urine but not in blood. In contrast, SA produced an increase in TCOHtotal levels in blood at 30, 60, and 90 min and urine after coexposure. Data confirm in vitro observations that NA, VA, and SA affect in vivo TCE kinetics. Future efforts need to be directed to evaluate whether populations chronically medicated with the considered drugs display greater health risks related to TCE exposure.

  11. Metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinyl acetate. Demonstration of common physiological metabolites in rat small intestinal mucosa and circulation

    Cullum, M.E.; Zile, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and metabolism of physiological doses of all-trans-retinoic acid were examined in blood and small intestinal mucosa of vitamin A-depleted rats. A major portion of intrajugularly injected retinoic acid is rapidly (within 2 min) sequestered by tissues; subsequently 13-cis-retinoic acid and polar metabolites are released into circulation. All-trans-retinoic acid appears in small intestinal epithelium within 2 min after dosing and is the major radioactive compound there for at least 2 h. Retinoyl glucuronide and 13-cis-retinoic acid are early metabolites of all-trans-retinoic acid in the small intestine of bile duct-cannulated rats. Retinoyl glucuronide, the major metabolite of retinoic acid intestinal epithelium, in contrast to other polar metabolites, was not detected in circulation. An examination of [ 3 H]retinyl acetate metabolites under steady state conditions in vitamin A-repleted rats demonstrates the occurrence of all-trans-retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid in circulation and in intestinal epithelium, in a pattern similar to that found after injection of retinoic acid into vitamin A-depleted rats. These data establish that all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, and retinoyl glucuronide are physiological metabolites of vitamin A in target tissues, and therefore are important candidates as mediators of the biological effect of the vitamin

  12. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    Padalkar, Vikas S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan, E-mail: n.sekar@ictmumbai.edu.in

    2014-11-15

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and {sup 1}H –NMR, {sup 13}C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous.

  13. Identification of glucuronides as in vivo liver conjugates of seven cannabinoids and some of their hydroxy and acid metabolites.

    Harvey, D J; Martin, B R; Paton, W D

    1977-02-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of cannabidiol (CBD), 7-hydroxy-CBD, propyl-CBD, cannabinol (CBN), 7-hydroxy-CBN, CBN-7-oic acid, propyl CBN and cannabichromene have been identified as major metabolites of CBD, CBN and their propyl homologues and of cannabichromene in mouse liver. Trace amounts of the glucuronide conjugates of delta1- and delta1(6)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were also detected. Identification was made by combined gas-liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric studies of the trimethylsilyl (TMS), d9-TMS and methyl ester-TMS derivatives of the glucuronides and the TMS derivatives of the product of the reduction of the metabolites with lithium aluminium deuteride.

  14. Determination of neurotransmitters and their metabolites using one- and two-dimensional liquid chromatography with acidic potassium permanganate chemiluminescence detection.

    Holland, Brendan J; Conlan, Xavier A; Stevenson, Paul G; Tye, Susannah; Reker, Ashlie; Barnett, Neil W; Adcock, Jacqui L; Francis, Paul S

    2014-09-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with chemiluminescence detection based on the reaction with acidic potassium permanganate and formaldehyde was explored for the determination of neurotransmitters and their metabolites. The neurotransmitters norepinephrine and dopamine were quantified in the left and right hemispheres of rat hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, and the metabolites vanillylmandelic acid, 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid and homovanillic acid were identified in human urine. Under optimised chemiluminescence reagent conditions, the limits of detection for these analytes ranged from 2.5 × 10(-8) to 2.5 × 10(-7) M. For the determination of neurotransmitter metabolites in urine, a two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) separation operated in heart-cutting mode was developed to overcome the peak capacity limitations of the one-dimensional separation. This approach provided the greater separation power of 2D-HPLC with analysis times comparable to conventional one-dimensional separations.

  15. The influence of arachidonic acid metabolites on cell division in the intestinal epithelium and in colonic tumors.

    Petry, F M; Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1984-09-01

    Various metabolites of arachidonic acid are now known to influence cell division. In this paper the effects on cell proliferation of arachidonic acid, some inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism and some analogs of arachidonic acid metabolites is described. The epithelial cell proliferation rate in the jejunum, in the descending colon and in dimethylhydrazine-induced tumors of rat colon was measured using a stathmokinetic technique. Administration of arachidonic acid resulted in retardation of cell proliferation in each of the tissues examined. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor (Flurbiprofen) prevented this effect of arachidonic acid in the jejunal crypts and in colonic tumors, but not in colonic crypts. In contrast, inhibitors of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase (Benoxaprofen and BW755c) prevented the effect of arachidonic acid in the colonic crypts and reduced its effect on colonic tumours but did not alter its effect on the jejunum. An inhibitor of thromoboxane A2 synthetase (U51,605) was also able to prevent the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid on colonic tumors. Treatment with 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 inhibited cell proliferation in jejunal crypts and in colonic tumors, as did a thromboxane A2 mimicking agent, U46619. Nafazatrom, an agent that stimulates prostacyclin synthesis and inhibits lypoxygenase, promoted cell proliferation in the jejunal crypts and colonic crypts, but inhibited cell proliferation in colonic tumours.

  16. Dissociative photoionization of quinoline and isoquinoline

    Bouwman, J.; Sztáray, B.; Oomens, J.; Hemberger, P.; Bodi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Two nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomers of C9H7N composition, quinoline, and isoquinoline have been studied by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectra have been

  17. 2-Isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl quinoline-2-carboxylate

    E. Fazal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C20H25NO2, the cyclohexyl ring adopts a slightly disordered chair conformation. The dihedral angle between the mean planes of the quinoline ring and the carboxylate group is 22.2 (6°. In the crystal, weak C—H...N interactions make chains along [010].

  18. Zeolites Promoting Quinoline Synthesis via Friedlander Reaction

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Vitvarová, Dana; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, 19-20 (2010), s. 1430-1437 ISSN 1022-5528 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysis * zeolites * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2010

  19. Vasorelaxing Action of the Kynurenine Metabolite, Xanthurenic Acid: The Missing Link in Endotoxin-Induced Hypotension?

    Carmine Vecchione

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism is activated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. L-kynurenine, an upstream metabolite of the pathway, acts as a putative endothelium-derived relaxing factor, and has been hypothesized to play a causative role in the pathophysiology of inflammation-induced hypotension. Here, we show that xanthurenic acid (XA, the transamination product of 3-hydroxykynurenine, is more efficacious than L-kynurenine in causing relaxation of a resistance artery, but fails to relax pre-contracted aortic rings. In the mesenteric artery, XA enhanced activating phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS, and the relaxing action of XA was abrogated by pharmacological inhibition of NOS and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Systemic injection of XA reduced blood pressure in mice, and serum levels of XA increased by several fold in response to a pulse with the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS. LPS-induced hypotension in mice was prevented by pre-treatment with the kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO inhibitor, Ro-618048, which lowered serum levels of XA but enhanced serum levels of L-kynurenine. UPF 648, another KMO inhibitor, could also abrogate LPS-induced hypotension. Our data identify XA as a novel vasoactive compound and suggest that formation of XA is a key event in the pathophysiology of inflammation-induced hypotension.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of dietary kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid in rats.

    Zabela, Volha; Sampath, Chethan; Oufir, Mouhssin; Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Kaempferol is a major flavonoid in the human diet and in medicinal plants. The compound exerts anxiolytic activity when administered orally in mice, while no behavioural changes were observed upon intraperitoneal administration, or upon oral administration in gut sterilized animals. 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), which possesses anxiolytic effects when administered intraperitoneally, is a major intestinal metabolite of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic properties of the compounds are currently not clear. UHPLC-MS/MS methods were validated to support pharmacokinetic studies of kaempferol and 4-HPAA in rats. Non-compartmental and compartmental analyses were performed. After intravenous administration, kaempferol followed a one-compartment model, with a rapid clearance (4.40-6.44l/h/kg) and an extremely short half-life of 2.93-3.79min. After oral gavage it was not possible to obtain full plasma concentration-time profiles of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetics of 4-HPAA was characterized by a two-compartment model, consisting of a quick distribution phase (half-life 3.04-6.20min) followed by a fast elimination phase (half-life 19.3-21.1min). Plasma exposure of kaempferol is limited by poor oral bioavailability and extensive metabolism. Both compounds are rapidly eliminated, so that effective concentrations at the site of action do not appear to be reached. At present, it is not clear how the anxiolytic-like effects reported for the compounds can be explained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Visible-light-promoted and one-pot synthesis of phenanthridines and quinolines from aldehydes and O-acyl hydroxylamine.

    An, Xiao-De; Yu, Shouyun

    2015-06-05

    A one-pot synthesis of phenanthridines and quinolines from commercially available or easily prepared aldehydes has been reported. O-(4-Cyanobenzoyl)hydroxylamine was utilized as the nitrogen source to generate O-acyl oximes in situ with aldehydes catalyzed by Brønsted acid. O-Acyl oximes were then subjected to visible light photoredox catalyzed cyclization via iminyl radicals to furnish aza-arenes. A variety of phenanthridines and quinolines have been prepared assisted by Brønsted acid and photocatalyst under visible light at room temperature with satisfactory yields.

  2. Metabolites derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for cardioprotection.

    Gilbert, Kim; Malick, Mandy; Madingou, Ness; Touchette, Charles; Bourque-Riel, Valérie; Tomaro, Leandro; Rousseau, Guy

    2015-12-15

    Although controversial, some data suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are beneficial to cardiovascular diseases, and could reduce infarct size. In parallel, we have reported that the administration of Resolvin D1 (RvD1), a metabolite of docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 PUFA, can reduce infarct size. The present study was designed to determine if the inhibition of two important enzymes involved in the formation of RvD1 from omega-3 PUFA could reduce the cardioprotective effect of omega-3 PUFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a diet rich in omega-3 PUFA during 10 days before myocardial infarction (MI). Two days before MI, rats received a daily dose of Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, PD146176, an inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase, both inhibitors or vehicle. MI was induced by the occlusion of the left coronary artery for 40min followed by reperfusion. Infarct size and neutrophil accumulation were evaluated after 24h of reperfusion while caspase-3, -8 and Akt activities were assessed at 30min of reperfusion. Rats receiving inhibitors, alone or in combination, showed a larger infarct size than those receiving omega-3 PUFA alone. Caspase-3 and -8 activities are higher in ischemic areas with inhibitors while Akt activity is diminished in groups treated with inhibitors. Moreover, the study showed that RvD1 restores cardioprotection when added to the inhibitors. Results from this study indicate that the inhibition of the metabolism of Omega-3 PUFA attenuate their cardioprotective properties. Then, resolvins seem to be an important mediator in the cardioprotection conferred by omega-3 PUFA in our experimental model of MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Arachidonic acid metabolites in normal and autoimmune mice do not influence lymphocyte-high endothelial venule interactions.

    Manolios, N; Bakiera, B; Geczy, C L; Schrieber, L

    1991-02-01

    In peripheral lymphoid organs the number of lymphocytes and the proportion of functional lymphocyte subsets are regulated by multiple factors including the control of lymphocyte migration by selective lymphocyte-high endothelial venule (HEV) interactions. In this study, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels from normal and autoimmune mouse lymph node cells were measured. The contribution of eicosanoids to lymphocyte-HEV interactions in normal (CBA/T6) and autoimmune (MRL/n) mice was examined. There was no association between PGE2 production in normal or autoimmune mice and the age of onset of disease activity in the latter strains. Arachidonic acid metabolites, in particular PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), did not have any effects on lymphocyte-HEV binding. Likewise, lymphocytes treated in vivo and/or in vitro with arachidonic acid metabolite inhibitors (acetyl salicylic acid, indomethacin, BW755C) did not alter lymphocyte-HEV binding interactions in both normal and autoimmune mice. No clinical significance could be attributed to lymph node PGE2 production and the age of onset of autoimmune disease. In summary, these findings cast doubt on the role of arachidonic acid metabolites in lymphocyte-HEV binding interactions.

  4. β-Cypermethrin and its metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid exhibit immunotoxicity in murine macrophages.

    Wang, Xia; He, Bingnan; Kong, Baida; Wei, Lai; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Chenqian; Shao, Yiyan; Lin, Jiajia; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-12-01

    β-Cypermethrin (β-CYP), one of most important pyrethroids, is widely used to control insects, and has been detected in organisms, including human. Pyrethroids have been shown to pose neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, endocrine disruption and reproductive risks in mammals. However, research in immunotoxicity of pyrethroids, especially their metabolites, is limited. A common metabolite of pyrethroids is 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in mammals. Thus, in this study, we evaluated the immunotoxicity of β-CYP and 3-PBA in mouse macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells. MTT assays showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry with Annexin-V/PI staining demonstrated that both β-CYP and 3-PBA induced RAW 264.7 cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results also showed that N-acetylcysteine partially blocked β-CYP- and 3-PBA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Intrinsic apoptotic pathway was stimulated by both β-CYP and 3-PBA exposure. In addition, we found that β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines with or without LPS stimulation. Phagocytosis assay showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited phagocytic ability of macrophages. Moreover, it was also found that both β-CYP and 3-PBA increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in RAW 264.7 cells. Accordingly, both β-CYP and 3-PBA were found to regulate the mRNA levels of oxidative stress-related genes in RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, the results obtained in this study demonstrated that β-CYP and 3-PBA may have immunotoxic effect on macrophages and that elevated ROS may underlie the mechanism. The present study will help to understand the health risks caused by β-CYP and other pyrethroids. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  5. Elevated prostaglandin E metabolites and abnormal plasma fatty acids at baseline in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients: a pilot study.

    O'Connor, Michael Glenn; Thomsen, Kelly; Brown, Rebekah F; Laposata, Michael; Seegmiller, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Airway inflammation is a significant contributor to the morbidity of cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. One feature of this inflammation is the production of oxygenated metabolites, such as prostaglandins. Individuals with CF are known to have abnormal metabolism of fatty acids, typically resulting in reduced levels of linoleic acid (LA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This is a randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial of DHA supplementation with endpoints of plasma fatty acid levels and prostaglandin E metabolite (PGE-M) levels. Patients with CF age 6-18 years with pancreatic insufficiency were recruited. Each participant completed 3 four-week study periods: DHA at two different doses (high dose and low dose) and placebo with a minimum 4 week wash-out between each period. Blood, urine, and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) were collected at baseline and after each study period for measurement of plasma fatty acids as well as prostaglandin E metabolites. Seventeen participants were enrolled, and 12 participants completed all 3 study periods. Overall, DHA supplementation was well tolerated without significant adverse events. There was a significant increase in plasma DHA levels with supplementation, but no significant change in arachidonic acid (AA) or LA levels. However, at baseline, AA levels were lower and LA levels were higher than previously reported for individuals with CF. Urine PGE-M levels were elevated in the majority of participants at baseline, and while levels decreased with DHA supplementation, they also decreased with placebo. Urine PGE-M levels are elevated at baseline in this cohort of pediatric CF patients, but there was no significant change in these levels with DHA supplementation compared to placebo. In addition, baseline plasma fatty acid levels for this cohort showed some difference to prior reports, including higher levels of LA and lower levels of AA, which may reflect changes in clinical care, and consequently warrants further

  6. Antifungal activity of secondary plant metabolites from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.): Glycoalkaloids and phenolic acids show synergistic effects.

    Sánchez-Maldonado, A F; Schieber, A; Gänzle, M G

    2016-04-01

    To study the antifungal effects of the potato secondary metabolites α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and caffeic acid, alone or combined. Resistance to glycoalkaloids varied among the fungal species tested, as derived from minimum inhibitory concentrations assays. Synergistic antifungal activity between glycoalkaloids and phenolic compounds was found. Changes in the fluidity of fungal membranes caused by potato secondary plant metabolites were determined by calculation of the generalized polarization values. The results partially explained the synergistic effect between caffeic acid and α-chaconine and supported findings on membrane disruption mechanisms from previous studies on artificial membranes. LC/MS analysis was used to determine variability and relative amounts of sterols in the different fungal species. Results suggested that the sterol pattern of fungi is related to their resistance to potato glycoalkaloids and to their taxonomy. Fungal resistance to α-chaconine and possibly other glycoalkaloids is species dependent. α-Chaconine and caffeic acid show synergistic antifungal activity. The taxonomic classification and the sterol pattern play a role in fungal resistance to glycoalkaloids. Results improve the understanding of the antifungal mode of action of potato secondary metabolites, which is essential for their potential utilization as antifungal agents in nonfood systems. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  8. Metabolic pathways of quinoline, indole and their methylated analogs by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    Johansen, S.S.; Licht, D.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of quinoline, isoquinoline and 3-, 4-, 6- and 8-methylquinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was compared with that of the N-containing analogues indole and 1-, 2-, 3- and 7-methylindole. The metabolites were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV dete...... inhibited. An incomplete transformation of some methylated compounds was observed, e.g. for 3- and 6-methylquinoline and 3- and 7-methylindole, with residual concentrations of 0.5-4 mg/l in relation to initial concentrations of 10-15 mg/l....

  9. Detection of metabolites of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in human urine specimens: 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD, a prevalent metabolite of LSD.

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Hallare, D A; Manglicmot, M G; Czarny, R J; McWhorter, L K; Anderson, C J

    1999-03-05

    Seventy-four urine specimens previously found to contain lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analyzed by a new procedure for the LSD metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD) using a Finnigan LC-MS-MS system. This procedure proved to be less complex, shorter to perform and provides cleaner chromatographic characteristics than the method currently utilized by the Navy Drug Screening Laboratories for the extraction of LSD from urine by GC-MS. All of the specimens used in the study screened positive for LSD by radioimmunoassay (Roche Abuscreen). Analysis by GC-MS revealed detectable amounts of LSD in all of the specimens. In addition, isolysergic diethylamide (iso-LSD), a byproduct of LSD synthesis, was quantitated in 64 of the specimens. Utilizing the new LC-MS-MS method, low levels of N-desmethyl-LSD (nor-LSD), another identified LSD metabolite, were detected in some of the specimens. However, all 74 specimens contained O-H-LSD at significantly higher concentrations than LSD, iso-LSD, or nor-LSD alone. The O-H-LSD concentration ranged from 732 to 112 831 pg/ml (mean, 16340 pg/ml) by quantification with an internal standard. The ratio of O-H-LSD to LSD ranged from 1.1 to 778.1 (mean, 42.9). The presence of O-H-LSD at substantially higher concentrations than LSD suggests that the analysis for O-H-LSD as the target analyte by employing LC-MS-MS will provide a much longer window of detection for the use of LSD than the analysis of the parent compound, LSD.

  10. Quinoline-Based Hybrid Compounds with Antimalarial Activity

    Xhamla Nqoro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of quinoline-based compounds for the treatment of malaria infections is hampered by drug resistance. Drug resistance has led to the combination of quinolines with other classes of antimalarials resulting in enhanced therapeutic outcomes. However, the combination of antimalarials is limited by drug-drug interactions. In order to overcome the aforementioned factors, several researchers have reported hybrid compounds prepared by reacting quinoline-based compounds with other compounds via selected functionalities. This review will focus on the currently reported quinoline-based hybrid compounds and their preclinical studies.

  11. Whey protein delays gastric emptying and suppresses plasma fatty acids and their metabolites compared to casein, gluten, and fish protein

    Stanstrup, Jan; Schou, Simon S; Holmer-Jensen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ), and cod (COD). Obese, nondiabetic subjects were included in the randomized, blinded, crossover meal study. Subjects ingested a high fat meal containing one of the four protein sources. Plasma samples were collected at five time points and metabolites analyzed using LC-Q-TOF-MS. In contrast to previous...... studies, the WI meal caused a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to the other test meals. The WI meal also caused elevated levels of a number of amino acids, possibly stimulating insulin release leading to reduced plasma glucose. The WI meal also caused decreased levels of a number of fatty acids......, while the GLU meal caused elevated levels of a number of unidentified hydroxy fatty acids and dicarboxylic fatty acids. Also reported are a number of markers of fish intake unique to the COD meal....

  12. The ytterbium nitrate-quinoline (piperidine) nitrate-water system

    Khisaeva, D.A.; Boeva, M.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Using the method of cross sections the solubility of solid phases in the ytterbium nitrate-quinoline nitrate - water (1) and ytterbium nitrate-piperidine nitrate-water (2) systems is studied at 25 and 50 deg C. It is established, that in system 1 congruently melting compound of the composition Yb(NO 3 ) 3 x2C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 x3H 2 O is formed. The new solid phase has been isolated as a preparation and subjected to chemical X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and IR spectroscopic analyses. Isotherms of system 2 in the studied range of concentrations and temperatures consist of two branches, corresponding to crystallization of tetruaqueous ytterbi um nitrate and nitric acid piperidine

  13. γ-radiolysis of the quinoline

    Vieira, E.M.

    1989-06-01

    The chemical and radiolytic stability of products by radiation from quinoline in isopropanol solution was studied. Doses were from 2 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 Gy and concentration in the samples was L:L by volume. It has observed significant effects for high radiation doses. Lower doses affected the solvent with the production of long polymeric hydrocarbons. Products formed were characterized by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (CG/MS). (author)

  14. Dynamic microbial succession of Shanxi aged vinegar and its correlation with flavor metabolites during different stages of acetic acid fermentation.

    Zhu, Yunping; Zhang, Feifei; Zhang, Chengnan; Yang, Li; Fan, Guangsen; Xu, Youqiang; Sun, Baoguo; Li, Xiuting

    2018-06-05

    Shanxi aged vinegar (SAV), one of the famous Chinese vinegars, is produced by multispecies solid-state fermentation in which the acetic acid fermentation stage (AAF) is especially important. However, how bacterial succession and their metabolites change along with the different stages of AAF is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the dynamic bacterial succession and flavor formation in three batches of SAV using high-throughput sequencing and metabolomics approaches. It is interesting to find that AAF can be divided into three stages based on its bacterial community succession (early stage, days 0-4; medium stage, days 5-21; and later stage, days 22-26). Pantoea, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Rhizobium played an important role in the early stage; Lactobacillus was dominant in the medium stage (67.72%); and Acetobacter, Komagataeibacter and Kroppenstedtia were the key bacteria in the later stage. A total of seven organic acids and 42 volatile constituents (esters, alcohol, ketones and aldehydes) were detected during the AAF. Spearman correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between the bacterial community and these flavor metabolites during the AAF of the SAV. This is the first report to explore the relationships between volatile flavor metabolites and bacterial community succession by a three-staged method and provide theoretical support for a flavor formation mechanism in traditional SAV.

  15. Diglycolic acid is the nephrotoxic metabolite in diethylene glycol poisoning inducing necrosis in human proximal tubule cells in vitro.

    Landry, Greg M; Martin, Sarah; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2011-11-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG), a solvent and chemical intermediate, can produce an acute toxic syndrome, the hallmark of which is acute renal failure due to cortical tubular degeneration and proximal tubular necrosis. DEG is metabolized to two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2-HEAA) and diglycolic acid (DGA), which are believed to be the proximate toxicants. The precise mechanism of toxicity has yet to be elucidated, so these studies were designed to determine which metabolite was responsible for the proximal tubule cell death. Human proximal tubule (HPT) cells in culture, obtained from normal cortical tissue and passaged 3-6 times, were incubated with increasing concentrations of DEG, 2-HEAA, or DGA separately and in combination for 48 h at pH 6 or 7.4, and various parameters of necrotic and apoptotic cell death were measured. DEG and 2-HEAA did not produce any cell death. DGA produced dose-dependent necrosis at concentrations above 25 mmol/l. DGA did not affect caspase-3 activity and increased annexin V staining only in propidium iodide-stained cells. Hence, DGA induced necrosis, not apoptosis, as corroborated by severe depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. DGA is structurally similar to citric acid cycle intermediates that are taken up by specific transporters in kidney cells. HPT cells, incubated with N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid, a sodium dicarboxylate-1 transporter inhibitor showed significantly decreased cell death compared with DGA alone. These studies demonstrate that DGA is the toxic metabolite responsible for DEG-induced proximal tubular necrosis and suggest a possible transporter-mediated uptake of DGA leading to toxic accumulation and cellular dysfunction.

  16. In vitro neuroprotective potential of lichen metabolite fumarprotocetraric acid via intracellular redox modulation

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Crespo, Ana; Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The lichen-forming fungi Cetraria islandica has been largely used in folk medicines, and it has recently showed promising in vitro antioxidant effects in glial-like cells. Current work aimed at investigating the neuroprotective potential of its major isolated secondary metabolite: the depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid (FUM). H 2 O 2 was used herein to induce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated cytotoxicity in two models of neurons and astrocytes cells (SH-SY5Y and U373-MG cell lines). We found that a pre-treatment with FUM significantly enhanced cell viability compared to H 2 O 2 -treated cells, and we selected the optimal concentrations in each model (1 and 25 μg/ml, respectively) for assessing its cytoprotective mechanisms. FUM, which exerted effective peroxyl radical scavenging effect in the chemical oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay, alleviated the alterations in OS markers provoked by H 2 O 2 . It attenuated intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion. At mitochondrial level, FUM prevented from the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the increase in mitochondrial calcium, implying a protective role against oxidative damage in mitochondrial membrane. Similarly, FUM pre-treatment diminished H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis, as evidenced by the reduction in caspase-3 activity and expression; inmunoblot analysis also revealed a decrease in Bax and an increase in Bcl-2 proteins levels. Furthermore, FUM up-regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase-1, and hemeoxigenase-1. These findings and the activation of Nrf2 binding activity in nuclear extracts suggest a plausible involvement of Nrf2 signaling pathway in the cytoprotection by FUM. In conclusion, FUM emerges as a potential drug candidate in the therapy of OS-related diseases, such as the neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • FUM pre-treatment exerts significant cytoprotection against H 2 O 2 -mediated apoptosis. • ROS

  17. In vitro neuroprotective potential of lichen metabolite fumarprotocetraric acid via intracellular redox modulation

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Crespo, Ana [Department of Plant Biology II, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar, E-mail: pserra@ucm.es [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University Complutense of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-01

    The lichen-forming fungi Cetraria islandica has been largely used in folk medicines, and it has recently showed promising in vitro antioxidant effects in glial-like cells. Current work aimed at investigating the neuroprotective potential of its major isolated secondary metabolite: the depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid (FUM). H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used herein to induce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated cytotoxicity in two models of neurons and astrocytes cells (SH-SY5Y and U373-MG cell lines). We found that a pre-treatment with FUM significantly enhanced cell viability compared to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, and we selected the optimal concentrations in each model (1 and 25 μg/ml, respectively) for assessing its cytoprotective mechanisms. FUM, which exerted effective peroxyl radical scavenging effect in the chemical oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay, alleviated the alterations in OS markers provoked by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It attenuated intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion. At mitochondrial level, FUM prevented from the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the increase in mitochondrial calcium, implying a protective role against oxidative damage in mitochondrial membrane. Similarly, FUM pre-treatment diminished H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by the reduction in caspase-3 activity and expression; inmunoblot analysis also revealed a decrease in Bax and an increase in Bcl-2 proteins levels. Furthermore, FUM up-regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase-1, and hemeoxigenase-1. These findings and the activation of Nrf2 binding activity in nuclear extracts suggest a plausible involvement of Nrf2 signaling pathway in the cytoprotection by FUM. In conclusion, FUM emerges as a potential drug candidate in the therapy of OS-related diseases, such as the neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • FUM pre-treatment exerts significant cytoprotection against H

  18. Novel {beta}-cyclodextrin modified CdTe quantum dots as fluorescence nanosensor for acetylsalicylic acid and metabolites

    Algarra, M. [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Campos, B.B.; Aguiar, F.R.; Rodriguez-Borges, J.E. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 169-007 Porto (Portugal); Esteves da Silva, J.C.G., E-mail: jcsilva@fc.up.pt [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-05-01

    {beta}-Cyclodextrin was modified with 11-[(ethoxycarbonyl)thio]undecanoic acid and used as a capping agent, together with mercaptosuccinic acid, to prepare water-stable CdTe quantum dots. The water soluble quantum dot obtained displays fluorescence with a maximum emission at 425 nm (under excitation at 300 nm) with lifetimes of 0.53, 4.8, 181, and 44.1 ns, respectively. The S-{beta}CD-MSA-CdTe can act as a nanoprobe that is due to the affinity of the cyclodextrin moiety for selected substances such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolites as foreign species. The fluorescence of the S-{beta}CD-MSA-CdTe is enhanced on addition of ASA. Linear calibration plots are observed with ASA in concentrations between 0 and 1 mg/l, with a limit of detection at 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} mol/l (1.5 ng/ml) and a precision as relative standard deviation of 1% (0.05 mg/l). The interference effect of certain compounds as ascorbic acid and its main metabolites such as salicylic, gentisic and salicyluric acid upon the obtained procedure was studied. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanosensors constituted by CdTe quantum dots capped with modified cyclodextrin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This nanomaterial shows fluorescence properties compatible with a semiconductor quantum dot. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanosensor shows fluorescence enhancement when inclusion complexes are formed with acetylsalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This nanomaterial has nanosensor potential taking into consideration the formation stability of the inclusion complex.

  19. ω-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their cytochrome P450-derived metabolites suppress colorectal tumor development in mice.

    Wang, Weicang; Yang, Jun; Nimiya, Yoshiki; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Sanidad, Katherine; Qi, Weipeng; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Park, Yeonhwa; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Guodong

    2017-10-01

    Many studies have shown that dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) reduces the risks of colorectal cancer; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we used a LC-MS/MS-based lipidomics to explore the role of eicosanoid signaling in the anti-colorectal cancer effects of ω-3 PUFAs. Our results showed that dietary feeding of ω-3 PUFAs-rich diets suppressed growth of MC38 colorectal tumor, and modulated profiles of fatty acids and eicosanoid metabolites in C57BL/6 mice. Notably, we found that dietary feeding of ω-3 PUFAs significantly increased levels of epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs, metabolites of ω-3 PUFA produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes) in plasma and tumor tissue of the treated mice. We further showed that systematic treatment with EDPs (dose=0.5 mg/kg per day) suppressed MC38 tumor growth in mice, with reduced expressions of pro-oncogenic genes such as C-myc, Axin2, and C-jun in tumor tissues. Together, these results support that formation of EDPs might contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer effects of ω-3 PUFAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis and antiplasmodial evaluation of novel (4-aminobutyloxy)quinolines

    Vandekerckhove, S.; Mueller, C.; Vogt, D.; Lategan, C.; Smith, P.J.; Chibale, K.; Kimpe, de N.; D'hooghe, M.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of 5-, 6- and 8-(4-aminobutyloxy)quinolines as novel oxygen analogues of known 4- and 8-(4-aminobutylamino)quinoline antimalarial drugs was generated from hydroxyquinolines through a three-step approach with a rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation as the key step. Antiplasmodial assays of

  1. Preliminary study to prepare a reference material of styrene metabolites – mandelic acid and phenolglyoxilic acid – in human urine

    Šperlingová, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Kučera, Jan; Tichý, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 8, 3-4 (2003), s. 113-116 ISSN 0949-1775 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : reference material * human urine * styrene metabolites Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.637, year: 2003

  2. Andrastin A and barceloneic acid metabolites, protein farnesyl transferase inhibitors from Penicillium alborcoremium: chemotaxonomic significance and pathological implications

    Overy, David Patrick; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Dalsgaard, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    A survey of Penicillium albocoremium was undertaken to identify potential taxonomic metabolite markers. One major and four minor metabolites were consistently produced by the 19 strains surveyed on three different media. Following purification and spectral studies, the metabolites were identified...

  3. Not flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) but its murine metabolite 6-OH-FAA exhibits remarkable antivascular activities in vitro.

    Pham, Minh Hien; Dauzonne, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2016-06-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) has been proved to be a potent vascular-disrupting agent in mice. Unfortunately, FAA did not produce any anticancer activity in clinical trials. Previously, we had reported that FAA is metabolized by mouse microsomes into six metabolites, whereas it was poorly metabolized by human microsomes, with fewer metabolites formed in lesser amounts. Especially, 6-OH-FAA was not formed by human microsomes. In this work, two major available metabolites, 4'-OH-FAA and 6-OH-FAA, were tested and compared with the parent compound FAA for their potential antivascular activities in vitro. The ability of the products to induce morphological changes, disrupt preformed capillaries of EA.hy926 endothelial cells and inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro was assessed. The action mechanism was determined using the RhoA and Rac1 inhibitors. At 25 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA induced morphological changes and membrane blebbing, whereas 300 µg/ml of FAA and 4'-OH-FAA slightly changed the morphology without inducing membrane blebbing. At 300 µg/ml, 6-OH-FAA produced morphological changes that were 2.1-6.9-fold greater than that produced by FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, an effect that was consistent with its much greater inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA. 6-OH-FAA significantly disrupted the EA.hy926 cell capillaries. 6-OH-FAA activities were prevented in EA.hy926 cells pretreated with RhoA, but not Rac1, inhibitor. In this short communication we report for the first time that, in vitro, 6-OH-FAA, a mouse-specific FAA metabolite, exhibits significantly stronger antivascular activities compared with FAA and 4'-OH-FAA, which are mediated through the RhoA kinase pathway.

  4. The modern view of the idea of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its metabolite use to restore the motor function

    А. G. Rodinskij

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The literature review is devoted to the idea of using gamma-aminobutyric acid and its metabolites as medicines in conditions of peripheral nervous system injury. We examined the modern problems of denervated muscles restoration and a wide range of GABA effects which could be useful in conditions of injury. GABA and its metabolites have elements of nootropic, antihypoxic, organoprotective and anabolic activity. It is obvious that traumas of peripheral nerves lead to degeneration of injured fibers and significant disorders of metabolism at a number of regulatory levels. Regeneration of the nerve and the rate of recovery of muscle activity depend significantly on the level of resistivity of the injured nerve tissue and on possibilities for supply of this tissue by additional energetic reserves. Under the above-mentioned conditions, disorders are determined, to a significant extent, by the development of hypoxia. This is why elucidation of the phenomenology and mechanisms of action of GABA and its metabolites (agent are having, as was mentioned above, protective and antihypoxic properties on the nerve/muscle apparatus and its links under conditions of traumatization of a large nerve is urgent. GABA and its metabolites have an antinociceptive activity which helps not only in inhibition of central and spinal neurons, but also helps to decrease pain sensitivity of patient after traumatic neuropathy to forming of motivation to recovery rehabilitation. Besides above mentioned, the ability of GABA to increase concentration of Ca2 + after injury was discussed. This ability may affect the expression of genes, the direction of the growth cone, and, perhaps, reduce cell death. Conclusion. This indicates that the GABA has a selectivity of action to the damaged structure and can be prospective agent for regenerative therapy.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry determination of glutamic acid and homocysteine's metabolites: Potential biomarkers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Cieslarova, Zuzana; Lopes, Fernando Silva; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Colnaghi Simionato, Ana Valéria

    2017-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both lower and upper motor neurons, leading to muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death caused by respiratory failure or infectious complications. Altered levels of homocysteine, cysteine, methionine, and glutamic acid have been observed in plasma of ALS patients. In this context, a method for determination of these potential biomarkers in plasma by capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS) is proposed herein. Sample preparation was carefully investigated, since sulfur-containing amino acids may interact with plasma proteins. Owing to the non-thiol sulfur atom in methionine, it was necessary to split sample preparation into two methods: i) determination of homocysteine and cysteine as S-acetyl amino acids; ii) determination of glutamic acid and methionine. All amino acids were separated within 25min by CE-MS/MS using 5molL -1 acetic acid as background electrolyte and 5mmolL -1 acetic acid in 50% methanol/H 2 O (v/v) as sheath liquid. The proposed CE-MS/MS method was validated, presenting RSD values below 6% and 11% for intra- and inter-day precision, respectively, for the middle concentration level within the linear range. The limits of detection ranged from 35 (homocysteine) to 268nmolL -1 (glutamic acid). The validated method was applied to the analysis of plasma samples from a group of healthy individuals and patients with ALS, showing the potential of glutamic acid and homocysteine metabolites as biomarkers of ALS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolite changes during natural and lactic acid bacteria fermentations in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends

    Ng'ong'ola-Manani, Tinna Austen; Østlie, Hilde Marit; Mwangwela, Agnes Mbachi; Wicklund, Trude

    2014-01-01

    The effect of natural and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation processes on metabolite changes in pastes of soybeans and soybean–maize blends was studied. Pastes composed of 100% soybeans, 90% soybeans and 10% maize, and 75% soybeans and 25% maize were naturally fermented (NFP), and were fermented by lactic acid bacteria (LFP). LAB fermentation processes were facilitated through back-slopping using a traditional fermented gruel, thobwa as an inoculum. Naturally fermented pastes were designated 100S, 90S, and 75S, while LFP were designated 100SBS, 90SBS, and 75SBS. All samples, except 75SBS, showed highest increase in soluble protein content at 48 h and this was highest in 100S (49%) followed by 90SBS (15%), while increases in 100SBS, 90S, and 75S were about 12%. Significant (P acids throughout fermentation were attributed to cysteine in 100S and 90S; and methionine in 100S and 90SBS. A 3.2% increase in sum of total amino acids was observed in 75SBS at 72 h, while decreases up to 7.4% in 100SBS at 48 and 72 h, 6.8% in 100S at 48 h and 4.7% in 75S at 72 h were observed. Increases in free amino acids throughout fermentation were observed in glutamate (NFP and 75SBS), GABA and alanine (LFP). Lactic acid was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher in LFP than in NFP, and other organic acids detected were acetate and succinate. Maltose levels were the highest among the reducing sugars and were two to four times higher in LFP than in NFP at the beginning of the fermentation, but at 72 h, only fructose levels were significantly (P acid solubility and degradation of phytic acid (85% in NFP and 49% in LFP by 72 h). PMID:25493196

  7. The simultaneous detection and quantification of p-aminobenzoic acid and its phase 2 biotransformation metabolites in human urine using LC-MS/MS.

    Nortje, Carla; Jansen van Rensburg, Peet; Cooke, Cecile; Erasmus, Elardus

    2015-01-01

    p-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA) can be used as a probe substance to investigate glycine conjugation, a reaction of phase 2 biotransformation. An LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of PABA and its metabolites from human urine was developed and validated. The metabolites can be quantified with acceptable precision and accuracy directly from human urine samples after ingestion of 550 mg PABA. The developed LC-MS/MS assay is to our knowledge the first method available for the simultaneous quantification of PABA and its glycine conjugation metabolites in human urine and provides important quantitative data for studies of this phase 2 biotransformation pathway.

  8. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with [ 14 C]aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment

  9. Abscisic acid metabolite profiling as indicators of plastic responses to drought in grasses from arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina).

    Cenzano, Ana M; Masciarelli, O; Luna, M Virginia

    2014-10-01

    The identification of hormonal and biochemical traits that play functional roles in the adaptation to drought is necessary for the conservation and planning of rangeland management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought on i) the water content (WC) of different plant organs, ii) the endogenous level of abscisic acid (ABA) and metabolites (phaseic acid-PA, dihydrophaseic acid-DPA and abscisic acid conjugated with glucose ester-ABA-GE), iii) the total carotenoid concentration and iv) to compare the traits of two desert perennial grasses (Pappostipa speciosa and Poa ligularis) with contrasting morphological and functional drought resistance traits and life-history strategies. Both species were subjected to two levels of gravimetric soil moisture (the highest near field capacity during autumn-winter and the lowest corresponding to summer drought). Drought significantly increased the ABA and DPA levels in the green leaves of P. speciosa and P. ligularis. Drought decreased ABA in the roots of P. speciosa while it increased ABA in the roots of P. ligularis. P. ligularis had the highest ABA level and WC in green leaves. While P. speciosa had the highest DPA levels in leaves. In conclusion, we found the highest ABA level in the mesophytic species P. ligularis and the lowest ABA level in the xerophytic species P. speciosa, revealing that the ABA metabolite profile in each grass species is a plastic response to drought resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Simultaneous Determination of Ursodiol and its Major Metabolites, Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid and Glycoursodeoxycholic Acid in Human Plasma

    M. Ganesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method is described for the quantification of ursodiol and its major metabolites glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA in human plasma using single internal standard (Ursodeoxycholic Acid d4. Solid phase extraction was performed and chromatographic separation of 5µL injected sample was achieved using Waters Xterra, 5µm column with a mobile phase comprised of methanol and 5 mM ammonium formate with 0.1 % acetic acid ( 70 : 30, v/v . The mass spectrometer was used in negative ion mode and multiple reactions monitoring using electro spray ionization mode as an interface. The method was fully validated and the calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 25.9 to 15300.1 ng/mL for ursodiol, 2.7 to 1587.5ng/mLfor tauroursodeoxycholicacid and 25.4 to 15040.9 ng/mL for glycoursodeoxycholic acid. The method was sensitive and specific, with the lower limit of quantification of 25.9, 2.7 and 25.4 ng/ml for ursodiol, tauroursodeoxycholic acid and glycoursodeoxycholic acid respectively. The present method includes a simple and rapid sample preparation with shorter analysis run time and less flow rate compared to previously reported methods. The method was applied successfully for a bioequivalence study in healthy subjects.

  11. Non-enzymatic lipid oxidation products in biological systems: assessment of the metabolites from polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Vigor, Claire; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Pinot, Edith; Oger, Camille; Vercauteren, Joseph; Le Faouder, Pauline; Galano, Jean-Marie; Lee, Jetty Chung-Yung; Durand, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Metabolites of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids notably omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have become important biomarkers of lipid products. Especially the arachidonic acid-derived F2-isoprostanes are the classic in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in biological systems. In recent years other isoprostanes from eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, adrenic and α-linolenic acids have been evaluated, namely F3-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes and F1-phytoprostanes, respectively. These have been gaining interest as complementary specific biomarkers in human diseases. Refined extraction methods, robust analysis and elucidation of chemical structures have improved the sensitivity of detection in biological tissues and fluids. Previously the main reliable instrumentation for measurement was gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), but now the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and immunological techniques is gaining much attention. In this review, the types of prostanoids generated from non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of some important omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and biological samples that have been determined by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  13. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    Chapkin, R.S.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C)18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized /sup 14/C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, /sup 14/C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined.

  14. Generation of novel metabolites of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n6) by guinea pig epidermis

    Chapkin, R.S.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the authors have demonstrated the inability of rat and guinea pig (GP) skin enzyme preparations to desaturate 18:2n6 into gammalinolenic acid (18:3n6) using an in vitro microsomal system, the fate of this dietary essential fatty acid in the GP epidermis is unknown. To explore the fate of 18:2n6, intact tissue slices from GP epidermis were incubated with [1- 14 C]18:2n6. After incubation, the extracted lipids were transesterified using methanolic-HCL. The fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed using a combination of (i) argentation TLC, scanned using a proportional TLC radioscanner, and (ii) reverse phase HPLC, equipped with a flow through radioscanner. The results indicate that the intact epidermis metabolized 14 C-18:2n6 to a group of novel products more polar than 18:2n6. In subsequent experiments, 14 C-18:2n6 was either incubated with the 800 xg supernatant, the 105,000 xg pellet or supernatant from GP epidermis. Metabolism of 18:2n6 by the high speed supernatant resulted in the generation of polar products with chromatographic properties of not greater than 2 double bonds. These results indicate that although the GP epidermis lacks the capacity to desaturate 18:2n6 to 18:3n6, it can convert dietary 18:2n6 into a group of novel polar metabolites via a cytosolic mediated process. The function of these metabolites in the GP integumentary system remains to be determined

  15. Synthesis and antiplasmodial evaluation of novel (4-aminobutyloxy)quinolines.

    Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; Müller, Christian; Vogt, Dieter; Lategan, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Chibale, Kelly; De Kimpe, Norbert; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A variety of 5-, 6- and 8-(4-aminobutyloxy)quinolines as novel oxygen analogues of known 4- and 8-(4-aminobutylamino)quinoline antimalarial drugs was generated from hydroxyquinolines through a three-step approach with a rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation as the key step. Antiplasmodial assays of these new quinolines revealed micromolar potency for all representatives against a chloroquine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum, and three compounds showed submicromolar activity against a chloroquine-resistant strain of P. falciparum with IC(50)-values ranging between 150 and 680 nM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic rates of acetyl salicylic acid and its metabolites in an Otomi ethnic group of Mexico.

    Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Flores-Pérez, Janett; Guillé-Pérez, Adrian; Vargas, Arturo

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic differences of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolites: gentisic acid (GA), salicylic acid (SA) and salicyluric acid (SUA) between Otomies and Mesticians healthy subjects. Design. Ten Otomies and 10 Mesticians were included. After a single dose of aspirin given orally (15 mg/kg), blood and urine samples were collected at different times. Results. Pharmacokinetic parameters of salicylates showed significant differences, except distribution volume of SA, and elimination half-life of SUA. Metabolic rates of ASA showed significant differences for all rates between both groups. On the other hand, percentages of dose excreted were more reduced for SA and SUA for the Otomies than for the Mesticians. Conclusion. Results reflect differences in the hydrolysis way i.e. from ASA to SA and aromatic hydroxylation i.e. from SA to GA, which were slower in Otomies subjects, showing a possible pharmacokinetic differences about the capabilities of ASA biotransformation as a consequence of ethnic differences.

  17. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding.

  18. Kynurenic Acid: The Janus-Faced Role of an Immunomodulatory Tryptophan Metabolite and Its Link to Pathological Conditions

    Elisa Wirthgen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan metabolites are known to participate in the regulation of many cells of the immune system and are involved in various immune-mediated diseases and disorders. Kynurenic acid (KYNA is a product of one branch of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. The influence of KYNA on important neurophysiological and neuropathological processes has been comprehensively documented. In recent years, the link of KYNA to the immune system, inflammation, and cancer has become more apparent. Given this connection, the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive functions of KYNA are of particular interest. These characteristics might allow KYNA to act as a “double-edged sword.” The metabolite contributes to both the resolution of inflammation and the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment, which, for instance, allows for tumor immune escape. Our review provides a comprehensive update of the significant biological functions of KYNA and focuses on its immunomodulatory properties by signaling via G-protein-coupled receptor 35 (GPR35- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathways. Furthermore, we discuss the role of KYNA–GPR35 interaction and microbiota associated KYNA metabolism for gut homeostasis.

  19. Effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites and rumen fatty acids in Sannan Lactating dairy goat

    Rashid Safari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites, rumen and blood plasma fatty acids concentrations twelve Sannan dairy goats with 30 ± 5 days in milk (DIM were allocated to 3 treatments in a 3×2 change over design with 2 periods of 30 days. Treatments were: 1 the control (without fish oil, 2 microencapsulated fish oil (2% fish oil capsulated in 6% treated whey protein concentrate, 3 fish oil (2% fish oil and 6% whey protein concentrate. Concentration of C18:0 in the rumen for microencapsulated fish oil decreased significantly in comparison with the control. The same manner was observed in goat’s blood plasma for microencapsulated fish oil. Microencapsulated fish oil led to a significant increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids concentration, hence concentration of C18:3, C20:5 EPA, C22:5 DPA and C22:6 DHA as a source of ω3 fatty acids increased 10, 20, 10 and 13 folds in comparison with the control and 10, 20, 2 and 2.5 folds in comparison with the fish oil treatment, respectively. HDL concentration in protected fish oil was significantly higher than that for the control and unprotected fish oil treatments. It seems that fish oil supplementation caused significant changes in blood fatty acids composition of ruminants as well as ω3 fatty acids in their products. Significant increase of ω3 fatty acids in blood plasma of microencapsulated fish oil treatment showed the protective effect of capsulation against rumen microbial biohydrogenation.

  20. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid.

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium.

  1. A urinary metabolite of {Delta}{sup 1}-tetrahydrocannabinol. The first synthesis of 4``-hydroxy-{Delta}{sup 1}-tetrahydrocannabinol-7-oic acid labelled with deuterium

    Szirmai, Maria; Odqvist, Helena [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Pharmacognosy; Halldin, M.M. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1996-04-01

    The first synthesis of 4``-hydroxy-{Delta}-{sup 1}-THC-7-oic acid, one of the three major metabolites of {Delta}{sup 1}-THC identified in human urine is discussed. Methyl 4-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)butanoate was prepared from 3,5-diydroxybenzoic acid in an overall yield of 15% was condensed with a terpene synthon under acidic conditions followed by hydrolysis and conversion of the 4``-carboxylic acid function to the corresponding methyl ketone using methyllithium. Reduction with NaBH{sub 4} afforded the secondary alcohol in the side-chain. Acetylation and removal of the 1,3-dithiane masking group gave the aldehyde in C-7-position which was further oxidized using NaClO{sub 2} followed by deacetylation to give the desired metabolite. The same procedure may be used for the synthesis of unlabelled 4``-hydroxy-{Delta}{sup 1}-THC-7-oic acid. (author).

  2. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites.

    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Estranero, Jasper G; Moore, Gareth G L; Green, Edward W; Kyriacou, Charalambos P; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-05-10

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway-kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP-the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington's disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits.

  3. An integrated scheme for the simultaneous determination of biogenic amines, precursor amino acids, and related metabolites by liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    Oka, K; Kojima, K; Togari, A; Nagatsu, T; Kiss, B

    1984-06-08

    A new method using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) for the simultaneous determination of monoamines, their precursor amino acids, and related major metabolites in small samples of brain tissue weighing from 0.5 to 50 mg is described. The method is based on the preliminary isolation of monoamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and serotonin), their precursor amino acids (tyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan), and their major metabolites (3-methoxytyramine, normetanephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, vanillylmandelic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) by chromatography on small columns of Amberlite CG-50 and Dowex 50W, and by ethyl acetate extraction. All the compounds in the four isolated fractions were measured by HPLC-ED on a reversed-phase column under four different conditions. The sensitivity was from 0.1 to 40 pmol, depending on the substances analysed. This newly established method was applied to the study of the effects of an aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor (NSD-1015) and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (pargyline) on the levels of monoamines, their precursor amino acids and their major metabolites in brain regions of mice.

  4. Toxicity and removal efficiency of pharmaceutical metabolite clofibric acid by Typha spp.--potential use for phytoremediation?

    Dordio, Ana V; Duarte, Cátia; Barreiros, Margarida; Carvalho, A J Palace; Pinto, A P; da Costa, Cristina Teixeira

    2009-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess Typha spp.'s ability to withstand and remove, from water, a metabolite of blood lipid regulator drugs, clofibric acid (CA). At a concentration of 20 microg L(-1), Typha had removed >50% of CA within the first 48h, reaching a maximum of 80% by the end of the assay. Experimental conditions assured that photodegradation, adsorption to vessel walls and microbial degradation did not contribute to the removal. Exposure to higher CA concentrations did not affect Typha's photosynthetic pigments but the overall increase in enzyme activity (ascorbate and guaiacol peroxidases, catalase, superoxide dismutase) indicates that both roots and leaves were affected by the xenobiotic. Eventually, Typha seemed able to cope with the CA's induced oxidative damage suggesting its ability for phytoremediation of CA contaminated waters.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic acids are primary metabolites of alkyl-PAHs - a case study with Nereis diversicolor

    Malmquist, Linus Mattias Valdemar; Selck, Henriette; Jørgensen, Kåre Bredeli

    2015-01-01

    Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl-PA...... that carboxylic acid metabolites of alkyl-PAHs have the potential of constituting a new class of contaminants in marine waters that needs attention in relation to ecological risk assessments.......Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl...

  6. The shikimic acid: an important metabolite for the Aglianico del Vulture wines

    Pasquale Tamborra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Shikimic acid is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids and flavonoids (anthocyanins, tannins and flavonols. In the pharmaceutical industry, it is obtained by extraction of star anise from China, and at a yield of 3-7% it is used for the production of antiviral drug, e.g. oseltamivir. Unlike flavonoids which are only present in the grape skins, shikimic acid is present in the juice together with hydroxycinnamil tartaric acids (caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acid. Therefore, their content in white wines may not be negligible and their presence may explain the epidemiological studies that showed a reduced incidence of cardiovascular diseases also in people with moderate white wine consumption. The content of shikimic acid has been used to characterize wines. In southern Italy it has been used to distinguish Aglianico grape, which holds medium-high content, from Negroamaro, Primitivo and Uva di Troia grapes who have rather lower levels. It could be useful also to distinguish Fiano di Avellino (high value from Fiano Minutolo (low value. However, results of a recent work showed that the shikimic acid content decreases significantly during the ripening of the grapes and therefore its content in wine is strongly influenced by the harvest period. Finally, in a recent paper it was highlighted the increase in shikimic acid content at the end of fermentation in an Aglianico del Vulture wine, produced in the area of Rapolla (PZ, Italy municipality during the 2013 harvest. These last experimental results explain why the values of shikimic acid were lower in grapes and surprisingly higher in wines produced in the 2011 and 2012 harvest.

  7. Thermodynamics of organic mixtures containing amines. VIII. Systems with quinoline

    Gonzalez, Juan Antonio [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: jagl@termo.uva.es; Domanska, Urszula; Zawadzki, Maciej [Physical Chemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-08-15

    (Solid + liquid) equilibrium temperatures for mixtures containing quinoline and 1-dodecanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octadecanol have been measured using a dynamic method. (Quinoline + benzene, +alkane, or +1-alkanol) systems were investigated using DISQUAC. The corresponding interaction parameters are reported. The model yields a good representation of molar excess Gibbs free energies, G{sup E}, molar excess enthalpies, H{sup E}, and of the (solid + liquid) equilibria, SLE. Interactional and structural effects were analysed comparing H{sup E} and the molar excess internal energy at constant volume, U{sub V}{sup E}. It was encountered that structural effects are very important in systems involving alkanes or 1-alkanols. Interactions between amine molecules are stronger in mixtures with quinoline than in those containing pyridine, which was ascribed to the higher polarizability of quinoline.

  8. SYNTHESIS AND IN-VITRO STUDIES OF SOME NEW QUINOLINE ...

    KEY WORDS: Synthesis, Quinoline, 1,3,4-thiadiazolo pyrimidin, Spectral data, ... aqueous sodium hydroxide (1.0 mL) solution in drop wise. ... small amount of anhydrous potassium carbonate and suitable aryl isothiocyantes in DMF (15.

  9. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites in brain function and disease.

    Bazinet, Richard P; Layé, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    The brain is highly enriched with fatty acids. These include the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are largely esterified to the phospholipid cell membrane. Once PUFAs are released from the membrane, they can participate in signal transduction, either directly or after enzymatic conversion to a variety of bioactive derivatives ('mediators'). PUFAs and their mediators regulate several processes within the brain, such as neurotransmission, cell survival and neuroinflammation, and thereby mood and cognition. PUFA levels and the signalling pathways that they regulate are altered in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. Diet and drugs targeting PUFAs may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders.

  11. [Simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Wei, Hui-hui; Gu, Yuan; Liu, Yan-ping; Wei, Guang-li; Chen, Yong; Liu, Chang-xiao; Si, Duan-yun

    2015-10-01

    A rapid, sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of clevidipine butyrate and its primary metabolite clevidipine acid in dog blood. After one-step protein precipitation with methanol, the chromatographic separation was carried out on an Ecosil C18 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 µm) with a gradient mobile phase consisting of methanol and 5 mmol · L(-1) ammonium formate. A chromatographic total run time of 13.0 min was achieved. The quantitation analysis was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) at the specific ion transitions of m/z 454.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 234.1 for clevidipine butyrate, m/z 354.0 [M-H]- --> m/z 208.0 for clevidipine acid and m/z 256.1 [M-H]- --> m/z 227.1 for elofesalamide (internal standard, IS) in the negative ion mode with electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The linear calibration curves for clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were obtained in the concentration ranges of 0.5-100 ng · mL and 1-200 ng · mL(-1), separately. The lower limit of quantification of clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid were 0.5 ng · mL(-1) and 1 ng · mL(-1). The intra and inter-assay precisions were all below 12.9%, the accuracies were all in standard ranges. Stability testing indicated that clevidipine butyrate and clevidipine acid in dog blood with the addition of denaturant methanol was stable under various processing and/or handling conditions. The validated method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of clevidipine butyrate injection to 8 healthy Beagle dogs following intravenous infusion at a flow rate of 5 mg · h(-1) for 0.5 h.

  12. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of the lichen metabolite usnic acid: A DFT study

    Galasso, V.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculations of structural preferences, acidic properties, carbonyl vibrations, 13 C NMR chemical shifts, and absorption spectrum account for the unique structural backbone, chemical behaviour, and spectroscopic properties of usnic acid, the cortical pigment and potent reactive of lichens. - Abstract: The molecular structure of usnic acid was investigated by the density functional theory (DFT). Two keto-enol tautomers are nearly isoenergetic and more stable than other tautomers. Noteworthy is the energy difference among the three intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The DFT/PCM calculated dissociation constants account for the acidic sequence of the three OH-groups. The electronic structure was also studied by calculating IR/Raman, NMR, and absorption features. A reliable assignment of the 'fingerprint' carbonyl stretching modes was supported by calculations on related molecules. The calculated NMR chemical shifts fit expectation in terms of a fast interconversion between the two most preferred tautomers. A variety of π → π* and n → π* excitations, localized on a single ring or involving a charge-transfer between the two lateral rings of the molecule, gives rise to the broad UV-absorption bands. This property accounts for the efficient protection against damaging solar radiation provided by usnic acid for lichens.

  13. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of the lichen metabolite usnic acid: A DFT study

    Galasso, V., E-mail: galasso@univ.trieste.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculations of structural preferences, acidic properties, carbonyl vibrations, {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts, and absorption spectrum account for the unique structural backbone, chemical behaviour, and spectroscopic properties of usnic acid, the cortical pigment and potent reactive of lichens. - Abstract: The molecular structure of usnic acid was investigated by the density functional theory (DFT). Two keto-enol tautomers are nearly isoenergetic and more stable than other tautomers. Noteworthy is the energy difference among the three intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The DFT/PCM calculated dissociation constants account for the acidic sequence of the three OH-groups. The electronic structure was also studied by calculating IR/Raman, NMR, and absorption features. A reliable assignment of the 'fingerprint' carbonyl stretching modes was supported by calculations on related molecules. The calculated NMR chemical shifts fit expectation in terms of a fast interconversion between the two most preferred tautomers. A variety of {pi} {yields} {pi}* and n {yields} {pi}* excitations, localized on a single ring or involving a charge-transfer between the two lateral rings of the molecule, gives rise to the broad UV-absorption bands. This property accounts for the efficient protection against damaging solar radiation provided by usnic acid for lichens.

  14. Identification of three new phase II metabolites of a designer drug methylone formed in rats by N-demethylation followed by conjugation with dicarboxylic acids.

    Židková, Monika; Linhart, Igor; Balíková, Marie; Himl, Michal; Dvořáčková, Veronika; Lhotková, Eva; Páleníček, Tomáš

    2018-06-01

    1. Methylone (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone, MDMC), which appeared on the illicit drug market in 2004, is a frequently abused synthetic cathinone derivative. Known metabolic pathways of MDMC include N-demethylation to normethylone (3,4-methylenedioxycathinone, MDC), aliphatic chain hydroxylation and oxidative demethylenation followed by monomethylation and conjugation with glucuronic acid and/or sulphate. 2. Three new phase II metabolites, amidic conjugates of MDC with succinic, glutaric and adipic acid, were identified in the urine of rats dosed subcutaneously with MDMC.HCl (20 mg/kg body weight) by LC-ESI-HRMS using synthetic reference standards to support identification. 3. The main portion of administered MDMC was excreted unchanged. Normethylone, was a major urinary metabolite, of which a minor part was conjugated with dicarboxylic acids. 4. Previously identified ring-opened metabolites 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethcathinone (4-OH-3-MeO-MC), 3-hydroxy-4-methoxymeth-cathinone (3-OH-4-MeO-MC) and 3,4-dihydroxymethcathinone (3,4-di-OH-MC) mostly in conjugated form with glucuronic and/or sulphuric acids were also detected. 5. Also, ring-opened metabolites derived from MDC, namely, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycathinone (4-OH-3-MeO-C), 3-hydroxy-4-methoxycathinone (3-OH-4-MeO-C) and 3,4-dihydroxycathinone (3,4-di-OH-C) were identified for the first time in vivo.

  15. A comprehensive review of the published assays for the quantitation of the immunosuppressant drug mycophenolic acid and its glucuronidated metabolites in biological fluids

    Syed, Muzeeb; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is steadily on the rise in combination with other immunosuppressant drugs in transplantation patients. The biotransformation of MPA resulted in the formation of glucuronide metabolites, MPAG and AcMPAG. There are a plethora of assays validated for the an...

  16. Quinoxaline-, dopamine-, and amino acid-derived metabolites from the edible insect Protaetia brevitarsis seulensis.

    Lee, JungIn; Hwang, In Hyun; Kim, Jang Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ae; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Young Ho; Na, MinKyun

    2017-09-01

    Edible insects have been reported to produce metabolites showing various pharmacological activities, recently emerging as rich sources of health functional food. In particular, the larvae of Protaetia brevitarsis seulensis (Kolbe) have been used as traditional Korean medicines for treating diverse diseases, such as breast cancer, inflammatory disease, hepatic cancer, liver cirrhosis, and hepatitis. However, only few chemical investigations were reported on the insect larvae. Therefore, the aim of this study was to discover and identify biologically active chemical components of the larvae of P. brevitarsis seulensis. As a result, a quinoxaline-derived alkaloid (1) was isolated, which was not reported previously from natural sources. In addition, other related compounds (2, 4-10, 15, 16) were also encountered for the first time from the larvae. The structures of all the isolated compounds were established mainly by analysis of HRESIMS, NMR, and electronic circular dichroism data. Compound 5 exhibited inhibition of tyrosinase with IC 50 value of 44.8 µM.

  17. Identification of rotundic acid metabolites after oral administration to rats and comparison with the biotransformation by Syncephalastrum racemosum AS 3.264.

    Li, Hui; Yang, Bao; Cao, Di; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Qing; Rong, Li; Zhou, Xinghong; Jin, Jing; Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2018-02-20

    The objective of this study was to identify the metabolites of rotundic acid after oral administration to rats and compare the similarities with its biotransformation by Syncephalastrum racemosum AS 3.264 using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry. A total of fourteen metabolites were determined based on the mass spectrometry and chromatographic behaviors, among which eleven (M1-M3, M7-M14) and six (M2, M4-M8) metabolites were identified in rats and S. racemosum, respectively. Three identical metabolites (M2, M7 and M8) were found in rats and S. racemosum, indicating that there were metabolic similarities. Moreover, to confirm the results of mass spectrometry, three (M2, M4 and M7) metabolites were obtained by the means of amplifying incubation and their structures were determined by various spectroscopic analyses, and M4 was proved to be a previously undescribed compound. This results showed that in vitro assisted preparation by microbial transformation is a feasible and effective method of obtaining metabolites which are in low amounts and difficult to be prepared in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitric oxide production from macrophages is regulated by arachidonic acid metabolites.

    Imai, Y; Kolb, H; Burkart, V

    1993-11-30

    In activated macrophages the inducible form of the enzyme nitric oxide (NO) synthase generates high amounts of the toxic mediator NO. After 20 h of treatment with LPS rat peritoneal macrophages release 12-16 nmol NO2-/10(5) cells which is detectable in the culture supernatant by the Griess reaction as a measure of NO formation. The addition of aminoguanidine (1 mM), a preferential inhibitor of the inducible NO-synthase, completely abolished NO2-accumulation. Incubation with indomethacin or acetyl-salicylic acid, preferential inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase pathway of the arachidonic acid metabolism, did not influence NO2- levels. Nordihydro-guaiaretic acid (50 microM), a preferential inhibitor of the lipoxygenase pathway, caused strong reduction of NO2- accumulation to 1.9 +/- 0.3 nmol/200 microliter. Simultaneous inhibition of cyclo- and lipoxygenase by BW755c resulted in an intermediate effect (7.3 +/- 1.1 nmol/200 microliter NO2-). These results show that the induction of NO production in activated macrophages is regulated by products of the lipoxygenase-pathway of the arachidonic acid metabolism.

  19. Melatonin in octopus (Octopus vulgaris): tissue distribution, daily changes and relation with serotonin and its acid metabolite.

    Muñoz, José L P; López Patiño, Marcos A; Hermosilla, Consuelo; Conde-Sieira, Marta; Soengas, José L; Rocha, Francisco; Míguez, Jesús M

    2011-08-01

    Information regarding melatonin production in molluscs is very limited. In this study the presence and daily fluctuations of melatonin levels were investigated in hemolymph, retina and nervous system-related structures in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris. Adult animals were maintained in captivity under natural photoperiod and killed at different times in a regular daily cycle. Levels of melatonin, serotonin (5-HT) and its acid metabolite (5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-HIAA) in the hemolymph, retina, optic lobe, and cerebral ganglion were assayed by HPLC. Melatonin content fluctuated rhythmically in the retina and hemolymph, peaking at night. In the retina, but not in the other neural tissues, the rhythm was opposite to that of 5-HT, which displayed basal levels at night. Also, 5-HIAA levels in the retina were higher during the night, supporting that rhythmic melatonin production could be linked to diurnal changes in 5-HT degradation. The high levels of melatonin found in the retina point to it as the major source of melatonin in octopus; in addition, a large variation of melatonin content was found in the optic lobe with maximal values at night. All these data suggest that melatonin might play a role in the transduction of the light-dark cycle information for adjustment of rhythmic physiological events in cephalopods.

  20. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C labelling

    Hassel, B

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by {sup 13}C-and {sup 14}C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [{sup 13}C]acetate, it was shown that glial cells export {approx}60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [{sup 13}C]glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs.

  1. Root jasmonic acid synthesis and perception regulate folivore-induced shoot metabolites and increase Nicotiana attenuata resistance.

    Fragoso, Variluska; Rothe, Eva; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2014-06-01

    While jasmonic acid (JA) signaling is widely accepted as mediating plant resistance to herbivores, and the importance of the roots in plant defenses is recently being recognized, the role of root JA in the defense of above-ground parts remains unstudied. To restrict JA impairment to the roots, we micrografted wildtype Nicotiana attenuata shoots to the roots of transgenic plants impaired in JA signaling and evaluated ecologically relevant traits in the glasshouse and in nature. Root JA synthesis and perception are involved in regulating nicotine production in roots. Strikingly, systemic root JA regulated local leaf JA and abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations, which were associated with differences in nicotine transport from roots to leaves via the transpiration stream. Root JA signaling also regulated the accumulation of other shoot metabolites; together these account for differences in resistance against a generalist, Spodoptera littoralis, and a specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. In N. attenuata's native habitat, silencing root JA synthesis increased the shoot damage inflicted by Empoasca leafhoppers, which are able to select natural jasmonate mutants. Silencing JA perception in roots also increased damage by Tupiocoris notatus. We conclude that attack from above-ground herbivores recruits root JA signaling to launch the full complement of plant defense responses. © 2014 Max Planck Society. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by 13C and 14C labelling

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by 13 C-and 14 C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [ 13 C[acetate, it was shown that glial cells export ∼60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [ 13 C[glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of 13 CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs

  3. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    Trunnelle, Kelly J., E-mail: kjtrunnelle@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bennett, Deborah H. [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ahn, Ki Chang [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schenker, Marc B. [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tancredi, Daniel J. [Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, 4610 X Street Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Gee, Shirley J. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T. [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hammock, Bruce D. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: • We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. • We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. • 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. • Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  4. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: • We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. • We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. • 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. • Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure

  5. Acylated quinic acids are the main salicortin metabolites in the lepidopteran specialist herbivore Cerura vinula

    Feistel, F.; Paetz, C.; Menezes, R.; Veit, D.; Schneider, B.

    2018-01-01

    Salicortin is a phenolic glucoside produced in Salicaceae as a chemical defense against herbivory. The specialist lepidopteran herbivorous larvae of Cerura vinula are able to overcome this defense. We examined the main frass constituents of C. vinula fed on Populus nigra leaves, and identified 11 quinic acid derivatives with benzoate and/or salicylate substitution.We asked whether the compounds are a result of salicortin breakdown and sought answers by carrying out feeding experiments with hi...

  6. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    Mario O. Carignan; Jose I. Carreto

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack t...

  7. Stable isotope N-phosphoryl amino acids labeling for quantitative profiling of amine-containing metabolites using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Zhang, Shanshan; Shi, Jinwen; Shan, Changkai; Huang, Chengting; Wu, Yile; Ding, Rong; Xue, Yuhua; Liu, Wen; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Yufen; Xu, Pengxiang; Gao, Xiang

    2017-07-25

    Stable isotope chemical labeling liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a powerful strategy for comprehensive metabolomics profiling, which can improve metabolites coverage and quantitative information for exploration of metabolic regulation in complex biological systems. In the current work, a novel stable isotope N-phosphoryl amino acids labeling strategy (SIPAL) has been successful developed for quantitative profiling of amine-containing metabolites in urine based on organic phosphorus chemistry. Two isotopic reagents, 16 O 2 - and 18 O 2 -N-diisopropyl phosphoryl l-alanine N-hydroxysuccinimide esters ( 16 O/ 18 O-DIPP-L-Ala-NHS), were firstly synthesized in high yields for labeling the amine-containing metabolites. The performance of SIPAL strategy was tested by analyzing standard samples including 20 l-amino acids, 10 d-amino acids and small peptides by using LC-MS. We observed highly efficient and selective labeling for SIPAL strategy within 15 min in a one-pot derivatization reaction under aqueous reaction conditions. The introduction of a neutral phosphate group at N-terminus can increase the proton affinity and overall hydrophobicity of targeted metabolites, leading to the better ionization efficiency in electrospray ionization processes and chromatographic separations of hydrophilic metabolites on reversed-phase column. Furthermore, the chiral metabolites, such as d-amino acids, could be converted to diastereomers after SIPAL and successfully separated on regular reversed-phase column. The chirality of labeled enantiomers can be determined by using different detection methods such as 31 P NMR, UV, and MS, demonstrating the potential application of SIPAL strategy. In addition, absolute quantification of chiral metabolites in biological samples can be easily achieved by using SIPAL strategy. For this purpose, urine samples collected from a healthy volunteer were analyzed by using LC-ESI-Orbitrap MS. Over 300 pairs of different amine

  8. Whole-body biodistribution, dosimetry and metabolite correction of [11C]palmitate: A PET tracer for imaging of fatty acid metabolism

    Christensen, Nana Louise; Jakobsen, Steen; Schacht, Anna Christina

    2017-01-01

    release and parent [11C]palmitate measured by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method. Finally, myocardial fatty acid uptake was calculated in a patient cohort using input functions derived from individual metabolite correction compared with population-based metabolite correction. RESULTS: In humans, mean......INTRODUCTION: Despite the decades long use of [11C]palmitate positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography in basic metabolism studies, only personal communications regarding dosimetry and biodistribution data have been published. METHODS: Dosimetry and biodistribution studies were...

  9. The biodiversity of lactic acid bacteria in Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs is reflected in both composition and metabolite formation.

    De Vuyst, Luc; Schrijvers, Vincent; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Hoste, Bart; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Kalantzopoulos, George; Tsakalidou, Effie; Messens, Winy

    2002-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria into the species Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, and Weissella cibaria. This consortium seems to be unique for the Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs studied. Strains of the species W. cibaria have not been isolated from sourdoughs previously. No Lactobacillus pontis or Lactobacillus panis strains were found. An L. brevis-like isolate (ACA-DC 3411 t1) could not be identified properly and might be a new sourdough LAB species. In addition, fermentation capabilities associated with the LAB detected have been studied. During laboratory fermentations, all heterofermentative sourdough LAB strains produced lactic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol. Mannitol was produced from fructose that served as an additional electron acceptor. In addition to glucose, almost all of the LAB isolates fermented maltose, while fructose as the sole carbohydrate source was fermented by all sourdough LAB tested except L. sanfranciscensis. Two of the L. paralimentarius isolates tested did not ferment maltose; all strains were homofermentative. In the presence of both maltose and fructose in the medium, induction of hexokinase activity occurred in all sourdough LAB species mentioned above, explaining why no glucose accumulation was found extracellularly. No maltose phosphorylase activity was found either. These data produced a variable fermentation coefficient and a unique sourdough metabolite composition.

  10. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites on bleomycin-induced cytotoxic action on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro.

    Sailaja Polavarapu

    Full Text Available In the present study, we noted that bleomycin induced growth inhibitory action was augmented by all the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs tested on human neuroblastoma IMR-32 (0.5 × 10(4 cells/100 µl of IMR cells (EPA > DHA > ALA = GLA = AA > DGLA = LA: ∼ 60, 40, 30, 10-20% respectively at the maximum doses used. Of all the prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGF2α, and PGI2 and leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4 tested; PGE1, PGE2 and LTD4 inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells to a significant degree at the highest doses used. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoate (19, 20 DiHDPA and 10(S,17(S-dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid (protectin: 10(S,17(SDiHDoHE, metabolites of DHA, significantly inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells. Pre-treatment with AA, GLA, DGLA and EPA and simultaneous treatment with all PUFAs used in the study augmented growth inhibitory action of bleomycin. Surprisingly, both indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA at 60 and 20 µg/ml respectively enhanced the growth of IMR-32 cells even in the presence of bleomycin. AA enhanced oxidant stress in IMR-32 cells as evidenced by an increase in lipid peroxides, superoxide dismutase levels and glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that PUFAs suppress growth of human neuroblastoma cells, augment growth inhibitory action of bleomycin by enhancing formation of lipid peroxides and altering the status of anti-oxidants and, in all probability, increase the formation of lipoxins, resolvins and protectins from their respective precursors that possess growth inhibitory actions.

  11. Essential role of Bordetella NadC in a quinolinate salvage pathway for NAD biosynthesis.

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; McKelvey, Pamela J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2017-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is produced via de novo biosynthesis pathways and by salvage or recycling routes. The classical Bordetella bacterial species are known to be auxotrophic for nicotinamide or nicotinic acid. This study confirmed that Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis have the recycling/salvage pathway genes pncA and pncB, for use of nicotinamide or nicotinic acid, respectively, for NAD synthesis. Although these Bordetellae lack the nadA and nadB genes needed for de novo NAD biosynthesis, remarkably, they have one de novo pathway gene, nadC, encoding quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase. Genomic analyses of taxonomically related Bordetella and Achromobacter species also indicated the presence of an 'orphan' nadC and the absence of nadA and nadB. When supplied as the sole NAD precursor, quinolinate promoted B. bronchiseptica growth, and the ability to use it required nadC. Co-expression of Bordetella nadC with the nadB and nadA genes of Paraburkholderia phytofirmans allowed B. bronchiseptica to grow in the absence of supplied pyridines, indicative of de novo NAD synthesis and functional confirmation of Bordetella NadC activity. Expression of nadC in B. bronchiseptica was influenced by nicotinic acid and by a NadQ family transcriptional repressor, indicating that these organisms prioritize their use of pyridines for NAD biosynthesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent Advances in Metal-Free Quinoline Synthesis

    Ginelle A. Ramann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The quinoline ring system is one of the most ubiquitous heterocycles in the fields of medicinal and industrial chemistry, forming the scaffold for compounds of great significance. These include anti-inflammatory and antitumor agents, the antimalarial drugs quinine and chloroquine, and organic light-emitting diodes. Quinolines were first synthesized in 1879, and since then a multitude of synthetic routes have been developed. Many of these methods, such as the Skraup, Doebner–Von Miller, and Friedlander quinoline syntheses, are well-known but suffer from inefficiency, harsh reaction conditions, and toxic reagents. This review focuses on recent transition metal-free processes toward these important heterocycles, including both novel routes and modifications to established methods. For example, variations on the Skraup method include microwave irradiation, ionic liquid media, and novel annulation partners, all of which have shown increased reaction efficiency and improved yield of the heteroring-unsubstituted quinoline products. Similarly, modifications to other synthetic routes have been implemented, with the quinoline products displaying a wide variety of substitution patterns.

  14. Enantiomeric fractioning, degradation and metabolite formation of Mecoprop in subsoils with a phenoxy acid contamination history

    Frkova, Zuzana; Johansen, Anders; Karlson, Ulrich G.

    2015-01-01

    for their ability to degrade mecoprop under natural and amended conditions. Degradation of mecoprop was studied at elevated and environmentally relevant mecoprop concentrations as affected by nitrate and glucose at nitrate-reducing conditions and at a presence of oxygen (mimicking purging the soil with air. Results......As persistence and toxicity of the enantiomers of chiral pesticides are different a more comprehensive understanding of the fate of enantiomers of agrochemicals in the environment is necessary. Subsoils sampled vertically (2.5-6 m) at a site with a history of phenoxy acid contamination were used...... and enantioselectivity. Glucose hinders mecoprop degradation and changes the EF. Changing EF confirmed enzymatic dgradation of mecoprop in soils, which was well interpreted using the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. The highest mecoprop degradation rate was measured in soils incubated at nitrate-reducing conditions...

  15. Arachidonic Acid Metabolite as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Thaiz F. Borin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (BC (also referred to as stage IV spreads beyond the breast to the bones, lungs, liver, or brain and is a major contributor to the deaths of cancer patients. Interestingly, metastasis is a result of stroma-coordinated hallmarks such as invasion and migration of the tumor cells from the primary niche, regrowth of the invading tumor cells in the distant organs, proliferation, vascularization, and immune suppression. Targeted therapies, when used as monotherapies or combination therapies, have shown limited success in decreasing the established metastatic growth and improving survival. Thus, novel therapeutic targets are warranted to improve the metastasis outcomes. We have been actively investigating the cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4 family of enzymes that can biosynthesize 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in the regulation of vascular tone and angiogenesis. We have shown that 20-HETE can activate several intracellular protein kinases, pro-inflammatory mediators, and chemokines in cancer. This review article is focused on understanding the role of the arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in BC metastasis with an emphasis on 20-HETE as a novel therapeutic target to decrease BC metastasis. We have discussed all the significant investigational mechanisms and put forward studies showing how 20-HETE can promote angiogenesis and metastasis, and how its inhibition could affect the metastatic niches. Potential adjuvant therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment showing anti-tumor properties against BC and its lung metastasis are discussed at the end. This review will highlight the importance of exploring tumor-inherent and stromal-inherent metabolic pathways in the development of novel therapeutics for treating BC metastasis.

  16. The use of 123I-labeled heptadecanoic acid (HDA) as metabolitic tracer

    Dudczak, R.; Kletter, K.; Frischauf, H.; Schmoliner, R.; Losert, U.; Angelberger, P.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using 123 I-heptadecanoic acid (HDA) as a metabolic tracer was studied. Different administration routes of HDA were compared. An intracoronary bolus injection was given to calves (n=3), and an intravenous injection was given to patients (n=4). In addition, we examined the influence of 4-h halothane anesthesia in calves and in patients the impact of an isulin (1.5 IU/kg)+glucose (1.5 g/kg) infusion on the myocardial kinetics of HDA. Data were accumulated with a scintillation probe in calves (t=50 min) and a gamma camera in patients (t=70 min). In calves after an intracoronary bolus injection of HDA the myocardial time-activity curve could be described by two exponentials. The mean elimination half-time of the initial phase (tsub(a) 1/2) was 7.3 min and that of the second phase (tsub(b) 1/2) was 35 min. The ratio of the size of the initial and second component at t 0 was 0.93. Halothane anesthesia prolonged the elimination half-times and reduced the component ratio. The biphasic behavior of the myocardial time-activity curve was maintained in patients after intravenous administration of HDA under basal conditions (inital tsub(a) 1/2=8.4 min). However, during infusion of insulin+glucose the decline in the myocardial activity was prolonged and monoexponential. This data show that insulin glucose, interfering with fatty acid metabolism, influences the myocardial washout of HDA, and thus support it use as a metabolic tracer. (orig.)

  17. Dynamics of Excited State Proton Transfer in Nitro Substituted 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    Marciak, H; Hristova, S.; Deneva, V

    2017-01-01

    The ground state tautomerism and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) and its nitro derivatives, 7-nitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (2) and 7,9-dinitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (3), have been studied in acetonitrile using steady state as well as time d...

  18. Gut microbial metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids correlate with specific fecal bacteria and serum markers of metabolic syndrome in obese women.

    Druart, Céline; Dewulf, Evelyne M; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Thissen, Jean-Paul; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this human study was to assess the influence of prebiotic-induced gut microbiota modulation on PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites production. Therefore, we analyzed the circulating fatty acid profile including CLA/CLnA in obese women treated during 3 months with inulin-type fructan prebiotics. In these patients, we had already determined gut microbiota composition by phylogenetic microarray and qPCR analysis of 16S rDNA. Some PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites were detected in the serum of obese patients. Despite the prebiotic-induced modulation of gut microbiota, including changes in CLA/CLnA-producing bacteria, the treatment did not impact significantly on the circulating level of these metabolites. However, some PUFA-derived bacterial metabolites were positively correlated with specific fecal bacteria (Bifidobacterium spp., Eubacterium ventriosum and Lactobacillus spp.) and inversely correlated with serum cholesterol (total, LDL, HDL). These correlations suggest a potential beneficial effect of some of these metabolites but this remains to be confirmed by further investigation.

  19. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Priyandoko, Didik; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2011-05-04

    The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA) induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  20. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid

    Radogna, Flavia

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10-9 vs. 10-5M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10-5M, but drops to 10-9M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  1. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling of bile acid metabolites in biofluids: application to experimental toxicology studies.

    Want, Elizabeth J; Coen, Muireann; Masson, Perrine; Keun, Hector C; Pearce, Jake T M; Reily, Michael D; Robertson, Donald G; Rohde, Cynthia M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Plumb, Robert S; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2010-06-15

    We have developed an ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS(E)) method to measure bile acids (BAs) reproducibly and reliably in biological fluids and have applied this approach for indications of hepatic damage in experimental toxicity studies. BAs were extracted from serum using methanol, and an Acquity HSS column coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer was used to separate and identify 25 individual BAs within 5 min. Employing a gradient elution of water and acetonitrile over 21 min enabled the detection of a wide range of endogenous metabolites, including the BAs. The utilization of MS(E) allowed for characteristic fragmentation information to be obtained in a single analytical run, easily distinguishing glycine and taurine BA conjugates. The proportions of these conjugates were altered markedly in an experimental toxic state induced by galactosamine exposure in rats. Principally, taurine-conjugated BAs were greatly elevated ( approximately 50-fold from control levels), and were highly correlated to liver damage severity as assessed by histopathological scoring (r = 0.83), indicating their potential as a sensitive measure of hepatic damage. The UPLC-MS approach to BA analysis offers a sensitive and reproducible tool that will be of great value in exploring both markers and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and can readily be extended to clinical studies of liver damage.

  2. The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in signal transduction in an identified neural network mediating presynaptic inhibition in Aplysia

    Shapiro, E.; Piomelli, D.; Feinmark, S.; Vogel, S.; Chin, G.; Schwartz, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neuromodulation is a form of signal transduction that results in the biochemical control of neuronal excitability. Many neurotransmitters act through second messengers, and the examination of biochemical cascades initiated by neurotransmitter-receptor interaction has advanced the understanding of how information is acquired and stored in the nervous system. For example, 5-HT and other facilitory transmitters increase cAMP in sensory neurons of Aplysia, which enhances excitability and facilitates transmitter output. The authors have examined the role of arachidonic acid metabolites in a neuronal circuit mediating presynaptic inhibition. L32 cells are a cluster of putative histaminergic neurons that each make dual-action synaptic potentials onto two follower neurons, L10 and L14. The synaptic connections, biophysical properties, and roles in behavior of the L10 and L14 follower cells have been well studied. The types of ion channels causing each component of the L32-L10 and L32-L14 dual actions have been characterized and application of histamine mimics the effects of stimulating L32 in both L10 and L14

  3. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Didik Priyandoko

    Full Text Available The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  4. Modulation of Immunological Pathways in Autistic and Neurotypical Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines by the Enteric Microbiome Metabolite Propionic Acid.

    Frye, Richard E; Nankova, Bistra; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Rose, Shannon; Bennuri, Sirish C; MacFabe, Derrick F

    2017-01-01

    Propionic acid (PPA) is a ubiquitous short-chain fatty acid which is a fermentation product of the enteric microbiome and present or added to many foods. While PPA has beneficial effects, it is also associated with human disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We previously demonstrated that PPA modulates mitochondrial dysfunction differentially in subsets of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients with ASD. Specifically, PPA significantly increases mitochondrial function in LCLs that have mitochondrial dysfunction at baseline [individuals with autistic disorder with atypical mitochondrial function (AD-A) LCLs] as compared to ASD LCLs with normal mitochondrial function [individuals with autistic disorder with normal mitochondrial function (AD-N) LCLs] and control (CNT) LCLs. PPA at 1 mM was found to have a minimal effect on expression of immune genes in CNT and AD-N LCLs. However, as hypothesized, Panther analysis demonstrated that 1 mM PPA exposure at 24 or 48 h resulted in significant activation of the immune system genes in AD-A LCLs. When the effect of PPA on ASD LCLs were compared to the CNT LCLs, both ASD groups demonstrated immune pathway activation, although the AD-A LCLs demonstrate a wider activation of immune genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified several immune-related pathways as key Canonical Pathways that were differentially regulated, specifically human leukocyte antigen expression and immunoglobulin production genes were upregulated. These data demonstrate that the enteric microbiome metabolite PPA can evoke atypical immune activation in LCLs with an underlying abnormal metabolic state. As PPA, as well as enteric bacteria which produce PPA, have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases which have components of immune dysfunction, including ASD, diabetes, obesity, and inflammatory diseases, insight into this metabolic modulator may have wide applications for both health and disease.

  5. Changes in the levels of major sulfur metabolites and free amino acids in pea cotyledons recovering from sulfur deficiency

    Macnicol, P.K.; Randall, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in levels of sulfur metabolites and free amino acids were followed in cotyledons of sulfur-deficient, developing pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) for 24 hours after resupply of sulfate, during which time the legumin mRNA levels returned almost to normal. Two recovery situations were studied: cultured seeds, with sulfate added to the medium, and seeds attached to the intact plant, with sulfate added to the roots. In both situations the levels of cysteine, glutathione, and methionine rose rapidly, glutathione exhibiting an initial lag. In attached but not cultured seeds methionine markedly overshot the level normally found in sulfur-sufficient seeds. In the cultured seed S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), but not S-methylmethionine, showed a sustained rise; in the attached seed the changes were slight. The composition of the free amino acid pool did not change substantially in either recovery situation. In the cultured seed the large rise in AdoMet level occurred equally in nonrecovering seeds. It was accompanied by 6-fold and 10-fold increases in γ-aminobutyrate and alanine, respectively. These effects are attributed to wounding resulting from excision of the seed. 35 S-labeling experiments showed that there was no significant accumulation of label in unidentified sulfur-containing amino compounds in either recovery situation. It was concluded from these results and those of other workers that, at the present level of knowledge, the most probable candidate for a signal compound, eliciting recovery of legumin mRNA level in response to sulfur-feeding, is cysteine

  6. Diglycolic acid, the toxic metabolite of diethylene glycol, chelates calcium and produces renal mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro.

    Conrad, Taylor; Landry, Greg M; Aw, Tak Yee; Nichols, Royce; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2016-07-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) has caused many cases of acute kidney injury and deaths worldwide. Diglycolic acid (DGA) is the metabolite responsible for the renal toxicity, but its toxic mechanism remains unclear. To characterize the mitochondrial dysfunction produced from DGA by examining several mitochondrial processes potentially contributing to renal cell toxicity. The effect of DGA on mitochondrial membrane potential was examined in normal human proximal tubule (HPT) cells. Isolated rat kidney mitochondria were used to assess the effects of DGA on mitochondrial function, including respiratory parameters (States 3 and 4), electron transport chain complex activities and calcium-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. DGA was compared with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to determine calcium chelating ability. DGA cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase leakage from cultured proximal tubule cells. DGA decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in HPT cells. In rat kidney mitochondria, DGA decreased State 3 respiration, but did not affect State 4 respiration or the ADP/O ratio. DGA reduced glutamate/malate respiration at lower DGA concentrations (0.5 mmol/L) than succinate respiration (100 mmol/L). DGA inhibited Complex II activity without altering Complex I, III or IV activities. DGA blocked calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling, indicating inhibition of the calcium-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition. DGA and EGTA reduced the free calcium concentration in solution in an equimolar manner. DGA toxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction occurred as similar concentrations. DGA inhibited mitochondrial respiration, but without uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. The more potent effect of DGA on glutamate/malate respiration and the inhibition of mitochondrial swelling was likely due to its chelation of calcium. These results indicate that DGA produces mitochondrial dysfunction by chelating calcium to

  7. 12(R)-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid: a cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonate metabolite that inhibits Na+, K+-ATPase in the cornea

    Schwartzman, M.L.; Balazy, M.; Masferrer, J.; Abraham, N.G.; McGiff, J.C.; Murphy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    When corneal microsomes were incubated with arachidonic acid in the presence of an NADPH-generating system, four polar metabolites (compounds A-D) were formed. Synthesis of these metabolites could be inhibited by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A, and anti-cytochrome c reductase antibodies. One of the metabolites, compound C, was found to inhibit partially purified Na + , K + -ATPase from the corneal epithelium in a dose-dependent manner. After compound C was purified by TLC and HPLC, it was found to have a UV absorption spectrum with a maximum absorbance at 236 nm suggesting the presence of a conjugated diene. Mass spectrometric analysis using positive- and negative-ionization modes was carried out on derivatized compound C. Abundant fragment ions were consistent with compound C being a monooxygenated derivative of arachidonic acid with a hydroxyl substituent at carbon-12 of the icosanoid backbone; all deuterium atoms from [ 2 H 8 ]arachidonate were retained in the structure. Compound C was characterized as a 12-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid. However, only 12(R) isomer was found to be an inhibitor of the Na + , K + -ATPase from the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the biologically active compound C was 12(R)-hydroxyy-5,8,10,14-icosatetraenoic acid. Such an inhibitor of Na + , K + -ATPase synthesized in the cornea may have an important role in regulating ocular transparency and aqueous human secretion

  8. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Clopidogrel Bisulfate, Its Carboxylic Acid Metabolite, and Atorvastatin in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    Octavian Croitoru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive, and specific reversed phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel, its carboxylic acid metabolite, and atorvastatin in human serum. Plasma samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile and ibuprofen was chosen as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was performed on an BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm via gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of 10 mM phosphoric acid (sodium buffer solution (pH = 2.6 adjusted with 85% orthophosphoric acid : acetonitrile : methanol with flow rate of 1 mL·min−1. Detection was achieved with PDA detector at 220 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and stability tests. Calibration curves of the analytes were found to be linear in the range of 0.008–2 μg·mL−1 for clopidogrel, 0.01–4 μg·mL−1 for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 0.005–2.5 μg·mL−1 for atorvastatin. The results of accuracy (as recovery with ibuprofen as internal standard were in the range of 96–98% for clopidogrel, 94–98% for its carboxylic acid metabolite, and 90–99% for atorvastatin, respectively.

  9. 12(R)-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid: a cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonate metabolite that inhibits Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in the cornea

    Schwartzman, M.L.; Balazy, M.; Masferrer, J.; Abraham, N.G.; McGiff, J.C.; Murphy, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    When corneal microsomes were incubated with arachidonic acid in the presence of an NADPH-generating system, four polar metabolites (compounds A-D) were formed. Synthesis of these metabolites could be inhibited by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A, and anti-cytochrome c reductase antibodies. One of the metabolites, compound C, was found to inhibit partially purified Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium in a dose-dependent manner. After compound C was purified by TLC and HPLC, it was found to have a UV absorption spectrum with a maximum absorbance at 236 nm suggesting the presence of a conjugated diene. Mass spectrometric analysis using positive- and negative-ionization modes was carried out on derivatized compound C. Abundant fragment ions were consistent with compound C being a monooxygenated derivative of arachidonic acid with a hydroxyl substituent at carbon-12 of the icosanoid backbone; all deuterium atoms from (/sup 2/H/sub 8/)arachidonate were retained in the structure. Compound C was characterized as a 12-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid. However, only 12(R) isomer was found to be an inhibitor of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the biologically active compound C was 12(R)-hydroxyy-5,8,10,14-icosatetraenoic acid. Such an inhibitor of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase synthesized in the cornea may have an important role in regulating ocular transparency and aqueous human secretion.

  10. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Goto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tgoto@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Ohue, Ryuji [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Nomura, Wataru [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Sugawara, Tatsuya [Laboratory of Marine Bioproducts Technology, Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yu, Rina [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Nahoko [Laboratory of Fermentation Physiology and Applied Microbiology, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  11. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis

  12. Kinetic interaction in hydrogenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine

    El-Bishtawi, R.F.; Seapan, M.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid fossil fuels contain numerous nitrogen compounds. During hydrodenitrogenation processes, these compounds for the active catalytic sites, with each compound affecting the kinetics of the other compounds. An understanding of the kinetic interaction is essential in using the results of model compound kinetics to predict the behavior of complex mixtures. In this work, the authors study the hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine in n-hexadecane over a commercial nickel-molybdenum catalyst in a batch autoclave reactor at 8.3 MPa (1200 psig) and 357-390 0 C. The reaction networks and kinetics of individual compounds were developed. These results confirm the existing knowledge of reaction networks for quinoline and acridine. Furthermore, their experiments show that formation for o-ethylaniline, o-toluidine and aniline are also important steps in quinoline denitrogenation. For total nitrogen removal, a dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model considering separate sites for adsorption of hydrogen and nitrogen compounds give the best fit

  13. Biological Activity Predictions and Hydrogen Bonding Analysis in Quinolines

    Gupta, Palvi; Kamni

    The paper has been designed to make a comprehensive review of a particular series of organic molecular assembly in the form of compendium. An overview of general description of fifteen quinoline derivatives has been given. The biological activity spectra of quinoline derivatives have been correlated on structure activity relationships base which provides the different Pa (possibility of activity) and Pi (possibility of inactivity) values. Expositions of the role of intermolecular interactions in the identified derivatives have been discussed with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria criteria as proposed by Desiraju and Steiner (1999) in an International monogram on crystallography. Distance-angle scatter plots for intermolecular interactions are presented for a better understanding of the packing interactions which exist in quinoline derivatives.

  14. The metabolite beta-aminoisobutyric acid and physical inactivity among hemodialysis patients.

    Molfino, Alessio; Amabile, Maria Ida; Ammann, Thomas; Farcomeni, Alessio; Lionetto, Luana; Simmaco, Maurizio; Lai, Silvia; Laviano, Alessandro; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Chiappini, Maria Grazia; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    Physical inactivity is frequent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), and represents a reliable predictor of morbidity and mortality. Beta-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a contraction-induced myokine, the plasma levels of which increase with exercise and are inversely associated with metabolic risk factors. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether physical inactivity and clinical parameters relate to plasma BAIBA levels in this patient population. Adult patients on HD were included, and the presence of physical inactivity was assessed. BAIBA levels were measured in these patients and in healthy individuals. We assessed barriers to physical activity, including 23 items regarding psychophysical and financial barriers. Body composition was assessed by bioimpedance and muscle strength by handgrip dynamometer. Nonparametric tests and logistic regression analyses were performed. Forty-nine patients on HD were studied; 49% were physically active and 51% were inactive. Of the patients, 43 reported barriers to physical activity and 61% of inactive patients reported three or more barriers. BAIBA levels were lower in patients on HD with respect to controls (P HD patients as active and inactive, both groups showed significantly lower BAIBA levels versus controls (P = 0.0005, P HD showed increased BAIBA levels compared with diabetic patients (P HD endorsing the two most frequent barriers showed lower BAIBA levels than those not reporting these barriers (P = 0.006). Active patients showed higher intracellular water (%) (P = 0.008), and active and inactive patients showed significant correlation between total body muscle mass and handgrip strength (P = 0.04, P = 0.005, respectively). Physical inactivity is highly prevalent among patients on HD and BAIBA correlates with barriers to physical activity reported by inactive patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Raman Spectra and Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds of Quinoline in Solutions

    Tukhvatullin, F.H.; Jumabayev, A.; Hushvaktov, H.; Absanov, A.; Hudoyberdiev, B.

    2012-01-01

    The half-widths of the 1014- and 1033-cm -1 bands of the Raman spectrum of quinoline at its dilution in neutral solvents (benzene, CCl 4 ) are narrowed by 1.3-1.5 times at high dilutions. This effect is associated with the increased time of the vibrational relaxation. For the 520-cm -1 band in pure liquid quinoline, the parallel polarized component at 20 o C is asymmetric in the high-frequency region. The shape of the perpendicular polarized component is complicated. A non-coincidence of the peak frequencies of the parallel and perpendicular polarized components is observed (∼ 2 cm -1 ). Quantum-chemical calculations showed that, in the region of 520 cm -1 for a monomer molecule, we should really have two near located lines with the wavenumbers 530 and 527 cm -1 (scaling factor 0.97), and with the depolarization ratios 0.61 and 0.26. In the solutions with propan-2-ol, the 1033.8-cm -1 band becomes of a doublet character. The resolution of the doublet becomes better by the dilution of a binary quinoline-alcohol solution with a large amount of a neutral solvent (benzene). The wavenumbers of bands in the triple mixture are 1033 cm -1 and 1039 cm -1 . The doublet nature of the band in the binary and triple mixtures is associated with the presence of monomer molecules and quinoline-propan-2-ol aggregates (the high-frequency line) in the liquid mixture. Quantum-chemical calculations showed that the hydrogen bonds with a length of 1.958 A and an energy gain of 22.0 kJ/mole can be formed between molecules of quinoline and alcohol. The formation of aggregates can be also detected in the 820-cm -1 band of propan-2-ol. A similar picture is observed for the 667-cm -1 band of chloroform in its solution with quinoline.

  16. Grafting polyethylenimine with quinoline derivatives for targeted imaging of intracellular Zn2+ and logic gate operations

    Pan, Yi; Shi, Yupeng; Chen, Junying; Wong, Chap-Mo; Zhang, Heng; Li, Mei-Jin; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent Zn 2+ probe which exhibited excellent biocompatibility, water solubility, and cell-membrane permeability, was facilely synthesized in a single step by grafting polyethyleneimine (PEI) with quinoline derivatives. The primary amino groups in the branched PEI can increase water solubility and cell permeability of the probe PEIQ, while quinoline derivatives can specifically recognize Zn 2+ and reduce the potential cytotoxicity of PEI. Basing on fluorescence off-on mechanism, PEIQ demonstrated excellent sensing capability towards Zn 2+ in absolute aqueous solution, where a high sensitivity with a detection limit as low as 38.1 nM, and a high selectivity over competing metal ions and potential interfering amino acids, were achieved. Inspired by these results, elementary logic operations (YES, NOT and INHIBIT) have been constructed by employing PEIQ as the gate while Zn 2+ and EDTA as chemical inputs. Together with the low cytotoxicity and good cell-permeability, the practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging was satisfactorily demonstrated, emphasizing its wide application in fundamental biology research. - Graphical abstract: The fluorescent Zn 2+ probe, PEIQ, is facilely synthesized by grafting PEI with 8-CAAQ, and demonstrated for the pratical applications in Zn 2+ imaging and implementation of molecular logic operations within biological cells. - Highlights: • PEIQ, fluorescent Zn 2+ probe, is synthesized by grafting PEI with quinoline derivatives. • PEIQ exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity in absolute aqueous solution. • PEIQ is biocompatible, water soluble, and cell-membrane permeable. • Elementary logic operations have been demonstrated for PEIQ/Zn 2+ /EDTA system. • The practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging is demonstrated.

  17. Investigations on some metabolites of Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue. Part III. Chromatographical search for iridoids, phenolic acids, terpenoids and sugars

    Barbara Dohnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissus cultures of Tecoma stans Juss. cultivated on modified Murashige-Skoog medium (RT-k were phytochemically analysed by means of chromatographical methods (PC, TLC. The following products were found as metabolites: phenolic acids - chlorogenics, caffeic, ferulic, vanillic, o-coumaric and sinapic; steroids - β-sitosterol; triterpenes - ursolic and oleanolic acids, α-amyrine; sugars - glucose, fructose, sucrose, xylose. Meso-inositol was isolated in 0.8% yield. In intact plant leaves, some differences concerning the content and/or number of individual compounds were observed, namely: lack of sinapic acid and occurrence of p-coumaric acid, lower content of β-sitosterol, lack of oleanolic acid, occurrence of β-amyrine and of one unidentified triterpenoid, lack of xylose, occurrence of maltose, raffinose, and stachiose. The level of mesoinositol inn leaves was distincly lower than in the callus tissues. Neither in callus tissues nor in leaves iridoid glycosides were found.

  18. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.

    2015-01-01

    could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also...

  19. Enhancement of gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and other health-related metabolites in germinated red rice (Oryza sativa L.) by ultrasonication.

    Ding, Junzhou; Ulanov, Alexander V; Dong, Mengyi; Yang, Tewu; Nemzer, Boris V; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming; Feng, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) that has a red (reddish brown) bran layer in de-hulled rice is known to contain rich biofunctional components. Germination is an effective technique to improve the nutritional quality, digestibility, and flavor of de-hulled rice. Ultrasonication, a form of physical stimulation, has been documented as a novel approach to improve the nutritional quality of plant-based food. This study was undertaken to test the use of ultrasound to enhance the nutritional value of red rice. Ultrasonication (5min, 16W/L) was applied to rice during soaking or after 66h germination. Changes of metabolites (amino acids, sugars, and organic acids) in red rice treated by ultrasonication were determined using a GC/MS plant primary metabolomics analysis platform. Differential expressed metabolites were identified through multivariate statistical analysis. Results showed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and riboflavin (vitamin B 2 ) in red rice significantly increased after germination for 72h, and then experienced a further increase after treatment by ultrasound at different stages during germination. The metabolomics analysis showed that some plant metabolites, i.e. GABA, O-phosphoethanolamine, and glucose-6-phosphate were significantly increased after the ultrasonic treatment (VIP>1.5) in comparison with the untreated germinated rice. The findings of this study showed that controlled germination with ultrasonic stress is an effective method to enhance GABA and other health-promoted components in de-hulled rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of azoxystrobin and its metabolites, azoxystrobin free acid and 2-hydroxybenzonitrile, in greenhouse-grown lettuce.

    Gautam, Maheswor; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2017-12-01

    Lettuce is an important part of the diet in Europe. The permitted levels of pesticides in lettuce are strictly regulated and there is growing urge among food safety authorities to analyse pesticide metabolites as well. Azoxystrobin is one of pesticides that is frequently detected in lettuce. Although there are several analytical methods for the determination of azoxystrobin in lettuce, a sensitive method for the determination of its metabolites in lettuce is lacking. This study aimed at developing an extraction and LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of azoxystrobin, and its metabolites azoxystrobin free acid and 2-hydroxybenzonitrile in lettuce. Accelerated solvent extraction, QuEChERS extraction, and shaking extraction were compared using various solvents. The final method consisted of shaking freeze-dried sample in 0.1% formic acid in 80% aqueous acetonitrile. The selected method was validated by spiking each analyte at 125 ng/g and 500 ng/g. The method resulted in acceptable recovery for 2-hydroxybenzonitrile, azoxystrobin free acid, and azoxystrobin, with a RSD of lettuce.

  1. Insight on the impacts of free amino acids and their metabolites on the immune system from a perspective of inborn errors of amino acid metabolism.

    Pakula, Malgorzata M; Maier, Thorsten J; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Amino acids (AAs) support a broad range of functions in living organisms, including several that affect the immune system. The functions of the immune system are affected when free AAs are depleted or in excess because of external factors, such as starvation, or because of genetic factors, such as inborn errors of metabolism. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss the current insights into how free AAs affect immune responses. When possible, we make comparisons to known disease states resulting from inborn errors of metabolism, in which changed levels of AAs or AA metabolites provide insight into the impact of AAs on the human immune system in vivo. We also explore the literature describing how changes in AA levels might provide pharmaceutical targets for safe immunomodulatory treatment. Expert opinion: The impact of free AAs on the immune system is a neglected topic in most immunology textbooks. That neglect is undeserved, because free AAs have both direct and indirect effects on the immune system. Consistent choices of pre-clinical models and better strategies for creating formulations are required to gain clinical impact.

  2. Transfer of carbon from 14C-labeled volatile fatty acids to other metabolites in the rumen epithelial slices of cattle

    Shoji, Yoshio; Tsuda, Tsuneyuki

    1979-01-01

    Incorporation of 1- 14 C-acetate, 1- 14 C-propionate and 1- 14 C-butyrate into various metabolite fractions in incubated bovine rumen epithelial slices was investigated in vitro. After 3 hours of in vitro incubation, the metabolites were fractionated into CO 2 , total organic acid, total lipid, non-lipid and residual fractions, and some of these fractions were fractionated further. 1- 14 C-acetate was less oxidized than 1- 14 C-propionate and 1- 14 C-butyrate in both Krebs-Ringer phosphate (KRP) and Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate (KRB) buffer solutions, and the oxidation rate of 1- 14 C-propionate was markedly higher in the KRB buffer than in the KRP buffer. As for organic acids examined, 1- 14 C-acetate was mainly incorporated into lactic, β-hydroxybutyric and pyruvic acids, 1- 14 C-propionate into lactic and succinic acids, and 1- 14 C-butyrate into β-hydroxybutyric and lactic acids, though substantial portions of all 3 volatile fatty acids (VFA) were incorporated into some other organic acids. Interconversion among these VFA was also observed in small amounts. Considerable amounts of these VFA were incorporated into lipid fraction, mainly into phospho-lipids and free higher fatty acids, and considerable amounts into some other lipids. About 10% of these 3 VFA added as substrates were incorporated into non-lipid fraction, mainly into the neutral fraction, but none of them into the cation fraction (amino acid fraction). Less than 1% of these 3 VFA were incorporated into the residual fraction which was considered to be tissue protein. (Kaihara, S.)

  3. An efficient synthesis of quinolines under solvent-free conditions

    Unknown

    An efficient synthesis of quinolines under solvent-free conditions. 201 was then irradiated with microwaves in a microwave oven (Samsung model# CE118KF) at 1050W (70% of total power) for 5 minutes (3 + 2 with an inter- mission of 5 minutes). The reaction mixture was cooled at room temperature and rendered basic (pH.

  4. Transformation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    Licht, D.; Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.

    1996-01-01

    kinetics. The kinetic parameters for indole were an apparent maximum specific transformation rate (V-Amax) of 263 mu mol mg total protein(-1) day(-1) and an apparent half-saturation constant (K-Am) of 139 mu M. The V-Amax for quinoline was 170 mu mol mg total protein(-1) day(-1) and K-Am was 92 mu M...

  5. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8 ...

    Unknown

    chelated ruthenium organometallics. BIKASH KUMAR PANDA. Department of Inorganic ... Ruthenium organometallics; quinolin-8-olato chelation; emission properties; trivalent ruthenium. 1. Introduction. There is continuing ... chem.istry of orthometallated ruthenium compounds is of current interest in the context of synthesis ...

  6. Quinoline hybrids and their antiplasmodial and antimalarial activities.

    Hu, Yuan-Qiang; Gao, Chuan; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Lei; Xu, Zhi; Feng, Lian-Shun; Wu, Xiang; Zhao, Feng

    2017-10-20

    Malaria, in particular infection with P. falciparum (the most lethal of the human malaria parasite species, responsible for nearly one million deaths every year), is one of the most devastating and common infectious disease throughout the world. Beginning with quinine, quinoline containing compounds have long been used in clinical treatment of malaria and remained the mainstays of chemotherapy against malaria. The emergence of P. falciparum strains resistant to almost all antimalarials prompted medicinal chemists and biologists to study their effective replacement with an alternative mechanism of action and new molecules. Combination with variety of quinolines and other active moieties may increase the antiplasmodial and antimalarial activities and reduce the side effects. Thus, hybridization is a very attractive strategy to develop novel antimalarials. This review aims to summarize the recent advances towards the discovery of antiplasmodial and antimalarial hybrids including quinoline skeleton to provide an insight for rational designs of more active and less toxic quinoline hybrids antimalarials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship between neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites and reductions in right medial prefrontal cortical thickness in major depressive disorder.

    Meier, Timothy B; Drevets, Wayne C; Wurfel, Brent E; Ford, Bart N; Morris, Harvey M; Victor, Teresa A; Bodurka, Jerzy; Teague, T Kent; Dantzer, Robert; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Reductions in gray matter volume of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), especially the rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, sgACC) are a widely reported finding in major depressive disorder (MDD). Inflammatory mediators, which are elevated in a subgroup of patients with MDD, activate the kynurenine metabolic pathway and increase production of neuroactive metabolites such as kynurenic acid (KynA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA) which influence neuroplasticity. It is not known whether the alterations in brain structure and function observed in major depressive disorders are due to the direct effect of inflammatory mediators or the effects of neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites. Here, using partial posterior predictive distribution mediation analysis, we tested whether the serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites mediated reductions in cortical thickness in mPFC regions in MDD. Further, we tested whether any association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and cortical thickness would be mediated by kynurenine pathway metabolites. Seventy-three unmedicated subjects who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD and 91 healthy controls (HC) completed MRI scanning using a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. Automated cortical parcellation was performed using the PALS-B12 Brodmann area atlas as implemented in FreeSurfer in order to compare the cortical thickness and cortical area of six PFC regions: Brodmann areas (BA) 9, 10, 11, 24, 25, and 32. Serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection, while high-sensitivity CRP concentration was measured immunoturbidimetrically. Compared with HCs, the MDD group showed a reduction in cortical thickness of the right BA24 (pdepressive episodes displayed thinner cortex in BA32 (pmediated the relationship between diagnosis and cortical thickness of right BA32

  8. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Goebel, Neal C.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. PMID:26655755

  9. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Goebel, Neal C; Shaffer, Brenda T; Henkels, Marcella D; Zabriskie, T Mark; Loper, Joyce E

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Supplementing Blends of Sugars, Amino Acids, and Secondary Metabolites to the Diet of Termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Drive Distinct Gut Bacterial Communities.

    Huang, Xing-Feng; Chaparro, Jacqueline M; Reardon, Kenneth F; Judd, Timothy M; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2016-10-01

    Although it is well known that diet is one of the major modulators of the gut microbiome, how the major components of diet shape the gut microbial community is not well understood. Here, we developed a simple system that allows the investigation of the impact of given compounds as supplements of the diet on the termite gut microbiome. The 16S rRNA pyrosequencing analysis revealed that feeding termites different blends of sugars and amino acids did not majorly impact gut community composition; however, ingestion of blends of secondary metabolites caused shifts in gut bacterial community composition. The supplementation of sugars and amino acids reduced the richness significantly, and sugars alone increased the evenness of the gut bacterial community significantly. Secondary metabolites created the most dramatic effects on the microbial community, potentially overriding the effect of other types of compounds. Furthermore, some microbial groups were stimulated specifically by particular groups of compounds. For instance, termites fed with secondary metabolites contained more Firmicutes and Spirochaetes compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, our results suggest that the termite (Reticulitermes flavipes) can be used as a simple and effective system to test the effects of particular chemical compounds in modulating the gut microbiome.

  11. Increased formic acid excretion and the development of kidney toxicity in rats following chronic dosing with trichloroethanol, a major metabolite of trichloroethylene

    Green, Trevor; Dow, Jacky; Foster, John

    2003-01-01

    The chronic toxicity of trichloroethanol, a major metabolite of trichloroethylene, has been assessed in male Fischer rats (60 per group) given trichloroethanol in drinking water at concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g/l for 52 weeks. The rats excreted large amounts of formic acid in urine reaching a maximum after 12 weeks (∼65 mg/24 h at 1 g/l) and thereafter declining to reach an apparent steady state at 40 weeks (15-20 mg/24 h). Urine from treated rats was more acidic throughout the study and urinary methylmalonic acid and plasma N-methyltetrahydrofolate concentrations were increased, indicating an acidosis, vitamin B12 deficiency and impaired folate metabolism, respectively. The rats treated with trichloroethanol developed kidney damage over the duration of the study which was characterised by increased urinary NAG activity, protein excretion (from 4 weeks), increased basophilia, protein accumulation and tubular damage (from 12 to 40 weeks), increased cell replication (at week 28) and evidence in some rats of focal proliferation of abnormal tubules at 52 weeks. It was concluded that trichloroethanol, the major metabolite of trichloroethylene, induced nephrotoxicity in rats as a result of formic acid excretion and acidosis

  12. Effects of oral calcium supplementation on mineral and acid-base status, energy metabolites, and health of postpartum dairy cows.

    Martinez, N; Sinedino, L D P; Bisinotto, R S; Daetz, R; Lopera, C; Risco, C A; Galvão, K N; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to characterize blood concentrations of minerals and acid-base status after oral dosing of Ca salts and to determine the effects of oral Ca on mineral and metabolic status and incidence diseases. The hypotheses were that administration of oral Ca as CaCl2 and CaSO4 maintains blood total Ca (tCa) concentrations ≥2.125 mM and reduces the incidence of diseases in early lactation. In experiment 1, 18 Holstein cows on the day of calving were assigned to receive a single dose of 0, 43, or 86g of Ca as an oral bolus. Blood was sampled before and after treatments to characterize acid-base status and concentrations of minerals. In experiment 2, 450 Holstein cows considered of low (LRM; normal calving) or high risk (HRM; dystocia, twins, stillbirth, retained placenta, vulvo-vaginal laceration, or a combination of these) of metritis (primiparous-LRM=84; primiparous-HRM=84; multiparous-LRM=138; multiparous-HRM=138) on the day of calving were blocked by parity and then randomly assigned to control, no Ca supplementation; 86g of Ca on d 0 and 1 postpartum (CaS1); or 86g of Ca on d 0 and 1 postpartum followed by 43g/d on d 2 to 4 postpartum (CaS4). Blood was sampled before and 30 min after treatment on d 0, and 30 min after treatments on d 1 to 4, and d 7 and 10 for determination of concentrations of minerals and metabolites and blood acid-base responses. Disease incidence was evaluated for the first 30 DIM. Concentrations of ionized Ca (iCa) increased for 2h in cows supplemented with 43g of Ca and fewer than 8h in cows supplemented with 86g of Ca. The changes in iCa concentrations from pretreatment to 30 min after 86g of Ca supplemented on d 0 were 0.11±0.03 mM in multiparous cows and 0.25±0.03 mM in primiparous cows. Oral Ca reduced the incidence of subclinical hypocalcemia (SCH; tCa cows. Stopping oral Ca in CaS1 on d 1 postpartum, however, caused a rebound in SCH on d 2 to 4 postpartum in primiparous cows. Oral Ca increased the incidence of

  13. Lipid profiling following intake of the omega 3 fatty acid DHA identifies the peroxidized metabolites F4-neuroprostanes as the best predictors of atherosclerosis prevention.

    Gladine, Cécile; Newman, John W; Durand, Thierry; Pedersen, Theresa L; Galano, Jean-Marie; Demougeot, Céline; Berdeaux, Olivier; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Mazur, Andrzej; Comte, Blandine

    2014-01-01

    The anti-atherogenic effects of omega 3 fatty acids, namely eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) are well recognized but the impact of dietary intake on bioactive lipid mediator profiles remains unclear. Such a profiling effort may offer novel targets for future studies into the mechanism of action of omega 3 fatty acids. The present study aimed to determine the impact of DHA supplementation on the profiles of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) oxygenated metabolites and to investigate their contribution to atherosclerosis prevention. A special emphasis was given to the non-enzymatic metabolites knowing the high susceptibility of DHA to free radical-mediated peroxidation and the increased oxidative stress associated with plaque formation. Atherosclerosis prone mice (LDLR(-/-)) received increasing doses of DHA (0, 0.1, 1 or 2% of energy) during 20 weeks leading to a dose-dependent reduction of atherosclerosis (R(2) = 0.97, p = 0.02), triglyceridemia (R(2) = 0.97, p = 0.01) and cholesterolemia (R(2) = 0.96, pF4-neuroprostanes, a specific class of DHA peroxidized metabolites, was strongly correlated with the hepatic DHA level. Moreover, unbiased statistical analysis including correlation analyses, hierarchical cluster and projection to latent structure discriminate analysis revealed that the hepatic level of F4-neuroprostanes was the variable most negatively correlated with the plaque extent (pF4-neuroprostanes in particular, are potential biomarkers of DHA-associated atherosclerosis prevention. While these may contribute to the anti-atherogenic effects of DHA, further in vitro investigations are needed to confirm such a contention and to decipher the molecular mechanisms of action.

  14. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue

    Campioli, Enrico [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Duong, Tam B. [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Deschamps, François [Synthèse AptoChem Inc., Montréal, Québec (Canada); Papadopoulos, Vassilios, E-mail: vassilios.papadopoulos@mcgill.ca [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals. - Highlights: • DINCH and CHDA did not affect the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH affected the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH effect was blocked by the specific PPAR-α antagonist GW6471. • MINCH exerted a similar effect as MEHP on SVF adipogenesis. • DINCH/MINCH are potential metabolic

  15. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Vrenken, T.E.; Buist-Homan, M.; Kalsbeek, A.J.; Faber, K.N.; Moshage, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Leflunomide is used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases as an anti-inflammatory agent. Leflunomide and its active metabolite A77 1726 modulate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), Src kinases, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt-pathway and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB

  16. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis

    Vrenken, Titia E.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Kalsbeek, Allard Jan; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    Background/Aims: Leflunomide is used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases as an anti-inflammatory agent. Leflunomide and its active metabolite A77 1726 modulate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), Src kinases, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt-pathway and nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B

  17. Polyphasic characterization of Dolichospermum spp. and Sphaerospermopsis spp. (Nostocales, cyanobacteria): morphology, 16S rRNA gene sequences and fatty acid and secondary metabolite profiles

    Zapomělová, Eliška; Hrouzek, Pavel; Řezanka, Tomáš; Jezberová, Jitka; Řeháková, Klára; Hisem, D.; Komárková, Jaroslava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2011), s. 1152-1163 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600960703; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/10/1501; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/0309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : taxonomy * cyanobacteria * Anabaena * Dolichospermum * Sphaerospermopsis * phylogeny * 16S rRNA gene * fatty acids * secondary metabolites Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.071, year: 2011

  18. Comparative bioavailability of two oral formulations of clopidogrel: Determination of clopidogrel and its carboxylic acid metabolite (SR26334 under fasting and fed conditions in healthy subjects

    Brvar Nina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two randomized, single dose, 2-period, 2-sequence crossover studies were conducted to evaluate the comparative bioavailability of two clopidogrel formulations under fasting and fed conditions. Assessment of bioequivalence was based upon measurement of plasma concentrations of the parent drug, clopidogrel, and its major (inactive metabolite, clopidogrel carboxylic acid, using improved methanol-free extraction. Bioequivalence of Krka’s formulation to the innovator’s formulation was demonstrated under both fasting and fed conditions on 205 volunteers. Confidence intervals for AUC0-t, AUC0-inf and Cmax of clopidogrel and its main metabolite were well within the acceptance range of 80.00 to 125.00 %. Food substantially increased the bioavailability of clopidogrel from both formulations, while no effect of food on the extent and rate of exposure to the metabolite was observed. The effect of food was comparable between the two formulations, as indicated by the same direction and rank of food impact on the bioavailability of both formulations.

  19. Biomimetic trapping cocktail to screen reactive metabolites: use of an amino acid and DNA motif mixture as light/heavy isotope pairs differing in mass shift.

    Hosaka, Shuto; Honda, Takuto; Lee, Seon Hwa; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2018-06-01

    Candidate drugs that can be metabolically transformed into reactive electrophilic products, such as epoxides, quinones, and nitroso compounds, are of special concern because subsequent covalent binding to bio-macromolecules can cause adverse drug reactions, such as allergic reactions, hepatotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Several strategies have been reported for screening reactive metabolites, such as a covalent binding assay with radioisotope-labeled drugs and a trapping method followed by LC-MS/MS analyses. Of these, a trapping method using glutathione is the most common, especially at the early stage of drug development. However, the cysteine of glutathione is not the only nucleophilic site in vivo; lysine, histidine, arginine, and DNA bases are also nucleophilic. Indeed, the glutathione trapping method tends to overlook several types of reactive metabolites, such as aldehydes, acylglucuronides, and nitroso compounds. Here, we introduce an alternate way for screening reactive metabolites as follows: A mixture of the light and heavy isotopes of simplified amino acid motifs and a DNA motif is used as a biomimetic trapping cocktail. This mixture consists of [ 2 H 0 ]/[ 2 H 3 ]-1-methylguanidine (arginine motif, Δ 3 Da), [ 2 H 0 ]/[ 2 H 4 ]-2-mercaptoethanol (cysteine motif, Δ 4 Da), [ 2 H 0 ]/[ 2 H 5 ]-4-methylimidazole (histidine motif, Δ 5 Da), [ 2 H 0 ]/[ 2 H 9 ]-n-butylamine (lysine motif, Δ 9 Da), and [ 13 C 0 , 15 N 0 ]/[ 13 C 1 , 15 N 2 ]-2'-deoxyguanosine (DNA motif, Δ 3 Da). Mass tag triggered data-dependent acquisition is used to find the characteristic doublet peaks, followed by specific identification of the light isotope peak using MS/MS. Forty-two model drugs were examined using an in vitro microsome experiment to validate the strategy. Graphical abstract Biomimetic trapping cocktail to screen reactive metabolites.

  20. Immunoregulation of antitumor response; differential secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites by macrophages during stimulation ''in vitro'' with BCG and ''Corynebacterium parvum''

    Tomecki, Jaroslaw; Sukiennik, Jadwiga; Kordowiak, Anna

    1993-01-01

    The level of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in the supernatants of cultures peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) were studied under various conditions using BCG and ''Corynebacterium parvum'' as stimulators. The metabolite levels were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The degree of macrophage cytotoxic/cytostatic activity was dependent on the dose and character of stimulators used and the source of macrophages. The application of micro cytotoxicity assay for the evaluation of tumor cell lysis (lung sarcoma SaL-1) ''in vitro'' revealed that peritoneal macrophages from healthy and tumor bearing BALB/c mice may affect the degree of antitumor response. In the supernatants of cultured PEC from tumor bearing mice AA level increased (by 10-fold) in comparison with PEC from healthy mice. Stimulation with BCG induced over a double level of AA in PEC isolated from tumor bearing mice non-stimulated or stimulated with ''C.parvum''. A lower level of prostaglandins (PGs) was found in the supernatants of cultured PEC isolated from healthy mice (stimulated and non-stimulated), but the highest level of PGs was observed in the supernatants of cultured PEC isolated from tumor bearing mice stimulated with BCG. The unique metabolite of AA was found only in the supernatants form non-stimulated PEC from tumor bearing mice. PEC from tumor bearing mice produced metabolites of AA which were not detected in control group. These results suggest that macrophages also play a regulatory role by secretion of AA. This process can be modified by bacterial antigens. (author). 21 refs, 7 figs

  1. Quinoline-2-thiol Derivatives as Fluorescent Sensors for Metals, pH and HNO

    Naphtali A. O’Connor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A tautomeric equilibrium exists for quinoline-2-thiol and quinoline-2(1H-thione. Quantum mechanical calculations predict the thione is the major tautomer and this is confirmed by the absorption spectra. The utility of quinolone-2-thiol/quinoline-2(1H-thione as a chromophore for developing fluorescent sensors is explored. No fluorescence is observed when excited at absorption maxima, however a fluorescence increase is observed when exposed to HNO, a molecule of import as a cardiovascular therapeutic. Alkylated quinoline-2-thiol derivatives are found to be fluorescent and show a reduction in fluorescence when exposed to metals and changes in pH.

  2. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-05

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  3. Quinolinium 8-hy-droxy-7-iodo-quinoline-5-sulfonate 0.8-hydrate.

    Smith, Graham

    2012-12-01

    In the crystal structure of the title hydrated quinolinium salt of ferron (8-hy-droxy-7-iodo-quinoline-5-sulfonic acid), C9H7N(+)·C9H5INO4S(-)·0.8H2O, the quinolinium cation is fully disordered over two sites (occupancy factors fixed at 0.63 and 0.37) lying essentially within a common plane and with the ferron anions forming π-π-associated stacks down the b axis [minimum ring centroid separation = 3.462 (6) Å]. The cations and anions are linked into chains extending along c through hy-droxy O-H⋯O and quinolinium N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to sulfonate O-atom acceptors which are also involved in water O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions along b, giving a two-dimensional network.

  4. Structural Analysis of Quinoline 2-Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas putida 86

    Bonin, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the Quinoline 2-Oxidoreductase (Qor), a member of the molybdenum hydroxylase family, was solved at 1.8 Å resolution. Still controversial for molybdenum hydroxylases is the nature of the molybdenum apical ligand. In Qor the sulfido-ligand was found in the equatorial position while the oxo-ligand occupied the apical position. In addition, structural studies were carried out on two Nus family proteins. These resulted in the crystal structures of the transcription factors...

  5. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Phenothiazine and Quinoline Derivatives

    Găină, Luiza; Cristea, Castelia; Moldovan, Claudia; Porumb, Dan; Surducan, Emanoil; Deleanu, Călin; Mahamoud, Abdalah; Barbe, Jacques; Silberg, Ioan A.

    2007-01-01

    Application of a dynamic microwave power system in the chemical synthesis of some phenothiazine and quinoline derivatives is described. Heterocyclic ring formation, aromatic nucleophilic substitution and heterocyclic aldehydes/ketones condensation reactions were performed on solid support, or under solvent free reaction conditions. The microwave-assisted Duff formylation of phenothiazine was achieved. Comparison of microwave-assisted synthesis with the conventional synthetic methods demonstrates advantages related to shorter reaction times and in some cases better reaction yields.

  6. Enhanced solid state emission of quinoline derivatives for fluorescent sensors

    Kim, Hyong-Jun, E-mail: hkim@kongju.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) molecules are of utmost interest in the fields of organic light emitting diode, photo-patterning, chemosensor, proton transfer laser, and photostabilizer. Fine control of the functional substituents as well as the molecular structure of core ESIPT unit is primarily demanded for specific applications. Here, the photophysics of quinoline derivatives of 2-quinolin-2-yl-phenol and 2-(8-chloroquinolin-2-yl)phenol is explored. Straightening the twist between the hydroxyphenyl and the quinoline moieties with the aid of the hydrogen bonding promoted the excited energy to flow through a radiative decay pathway via proton transfer to the nitrogen. Furthermore, close molecular packing of J-aggregates and thus resulted vibration restriction in a dense matter opens an ESIPT corridor and is characterized to show enhanced emission. The mechanism is applied to the selective Cu{sup 2+} or Fe{sup 2+} cation detection and further immunofluorescence labeling using avidin–biotin protein specific binding is demonstrated with the aid of nano self-assembly technique. - Highlights: • New orange fluorescent hydroxyphenylquinoline derivative was synthesized. • Molecular structure planarization induced enhanced fluorescence with large Stokes' shift. • Selective solution phase cation detection and solid state bio-sensing were demonstrated successfully.

  7. Effects of Various Kynurenine Metabolites on Respiratory Parameters of Rat Brain, Liver and Heart Mitochondria

    Halina Baran*

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid dose-dependently and significantly affected rat heart mitochondria. Now we have investigated the effects of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic, anthranilic, 3-hydroxyanthranilic, xanthurenic and quinolinic acids on respiratory parameters (ie, state 2, state 3, respiratory control index (RC and ADP/oxygen ratio in brain, liver and heart mitochondria of adult rats. Mitochondria were incubated with glutamate/malate (5 mM or succinate (10 mM and in the presence of L-tryptophan metabolites (1 mM or in the absence, as control. Kynurenic and anthranilic acids significantly reduced RC values of heart mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Xanthurenic acid significantly reduced RC values of brain mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Furthermore, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid decreased RC values of brain, liver and heart mitochondria using glutamate/malate. In the presence of succinate, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid affected RC values of brain mitochondria, whereas in liver and heart mitochondria only 3-hydroxykynurenine lowered RC values significantly. Furthermore, lowered ADP/oxygen ratios were observed in brain mitochondria in the presence of succinate with 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and to a lesser extent with glutamate/malate. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid significantly lowered the ADP/oxygen ratio in heart mitochondria exposed to glutamate/malate, while in the liver mitochondria only a mild reduction was found. Tests of the influence of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on complex I in liver mitochondria showed that only 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-kynurenine led to a significant acceleration of NADH-driven complex I activities. The data indicate that L-tryptophan metabolites had different effects on brain, liver

  8. Metabolic characteristics of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) and anti-tumour activity of the 13-cis-retinoic acid metabolite 4-oxo-13-cis-retinoic acid in neuroblastoma.

    Sonawane, Poonam; Cho, Hwang Eui; Tagde, Ashujit; Verlekar, Dattesh; Yu, Alice L; Reynolds, C Patrick; Kang, Min H

    2014-12-01

    Isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid; 13-cRA) is a differentiation inducer used to treat minimal residual disease after myeloablative therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma. However, more than 40% of children develop recurrent disease during or after 13-cRA treatment. The plasma concentrations of 13-cRA in earlier studies were considered subtherapeutic while 4-oxo-13-cis-RA (4-oxo-13-cRA), a metabolite of 13-cRA considered by some investigators as inactive, were greater than threefold higher than 13-cRA. We sought to define the metabolic pathways of 13-cRA and investigated the anti-tumour activity of its major metabolite, 4-oxo-13-cRA. Effects of 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA on human neuroblastoma cell lines were assessed by DIMSCAN and flow cytometry for cell proliferation, MYCN down-regulation by reverse transcription PCR and immunoblotting, and neurite outgrowth by confocal microscopy. 13-cRA metabolism was determined using tandem MS in human liver microsomes and in patient samples. Six major metabolites of 13-cRA were identified in patient samples. Of these, 4-oxo-13-cRA was the most abundant, and 4-oxo-13-cRA glucuronide was also detected at a higher level in patients. CYP3A4 was shown to play a major role in catalysing 13-cRA to 4-oxo-13-cRA. In human neuroblastoma cell lines, 4-oxo-13-cRA and 13-cRA were equi-effective at inducing neurite outgrowth, inhibiting proliferation, decreasing MYCN mRNA and protein, and increasing the expression of retinoic acid receptor-β mRNA and protein levels. We showed that 4-oxo-13-cRA is as active as 13-cRA against neuroblastoma cell lines. Plasma levels of both 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA should be evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies of isotretinoin in neuroblastoma. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. A novel study of screening and confirmation of modafinil, adrafinil and their metabolite modafinilic acid under EI-GC-MS and ESI-LC-MS-MS ionization.

    Dubey, S; Ahi, S; Reddy, I M; Kaur, T; Beotra, A; Jain, S

    2009-12-01

    Adrafinil and modafinil have received wide publicity and have become controversial in the sporting world when several athletes were discovered allegedly using these drugs as doping agents. By acknowledging the facts, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) banned these drugs in sports since 2004. The present study explores the possibility of differentiating adrafinil and modafinil and their major metabolites under electron impact ionization in gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MSD) and electrospray ionization in liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) by studying the fragmentation pattern of these drugs. Adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite, modafinilic acid were analyzed on EI-GC-MSD and ESI-LC-MS/MS using various individual parameters on both the instruments. The analytical technique and equipment used in the analysis were an Agilent 6890N GC with 5973 mass selective detector for the GC-MSD analysis and an Agilent 1100 HPLC with API-3200 Triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for the LC-MS/MS analysis. Validation of both methods was performed using six replicates at different concentrations. The results show that adrafinil, modafinil and their major metabolite modafinilic acid could be detected as a single artifact without differentiation under EI-GC-MSD analysis. However, all drugs could be detected and differentiated under ESI-LCMS/MS analysis without any artifaction. The GC-MSD analysis gives a single artifact for both the drugs without differentiation and thus can be used as a marker for screening purposes. Further, the Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) method developed under LC-MS/MS is fit for the purpose for confirmation of suspicious samples in routine sports testing and in forensic and clinical analysis.

  10. Effects of feeding ground redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) to gestating ewes on pre- and postpartum performance, serum metabolites and hormones, milk fatty acid composition, and progeny preweaning performance.

    Stewart, W C; Whitney, T R; Scholljegerdes, E J; Hallford, D M; Walker, J W; Adams, R P; Naumann, H D

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate effects of replacing sorghum × Sudangrass hay with ground juniper in gestating ewe supplements on pre- and postpartum growth performance, serum metabolites and hormonal concentrations, milk fatty acid composition, and progeny preweaning performance. In a completely randomized design, commercial Rambouillet ewes (age = 3 to 5 yr; initial BW = 65.2 ± 1.6 kg) on a base diet of long-stem sorghum × Sudangrass hay were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary supplements in which ground juniper replaced 0% (CNTL), 33% (18JUN), 66% (36JUN), or 100% (54JUN) of the ground sorghum × Sudangrass hay in a pelleted supplement with ground juniper from d 38 ± 4 of gestation to 2 d postpartum. Treatment DM diet intake overall (g/kg BW) in ewes receiving no juniper was similar ( ≥ 0.38) to that of those receiving increasing concentrations of juniper. Changes in ewe BW and BCS were similar ( ≥ 0.24) in ewes throughout gestation. All serum metabolites and hormones were within normal clinical ranges; however, serum IGF-1 decreased linearly ( = 0.003), alanine increased (linear; = 0.003), and serum Na decreased (linear; = 0.049) as the percentage of juniper increased in the diet. Ewe milk fatty acid composition was similar ( > 0.05) for the majority of fatty acids across treatment groups, with the exception of arachidonic acid (C20:4n6) being greater ( hormones measured pre- and postpartum. Lamb birth weight and preweaning performance appeared unaffected by maternal consumption of ground juniper containing supplements. Results also provide novel information regarding the effects of plant secondary compound consumption throughout pregnancy on ewe and progeny performance and health.

  11. N-lactoyl-amino acids are ubiquitous metabolites that originate from CNDP2-mediated reverse proteolysis of lactate and amino acids

    Jansen, Robert S; Addie, Ruben; Merkx, Remco; Fish, Alexander; Mahakena, Sunny; Bleijerveld, Onno B; Altelaar, Maarten; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J; Borst, P; van de Wetering, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological advances in metabolomics, large parts of the human metabolome are still unexplored. In an untargeted metabolomics screen aiming to identify substrates of the orphan transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 5 (ABCC5), we identified a class of mammalian metabolites,

  12. Determination of free radical reaction products and metabolites of salicylic acid using capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    Coolen, S.A.J.; Huf, F.A.; Reijenga, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydroxylated radical products of salicylic acid are often used as a relative measurement in free radical research. Several analytical methods exist to determine the amount of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. In this study we use capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and

  13. [A thin-layer chromatography method for determining the styrene metabolites mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acid in urine].

    Gartzke, J; Burck, D

    1989-06-01

    A thin-layer chromatographic method is described for the determination of mandelic and phenyglyoxillic acid on silicagel (Silufol UV 254) after extraction from urine of styrene exposed workers. The quantitative determination was performed after eluting the spots. Phenylglyoxilic acid was measured at 255 nm and mandelic acid by derivative spectroscopically estimation of the .CH(OH).COOH -chromophore at 217 nm or by a three-wavelength mode, respectively. The recovery in urine was 80-104% for phenylglyoxilic acid and 99-105% for mandelic acid.

  14. Impact of supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites on muscle wasting in patients with critical illness or other muscle wasting illness: a systematic review.

    Wandrag, L; Brett, S J; Frost, G; Hickson, M

    2015-08-01

    Muscle wasting during critical illness impairs recovery. Dietary strategies to minimise wasting include nutritional supplements, particularly essential amino acids. We reviewed the evidence on enteral supplementation with amino acids or their metabolites in the critically ill and in muscle wasting illness with similarities to critical illness, aiming to assess whether this intervention could limit muscle wasting in vulnerable patient groups. Citation databases, including MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, the meta-register of controlled trials and the Cochrane Collaboration library, were searched for articles from 1950 to 2013. Search terms included 'critical illness', 'muscle wasting', 'amino acid supplementation', 'chronic obstructive pulmonary disease', 'chronic heart failure', 'sarcopenia' and 'disuse atrophy'. Reviews, observational studies, sport nutrition, intravenous supplementation and studies in children were excluded. One hundred and eighty studies were assessed for eligibility and 158 were excluded. Twenty-two studies were graded according to standardised criteria using the GRADE methodology: four in critical care populations, and 18 from other clinically relevant areas. Methodologies, interventions and outcome measures used were highly heterogeneous and meta-analysis was not appropriate. Methodology and quality of studies were too varied to draw any firm conclusion. Dietary manipulation with leucine enriched essential amino acids (EAA), β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate and creatine warrant further investigation in critical care; EAA has demonstrated improvements in body composition and nutritional status in other groups with muscle wasting illness. High-quality research is required in critical care before treatment recommendations can be made. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. Protective effects of lichen metabolites evernic and usnic acids against redox impairment-mediated cytotoxicity in central nervous system-like cells.

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; Divakar, Pradeep Kumar; Crespo, Ana; Gómez-Serranillos, M Pilar

    2017-07-01

    Lichens species produce unique secondary metabolites that attract increasing pharmacological interest, including their redox modulatory activities. Current work evaluated for the first time the in vitro cytoprotective properties, based on the antioxidant activities, of the Parmeliaceae lichens Evernia prunastri and Usnea ghattensis and the mechanism of action of their major phenolic constituents: the evernic and usnic acids, respectively. In two models of central nervous system-like cells (U373-MG and SH-SY5Y cell lines), exogenous H 2 O 2 induced oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity. We first assessed their radical scavenging capacities (ORAC and DPPH tests) and the phenolic content of the extracts. At the optimal concentrations, pretreatments with evernic acid displayed significant protection against H 2 O 2 -induced cytotoxic damage in both models. It reversed the alterations in oxidative stress markers (including ROS generation, glutathione system and lipid peroxidation levels) and cellular apoptosis (caspase-3 activity). Such effects were in part mediated by a notable enhancement of the expression of intracellular phase-II antioxidant enzymes; a plausible involvement of the Nrf2 cytoprotective pathway is suggested. Usnic acid exerted similar effects, to some extent more moderate. Results suggest that lichen polyketides evernic and usnic acids merit further research as promising antioxidant candidates in the therapy of oxidative stress-related diseases, including the neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrochemical sensor for hazardous food colourant quinoline yellow based on carbon nanotube-modified electrode.

    Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Wu, Kangbing; Chen, Jianwei; Zhou, Yikai

    2011-09-15

    A novel electrochemical method using multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) film-modified electrode was developed for the detection of quinoline yellow. In pH 8 phosphate buffer, an irreversible oxidation peak at 0.71V was observed for quinoline yellow. Compared with the unmodified electrode, the MWNT film-modified electrode greatly increases the oxidation peak current of quinoline yellow, showing notable enhancement effect. The effects of pH value, amount of MWNT, accumulation potential and time were studied on the oxidation peak current of quinoline yellow. The linear range is from 0.75 to 20mgL(-1), and the limit of detection is 0.5mgL(-1). It was applied to the detection of quinoline yellow in commercial soft drinks, and the results consisted with the value that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Degradation of quinoline and isoquinoline by vacuum ultraviolet light and mechanism thereof

    Zhu Dazhang; Ni Yaming; Sun Dongmei; Wang Shilong; Sun Xiaoyu; Yao Side

    2010-01-01

    Since the wavelength is shorter than 190 nm, vacuum ultraviolet light has high energy enough to break the H-O bonds of water to produce HO·, as well as the protection is very easy, degradation of organic contaminants in water by vacuum ultraviolet light has obviously excellent feature of no reagent adding to the wastewater among advanced oxidation technologies. In this paper, it was reported that quinoline and isoquinoline were degraded in water by the irradiation of low-pressure quartz mercury light with the electric power of 200 W which mainly emitted the light of 185 nm and 254 nm. The change regulation of the concentration of substrates, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) were investigated as well as the degradation processes of quinoline and isoquinoline were compared. It showed that both quinoline and isoquinoline could be degraded very fast under the given conditions. The concentration of the substrates decreased to nearly 0 in 10 minutes while the apparent first reaction rate constants were 0.41 ± 0.02 min -1 and 0.19 ± 0.01 min -1 , respectively. Meanwhile, the COD and TOC decreased to nearly 0 in 30 minutes. Quinoline has the faster degradation rate. In order to investigate mechanism thereof, pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis of quinoline and isoquinoline aqueous solution were performed, respectively. Pulse radiolysis indicated that the reaction rate constant of quinoline and HO· was faster than that of isoquinoline. In the meanwhile, laser flash photolysis indicated that both quinoline and isoquinoline could be ionized by the UV-C light while the photo-ionization efficiency of quinoline was higher than that of quinoline. These two reasons caused the faster degradation rate of quinoline. (authors)

  18. Salicylic acid treatment reduces the rot of postharvest citrus fruit by inducing the accumulation of H2O2, primary metabolites and lipophilic polymethoxylated flavones.

    Zhu, Feng; Chen, Jiajing; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Mingfei; Yun, Ze; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Cheng, Yunjiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2016-09-15

    To comprehensively analyze the effects of salicylic acid (SA) on the storability of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu), fruits were treated with 2mM SA. The disease incidence of control/SA-treated fruit at 50d and 120d after treatment was 23.3%/10% and 67.3%/23.3%, respectively, suggesting that SA treatment can significantly reduce the rot rate of postharvest citrus fruit. Fruit quality assays revealed that the treatment can maintain fruit firmness without affecting the inner quality. Furthermore, the contents of H2O2 and some defense-related metabolites, such as ornithine and threonine, in citrus pericarp, were significantly increased by SA treatment. Moreover, it was lipophilic polymethoxylated flavones, rather than flavanone glycosides, that accumulated in SA-treated fruits and these can directly inhibit pathogen development. These results suggest that the effects of SA on postharvest citrus fruit may be attributed to the accumulation of H2O2 and defense-related metabolites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Grafting polyethylenimine with quinoline derivatives for targeted imaging of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} and logic gate operations

    Pan, Yi; Shi, Yupeng; Chen, Junying; Wong, Chap-Mo; Zhang, Heng [Key Laboratory of Sensing Technology and Biomedical Instruments (Guangdong Province), School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Mei-Jin [Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety, Ministry of Education and Fujian Province, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Li, Cheuk-Wing [Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau (China); Yi, Changqing, E-mail: yichq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Sensing Technology and Biomedical Instruments (Guangdong Province), School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Research Institute of Sun Yat-Sen University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen (China)

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe which exhibited excellent biocompatibility, water solubility, and cell-membrane permeability, was facilely synthesized in a single step by grafting polyethyleneimine (PEI) with quinoline derivatives. The primary amino groups in the branched PEI can increase water solubility and cell permeability of the probe PEIQ, while quinoline derivatives can specifically recognize Zn{sup 2+} and reduce the potential cytotoxicity of PEI. Basing on fluorescence off-on mechanism, PEIQ demonstrated excellent sensing capability towards Zn{sup 2+} in absolute aqueous solution, where a high sensitivity with a detection limit as low as 38.1 nM, and a high selectivity over competing metal ions and potential interfering amino acids, were achieved. Inspired by these results, elementary logic operations (YES, NOT and INHIBIT) have been constructed by employing PEIQ as the gate while Zn{sup 2+} and EDTA as chemical inputs. Together with the low cytotoxicity and good cell-permeability, the practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging was satisfactorily demonstrated, emphasizing its wide application in fundamental biology research. - Graphical abstract: The fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, PEIQ, is facilely synthesized by grafting PEI with 8-CAAQ, and demonstrated for the pratical applications in Zn{sup 2+} imaging and implementation of molecular logic operations within biological cells. - Highlights: • PEIQ, fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, is synthesized by grafting PEI with quinoline derivatives. • PEIQ exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity in absolute aqueous solution. • PEIQ is biocompatible, water soluble, and cell-membrane permeable. • Elementary logic operations have been demonstrated for PEIQ/Zn{sup 2+}/EDTA system. • The practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging is demonstrated.

  20. UV action spectroscopy of protonated PAH derivatives. Methyl substituted quinolines

    Klærke, Benedikte; Holm, Anne; Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    using the electrostatic storage ring ELISA, an electrospray ion source and 3 ns UV laser pulses. Results. It is shown that the absorption profile is both redshifted and broadened when moving the methyl group from the heterocycle containing nitrogen to the homoatomic ring. The absorption profiles......Aims. We investigate the production of molecular photofragments upon UV excitation of PAH derivatives, relevant for the interstellar medium. Methods. The action absorption spectra of protonated gas-phase methyl-substituted quinolines (CH3−C9H7NH+) have been recorded in the 215–338 nm spectral range...

  1. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-05

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and validation of bioanalytical UHPLC-UV method for simultaneous analysis of unchanged fenofibrate and its metabolite fenofibric acid in rat plasma: Application to pharmacokinetics

    Rayan G. Alamri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, precise, selective and fast ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC-UV method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a lipid regulating agent fenofibrate and its metabolite fenofibric acid in rat plasma. The chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed-phase Acquity® BEH C18 column using methanol–water (65:35, v/v as the mobile phase. The isocratic flow was 0.3 ml/min with rapid run time of 2.5 min and UV detection was at 284 nm. The method was validated over a concentration range of 100–10000 ng/ml (r2 ⩾ 0.9993. The selectivity, specificity, recovery, accuracy and precision were validated for determination of fenofibrate/fenofibric acid in rat plasma. The lower limits of detection and quantitation of the method were 30 and 90 ng/ml for fenofibrate and 40 and 100 ng/ml for fenofibric acid, respectively. The within and between-day coefficients of variation were less than 5%. The validated method has been successfully applied to measure the plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetics study of fenofibrate in an animal model to illustrate the scope and application of the method.

  3. The effect of the antipsoriatic drug metabolite etretin (Ro 10-1670) on UVB irradiation induced changes in the metabolism of arachidonic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    Punnonen, Kari; Jansen, C.T.; Puustinen, Tapio

    1986-01-01

    [ 14 C]Arachidonic acid was avidly incorporated into human keratinocytes in culture and following exposure to UVB irradiation of 9 mJ/cm 2 (erythemally effective, EE) substantial amounts of 14 C-radiolabel were released from the cells. The release of radiolabel was accompanied by a decrease in the labelling of phosphatidylethanolamine whereas the labelling of triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters was increased. Keratinocytes produced significant amounts of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) and following UVB irradiation of 9 mJ/cm 2 (EE) the formation of prostaglandin E 2 was increased. Etretin (Ro 10-1670), the active metabolite of the antipsoriatic drug etretinate (Ro 10-9359), affected significantly neither the total release of radiolabel induced by UVB nor the formation of prostaglandin E 2 . However, in the presence of etretin the UVB irradiation induced transfer of [ 14 C]arachidonic acid into triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters was not increased as much as in the corresponding experiments without etretin. On the basis of the present study it appears that etretin dose not interfere with the release of arachidonic acid in amounts which could be related to the therapeutic effects of the combination of retinoids with UVB irradiation (Re-UVB) in the treatment of psoriasis. (author)

  4. Simultaneous determination of difenoconazole, trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid residues in watermelon under field conditions by GC-MS/MS.

    Kang, Di; Zhang, Haizhen; Chen, Yuling; Wang, Fei; Shi, Lihong; Hu, Deyu; Zhang, Kankan

    2017-11-01

    An optimized quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe method for the simultaneous determination of difenoconazole, trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid residues in watermelon and soil was developed and validated by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (1% formic acid) and cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction with octadecylsilane sorbent. The limit of quantification of the method was 0.01 mg/kg, and the limit of detection was 0.003 mg/kg for all three analytes. The recoveries of the fungicides in watermelon, pulp and soil were 72.32-99.20% for difenoconazole, 74.68-87.72% for trifloxystrobin and 78.59-92.66% for trifloxystrobin acid with relative standard deviations of 1.34-14.04%. The dissipation dynamics of difenoconazole and trifloxystrobin in watermelon and soil followed the first-order kinetics with half-lives of 3.2-8.8 days in both locations. The final residue levels of difenoconazole and trifloxystrobin were below 0.1 mg/kg (maximum residue level [MRL] set by China) and 0.2 mg/kg (MRL set by European Union), respectively, in pulp samples collected 14 days after the last application. These results could help Chinese authorities to establish MRL of trifloxystrobin in watermelon and provide guidance for the safe and proper application of both fungicides on watermelon. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotoxicity risk assessment of diversely substituted quinolines using the SOS chromotest.

    Duran, Leidy Tatiana Díaz; Rincón, Nathalia Olivar; Galvis, Carlos Eduardo Puerto; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V; Lorenzo, Jorge Luis Fuentes

    2015-03-01

    Quinolines are aromatic nitrogen compounds with wide therapeutic potential to treat parasitic and microbial diseases. In this study, the genotoxicity of quinoline, 4-methylquinoline, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), and diversely functionalized quinoline derivatives and the influence of the substituents (functional groups and/or atoms) on their genotoxicity were tested using the SOS chromotest. Quinoline derivatives that induce genotoxicity by the formation of an enamine epoxide structure did not induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli PQ37 cells, with the exception of 4-methylquinoline that was weakly genotoxic. The chemical nature of the substitution (C-5 to C-8: hydroxyl, nitro, methyl, isopropyl, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine atoms; C-2: phenyl and 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl rings) of quinoline skeleton did not significantly modify compound genotoxicities; however, C-2 substitution with α-, β-, or γ-pyridinyl groups removed 4-methylquinoline genotoxicity. On the other hand, 4-NQO derivatives whose genotoxic mechanism involves reduction of the C-4 nitro group were strong inducers of the SOS response. Methyl and nitrophenyl substituents at C-2 of 4-NQO core affected the genotoxic potency of this molecule. The relevance of these results is discussed in relation to the potential use of the substituted quinolines. The work showed the sensitivity of SOS chromotest for studying structure-genotoxicity relationships and bioassay-guided quinoline synthesis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 15-Lipoxygenase metabolites of α-linolenic acid, [13-(S)-HPOTrE and 13-(S)-HOTrE], mediate anti-inflammatory effects by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome

    Kumar, Naresh; Gupta, Geetika; Anilkumar, Kotha; Fatima, Naireen; Karnati, Roy; Reddy, Gorla Venkateswara; Giri, Priyanka Voori; Reddanna, Pallu

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) appears to be critical in the regulation of various pathophysiological processes and to maintain cellular homeostasis. While a high proportion of dietary intake of ω-6 PUFAs is associated with various inflammatory disorders, higher intake of ω-3 PUFAs is known to offer protection. It is now well established that beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs are mediated in part by their oxygenated metabolites mainly via the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. However, the down-stream signaling pathways that are involved in these anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFAs have not been elucidated. The present study evaluates the effects of 15-LOX metabolites of α-linolenic acid (ALA, ω-3 PUFA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. Further, the effect of these metabolites on the survival of BALB/c mice in LPS mediated septic shock and also polymicrobial sepsis in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) mouse model was studied. These studies reveal the anti-inflammatory effects of 13-(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HPOTrE] and 13-(S)-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid [13-(S)-HOTrE] by inactivating NLRP3 inflammasome complex through the PPAR-γ pathway. Additionally, both metabolites also deactivated autophagy and induced apoptosis. In mediating all these effects 13-(S)-HPOTrE was more potent than 13-(S)-HOTrE. PMID:27535180

  8. Pharmacological effects of a synthetic quinoline, a hybrid of tomoxiprole and naproxen, against acute pain and inflammation in mice: a behavioral and docking study

    Hossein Hosseinzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In the present study, we investigated the potential anti-nociceptive activity and acute anti-inflammatory effect of a synthetic quinoline compound (2-(4-Methoxyphenylbenzo[h]quinoline-4-carboxylic acid, QC, possessing structural elements of both naproxen and tomoxiprole drugs. Materials and Methods: The anti-nociceptive activity of QC was evaluated using chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models and its acute anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by xylene-induced ear edema test in mice. Results: QC displayed a dose dependent effect in both acute anti-nociceptive tests (writhing and hot plate. This compound at dose of 6.562 mg/kg showed a high anti-nociceptive effect near equal to  diclofenac 5 mg/kg. It also showed high anti-inflammatory effects (less than 6.562 mg/kg comparable to those of reference drugs diclofenac (5 mg/kg and celecoxib (100 mg/kg. Docking study showed that this quinoline derivative could inhibit COX-2 enzyme strongly. Conclusion: QC showed high anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects comparable to reference drugs and can exert its anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities through COX-2 inhibition.

  9. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Agro-Food Processing, Zhejiang R & D Center for Food Technology and Equipment, Fuli Institute of Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China); Ren, Yiping, E-mail: renyiping@263.net [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1–0.3 ng/mL and 0.4–1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%–105.4%, 98.2%–114.0% and 92.2%–108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD < 7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive

  10. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1–0.3 ng/mL and 0.4–1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%–105.4%, 98.2%–114.0% and 92.2%–108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD < 7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive

  11. Synthesis of 2,3-Disubstituted Quinolines via Ketenimine or Carbodiimide Intermediates.

    Zhao, Hongyang; Xing, Yanpeng; Lu, Ping; Wang, Yanguang

    2016-10-10

    Cyclopenta[b]quinolines and cyclohexa[b]quinolines were prepared via the reactions of α-diazo ketones with N-(2-cyclopropylidenemethylphenyl)phosphanimines and N-(2-cyclobutylidenemethylphenyl) phosphanimine, respectively. The reaction proceeds in a cascade involving ketenimine formation, 6 π-electron ring closure, and 1,3-alkyl shift. A similar approach was developed for the synthesis of dihydropyrrolo-[2,3-b]quinolines from N-(2-cyclopropylidenemethylphenyl)phosphanimines and isocyanates. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline.

    Cui, Mingchao; Zhang, Wenbing; Fang, Jun; Liang, Qianqiong; Liu, Dongxuan

    2017-08-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has been used extensively to investigate the biodegradation of various organic pollutants. To date, little isotope fractionation information is available for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. In this study, we report on the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during quinoline and 3-methylquinoline aerobic microbial degradation by a Comamonas sp. strain Q10. Degradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline was accompanied by isotope fractionation. Large hydrogen and small carbon isotope fractionation was observed for quinoline while minor carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation effects occurred for 3-methylquinoline. Bulk carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors (ε bulk ) for quinoline biodegradation were -1.2 ± 0.1 and -38 ± 1‰, respectively, while -0.7 ± 0.1 and -5 ± 1‰ for 3-methylquinoline, respectively. This reveals a potential advantage for employing quinoline as the model compound and hydrogen isotope analysis for assessing aerobic biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE C ) values of carbon were 1.008 ± 0.0005 for quinoline and 1.0048 ± 0.0005 for 3-methylquinoline while AKIE H values of hydrogen of 1.264 ± 0.011 for quinoline and 1.0356 ± 0.0103 for 3-methylquinoline were obtained. The combined evaluation of carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation yields Λ values (Λ = Δδ 2 H/Δδ 13 C ≈ εH bulk /εC bulk ) of 29 ± 2 for quinoline and 8 ± 2 for 3-methylquinoline. The results indicate that the substrate specificity may have a significant influence on the isotope fractionation for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The substrate-specific isotope enrichment factors would be important for assessing the behavior and fate of quinolinic compounds in the environment.

  13. Enrichment of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in Bean Sprouts: Exploring Biosynthesis of Plant Metabolite Using Common Household Reagents

    Rojanarata, Theerasak; Plianwong, Samarwadee; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2018-01-01

    The enrichment of plant foods with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is currently an interesting issue in the field of nutraceuticals and can be used as an experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Here, an interdisciplinary hands-on experiment to produce GABA-enriched mung bean sprouts using common household reagents is described. Based…

  14. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasm...

  15. Dietary supplementation with dimethylglycine affects broiler performance and plasma metabolites depending on dose and dietary fatty acid profile.

    Kalmar, I D; Cools, A; Verstegen, M W A; Huyghebaert, G; Buyse, J; Roose, P; Janssens, G P J

    2011-04-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with N,N-dimethylglycine sodium salt (Na-DMG) was evaluated in a feeding trial with 1500 1-day-old broiler chicks (Cobb 500). DMG was supplemented at 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 or 1 g Na-DMG/kg feed to a ration with either animal fat (chicken fat) or vegetal fat (soy oil) as main fat source. In the vegetal fat diets, production value was significantly linearly improved by supplementation with DMG up to 11%. Irrespective of dietary fat source, abdominal fat percentage was significantly linearly reduced up to 24% and meat yield tended to increase linearly with DMG level up to 4%. In the vegetal fat groups, DMG significantly lowered abdominal fat pad by up to 38% and tended to increase meat yield up to 6% at the highest dose. Fasted non-esterified fatty acid level significantly decreased with increasing DMG level up to 36% and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) decreased with a statistical trend up to 46% at the highest dose. In vegetal fat diets, addition of DMG resulted in significant lower TBARS level by 56% at the highest dose. Finally, a significant quadratic effect on ascites heart index was present in the vegetal fat diets, with a minimal value at 0.5 g Na-DMG/kg. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with DMG may improve technical and slaughter performance, and may reduce oxidative stress and pulmonary hypertension, but the degree of effects is modulated by fatty acid profile of the diet. Herewith, effects are more pronounced in a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with a diet rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  17. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  18. Crosslinked wholly aromatic polyether membranes based on quinoline derivatives and their application in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Kallitsis, K. J.; Nannou, R.; Andreopoulou, A. K.; Daletou, M. K.; Papaioannou, D.; Neophytides, S. G.; Kallitsis, J. K.

    2018-03-01

    An AB type difunctional quinoline based monomer bearing a pentafluorophenyl unit combined with a phenol functionality is being synthesized and homopolymerized to create linear aromatic polyethers as polymer electrolytes for HT-PEM FCs applications. Several conditions are tested for the optimized synthesis of the monomer and homopolymer. Additionally, covalent crosslinking through aromatic polyether bond formation enables the creation of wholly aromatic crosslinked polymeric electrolyte membranes. More specifically, the perfluorophenyl units are crosslinked with other hydroxyl end functionalized moieties, providing membranes with enhanced chemical and mechanical properties that are moreover easily doped with phosphoric acid even at ambient temperatures. All membranes are evaluated for their structural and thermal characteristics and their doping ability with phosphoric acid. Selected crosslinked membranes are further tested in terms of their single cell performance at the temperature range 160 °C-200 °C showing promising performance and high conductivity values even up to 0.2 S cm-1 in some cases.

  19. Abscisic Acid Induced Changes in Production of Primary and Secondary Metabolites, Photosynthetic Capacity, Antioxidant Capability, Antioxidant Enzymes and Lipoxygenase Inhibitory Activity of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth.

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to investigate and distinguish the relationships in the production of total phenolics, total flavonoids, soluble sugars, H2O2, O2−, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL activity, leaf gas exchange, antioxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme activity [ascorbate peroxidase (APX, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (LOX] under four levels of foliar abscisic acid (ABA application (0, 2, 4, 6 µM for 15 weeks in Orthosiphon stamineus Benth. It was found that the production of plant secondary metabolites, soluble sugars, antioxidant activity, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was influenced by foliar application of ABA. As the concentration of ABA was increased from 0 to 6 µM the production of total phenolics, flavonoids, sucrose, H2O2, O2−, PAL activity and LOX inhibitory activity was enhanced. It was also observed that the antioxidant capabilities (DPPH and ORAC were increased. This was followed by increases in production of antioxidant enzymes APX, CAT and SOD. Under high application rates of ABA the net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was found to be reduced. The production of primary and secondary metabolites displayed a significant positive relationship with H2O2 (total phenolics, r2 = 0.877; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.812; p ≤ 0.05 and O2− (total phenolics, r2 = 0.778; total flavonoids, r2 = 0.912; p ≤ 0.05. This indicated that increased oxidative stress at high application rates of ABA, improved the production of phytochemicals.

  20. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    Yun Sun Lee

    Full Text Available Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  1. A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels in the leaves of three crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species, Ananas comosus, Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata.

    Chen, Li-Song; Lin, Qin; Nose, Akihiro

    2002-02-01

    A comparative study on diurnal changes in metabolite levels associated with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the leaves of three CAM species, Ananas comosus (pineapple), a hexose-utilizing species, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana and K. pinnata, two starch-utilizing species, were made. All three CAM species showed a typical feature of CAM with nocturnal malate increase. In the two Kalanchoë species, isocitrate levels were higher than citrate levels; the reverse was the case in pineapple. In the two Kalanchoë species, a small nocturnal citrate increase was found and K. daigremontiana showed a small nocturnal isocitrate increase. Glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose 6-phosphate (F-6-P) and glucose 1-phosphate (G-1-P) levels in the three CAM species rose rapidly during the first part of the dark period and decreased during the latter part of the dark period. The levels of the metabolites also decreased during the first 3 h of the light period, then, remained little changed through the rest of the light period. Absolute levels of G-6-P, F-6-P and G-1-P were higher in pineapple than in the two Kalanchoë species. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)) levels in the three CAM species increased during the dark period, then dramatically decreased during the first 3 h of the light period and remained unchanged through the rest of the light period. The extent of nocturnal F-1,6-P(2) increase was far greater in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple. Absolute levels of F-1,6-P(2) were higher in the two Kalanchoë species than in pineapple, especially during dark period. Diurnal changes in oxaloacetate (OAA), pyruvate (Pyr) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) levels in the three CAM species were similar.

  2. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    Lee, Yun Sun; Ju, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Uddin, Md Romij; Kim, Yeon Bok; Baek, Jin Hong; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Ki Won; Seo, Hak Soo; Park, Sang Un; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera (Asphodeloideae) is a medicinal plant in which useful secondary metabolites are plentiful. Among the representative secondary metabolites of Aloe vera are the anthraquinones including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, which are tricyclic aromatic quinones synthesized via a plant-specific type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway. However, it is not yet clear which cellular responses can induce the pathway, leading to production of tricyclic aromatic quinones. In this study, we examined the effect of endogenous elicitors on the type III polyketide biosynthesis pathway and identified the metabolic changes induced in elicitor-treated Aloe vera adventitious roots. Salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon were used to treat Aloe vera adventitious roots cultured on MS liquid media with 0.3 mg/L IBA for 35 days. Aloe emodin and chrysophanol were remarkably increased by the SA treatment, more than 10-11 and 5-13 fold as compared with untreated control, respectively. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 37 SA-induced compounds, including aloe emodin and chrysophanol, and 3 of the compounds were tentatively identified as tricyclic aromatic quinones. Transcript accumulation analysis of polyketide synthase genes and gas chromatography mass spectrometry showed that these secondary metabolic changes resulted from increased expression of octaketide synthase genes and decreases in malonyl-CoA, which is the precursor for the tricyclic aromatic quinone biosynthesis pathway. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity was enhanced in extracts of SA-treated adventitious roots. Our results suggest that SA has an important role in activation of the plant specific-type III polyketide biosynthetic pathway, and therefore that the efficacy of Aloe vera as medicinal agent can be improved through SA treatment.

  3. The Biodiversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Greek Traditional Wheat Sourdoughs Is Reflected in Both Composition and Metabolite Formation

    De Vuyst, Luc; Schrijvers, Vincent; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Hoste, Bart; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Kalantzopoulos, George; Tsakalidou, Effie; Messens, Winy

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria into the species Lactob...

  4. Immune regulation by microbiome metabolites.

    Kim, Chang H

    2018-03-22

    Commensal microbes and the host immune system have been co-evolved for mutual regulation. Microbes regulate the host immune system, in part, by producing metabolites. A mounting body of evidence indicates that diverse microbial metabolites profoundly regulate the immune system via host receptors and other target molecules. Immune cells express metabolite-specific receptors such as P2X 7 , GPR41, GPR43, GPR109A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor precursor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), TGR5 and other molecular targets. Microbial metabolites and their receptors form an extensive array of signals to respond to changes in nutrition, health and immunological status. As a consequence, microbial metabolite signals contribute to nutrient harvest from diet, and regulate host metabolism and the immune system. Importantly, microbial metabolites bidirectionally function to promote both tolerance and immunity to effectively fight infection without developing inflammatory diseases. In pathogenic conditions, adverse effects of microbial metabolites have been observed as well. Key immune-regulatory functions of the metabolites, generated from carbohydrates, proteins and bile acids, are reviewed in this article. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effect of inulin supplementation and dietary fat source on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, abdominal fat deposition, and tissue fatty acid composition in broiler chickens.

    Velasco, S; Ortiz, L T; Alzueta, C; Rebolé, A; Treviño, J; Rodríguez, M L

    2010-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding inulin to diets containing 2 different types of fat as energy sources on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, and fatty acids of abdominal adipose tissue and breast and thigh meat. A total of 240 one-day-old female broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 1 of 6 treatments with 8 replicates per treatment and 5 chicks per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments including 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of diet) and 2 types of fat [palm oil (PO) and sunflower oil (SO)] at an inclusion rate of 90 g/kg of diet. The experimental period lasted from 1 to 34 d. Dietary fat type did not affect BW gain but impaired feed conversion (P abdominal fat deposition and serum lipid and glucose concentrations. Triacylglycerol contents in liver were higher in the birds fed PO diets. Dietary fat type also modified fatty acids of abdominal and i.m. fat, resulting in a higher concentration of C16:0 and C18:1n-9 and a lower concentration of C18:2n-6 in the birds fed PO diets. The addition of inulin to diets modified (P = 0.017) BW gain quadratically without affecting feed conversion. Dietary inulin decreased the total lipid concentration in liver (P = 0.003) and that of triacylglycerols and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (up to 31%) in blood serum compared with the control groups. The polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio increased in abdominal and i.m. fat when inulin was included in the SO-containing diets. The results from the current study suggest that the addition of inulin to broiler diets has a beneficial effect on blood serum lipids by decreasing triacylglyceride concentrations The results also support the use of inulin to increase the capacity of SO for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio of i.m. fat in broilers.

  6. Computer prediction of biological activity of 2-methyl(phenyl-6,9-epoksybenzo[g]quinoline-4,5,10-Trion and 5-methyl-(1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a] quinoline

    Yu. V. Karpenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available , One of the priority measures, which are evaluated in the creation of new effective medicines, is their high selective effect and lack of side effects. A considerable interest is the possibility of combining several structures of heterocycles in one molecule, such as quinoline and furan, which may cause an increase in biological activity of these combined compounds or an emergence of new properties. It is known that derivatives of 1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]quinoline have anticonvulsant effect and treat the syndrome of disorders with the nervous system. The aim of research. The main purpose of this work was an establishment of combinatorial library of bioregulators, which combines structures 5,8-dioksoquinoline and furan (1-8, quinoline and triazole (9-12, using computer program PASS (Prediction Activitity Spectra for Substances. Virtual screening of heterocycles derivatives was conducted to determine the direction of their bioactivity researches. Materials and methods. The virtual screening of compounds was performed by using the computer program PASS (Prediction Activity Spectra for Substances. For the specific activity the increase of Pa quantity and the decrease of the Pi quantity, helps to get the greater chance to detect this activity in the experiment. Predicting the probability of substance manifestation of specific types of biological activity determines which tests are the most appropriate for studying the biological activity of specific chemical substances and which substances of those that are available to the researcher likely will show the desired effect. With theoretical prediction the most likely basic structures of new compounds with desired biological effect, which best suits the task will be selected. Results. Analysis of computer prediction demonstrates the promising search of antineoplastic, antibiotic, analgesic and other types of activity in some of these compounds. An important instant of prediction of these substances is

  7. Morphine metabolites

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    , morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are the major metabolites of morphine. The metabolism of morphine occurs not only in the liver, but may also take place in the brain and the kidneys. The glucuronides are mainly eliminated via bile and urine. Glucuronides as a rule...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...... systemic administration reflect hepatic metabolism of morphine and that the morphine glucuronides, despite their high polarity, can penetrate into the brain. Like morphine, M6G has been shown to be relatively more selective for mu-receptors than for delta- and kappa-receptors while M3G does not appear...

  8. Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its metabolites, glycidol and beta-chlorolactic acid, using the single cell gel/comet assay.

    El Ramy, R; Ould Elhkim, M; Lezmi, S; Poul, J M

    2007-01-01

    3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a member of a group of chemicals known as chloropropanols. It is found in many foods and food ingredients as a result of food processing. 3-MCPD is regarded as a rat carcinogen known to induce Leydig-cell and mammary gland tumours in males and kidney tumours in both genders. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible involvement of genotoxic mechanisms in 3-MCPD induced carcinogenicity at the target organ level. For that purpose, we evaluated DNA damages in selected target (kidneys and testes) and non-target (blood leukocytes, liver and bone marrow) male rat organs by the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay, 3 and 24 h after 3-MCPD oral administration to Sprague-Dawley and Fisher 344 adult rats. 3-MCPD may be metabolised to a genotoxic intermediate, glycidol, whereas the predominant urinary metabolite in rats following 3-MCPD administration is beta-chlorolactic acid. Therefore, we also studied the DNA damaging effects of 3-MCPD and its metabolites, glycidol and beta-chlorolactic acid, in the in vitro comet assay on CHO cells. Our results show the absence of genotoxic potential of 3-MCPD in vivo in the target as well as in the non-target organs. Glycidol, the epoxide metabolite, induced DNA damages in CHO cells. beta-Chlorolactic acid, the main metabolite of 3-MCPD in rats, was shown to be devoid of DNA-damaging effects in vitro in mammalian cells.

  9. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  10. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are associated with hippocampal activity during autobiographical memory recall in patients with depression.

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Dantzer, Robert; Teague, T Kent; Bodurka, Jerzy; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of inflammatory mediators such as c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 1β (IL-1), and IL-6 as well as kynurenine metabolites are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and affect depressive behavior, cognition, and hippocampal plasticity in animal models. We previously reported that the ratios of kynurenic acid (KynA) to the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA), were positively correlated with hippocampal volume in depression. The hippocampus is critical for autobiographical memory (AM) recall which is impaired in MDD. Here we tested whether the ratios, KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were associated with AM recall performance as well as hippocampal activity during AM recall. Thirty-five unmedicated depressed participants and 25 healthy controls (HCs) underwent fMRI scanning while recalling emotionally-valenced AMs and provided serum samples for the quantification of kynurenine metabolites, CRP, and cytokines (IL-1 receptor antagonist - IL-1RA; IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha - TNF, interferon gamma -IFN-γ, IL-10). KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were lower in the MDD group relative to the HCs. The concentrations of the CRP and the cytokines did not differ significantly between the HCs and the MDD group. Depressed individuals recalled fewer specific AMs and displayed increased left hippocampal activity during the recall of positive and negative memories. KynA/3HK was inversely associated with left hippocampal activity during specific AM recall in the MDD group. Further, KynA/QA was positively correlated with percent negative specific memories recalled in the MDD group and showed a non-significant trend toward a positive correlation with percent positive specific memories recalled in HCs. In contrast, neither CRP nor the cytokines were significantly associated with AM recall or activity of the hippocampus during AM recall. Conceivably, an imbalance in levels of KynA versus QA

  11. The pyrethroid metabolites 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol do not exhibit estrogenic activity in the MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cell line or Sprague-Dawley rats

    Laffin, Brian; Chavez, Marco; Pine, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are one of the most frequently and widely used class of insecticides, primarily because they have a higher insect to mammalian toxicity ratio than organochlorines or organophosphates. The basic structure of pyrethroids can be characterized as an acid joined to an alcohol by an ester bond. Pyrethroid degradation occurs through either oxidation at one or more sites located in the alcohol or acid moieties or hydrolysis at the central ester bond, the latter reaction being important for mammalian metabolism of most pyrethroids. The primary alcohol liberated from the ester cleavage is hydroxylated to 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol, which for most pyrethroids is then oxidized to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid. These products may then be conjugated with amino acids, sulfates, sugars, or sugar acids. In vitro studies have suggested that some of the pyrethroids may have estrogenic activity. Interestingly, the chemical structure of specific pyrethroid metabolites indicates that they may be more likely to interact with the estrogen receptor than the parent compounds. Two of the pyrethroid metabolites, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (3PBalc) have been reported to have endocrine activity using a yeast based assay. 3PBAlc exhibited estrogenic activity with reported EC 50 s of 6.67 x 10 -6 and 2 x 10 -5 while 3PBAcid exhibited anti-estrogenic activity with a calculated IC 50 of 6.5 x 10 -5 . To determine if the metabolites were able to cause the same effects in a mammalian system, the estrogen-dependent cell line, MCF-7, was utilized. Cells were treated with 1.0, 10.0 or 100.0 μM concentrations of each metabolite and cytotoxicity was assessed. The two lowest concentrations of both metabolites did not induce cell death and even appeared to increase proliferation over that of the control cells. However, when cellular proliferation was measured using a Coulter counter neither metabolite stimulated proliferation (1.0 nM, 10.0 nM, or 10.0 μM) or

  12. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites as modulators of stem cell biology with reference to inflammation, cancer, and metastasis.

    Das, Undurti N

    2011-12-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent and expected to be of benefit in the management of coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease in which pro-inflammatory cytokines are increased. Identifying endogenous bioactive molecules that have a regulatory role in stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation may aid in the use of stem cells in various diseases including cancer. Essential fatty acids form precursors to both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules have been shown to regulate gene expression, enzyme activity, modulate inflammation and immune response, gluconeogenesis via direct and indirect pathways, function directly as agonists of a number of G protein-coupled receptors, activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and stimulate cell proliferation via Ca(2+), phospholipase C/protein kinase, events that are also necessary for stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Hence, it is likely that bioactive lipids play a significant role in various diseases by modulating the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells in addition to their capacity to suppress inflammation. Ephrin Bs and reelin, adhesion molecules, and microRNAs regulate neuronal migration and cancer cell metastasis. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their products seem to modulate the expression of ephrin Bs and reelin and several adhesion molecules and microRNAs suggesting that bioactive lipids participate in neuronal regeneration and stem cell proliferation, migration, and cancer cell metastasis. Thus, there appears to be a close interaction among essential fatty acids, their bioactive products, and inflammation and cancer growth and its metastasis.

  13. Synthesis of pyrrolo(2,3-b)quinolines by palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation

    Gee, Moon Bae; Lee, Won Jung; Yum, Eul Kgun

    2003-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 2-amino-3-iodoquinoline derivatives and 1-trimethylsilyl internal alkynes provided highly regioselective pyrrolo(2,3-b)quinolines with trimethylsilyl group next to the nitrogen atom in the pyrrole ring

  14. Chlorine- and Sulphur-substituted Pyrrolo[3,4-b]quinolines and ...

    Chlorine- and Sulphur-substituted Pyrrolo[3,4-b]quinolines and Related Derivatives .... J. Chem., 2003, 56, 40–46,. . .... It is evident from the above that by judicious selection and application of reagents ...

  15. Aspergillus fumigatus CY018, an endophytic fungus in Cynodon dactylon as a versatile producer of new and bioactive metabolites.

    Liu, J Y; Song, Y C; Zhang, Z; Wang, L; Guo, Z J; Zou, W X; Tan, R X

    2004-11-09

    Aspergillus fumigatus CY018 was recognized as an endophytic fungus for the first time in the leaf of Cynodon dactylon. By bioassay-guided fractionation, the EtOAc extract of a solid-matrix steady culture of this fungus afforded two new metabolites, named asperfumoid (1) and asperfumin (2), together with six known bioactive compounds including monomethylsulochrin, fumigaclavine C, fumitremorgin C, physcion, helvolic acid and 5alpha,8alpha-epidioxy-ergosta-6,22-diene-3beta-ol as well as other four known compounds ergosta-4,22-diene-3beta-ol, ergosterol, cyclo(Ala-Leu) and cyclo(Ala-Ile). Through detailed spectroscopic analyses including HRESI-MS, homo- and hetero-nuclear correlation NMR experiments (HMQC, COSY, NOESY and HMBC), the structures of asperfumoid and asperfumin were established to be spiro-(3-hydroxyl-2,6-dimethoxyl-2,5-diene-4-cyclohexone-(1,3')-5'-methoxyl-7'-methyl-(1'H, 2'H, 4'H)-quinoline-2',4'-dione) and 5-hydroxyl-2-(6-hydroxyl-2-methoxyl-4-methylbenzoyl)-3,6-dimethoxyl-benzoic methyl ester, respectively. All of the 12 isolates were subjected to in vitro bioactive assays against three human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Tricophyton rubrum and Aspergillus niger. As a result, asperfumoid, fumigaclavine C, fumitremorgin C, physcion and helvolic acid were shown to inhibit C. albicans with MICs of 75.0, 31.5, 62.5, 125.0 and 31.5 microg/mL, respectively.

  16. 2,3,8-Trisubstituted Quinolines with Antimalarial Activity.

    Martinez, Pablo D G; Krake, Susann H; Poggi, Maitia L; Campbell, Simon F; Willis, Paul A; Dias, Luiz C

    2018-01-01

    Combination therapy drugs are considered a fundamental way to control malaria as it mimimizes the risk of emergence of resistance to the individual partner drugs. Consequently, this type of therapy constitutes a driving force for the discovery of new drugs with different modes of action, since this will provide options for combining different drugs to achieve the optimum antimalarial treatment. In this context, a 2,3,8-trisubstitued quinoline compound was found in a high throughput screen (HTS) to show an excellent inhibition of P. falciparum NF54 (IC50 = 22 nM) and low cytotoxicity. We performed a detailed evaluation of the substituents to improve the metabolic stability and solubility liabilities of the original hit and identified derivatives with enhanced physicochemical and/or PK properties and that maintained biological activity. However the high potency was not retained on testing against drug resistant plasmodium strains.

  17. 2,3,8-Trisubstituted Quinolines with Antimalarial Activity

    PABLO D.G. MARTINEZ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Combination therapy drugs are considered a fundamental way to control malaria as it mimimizes the risk of emergence of resistance to the individual partner drugs. Consequently, this type of therapy constitutes a driving force for the discovery of new drugs with different modes of action, since this will provide options for combining different drugs to achieve the optimum antimalarial treatment. In this context, a 2,3,8-trisubstitued quinoline compound was found in a high throughput screen (HTS to show an excellent inhibition of P. falciparum NF54 (IC50 = 22 nM and low cytotoxicity. We performed a detailed evaluation of the substituents to improve the metabolic stability and solubility liabilities of the original hit and identified derivatives with enhanced physicochemical and/or PK properties and that maintained biological activity. However the high potency was not retained on testing against drug resistant plasmodium strains.

  18. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate)2.

    Black, Nicholas; Daiki, Tonouchi; Matsushita, Michio M; Woollins, J Derek; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2017-12-20

    The magnetic, structural, conductivity and magnetoresistance properties of [Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate) 2 ] ([Ni(qs) 2 ]) have been studied. Despite the insolubility of the material necessitating its study as a powdered sample, a remarkably high conductivity has been measured. The conductivity is an order of magnitude greater than the thin-film processable thiol analogue previously reported and has been interpreted through the same space-charge limited conduction mechanism with charges injected from the electrodes. The introduction of selenium, results in a material with conductivity approaching metallic due to the enhanced interaction between adjacent molecules. Additionally, under an applied magnetic field, the material displays a negative magnetoresistance effect above 35% at 2 K. The effect can still be observed at 200 K and is interpreted in terms of a double-exchange mechanism.

  19. Strategies for Pathogen Biocontrol Using Lactic Acid Bacteria and Their Metabolites: A Focus on Meat Ecosystems and Industrial Environments

    Patricia Castellano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of trade and lifestyle ensure that the factors responsible for the emergence of diseases are more present than ever. Despite biotechnology advancements, meat-based foods are still under scrutiny because of the presence of pathogens, which causes a loss of consumer confidence and consequently a fall in demand. In this context, Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB as GRAS organisms offer an alternative for developing pathogen-free foods, particularly avoiding Listeria monocytogenes, with minimal processing and fewer additives while maintaining the foods’ sensorial characteristics. The use of LAB strains, enabling us to produce antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins in addition to lactic acid, with an impact on quality and safety during fermentation, processing, and/or storage of meat and ready-to-eat (RTE meat products, constitutes a promising tool. A number of bacteriocin-based strategies including the use of bioprotective cultures, purified and/or semi-purified bacteriocins as well as their inclusion in varied packaging materials under different storage conditions, have been investigated. The application of bacteriocins as part of hurdle technology using non-thermal technologies was explored for the preservation of RTE meat products. Likewise, considering that food contamination with L. monocytogenes is a consequence of the post-processing manipulation of RTE foods, the role of bacteriocinogenic LAB in the control of biofilms formed on industrial surfaces is also discussed.

  20. Strategies for Pathogen Biocontrol Using Lactic Acid Bacteria and Their Metabolites: A Focus on Meat Ecosystems and Industrial Environments

    Castellano, Patricia; Pérez Ibarreche, Mariana; Fontana, Cecilia; Vignolo, Graciela M.

    2017-01-01

    The globalization of trade and lifestyle ensure that the factors responsible for the emergence of diseases are more present than ever. Despite biotechnology advancements, meat-based foods are still under scrutiny because of the presence of pathogens, which causes a loss of consumer confidence and consequently a fall in demand. In this context, Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) as GRAS organisms offer an alternative for developing pathogen-free foods, particularly avoiding Listeria monocytogenes, with minimal processing and fewer additives while maintaining the foods’ sensorial characteristics. The use of LAB strains, enabling us to produce antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) in addition to lactic acid, with an impact on quality and safety during fermentation, processing, and/or storage of meat and ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products, constitutes a promising tool. A number of bacteriocin-based strategies including the use of bioprotective cultures, purified and/or semi-purified bacteriocins as well as their inclusion in varied packaging materials under different storage conditions, have been investigated. The application of bacteriocins as part of hurdle technology using non-thermal technologies was explored for the preservation of RTE meat products. Likewise, considering that food contamination with L. monocytogenes is a consequence of the post-processing manipulation of RTE foods, the role of bacteriocinogenic LAB in the control of biofilms formed on industrial surfaces is also discussed. PMID:28696370

  1. Heterocycles [h]-Fused Onto 4-Oxoquinoline-3-Carboxylic Acid, Part VIII [1]. Convenient Synthesis and Antimicrobial Properties of Substituted Hexahydro[1,4]diazepino[2,3-h]quinoline-9-carboxylic acid and Its Tetrahydroquino[7,8-b]benzodiazepine Analog

    Yusuf M. Al-Hiari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available [1,4]Diazepino[2,3-h]quinolone carboxylic acid 3 and its benzo-homolog tetrahydroquino[7,8-b]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid 5 were prepared via PPAcatalyzed thermal lactamization of the respective 8-amino-7-substituted-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives 8, 10. The latter compounds were obtained by reduction of their 8-nitro-7-substituted-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid precursors 7, 9 which, in turn, were prepared by reaction of 7-chloro-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-8-nitro-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (6 with each of β-alanine and anthranilic acid. All intermediates and target compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, NMR, IR and MS spectral data. The prepared targets and the intermediates have shown interesting antibacterial activity mainly against Gram positive strains. In particular, compound 8 showed good activity against S. aureus (MIC = 0.39 μg/mL and B. subtilis (MIC = 0.78 μg/mL. Compounds 5a and 9 have also displayed good antifungal activity against C. albicans (MIC = 1.56 μg/mL and 0.78 μg/mL, respectively. None of the compounds tested showed any anticancer activity against solid breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells or a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line.

  2. Quinolines in clothing textiles--a source of human exposure and wastewater pollution?

    Luongo, Giovanna; Thorsén, Gunnar; Ostman, Conny

    2014-05-01

    A production process in which the use of various types of chemicals seems to be ubiquitous makes the textile industry a growing problem regarding both public health as well as the environment. Among several substances used at each stage, the present study focuses on the quinolines, a class of compounds involved in the manufacture of dyes, some of which are skin irritants and/or classified as probable human carcinogens. A method was developed for the determination of quinoline derivatives in textile materials comprising ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction, solid phase extraction cleanup, and final analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Quinoline and ten quinoline derivatives were determined in 31 textile samples. The clothing samples, diverse in color, material, brand, country of manufacture, and price, and intended for a broad market, were purchased from different shops in Stockholm, Sweden. Quinoline, a possible human carcinogen, was found to be the most abundant compound present in almost all of the samples investigated, reaching a level of 1.9 mg in a single garment, and it was found that quinoline and its derivatives were mainly correlated to polyester material. This study points out the importance of screening textiles with nontarget analysis to investigate the presence of chemicals in an unbiased manner. Focus should be primarily on clothing worn close to the body.

  3. Vitamin A active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid, induces spinal cord sensitization. II. Effects after intrathecal administration

    Alique, M; Lucio, F J; Herrero, J F

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In our previous study (see accompanying paper) we observed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) p.o. induces changes in spinal cord neuronal responses similar to those observed in inflammation-induced sensitization. In the present study we assessed the it. effects of ATRA, and its mechanisms of action. Experimental approach: The effects of all drugs were studied after it. administration in nociceptive withdrawal reflexes using behavioural tests in awake male Wistar rats. Key results: The administration of ATRA in normal rats induced a dose-dependent enhancement of nociceptive responses to noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation, as well as responses to innocuous stimulation. The intensity of the responses was similar to that observed in non-treated animals after carrageenan-induced inflammation. The effect induced by ATRA was fully prevented by the previous administration of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) pan-antagonist LE540 but not by the retinoid X receptor (RXR) pan-antagonist HX531, suggesting a selective action on spinal cord RARs. The COX inhibitor dexketoprofen and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist IL-1ra inhibited ATRA effect. The results indicate that COX and interleukin-1 are involved in the effects of ATRA in the spinal cord, similar to that seen in inflammation. Conclusions and implications: In conclusion, ATRA induces changes in the spinal cord similar to those observed in inflammation. The sensitization-like effect induced by ATRA was mediated by RARs and associated with a modulation of COX-2 and interleukin-1 activities. ATRA might be involved in the mechanisms underlying the initiation and/or maintenance of sensitization in the spinal cord. PMID:16847438

  4. Quinoline based furanones and their nitrogen analogues: Docking, synthesis and biological evaluation

    Sukhbir Lal Khokra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A small library of twenty-four quinoline based butenolides also known as furanones and their nitrogen analogues was prepared by using two different aroylpropionic acids, viz. 3-(2-naphthoylpropionic acid (3 and 3-(biphenyl-4-ylpropionic acid (4, as starting materials. The 3-aroylpropionic acids were reacted with different 6-substituted-2-chloroquinolin-3-carbaldehydes (2a–d to obtain the corresponding furan-2(3H-ones (5a–h. The purified and characterized furanones were then converted into their corresponding 2(3H-pyrrolones (6a–h and N-benzyl-pyrrol-2(3H-ones (7a–h. The antimicrobial activities of the title compounds were evaluated against two strains of each Gram +ve (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, Gram −ve bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against fungal strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. In vivo anti-inflammatory potential of the title compounds was investigated by standard method. Majority of the compounds showed significant antibacterial activity against both the Gram +ve strains. Eight most potent anti-inflammatory compounds (5b, 5d, 5h, 6b, 7b, 7d, 7f, 7h which exhibited >53% inhibition in edema, were also screened for their in vivo analgesic activity. All the tested compounds were found to have significant reduction in ulcerogenic action but only three compounds (5d, 5h and 7h showed comparable analgesic activity to standard drug, diclofenac. The results were also validated using in silico approach and maximum mol doc score was obtained for compounds 7a–h. On comparing the in vivo and in silico anti-inflammatory results of synthesized compounds, N-benzyl pyrrolones (7a–h emerged as the potent anti-inflammatory agents. It was also observed that compounds that possess electron withdrawing group such as Cl or NO2 are more biologically active.

  5. Transient postnatal fluoxetine decreases brain concentrations of 20-HETE and 15-epi-LXA4, arachidonic acid metabolites in adult mice.

    Yuan, Zhi-Xin; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-10-01

    Transient postnatal exposure of rodents to the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine alters behavior and brain 5-HT neurotransmission during adulthood, and also reduces brain arachidonic (ARA) metabolic consumption and protein level of the ARA metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P4504A (CYP4A). Brain 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), converted by CYP4A from ARA, will be reduced in adult mice treated transiently and postnatally with fluoxetine. Male mice pups were injected i.p. daily with fluoxetine (10mg/kg) or saline during P4-P21. At P90 their brain was high-energy microwaved and analyzed for 20-HETE and six other ARA metabolites by enzyme immunoassay. Postnatal fluoxetine vs. saline significantly decreased brain concentrations of 20-HETE (-70.3%) and 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (-60%) in adult mice, but did not change other eicosanoid concentrations. Behavioral changes in adult mice treated postnatally with fluoxetine may be related to reduced brain ARA metabolism involving CYP4A and 20-HETE formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification of liver protein targets modified by tienilic acid metabolites using a two-dimensional Western blot-mass spectrometry approach

    Methogo, Ruth Menque; Dansette, Patrick M.; Klarskov, Klaus

    2007-12-01

    A combined approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis-immuno-blotting and nanoliquid chromatography coupled on-line with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins modified by a reactive intermediate of tienilic acid (TA). Liver homogenates from rats exposed to TA were fractionated using ultra centrifugation; four fractions were obtained and subjected to 2D electrophoresis. Following transfer to PVDF membranes, modified proteins were visualized after India ink staining, using an anti-serum raised against TA and ECL detection. Immuno-reactive spots were localized on the PVDF membrane by superposition of the ECL image, protein spots of interest were excised, digested on the membrane with trypsin followed by nLC-MS/MS analysis and protein identification. A total of 15 proteins were identified as likely targets modified by a TA reactive metabolite. These include selenium binding protein 2, senescence marker protein SMP-30, adenosine kinase, Acy1 protein, adenosylhomocysteinase, capping protein (actin filament), protein disulfide isomerase, fumarylacetoacetase, arginase chain A, ketohexokinase, proteasome endopeptidase complex, triosephosphate isomerase, superoxide dismutase, dna-type molecular chaperone hsc73 and malate dehydrogenase.

  7. A comprehensive review of the published assays for the quantitation of the immunosuppressant drug mycophenolic acid and its glucuronidated metabolites in biological fluids.

    Syed, Muzeeb; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic use of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is steadily on the rise in combination with other immunosuppressant drugs in transplantation patients. The biotransformation of MPA resulted in the formation of glucuronide metabolites, MPAG and AcMPAG. There are a plethora of assays validated for the analysis of MPA alone or with MPAG/AcMPAG in various biological specimens including plasma/serum, urine, ultrafiltrate, saliva, PBMC, dried blood spots, tissue extract, tumor biopsies and vitreous humor. Based on the need for experimental work, a proper choice of the assay and internal standard may be made using the choices in the literature. While the chemical methods involving high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or LC coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are popular, enzymatic assays, in spite of their higher bias, have been used for the routine drug monitoring of MPA. The objectives of the present review are: (a) to provide a focused systematic compilation of the HPLC or LC-MS/MS methods for MPA, MPAG and/or AcMPAG published in the last decade (2005 to current) to enable visual comparison of the methods; (b) to compare and contrast a few enzymatic assays with those of the chemical methods; and (c) to discuss relevant issues/limitations and perspectives on select assays under various subheadings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Changes in the Levels of Abscisic Acid and Its Metabolites in Excised Leaf Blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after Water Stress 1

    Zeevaart, Jan A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a μBondapak-NH2 column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector. The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse. Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible. Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness, responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period. PMID:16661500

  9. Changes in the Levels of Abscisic Acid and Its Metabolites in Excised Leaf Blades of Xanthium strumarium during and after Water Stress.

    Zeevaart, J A

    1980-10-01

    The time course of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during water stress and of degradation following rehydration was investigated by analyzing the levels of ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid (PA) and alkalihydrolyzable conjugated ABA in excised leaf blades of Xanthium strumarium. Initial purification was by reverse-phase, preparative, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which did not require prior partitioning. ABA and PA were purified further by analytical HPLC with a muBondapak-NH(2) column, and quantified by GLC with an electron capture detector.The ABA content of stressed leaves increased for 4 to 5 hours and then leveled off due to a balance between synthesis and degradation. Since PA accumulated at a constant rate throughout the wilting period, it was concluded that the rate of ABA synthesis decreased after the first 4 to 5 hours stress. Conjugated ABA increased at a low rate during stress. This is interpreted to indicate that free ABA was converted to the conjugated form, rather than the reverse.Following rehydration of wilted leaves, the ABA level immediately ceased increasing; it remained constant for 1 hour and then declined rapidly to the prestress level over a 2- to 3-hour period with a concomitant rise in the PA level. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of ABA after relief of stress, the high PA content of rehydrated leaves declined only slowly. The level of conjugated ABA did not change following rehydration, indicating that conjugation of ABA was irreversible.Detached Xanthium leaves that were subjected to a wilting-recovery-rewilting cycle in darkness, responded to the second wilting period by formation of the same amount of ABA as accumulated after the first stress period.

  10. Elevated Metabolites of Steroidogenesis and Amino Acid Metabolism in Preadolescent Female Children With High Urinary Bisphenol A Levels: A High-Resolution Metabolomics Study.

    Khan, Adnan; Park, Hyesook; Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Bohyun; Gwak, Hye Sun; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jee, Sun Ha; Park, Youngja H

    2017-12-01

    Health risks associated with bisphenol A (BPA) exposure are controversially highlighted by numerous studies. High-resolution metabolomics (HRM) can confirm these proposed associations and may provide a mechanistic insight into the connections between BPA exposure and metabolic perturbations. This study was aimed to identify the changes in metabolomics profile due to BPA exposure in urine and serum samples collected from female and male children (n = 18) aged 7-9. Urine was measured for BPA concentration, and the children were subsequently classified into high and low BPA groups. HRM, coupled with Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/MS, followed by multivariate statistical analysis using MetaboAnalyst 3.0, were performed on urine to discriminate metabolic profiles between high and low BPA children as well as males and females, followed by further validation of our findings in serum samples obtained from same population. Metabolic pathway analysis showed that biosynthesis of steroid hormones and 7 other pathways-amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, tyrosine metabolism, lysine degradation, pyruvate metabolism, and arginine biosynthesis-were affected in high BPA children. Elevated levels of metabolites associated with these pathways in urine and serum were mainly observed in female children, while these changes were negligible in male children. Our results suggest that the steroidogenesis pathway and amino acid metabolism are the main targets of perturbation by BPA in preadolescent girls. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Detection and quantification of α-keto-δ-(N(G),N(G)-dimethylguanidino)valeric acid: a metabolite of asymmetric dimethylarginine.

    Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Rodionov, Roman N; Drust, Andreas; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M

    2011-12-15

    Nitric oxide is an ubiquitary cell signaling substance. Its enzymatic production rate by nitric oxide synthase is regulated by the concentrations of the substrate L-arginine and the competitive inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). A newly recognized elimination pathway for ADMA is the transamination to α-keto-δ-(N(G),N(G)-dimethylguanidino)valeric acid (DMGV) by the enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2). This pathway has been proven to be relevant for nitric oxide regulation, but up to now no method exists for the determination of DMGV in biological fluids. We have developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of DMGV. D(6)-DMGV was used as internal standard. Samples were purified online by column switching, and separation was achieved on a porous graphitic carbon column. The calibration was linear over ranges of 10 to 200 nmol/L for plasma and 0.1 to 20 μmol/L for urine. The intra- and interday accuracies and precisions in plasma and urine were better than 10%. In plasma samples, DMGV was present in concentrations between 19.1 and 77.5 nmol/L. In urine samples, concentrations between 0.0114 and 1.03 μmol/mmol creatinine were found. This method can be used as a tool for the scientific investigation of the ADMA conversion to DMGV via the enzyme AGXT2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of impregnation methods and drying conditions on quinoline hydrodenitrogenation over Ni-W based catalysts

    Guo, Fang; Qiu, Zegang; Zhao, Liangfu; Xiang, Hongwei [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Guo, Shaoqing [Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China)

    2014-04-15

    The effects of impregnation methods (co-impregnation and sequential impregnation) and drying conditions (air and vacuum) on the structure and catalytic behavior of MCM-41 supported Ni-W catalysts were investigated. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy (DRS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pyridine adsorbed infrared spectroscopy (Py-IR) techniques. They were tested for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline at temperatures of 300-400 deg C. The HDN results showed that the catalysts prepared by co-impregnation were more active than the catalysts prepared by sequential impregnation and the catalysts prepared by drying under vacuum were more active than the catalysts dried in air. Characterization revealed that the co-impregnation method and drying under vacuum promoted the dispersion of W, the formation of the active phases, and the formation of acidic sites on the catalysts. (author)

  13. Crystal structure of Sus scrofa quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide.

    Hyung-Seop Youn

    Full Text Available We have determined the crystal structure of porcine quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN, which is the first crystal structure of a mammalian QAPRTase with its reaction product. The structure was determined from protein obtained from the porcine kidney. Because the full protein sequence of porcine QAPRTase was not available in either protein or nucleotide databases, cDNA was synthesized using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to determine the porcine QAPRTase amino acid sequence. The crystal structure revealed that porcine QAPRTases have a hexameric structure that is similar to other eukaryotic QAPRTases, such as the human and yeast enzymes. However, the interaction between NAMN and porcine QAPRTase was different from the interaction found in prokaryotic enzymes, such as those of Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The crystal structure of porcine QAPRTase in complex with NAMN provides a structural framework for understanding the unique properties of the mammalian QAPRTase active site and designing new antibiotics that are selective for the QAPRTases of pathogenic bacteria, such as H. pylori and M. tuberculosis.

  14. Melatonin prevents maternal fructose intake-induced programmed hypertension in the offspring: roles of nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites.

    Tain, You-Lin; Leu, Steve; Wu, Kay L H; Lee, Wei-Chia; Chan, Julie Y H

    2014-08-01

    Fructose intake has increased globally and is linked to hypertension. Melatonin was reported to prevent hypertension development. In this study, we examined whether maternal high fructose (HF) intake causes programmed hypertension and whether melatonin therapy confers protection against the process, with a focus on the link to epigenetic changes in the kidney using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with HF (60% diet by weight) alone or with additional 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to four groups: control, HF, control + melatonin (M), and HF + M. Maternal HF caused increases in blood pressure (BP) in the 12-wk-old offspring. Melatonin therapy blunted the HF-induced programmed hypertension and increased nitric oxide (NO) level in the kidney. The identified differential expressed gene (DEGs) that are related to regulation of BP included Ephx2, Col1a2, Gucy1a3, Npr3, Aqp2, Hba-a2, and Ptgs1. Of which, melatonin therapy inhibited expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH, Ephx2 gene encoding protein). In addition, we found genes in arachidonic acid metabolism were potentially involved in the HF-induced programmed hypertension and were affected by melatonin therapy. Together, our data suggest that the beneficial effects of melatonin are attributed to its ability to increase NO level in the kidney, epigenetic regulation of genes related to BP control, and inhibition of SEH expression. The roles of DEGs by the NGS in long-term epigenetic changes in the adult offspring kidney require further clarification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of Pyrano[3,2-c]quinolin-2,5-dione Derivatives Catalyzed by L-Proline

    Jing Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of 4-aryl-6-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinolin-2,5(6H-diones were synthesized via the three-component reactions of aromatic aldehydes, 4-hydroxy-1-methylquinolin-2(1H-one, and Meldrum’s acid catalyzed by L-proline. The structures of the products were identified by spectroscopic analysis. A mechanism for this three-component reaction catalyzed by L-proline was proposed.

  16. N-{4-[(2E-3-(2H-1,3-Benzodioxol-5-ylprop-2-enoyl]phenyl}quinoline-3-carboxamide

    Efrain Polo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An amide chalconehas been synthesized in a two-step reaction. First, N-(4-acetylphenylquinoline-3-carboxamide 2 was synthesized by the reaction of quinoline-3-carboxylic acid 1 and thionyl chloride (SOCl2, following the addition of 4-aminoacetophenone. Then, a typical Claisen–Schmidtreactionwas made between 2 and piperonal using KOH solution as a catalystin ethanol, under ultrasonic irradiation. The structure of the target compound was established by FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, HRMS, 1H and 13C-NMR.

  17. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    Jing Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402 and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  18. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. Copyright © 2016 Niu et al.

  19. Novel Basic Mesoporous Catalysts for Friedländer Reaction from 2-Aminoaryl Ketones: Quinolin-2(1H)-ones vs. Quinolines

    Domínguez-Fernández, F.; López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Bek, David; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2009), s. 241-243 ISSN 1867-3880 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : quinolines * heterogeneous catalysis * basicity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Determination of the pK values of 5-aminosalicylic acid and N-acetylaminosalicylic acid and comparison of the pH dependent lipid-water partition coefficients of sulphasalazine and its metabolites.

    Allgayer, H; Sonnenbichler, J; Kruis, W; Paumgartner, G

    1985-01-01

    Sulphasalazine (SASP), used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, is split into sulphapyridine (SP) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in the colon. Lower plasma levels of SASP and 5-ASA as compared to those of SP may be due to different absorption rates from the colon because of different pK values and pH dependent lipid-water partition coefficients. In this study we determined the pK values of 5-ASA and its major metabolite, N-acetyl amino-salicylic acid (AcASA), by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and compared the pH dependent apparent benzene-water partition coefficients (Papp) of SASP, SP and 5-ASA with respect to their different plasma levels. The COOH group of 5-ASA had a pK value of 3.0, the -NH3+ group had 6.0, the -OH group 13.9; the -COOH group of AcASA had 2.7 and the -OH group 12.9; The Papp of SASP (0.042 +/- 0.004) and 5-ASA (0.059 +/- 0.01) were significantly lower than that of SP (0.092 +/- 0.03) (at pH 5.5).

  1. Smaller Dentate Gyrus and CA2 and CA3 Volumes Are Associated with Kynurenine Metabolites in Collegiate Football Athletes.

    Meier, Timothy B; Savitz, Jonathan; Singh, Rashmi; Teague, T Kent; Bellgowan, Patrick S F

    2016-07-15

    An imbalance in kynurenine pathway metabolism is hypothesized to be associated with dysregulated glutamatergic neurotransmission, which has been proposed as a mechanism underlying the hippocampal volume loss observed in a variety of neurological disorders. Pre-clinical models suggest that the CA2-3 and dentate gyrus hippocampal subfields are particularly susceptible to excitotoxicity after experimental traumatic brain injury. We tested the hypothesis that smaller hippocampal volumes in collegiate football athletes with (n = 25) and without (n = 24) a concussion history would be most evident in the dentate gyrus and CA2-3 subfields relative to nonfootball healthy controls (n = 27). Further, we investigated whether the concentration of peripheral levels of kynurenine metabolites are altered in football athletes. Football athletes with and without a self-reported concussion history had smaller dentate gyrus (p Football athletes with and without a concussion history had a trend toward lower (p history had greater levels of quinolinic acid compared with athletes without a concussion history (p football athletes with a concussion history (p football athletes without a concussion history (p < 0.05). Our results raise the possibility that abnormalities of the kynurenine metabolic pathway constitute a mechanism for hippocampal volume differences in the context of sports-related brain injury.

  2. Uptake and fate of phenol, aniline and quinoline in terrestrial plants

    Cataldo, D.A.; Bean, R.M.; Fellows, R.J.

    1987-06-01

    The bioavailability and chemical fate of xenobiotics in terrestrial plants can influence the impact of fossil fuel development on the human food chain. To determine the relative behavior of organic residues representing a range of chemical classes, we compared the rates of root absorption, tissue distribution and chemical fate of phenol, aniline and quinoline in soybean plants. Root absorption rates for these compounds were 180, 13 and 30 μg/g (fresh weight) root/day, respectively. Following uptake, aniline was concentrated in the root, while phenol and quinoline were evenly distributed in roots and leaves. After accumulation, phenol was readily decomposed, and its carbon was respired. While aniline was susceptible to oxidative decomposition, it persisted in leaves and roots; 25% of the soluble activity represented aniline, and a significant fraction was bound or conjugated to cell constitutents. Quinoline persisted both in the parent form and as metabolic products. However, in leaves, additional compounds were found that were chemically similar to quinoline; these were not found in unexposed plants. A substantial fraction of the quinoline accumulated by leaves was emitted to the atmosphere by volatilization. 12 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  3. The simultaneous identification of metoprolol and its major acidic and basic metabolites in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Li, Feng; Cooper, S.F. [Universite du Quebec, Pointe-Claire (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    A novel gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed to confirm and identify metoprolol and its metabolites by double derivatization with S-(-)menthyl chloroformate [(-)-MCF] and N-methyl(trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide) (MSTFA). This is the first report, which describes the simultaneous identification of metoprolol, its one major acidc and other basic metabolites in human urine based on solid-phase extraction with C{sub 18} reversed-phase cartridges. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  4. An Efficient Synthesis of Substituted Quinolines via Indium(III) Chloride Catalyzed Reaction of Imines with Alkynes

    Zhu, Mei; Fu, Weijun; Xun, Chen; Zou, Guanglong

    2012-01-01

    An efficient synthetic method for the preparation of quinolines through indium(III) chloride-catalyzed tandem addition-cyclization-oxidation reactions of imines with alkynes was developed. The processes can provide a diverse range of quinoline derivatives in good yields from simple imines and alkynes

  5. Metabolite Profiles of Diabetes Risk

    Gerszten, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases present particular difficulty for clinicians because they are often present for years before becoming clinically apparent. We investigated whether metabolite profiles can predict the development of diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study. Five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids had highly-significant associations with future diabetes, while a combination of three amino acids strongly predicted future diabetes by up to 12 years (>5-fold increased risk for individuals in ...

  6. Bioactive metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid

    Kuda, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 136, May (2017), s. 12-20 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-04859S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29182A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : DHA * specialized proresolving mediators * FAHFA * DHEA * N-acyl amides * omega-3 PUFA Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  7. Novel quinolines carrying pyridine, thienopyridine, isoquinoline, thiazolidine, thiazole and thiophene moieties as potential anticancer agents

    Ghorab Mostafa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of ongoing studies in developing new anticancer agents, novel 1,2-dihydropyridine 4, thienopyridine 5, isoquinolines 6–20, acrylamide 21, thiazolidine 22, thiazoles 23–29 and thiophenes 33–35 bearing a biologically active quinoline nucleus were synthesized. The structure of newly synthesized compounds was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses and spectral data. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. 2,3-Dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamides 27, 25, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (34, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (7, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (35, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (6, 2-cyano-3-(dimethylamino-N-(quinolin-3-ylacrylamide (21, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitriles (11 and (8 exhibited higher activity (IC50 values of 27–45 μmol L–1 compared to doxorubicin (IC50 47.9 μmol L–1. LQ quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (12, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (28 and quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (15 show activity comparable to doxorubicin, while (quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (9, 2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (24, thieno [3,4-c] pyridine-4(5H-one (5, cyclopenta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (33 and (quinolin-3-yl-6-stryl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (10 exhibited moderate activity, lower than doxorubicin.

  8. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules

    Das Undurti N

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a β blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by ~80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs and their long-chain metabolites: γ-linolenic acid (GLA, dihomo-GLA (DGLA, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1, prostacyclin (PGI2, PGI3, lipoxins (LXs, resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-γ ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and the co

  9. Effects of pistachio by-products on digestibility, milk production, milk fatty acid profile and blood metabolites in Saanen dairy goats.

    Sedighi-Vesagh, R; Naserian, A A; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pistachio by-products (PBP) on nutrient digestibility, blood metabolites and milk fatty acid (FA) profile in Saanen dairy goats. Nine multiparous lactating Saanen goats (on day 90 post-partum, 45 ± 2/kg BW) were randomly assigned to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with three treatment diets: 1) control diet (alfalfa hay based), 2) 32% PBP and 3) 32% PBP + polyethylene glycol (PEG-4000; 1 g/kg dry matter). Each period lasted 21 days, including 14 day for treatment adaptation and 7 day for data collection. Pistachio by-products significantly decreased (p < 0.01) crude protein (CP) digestibility compared with the control diet (64.4% vs. 58.7%), but PEG addition did not differ for CP digestibility of goats fed 32% PBP + PEG and those fed the two other diets. The digestibility of NDF tended (p = 0.06) to decrease for goats fed PBP compared with those fed the control diet. Yields of milk and 4% fat-corrected milk were not affected by dietary treatments. Compared with the control diet, PBP supplementation appreciably changed the proportions of almost all the milk FA measured; the main effects were decreases (p < 0.01) in FA from 8:0 to 16:0 and increases (p < 0.01) proportions of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 and trans-11 18:1, monounsaturated FA, polyunsaturated FA and long-chain FA. The saturated FA, short-chain FA and medium-chain FA proportions were lower (p < 0.01) in goats fed the two PBP supplemented diet than in those fed the control diet and PEG addition led to intermediate proportions of saturated FA, unsaturated and monounsaturated FA. Inclusion of PBP in the diet decreased (p < 0.01) plasma concentrations of glucose and urea nitrogen compared with the control diet. It was concluded that PBP can be used as forage in the diet of dairy goats without interfering with milk yield. Inclusion of 32% PBP in the diet of dairy goats had beneficial effects on milk FA profile but PEG addition to PBP

  10. Whole-body biodistribution, dosimetry and metabolite correction of [11C]palmitate: A PET tracer for imaging of fatty acid metabolism

    Christensen, Nana Louise; Jakobsen, Steen; Schacht, Anna Christina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the decades long use of [11C]palmitate positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography in basic metabolism studies, only personal communications regarding dosimetry and biodistribution data have been published. METHODS: Dosimetry and biodistribution studies were...... performed in 2 pigs and 2 healthy volunteers by whole-body [11C]palmitate PET scans. Metabolite studies were performed in 40 participants (healthy and with type 2 diabetes) under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions. Metabolites were estimated using 2 approaches and subsequently compared: Indirect [11C]CO2...

  11. SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL INDOLO[3,2-c]QUINOLINES; ETHYL 3-CHLORO-9,11-DIMETHOXY INDOLO[3,2-c]QUINOLINE-6-CARBOXYLATE

    Tutik Dwi Wahyuningsih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available -Carboline and its derivatives are significant due to their pharmacological importance. The synthesis of indolo[3,2-c]quinolines as a benzo analog of -carboline has been carried out via an oxime ether intermediate. Reaction of 2'-glyoxylic ester with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in the presence of sodium acetate afforded the oxime acetate in 82%. It was then treated with natrium and fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in ethanol to give an orange solid of oxime ether acetate which is in subsequent treatment with a base yielded a pale yellow solid of indolo[3,2-c]carboline in 43%. Keywords: -carboline, oxime, indolo[3,2-c]quinoline.

  12. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  13. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene 1 metabolite, increases sirtuin 1 mRNA and protein levels and decreases hepatic fat accumulation in ob/ob mice

    Lycopene has been shown to be beneficial in protecting against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The recent demonstration that lycopene can be converted by carotene 99,10’-oxygenase into a biologically active metabolite, ALA, led us to propose that the function of lycopene can be mediated by ALA. I...

  14. Synthesis of Quinolines through Three-Component Cascade Annulation of Aryl Diazonium Salts, Nitriles, and Alkynes.

    Wang, Hao; Xu, Qian; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Shouyun

    2017-01-06

    An efficient and rapid synthesis of multiply substituted quinolines is described. This method is enabled by a three-component cascade annulation of readily available aryl diazonium salts, nitriles, and alkynes. This reaction is catalyst- and additive-free. Various aryl diazonium salts, nitriles, and alkynes can participate in this transformation, and the yields are up to 83%.

  15. Copper(II)-catalyzed electrophilic amination of quinoline N-oxides with O-benzoyl hydroxylamines.

    Li, Gang; Jia, Chunqi; Sun, Kai; Lv, Yunhe; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Kexiao; Wu, Hankui

    2015-03-21

    Copper acetate-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization amination of quinoline N-oxides was achieved using O-benzoyl hydroxylamine as an electrophilic amination reagent, thereby affording the desired products in moderate to excellent yields. Electrophilic amination can also be performed in good yield on a gram scale.

  16. Quinoline Fluorescent Probes for Zinc - from Diagnostic to Therapeutic Molecules in Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Czaplinska, Barbara; Spaczynska, Ewelina; Musiol, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent compounds had gained strong attention due to their wide and appealing applications. Microscopic techniques and visualization are good examples among others. Introduction of fluorescent dyes into microbiology opens the possibility to observe tissues, organisms or organelle with exceptional sensitivity and resolution. Probes for detection of biologically relevant metals as zinc, iron or copper seems to be particularly important for drug design and pharmaceutical sciences. Quinoline derivatives are well known for their good metal affinity and wide spectrum of biological activity. In this regard, molecular sensors built on this scaffold may be useful not only as analytical but also as therapeutic agents. In the present review, application of quinoline moiety in designing of novel fluorescent probes for zinc is presented and discussed. Zinc cations are relevant for vast majority of processes and recently attract a great deal of attention for their role in neurodegenerative diseases. Compounds interacting with Zn2+ may be used for early diagnosis of such disorders, for example the Alzheimer disease. Quinoline-based zinc probes may exert some beneficial role in organism acting as theranostic agents. First preliminary drugs for Alzheimer therapy that are based on quinoline moiety are good example of this trend. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Asymmetric hydrogenation of quinolines catalyzed by iridium complexes of monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidites

    Mrsic, Natasa; Lefort, Laurent; Boogers, Jeroen A. F.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; de Vries, Johannes G.; Mršić, Nataša

    The monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidite PipPhos is used as ligand for the iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 2- and 2,6-substituted quinolines. If tri-ortho-tolylphosphine and/or chloride salts are used as additives enantioselectivities are strongly enhanced up to 89%. NMR indicates

  18. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  19. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    Looking at the metabolite profile of an organism provides insights into the metabolomic state of a cell and hence also into pathways employed. Little is known about the metabolites produced by corals and their algal symbionts. In particular, corals from the central Red Sea are understudied, but interesting study objects, as they live in one of the warmest and most saline environments and can provide clues as to the adjustment of corals to environmental change. In this study, we applied gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabolite profiling to analyze the metabolic profile of four coral species and their associated symbionts: Fungia granulosa, Acropora hemprichii, Porites lutea, and Pocillopora verrucosa. We identified and quantified 102 compounds among primary and secondary metabolites across all samples. F. granulosa and its symbiont showed a total of 59 metabolites which were similar to the 51 displayed by P. verrucosa. P. lutea and A. hemprichii both harbored 40 compounds in conjunction with their respective isolated algae. Comparing across species, 28 metabolites were exclusively present in algae, while 38 were exclusive to corals. A principal component and cluster analyses revealed that metabolite profiles clustered between corals and algae, but each species harbored a distinct catalog of metabolites. The major classes of compounds were carbohydrates and amino acids. Taken together, this study provides a first description of metabolites of Red Sea corals and their associated symbionts. As expected, the metabolites of coral hosts differ from their algal symbionts, but each host and algal species harbor a unique set of metabolites. This corroborates that host-symbiont species pairs display a fine-tuned complementary metabolism that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing

  20. Indium-Catalyzed Annulation of o-Acylanilines with Alkoxyheteroarenes: Synthesis of Heteroaryl[b]quinolines and Subsequent Transformation to Cryptolepine Derivatives

    Kyohei Yonekura

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We disclose herein the first synthetic method that is capable of offering heteroaryl[b]quinolines (HA[b]Qs with structural diversity, which include tricyclic and tetracyclic structures with (benzothienyl, (benzofuranyl, and indolyl rings. The target HA[b]Q is addressed by the annulation of o-acylanilines and MeO–heteroarenes with the aid of an indium Lewis acid that effectively works to make two different types of the N–C and C–C bonds in one batch. A series of indolo[3,2-b]quinolines prepared here can be subsequently transformed to structurally unprecedented cryptolepine derivatives. Mechanistic studies showed that the N–C bond formation is followed by the C–C bond formation. The indium-catalyzed annulation reaction thus starts with the nucleophilic attack of the NH2 group of o-acylanilines to the MeO-connected carbon atom of the heteroaryl ring in an SNAr fashion, and thereby the N–C bond is formed. The resulting intermediate then cyclizes to make the C–C bond through the nucleophilic attack of the heteroaryl-ring-based carbon atom to the carbonyl carbon atom, providing the HA[b]Q after aromatizing dehydration.

  1. Hydrogenation of tetralin in the presence of dibenzothiophene and quinoline on Pt-Pd/SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Gutierrez, O.Y.; Yu, Y.; Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center

    2012-07-01

    Three Pt-Pd catalysts with 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% of Pt and Pd, respectively, were supported on amorphous silica alumina with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:SiO{sub 2} wt.% ratios of 20:80, 30:70 and 55:45. The materials were characterized by physisorption of N{sub 2}, TEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and adsorption of pyridine and CO followed by IR spectroscopy. The EXAFS fitting and IR characterization showed that bimodal distributions of monometallic Pd and bimetallic Pt-Pd particles. The bimetallic particles in all catalysts have a Pt-rich core and a Pd-rich shell. However, the degree of alloying and proportion of exposed Pt increases with increasing concentration of Lewis acid sites (LAS) in the support, probably because the LAS are good anchoring sites for Pt species. The activity of the catalysts for the hydrogenation of tetralin in the presence of DBT and quinoline, and the corresponding selectivity to cis-decalin increase with the proportion of exposed Pt. Therefore, in the presence of DBT and quinoline the morphology of bimetallic clusters is the parameter determining its hydrogenation performance. (orig.)

  2. Perfluorinated acids as ion-pairing agents in the determination of monoamine transmitters and some prominent metabolites in rat brain by high-performance liquid chromatography with amperometric detection.

    Patthy, M; Gyenge, R

    1988-09-30

    The behaviour of trifluoroacetate and heptafluorobutyrate as pairing ions for the reversed-phase ion-pair separation of monoamine transmitters and related metabolites was studied. The performance of systems with the perfluorinated acids was compared with that of systems containing sodium octyl sulphonate and was found to be better in terms of peak resolution combined with total analysis time, day-to-day reproducibility and the time required for attaining initial chromatographic equilibrium. Rat brain samples were deproteinized in the acidified mobile phase, injected directly on to a high-performance liquid chromatographic column and quantitated using an amperometric detector. Sample run times were 6-8 min, at a relatively low flow-rate. The detection limits achieved are fairly uncommon with conventional bore columns. The two perfluorinated acids studied differ in the dominant mechanisms of ion-pair formation and show selectivity differences as a result.

  3. Online restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma.

    Li, De-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yang, Xiu-Ling; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Qi, Jin-Long

    2016-09-01

    An automated online solid-phase extraction with restricted-access material combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. After protein precipitation by methanol, which contained the internal standards, the supernatant of plasma samples was injected to the system, the endogenous large molecules were flushed out, and target analytes were trapped and enriched on the adsorbent, resulting in a minimization of sample complexity and ion suppression effects. Calibration curves were linear over the concentrations of 5-1000 ng/mL for vanillin and 10-5000 ng/mL for vanillic acid with a coefficient of determination >0.999 for the determined compounds. The lower limits of quantification of vanillin and vanillic acid were 5.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-run precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation were 2.6-8.6 and 3.2-10.2%, respectively, and the accuracies expressed as the relative error were in the range of -6.1 to 7.3%. Extraction recoveries of analytes were between 89.5 and 97.4%. There was no notable matrix effect for any analyte concentration. The developed method was proved to be sensitive, repeatable, and accurate for the quantification of vanillin and its vanillic acid metabolite in human plasma. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  5. Disposition and metabolism of benzo[f]quinoline

    1982-01-01

    5,6-( 14 C) Benzoquinoline (BQ) administered orally as a single dose was very rapidly absorbed in the rat; the extent of absorption, however, was not determined. 14 C-derived radioactivity appeared to be extensively distributed in all the tissues studied, albeit at levels which represented minute fractions of the administered dose. None of the tissue studies appeared to accumulate significant levels of 14 C-BQ-derived radioactivity although the level of radioactivity in the adrenals at the termination of the experiment (168 h) suggested a slight accumulating potential for this organ. The diarrhea encountered in the elimination studies precluded a meaningful analysis of the data on elimination. HPLC analysis of the plasma from rats dosed with radioactive BQ revealed that metabolites appear in plasma starting a short time after administration of BQ and remain in detectable but progressively decreasing amounts for 24 hours. Analysis of urine collected over 48 hours post dosing reveals that 30 to 35% of radioactivity is extractable as free metabolites. The kinetics of endogenous hepatic DNA, RNA or protein adducts with 14 C-BQ derivatives were studied during a course of 96 hours following a single oral dose (20 mg/kg) of 14 C-BQ in rats. Peak adduct formation appeared at the same time in all three macromolecules although the highest level of adducts was observed in DNA. The data suggest DNA to be a target macromolecule for BQ and/or its derivatives in vivo

  6. Metabolites of cannabidiol identified in human urine.

    Harvey, D J; Mechoulam, R

    1990-03-01

    1. Urine from a dystonic patient treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was examined by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry for CBD metabolites. Metabolites were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS, and methyl ester/TMS derivatives and as the TMS derivatives of the product of lithium aluminium deuteride reduction. 2. Thirty-three metabolites were identified in addition to unmetabolized CBD, and a further four metabolites were partially characterized. 3. The major metabolic route was hydroxylation and oxidation at C-7 followed by further hydroxylation in the pentyl and propenyl groups to give 1"-, 2"-, 3"-, 4"- and 10-hydroxy derivatives of CBD-7-oic acid. Other metabolites, mainly acids, were formed by beta-oxidation and related biotransformations from the pentyl side-chain and these were also hydroxylated at C-6 or C-7. The major oxidized metabolite was CBD-7-oic acid containing a hydroxyethyl side-chain. 4. Two 8,9-dihydroxy compounds, presumably derived from the corresponding epoxide were identified. 5. Also present were several cyclized cannabinoids including delta-6- and delta-1-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. 6. This is the first metabolic study of CBD in humans; most observed metabolic routes were typical of those found for CBD and related cannabinoids in other species.

  7. Removal of pyridine and quinoline by bio-zeolite composed of mixed degrading bacteria and modified zeolite

    Bai Yaohui; Sun Qinghua; Xing Rui; Wen Donghui; Tang Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    In the process of the biodegradation of pyridine and quinoline, ammonium is often generated because of the transformation of N from pyridine and quinoline. Zeolite has been proven to be an effective sorbent for the removal of the ammonium. The natural zeolite can be modified to be the macroporous carrier in the biological wastewater treatment process. In this study, a specific bio-zeolite composed of mixed bacteria (a pyridine-degrading bacterium and a quinoline-degrading bacterium) and modified zeolite was used for biodegradation and adsorption in two types of wastewater: sterile synthetic and coking wastewater. The experimental results indicated that pyridine and quinoline could be degraded simultaneously by the mixed bacteria. Furthermore, NH 4 + -N transformed from pyridine and quinoline could be removed by the modified zeolite. In addition, the bacterial community structures of the coking wastewater and the bio-zeolite were monitored by the amplicon length heterogeneity polymerase-chain reaction (LH-PCR) technique. Both LH-PCR results and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that the microorganisms, including BW001 and BW003, could be easily attached on the surface of the modified zeolite and that the bio-zeolite could be used in the treatment of wastewater containing pyridine and/or quinoline.

  8. β-Orcinol Metabolites from the Lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta

    Panagiota Papadopoulou

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Four new β-orcinol metabolites, hypotrachynic acid (1, deoxystictic acid (2, cryptostictinolide (3 and 8 ́-methylconstictic acid (4 along with the metabolites 8 ́-methylstictic acid (5, 8 ́-methylmenegazziaic acid (6, stictic acid (7, 8 ́-ethylstictic acid (8 and atranorin (9, that have been previously described, were isolated for the first time from the tissue extracts of the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta (Flörke Hale. The structures of the new metabolites were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. Radical scavenging activity (RSA of the metabolites isolated in adequate amounts, was evaluated using luminol chemiluminescence and comparison with Trolox®.

  9. Measurement of 12(S)-hydroxy-5Z,8E,10E-heptadecatrienoic acid and its metabolite 12-oxo-5Z,8E,10E-heptadecatrienoic acid in human plasma by gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Hofmann, U.; Seefried, S.; Meese, C.O.; Mettang, T.; Huebel, E.K.; Kuhlmann, U.

    1990-01-01

    Thromboxane A2, the predominant product of arachidonic acid metabolism in the blood platelet, is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist. During its biosynthesis from cyclic endoperoxide, 12(S)-hydroxy-5Z,8E,10E-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) is formed in equal amounts. The further metabolism of HHT, catalyzed by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, leads to 12-oxo-5Z,8E,10E-heptadecatrienoic acid (Oxo-HT). Sample workup procedures are described which allow for the sensitive and reproducible determination of these two arachidonic acid metabolites in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the presence of deuterated analogues as internal standards. HHT is derivatized to the pentafluorobenzyl ester tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether. In order to enable quantification of low concentrations of about 10 pg/ml in nonstimulated human plasma, the samples have to be purified by HPLC. Oxo-HT is derivatized to the pentafluorobenzyl ester, which is purified by HPLC, and then derivatized to the trimethylsilyloxime. The method allows quantification of Oxo-HT in concentrations down to 10 pg/ml plasma. The reported methods have been used to measure HHT and Oxo-HT in stimulated platelet rich plasma and to quantify HHT in nonstimulated plasma. Determination of endogenous levels of these two arachidonic acid metabolites may give new insights into the overall biosynthesis of thromboxane A2 in man

  10. Determination of glyphosate residuals and of their metabolite Aminomethyl-Phosphonic acid in waters, by means of liquid chromatography of high efficiency with post-column derivation and fluorescence detection

    Rodriguez, Hugo A; Guerrero, Jairo; Castro, Rene

    2002-01-01

    The glyphosate is a no selective herbicide largely used in the world in order to control annual and perennial weeds. Its principal metabolite in soils and waters is the Aminomethyl-Phosphonic Acid (AMPA) formed by micro organism's action. This herbicide is used in Colombia in high doses to illegal crops eradication of coca and Amapola and like natural accelerator in sugar cane, constituting an environmental and social problem for the country, being necessary the evaluation of glyphosate residues in different matrices. This study describes the validation of the analytical methodology for the simultaneous determination of glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in waters of some Colombian regions. The experimental procedure pointed out two main steps: the first one was a cleaning, extraction and concentration step by solid phase extraction; the second step is the separation, identification and quantification of the compounds by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with post-column derivation and fluorescence detection. The results of the validation show that the methodology is specific, selective, precise and robust with linear calibration curve in the linear range between 10 and 750 μg/L, with limits of detection of 0.8 μg/L and limits of quantification of 2 μg/L for the two analyses. The recoveries are in the order of 73% for glyphosate and 70% for AMPA. More over analysis results are presented for water samples of some country regions where glyphosate is applied in different doses with different purposes, finding residues of the herbicide and its metabolite in concentrations above the allowed values in drinking waters for pesticides of toxicology category IV, like the glyphosate, according with the Colombian legislation

  11. Amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and metabolites of the catecholamine neurotransmitters are agonists of a rat trace amine receptor.

    Bunzow, J R; Sonders, M S; Arttamangkul, S; Harrison, L M; Zhang, G; Quigley, D I; Darland, T; Suchland, K L; Pasumamula, S; Kennedy, J L; Olson, S B; Magenis, R E; Amara, S G; Grandy, D K

    2001-12-01

    The trace amine para-tyramine is structurally and functionally related to the amphetamines and the biogenic amine neurotransmitters. It is currently thought that the biological activities elicited by trace amines such as p-tyramine and the psychostimulant amphetamines are manifestations of their ability to inhibit the clearance of extracellular transmitter and/or stimulate the efflux of transmitter from intracellular stores. Here we report the discovery and pharmacological characterization of a rat G protein-coupled receptor that stimulates the production of cAMP when exposed to the trace amines p-tyramine, beta-phenethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine. An extensive pharmacological survey revealed that psychostimulant and hallucinogenic amphetamines, numerous ergoline derivatives, adrenergic ligands, and 3-methylated metabolites of the catecholamine neurotransmitters are also good agonists at the rat trace amine receptor 1 (rTAR1). These results suggest that the trace amines and catecholamine metabolites may serve as the endogenous ligands of a novel intercellular signaling system found widely throughout the vertebrate brain and periphery. Furthermore, the discovery that amphetamines, including 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy"), are potent rTAR1 agonists suggests that the effects of these widely used drugs may be mediated in part by this receptor as well as their previously characterized targets, the neurotransmitter transporter proteins.

  12. Application of N-Quinoline-2-carboxamido-8-aminoquinoline in Fabrication of a Ho(III-PVC Membrane Sensor

    Hassan Ali Zamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-quinoline-2-carboxamido-8-aminoquinoline (QCA was used as a suitable ion carrier in the construction of a Ho(III PVC-based membrane sensor. This sensor demonstrated good selectivity and sensitivity towards the holmium ion for a broad variety of cations, including alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions. The proposed electrode exhibits a linear dynamic range between 1.0×10-6 and 1.0×10-2 M, with a near Nernstian slope of 20.4±0.3 mV per decade and a detection limit of 4.2×10-7 M. The best performance was obtained with a membrane composition of 30% poly(vinyl chloride, 56% nitrobenzene, 2% sodium tetraphenyl borate, 10% oleic acid and 2% QCA. The potentiometric response of the constructed electrode is pH independent in the range of 2.4-7.4. The sensor possesses the advantages of short conditioning time, fast response time (∼ 5 s and especially, good selectivity towards transition and heavy metal and some mono, di and trivalent cations. The Ho3+ sensor was successfully applied as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Ho(III ions with EDTA. The electrode was also used for the determination of Ho3+ ions in mixtures of different ions and the determination of the fluoride ion in mouth wash solutions.

  13. Insight into the effects of modifying chromophores on the performance of quinoline-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Mao, Mao; Wang, Jian-Bo; Liu, Xiu-Lin; Wu, Guo-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin; Song, Qin-Hua

    2018-02-01

    A series of organic dyes based on quinoline as an electron-deficient π-linker, were designed and synthesized for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) application. These push-pull conjugated dyes, sharing same anchoring group with distinctive electron-rich donating groups such as N,N-diethyl (DEA-Q), 3,6-dimethoxy carbazole (CBZ-Q), bis(4-butoxyphenyl)amine (BPA-Q), were synthesized by Riley oxidation of sbnd CH3 followed by Knoevenagel condensation of the corresponding aldehyde precursors 2a-c with cyanoacrylic acid. The optical, electrochemical, theoretical calculation and photovoltaic properties with these three dyes were systematically investigated. Compared to DEA-Q and CBZ-Q, BPA-Q possesses better light harvesting properties with regard to extended conjugate length, red-shifted intramolecular charge transfer band absorption and broaden light-responsive IPCE spectrum, resulting in a greater short circuit photocurrent density output. BPA-Q also has improved open-circuit voltage due to the apparent large charge recombination resistance. Consequently, assembled with iodine redox electrolytes, the device with BPA-Q achieved the best overall conversion efficiency value of 3.07% among three dyes under AM 1.5G standard conditions. This present investigation demonstrates the importance of various N-substituent chromophores in the prevalent D-π-A type organic sensitizers for tuning the photovoltaic performance of their DSSCs.

  14. Protonated MIL-125-NH2: Remarkable Adsorbent for the Removal of Quinoline and Indole from Liquid Fuel.

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Yoon, Ji Woong; Chang, Jong-San; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-06-21

    The removal of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) from fossil fuels prior to combustion is currently of particular importance, and so we investigated an adsorptive method using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for the removal of indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI), which are two of the main NCCs present in fossil fuels. We herein employed an amino (-NH 2 )-functionalized MIL-125 (MIL-125-NH 2 ) MOF, which was further modified by protonation (P-MIL-125-NH 2 ). These modified MOFs exhibited extraordinary performance in the adsorption of both IND (as representative neutral NCC) and QUI (as representative basic NCC). These MOFs were one of the most efficient adsorbents for the removal of NCCs. For example, P-MIL-125-NH 2 showed the highest adsorption capacity for QUI among ever reported adsorbent. The improved adsorption of IND was explained by H-bonding and cation-π interactions for MIL-125-NH 2 and P-MIL-125-NH 2 , respectively, while the mechanisms for QUI were H-bonding and acid-base interactions, respectively. This is a rare phenomenon for a single material (especially not with very high porosity) to exhibit such remarkable performances in the adsorption of both basic QUI and neutral IND. The adsorption results obtained using regenerated MIL-125-NH 2 and P-MIL-125-NH 2 also showed that these materials can be used several times without any severe degradation.

  15. The systems cerium(3) (samarium) nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water

    Khisaeva, D.A.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Semenova, Eh.B.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of cross sections at 25 and 50 deg C the solubility in the systems cerium (3) nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water and samarium nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water has been studied. It is established that in the systems during chemical interaction of components congruently melting compounds of the composition: Ce(NO 3 ) 2 x2[C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 ]x6H 2 O and Sm(NO 3 ) 3 x2[C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 ]x2H 2 O are formed. New solid phases are separated preparatively and are subjected to chemical, differential thermal and IR spectroscopic analyses. The investigation results are compared with similar ones for nitrates of other representatives of lanthanide group

  16. Microstructural characteristics of toluene and quinoline-insolubles from coal-tar pitch and their cokes

    Panaitescu, C. [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Fuel Laboratory, Polizu St. 1, Sector 1, 011061, Bucharest (Romania); Predeanu, G. [Metallurgical Research Institute, Department of Raw Materials, Mehadia St. 39, Sector 6, 060543 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-08-01

    The structural composition of coal-tar pitch used in the preparation of the special binder-pitch, was determined with special emphasis on the optical properties of the {beta}-resins, as typical components necessary to obtain electrodes of best quality through the pyrogenetic processes of baking and graphitization. In addition to raw toluene- and quinoline-insolubles (TI, QI), the corresponding cokes were analysed to evaluate, by structural composition and microtexture, the behaviour of pitch fractions during carbonization. The results suggest the dependence of the texture development on the type of toluene- and quinoline-insolubles and {beta}-resins during processing conditions, which influence the mesophase formation. An original and important result of the carbopetrographical study is represented by the identification and evaluation of {beta}-resins in the coke texture. (author)

  17. Antiviral Activity of Novel Quinoline Derivatives against Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    Carolina de la Guardia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes dengue fever, a debilitating disease with an increasing incidence in many tropical and subtropical territories. So far, there are no effective antivirals licensed to treat this virus. Here we describe the synthesis and antiviral activity evaluation of two compounds based on the quinoline scaffold, which has shown potential for the development of molecules with various biological activities. Two of the tested compounds showed dose-dependent inhibition of dengue virus serotype 2 in the low and sub micromolar range. The compounds 1 and 2 were also able to impair the accumulation of the viral envelope glycoprotein in infected cells, while showing no sign of direct virucidal activity and acting possibly through a mechanism involving the early stages of the infection. The results are congruent with previously reported data showing the potential of quinoline derivatives as a promising scaffold for the development of new antivirals against this important virus.

  18. Syntheses and anti-microbial evaluation of new quinoline scaffold derived pyrimidine derivatives

    Shikha S. Dave

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of diversely substituted chalcones derived from a quinoline scaffold, e.g. (E-3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl prop-2-en-1-one and its pyrimidine analogues e.g. 2-[2-amino-6-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-5,6-dihydropyrimidin-4-yl]phenols have been prepared by condensation of 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline with differently substituted 2-hydroxy acetophenones and further treatment with guanidine carbonate. All the newly synthesized compounds have been evaluated for their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus typhi, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Pseudomonas chrysogenum.

  19. Rapid establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia driven by the scoured cake layer in an anaerobic baffled ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shun; Ren, Xuesong; Hu, Zhenhu; Yuan, Shoujun

    2017-11-01

    Although toxic and refractory organics, such as phenol and quinoline, are decomposed by anaerobic bacteria, the establishment of specific degrading consortia is a relatively slow process. An anaerobic membrane bioreactor allows for complete biomass retention that can aid the establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia. In this study, the anaerobic digestion of phenol (500 mg L -1 ) and quinoline (50 mg L -1 ) was investigated using an anaerobic baffled ceramic membrane bioreactor (ABCMBR). The results showed that, within 30 days, 99% of phenol, 98% of quinoline and 88% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed. The substrate utilisation rates of the cake layer for phenol and quinoline, and specific methanogenic activity of the cake layer, were 7.58 mg phenol g -1  mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) day -1 , 8.23 mg quinoline g -1  MLVSS day -1 and 0.55 g COD CH4  g -1  MLVSS day -1 , respectively. The contribution of the cake layer to the removals of phenol and quinoline was extremely underestimated because the uncounted scoured cake layer was disregarded. Syntrophus was the key population for phenol and quinoline degradation, and it was more abundant in the cake layer than in the bulk sludge. The highly active scattered cake layer sped up the establishment of phenol- and quinoline-degrading consortia in the ABCMBR.

  20. Tandem Reduction/Cyclization of O-Nitrophenyl Propargyl Alcohols-A Novel Synthesis of 2- & 2,4-Disubstituted Quinolines and Application to the Synthesis of Streptonigrin

    Sandelier, Matthew J

    2008-01-01

    The quinoline ring system is a common structural component of a wide variety of natural products with highly desirable biological activity, including antimalarial agents such as quinine, chloroquine...

  1. Quinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives as Potential Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors

    Jing-Kang Shen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel quinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives 1017 and 2327 were designed and synthesized as cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitors. All of them exhibited activity against CETP. Particularly, compounds 24 and 26 displayed the best activity against CETP with the same inhibitory rate of 80.1%.

  2. 8-[(3-Phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-ylmethoxy]quinoline monohydrate

    Shu-Yuan Bai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H13N3O2·H2O, the oxadiazole ring forms dihedral angles 7.21 (10 and 21.25 (11° with the quinoline and benzene rings, respectively. The crystal structure features O—H...N hydrogen bonds and is further consolidated by C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the water molecule of hydration.

  3. Ionic liquid catalyzed convenient synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline under sonic condition

    Patel, Devji S.; Avalani, Jemin R.; Raval, Dipak K., E-mail: dipanalka@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Sardar Patel University Gujarat (India)

    2012-10-15

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline from aldehydes, enaminones, and malononitrile using 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-en-8-ium acetate ([DBU][Ac]) as a catalyst under ultrasound irradiation is described. Compared with other methods, this new method has the advantages of easier work-up, milder reaction conditions, high yields and environmentally benign procedure. (author)

  4. Diiodido[methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate-κN]mercury(II

    Yu-Hong Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title mononuclear complex, [HgI2(C12H11NO3], the HgII ion has a distorted trigonal–planar coordination sphere defined by two I− anions and the N atom of a methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate ligand. In the crystal, face-to-face π–π stacking interactions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.563 (9 Å, are observed.

  5. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Substituted Ethyl 2-(Quinolin-4-yl-propanoates

    Yong Zhou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Substituted 4-hydroxyquinolines were synthesized from anilines and diethyl 2-(ethoxymethylenemalonate by the Gould-Jacobs reaction via cyclization of the intermediate anilinomethylenemalonate followed by hydrolysis and decarboxylation. The 4-hydroxyquinolines reacted with phosphorous oxychloride to form 4-chloroquinolines, which reacted on heating with diethyl sodiomethylmalonate in DMF to yield moderate yields of substituted ethyl 2-(quinolin-4-ylpropanoates, many of which showed potent antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori.

  6. Validation of UHPLC-MS/MS methods for the determination of kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, and application to in vitro blood-brain barrier and intestinal drug permeability studies.

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Oufir, Mouhssin; Walter, Fruzsina R; Deli, Maria A; Smiesko, Martin; Zabela, Volha; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-09-05

    Sedative and anxiolytic-like properties of flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin, and of some of their intestinal metabolites, have been demonstrated in pharmacological studies. However, routes of administration were shown to be critical for observing in vivo activity. Therefore, the ability to cross intestinal and blood-brain barriers was assessed in cell-based models for kaempferol (KMF), and for the major intestinal metabolite of KMF, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA). Intestinal transport studies were performed with Caco-2 cells, and blood-brain barrier transport studies with an immortalized monoculture human model and a primary triple-co-culture rat model. UHPLC-MS/MS methods for KMF and 4-HPAA in Ringer-HEPES buffer and in Hank's balanced salt solution were validated according to industry guidelines. For all methods, calibration curves were fitted by least-squares quadratic regression with 1/X(2) as weighing factor, and mean coefficients of determination (R(2)) were >0.99. Data obtained with all barrier models showed high intestinal and blood-brain barrier permeation of KMF, and no permeability of 4-HPAA, when compared to barrier integrity markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo photoacoustic tumor tomography using a quinoline-annulated porphyrin as NIR molecular contrast agent.

    Luciano, Michael; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhou, Feifei; Zhu, Hua; Bornhütter, Tobias; Röder, Beate; Zhu, Quing; Brückner, Christian

    2017-01-25

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of a tetra-PEG-modified and freely water-soluble quinoline-annulated porphyrin are described. We previously demonstrated the ability of quinoline-annulated porphyrins to act as an in vitro NIR photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contrast agent. The solubility of the quinoline-annulated porphyrin derivative in serum now allowed the assessment of the efficacy of the PEGylated derivative as an in vivo NIR contrast agent for the PAI of an implanted tumor in a mouse model. A multi-fold contrast enhancement when compared to the benchmark dye ICG could be shown, a finding that could be traced to its photophysical properties (short triplet lifetimes, low fluorescence and singlet oxygen sensitization quantum yields). A NIR excitation wavelength of 790 nm could be used, fully taking advantage of the optical window of tissue. Rapid renal clearance of the dye was observed. Its straight-forward synthesis, optical properties with the possibility for further optical fine-tuning, nontoxicity, favorable elimination rates, and contrast enhancement make this a promising PAI contrast agent. The ability to conjugate the PAI chromophore with a fluorescent tag using a facile and general conjugation strategy was also demonstrated.

  8. The pharmacokinetics of oxcarbazepine and its active metabolite 10-hydroxy-carbazepine in healthy subjects and in epileptic patients treated with phenobarbitone or valproic acid.

    Tartara, A; Galimberti, C A; Manni, R; Morini, R; Limido, G; Gatti, G; Bartoli, A; Strada, G; Perucca, E

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of oxcarbazepine (OXC) and its active metabolite 10-hydroxy-carbazepine (10-OH-CZ) after a single oral OXC dose (600 mg) were compared in healthy control subjects and in epileptic patients treated with phenobarbitone or sodium valproate (n = 8 in each group). In all groups, serum 10-OH-CZ concentrations were much higher than those of the parent drug. In patients on valproate, the kinetics of OXC and 10-OH-CZ did not differ significantly from those observed in controls. In patients on phenobarbitone, AUC values of both OXC and 10-OH-CZ were lower than in controls (2.9 +/- 0.4 vs 5.1 +/- 0.7 microg ml(-1) h and 89 +/- 7 vs 119 +/- 10 microg ml(-1) h respectively, means +/- s.e. mean, P effect is unlikely to be of great clinical significance. PMID:12959317

  9. Structural, functional, and evolutionary analysis of moeZ, a gene encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of the Pseudomonas metabolite, pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid

    Crawford Ronald L

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid (pdtc is a small secreted metabolite that has a high affinity for transition metals, increases iron uptake efficiency by 20% in Pseudomonas stutzeri, has the ability to reduce both soluble and mineral forms of iron, and has antimicrobial activity towards several species of bacteria. Six GenBank sequences code for proteins similar in structure to MoeZ, a P. stutzeri protein necessary for the synthesis of pdtc. Results Analysis of sequences similar to P. stutzeri MoeZ revealed that it is a member of a superfamily consisting of related but structurally distinct proteins that are members of pathways involved in the transfer of sulfur-containing moieties to metabolites. Members of this family of enzymes are referred to here as MoeB, MoeBR, MoeZ, and MoeZdR. MoeB, the molybdopterin synthase activating enzyme in the molybdopterin cofactor biosynthesis pathway, is the most characterized protein from this family. Remarkably, lengths of greater than 73% nucleic acid homology ranging from 35 to 486 bp exist between Pseudomonas stutzeri moeZ and genomic sequences found in some Mycobacterium, Mesorhizobium, Pseudomonas, Streptomyces, and cyanobacteria species. Conclusions The phylogenetic relationship among moeZ sequences suggests that P. stutzeri may have acquired moeZ through lateral gene transfer from a donor more closely related to mycobacteria and cyanobacteria than to proteobacteria. The importance of this relationship lies in the fact that pdtc, the product of the P. stutzeri pathway that includes moeZ, has an impressive set of capabilities, some of which could make it a potent pathogenicity factor.

  10. Studies on the secondary metabolites from the Indian gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa: Isolation and characterization of four analogues of the cardiotoxin subergorgic acid

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Naik, C.G.; Kamat, S.Y.; Puar, M.S.; Das, Pradip; Hegde, V.R.

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the Indian Ocean gorgonian coral Subergorgia suberosa resulted in isolation and identification of four novel compounds 2-5. Structural investigation revealed compound 1 to be subergorgic acid...

  11. Urinary concentrations of cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monohydroxy isononyl ester, a metabolite of the non-phthalate plasticizer di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), and markers of ovarian response among women attending a fertility center

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia, E-mail: lminguez@hsph.harvard.edu [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Souter, Irene [Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Chiu, Yu-Han [Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Williams, Paige L. [Department of Epidemiology, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Ford, Jennifer B. [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M. [National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta (United States); Hauser, Russ [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Department of Epidemiology, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (United States); Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), a non-phthalate plasticizer, was introduced commercially in 2002 as an alternative to ortho-phthalate esters because of its favorable toxicological profile. However, the potential health effects from DINCH exposure remain largely unknown. We explored the associations between urinary concentrations of metabolites of DINCH on markers of ovarian response among women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments. Between 2011 and 2015, 113 women enrolled a prospective cohort study at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center and provided up to two urine samples prior to oocyte retrieval. The urinary concentrations of two DINCH metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monohydroxy isononyl ester (MHiNCH) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monocarboxyisooctyl ester (MCOCH), were quantified by isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the association between urinary metabolite concentrations and markers of ovarian response, accounting for multiple IVF cycles per woman via random intercepts. On average, women with detectable urinary MHiNCH concentrations, as compared to those below LOD, had a lower estradiol levels (−325 pmol/l, p=0.09) and number of retrieved oocytes (−1.8, p=0.08), with a stronger association among older women. However, urinary MHiNCH concentrations were unrelated to mature oocyte yield and endometrial wall thickness. In conclusion, we found suggestive negative associations between urinary MHiNCH concentrations and peak estradiol levels and number of total oocyte yields. This is the first study evaluating the effect of DINCH exposure on human reproductive health and raises the need for further experimental and epidemiological studies to better understand the potential effects of this chemical on health. - Highlights: • Women with detectable urinary MHiNCH concentrations had a lower estradiol levels and number of retrieved

  12. Urinary concentrations of cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monohydroxy isononyl ester, a metabolite of the non-phthalate plasticizer di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), and markers of ovarian response among women attending a fertility center

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Souter, Irene; Chiu, Yu-Han; Williams, Paige L.; Ford, Jennifer B.; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M.; Hauser, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH), a non-phthalate plasticizer, was introduced commercially in 2002 as an alternative to ortho-phthalate esters because of its favorable toxicological profile. However, the potential health effects from DINCH exposure remain largely unknown. We explored the associations between urinary concentrations of metabolites of DINCH on markers of ovarian response among women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments. Between 2011 and 2015, 113 women enrolled a prospective cohort study at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center and provided up to two urine samples prior to oocyte retrieval. The urinary concentrations of two DINCH metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monohydroxy isononyl ester (MHiNCH) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid monocarboxyisooctyl ester (MCOCH), were quantified by isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the association between urinary metabolite concentrations and markers of ovarian response, accounting for multiple IVF cycles per woman via random intercepts. On average, women with detectable urinary MHiNCH concentrations, as compared to those below LOD, had a lower estradiol levels (−325 pmol/l, p=0.09) and number of retrieved oocytes (−1.8, p=0.08), with a stronger association among older women. However, urinary MHiNCH concentrations were unrelated to mature oocyte yield and endometrial wall thickness. In conclusion, we found suggestive negative associations between urinary MHiNCH concentrations and peak estradiol levels and number of total oocyte yields. This is the first study evaluating the effect of DINCH exposure on human reproductive health and raises the need for further experimental and epidemiological studies to better understand the potential effects of this chemical on health. - Highlights: • Women with detectable urinary MHiNCH concentrations had a lower estradiol levels and number of retrieved

  13. Biosynthesis of quinoxaline antibiotics: Purification and characterization of the quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid activating enzyme from Streptomyces triostinicus

    Glund, K.; Schlumbohm, W.; Bapat, M.; Keller, U.

    1990-01-01

    A quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid activating enzyme was purified to homogeneity from triostin-producing Streptomyces triostinicus. It could also be purified from quinomycin-producing Streptomyces echinatus. Triostins and quinomycins are peptide lactones that contain quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid as chromophoric moiety. The enzyme catalyzes the ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction dependent on quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid and the formation of the corresponding adenylate. Besides quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid, the enzyme also catalyzes the formation of adenylates from quinoline-2-carboxylic acid and thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid. No adenylates were seen from quinoline-3-carboxylic acid, quinoline-4-carboxylic acid, pyridine-2-carboxylic acid, and 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid. Previous work revealed that quinoline-2-carboxylic acid and thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid became efficiently incorporated into the corresponding quinoxaline antibiotic analogues in vivo. Together with the data described here, this suggests that the enzyme is part of the quinoxaline antibiotics synthesizing enzyme system. The enzyme displays a native molecular weight of 42,000, whereas in its denatured form it is a polypeptide of Mr 52,000-53,000. It resembles in its behavior actinomycin synthetase I, the chromophore activating enzyme involved in actinomycin biosynthesis

  14. Bioavailable Concentrations of Delphinidin and Its Metabolite, Gallic Acid, Induce Antioxidant Protection Associated with Increased Intracellular Glutathione in Cultured Endothelial Cells

    Goszcz, Katarzyna; Deakin, Sherine J.; Duthie, Garry G.; Stewart, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Despite limited bioavailability and rapid degradation, dietary anthocyanins are antioxidants with cardiovascular benefits. This study tested the hypothesis that the antioxidant protection conferred by the anthocyanin, delphinidin, is mediated by modulation of endogenous antioxidant defences, driven by its degradation product, gallic acid. Delphinidin was found to degrade rapidly (t1/2 ~ 30 min), generating gallic acid as a major degradation product. Both delphinidin and gallic acid generated oxygen-centred radicals at high (100 μM) concentrations in vitro. In a cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell model of oxidative stress, the antioxidant protective effects of both delphinidin and gallic acid displayed a hormesic profile; 100 μM concentrations of both were cytotoxic, but relatively low concentrations (100 nM–1 μM) protected the cells and were associated with increased intracellular glutathione. We conclude that delphinidin is intrinsically unstable and unlikely to confer any direct antioxidant activity in vivo yet it offered antioxidant protection to cells at low concentrations. This paradox might be explained by the ability of the degradation product, gallic acid, to confer benefit. The findings are important in understanding the mode of protection conferred by anthocyanins and reinforce the necessity to conduct in vitro experiments at biologically relevant concentrations. PMID:29081896

  15. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    Licciardi Paul V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of healthy mucosal immune responses. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that have the capacity to alter the composition of bacterial species in the intestine that can in turn influence the production of fermentation-derived metabolites. Principal among these metabolites are the short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate that have potent anti-inflammatory activities important in regulating immune function at the intestinal mucosal surface. Therefore strategies aimed at restoring the microbiota profile may be effective in the prevention or treatment of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis Probiotic bacteria have diverse effects including altering microbiota composition, regulating epithelial cell barrier function and modulating of immune responses. The precise molecular mechanisms mediating these probiotic effects are not well understood. Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors important in the epigenetic control of host cell responses. It is hypothesized that the biological function of probiotics may be a result of epigenetic modifications that may explain the wide range of effects observed. Studies delineating the effects of probiotics on short-chain fatty acid production and the epigenetic actions of short-chain fatty acids will assist in understanding the association between microbiota and allergic or autoimmune disorders. Testing the hypothesis We propose that treatment with

  16. Ultrasound mediated catalyst free synthesis of 6H-1-benzopyrano[4,3-b]quinolin-6-ones leading to novel quinoline derivatives: their evaluation as potential anti-cancer agents.

    Mulakayala, Naveen; Rambabu, D; Raja, Mohan Rao; M, Chaitanya; Kumar, Chitta Suresh; Kalle, Arunasree M; Rama Krishna, G; Malla Reddy, C; Basaveswara Rao, M V; Pal, Manojit

    2012-01-15

    A facile and catalyst free synthesis of 6H-1-benzopyrano[4,3-b]quinolin-6-ones has been accomplished via the reaction of 4-chloro-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde with various aromatic amines in the presence of ultrasound. Some of these compounds were converted to the corresponding 2-(3-(hydroxymethyl)quinolin-2-yl)phenols and further structure elaboration of a representative quinoline derivative is presented. Molecular structure of two representative compounds was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Many of these compounds were evaluated for their anti-proliferative properties in vitro against four cancer cell lines and several compounds were found to be active. Further in vitro studies indicated that inhibition of sirtuins could be the possible mechanism of action of these molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An expeditious I sub(2)-catalyzed entry into 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline system of cryptotackieine

    Parvatkar, P.T.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    A synthesis of a series of novel 6H-indolo[2,3-b]- quinolines with different substituents on the quinoline ring is described. The method involves reaction of indole-3-carboxyaldehyde with aryl amines in the presence of a catalytic amount of iodine...

  18. Synthesis of an Albendazole Metabolite: Characterization and HPLC Determination

    Mahler, Graciela; Davyt, Danilo; Gordon, Sandra; Incerti, Marcelo; Nunez, Ivana; Pezaroglo, Horacio; Scarone, Laura; Serra, Gloria; Silvera, Mauricio; Manta, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, students are introduced to the synthesis of an albendazole metabolite obtained by a sulfide oxidation reaction. Albendazole as well as its metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, are used as anthelmintic drugs. The oxidation reagent is H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] in acetic acid. The reaction is environmental friendly,…

  19. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S.

    1990-01-01

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and β-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6'exomethylene SV (I), 6'CH 2 OH-SV (II), 6'COOH-SV (III) and a β-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6' is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However 3 H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding 14 C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man

  20. Natural product inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis: synthesis of the marine microbial metabolites pseudopyronines A and B and evaluation of their anti-infective activities

    Giddens, Anna C.; Nielsen, Lone; Boshoff, Helena I.

    2007-01-01

    of pathogenic microorganisms and were found to exhibit good potency (IC50≥0.46 μg/mL) and selectivity towards Leishmania donovani. Several of the compounds inhibited recombinant fatty acid biosynthesis enzymes from both Plasmodium falciparum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, validating these targets in the search...

  1. Lycopene metabolite, apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, inhibits diethylnitrosamine-initiated, high fat diet-promoted hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis in mice

    Obesity is associated with increased risk in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and mortality. An important disease control strategy is the prevention of obesity-related hepatic inflammation and tumorigenesis by dietary means. Here, we report that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid (APO10LA), a cleavag...

  2. Influence of dietary fat on metabolism of (14-14C)erucic acid in the perfused rat liver. Distribution of metabolites in lipid classes

    Holmer, G.; Ronneberg, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two groups of rats were fed diets containing 20% by weight of either partially hydrogenated marine oil supplemented with sunflower seed oil (PHMO) or palm oil (PO) for 8 wk. Using a liver perfusion system, the effect of dietary long chain monoenoic fatty acids on the uptake and metabolism of [14- 14 C]erucic acid was studied. The perfusion times were 15 and 60 min, respectively. The two groups showed equal ability for erucic acid uptake in the liver but differed in the channeling of the fatty acids into various metabolic pathways. A higher metabolic turnover of 22:1 in the PHMO livers relative to the PO livers was demonstrated by an increased recovery of total [ 14 C]labeling in the triglyceride (TG) and phospholipid (PL) fractions, already evident after 15 min of perfusion. The chain-shortening capacity was highest in the PHMO group, reflected by a higher [ 14 C]18:1 incorporation in both TG and PL, and increasing from 15 to 60 min of perfusion. The amount of [ 14 C]18:1 found in PL and TG after 60 min of perfusion of livers from rats fed PO corresponded to that shown for the PHMO group after 15 min. The PL demonstrated a discrimination against 22:1 compared to TG, and, when available, 18:1 was highly preferred for PL-synthesis. The total fatty acid distribution in the TG, as determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC), reflected the composition of the dietary fats. In the total liver PL, 22:1 and 20:1 were present in negligible amounts, although the PHMO diet contained 12-13% of both 22:1 and 20:1. In the free fatty acid fraction (FFA), the major part of the radioactivity (approximately 80%) was [14- 14 C]erucic acid, and only small amounts of [ 14 C]18:1 (less than 2%) were present, even after 60 min of perfusion. The shortened-chain 18:1 was readily removed from the FFA pool and preferentially used for lipid esterification

  3. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    Liu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, Deepa; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.

    2016-01-11

    Rapid acidification of the culture medium by the production of organic acids and the production of acid-induced proteases are key characteristics of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The D15 mutant of A. niger is non-acidifying mutant and used often for the expression of recombinant proteins in A. niger, because of its reduced production of extracellular proteases under non-acidic conditions. In this study, the D15 mutant is characterized in detail. Strongly reduced levels of citric and oxalic acid were observed in the D15 mutant both in shake flask cultures and in controlled batch cultivations. To identify the mutation in the D15 mutant, we successfully combined high-throughput sequencing (Illumina) with bulk segregant analysis. Because of the lack of a sexual cycle for A. niger, the parasexual cycle was used to generate a pool of segregants. From the 52 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the parental strains, three SNPs were homozygous in the genomic DNA of pool of segregants. These three SNPs mapped to all the right arm of chromosome II, indicating that this region contains the genetic locus affecting the phenotype related to acid production. Of the three SNPs, one mutation resulted in a missense mutation in the gene encoding the A. niger homologue of the A. nidulans methyltransferase gene laeA. Complementation analysis of the original mutant with the laeA gene and targeted disruption of laeA further confirmed that LaeA is involved in citric acid production in A. niger lab (N402) and citric acid production strains (ATCC 11414). Analysis of the secondary metabolite (SM) profile of the laeA mutants indicate that LaeA is required for the production of several SMs (asperrubrol, atromentin and JBIR86), but deletion of laeA also resulted in the presence of SMs (aspernigrin A/B and BMS-192548) that were not detected in the wild-type strain. The levels of ten other SMs were not strongly affected as a result of laeA deletion indicating that only a

  4. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an important analyte in clinical and forensic toxicology with a narrow detection window of 3-6 h. In the search of improved detection methods, the existence in vivo of a glucuronated GHB metabolite (GHB-GLUC) was hypothesized. Chemically pure standards of GHB...

  5. Visible light- and radiation-induced alkylation of pyridine ring with alkanoic acid

    Sugimori, Akira; Yamada, Tetsuo

    1986-01-01

    Quinoline and 4-methylquinoline are efficiently alkylated with alkanoic acid in the presence of iron(III) sulfate upon visible light-irradiation. Iron(III) sulfate not only accelerates the photoreaction but also increases the yield of alkylation. Gamma-irradiation also brings about the alkylation. In the photo- and radiation-induced alkylation with alkanoic acid, alkyl radicals play important roles. (author)

  6. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    Cuca-Suarez, Luis Enrique; Barrera, Ericsson David Coy; Alvarez Caballero, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data ( 1 H, 13 C, 1 D, 2 D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  7. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    Cuca-Suarez, Luis Enrique; Barrera, Ericsson David Coy [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Quimica; Alvarez Caballero, Juan Manuel [Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta DTCH (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Basicas

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 1}D, {sup 2}D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  8. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of S. scrofa quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase purified from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotidewere obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) is a key enzyme in NAD biosynthesis; it catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. In order to elucidate the mechanism of NAMN biosynthesis, crystals of Sus scrofa QAPRTase (Ss-QAPRTase) purified from porcine kidney in complex with NAMN were obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. The Ss-QAPRTase–NAMN cocrystals belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 119.1, b = 119.1, c = 93.7 Å, γ = 120.0°. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were estimated as 3.10 Å 3 Da –1 and 60.3%, respectively, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  10. Crystal structure of bis(azido-κNbis(quinolin-8-amine-κ2N,N′iron(II

    Fatima Setifi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for new molecular materials with interesting magnetic properties using the pseudohalide azide ion and quinolin-8-amine (aqin, C9H8N2 as a chelating ligand, led to the synthesis and structure determination of the title complex, [Fe(N32(C9H8N22]. The complex shows an octahedral geometry, with the FeII atom surrounded by six N atoms; the two N3− anions coordinate in a cis configuration, while the remaining N atoms originate from the two quinolin-8-amine ligands with the quinoline N atoms lying on opposite sides of the Fe atom. The crystal packing is dominated by layers of hydrophilic and aromatic regions parallel to the ac plane, stabilized by a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network and π–π stacking.

  11. GAS PHASE SYNTHESIS OF (ISO)QUINOLINE AND ITS ROLE IN THE FORMATION OF NUCLEOBASES IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Mebel, Alexander M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) have been proposed to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the formation mechanisms of even their simplest prototypes—quinoline and isoquinoline—remain elusive. Here, we reveal a novel concept that under high temperature conditions representing circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars, (iso)quinoline can be synthesized via the reaction of pyridyl radicals with two acetylene molecules. The facile gas phase formation of (iso)quinoline in circumstellar envelopes defines a hitherto elusive reaction class synthesizing aromatic structures with embedded nitrogen atoms that are essential building blocks in contemporary biological-structural motifs. Once ejected from circumstellar shells and incorporated into icy interstellar grains in cold molecular clouds, these NPAHs can be functionalized by photo processing forming nucleobase-type structures as sampled in the Murchison meteorite

  12. Abnormalities in Functional Connectivity in Collegiate Football Athletes with and without a Concussion History: Implications and Role of Neuroactive Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites.

    Meier, Timothy B; Lancaster, Melissa A; Mayer, Andrew R; Teague, T Kent; Savitz, Jonathan

    2017-02-15

    There is a great need to identify potential long-term consequences of contact sport exposure and to identify molecular pathways that may be associated with these changes. We tested the hypothesis that football players with (Ath-mTBI) (n = 25) and without a concussion history (Ath) (n = 24) have altered resting state functional connectivity in regions with previously documented structural changes relative to healthy controls without football or concussion history (HC) (n = 27). As a secondary aim, we tested the hypothesis that group differences in functional connectivity are moderated by the relative ratio of neuroprotective to neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway. Ath-mTBI had significantly increased connectivity of motor cortex to the supplementary motor area relative to Ath and HC. In contrast, both Ath-mTBI and Ath had increased connectivity between the left orbital frontal cortex and the right lateral frontal cortex, and between the left cornu ammonis areas 2 and 3/dentate gyrus (CA2-3/DG) of the hippocampus and the middle and posterior cingulate cortices, relative to HC. The relationship between the ratio of plasma concentrations of kynurenic acid to quinolinic acid (KYNA/QUIN) and left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex connectivity to multiple regions as well as KYNA/QUIN and right CA2-3/DG connectivity to multiple regions differed significantly according to football and concussion history. The results suggest that football exposure with and without concussion history can have a significant effect on intrinsic brain connectivity and implicate the kynurenine metabolic pathway as one potential moderator of functional connectivity dependent on football exposure and concussion history.

  13. Metabolomic analysis reveals key metabolites related to the rapid adaptation of Saccharomyce cerevisiae to multiple inhibitors of furfural, acetic acid, and phenol.

    Wang, Xin; Li, Bing-Zhi; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Zhang, Wei-Wen; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2013-03-01

    During hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, a broad range of inhibitors are generated, which interfere with yeast growth and bioethanol production. In order to improve the strain tolerance to multiple inhibitors--acetic acid, furfural, and phenol (three representative lignocellulose-derived inhibitors) and uncover the underlying tolerant mechanism, an adaptation experiment was performed in which the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated repeatedly in a medium containing multiple inhibitors. The adaptation occurred quickly, accompanied with distinct increase in growth rate, glucose utilization rate, furfural metabolism rate, and ethanol yield, only after the first transfer. A similar rapid adaptation was also observed for the lab strains of BY4742 and BY4743. The metabolomic analysis was employed to investigate the responses of the industrial S. cereviaise to three inhibitors during the adaptation. The results showed that higher levels of 2-furoic acid, 2, 3-butanediol, intermediates in glycolytic pathway, and amino acids derived from glycolysis, were discovered in the adapted strains, suggesting that enhanced metabolic activity in these pathways may relate to resistance against inhibitors. Additionally, through single-gene knockouts, several genes related to alanine metabolism, GABA shunt, and glycerol metabolism were verified to be crucial for the resistance to multiple inhibitors. This study provides new insights into the tolerance mechanism against multiple inhibitors, and guides for the improvement of tolerant ethanologenic yeast strains for lignocellulose-bioethanol fermentation.

  14. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence quenching of Ru(bpy){sub 3} {sup 2+} (bpy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) in the presence of acetaminophen, salicylic acid and their metabolites

    Haslag, Catherine S. [Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Richter, Mark M., E-mail: MarkRichter@missouristate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Quenching of Ru(bpy) {sub 3}{sup 2+} (bpy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) coreactant electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) has been observed in the presence of acetaminophen, salicylic acid and related complexes. However, no quenching is observed with the acetylsalicylic acid. In most instances, quenching is observed with 100-fold excess of quencher (compared to ECL luminophore) with complete quenching observed between 10,000 and 100,000 fold excess. Fluorescence and UV-vis experiments coupled with bulk electrolysis support the formation of benzoquinone products upon electrochemical oxidation. The mechanism of quenching may involve the interaction of the electrochemically generated benzoquinone species with (i) the {sup Low-Asterisk }Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} excited state or (ii) highly energetic coreactant radicals. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Efficient quenching of the electrogenerated chemiluminescence is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Acetaminophen, salicylic acid and related compounds can be detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle The mechanism of quenching involves benzoquinones formed upon electrolysis.

  15. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism

  16. Synthesis of deuterium labeled perillyl alcohol and dual C-13 and deuterium labeled perillic acid, major metabolites of d-limonene

    Chen, Haitao; Chan, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Dual C-13 and deuterium labeled perillic acid, [(1,1-dideuterio-1- 13 C-2-methyl)ethenyl]-1-cyclohexene -1-carboxylic acid (6) and deuterated perillyl alcohol, [(2,2-dideuterio-1-methyl)ethenyl]-1-deuteriohydroxymethyl-1-cyclo -hexene (9) were synthesized from commercially available (4S)-(-)-perillaidehyde (1). Compound 1 was first protected with ethylene glycol to yield the ethylene ketal followed by oxidation with OsO 4 /NalO 4 to cleave the terminal double bond to afford the key intermediate ketone, 4-acetyl-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde ethylene ketal (3). 3 was then converted to the labeled perillyl aldehyde by Wittig reaction with prepared Ph 3 P 13 CD 3 l or Ph 3 PCD 3 l. Followed by deprotection to give the labeled perillaldehydes, [(2,2-dideuterio-2- 13 C-1-methyl)ethenyl] -1-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde-1-carboxaldehyde (5) or [(2,2-dideuterio-1-methyl)ethenyl] -1-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde (8). 5 was further oxidized by freshly prepared Ag 2 O to give the desired compound 6. 8 was reduced by LiAID 4 to afford the desired compound 9. The same synthetic procedure may be adopted to synthesize the radioactive isotope labeled perillic acid and perilly alcohol. (author)

  17. Hydrophobicity and charge shape cellular metabolite concentrations.

    Arren Bar-Even

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available What governs the concentrations of metabolites within living cells? Beyond specific metabolic and enzymatic considerations, are there global trends that affect their values? We hypothesize that the physico-chemical properties of metabolites considerably affect their in-vivo concentrations. The recently achieved experimental capability to measure the concentrations of many metabolites simultaneously has made the testing of this hypothesis possible. Here, we analyze such recently available data sets of metabolite concentrations within E. coli, S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis and human. Overall, these data sets encompass more than twenty conditions, each containing dozens (28-108 of simultaneously measured metabolites. We test for correlations with various physico-chemical properties and find that the number of charged atoms, non-polar surface area, lipophilicity and solubility consistently correlate with concentration. In most data sets, a change in one of these properties elicits a ~100 fold increase in metabolite concentrations. We find that the non-polar surface area and number of charged atoms account for almost half of the variation in concentrations in the most reliable and comprehensive data set. Analyzing specific groups of metabolites, such as amino-acids or phosphorylated nucleotides, reveals even a higher dependence of concentration on hydrophobicity. We suggest that these findings can be explained by evolutionary constraints imposed on metabolite concentrations and discuss possible selective pressures that can account for them. These include the reduction of solute leakage through the lipid membrane, avoidance of deleterious aggregates and reduction of non-specific hydrophobic binding. By highlighting the global constraints imposed on metabolic pathways, future research could shed light onto aspects of biochemical evolution and the chemical constraints that bound metabolic engineering efforts.

  18. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  19. Thermo-optical properties of 1H[3,4-b] quinoline films used in electroluminescent devices

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Kępińska, Mirosława; Sanetra, Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Electroluminescence cells with H[3,4-b] quinoline layers are promising devices for a blue light emitting EL diode. This work measured the optical reflectance as a function of temperature in copolymers PAQ layers deposited on Si crystalline substrate. Using the extended Cauchy dispersion model of the film refractive index we determined the thermo-optical coefficients for quinoline layers in the temperature range of 76-333 K from combined ellipsometric and spectrofotometric studies. The obtained values of thermo-optical coefficients of thin PAQ film, were negative and ranged in 5-10 × 10-4 [1/K].

  20. Synthesis of Novel Benzimidazolyl-substituted Acrylonitriles and Amidino-substituted Benzimidazo[1,2-a]Quinolines

    Grace Karminski-Zamola

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel benzimidazole derivatives 3-10 were synthesized. Benzimidazolyl-substituted acrylonitriles 3 and 4 underwent a photochemical dehydrocyclization reaction to give the corresponding mono- and dicyano-substituted benzimidazo[1,2-a] quinolines 5 and 6. Pinner reaction of these compounds did not give the expected mono- and diamidines, but rather only compounds 7-10, with amido groups at 6-position were isolated. A mechanism for the reaction is proposed. Acyclic compounds 3 and 4, as well as cyclic benzimidazo[1,2-a]quinolines 5-8, exhibit interesting spectroscopic properties and are potential biologically active compounds.

  1. Screening of diseases associated with abnormal metabolites for ...

    Dina A. Ghoraba

    2013-12-09

    Dec 9, 2013 ... IEMs to evaluate the efficiency of HPLC in detecting abnormal metabolites in urine samples. ... the initial screening of organic acid disorders and many other disease ..... Although a chromatogram from a patient with gross.

  2. Crystal structure of bis(3-bromomesityl(quinolin-1-ium-8-ylboron(III tribromide

    Jungho Son

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C27H26.82BBr2.18N+·Br3−, is a cationic triarylborane isolated as its tribromide salt. The aryl substituents include a protonated 8-quinolyl group and two 3-bromomesityl groups. The molecule was prepared on combination of 3:1 Br2 and dimesityl(quinolin-8-ylborane in hexanes. The refinement of the structure indicated a degree of `over-bromination' (beyond two bromine atoms for the cation. There are two tribromide ions in the asymmetric unit, both completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry.

  3. Ternary systems, consist of erbium nitrates, water and nitrates of pyridines, quinolines

    Starikova, L.I.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Khalfina, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    At 25 and 50 deg C investigated is solubility of solid phases in ternary water salt systems: erbium nitrate-pyridine nitrate-water; erbium nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water. Formation of congruently soluble compounds of the Er(NO 3 ) 3 x2C 5 H 5 NxHNO 3 , Er(NO 3 ) 3 x2C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 x4H 2 O composition is established. X-ray phase and thermogravimetric analyses have been carried out

  4. Electronic structure and magnetism in transition metals doped 8-hydroxy-quinoline aluminum.

    Baik, Jeong Min; Shon, Yoon; Lee, Seung Joo; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Kang, Tae Won; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2008-10-15

    We report the room-temperature ferromagnetism in transition metals (Co, Ni)-doped 8-hydroxy-quinoline aluminum (Alq3) by thermal coevaporation of high purity metal and Alq3 powders. For 5% Co-doped Alq3, a maximum magnetization of approximately 0.33 microB/Co at 10 K was obtained and ferromagnetic behavior was observed up to 300 K. The Co atoms interact chemically with O atoms and provide electrons to Alq3, forming new states acting as electron trap sites. From this, it is suggested that ferromagnetism may be associated with the strong chemical interaction of Co atoms and Alq3 molecules.

  5. Ring-substituted 4-Hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-ones: Preparation and Biological Activity

    Jiri Dohnal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study, a series of twelve ring-substituted 4-hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-one derivatives were prepared. The procedures for synthesis of the compounds are presented. The compounds were analyzed using RP-HPLC to determine lipophilicity and tested for their photosynthesis-inhibiting activity using spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. All the synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antifungal activity using in vitro screening with eight fungal strains. For all the compounds, the relationships between the lipophilicity and the chemical structure of the studied compounds are discussed, as well as their structure-activity relationships (SAR.

  6. Post-ruminal branched-chain amino acid supplementation and intravenous lipopolysaccharide infusion alters blood metabolites, rumen fermentation, and nitrogen balance of beef steers.

    Löest, C A; Gilliam, G G; Waggoner, J W; Turner, J L

    2018-04-27

    Steers exposed to an endotoxin may require additional branched-chain AA (BCAA) to support an increase in synthesis of immune proteins. This study evaluated effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and BCAA supplementation on blood metabolites and N balance of 20 ruminally-cannulated steers (177 ± 4.2 kg BW). The experiment was a randomized block design, with 14-d adaptation to metabolism stalls and diet (DM fed = 1.5% BW) and 6-d collection. Treatments were a 2 × 2 factorial of LPS (0 vs 1.0 to 1.5 μg/kg BW; -LPS vs +LPS) and BCAA (0 vs 35 g/d; -BCAA vs +BCAA). The LPS in 100 mL sterile saline was infused (1 mL/min via i.v. catheter) on d 15. The BCAA in an essential AA solution were abomasally infused (900 mL/d) 3 times daily in equal portions beginning on d 7. Blood, rumen fluid, and rectal temperature were collected on d 15 at h 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 after LPS infusion. Feces and urine were collected from d 16 to 20. Rectal temperatures were greater for +LPS vs. -LPS steers at 4 h and lower at 8 h after LPS infusion (LPS h, P BCAA than -BCAA steers at 12 h after LPS infusion (BCAA × h, P BCAA, P BCAA than -BCAA steers at 0 h and 24 h after LPS infusion (BCAA × h, P ≤ 0.05). Steers receiving +LPS had lower rumen pH at 8 h, greater total VFA at 8 h, and lower rumen NH3 at 24 h after LPS infusion compared with -LPS steers (LPS × h, P ≤ 0.04). Total tract passage rates, DM, OM, NDF, ADF, and N intake, fecal N, digested N, and retained N were lower (P BCAA vs -BCAA steers. The absence of LPS × BCAA interactions (P ≥ 0.20) for N balance indicated that post-ruminal supplementation of BCAA did not alleviate the negative effects of endotoxin on N utilization by growing steers.

  7. Biological Cleavage of the C–P Bond in Perfluoroalkyl Phosphinic Acids in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats and the Formation of Persistent and Reactive Metabolites

    Yeung, Leo W.Y.; Mabury, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids (PFPiAs) have been detected in humans, wildlife, and various environmental matrices. These compounds have been used with perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids (PFPAs) as surfactants in consumer products and as nonfoaming additives in pesticide formulations. Unlike the structurally related perfluoroalkyl sulfonic and carboxylic acids, little is known about the biological fate of PFPiAs. Objectives: We determined the biotransformation products of PFPiAs and some pharmacokinetic parameters in a rat model. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received an oral gavage dose of either C6/C8PFPiA, C8/C8PFPiA, or C8PFPA. Blood was sampled over time, and livers were harvested upon sacrifice. Analytes were quantified using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry or gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: PFPiAs were metabolized to the corresponding PFPAs and 1H-perfluoroalkanes (1H-PFAs), with 70% and 75% biotransformation 2 wk after a single bolus dose for C6/C8PFPiA and C8/C8PFPiA, respectively. This is the first reported cleavage of a C-P bond in mammals, and the first attempt, with a single-dose exposure, to characterize the degradation of any perfluoroalkyl acid. Elimination half-lives were 1.9±0.5 and 2.8±0.8 days for C6/C8PFPiA and C8/C8PFPiA, respectively, and 0.95±0.17 days for C8PFPA. Although elimination half-lives were not determined for 1H-PFAs, concentrations were higher than the corresponding PFPAs 48 h after rats were dosed with PFPiAs, suggestive of slower elimination. Conclusions: PFPiAs were metabolized in Sprague-Dawley rats to form persistent PFPAs as well as 1H-PFAs, which contain a labile hydrogen that may undergo further metabolism. These results in rats produced preliminary findings of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of PFPiAs, which should be further investigated in humans. If there is a parallel between the disposition of these chemicals in humans and rats, then

  8. Influence of natural and synthetic vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on primary and secondary metabolites and associated metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) plants under water deficit regimes.

    Aziz, Aniqa; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Phytoextracts are being widely used these days as a source of bioactive compounds for mitigating the harmful effects of abiotic stresses including drought stress. In this study, it was assessed how far foliar applied pure synthetic ascorbic acid (AsA) or natural sweet orange juice (OJ) enriched with AsA could mitigate the drought stress induced adverse effects on growth and some key metabolic processes in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.; cultivar V 9 ) plants. Two weeks old quinoa seedlings were subjected to varying irrigation regimes as control [100% field capacity (FC)] and drought stress (60% FC, 40% FC and 20% FC). After one month of water deficit treatments, various levels of ascorbic acid (150 mg L -1 AsA or 25% OJ) besides control [distilled water (DW) and no spray (NS)] were applied as a foliar spray. After 15 days of AsA application, different physio-biochemical attributes were measured. The results showed that water deficit markedly decreased plant growth, relative water content (RWC), photosynthetic rate, total carotenoids (CAR) and total flavonoids, while it increased relative membrane permeability (RMP), intrinsic AsA content, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), malondialdehyde (MDA), glycinebetaine (GB), total phenolics, total soluble proteins (TSP), total free amino acids, activities of key antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD)], total soluble sugars (TSS), reducing (RS) and non-reducing sugars (NRS). Most obvious results of most of these parameters were observed at 40% and 20% FC. Foliar-applied pure 150 mg L -1 AsA and 25% OJ were found to be very effective in improving plant growth, RMP, photosynthetic rate, CAR, proline, AsA, MDA, GB, TSP, free amino acids, SOD, POD, TSS, RS, NRS and total flavonoids. It was noticed that 25% OJ enriched with AsA and other essential nutrients and biomolecules was as efficient as 150 mg L -1 AsA in reducing the adverse effects of drought stress on quinoa plants. So, it was concluded

  9. Probing the active site of MIO-dependent 2,3-aminomutases, key catalysts in the biosynthesis of beta-amino acids incorporated in secondary metabolites

    Bruner, Steven D.; Cooke, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The tyrosine aminomutase SgTAM produces (S)-β-tyrosine from l-tyrosine in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027. This conversion is promoted by the methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) prosthetic group. MIO was first identified in the homologous family of ammonia lyases, which deaminate aromatic amino acids to form α,β-unsaturated carboxylates. Studies of substrate specificity have been described for lyases but there have been no reports in altering the substrate specificity of aminomutases. Furthermore, it remains unclear as to what structural properties are responsible for catalyzing the presumed readdition of the amino group into the α,β-unsaturated intermediates to form β-amino acids. Attempts to elucidate specificity and mechanistic determinants of SgTAM have also proved to be difficult as it is recalcitrant to perturbations to the active site via mutagenesis. An X-ray co-crystal structure of the SgTAM mutant of the catalytic base with l-tyrosine verified important substrate binding residues as well as the enzymatic base. Further mutagenesis revealed that removal of these crucial interactions renders the enzyme inactive. Proposed structural determinants for mutase activity probed via mutagenesis, time-point assays and X-ray crystallography revealed a complicated role for these residues in maintaining key quaternary structure properties that aid in catalysis. PMID:20577998

  10. Physiological Characteristics of Some Monoamine Metabolites in Cat Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Orešković, Darko; Sanković, Mauricio; Fröbea, Ana; Klarica, Marijan

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of main metabolites of serotonin and dopamine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and homovanillic acid, respectively, were measured in cisternal cerebrospinal fluid of cats by high performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector. Higher concentrations of homovanillic acid and a wide interindividual oscillation for both parameters have been found. However, samples collected at four different time intervals showed stabile intraindividual concentrations of the m...

  11. T3P- A Novel Catalyst for Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: One-Pot Synthesis of Pyrano[3,2-c]quinolines and furano[3,2-c]quinolines

    T. S. R. Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available T3P was found to be an efficient catalyst for the Aza-Diels–Alder reactions of aldimines with dihydropyran or dihydrofuran to afford the corresponding pyrano-and furo [3,2-c]quinolines in high yields with high diastereoselectivity in a short period of time.

  12. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  13. Spectroscopic determination of ionization constants of quinoline and 3-aminoquinoline at different temperature

    Indhar, H.A.B.

    2000-01-01

    Quinoline and its derivative are chemically and biologically important heterocylic compounds. Its ionization constant (pK/sub a/ values have been previously determined only at 18 or 20 deg. C. We have enhanced this work at different temperatures from 20-50 deg. C at the interval of 5 deg. C. The dissociation constants (pk/sub a/s), and Gibb's free energies of quinoline and 3-aminoquinoline have been determined by UV-Spectrophotometer (lambda 2) equipped with a temperature control of - + 0.1 deg. C at temperatures ranging from 20-50 deg. C in water. The experimental data have been used for the determination of thermodynamic ionization constants (pk /sub a //sup t/) sub t/, concentration ionization constants (pK/sub a//sup M/) and Gibbs's free energy values of pK/sub a/sup M/. The ionization constant values decrease with increase of temperature. The significance of relative magnitudes of the values is discussed and some useful generalization are obtained. The curves are parabolic. A computer program in GW-BASIC calculates the values of dissociation constants. From the pK/sub a/ values, Gibb's free energies are compared and discussed. (author)

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies on IR, Raman, and UV-Vis spectra of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde.

    Kumru, M; Küçük, V; Kocademir, M; Alfanda, H M; Altun, A; Sarı, L

    2015-01-05

    Spectroscopic properties of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde (Q7C) have been studied in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The FT-IR (4000-50 cm(-1)), FT-Raman (4000-50 cm(-1)), dispersive-Raman (3500-50 cm(-1)), and UV-Vis (200-400 nm) spectra of Q7C were recorded at room temperature (25 °C). Geometry parameters, potential energy surface about CCH(O) bond, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis spectrum, and thermodynamic characteristics (at 298.15K) of Q7C were computed at Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional B3LYP levels employing the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Frontier molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, and Mulliken charge analyses of Q7C have also been performed. Q7C has two stable conformers that are energetically very close to each other with slight preference to the conformer that has oxygen atom of the aldehyde away from the nitrogen atom of the quinoline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The sensitivity and selectivity properties of a fluorescence sensor based on quinoline-Bodipy

    Nuri Kursunlu, Ahmed, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com; Guler, Ersin

    2014-01-15

    A novel florescence sensor (Q-BODIPY) based on quinoline-Bodipy (quinoline-boradiazaindacene) was prepared by ‘click chemistry’ in several stages. The sensing actions of Q-BODIPY were confirmed by UV–vis titration, emission and excitation spectroscopic studies in presence of Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, La{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions in methanol:H{sub 2}O (1:1) medium. Whereas some metal ions can only cause quenching effect on the fluorescence intensity of Q-BODIPY, some of them show an increase in fluorescence intensity. The stoichiometry of host–guest complexes formed was determined by Job′s plot method. The binding constants were calculated by Stern–Volmer method. As a fluorescence sensor, Q-BODIPY shows the best selectivity performance against Zn{sup 2+} ions in according to all spectroscopic data. -- Highlights: • Q-BODIPY prepared by several techniques shows a fluorescent behavior toward p, d and f block metal ions. • Q-BODIPY has both a more sensitivity and more effective ability for the detection of Zn(II) ion. • The synthesis strategies to produce Bodipy′s with metal coordinating offer a new approach for the design of novel fluorescence sensors.

  16. Polar metabolites of polycyclic aromatic compounds from fungi are potential soil and groundwater contaminants

    Boll, Esther Sørensen; Johnsen, Anders R.; Christensen, Jan H.

    2015-01-01

    and either hydroxylated or oxidized to carboxylic acids at the methyl group. The metabolism of the sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC resulted in sulfate conjugates. The sorption of the PAC metabolites to three soils was determined using a batch equilibrium method, and partition coefficients (Kd's) were......-methylphenanthrene, 1-methylpyrene), and one sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC (dibenzothiophene). Fifty-eight metabolites were tentatively identified; metabolites from the un-substituted PACs were hydroxylated and sulfate conjugated, whereas metabolites from alkyl-substituted PACs were sulfate conjugated...... calculated for fourteen representative metabolites. Sulfate conjugated metabolites displayed Kd's below 70 whereas the metabolites with both a sulfate and a carboxylic acid group had Kd's below 2.8. The low Kd's of water-soluble PAC metabolites indicate high mobility in soil and a potential for leaching...

  17. (quinolin-5-yl)urea as a host for distinction of phthalic acid and ...

    Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, North Guwahati 781 039, India e-mail: ... well-known in both in solid and in solution state.1–5. Hosts having urea ..... References. 1. Byrne P, Turner D R, Lloyd G O, Clarke N and Steed ... 2002 In Handbook of pharmaceutical salts (New-York: Wiley-VCH). 9.

  18. Determination of glufosinate ammonium and its metabolite, 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid, in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following mixed-mode solid-phase extraction and t-BDMS derivatization.

    Hori, Y; Fujisawa, M; Shimada, K; Hirose, Y

    2001-01-01

    A method for the analysis of glufosinate ammonium (GLUF) and its metabolite 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (MPPA) in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. Employing a mixed-mode cartridge with both anion exchange action and weak nonpolar interaction, we extracted GLUF and MPPA from the serum and carried out GC-MS analysis of their tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives. The detection limits of GLUF and MPPA were 10 pg and 1 pg, respectively. Full mass spectra of 100 pg GLUF and of 10 pg MPPA were easily obtainable. The recovery rate of 90.0+/-11.9% (or better) when the serum concentrations of GLUF and MPPA were 10-0.1 microg/mL. Results of 23 serum samples, from patients with GLUF poisoning, measured by this method correlate well with those derived from the conventional high-performance liquid chromatography method (r = 0.996). The developed GC-MS method is likely to become a useful analytical technique in clinical settings.

  19. Ruthenium-catalysed synthesis of 2- and 3-substituted quinolines from anilines and 1,3-diols

    Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Madsen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward synthesis of substituted quinolines is described by cyclocondensation of anilines with 1,3-diols. The reaction proceeds in mesitylene solution with catalytic amounts of RuCl3·xH 2O, PBu3 and MgBr2·OEt2. The transformation does not require any stoichiometric additives and only...

  20. New inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on SBA-15 molecular sieves involved in the quinolines synthesis

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Soriano, E.; Sturm, M.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2012), s. 97-103 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieves * heterogeneous catalysis * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  1. Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease Using Metabolite Profiling

    Havelund, Jesper F; Heegaard, Niels H H; Færgeman, Nils J K

    2017-01-01

    Biomarker research in Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been dominated by measuring dopamine metabolites or alpha-synuclein in cerebrospinal fluid. However, these markers do not allow early detection, precise prognosis or monitoring of disease progression. Moreover, PD is now considered a multifa......) and purine metabolism (uric acid) are also altered in most metabolite profiling studies in PD......., the potential as a biomarker and the significance of understanding the pathophysiology of PD. Many of the studies report alterations in alanine, branched-chain amino acids and fatty acid metabolism, all pointing to mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan...

  2. Detecting Beer Intake by Unique Metabolite Patterns.

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Bech, Lene; Lund, Erik; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-12-02

    Evaluation of the health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1), 18 participants were given, one at a time, four different test beverages: strong, regular, and nonalcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort, and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e., N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum of iso-α-acids and tricyclohumols) and the production process (i.e., pyro-glutamyl proline and 2-ethyl malate), was selected to establish a compliance biomarker model for detection of beer intake based on MSt1. The model predicted the MSt2 samples collected before and up to 12 h after beer intake correctly (AUC = 1). A biomarker model including four metabolites representing both beer raw materials and production steps provided a specific and accurate tool for measurement of beer consumption.

  3. Plant metabolites and nutritional quality of vegetables.

    Hounsome, N; Hounsome, B; Tomos, D; Edwards-Jones, G

    2008-05-01

    Vegetables are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and cholesterol-lowering compounds. Despite a large amount of information on this topic, the nutritional quality of vegetables has not been defined. Historically, the value of many plant nutrients and health-promoting compounds was discovered by trial and error. By the turn of the century, the application of chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance allowed quantitative and qualitative measurements of a large number of plant metabolites. Approximately 50000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants, and it is predicted that the final number will exceed 200000. Most of them have unknown function. Metabolites such as carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, vitamins, hormones, flavonoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation, and defense. Besides the importance for the plant itself, such metabolites determine the nutritional quality of food, color, taste, smell, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunostimulating, and cholesterol-lowering properties. This review is focused on major plant metabolites that characterize the nutritional quality of vegetables, and methods of their analysis.

  4. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  5. Modification of oxidative status in Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes by E-2-chloro-8-methyl-3-[(4'-methoxy-1'-indanoyl-2'-methyliden]-quinoline compared to chloroquine

    Juan Rodrigues

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available E-2-chloro-8-methyl-3-[(4'-methoxy-1'-indanoyl-2'-methyliden]-quinoline (IQ is a new quinoline derivative which has been reported as a haemoglobin degradation and ß-haematin formation inhibitor. The haemoglobin proteolysis induced by Plasmodium parasites represents a source of amino acids and haeme, leading to oxidative stress in infected cells. In this paper, we evaluated oxidative status in Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes in the presence of IQ using chloroquine (CQ as a control. After haemolysis, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, glutathione cycle and NADPH + H+-dependent dehydrogenase enzyme activities were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was also assayed to evaluate lipid damage. The results showed that the overall activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were significantly diminished by IQ (by 53.5% and 100%, respectively. Glutathione peroxidase activity was also lowered (31% in conjunction with a higher GSSG/GSH ratio. As a compensatory response, overall SOD activity increased and lipid peroxidation decreased, protecting the cells from the haemolysis caused by the infection. CQ shared most of the effects showed by IQ; however it was able to inhibit the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutathione-S-transferase. In conclusion, IQ could be a candidate for further studies in malaria research interfering with the oxidative status in Plasmodium berghei infection.

  6. Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Developing Highbush Blueberry Fruit Indicates Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Metabolism and Activation of Abscisic Acid Metabolism1[W][OA

    Zifkin, Michael; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn A.; Zaharia, L. Irina; Schernthaner, Johann P.; Gesell, Andreas; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Kennedy, James A.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) fruits contain substantial quantities of flavonoids, which are implicated in a wide range of health benefits. Although the flavonoid constituents of ripe blueberries are known, the molecular genetics underlying their biosynthesis, localization, and changes that occur during development have not been investigated. Two expressed sequence tag libraries from ripening blueberry fruit were constructed as a resource for gene identification and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction primer design. Gene expression profiling by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that flavonoid biosynthetic transcript abundance followed a tightly regulated biphasic pattern, and transcript profiles were consistent with the abundance of the three major classes of flavonoids. Proanthocyanidins (PAs) and corresponding biosynthetic transcripts encoding anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase were most concentrated in young fruit and localized predominantly to the inner fruit tissue containing the seeds and placentae. Mean PA polymer length was seven to 8.5 subunits, linked predominantly via B-type linkages, and was relatively constant throughout development. Flavonol accumulation and localization patterns were similar to those of the PAs, and the B-ring hydroxylation pattern of both was correlated with flavonoid-3′-hydroxylase transcript abundance. By contrast, anthocyanins accumulated late in maturation, which coincided with a peak in flavonoid-3-O-glycosyltransferase and flavonoid-3′5′-hydroxylase transcripts. Transcripts of VcMYBPA1, which likely encodes an R2R3-MYB transcriptional regulator of PA synthesis, were prominent in both phases of development. Furthermore, the initiation of ripening was accompanied by a substantial rise in abscisic acid, a growth regulator that may be an important component of the ripening process and contribute to the regulation

  7. Pharmacogenomic Characterization and Isobologram Analysis of the Combination of Ascorbic Acid and Curcumin-Two Main Metabolites of Curcuma longa-in Cancer Cells.

    Ooko, Edna; Kadioglu, Onat; Greten, Henry J; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Curcuma longa has long been used in China and India as anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions and also as a spice for varied curry preparations. The chemoprofile of the Curcuma species exhibits the presence of varied phytochemicals with curcumin being present in all three species but AA only being shown in C. longa . This study explored the effect of a curcumin/AA combination on human cancer cell lines. The curcumin/AA combination was assessed by isobologram analysis using the Loewe additivity drug interaction model. The drug combination showed additive cytotoxicity toward CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cell lines and HCT116p53 +/+ and HCT116p53 -/- colon cancer cell line, while the glioblastoma cell lines U87MG and U87MG.ΔEGFR showed additive to supra-additive cytotoxicity. Gene expression profiles predicting sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells to induction by curcumin and AA were determined by microarray-based mRNA expressions, COMPARE, and hierarchical cluster analyses. Numerous genes involved in transcription ( TFAM, TCERG1, RGS13, C11orf31 ), apoptosis-regulation ( CRADD, CDK7, CDK19, CD81, TOM1 ) signal transduction ( NR1D2, HMGN1, ABCA1, DE4ND4B, TRIM27 ) DNA repair ( TOPBP1, RPA2 ), mRNA metabolism ( RBBP4, HNRNPR, SRSF4, NR2F2, PDK1, TGM2 ), and transporter genes ( ABCA1 ) correlated with cellular responsiveness to curcumin and ascorbic acid. In conclusion, this study shows the effect of the curcumin/AA combination and identifies several candidate genes that may regulate the response of varied cancer cells to curcumin and AA.

  8. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil and its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, by differential pulse voltammetry using multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Soleimani, Mohammad; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was fabricated by multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). The electrochemical behavior of these two drugs was studied at the modified electrode using cyclic voltammetry and adsorptive differential pulse voltammetry. MPM and MPA were oxidized at the GCE during an irreversible process. DPV analysis showed two oxidation peaks at 0.87 V and 1.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPM and an oxidation peak at 0.87 V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPA in phosphate buffer solution of pH 5.0. The MWCNTs/GCE displayed excellent electrochemical activities toward oxidation of MPM and MPA relative to the bare GCE. The experimental design algorithm was used for optimization of DPV parameters. The electrode represents linear responses in the range 5.0 × 10{sup −6} to 1.6 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1} and 2.5 × 10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} to 6.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for MPM and MPA, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 9.0 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} and 4.0 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} for MPM and MPA, respectively. The modified electrode showed a good sensitivity and stability. It was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MPM and MPA in plasma and urine samples. - Highlights: • A new modified electrochemical sensor was constructed and used. • Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were used as the modifiers. • MPM and MPA were measured simultaneously at the low levels. • The sensor was used to the determination of MPA and MPM in real samples.

  9. Pharmacogenomic Characterization and Isobologram Analysis of the Combination of Ascorbic Acid and Curcumin—Two Main Metabolites of Curcuma longa—in Cancer Cells

    Ooko, Edna; Kadioglu, Onat; Greten, Henry J.; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Curcuma longa has long been used in China and India as anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions and also as a spice for varied curry preparations. The chemoprofile of the Curcuma species exhibits the presence of varied phytochemicals with curcumin being present in all three species but AA only being shown in C. longa. This study explored the effect of a curcumin/AA combination on human cancer cell lines. The curcumin/AA combination was assessed by isobologram analysis using the Loewe additivity drug interaction model. The drug combination showed additive cytotoxicity toward CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cell lines and HCT116p53+/+ and HCT116p53−/− colon cancer cell line, while the glioblastoma cell lines U87MG and U87MG.ΔEGFR showed additive to supra-additive cytotoxicity. Gene expression profiles predicting sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells to induction by curcumin and AA were determined by microarray-based mRNA expressions, COMPARE, and hierarchical cluster analyses. Numerous genes involved in transcription (TFAM, TCERG1, RGS13, C11orf31), apoptosis-regulation (CRADD, CDK7, CDK19, CD81, TOM1) signal transduction (NR1D2, HMGN1, ABCA1, DE4ND4B, TRIM27) DNA repair (TOPBP1, RPA2), mRNA metabolism (RBBP4, HNRNPR, SRSF4, NR2F2, PDK1, TGM2), and transporter genes (ABCA1) correlated with cellular responsiveness to curcumin and ascorbic acid. In conclusion, this study shows the effect of the curcumin/AA combination and identifies several candidate genes that may regulate the response of varied cancer cells to curcumin and AA. PMID:28210221

  10. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  11. Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    Shu, Xiang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Yu, Danxia; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jia, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 -10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer. © 2018 UICC.

  12. Series of coordination polymers based on 4-(5-sulfo-quinolin-8-yloxy) phthalate and bipyridinyl coligands: Structure diversity and properties

    Feng, Xun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); Liu, Jing [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); Li, Jin; Ma, Lu-Fang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); Wang, Li-Ya, E-mail: wlya@lynu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmacy Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473601 (China); Ng, Seik-Weng [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 80203 (Saudi Arabia); Qin, Guo-Zhan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Reactions between later metal salts and conjugational N-hetrocyclic sulfonate/ carboxylic acid under the presence of bipyridyl auxiliary ligands afforded a series of manganese, nickel, zinc, silver, cadmium coordination polymers bearing with phenyl pendant arm attached to quinoline skeletons, and they have been characterized by elements analysis, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studying. The series of polymers show interesting structural diversity in coordination environment, dimensions and topologies. They are all built from 2-D networks constructed from metal cluster through sulfonate or carboxylate groups, as the secondary building unit (SBU). The thermalgravimetric analyses show that they display framework stabilities in solid state. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies reveal the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions between adjacent Mn (II) ions in 1, and ferromagnetic interactions between Ni(II) ions for 2, respectively. The photo-luminescence properties of 3-5 have also been investigated systemically. - Highlights: • A series of coordination polymers based on later transition metal ions have been obtained. • They contain conjugational N-hetrocyclic sulfonate-carboxylic acid and bipyridyl auxiliary ligands. • They have been characterized systemically. • They exhibit structure diversity and interesting properties.

  13. Cytotoxic Cytochalasins and Other Metabolites from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a Fungal Endophyte of Spanish Moss.

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Bashyal, Bharat P; Liu, Mangping X; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; U'Ren, Jana M; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-10-01

    Two new metabolites, 6-oxo-12-norcytochalasin D (1) and 4,5-di-isobutyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone (2), together with seven known metabolites, cytochalasins D (3), Q (4), and N (5), 12-hydroxyzygosporin G (6), heptelidic acid chlorohydrin (7), (+)-heptelidic acid (8), and trichoderonic acid A (9), were isolated from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a fungal endophyte inhabiting Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides. Metabolite 1 is the first example of a 12-norcytochalasin. All metabolites, except 2 and 9, showed cytotoxic activity in a panel of five human tumor cell lines with IC50S of 0.2-5.0 μM.

  14. (1) H-MRS processing parameters affect metabolite quantification

    Bhogal, Alex A; Schür, Remmelt R; Houtepen, Lotte C

    2017-01-01

    investigated the influence of model parameters and spectral quantification software on fitted metabolite concentration values. Sixty spectra in 30 individuals (repeated measures) were acquired using a 7-T MRI scanner. Data were processed by four independent research groups with the freedom to choose their own...... + NAAG/Cr + PCr and Glu/Cr + PCr, respectively. Metabolite quantification using identical (1) H-MRS data was influenced by processing parameters, basis sets and software choice. Locally preferred processing choices affected metabolite quantification, even when using identical software. Our results......Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) can be used to quantify in vivo metabolite levels, such as lactate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu). However, there are considerable analysis choices which can alter the accuracy or precision of (1) H-MRS metabolite quantification...

  15. Approaches for introducing high molecular diversity in scaffolds: fast parallel synthesis of highly substituted 1H-quinolin-4-one libraries.

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Gorohovsky, Sofia; Levy, Amalia; Meir, Simcha; Shkoulev, Vladimir; Menashe, Naim; Greenwald, Moshe; Aizikovich, Alexander; Ofer, Dror; Byk, Gerardo; Gellerman, Garry

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a two steps strategy for the parallel synthesis of highly diversified quinolin-ones. In the first step we have combined and improved different synthetic methods for generating quinolin-4-ones bearing four different substitutions at specific positions using round bottomed flasks. The synthesis was assessed for a large number of substituted quinolin-4-ones. In the second step, the improved method was adapted to a parallel array synthesis using a 12 positions carrousel as demonstrated for the synthesis of 42-variable quinolin-4-ones. The first combinatorial library set 14(a-x) was obtained with a chemical purity of more than 95% without purification, the second library set 15(a-r), which included two synthetic steps, needed combinatorial purification using an innovative parallel purifier. The proposed approach contributes to a more extensive diversification of molecular scaffolds in general and provides access to highly substituted quinolinones in particular.

  16. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Makowska-Janusik, M. [Solid State Department, Institute of Physics, WSP Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, Czestochowa PL42201 (Poland); Gondek, E. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Kityk, I.V. [Department of Biology and Biophysics, Technical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 36, Czestochowa PL-42210 (Poland)]. E-mail: i.kityk@wsp.czest.pl; WisIa, J. [Departament of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Sanetra, J. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Danel, A. [Department of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2004-11-15

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 {mu}m varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities.

  17. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Makowska-Janusik, M.; Gondek, E.; Kityk, I. V.; Wisła, J.; Sanetra, J.; Danel, A.

    2004-11-01

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 μm varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities.

  18. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Makowska-Janusik, M.; Gondek, E.; Kityk, I.V.; WisIa, J.; Sanetra, J.; Danel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 μm varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities

  19. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions in Luminescent Quinoline-Triazoles with Dominant 1D Crystals

    Shi-Qiang Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinoline-triazoles 2-((4-(diethoxymethyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (1, 2-((4-(m-tolyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (2 and 2-((4-(p-tolyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (3 have been prepared with CuAAC click reactions and used as a model series to probe the relationship between lattice H-bonding interaction and crystal direction of growth. Crystals of 1–3 are 1D tape and prism shapes that correlate with their intermolecular and solvent 1D lattice H-bonding interactions. All compounds were thermally stable up to about 200 C and blue-green emissive in solution.

  20. Quinoline-substituted Zinc(II) phthalocyanine for the dual detection of ferric and zinc ions

    Gupta, Ankush [Lyallpur Khalsa College of Engineering, Jalandhar (India); Kim, A Rong [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Sub; Na, Kun [The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Myung Seok [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong S. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Here we present the synthesis and properties of quinoline-substituted zinc(II) phthalocyanine, Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ]. Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] can function as a highly selective chemosensor against Fe{sup 3+} and Zn{sup 2+} ions, exhibiting efficient fluorescence quenching and enhancement, respectively. Various characterization techniques were employed to investigate the intermolecular interactions of Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] with metal ions. A double-electron exchange and a forbidden photoinduced electron transfer behavior in Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] were attributed to such opposite responses. Furthermore, by taking advantage of selectivity, we successfully employed Zn[Pc(O-QN)-4 ] to stain and record confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Chang liver cells in the presence of metal ions.

  1. Application of a new procedure for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of plasma amino acid-related metabolites and untargeted shotgun proteomics to identify mechanisms and biomarkers of calcific aortic stenosis.

    Olkowicz, Mariola; Debski, Janusz; Jablonska, Patrycja; Dadlez, Michal; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2017-09-29

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAS) increasingly affects our ageing population, but the mechanisms of the disease and its biomarkers are not well established. Recently, plasma amino acid-related metabolite (AA) profiling has attracted attention in studies on pathology and development of biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases, but has not been studied in CAS. To evaluate the potential relationship between CAS and AA metabolome, a new ion-pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IP-RPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 43 AAs in plasma of stenotic patients and age-matched control subjects. Furthermore, untargeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and confirmatory ELISA assays were performed. The method developed offered high accuracy (intra-assay imprecision averaged 4.4% for all compounds) and sensitivity (LOQ within 0.01-0.5μM). We found that 22 AAs and three AA ratios significantly changed in the CAS group as compared to control. The most pronounced differences were observed in urea cycle-related AAs and branched-chain AA (BCAA)-related AAs. The contents of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and its monomethylated derivative (NMMA) were increased by 30-64% with CAS. The arginine/ADMA and Fischer's ratios as well as arginine, homoarginine, ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine, hydroxyproline, betaine and 3-methylhistidine correlated with cardiac function-related parameters and concomitant systemic factors in the CAS patients. The results of proteomic analysis were consistent with involvement of inflammation, lipid abnormalities, hemostasis and extracellular matrix remodeling in CAS. In conclusion, changes in plasma AA profile and protein pattern that we identified in CAS provide information relevant to pathomechanisms and may deliver new biomarkers of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 3,3′,4,4′,5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) Decreases Hepatic and Systemic Ratios of Epoxide to Diol Metabolites of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Male Rats

    Wu, Xianai; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Robertson, Larry W.; Hammock, Bruce; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the homeostasis of oxygenated regulatory lipid mediators (oxylipins), potential markers of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, such as 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), is associated with a range of diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Here we test the hypothesis that PCB 126 exposure alters the levels of oxylipins in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5-weeks old) were treated over a 3-month period every 2 weeks with intraperitoneal injections of PCB 126 in corn oil (cumulative doses of 0, 19.8, 97.8, and 390 µg/kg b.w.; 6 injections total). PCB 126 treatment caused a reduction in growth rates at the highest dose investigated, a dose-dependent decrease in thymus weights, and a dose-dependent increase in liver weights. Liver PCB 126 levels increased in a dose-dependent manner, while levels in plasma were below or close to the detection limit. The ratios of several epoxides to diol metabolites formed via the cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenase/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway from polyunsaturated fatty acids displayed a dose-dependent decrease in the liver and plasma, whereas levels of oxylipins formed by other metabolic pathways were generally not altered by PCB 126 treatment. The effects of PCB 126 on epoxide-to-diol ratios were associated with an increased CYP1A activity in liver microsomes and an increased sEH activity in liver cytosol and peroxisomes. These results suggest that oxylipins are potential biomarkers of exposure to PCB 126 and that the P450/sEH pathway is a therapeutic target for PCB 126-mediated hepatotoxicity that warrants further attention. PMID:27208083

  3. Photocytotoxicity of a 5-nitrofuran-ethenyl-quinoline antiseptic (Quinifuryl to P388 mouse leukemia cells

    Daghastanli N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinifuryl (MW 449.52, 2-(5'-nitro-2'-furanylethenyl-4-{N-[4'-(N,N-diethylamino-1'-methylbutyl]carbamoyl} quinoline, is a water soluble representative of a family of 5-nitrofuran-ethenyl-quinoline drugs which has been shown to be highly toxic to various lines of transformed cells in the dark. In the present study, the toxicity of Quinifuryl to P388 mouse leukemia cells was compared in the dark and under illumination with visible light (390-500 nm. Illumination of water solutions of Quinifuryl (at concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 9.0 µg/ml in the presence of P388 cells resulted in its photodecomposition and was accompanied by elevated cytotoxicity. A significant capacity to kill P388 cells was detected at a drug concentration as low as 0.09 µg/ml. The toxic effect detected at this drug concentration under illumination exceeded the effect observed in the dark by more than three times. Moreover, the general toxic effect of Quinifuryl, which included cell proliferation arrest, was nearly 100%. Both dose- and time-dependent toxic effects were measured under illumination. The LC50 value of Quinifuryl during incubation with P388 cells was ~0.45 µg/ml under illumination for 60 min and >12 µg/ml in the dark. We have demonstrated that the final products of the Quinifuryl photolysis are not toxic, which means that the short-lived intermediates of Quinifuryl photodecomposition are responsible for the phototoxicity of this compound. The data obtained in the present study are the first to indicate photocytotoxicity of a nitroheterocyclic compound and demonstrate the possibility of its application as a photosensitizer drug for photochemotherapy.

  4. Solvent effect on copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC): synthesis of novel triazolyl substituted quinolines as potential anticancer agents.

    Ellanki, Amarender Reddy; Islam, Aminul; Rama, Veera Swamy; Pulipati, Ranga Prasad; Rambabu, D; Krishna, G Rama; Reddy, C Malla; Mukkanti, K; Vanaja, G R; Kalle, Arunasree M; Kumar, K Shiva; Pal, Manojit

    2012-05-15

    A regioselective route to novel mono triazolyl substituted quinolines has been developed via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of 2,4-diazidoquinoline with terminal alkynes in DMF. The reaction provided bis triazolyl substituted quinolines when performed in water in the presence of Et(3)N. A number of the compounds synthesized showed promising anti-proliferative properties when tested in vitro especially against breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Iodine-Mediated Intramolecular Dehydrogenative Coupling: Synthesis of N-Alkylindolo[3,2-c]- and -[2,3-c]quinoline Iodides.

    Volvoikar, Prajesh S; Tilve, Santosh G

    2016-03-04

    An I2/TBHP-mediated intramolecular dehydrogenative coupling reaction is developed for the synthesis of a library of medicinally important 5,11-dialkylindolo[3,2-c]quinoline salts and 5,7-dimethylindolo[2,3-c]quinoline salts. The annulation reaction is followed by aromatization to yield tetracycles in good yield. This protocol is also demonstrated for the synthesis of the naturally occurring isocryptolepine in salt form.

  6. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method to quantify lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), iso-LSD, 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD, and nor-LSD and identify novel metabolites in plasma samples in a controlled clinical trial

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Liechti, Matthias E.; Rentsch, Katharina M.

    2018-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a widely used recreational drug. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of LSD, iso-LSD, 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD), and nor-LSD in plasma samples from 24 healthy subjects after controlled administration of 100 μg LSD in a clinical trial. In addition, metabolites that have been recently described in in vitro studies, including lysergic acid monoethylamide...

  7. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent

    Dimethylurea/citric acid deep eutectic solvent was used as a dual catalyst and a green reaction medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and reusability of DES with high activity makes this method efficient and eco-friendly.

  8. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  9. Metabolite Profiling of Candidatus Liberibacter Infection in Hamlin Sweet Oranges.

    Hung, Wei-Lun; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-18

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), is considered the most serious citrus disease in the world. CLas infection has been shown to greatly affect metabolite profiles in citrus fruits. However, because of uneven distribution of CLas throughout the tree and a minimum bacterial titer requirement for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection, the infected trees may test false negative. To prevent this, metabolites of healthy Hamlin oranges (CLas-) obtained from the citrus undercover protection systems (CUPS) were investigated. Comparison of the metabolite profile of juice obtained from CLas- and CLas+ (asymptomatic and symptomatic) trees revealed significant differences in both volatile and nonvolatile metabolites. However, no consistent pattern could be observed in alcohols, esters, sesquiterpenes, sugars, flavanones, and limonoids as compared to previous studies. These results suggest that CLas may affect metabolite profiles of citrus fruits earlier than detecting infection by PCR. Citric acid, nobiletin, malic acid, and phenylalanine were identified as the metabolic biomarkers associated with the progression of HLB. Thus, the differential metabolites found in this study may serve as the biomarkers of HLB in its early stage, and the metabolite signature of CLas infection may provide useful information for developing a potential treatment strategy.

  10. Responses to water stress of gas exchange and metabolites in Eucalyptus and Acacia spp.

    Warren, Charles R; Aranda, Ismael; Cano, F Javier

    2011-10-01

    Studies of water stress commonly examine either gas exchange or leaf metabolites, and many fail to quantify the concentration of CO₂ in the chloroplasts (C(c)). We redress these limitations by quantifying C(c) from discrimination against ¹³CO₂ and using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for leaf metabolite profiling. Five Eucalyptus and two Acacia species from semi-arid to mesic habitats were subjected to a 2 month water stress treatment (Ψ(pre-dawn) = -1.7 to -2.3 MPa). Carbohydrates dominated the leaf metabolite profiles of species from dry areas, whereas organic acids dominated the metabolite profiles of species from wet areas. Water stress caused large decreases in photosynthesis and C(c), increases in 17-33 metabolites and decreases in 0-9 metabolites. In most species, fructose, glucose and sucrose made major contributions to osmotic adjustment. In Acacia, significant osmotic adjustment was also caused by increases in pinitol, pipecolic acid and trans-4-hydroxypipecolic acid. There were also increases in low-abundance metabolites (e.g. proline and erythritol), and metabolites that are indicative of stress-induced changes in metabolism [e.g. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, photorespiration, phenylpropanoid pathway]. The response of gas exchange to water stress and rewatering is rather consistent among species originating from mesic to semi-arid habitats, and the general response of metabolites to water stress is rather similar, although the specific metabolites involved may vary. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Metabolite profiles and the risk of developing diabetes

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies allow the high-throughput profiling of metabolic status from a blood specimen (metabolomics). We investigated whether metabolite profiles could predict the development of diabetes. Among 2,422 normoglycemic individuals followed for 12 years, 201 developed diabetes. Amino acids, amines, and other polar metabolites were profiled in baseline specimens using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cases and controls were matched for age, body mass index and fasting g...

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 6H-1-benzopyrano[4,3-b]quinolin-6-one derivatives as inhibitors of colon cancer cell growth

    Tie-Ling Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A convenient synthesis of 6H-1-benzopyrano[4,3-b]quinolin-6-one derivatives was reported using 4-chloro-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbaldehyde with different aromatic amines using silica sulfuric acid. The compounds were tested for their anticancer activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80, prostate (PC3 and DU-145, breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 cancer cells. These com-pounds showed more selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells. 3c was tested against five other colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo, which had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity. 3c did not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. In fact, 3c induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells over expressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. It was cytotoxic approximately 3- and 5-fold to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells. 3c also produced concentration-dependent changes in HCT-116 colon cancer cells, in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation.

  13. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel Pyrazolo [3, 4-B] quinoline based heterocyclic azo compounds and their dyeing performance

    Thaokar, Sanjay F.; Patel, Dinesh M.; Patel, Manish P.; Patel, Ranjan G.

    2007-01-01

    3-Amino-6-methyl-1H- pyrazolo [3, 4-B] quinoline was synthesized in good yield. Monoazo compounds were prepared using this intermediate as diazo component with various heterocyclic coupling components. All the azo compounds were characterized by their percentage yield, melting point, elemental analysis, UV-visible spectra, IR-spectra and dyeing performance on nylon and polyester fibres and by their antibacterial activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. (author)

  14. Detection of Quinoline in G. boninense-Infected Plants Using Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Field Study.

    Akanbi, Fowotade Sulayman; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Jaafar; Sulaiman, Yusran; Hushiarian, Roozbeh

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and chitosan nanoparticles (CTSNPs) were anchored on a screen-printed electrode to fabricate a multi-walled structure for the detection of quinoline. The surface morphology of the nanocomposites and the modified electrode was examined by an ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of specific functional groups on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) were used to monitor the layer-by-layer assembly of ultra-thin films of nanocomposites on the surface of the electrode and other electrochemical characterizations. Under optimized conditions, the novel sensor displayed outstanding electrochemical reactivity towards the electro-oxidation of quinoline. The linear range was fixed between 0.0004 and 1.0 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 3.75 nM. The fabricated electrode exhibited high stability with excellent sensitivity and selectivity, specifically attributable to the salient characteristics of AuNPs, CTSNPs, and MWCNTs and the synergistic inter-relationship between them. The newly developed electrode was tested in the field. The Ipa increased with an increase in the amount of quinoline solution added, and the peak potential deviated minimally, depicting the real capability of the newly fabricated electrode.

  15. Detection of Quinoline in G. boninense-Infected Plants Using Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Field Study

    Fowotade Sulayman Akanbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs reinforced with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and chitosan nanoparticles (CTSNPs were anchored on a screen-printed electrode to fabricate a multi-walled structure for the detection of quinoline. The surface morphology of the nanocomposites and the modified electrode was examined by an ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of specific functional groups on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV were used to monitor the layer-by-layer assembly of ultra-thin films of nanocomposites on the surface of the electrode and other electrochemical characterizations. Under optimized conditions, the novel sensor displayed outstanding electrochemical reactivity towards the electro-oxidation of quinoline. The linear range was fixed between 0.0004 and 1.0 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD of 3.75 nM. The fabricated electrode exhibited high stability with excellent sensitivity and selectivity, specifically attributable to the salient characteristics of AuNPs, CTSNPs, and MWCNTs and the synergistic inter-relationship between them. The newly developed electrode was tested in the field. The Ipa increased with an increase in the amount of quinoline solution added, and the peak potential deviated minimally, depicting the real capability of the newly fabricated electrode.

  16. Synthesis, structural studies and antituberculosis evaluation of new hydrazone derivatives of quinoline and their Zn(II complexes

    Mustapha C. Mandewale

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The quinoline hydrazone ligands were synthesized through multi-step reactions. The 2-hydroxy-3-formylquinoline derivatives (1a–1c were prepared from acetanilide derivatives as starting materials using Vilsmeier–Haack reaction. Then the condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-formylquinoline derivatives with hydrazide derivatives (2a–2c yielded quinoline hydrazone ligands (3a–3i. The synthesis of a new series of Zn(II complexes carried out by refluxing with these quinoline hydrazone ligands (3a–3i is reported. The molecular structures of the ligands (3a–3i and the Zn complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectral studies like FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, MS, UV–Visible and fluorescence. The preliminary results of antituberculosis study showed that most of the Zn(II complexes 4a–4i demonstrated very good antituberculosis activity while the ligands 3a–3i showed moderate activity. Among the tested compounds 4e and 4g were found to be most active with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 8.00μM and 7.42 μM respectively against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37 RV strain ATCC No-27294 which is comparable to “first and second line” drugs used to treat tuberculosis.

  17. Direct detection of glucuronide metabolites of lidocaine in sheep urine.

    Doran, Gregory S; Smith, Alistair K; Rothwell, Jim T; Edwards, Scott H

    2018-02-15

    The anaesthetic lidocaine is metabolised quickly to produce a series of metabolites, including several hydroxylated metabolites, which are further metabolised by addition of a glucuronic acid moiety. Analysis of these glucuronide metabolites in urine is performed indirectly by cleaving the glucuronic acid group using β-glucuronidase. However, direct analysis of intact glucuronide conjugates is a more straightforward approach as it negates the need for long hydrolysis incubations, and minimises the oxidation of sensitive hydrolysis products, while also distinguishing between the two forms of hydroxylated metabolites. A method was developed to identify three intact glucuronides of lidocaine in sheep urine using LC-MS/MS, which was further confirmed by the synthesis of glucuronide derivatives of 3OH-MEGX and 4OH-LIDO. Direct analysis of urine allowed the detection of the glucuronide metabolites of hydroxylidocaine (OH-LIDO), hydroxyl-monoethylglycinexylidide (OH-MEGX), and hydroxy-2,6-xylidine (OH-XYL). Analysis of urine before and after β-glucuronidase digestion showed that the efficiency of hydrolysis of these glucuronide metabolites may be underestimated in some studies. Analysis of urine in the current study from three different sheep with similar glucuronide metabolite concentrations resulted in different hydrolysis efficiencies, which may have been a result of different levels of substrate binding by matrix components, preventing enzyme cleavage. The use of direct analysis of intact glucuronides has the benefit of being less influenced by these matrix effects, while also allowing analysis of unstable metabolites like 4OH-XYL, which rapidly oxidises after hydrolysis. Additionally, direct analysis is less expensive and less time consuming, while providing more information about the status of hydroxylated metabolites in urine. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 67Cu-labelled antibody fragments for RIT: strategies to prevent kidney accumulation of 67Cu-labelled metabolites

    Rutherford, R.A.D.; Zimmermann, K.; Waibel, R.; Ruch, C.; Pasquale, C. de; Novak-Hofer, I.

    1997-01-01

    Two different approaches to reduce accumulation of radiocopper labelled metabolites in the kidney were pursued. The first strategy consisted of pharmacological blockade of reuptake of metabolites by predosing with basic amino acids. The second approach is chemical modification of the DOTA chelator in an attempt to increase clearance of metabolites from the kidneys. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref

  19. Natural metabolites for parasitic weed management.

    Vurro, Maurizio; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Zermane, Nadjia

    2009-05-01

    Compounds of natural origin, such as phytotoxins produced by fungi or natural amino acids, could be used in parasitic weed management strategies by interfering with the early growth stages of the parasites. These metabolites could inhibit seed germination or germ tube elongation, so preventing attachment to the host plant, or, conversely, stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host, contributing to a reduction in the parasite seed bank. Some of the fungal metabolites assayed were very active even at very low concentrations, such as some macrocyclic trichothecenes, which at 0.1 microM strongly suppressed the germination of Orobanche ramosa L. seeds. Interesting results were also obtained with some novel toxins, such as phyllostictine A, highly active in reducing germ tube elongation and seed germination both of O. ramosa and of Cuscuta campestris Yuncker. Among the amino acids tested, methionine and arginine were particularly interesting, as they were able to suppress seed germination at concentrations lower than 1 mM. Some of the fungal metabolites tested were also able to stimulate the germination of O. ramosa seeds. The major findings in this research field are described and discussed.

  20. Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites in Humans: Disease and Healthy States

    Yiquan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that can be metabolised through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway. The first enzyme of the pathway, indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, is strongly stimulated by inflammatory molecules, particularly interferon gamma. Thus, the kynurenine pathway is often systematically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The biological significance is that 1 the depletion of tryptophan and generation of kynurenines play a key modulatory role in the immune response; and 2 some of the kynurenines, such as quinolinic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic acid, are neuroactive. The kynurenine pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in many diseases and disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, AIDS dementia complex, malaria, cancer, depression and schizophrenia, where imbalances in tryptophan and kynurenines have been found. This review compiles most of these studies and provides an overview of how the kynurenine pathway might be contributing to disease development, and the concentrations of tryptophan and kynurenines in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissues in control and patient subjects.

  1. Circulating prostacyclin metabolites in the dog

    Taylor, B.M.; Shebuski, R.J.; Sun, F.F.

    1983-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the concentration of prostacyclin (PGI2) metabolites in the blood of the dog. After a bolus i.v. dose of [11 beta- 3 H]PGI2 (5 micrograms/kg) into each of five dogs, blood samples were withdrawn at 0.33, 0.67, 1, 3, 5, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min postdrug administration. Plasma samples were extracted and the radioactive components were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography with autoradiofluorography and radio-high-performance liquid chromatography. The compounds were identified by comparing their mobility with synthetic standards; only parallel responses observed in both tests constituted positive identification. Seven metabolites were identified by these two techniques: 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha; 6-keto-PGE1; 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF 1 alpha; 2,3-dinor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha; and 2,3,18,19-tetranor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha. Several additional compounds, both polar and nonpolar in nature, which did not co-chromatograph with any of our standards were also detected. Early samples consisted predominantly of 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha and other 20-carbon metabolites. By 30 min, the predominant metabolites were the 16- and 18-carbon dicarboxylic acids. By 60 min, 85% of the radioactivity was associated with two unidentified polar compounds. The evidence suggests that 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha probably reflects only the transient levels of freshly entering PGI2 in the circulation, whereas levels of the most polar metabolites (e.g., dihydro-diketo-carboxyl tetranor-PGF 2 alpha) may be a better measure of the overall PGI2 presence due to its longer half-life in circulation

  2. Production of Metabolites

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  3. The purification of coal tar by the addition of quinoline and Zn(oh)/sub 2/

    Zhou, P.; Chen, Q.L.; Ao, X.Q.; Kang, C

    2017-01-01

    The coal tar was purified by the addition of quinoline and Zn(OH)2, in order to decrease the content of carbon and inorganic oxide particles. The effect on the viscosity and ash content of the coal tar were investigated by altering temperature, time, and the amount of quinolone and Zn(OH)2 . When the volume ratio between quinolone and coal tar was 20:1 and the static time was 24 h. The viscosity of three layers decreased with rising temperature. When the static temperature and time was 45 °C and 24 h, respectively. The viscosity of three layers decreased with the arising amount of quinoline. And when the volume ratio between quinolone and coal tar was 20:1 and the temperature was 45 °C. The viscosity of three layers decreased first and then increased with the prolonging of static time. And when the static time of coal tar was 24 h, the viscosity of coal tar is the lowest. Because of the lower viscosity of coal tar, decreasing the content of carbon and ash particles in upper and middle layer, the ash content decreased from 0.168% to 0.092%. The addition of Zn(OH)2 can lead ash content in middle layer decrease to 0.058%. Zn2SiO4 and ZnAl2O4 may be produced due to the reaction between Zn (OH) 2 and SiO2 or Al2O3, which can settle down easily. The results show that the content of carbon and inorganic oxide particles in upper-middle-class (the middle 4/5 of the whole volume) decreased with the addition of quinolone and Zn(OH)2 . When the volume ratio between quinolone and coal tar was 50:2, quality ratio between coal tar and Zn(OH)2 was 20000:1, the mixture were heated up to 45 °C at atmospheric pressure and keeping this constant temperature for 24 h, the ash content in upper-middle-class can decreased to 0.058%. (author)

  4. Mutagenic azide metabolite is azidoalanine

    Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Ronald, R.C.; Kleinhofs, A.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium axide produces high mutation rates in a number of species. Azide mutagenicity is mediated through a metabolite in barley and bacteria. Many studies showed that azide affects the L-cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Cell-free extracts of Salmonella typhimurium convert azide and O-acetylserine to the mutagenic metabolite. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the metabolite biosynthesis. To confirm the conclusion that the azide metabolite is formed through the β-substitution pathway of L-cysteine, we radioactively labeled the azide metabolite using 14 C-labeled precursors. Moreover, the mutagenic azide metabolite was purified and identified as azidoalanine based on mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  6. Kinetics on the reaction of substituted quinolines and p-substituted benzoylchlorides under various pressures

    Kim, Young Cheul; Lim, Jong Wan; Choi, Sung Yong; Kim, Se Kyong

    1999-01-01

    The reaction rates of substituted quinolines(6-CH 3 C 9 H 7 N, C 9 H 7 N) with p-substituted benzoylchlorides(p-CH 3 , p-H, p-NO 2 ) have been measured by conductometry in acetonitrile, and the rate constants are determined at various temperatures (10,15, 20, 25 .deg. C) and pressures(1, 200, 500, 1000bar). From the values of rate constants, the activation parameters(Ea, ΔV ≠ , ΔS ≠ , and ΔG ≠ ) and the pressure dependence of Hammett ρ values were determined. The rate constants increase as a function of temperatures and pressures, and are further increase by introduction the electron donor substituents in nucleophile(p-CH 3 ) or electron acceptor(p-NO 2 ) substituents in substrate. The activation volume, and the activation entropy are all negative. Hammett ρ values are also negative for nucleophile (ρ X ) and positive for the substrate (ρ Y ) over the pressure range studied. The results of kinetic studies for pressure and substituent show that these reactions proceed in typical S N 2 reaction mechanism and 'associative S N 2' in which bond formation favored with increasing pressures

  7. Investigating the Spectrum of Biological Activity of Substituted Quinoline-2-Carboxamides and Their Isosteres

    Ales Imramovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series of thirty-five substituted quinoline-2-carboxamides and thirty-three substituted naphthalene-2-carboxamides were prepared and characterized. They were tested for their activity related to the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport (PET in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. Primary in vitro screening of the synthesized compounds was also performed against four mycobacterial species. N-Cycloheptylquinoline-2-carboxamide, N-cyclohexylquinoline-2-carboxamide and N-(2-phenylethylquinoline-2-carboxamide showed higher activity against M. tuberculosis than the standards isoniazid or pyrazinamide and 2-(pyrrolidin-1-ylcarbonylquinoline and 1-(2-naphthoylpyrrolidine expressed higher activity against M. kansasii and M. avium paratuberculosis than the standards isoniazid or pyrazinamide. The most effective antimycobacterial compounds demonstrated insignificant toxicity against the human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell line. The PET-inhibiting activity expressed by IC50 value of the most active compound N-benzyl-2-naphthamide was 7.5 μmol/L. For all compounds, the structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  8. Green synthesis of novel quinoline based imidazole derivatives and evaluation of their antimicrobial activity

    N.C. Desai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have described the conventional and microwave method for the synthesis of N-(4-((2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethylene-5-oxo-2-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-1-yl(arylamides 3a–l. It is observed that the solvent-free microwave thermolysis is a convenient, rapid, high-yielding, and environmental friendly protocol for the synthesis of quinoline based imidazole derivatives when compared with conventional reaction in a solution phase. Antimicrobial activity of the newly synthesized compounds is screened in vitro on the following microbial cultures: Escherichia coli (MTCC 443, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 1688, Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96, Streptococcus pyogenes (MTCC 442, Candida albicans (MTCC 227, Aspergillus niger (MTCC 282, Aspergillus clavatus (MTCC 1323. All the synthesized bio-active molecules are tested for their in vitro antimicrobial activity by bioassay namely serial broth dilution. Among these compounds 3c, 3d, 3f, 3h and 3j show significant potency against different microbial strains. All the compounds have been characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral data. On the basis of statistical analysis, it is observed that these compounds give significant co-relation.

  9. N-Mesityl-C-acylketenimines: 1,5-Sigmatropic Shifts and Electrocyclization to Quinolines.

    Rao, V. V. Ramana; Fulloon, Belinda E.; Bernhardt, Paul V.; Koch, Rainer; Wentrup, Curt

    1998-08-21

    Flash vacuum thermolysis (FVT) of triazoles 6a-c generates alpha-oxoketenimines 10, the ester 10a being isolable. FVT of pyrroledione 8 generates the isomeric imidoylketene 9a. Ketenes 9 and ketenimines 10 undergo thermal interconversion by 1,3-shifts of methoxy and dimethylamino groups under mild FVT conditions (ca. 350-400 degrees C). Both 9 and 10 are directly observable by IR spectroscopy at either 77 K or on Ar matrix isolation at 12 K. On FVT at temperatures above ca. 400 degrees C, the ketenimines 10 undergo a 1,5-H shift to o-quinoid imines 12/13, followed by electrocyclization to dihydroquinolines 14 (unobserved) and 15 (observed by NMR). The latter are easily oxidized to alkylquinoline-3-carboxylates or quinoline-3-carboxamides 16 by atmospheric oxygen. Ab initio calculations on model compounds 18-23 predict an energy barrier of ca. 38 kcal mol(-)(1) (161 kJ mol(-)(1)) for the 1,5-H shift in N-(o-methylphenyl)ketenimines via the transition state TS19 followed by an electrocyclization barrier to dihydroquinoline 23a via TS22a of ca. 16 kcal mol(-)(1).

  10. Synthesis and study of the α-amylase inhibitory potential of thiadiazole quinoline derivatives.

    Taha, Muhammad; Tariq Javid, Muhammad; Imran, Syahrul; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Ullah, Hayat; Rahim, Fazal; Khan, Fahad; Islam Mohammad, Jahidul; Mohammed Khan, Khalid

    2017-10-01

    α-Amylase is a target for type-2 diabetes mellitus treatment. However, small molecule inhibitors of α-amylase are currently scarce. In the course of developing small molecule α-amylase inhibitors, we designed and synthesized thiadiazole quinoline analogs (1-30), characterized by different spectroscopic techniques such as 1 HNMR and EI-MS and screened for α-amylase inhibitory potential. Thirteen analogs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 30 showed outstanding α-amylase inhibitory potential with IC 50 values ranges between 0.002±0.60 and 42.31±0.17μM which is many folds better than standard acarbose having IC 50 value 53.02±0.12μM. Eleven analogs 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19 and 24 showed good to moderate inhibitory potential while seven analogs 8, 13, 16, 20, 21 and 29 were found inactive. Our study identifies novel series of potent α-amylase inhibitors for further investigation. Structure activity relationship has been established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolite profiles and the risk of developing diabetes.

    Wang, Thomas J; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P; McCabe, Elizabeth; Lewis, Gregory D; Fox, Caroline S; Jacques, Paul F; Fernandez, Céline; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Carr, Stephen A; Mootha, Vamsi K; Florez, Jose C; Souza, Amanda; Melander, Olle; Clish, Clary B; Gerszten, Robert E

    2011-04-01

    Emerging technologies allow the high-throughput profiling of metabolic status from a blood specimen (metabolomics). We investigated whether metabolite profiles could predict the development of diabetes. Among 2,422 normoglycemic individuals followed for 12 years, 201 developed diabetes. Amino acids, amines and other polar metabolites were profiled in baseline specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Cases and controls were matched for age, body mass index and fasting glucose. Five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids had highly significant associations with future diabetes: isoleucine, leucine, valine, tyrosine and phenylalanine. A combination of three amino acids predicted future diabetes (with a more than fivefold higher risk for individuals in top quartile). The results were replicated in an independent, prospective cohort. These findings underscore the potential key role of amino acid metabolism early in the pathogenesis of diabetes and suggest that amino acid profiles could aid in diabetes risk assessment.

  12. Comparative effects in rats of intact wheat bran and two wheat bran fractions on the disposition of the mutagen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline

    Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Harris, Philip J.; Kestell, Philip; Zhu, Shuotun; Munday, Rex; Munday, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Wheat bran protects against mutations and cancer, but contains different plant cell types that are likely to have different protective effects. We previously described the production and chemical characterisation of an aleurone-rich fraction (ARF) and a pericarp-rich fraction (PRF) from wheat grain. We compared these with whole bran (WB), fed to rats as 10% of a high fat AIN-76 diet. All bran-supplemented diets increased faecal bulk, in the order PRF > WB > ARF. PRF increased the activity of NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase only in the forestomach, whereas ARF and WB enhanced levels of glutathione S-transferase in the duodenum. ARF but not PRF was digested and fermented, and also encouraged bacterial growth. Rats were gavaged with the radioactive mutagen 14 C-labelled IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), and effects of the brans on plasma radioactivity measured. Compared with the control diet, all bran-supplemented diets reduced the concentration of radioactivity in plasma, in the order ARF > PRF > WB. All brans increased faecal elimination of radioactivity, but only ARF and PRF enhanced urinary radioactivity. These data suggest that wheat bran may reduce mutation and cancers through direct adsorption and enhanced elimination of a dietary mutagen and/or its metabolites, and that wheat bran enriched in pericarp or aleurone cell walls may exert protective effects through different mechanisms.

  13. Some Metabolites Act as Second Messengers in Yeast Chronological Aging

    Karamat Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating the longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining cellular processes. The concentrations of the key metabolites that affect yeast chronological aging are controlled spatially and temporally. Here, we analyze mechanisms through which the spatiotemporal dynamics of changes in the concentrations of the key metabolites influence yeast chronological lifespan. Our analysis indicates that a distinct set of metabolites can act as second messengers that define the pace of yeast chronological aging. Molecules that can operate both as intermediates of yeast metabolism and as second messengers of yeast chronological aging include reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glycerol, trehalose, hydrogen peroxide, amino acids, sphingolipids, spermidine, hydrogen sulfide, acetic acid, ethanol, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerol. We discuss several properties that these second messengers of yeast chronological aging have in common with second messengers of signal transduction. We outline how these second messengers of yeast chronological aging elicit changes in cell functionality and viability in response to changes in the nutrient, energy, stress, and proliferation status of the cell.

  14. Evaluation of Medical Metabolites in Boraginaceae Family

    Golnaz Taravati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Boraginaceae family is known as a medicinal plant classified in dicotyledons.  It is originated from Asia (Middle East. The aim of this study was to evaluate ingredient between 4 species of Boraginaceae family based on physiological & phytochemical traits as well as seed fatty acid contents.  4 species (E. russicum, E. italicum, E. amoenum, and B. officinalis were evaluated carefully. All seeds were cultivated in identical conditions in a greenhouse in Tehran to assesse parameters such as tannins, phenols, anthocyanin, total protein, seed oil contents, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, and Catalase (CAT activity. Analysis of oil from seeds of EchiumL. determined 7 different fatty acids including Linolenic acid (35.1%, Linoleic acid (16.8%, Oleic acid (16.6% and Arachidonic acid (15.5% as major fatty acids, while stearic acid (4.42%, Palmitic acid (6.22%, Gama-Linolenic acid (6.04% were the minor fatty acids extracted from seeds. Low protein content was observed in E. russicum(70 mg/g and maximum level of protein was in B. officinalis(91mg/g. E. amoenum had maximum phenols (38mg/g whereas E. russicum had minimum (26 mg/g. For total phenol, B. officinalis had maxium phenols (8.1mg/g whereas E. italicum had minimum (3.9mg/g. Anthocyanins: E. russicum had maximum anthocyanins (65 mg/g whereas B. officinalis had minimum (41 mg/g. In conclusion, it can be said that different species had different amounts of secondary metabolites so that no regular relation would be detected among plant species that we studied

  15. Metabolite profiling of Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid.

    Christian Czech

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of cognitive functions. Today the diagnosis of AD relies on clinical evaluations and is only late in the disease. Biomarkers for early detection of the underlying neuropathological changes are still lacking and the biochemical pathways leading to the disease are still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the metabolic changes resulting from the disease phenotype by a thorough and systematic metabolite profiling approach. For this purpose CSF samples from 79 AD patients and 51 healthy controls were analyzed by gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. In total 343 different analytes have been identified. Significant changes in the metabolite profile of AD patients compared to healthy controls have been identified. Increased cortisol levels seemed to be related to the progression of AD and have been detected in more severe forms of AD. Increased cysteine associated with decreased uridine was the best paired combination to identify light AD (MMSE>22 with specificity and sensitivity above 75%. In this group of patients, sensitivity and specificity above 80% were obtained for several combinations of three to five metabolites, including cortisol and various amino acids, in addition to cysteine and uridine.

  16. Comparison of Expression of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthesis Cluster Genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Mack, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help ...

  17. Synthesis of 2-Substituted Furo[2,3-b]- and Furo[3,2-c]quinolines via Heterogeneous Palladium-catalyzed Heteroannulation

    Park, Hee Jung [Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Ok-Kyung; Park, Young Chul; Yum, Eul Kgun [Chungnam National University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    As a part of our continuing organometallic studies on diversification of nitrogen-containing biologically active heterocycles, we attempted to synthesize furo[2,3-b]- and furo[3,2-c]quinolines starting from o-halohydroxyquinolines and terminal alkynes with heterogeneous Pd(OAc)2 catalyst, which was supported by nanosized pore carbon ball. 2-substituted furo[2,3-b]quinolines and furo[3,2-c]quinolines were synthesized from the reaction of 3-iodoquinolin-2-ol and 3-iodoquinolin-4-ol, respectively, with diverse alkynes. The heteroannulation reaction proceeds with Sonogashira coupling followed by 5-endo-dig cyclization in good isolated yields under copper and ligand free conditions.

  18. Synthesis of 2-Substituted Furo[2,3-b]- and Furo[3,2-c]quinolines via Heterogeneous Palladium-catalyzed Heteroannulation

    Park, Hee Jung; Yang, Ok-Kyung; Park, Young Chul; Yum, Eul Kgun

    2016-01-01

    As a part of our continuing organometallic studies on diversification of nitrogen-containing biologically active heterocycles, we attempted to synthesize furo[2,3-b]- and furo[3,2-c]quinolines starting from o-halohydroxyquinolines and terminal alkynes with heterogeneous Pd(OAc)2 catalyst, which was supported by nanosized pore carbon ball. 2-substituted furo[2,3-b]quinolines and furo[3,2-c]quinolines were synthesized from the reaction of 3-iodoquinolin-2-ol and 3-iodoquinolin-4-ol, respectively, with diverse alkynes. The heteroannulation reaction proceeds with Sonogashira coupling followed by 5-endo-dig cyclization in good isolated yields under copper and ligand free conditions

  19. Structure of pyridine and quinoline vinyl ethers according to data from 1H and 13C NMR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations

    Afonin, A.V.; Voronov, V.K.; Andriankov, M.A.; Danovich, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the structure of the vinyl ethers of heterocyclic compounds has not been undertaken. The present work was devoted to investigation of the stereochemical and electronic structure of the vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline. The PMR spectra of the samples were recorded for 5% solutions in deuterochloroform on a Tesla BS-497 spectrometer at 100 MHz. The 13 C NMR spectra were recorded on a Tesla BS-567A spectrometer at 25.1 MHz in deuterochloroform with the samples at concentrations of 30%. The internal standard was HMDS. The vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline exist preferentially in the nonplanar S-trans conformation. In the vinyl esters of pyridine and quinoline the p-π conjugation is concurrent in nature and depends on the position of the vinyloxy group in the heterocycle

  20. Potentiometric studies on mixed-ligand chelates of uranyl ion with carboxylic acid phenolic acids

    Bandiwadekar, S.P.; Chavar, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexes of UO 2 2+ with bidentate carboxylic and phenolic acids have been studied potentiometrically at 30 ± 0.1degC and μ=0.2M (NaClO 4 ). 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of UO 2 2+ with phthalic acid (PTHA), maleic acid (MAE), malonic acid (MAL), quinolinic acid (QA), 5-sulphosalicylic acid (5-SSA), salicylic acid (SA), and only 1:1 complexes in the case of mandelic acid (MAD) have been detected. The formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand complexes has been inferred from simultaneous equilibria in the present study. The values of ΔlogK, Ksub(DAL), Ksub(2LA) or Ksub(2AL) for the ternary complexes have been calculated. The stabilities of mixed ligand complexes depend on the size of the chelate ring and the stabilities of the binary complexes. (author). 15 refs

  1. Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activities of β-Carboline and Quinoline Alkaloids Derivatives from the Plants of Genus Peganum

    Ting Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was reported that the main chemical constituents in plants of genus Peganum were a serial of β-carboline and quinoline alkaloids. These alkaloids were quantitatively assessed for selective inhibitory activities on acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE by in vitro Ellman method. The results indicated that harmane was the most potent selective AChE inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.11 ± 2.00 μM and AChE selectivity index (SI, IC50 of BChE/IC50 of AChE of 10.82. Vasicine was the most potent BChE inhibitor with feature of dual AChE/BChE inhibitory activity, with an IC50 versus AChE/BChE of 13.68 ± 1.25/2.60 ± 1.47 μM and AChE SI of 0.19. By analyzing and comparing the IC50 and SI of those chemicals, it was indicated that the β-carboline alkaloids displayed more potent AChE inhibition but less BChE inhibition than quinoline alkaloids. The substituent at the C7 position of the β-carboline alkaloids and C3 and C9 positions of quinoline alkaloids played a critical role in AChE or BChE inhibition. The potent inhibition suggested that those alkaloids may be used as candidates for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship of those compounds investigated might provide guidance for the design and synthesis of AChE and BChE inhibitors.

  2. Differences in anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline enantiomers and investigation of the presumed underlying mechanism of action

    Mullié Catherine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better anti-malarial efficiency and lower neurotoxicity have been reported for mefloquine (MQ (+- enantiomer. However, the importance of stereoselectivity remains poorly understood as the anti-malarial activity of pure enantiomer MQ analogues has never been described. Building on these observations, a series of enantiopure 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives has previously been synthesized to optimize the efficiency and reduce possible adverse effects. Their in vitro activity on Plasmodium falciparum W2 and 3D7 strains is reported here along with their inhibition of β-haematin formation and peroxidative degradation of haemin, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial drugs. Results The (S-enantiomers of this series of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives were found to be at least as effective as both chloroquine (CQ and MQ. The derivative with a 5-carbon side-chain length was the more efficient on both P. falciparum strains. (R -enantiomers displayed an activity decreased by 2 to 15-fold as compared to their (S counterparts. The inhibition of β-haematin formation was significantly stronger with all tested compounds than with MQ, irrespective of the stereochemistry. Similarly, the inhibition of haemin peroxidation was significantly higher for both (S and (R-enantiomers of derivatives with a side-chain length of five or six carbons than for MQ and CQ. Conclusions The prominence of stereochemistry in the anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives is confirmed. The inhibition of β-haematin formation and haemin peroxidation can be put forward as presumed mechanisms of action but do not account for the stereoselectivity of action witnessed in vitro.

  3. Metabolite modifications in Solanum lycopersicum roots and leaves ...

    During the treatment, Cd accumulated significantly in the roots compared to stems and leaves. Plant growth (root, stem and leaf) decreased when Cd concentration increased. The analysis of 1H-NMR spectra of polar extracts showed clear differences between metabolites amounts (soluble sugars, organic and amino acids) ...

  4. Effects of Fusarium verticilloides , its metabolites and neem leaf ...

    41.18%), Fusarium spp. (29.41%) and Rhizopus spp. (23.53%). F. verticilloides metabolite was extracted using dichloromethane and phosphoric acid (10:1) while powdered neem leaf was extracted with ethanol for 72 h. The experiment, which ...

  5. Effects of Fusarium verticilloides, its metabolites and neem leaf ...

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... from the seeds samples were Aspergillus spp. (41.18%), Fusarium spp. (29.41%) and Rhizopus spp. (23.53%). F. verticilloides metabolite was extracted using dichloromethane and phosphoric acid (10:1) while powdered neem leaf was extracted with ethanol for 72 h. The experiment, which was made up of.

  6. Separation of prostaglandin metabolites on sephadex LH 20 columns

    Hansen, Harald S.; Bukhave, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sephadex LH 20 columns have been investigated for the separation of initial prostaglandin metabolites. Solvent systems are described for the separation of the free acids of 15-keto-dihydro-PGE, 15-keto-PGE, PGE, and PGF(1a). Further, one of the solvent systems is described for the separation...

  7. Interference with hemozoin formation represents an important mechanism of schistosomicidal action of antimalarial quinoline methanols.

    Juliana B R Corrêa Soares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the major causative agents of human schistosomiasis, which afflicts 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel remains the main drug used for schistosomiasis treatment, and reliance on the single therapy has been prompting the search for new therapeutic compounds against this disease. Our group has demonstrated that heme crystallization into hemozoin (Hz within the S. mansoni gut is a major heme detoxification route with lipid droplets involved in this process and acting as a potential chemotherapeutical target. In the present work, we investigated the effects of three antimalarial compounds, quinine (QN, quinidine (QND and quinacrine (QCR in a murine schistosomiasis model by using a combination of biochemical, cell biology and molecular biology approaches. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment of S. mansoni-infected female Swiss mice with daily intraperitoneal injections of QN, and QND (75 mg/kg/day from the 11(th to 17(th day after infection caused significant decreases in worm burden (39%-61% and egg production (42%-98%. Hz formation was significantly inhibited (40%-65% in female worms recovered from QN- and QND-treated mice and correlated with reduction in the female worm burden. We also observed that QN treatment promoted remarkable ultrastructural changes in male and female worms, particularly in the gut epithelium and reduced the granulomatous reaction to parasite eggs trapped in the liver. Microarray gene expression analysis indicated that QN treatment increased the expression of transcripts related to musculature, protein synthesis and repair mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: The overall significant reduction in several disease burden parameters by the antimalarial quinoline methanols indicates that interference with Hz formation in S. mansoni represents an important mechanism of schistosomicidal action of these compounds and points out the heme crystallization process as a

  8. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  9. Bignoniaceae Metabolites as Semiochemicals

    Lucía Castillo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Bignoniaceae are mostly found in tropical and neo-tropical regions in America, Asia and Africa, although some of them are cultivated in other regions as ornamentals. Species belonging to this family have been extensively studied in regard to their pharmacological properties (as extracts and isolated compounds. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported scientific evidence about the chemical properties as well as that of the extracts and isolated compounds from species of this family, focusing mainly in insect-plant interactions. As it is known, this family is recognized for the presence of iridoids which are markers of oviposition and feeding preference to species which have became specialist feeders. Some herbivore species have also evolved to the point of been able to sequester iridoids and use them as defenses against their predators. However, iridoids also exhibit anti-insect properties, and therefore they may be good lead molecules to develop botanical pesticides. Other secondary metabolites, such as quinones, and whole extracts have also shown potential as anti-insect agents.

  10. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-07-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied.

  11. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied

  12. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C 9 H 7 N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν 45 and ν 44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm −1 and 178 cm −1 , respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations

  13. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Pirali, O.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Gruet, S.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C9H7N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν45 and ν44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm-1 and 178 cm-1, respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations.

  14. Laboratory Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles: Quinoline, and Phenanthridine in Solid Argon and H2O

    Bernstein, M. P.; Mattioda, A. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout the universe. Their detection and identification are based on telescopic infrared (IR) spectra compared with laboratory data. Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics i.e., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules should be present in the interstellar medium, but have received relatively little attention. We present mid-IR spectra of two PANHs, quinoline (C9H7N), and phenanthridine (C13H9N) isolated in solid argon and frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions yielding data directly comparable to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H2O. Whereas the IR spectrum of phenanthridine in H2O is similar to that of the same compound isolated in an argon matrix, quinoline absorptions shift up to 16 cm(sup -1) (0.072 mm) between argon and H2O. Thus, astronomers will not always be able to rely on IR band positions of matrix isolated PANHs to correctly interpret the absorptions of PANHs frozen in H2O ice grains. Furthermore, our data suggest that relative band areas also vary, so determining column densities to better than a factor of 3 will require knowledge of the matrix in which the PANH is embedded and laboratory studies of relevant samples.

  15. Quinoline group based fluorescent sensor for detecting zinc ions in aqueous media and its logic gate behaviour

    Dong, Zhengping; Guo, Yueping; Tian, Xin; Ma, Jiantai

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive method for quantitative determination of Zn 2+ in water has been developed by using a novel fluorescent sensor NQA: (N-Quinolin-8-yl-2-[(quinolin-8-ylcarbamoylmethyl)-amino]-acetamide). The sensor displays great selectivity for Zn 2+ in the presence of other metal ions in aqueous solution and possesses an excellent sensitivity of about 2×10 −8 M for Zn 2+ . The binding stoichiometry, binding affinity, and pH sensitivity of the sensor have also been studied. Furthermore, the fluorescent changes of NQA upon the addition of cations (Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ) are utilized to construct an INHIBIT logic gate at the molecular level, using Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ as chemical inputs and the fluorescence intensity as output. NQA has ideal chemical and spectroscopic properties that satisfy the criteria for further biological and environmental applications. - Highlights: ► A novel fluorescent sensor for Zn 2+ in water has been synthesized. ► The sensor displays high selectivity for Zn 2+ in the presence of other ions. ► The sensor exhibits excellent sensing ability under the physiological pH window. ► The sensor can be utilized as an INHIBIT logic gate at the molecular level.

  16. TDDFT study on excited state intramolecular proton transfer mechanism in 2-amino-3-(2‧-benzazolyl)-quinolines

    Jia, Xueli; Li, Chaozheng; Li, Donglin; Liu, Yufang

    2018-03-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of the 2-amino-3-(2‧-benzoxazolyl)-quinoline (ABO) and 2-amino-3-(2‧-benzothiazolyl)-quinoline (ABT) molecules in both S0 and S1 states at B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) level in ethanol solvent have been studied to reveal the deactivation mechanism of the tautomers of the two molecules from the S1 state to the S0 state. The results show that the tautomers of ABO and ABT molecules may return to the S0 state by emitting fluorescence. In addition, the bond lengths, angles and infrared spectra are analyzed to confirm the hydrogen bonds strengthened upon photoexcitation, which can facilitate the proton transfer process. The frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and natural bond orbital (NBO) are also calculated to indicate the intramolecular charge transfer which can be used to explore the tendency of ESIPT reaction. The potential energy surfaces of the ABO and ABT molecules in the S0 and S1 states have been constructed. According to the energy potential barrier of 9.12 kcal/mol for ABO molecule and 5.96 kcal/mol for ABT molecule, it can be indicated that the proton transfer may occur in the S1 state.

  17. Deconstructing Quinoline-Class Antimalarials to Identify Fundamental Physicochemical Properties of Beta-Hematin Crystal Growth Inhibitors.

    Olafson, Katy N; Nguyen, Tam Q; Vekilov, Peter G; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2017-10-04

    A versatile approach to control crystallization involves the use of modifiers, which are additives that interact with crystal surfaces and alter their growth rates. Elucidating a modifier's binding specificity to anisotropic crystal surfaces is a ubiquitous challenge that is critical to their design. In this study, we select hematin, a byproduct of malaria parasites, as a model system to examine the complementarity of modifiers (i.e., antimalarial drugs) to β-hematin crystal surfaces. We divide two antimalarials, chloroquine and amodiaquine, into segments consisting of a quinoline base, common to both drugs, and side chains that differentiate their modes of action. Using a combination of scanning probe microscopy, bulk crystallization, and analytical techniques, we show that the base and side chain work synergistically to reduce the rate of hematin crystallization. In contrast to general observations that modifiers retain their function upon segmentation, we show that the constituents do not act as modifiers. A systematic study of quinoline isomers and analogues shows how subtle rearrangement and removal of functional moieties can create effective constituents from previously ineffective modifiers, along with tuning their inhibitory modes of action. These findings highlight the importance of specific functional moieties in drug compounds, leading to an improved understanding of modifier-crystal interactions that could prove to be applicable to the design of new antimalarials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    Kelecom, Alphonse

    2002-03-01

    After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  19. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  20. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.