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Sample records for metabolite glycidamide ga

  1. In Vivo acrylamide exposure may cause severe toxicity to mouse oocytes through its metabolite glycidamide.

    Duru Aras

    Full Text Available High acrylamide (ACR content in heat-processed carbohydrate-rich foods, as well as roasted products such as coffee, almonds etc., has been found to be as a risk factor for carcinogenicity and genotoxicity by The World Health Organization. Glycidamide (GLY, the epoxide metabolite of ACR, is processed by the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system and has also been found to be a genotoxic agent. The aim of this study was to determine whether ACR and/or GLY have any detrimental effect on the meiotic cell division of oocytes. For this purpose, germinal vesicle-stage mouse oocytes were treated with 0, 100, 500, or 1000 μM ACR or 0, 25, or 250 μM GLY in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed after an intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg/day ACR of female BALB/c mice for 7 days. The majority of in vitro ACR-treated oocytes reached the metaphase-II stage following 18 hours of incubation, which was not significantly different from the control group. Maturation of the oocytes derived from in vivo ACR-treated mice was impaired significantly. Oocytes, reaching the M-II stage in the in vivo ACR-treated group, were characterized by a decrease in meiotic spindle mass and an increase in chromosomal disruption. In vitro GLY treatment resulted in the degeneration of all oocytes, indicating that ACR toxicity on female germ cells may occur through its metabolite, GLY. Thus, ACR exposure must be considered, together with its metabolite GLY, when female fertility is concerned.

  2. Expression profile of human cells in culture exposed to glycidamide, a reactive metabolite of the heat-induced food carcinogen acrylamide

    Clement, Flurina C.; Dip, Ramiro; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2007-01-01

    Recent findings of acrylamide in many common foods have sparked renewed interest in assessing human health hazards and the long-term risk associated with exposure to vinyl compounds. Acrylamide is tumorigenic at high doses in rodents and has been classified as a probable human carcinogen. However, cancer risk projections in the population remain problematic because the molecular pathogenesis of acrylamide at the low level of dietary uptake is not understood. In particular, the question of whether specific transcriptional responses may amplify or mitigate the known genotoxicity of acrylamide has never been examined. Here, we used high-density DNA microarrays and PCR validations to assess genome-wide messenger profiles induced by glycidamide, the more reactive metabolite of acrylamide. The expression changes resulting from glycidamide treatment of human epithelial cells are characterized by the induction of detoxification enzymes, several members of the glutathione system and antioxidant factors. Low-dose experiments indicate that the up-regulation of epoxide hydrolase 1 represents the most sensitive transcriptional biomarker of glycidamide exposure. At higher concentrations, glycidamide induces typical markers of tumor progression such as steroid hormone activators, positive regulators of nuclear factor-κB, growth stimulators and apoptosis inhibitors. Concomitantly, growth suppressors and cell adhesion molecules are down-regulated. The main implication of these findings for risk assessment is that low concentrations of glycidamide elicit cytoprotective reactions whereas transcriptional signatures associated with tumor progression may be expected only at doses that exceed the range of ordinary dietary exposures

  3. Glycidamide inhibits progesterone production through reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis in R2C Rat Leydig Cells.

    Li, Mingwei; Sun, Jianxia; Zou, Feiyan; Bai, Shun; Jiang, Xinwei; Jiao, Rui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhang, Hui; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; Bai, Weibin

    2017-10-01

    The food contaminant acrylamide (AA) is usually recognized as a probable human carcinogen. In addition, AA has also been found able to induce male infertility in animals. Interestingly, resent research work revealed that the toxic effect of AA on the ability of male reproduction in vivo may due to glycidamide (GA) which is the metabolite of AA. In this study, R2C Leydig cells was used to investigate the toxic effects of GA on progesterone production. GA caused dose-dependent inhibition on the cell growth, with IC 25 , IC 50, and IC 75 values found at 0.635, 0.872, and 1.198 mM, respectively. The results of single cell gel/Comet assay showed that GA significantly induced early-phase cell apoptosis, reduced progesterone production, as well as decreasing the protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) in R2C cells. Furthermore, GA induced overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), upregulated Bax expression, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered mitochondria-mediated cell apoptosis. Consequently, the downstream effector caspase-3 was activated, resulting in Leydig cells apoptosis. Overall, our results showed that GA could damage R2C Leydig cells by the lesion of the ability of progesterone genesis and inducing cells apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human CYP2E1 mediates the formation of glycidamide from acrylamide

    Settels, Eva; Appel, Klaus E. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Experimental Toxicology, Berlin (Germany); Bernauer, Ulrike; Gundert-Remy, Ursula [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Safety of Substances and Preparations, Berlin (Germany); Palavinskas, Richard; Klaffke, Horst S. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Analytical Chemistry, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Regarding the cancer risk assessment of acrylamide (AA) it is of basic interest to know, as to what amount of the absorbed AA is metabolized to glycidamide (GA) in humans, compared to what has been observed in laboratory animals. GA is suspected of being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of AA. From experiments with CYP2E1-deficient mice it can be concluded that AA is metabolized to GA primarily by CYP2E1. We therefore examined whether CYP2E1 is involved in GA formation in non-rodent species with the focus on humans by using human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, marmoset and human liver microsomes and in addition, genetically engineered V79 cells expressing human CYP2E1 (V79h2E1 cells). Special emphasis was placed on the analytical detection of GA, which was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results show that AA is metabolized to GA in human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, in marmoset and human liver microsomes as well as in V79h2E1 cells. The activity of GA formation is highest in supersomes trademark; in human liver it is somewhat higher than in marmoset liver. A monoclonal CYP2E1 human selective antibody (MAB-2E1) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used as specific inhibitors of CYP2E1. The generation of GA could be inhibited by MAB-2E1 to about 80% in V79h2E1 cells and to about 90% in human and marmoset liver microsomes. Also DDC led to an inhibition of about 95%. In conclusion, AA is metabolized to GA by human CYP2E1. Overall, the present work describes (1) the application and refinement of a sensitive methodology in order to determine low amounts of GA, (2) the applicability of genetically modified V79 cell lines in order to investigate specific questions concerning metabolism and (3) the involvement, for the first time, of human CYP2E1 in the formation of GA from AA. Further studies will compare the activities of GA formation in genetically engineered V79 cells expressing CYP2E1 from different species. (orig.)

  5. Preconceptional paternal glycidamide exposure affects embryonic gene expression: Single embryo gene expression study following in vitro fertilization

    Brevik, A.; Rusňáková, Vendula; Duale, N.; Slagsvold, H.H.; Olsen, A.-K.; Storeng, R.; Kubista, Mikael; Brunborg, G.; Lindeman, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2011), s. 463-471 ISSN 0890-6238 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500520809 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Single-cell gene expression * Glycidamide * Acrylamide Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2011

  6. Analysis of hemoglobin adducts from acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide in paired mother/cord blood samples from Denmark

    von Stedingk, Hans; Vikström, Anna C; Rydberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge about fetal exposure to acrylamide/glycidamide from the maternal exposure through food is limited. Acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide are electrophiles and form adducts with hemoglobin (Hb), which could be used for in vivo dose measurement. In this study, a method.......20-0.73) for glycidamide, and 0.43 (range 0.17-1.34) for ethylene oxide. In vitro studies with acrylamide and glycidamide showed a lower (0.38-0.48) rate of adduct formation with Hb in cord blood than with Hb in maternal blood, which is compatible with the structural differences in fetal and adult Hb. Together...... for analysis of Hb adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the adduct FIRE procedure, was applied to measurements of adducts from these compounds in maternal blood samples (n = 87) and umbilical cord blood samples (n = 219). The adduct levels from the three compounds, acrylamide, glycidamide...

  7. Dietary determinants for Hb-acrylamide and Hb-glycidamide adducts in Danish non-smoking women

    Outzen, Malene; Egeberg, Rikke; Dragsted, Lars

    2011-01-01

    in erythrocytes were analysed by liquid chromatography/MS/MS. Dietary determinants were evaluated by multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age and smoking behaviour among ex-smokers. The median for Hb-AA was 35 pmol/g globin (5th percentile 17, 95th percentile 89) and for Hb-GA 21 pmol/g globin (5th......Acrylamide (AA) is a probable human carcinogen that is formed in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods. The validity of FFQ to assess AA exposure has been questioned. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate dietary determinants of Hb-AA and Hb-glycidamide (GA) adducts....... The study included 537 non-smoking women aged 50–65 years who participated in the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (1993–97). At study baseline, blood samples and information on dietary and lifestyle variables obtained from self-administered questionnaires were collected. From blood samples, Hb-AA and Hb-GA...

  8. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1 as a source of potent antibiotics and other secondary metabolites for biocontrol of plant pathogens

    Brans Alain

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytopathogenic fungi affecting crop and post-harvested vegetables are a major threat to food production and food storage. To face these drawbacks, producers have become increasingly dependent on agrochemicals. However, intensive use of these compounds has led to the emergence of pathogen resistance and severe negative environmental impacts. There are also a number of plant diseases for which chemical solutions are ineffective or non-existent as well as an increasing demand by consumers for pesticide-free food. Thus, biological control through the use of natural antagonistic microorganisms has emerged as a promising alternative to chemical pesticides for more rational and safe crop management. Results The genome of the plant-associated B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 was sample sequenced. Several gene clusters involved in the synthesis of biocontrol agents were detected. Four gene clusters were shown to direct the synthesis of the cyclic lipopeptides surfactin, iturin A and fengycin as well as the iron-siderophore bacillibactin. Beside these non-ribosomaly synthetised peptides, three additional gene clusters directing the synthesis of the antibacterial polyketides macrolactin, bacillaene and difficidin were identified. Mass spectrometry analysis of culture supernatants led to the identification of these secondary metabolites, hence demonstrating that the corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters are functional in strain GA1. In addition, genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis and export of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin were highlighted. However, only its chlorinated derivative, chlorotetaine, could be detected in culture supernatants. On the contrary, genes involved in ribosome-dependent synthesis of bacteriocin and other antibiotic peptides were not detected as compared to the reference strain B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42. Conclusion The production of all of these antibiotic compounds highlights B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 as

  9. ABA and GA3 regulate the synthesis of primary and secondary metabolites related to alleviation from biotic and abiotic stresses in grapevine.

    Murcia, Germán; Fontana, Ariel; Pontin, Mariela; Baraldi, Rita; Bertazza, Gianpaolo; Piccoli, Patricia N

    2017-03-01

    Plants are able to synthesize a large number of organic compounds. Among them, primary metabolites are known to participate in plant growth and development, whereas secondary metabolites are mostly involved in defense and other facultative processes. In grapevine, one of the major fruit crops in the world, secondary metabolites, mainly polyphenols, are of great interest for the wine industry. Even though there is an extensive literature on the content and profile of those compounds in berries, scarce or no information is available regarding polyphenols in other organs. In addition, little is known about the effect of plant growth regulators (PGRs), ABA and GA 3 (extensively used in table grapes) on the synthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in wine grapes. In table grapes, cultural practices include the use of GA 3 sprays shortly before veraison, to increase berry and bunch size, and sugar content in fruits. Meanwhile, ABA applications to the berries on pre-veraison improve the skin coloring and sugar accumulation, anticipating the onset of veraison. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to assess and characterize primary and secondary metabolites in leaves, berries and roots of grapevine plants cv. Malbec at veraison, and changes in compositions after ABA and GA 3 aerial sprayings. Metabolic profiling was conducted using GC-MS, GC-FID and HPLC-MWD. A large set of metabolites was identified: sugars, alditols, organic acids, amino acids, polyphenols (flavonoids and non-flavonoids) and terpenes (mono-, sesqui-, di- and triterpenes). The obtained results showed that ABA applications elicited synthesis of mono- and sesquiterpenes in all assessed tissues, as well as L-proline, acidic amino acids and anthocyanins in leaves. Additionally, applications with GA 3 elicited synthesis of L-proline in berries, and mono- and sesquiterpenes in all the tissues. However, treatment with GA 3 seemed to block polyphenol synthesis, mainly in berries. In conclusion, ABA and GA

  10. Comparison of estimated dietary intake of acrylamide with hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and glycidamide

    Bjellaas, Thomas; Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2007-01-01

    , a significant positive correlation was found between the AA-Hb adduct concentration and the intake of chips/snacks and crisp bread. GA-Hb adduct did not correlate with consumption of any of the main food groups. Neither AA-Hb nor GA-Hb adduct concentration correlated with total dietary intake of AA...

  11. Characteristics of mixed culture where one type of microorganism assimilates the metabolite; Isshurui no biseibutsu ga seiseisuru taishabutsu wo betsuno shuruino biseibutsu ga shikashite zoshokusuru kongo baiyo no moderuka to tokusei kaiseki

    Toyama, M.; Matsunaka, T.; Shimizu, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Biochemical Engineering and Science

    2000-11-10

    Unstructure models were developed for a mixed culture where one microorganism assimilates the metabolite produced by another microorganism The model system was a mixed culture using Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Ralstonia erthroprop where the former assimilates glucose and produces lactic acid, and the latter assimilates lactate and produce poly {beta}-hydroxy butyrate (PHB). Performance improvement is shown for the mixed culture over a single culture for chemostat using the model developed. Since the optimal dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is different for each microorganism, we developed another model which takes into account the effect of DO concentration on the dynamic behavior. Then the optimal DO concentration is obtained for chemostat. Moreover, we developed another model which takes into account NH{sub 3} concentration on the cell grown and PHB production by R. eutropha. Then the optimal time-profile for NH{sub 3} concentration is derived using the maximum principle. It is found that high Phba production could be attained even if NH{sub 3} concentration is not controlled if initial NH{sub 3} concentration is appropriately selected. (author)

  12. Morphine metabolites

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    , morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are the major metabolites of morphine. The metabolism of morphine occurs not only in the liver, but may also take place in the brain and the kidneys. The glucuronides are mainly eliminated via bile and urine. Glucuronides as a rule...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...... systemic administration reflect hepatic metabolism of morphine and that the morphine glucuronides, despite their high polarity, can penetrate into the brain. Like morphine, M6G has been shown to be relatively more selective for mu-receptors than for delta- and kappa-receptors while M3G does not appear...

  13. Secondary metabolites from Scorzonera latifolia roots

    Acikara, O. B.; Šmejkal, K.; Cvačka, Josef; Buděšínský, Miloš; Dračínský, Martin; Saltan, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 16 (2015), PM167 ISSN 0032-0943. [GA 2015. International Congress and Annual Meeting of the Society for Medicinal Plant and Natural Product Research /63./. 23.08.2015-27.08.2015, Budapest] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : medical plant * metabolites * Asteraceae Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Chemoenzymatic Preparation and Biophysical Properties of Sulfated Quercetin Metabolites

    Valentová, Kateřina; Káňová, Kristýna; Di Meo, F.; Pelantová, Helena; Chambers, Christopher S.; Rydlová, Lenka; Petrásková, Lucie; Křenková, Alena; Cvačka, Josef; Trouillas, P.; Křen, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 2231. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15082; GA MŠk LTC17009; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : quercetin * sulfotransferase * metabolites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  15. Development of 68Ga ethyl cysteinate dimer for PET studies

    Alireza Mirzaei; Jalilian, A.R.; Gholamali Shabani; Ashraf Fakhari; Mehdi Akhlaghi; Davood Beiki

    2016-01-01

    In this work development of 68 Ga-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 68 Ga-ECD) a 68 Ga tracer for possible cerebral blood flow based on 99m Tc ECD homolog is reported. 68 Ga-ECD was prepared using generator-based 68 GaCl 3 and ECD at optimized conditions. Quality control, stability, partition co-efficient and the biodistribution of the tracer (by tissue counting and PET/CT in rats) was studied. Significant metabolism of the lipophilic tracer into water soluble metabolite(s) led to urinary excretion of the tracer, un-comparable to that of homologous 99m Tc-compound. Cardiac uptake of the complex suggests formation of a possible lipophil cationic complex and/or metabolite. (author)

  16. In vivo MRS metabolite quantification using genetic optimization

    Papakostas, G. A.; Karras, D. A.; Mertzios, B. G.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2011-11-01

    The in vivo quantification of metabolites' concentrations, revealed in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra, constitutes the main subject under investigation in this work. Significant contributions based on artificial intelligence tools, such as neural networks (NNs), with good results have been presented lately but have shown several drawbacks, regarding their quantification accuracy under difficult conditions. A general framework that encounters the quantification procedure as an optimization problem, which is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed in this paper. Two different lineshape models are examined, while two GA configurations are applied on artificial data. Moreover, the introduced quantification technique deals with metabolite peaks' overlapping, a considerably difficult situation occurring under real conditions. Appropriate experiments have proved the efficiency of the introduced methodology, in artificial MRS data, by establishing it as a generic metabolite quantification procedure.

  17. In vivo MRS metabolite quantification using genetic optimization

    Papakostas, G A; Mertzios, B G; Karras, D A; Van Ormondt, D; Graveron-Demilly, D

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo quantification of metabolites' concentrations, revealed in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra, constitutes the main subject under investigation in this work. Significant contributions based on artificial intelligence tools, such as neural networks (NNs), with good results have been presented lately but have shown several drawbacks, regarding their quantification accuracy under difficult conditions. A general framework that encounters the quantification procedure as an optimization problem, which is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed in this paper. Two different lineshape models are examined, while two GA configurations are applied on artificial data. Moreover, the introduced quantification technique deals with metabolite peaks' overlapping, a considerably difficult situation occurring under real conditions. Appropriate experiments have proved the efficiency of the introduced methodology, in artificial MRS data, by establishing it as a generic metabolite quantification procedure

  18. Preliminary study to prepare a reference material of toluene metabolite - o-cresol and benzene metabolite-phenol - in human

    Šperlingová, I.; Dabrowská, L.; Stránský, V.; Kučera, Jan; Tichý, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2006), s. 231-235 ISSN 0949-1775 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR7831 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : reference material * toluene metabolites * o-cresol Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2006

  19. Muchinako, GA

    Muchinako, GA. Vol 28, No 2 (2013) - Articles Children living and/or working on the streets in Harare: Issues and challenges. Abstract. ISSN: 1012-1080. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  20. Nitric oxide metabolites in gnotobiotic piglets orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Trebichavský, Ilja; Zídek, Zdeněk; Franková, Daniela; Zahradníčková, Marie; Šplíchal, Igor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2001), s. 353-358 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : nitric oxide metabolites Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2001

  1. The concentration distributions of some metabolites in the exhaled breath of young adults

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2007), 026001 ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metabolites * exhaled breath * concentration distributions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. The cyanobacterial metabolite nocuolin A is a natural oxadiazine that triggers apoptosis in human cancer cells

    Voráčová, K.; Hájek, Jan; Mareš, Jan; Urajová, P.; Kuzma, M.; Cheel, J.; Villunger, A.; Kapuscik, A.; Bally, M.; Novák, P.; Kabeláč, M.; Krumschnabel, G.; Lukeš, M.; Voloshko, L.; Kopecký, J.; Hrouzek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2017), č. článku e0172850. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-18067S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : secondary metabolite * cancer * non-ribosomal synthetase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  3. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  4. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Agro-Food Processing, Zhejiang R & D Center for Food Technology and Equipment, Fuli Institute of Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China); Ren, Yiping, E-mail: renyiping@263.net [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1–0.3 ng/mL and 0.4–1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%–105.4%, 98.2%–114.0% and 92.2%–108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD < 7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive

  5. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1–0.3 ng/mL and 0.4–1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%–105.4%, 98.2%–114.0% and 92.2%–108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD < 7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive

  6. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  8. Changes of primary and secondary metabolites in barley plants exposed to CdO nanoparticles

    Večeřová, Kristýna; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Oravec, Michal; Pompeiano, Antonio; Tříska, Jan; Urban, Otmar

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 218, NOV (2016), s. 207-218 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15039 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : Barley * CdO nanoparticles * Gas chromatography * High performance liquid chromatography * Mass spectrometry * Plant metabolites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (UIACH-O) Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  9. Production of Metabolites

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  10. Mutagenic azide metabolite is azidoalanine

    Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Ronald, R.C.; Kleinhofs, A.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium axide produces high mutation rates in a number of species. Azide mutagenicity is mediated through a metabolite in barley and bacteria. Many studies showed that azide affects the L-cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Cell-free extracts of Salmonella typhimurium convert azide and O-acetylserine to the mutagenic metabolite. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the metabolite biosynthesis. To confirm the conclusion that the azide metabolite is formed through the β-substitution pathway of L-cysteine, we radioactively labeled the azide metabolite using 14 C-labeled precursors. Moreover, the mutagenic azide metabolite was purified and identified as azidoalanine based on mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Immune regulation by microbiome metabolites.

    Kim, Chang H

    2018-03-22

    Commensal microbes and the host immune system have been co-evolved for mutual regulation. Microbes regulate the host immune system, in part, by producing metabolites. A mounting body of evidence indicates that diverse microbial metabolites profoundly regulate the immune system via host receptors and other target molecules. Immune cells express metabolite-specific receptors such as P2X 7 , GPR41, GPR43, GPR109A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor precursor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), TGR5 and other molecular targets. Microbial metabolites and their receptors form an extensive array of signals to respond to changes in nutrition, health and immunological status. As a consequence, microbial metabolite signals contribute to nutrient harvest from diet, and regulate host metabolism and the immune system. Importantly, microbial metabolites bidirectionally function to promote both tolerance and immunity to effectively fight infection without developing inflammatory diseases. In pathogenic conditions, adverse effects of microbial metabolites have been observed as well. Key immune-regulatory functions of the metabolites, generated from carbohydrates, proteins and bile acids, are reviewed in this article. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Ga penetration into polymers

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Švorčík, V.; Efimenko, K.; Rybka, V.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 68, - (1999), s. 357-358 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/96/0077; GA AV ČR KSK1048601 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.753, year: 1999

  13. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting method for chemical screening of metabolites in cultivation broth

    Kameník, Zdeněk; Hadacek, F.; Marečková, M.; Ulanová, Dana; Kopecký, J.; Chobot, V.; Plháčková, Kamila; Olšovská, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, č. 51 (2010), s. 8016-8025 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : UHPLC * high - throughput fingerprinting * secondary metabolites Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  14. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil

    Uhlík, O.; Musilová, L.; Rídl, Jakub; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Koubek, J.; Holečková, M.; Mackova, M.; Macek, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 20 (2013), s. 9245-9256 ISSN 0175-7598 Grant - others:EK(XE) 265946; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10041 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plant secondary metabolites (PSM) * bacterial community * metabolic activity * bioremediation * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.811, year: 2013

  15. Ultra-rapid auxin metabolite profiling for high-throughput mutant screening in Arabidopsis

    Pěnčík, Aleš; Casanova-Sáez, R.; Pilařová, V.; Žukauskaitė, Asta; Pinto, R.; Micol, J.L.; Ljung, K.; Novák, Ondřej

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 10 (2018), s. 2569-2579 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-21581Y Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * auxin * metabolite profiling * multivariate data analysis * mutant * screening Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  16. Bioactive metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid

    Kuda, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 136, May (2017), s. 12-20 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-04859S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29182A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : DHA * specialized proresolving mediators * FAHFA * DHEA * N-acyl amides * omega-3 PUFA Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  17. Bignoniaceae Metabolites as Semiochemicals

    Lucía Castillo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Bignoniaceae are mostly found in tropical and neo-tropical regions in America, Asia and Africa, although some of them are cultivated in other regions as ornamentals. Species belonging to this family have been extensively studied in regard to their pharmacological properties (as extracts and isolated compounds. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported scientific evidence about the chemical properties as well as that of the extracts and isolated compounds from species of this family, focusing mainly in insect-plant interactions. As it is known, this family is recognized for the presence of iridoids which are markers of oviposition and feeding preference to species which have became specialist feeders. Some herbivore species have also evolved to the point of been able to sequester iridoids and use them as defenses against their predators. However, iridoids also exhibit anti-insect properties, and therefore they may be good lead molecules to develop botanical pesticides. Other secondary metabolites, such as quinones, and whole extracts have also shown potential as anti-insect agents.

  18. Profiling of urinary amino-carboxylic metabolites by in-situ heptafluorobutyl chloroformate mediated sample preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Hušek, Petr; Švagera, Z.; Hanzlíková, D.; Řimnáčová, Lucie; Zahradníčková, Helena; Opekarová, Iva; Šimek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1443, April 22 (2016), s. 211-232 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18509S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : metabolite profiling * metabolomics * urine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021967316302692

  19. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    Kelecom, Alphonse

    2002-03-01

    After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  20. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  1. Improved InGaN/GaN quantum wells on treated GaN template with a Ga-rich GaN interlayer

    Fang, Zhilai; Shen, Xiyang; Wu, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Treated GaN template was achieved by in situ droplet epitaxy of a Ga-rich GaN interlayer on the conventional GaN template. InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the conventional and treated GaN templates under the same growth conditions and then comprehensively characterized. The indium homogeneity in the InGaN layers and the interface sharpness between InGaN and GaN layers of the InGaN/GaN QWs on the treated GaN template were significantly improved. The emission intensity from the InGaN/GaN QWs on the treated GaN template was enhanced by 20% than that on the conventional GaN template, which was attributed to the strain reduction and the improvement in crystalline quality. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Simultaneous analysis of cocaine and its metabolites in urine by capillary electrophoresis - electrospray mass spectrometry using a pressurized liquid junction nanoflow interface

    Hezinová, Věra; Aturki, Z.; Klepárník, Karel; D´Orazio, G.; Foret, František; Fanali, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2012), s. 653-660 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Project s: GA ČR GA203/08/1680; GA ČR GAP206/11/2377; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk LC06023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : CE-MS * cocaine metabolites * liquid junction interface Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.261, year: 2012

  3. Antifungal Metabolites (Monorden, Monocillin IV, and Cerebrosides) from Humicola fuscoatra Traaen NRRL 22980, a Mycoparasite of Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia

    Wicklow, Donald T.; Joshi, Biren K.; Gamble, William R.; Gloer, James B.; Dowd, Patrick F.

    1998-01-01

    The mycoparasite Humicola fuscoatra NRRL 22980 was isolated from a sclerotium of Aspergillus flavus that had been buried in a cornfield near Tifton, Ga. When grown on autoclaved rice, this fungus produced the antifungal metabolites monorden, monocillin IV, and a new monorden analog. Each metabolite produced a clear zone of inhibition surrounding paper assay disks on agar plates seeded with conidia of A. flavus. Monorden was twice as inhibitory to A. flavus mycelium extension (MIC > 28 μg/ml) ...

  4. Quantitative analysis of volatile metabolites released in vitro by bacteria of the genus Stenotrophomonas for identification of breath biomarkers of respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis

    Shestivska, Violetta; Dryahina, Kseniya; Nunvář, J.; Sovová, Kristýna; Elhottová, Dana; Nemec, A.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2015), č. článku 027104. ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14534S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-15771P Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : volatile metabolites * stenotrophomonas * cystic fibrosis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2015

  5. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin

    2008-01-01

    ), and forsythoside B (18), and five flavone derivatives, luteolin (19), luteolin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (20), luteolin 7-O-(6''-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (21), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22), and apigenin 7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (23). The structures of the metabolites were...... elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis....

  6. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    My program examines the plant secondary metabolites (i.e. phenolics) important for human health, and which impart the organoleptic properties that are quality indicators for fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions; a...

  7. Marine metabolites: The sterols of soft coral

    Sarma, N.S.; Krishna, M.S.; Pasha, Sk.G.; Rao, T.S.P.; Venkateswarlu, Y.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    Sterols constitute a major group of secondary metabolites of soft corals. Several of these compounds have the 'usual' 3 beta-hydroxy, delta sup(5) (or delta sup(0)) cholestane skeleton, a large number of these metabolites are polar sterols...

  8. Familial Resemblance for Serum Metabolite Concentrations

    Draisma, H.H.M.; Beekman, M.; Pool, R.; van Ommen, G.J.B; Vaarhorst, A.A.M.; de Craen, A.J.; Willemsen, G.; Slagboom, P.E.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of

  9. 67Ga lung scan

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.; Pick, R.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with clinical signs of pulmonary embolic disease and lung infiltrates were studied to determine the value of gallium citrate 67 Ga lung scan in differentiating embolic from inflammatory lung disease. In 11 patients without angiographically proved embolism, only seven had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. In seven of these 11 patients, the 67 Ga concentration indicated inflammatory disease. In the 12 patients with angiographically proved embolic disease, six had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. None had an accumulation of 67 Ga in the area of pulmonary infiltrate. Thus, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are of limited value when lung infiltrates are present. In contrast, the accumulation of 67 Ga in the lung indicates an inflammatory process. Gallium imaging can help select those patients with lung infiltrates who need angiography

  10. Polyphasic characterization of Dolichospermum spp. and Sphaerospermopsis spp. (Nostocales, cyanobacteria): morphology, 16S rRNA gene sequences and fatty acid and secondary metabolite profiles

    Zapomělová, Eliška; Hrouzek, Pavel; Řezanka, Tomáš; Jezberová, Jitka; Řeháková, Klára; Hisem, D.; Komárková, Jaroslava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2011), s. 1152-1163 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600960703; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/10/1501; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/0309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : taxonomy * cyanobacteria * Anabaena * Dolichospermum * Sphaerospermopsis * phylogeny * 16S rRNA gene * fatty acids * secondary metabolites Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.071, year: 2011

  11. Metabolite Profiles of Diabetes Risk

    Gerszten, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases present particular difficulty for clinicians because they are often present for years before becoming clinically apparent. We investigated whether metabolite profiles can predict the development of diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study. Five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids had highly-significant associations with future diabetes, while a combination of three amino acids strongly predicted future diabetes by up to 12 years (>5-fold increased risk for individuals in ...

  12. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. AlGaN/GaN double-channel HEMT

    Quan Si; Hao Yue; Ma Xiaohua; Zheng Pengtian; Xie Yuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of AlGaN/GaN double-channel high electron mobility transistors on sapphire substrates is reported. Two carrier channels are formed in an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN/GaN multilayer structure. The DC performance of the resulting double-channel HEMT shows a wider high transconductance region compared with single-channel HEMT. Simulations provide an explanation for the influence of the double-channel on the high transconductance region. The buffer trap is suggested to be related to the wide region of high transconductance. The RF characteristics are also studied. (semiconductor devices)

  14. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    Licciardi Paul V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of healthy mucosal immune responses. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that have the capacity to alter the composition of bacterial species in the intestine that can in turn influence the production of fermentation-derived metabolites. Principal among these metabolites are the short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate that have potent anti-inflammatory activities important in regulating immune function at the intestinal mucosal surface. Therefore strategies aimed at restoring the microbiota profile may be effective in the prevention or treatment of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis Probiotic bacteria have diverse effects including altering microbiota composition, regulating epithelial cell barrier function and modulating of immune responses. The precise molecular mechanisms mediating these probiotic effects are not well understood. Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors important in the epigenetic control of host cell responses. It is hypothesized that the biological function of probiotics may be a result of epigenetic modifications that may explain the wide range of effects observed. Studies delineating the effects of probiotics on short-chain fatty acid production and the epigenetic actions of short-chain fatty acids will assist in understanding the association between microbiota and allergic or autoimmune disorders. Testing the hypothesis We propose that treatment with

  16. Comparison of trap characteristics between AlGaN/GaN and AlGaN/InGaN/GaN heterostructure by frequency dependent conductance measurement

    Chakraborty, Apurba; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent conductance measurement is carried out to observe the trapping effect in AlGaN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure and compared that with conventional AlGaN/GaN single heterostructure. It is found that the AlGaN/InGaN/GaN diode structure does not show any trapping effect, whereas single heterostructure AlGaN/GaN diode suffers from two kinds of trap energy states in near depletion to higher negative voltage bias region. This conductance behaviour of AlGaN/InGaN/GaN heterostructure is owing to more Fermi energy level shift from trap energy states at AlGaN/InGaN junction compare to single AlGaN/GaN heterostructure and eliminates the trapping effects. Analysis yielded interface trap energy state in AlGaN/GaN is to be with time constant of (33.8–76.5) μs and trap density of (2.38–0.656) × 10 12  eV −1  cm −2 in −3.2 to −4.8 V bias region, whereas for AlGaN/InGaN/GaN structure no interface energy states are found and the extracted surface trap energy concentrations and time constants are (5.87–4.39) ×10 10  eV −1  cm −2 and (17.8–11.3) μs, respectively, in bias range of −0.8–0.0 V

  17. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    Looking at the metabolite profile of an organism provides insights into the metabolomic state of a cell and hence also into pathways employed. Little is known about the metabolites produced by corals and their algal symbionts. In particular, corals from the central Red Sea are understudied, but interesting study objects, as they live in one of the warmest and most saline environments and can provide clues as to the adjustment of corals to environmental change. In this study, we applied gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabolite profiling to analyze the metabolic profile of four coral species and their associated symbionts: Fungia granulosa, Acropora hemprichii, Porites lutea, and Pocillopora verrucosa. We identified and quantified 102 compounds among primary and secondary metabolites across all samples. F. granulosa and its symbiont showed a total of 59 metabolites which were similar to the 51 displayed by P. verrucosa. P. lutea and A. hemprichii both harbored 40 compounds in conjunction with their respective isolated algae. Comparing across species, 28 metabolites were exclusively present in algae, while 38 were exclusive to corals. A principal component and cluster analyses revealed that metabolite profiles clustered between corals and algae, but each species harbored a distinct catalog of metabolites. The major classes of compounds were carbohydrates and amino acids. Taken together, this study provides a first description of metabolites of Red Sea corals and their associated symbionts. As expected, the metabolites of coral hosts differ from their algal symbionts, but each host and algal species harbor a unique set of metabolites. This corroborates that host-symbiont species pairs display a fine-tuned complementary metabolism that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing

  18. of Several Organophosphorus Insecticide Metabolites

    Russell L. Carr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase (PON1 is a calcium dependent enzyme that is capable of hydrolyzing organophosphate anticholinesterases. PON1 activity is present in most mammals and previous research established that PON1 activity differs depending on the species. These studies mainly used the organophosphate substrate paraoxon, the active metabolite of the insecticide parathion. Using serum PON1 from different mammalian species, we compared the hydrolysis of paraoxon with the hydrolysis of the active metabolites (oxons of two additional organophosphorus insecticides, methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos. Paraoxon hydrolysis was greater than that of methyl paraoxon, but the level of activity between species displayed a similar pattern. Regardless of the species tested, the hydrolysis of chlorpyrifos-oxon was significantly greater than that of paraoxon or methyl paraoxon. These data indicate that chlorpyrifos-oxon is a better substrate for PON1 regardless of the species. The pattern of species differences in PON1 activity varied with the change in substrate to chlorpyrifos-oxon from paraoxon or methyl paraoxon. For example, the sex difference observed here and reported elsewhere in the literature for rat PON1 hydrolysis of paraoxon was not present when chlorpyrifos-oxon was the substrate.

  19. 2015 Lowndes County (GA) Lidar

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Lidar for Lowndes County, GA with the option to Collect Lidar in Cook and Tift Counties, GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task...

  20. Gibberellins producing Bacillus methylotrophicus KE2 supports plant growth and enhances nutritional metabolites and food values of lettuce.

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    The nutritional quality of green leafy vegetables can be enhanced by application of plant beneficial micro-organisms. The present study was aimed to increase the food values of lettuce leaves by bacterial treatment. We isolated bacterial strain KE2 from Kimchi food and identified as Bacillus methylotrophicus by phylogenetic analysis. The beneficial effect of B. methylotrophicus KE2 on plants was confirmed by increasing the percentage of seed germination of Lactuca sativa L., Cucumis melo L., Glycine max L. and Brassica juncea L. It might be the secretion of array of gibberellins (GA 1 , GA 3 , GA 7 , GA 8 , GA 9 , GA 12 , GA 19 , GA 20 , GA 24 , GA 34 and GA 53 ) and indole-acetic acid from B. methylotrophicus KE2. The mechanism of plant growth promotion via their secreted metabolites was confirmed by a significant increase of GA deficient mutant rice plant growth. Moreover, the bacterial association was favor to enhance shoot length, shoot fresh weight and leaf width of lettuce. The higher concentration of protein, amino acids (Asp, Thr, Ser, Glu, Gly, Ala, Leu, Tyr and His), gama-aminobutric acid and fructose was found in bacterial culture (KE2) applied plants. The macro and micro minerals such as K, Mg, Na, P, Fe, Zn and N were also detected as significantly higher quantities in bacteria treated plants than untreated control plants. In addition, the carotenoids and chlorophyll a were also increased in lettuce at bacterial inoculation. The results of this study suggest that B. methylotrophicus KE2 application to soil helps to increase the plant growth and food values of lettuce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel strategy for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon monohydroxylated metabolites in urine using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Lanková, D.; Urbancová, K.; Šrám, Radim; Hajslová, J.; Pulkrabová, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 408, č. 10 (2016), s. 2515-2525 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-13458S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : monohydroxylated metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * SRM 3673 * tandem mass spectrometry * ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography * urine Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  2. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    Vriend Gert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases, however, treat chemical structures more as illustrations than as a datafield in its own right. Lack of chemical accuracy impedes progress in the areas mentioned above. We present a database of metabolites called BioMeta that augments the existing pathway databases by explicitly assessing the validity, correctness, and completeness of chemical structure and reaction information. Description The main bulk of the data in BioMeta were obtained from the KEGG Ligand database. We developed a tool for chemical structure validation which assesses the chemical validity and stereochemical completeness of a molecule description. The validation tool was used to examine the compounds in BioMeta, showing that a relatively small number of compounds had an incorrect constitution (connectivity only, not considering stereochemistry and that a considerable number (about one third had incomplete or even incorrect stereochemistry. We made a large effort to correct the errors and to complete the structural descriptions. A total of 1468 structures were corrected and/or completed. We also established the reaction balance of the reactions in BioMeta and corrected 55% of the unbalanced (stoichiometrically incorrect reactions in an automatic procedure. The BioMeta database was implemented in PostgreSQL and provided with a web-based interface. Conclusion We demonstrate that the validation of metabolite structures and reactions is a feasible and worthwhile undertaking, and that the validation results can be used to trigger corrections and improvements to BioMeta, our metabolite database. BioMeta provides some tools for rational drug design, reaction searches, and

  3. Strain Balanced AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN nanomembrane HEMTs.

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Kanglin; Park, Sung Hyun; Yuan, Ge; Ma, Zhenqiang; Han, Jung

    2017-07-25

    Single crystal semiconductor nanomembranes (NM) are important in various applications such as heterogeneous integration and flexible devices. This paper reports the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN NMs and NM high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). Electrochemical etching is used to slice off single-crystalline AlGaN/GaN layers while preserving their microstructural quality. A double heterostructure design with a symmetric strain profile is employed to ensure minimal residual strain in freestanding NMs after release. The mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), formed by the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure, is noticeably superior to previously reported values of many other NMs. AlGaN/GaN nanomembrane HEMTs are fabricated on SiO 2 and flexible polymeric substrates. Excellent electrical characteristics, including a high ON/OFF ratio and transconductance, suggest that III-Nitrides nanomembranes are capable of supporting high performance applications.

  4. Antimycobacterial Metabolites from Marine Invertebrates.

    Daletos, Georgios; Ancheeva, Elena; Chaidir, Chaidir; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Proksch, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Marine organisms play an important role in natural product-based drug research due to accumulation of structurally unique and bioactive metabolites. The exploration of marine-derived compounds may significantly extend the scientific knowledge of potential scaffolds for antibiotic drug discovery. Development of novel antitubercular agents is especially significant as the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains remains threateningly high. Marine invertebrates (i.e., sponges, corals, gorgonians) as a source of new chemical entities are the center of research for several scientific groups, and the wide spectrum of biological activities of marine-derived compounds encourages scientists to carry out investigations in the field of antibiotic research, including tuberculosis treatment. The present review covers published data on antitubercular natural products from marine invertebrates grouped according to their biogenetic origin. Studies on the structure-activity relationships of these important leads are highlighted as well. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal

    Weber, Tilmann; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2016-01-01

    . In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http...... analytical and chemical methods gave access to this group of compounds, nowadays genomics-based methods offer complementary approaches to find, identify and characterize such molecules. This paradigm shift also resulted in a high demand for computational tools to assist researchers in their daily work......Natural products are among the most important sources of lead molecules for drug discovery. With the development of affordable whole-genome sequencing technologies and other ‘omics tools, the field of natural products research is currently undergoing a shift in paradigms. While, for decades, mainly...

  6. Microsomal metabolism of trenbolone acetate metabolites ...

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a synthetic growth promoter widely used in animal agriculture, and its metabolites are suspected endocrine disrupting compounds in agriculturally impacted receiving waters. However, beyond the three widely recognized TBA metabolites (17-trenbolone, 17-trenbolone and trendione), little is known about other metabolites formed in vivo and subsequently discharged into the environment, with some evidence suggesting these unknown metabolites comprise a majority of the TBA mass dosed to the animal. Here, we explored the metabolism of the three known TBA metabolites using rat liver microsome studies. All TBA metabolites are transformed into a complex mixture of monohydroxylated products. Based on product characterization, the majority are more polar than the parent metabolites but maintain their characteristic trienone backbone. A minor degree of interconversion between known metabolites was also observed, as were higher order hydroxylated products with a greater extent of reaction. Notably, the distribution and yield of products were generally comparable across a series of variably induced rat liver microsomes, as well as during additional studies with human and bovine liver microsomes. Bioassays conducted with mixtures of these transformation products suggest that androgen receptor (AR) binding activity is diminished as a result of the microsomal treatment, suggesting that the transformation products are generally less potent than

  7. SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM MARINE PENICILLIUM BREVICOMPACTUM

    ROVIROSA, JUANA; DIAZ-MARRERO, ANA; DARIAS, JOSE; PAINEMAL, KARIN; SAN MARTIN, AURELIO

    2006-01-01

    In a screening of Basidiomycete cultures isolated from marine invertebrates collected along the Chilean coastline for the production of antibiotics we identified a Penicillium brevicompactum strain as a producer of metabolites inhibiting the growth of bacteria and fungi. Bioactivity guided purification resulted in the isolation of four known metabolites. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods.

  8. Biochemical and secondary metabolites changes under moisture ...

    The study showed the importance of carbohydrate and nitrogen cycle related metabolites in mediating tolerance in cassava by affecting their phenotypic expression in the plant. Keywords: Hydrothermal stress, bio-chemicals, pigments, secondary metabolites, cassava. African Journal of Biotechnology, Vol 13(31) 3173-3186 ...

  9. MARSI: metabolite analogues for rational strain improvement

    Cardoso, João G. R.; Zeidan, Ahmad A; Jensen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    reactions in an organism can be used to predict effects of MAs on cellular phenotypes. Here, we present the Metabolite Analogues for Rational Strain Improvement (MARSI) framework. MARSI provides a rational approach to strain improvement by searching for metabolites as targets instead of genes or reactions...

  10. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models

  11. A new paradigm for known metabolite identification in metabonomics/metabolomics: metabolite identification efficiency.

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  12. A New Paradigm for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Metabolite Identification Efficiency

    Jeremy R. Everett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE, both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  13. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Akyol, Fatih; Park, Pil Sung; Esposto, Michele; Rajan, Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow band gap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In 0.33 Ga 0.67 N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient interband tunneling was achieved close to zero bias with a high current density of 118 A/cm 2 at a reverse bias of 1 V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm 2 . These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  14. Antisites and anisotropic diffusion in GaAs and GaSb

    Tahini, H. A.; Bracht, H.; Chroneos, Alexander; Grimes, R. W.; Murphy, S. T.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    The significant diffusion of Ga under Ga-rich conditions in GaAs and GaSb is counter intuitive as the concentration of Ga vacancies should be depressed although Ga vacancies are necessary to interpret the experimental evidence for Ga transport

  15. Quantification of homocysteine-related metabolites and the role of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase in HepG2 cells

    Kořínek, M.; Šístek, V.; Mládková, Jana; Mikeš, P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Selicharová, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2013), s. 111-121 ISSN 0269-3879 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/1277 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : homocysteine * BHMT * LC-MS/MS * HepG2 * metabolites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.662, year: 2013

  16. Ga-Bi-Te system

    Rustamov, P.G.; Seidova, N.A.; Shakhbazov, M.G.; AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Neorganicheskoj i Fizicheskoj Khimii)

    1976-01-01

    To elucidate the nature of interaction in the system Ga-Bi-Te, a study has been made of sections GaTe-Bi 2 Te 3 , Ga 2 Te 3 -Bi, GaTe-Bi and Bi 2 Te 3 -Ga. The alloys have been prepared by direct melting of the components or their alloys with subsequent homogenizin.o annealing at 400 deg C. The study has been made by the methods of differential thermal, microstructural analysis and by microhardness measurements. On the basis of literature data and data obtained a projection of the liquidus surface of the phase diagram for the system Ga-Bi-Te has been constructed. In the ternary system there are 17 curves of monovariant equilibrium dividing the liquidus into 10 fields of primary crystallization of phases, 9 points of non-variant equilibrium of which 4 points are triple eutectics and 5 points are triple peritectics

  17. A universal protocol for the combined isolation of metabolites, DNA, long RNAs, small RNAs, and proteins from plants and microorganisms

    Valledor, Luis; Escandón, M.; Meijón, M.; Nukarinen, E.; Jesús Cañal, M.; Weckwerth, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 1 (2014), s. 173-180 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : systems biology * combined isolation * RNA * small RNA * proteins * metabolites * Chlamydomonas reinhardtii * Arabidopsis thaliana * Populus sp. * Pinus sp. * technical advance Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  18. Metabolite profiles of common Stemphylium species

    Andersen, Birgitte; Solfrizzo, Michelle; Visconti, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    and identified by their chromatographic and spectroscopic data (Rf values, reflectance spectrum, retention index and ultraviolet spectrum). These metabolites have been used for the chemotaxonomical characterization of Stemphylium botryosum, S. herbarum, S. alfalfae, S. majusculum, S. sarciniforme, S. vesicarium...

  19. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  20. METABOLITE CHARACTERIZATION IN SERUM SAMPLES FROM ...

    Preferred Customer

    Metabonomics offers a distinct advantage over other tests as it can be ... Metabolic profiling in heart disease has also been successfully ... resonances of the small metabolites showing fingerprints of serum metabolomic profile (Figure. 3).

  1. Secondary metabolites of cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.

    Kobayashi, Akio; Kajiyama, Shin-Ichiro

    1998-03-01

    Cyanobacteria attracted much attention recently because of their secondary metabolites with potent biological activities and unusual structures. This paper reviews some recent studies on the isolation, structural, elucidation and biological activities of the bioactive compounds from cyanobacteria Nostoc species.

  2. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing environmental impact.

  3. Growth regulator induced mobilization of 14C-metabolites into sunflower heads

    Prasad, T.G.; Udaykumar, M.; Rama Rao, S.; Krishna Sastry, K.S.

    1977-01-01

    Effect of exogenous application of mixtures of NAA, Ga and BA to the head in sunflower, after pollination and fertilization, on the mobilization of 14 C-metabolites was studied. Application of such mixtures increased mobilization and altered the pattern of translocation. TIBA applied to the head when the ray florets only had commenced opening also caused an increase in mobilization of 14 C-metabolites. Percent activity in relation to the activity fixed by the leaf increased from 36.8 in control to 63 in TIBA treated head. Field experiments conducted for 2 seasons also confirmed effectiveness of TIBA application in increasing percent seed filling and also 1000 grain weight. In sunflower it was possible to increase the sink capacity by application of growth regulators. (author)

  4. Antifungal metabolites (monorden, monocillin IV, and cerebrosides) from Humicola fuscoatra traaen NRRL 22980, a mycoparasite of Aspergillus flavus sclerotia.

    Wicklow, D T; Joshi, B K; Gamble, W R; Gloer, J B; Dowd, P F

    1998-11-01

    The mycoparasite Humicola fuscoatra NRRL 22980 was isolated from a sclerotium of Aspergillus flavus that had been buried in a cornfield near Tifton, Ga. When grown on autoclaved rice, this fungus produced the antifungal metabolites monorden, monocillin IV, and a new monorden analog. Each metabolite produced a clear zone of inhibition surrounding paper assay disks on agar plates seeded with conidia of A. flavus. Monorden was twice as inhibitory to A. flavus mycelium extension (MIC > 28 microg/ml) as monocillin IV (MIC > 56 microg/ml). Cerebrosides C and D, metabolites known to potentiate the activity of cell wall-active antibiotics, were separated from the ethyl acetate extract but were not inhibitory to A. flavus when tested as pure compounds. This is the first report of natural products from H. fuscoatra.

  5. AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures on ammono bulk GaN substrate

    Kruszewski, P; Prystawko, P; Krysko, M; Smalc-Koziorowska, J; Leszczynski, M; Kasalynas, I; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A; Plesiewicz, J; Dwilinski, R; Zajac, M; Kucharski, R

    2014-01-01

    The work shows a successful fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures on the bulk GaN substrate grown by ammonothermal method providing an ultralow dislocation density of 10 4  cm −2  and wafers of size up to 2 inches in diameter. The AlGaN layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy method demonstrate atomically smooth surface, flat interfaces with reproduced low dislocation density as in the substrate. The test electronic devices—Schottky diodes and transistors—were designed without surface passivation and were successfully fabricated using mask-less laser-based photolithography procedures. The Schottky barrier devices demonstrate exceptionally low reverse currents smaller by a few orders of magnitude in comparison to the Schottky diodes made of AlGaN/GaN HEMT on sapphire substrate. (paper)

  6. Hydrophobicity and charge shape cellular metabolite concentrations.

    Arren Bar-Even

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available What governs the concentrations of metabolites within living cells? Beyond specific metabolic and enzymatic considerations, are there global trends that affect their values? We hypothesize that the physico-chemical properties of metabolites considerably affect their in-vivo concentrations. The recently achieved experimental capability to measure the concentrations of many metabolites simultaneously has made the testing of this hypothesis possible. Here, we analyze such recently available data sets of metabolite concentrations within E. coli, S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis and human. Overall, these data sets encompass more than twenty conditions, each containing dozens (28-108 of simultaneously measured metabolites. We test for correlations with various physico-chemical properties and find that the number of charged atoms, non-polar surface area, lipophilicity and solubility consistently correlate with concentration. In most data sets, a change in one of these properties elicits a ~100 fold increase in metabolite concentrations. We find that the non-polar surface area and number of charged atoms account for almost half of the variation in concentrations in the most reliable and comprehensive data set. Analyzing specific groups of metabolites, such as amino-acids or phosphorylated nucleotides, reveals even a higher dependence of concentration on hydrophobicity. We suggest that these findings can be explained by evolutionary constraints imposed on metabolite concentrations and discuss possible selective pressures that can account for them. These include the reduction of solute leakage through the lipid membrane, avoidance of deleterious aggregates and reduction of non-specific hydrophobic binding. By highlighting the global constraints imposed on metabolic pathways, future research could shed light onto aspects of biochemical evolution and the chemical constraints that bound metabolic engineering efforts.

  7. Urinary metabolites of tetrahydronorharman in the rat

    Greiner, B.; Rommelspacher, H.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of THN in the rat was studied in vivo by use of /sup 14/C-radiolabelled compound. Structures of major urinary metabolites were determined by exact spectral data. Their concentrations were measured by liquid scintillation counting. It was found that THN is submitted to endogenous transformation, and that the excreted derivatives form three groups of similar concentration: unchanged substance, hydroxylated/conjugated compounds, and aromatic metabolites. Structures and proposed pathways are summed in diagram.

  8. Urinary metabolites of tetrahydronorharman in the rat

    Greiner, B.; Rommelspacher, H.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of THN in the rat was studied in vivo by use of 14 C-radiolabelled compound. Structures of major urinary metabolites were determined by exact spectral data. Their concentrations were measured by liquid scintillation counting. It was found that THN is submitted to endogenous transformation, and that the excreted derivatives form three groups of similar concentration: unchanged substance, hydroxylated/conjugated compounds, and aromatic metabolites. Structures and proposed pathways are summed in diagram

  9. GPCR-Mediated Signaling of Metabolites

    Husted, Anna Sofie; Trauelsen, Mette; Rudenko, Olga

    2017-01-01

    microbiota target primarily enteroendocrine, neuronal, and immune cells in the lamina propria of the gut mucosa and the liver and, through these tissues, the rest of the body. In contrast, metabolites from the intermediary metabolism act mainly as metabolic stress-induced autocrine and paracrine signals...... and obesity. The concept of key metabolites as ligands for specific GPCRs has broadened our understanding of metabolic signaling significantly and provides a number of novel potential drug targets....

  10. InGaN/GaN Nanowire LEDs and Lasers

    Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Jahangir, Shafat; Frost, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    -droop issues. The phonon and carrier confinement in nanowires also led to junction heating, and reduced heat dissipation. In this paper, we will present our studies on effective surface states passivation in InGaN/GaN quantum-disks (Qdisks)-in-nanowire light

  11. Robust AlGaN/GaN MMIC Receiver Components

    Heijningen, M. van; Janssen, J.P.B.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    Apart from delivering very high output powers, GaN can also be used to realize robust receiver components, such as Low Noise Amplifiersand Switches. This paper presents the designand measurement results of two GaN X-band switch and LNA MMICs, designed for integration in a radar front end. The switch

  12. Formation of GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs nanorings by droplet molecular-beam epitaxy

    Gong, Z.; Niu, Z.C.; Huang, S.S.; Fang, Z.D.; Sun, B.Q.; Xia, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    GaAs/AlGaAs lattice-matched nanorings are formed on GaAs (100) substrates by droplet epitaxy. The crucial step in the formation of nanorings is annealing Ga droplets under As flux for proper time. The observed morphologic evolution of Ga droplets during annealing does not support the hypothesis that As atoms preferentially react with Ga around the periphery of the droplets, but somehow relates to a dewetting process similar to that of unstable films. Photoluminescene (PL) test results confirm the quantum-confinement effect of these GaAs nanorings. Using similar methods, we have fabricated InGaAs/GaAs lattice-mismatched rings

  13. New metabolites of hongdenafil, homosildenafil and hydroxyhomosildenafil.

    Yeo, Miseon; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Choe, Sanggil; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Hye Kyung; Pyo, Jae Sung

    2018-02-05

    Recently, illegal sildenafil analogues have emerged, causing serious social issues. In spite of the importance of sildenafil analogues, their metabolic profiles or clinical effects have not been reported yet. In this study, new metabolites of illegal sildenafil analogues such as hongdenafil, homosildenafil, and hydroxyhomosildenafil were determined using liquid chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS). To prepare metabolic samples, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. For in vivo metabolites analysis, urine and feces samples of rats treated with sildenafil analogues were analyzed. For in vitro metabolites analysis, human liver microsomes incubated with sildenafil analogues were extracted and analyzed. All metabolites were characterized by LC-Q-TOF-MS and LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS. As a result, five, six, and seven metabolites were determined in hongdenafil, homosildenafil, and hydroxyhomosildenafil treated samples, respectively. These results could be applied to forensic science and other analytical fields. Moreover, these newly identified metabolites could be used as fundamental data to determine the side effect and toxicity of illegal sildenafil analogues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolites of cannabidiol identified in human urine.

    Harvey, D J; Mechoulam, R

    1990-03-01

    1. Urine from a dystonic patient treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was examined by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry for CBD metabolites. Metabolites were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS, and methyl ester/TMS derivatives and as the TMS derivatives of the product of lithium aluminium deuteride reduction. 2. Thirty-three metabolites were identified in addition to unmetabolized CBD, and a further four metabolites were partially characterized. 3. The major metabolic route was hydroxylation and oxidation at C-7 followed by further hydroxylation in the pentyl and propenyl groups to give 1"-, 2"-, 3"-, 4"- and 10-hydroxy derivatives of CBD-7-oic acid. Other metabolites, mainly acids, were formed by beta-oxidation and related biotransformations from the pentyl side-chain and these were also hydroxylated at C-6 or C-7. The major oxidized metabolite was CBD-7-oic acid containing a hydroxyethyl side-chain. 4. Two 8,9-dihydroxy compounds, presumably derived from the corresponding epoxide were identified. 5. Also present were several cyclized cannabinoids including delta-6- and delta-1-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. 6. This is the first metabolic study of CBD in humans; most observed metabolic routes were typical of those found for CBD and related cannabinoids in other species.

  15. High breakdown voltage in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs using AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN quantum-well electron-blocking layers.

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Yao, Yung-Chi; Huang, Chun-Ying; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Lien; Liu, Ching-Yun; Wang, Mei-Tan; Hwang, Jung-Min

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically study an enhancement of breakdown voltage in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) by using the AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN quantum-well (QW) electron-blocking layer (EBL) structure. This concept is based on the superior confinement of two-dimensional electron gases (2-DEGs) provided by the QW EBL, resulting in a significant improvement of breakdown voltage and a remarkable suppression of spilling electrons. The electron mobility of 2-DEG is hence enhanced as well. The dependence of thickness and composition of QW EBL on the device breakdown is also evaluated and discussed.

  16. Spatially resolved In and As distributions in InGaAs/GaP and InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot systems

    Shen, J; Cha, J J; Song, Y; Lee, M L

    2014-01-01

    InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaP are promising for monolithic integration of optoelectronics with Si technology. To understand and improve the optical properties of InGaAs/GaP QD systems, detailed measurements of the QD atomic structure as well as the spatial distributions of each element at high resolution are crucial. This is because the QD band structure, band alignment, and optical properties are determined by the atomic structure and elemental composition. Here, we directly measure the inhomogeneous distributions of In and As in InGaAs QDs grown on GaAs and GaP substrates at the nanoscale using energy dispersive x-ray spectral mapping in a scanning transmission electron microscope. We find that the In distribution is broader on GaP than on GaAs, and as a result, the QDs appear to be In-poor using a GaP matrix. Our findings challenge some of the assumptions made for the concentrations and distributions of In within InGaAs/GaAs or InGaAs/GaP QD systems and provide detailed structural and elemental information to modify the current band structure understanding. In particular, the findings of In deficiency and inhomogeneous distribution in InGaAs/GaP QD systems help to explain photoluminescence spectral differences between InGaAs/GaAs and InGaAs/GaP QD systems. (paper)

  17. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    Möreke, Janina; Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-01-01

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  18. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    Möreke, Janina, E-mail: janina.moereke@bristol.ac.uk; Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Haigh, Sarah J. [Super STEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Bldg, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  19. Shot noise reduction in the AlGaAs/GaAs- and InGaP/GaAs-based HBTs

    Sakalas, Paulius; Schroeter, Michael; Zampardi, Peter; Zirath, Herbert

    2003-05-01

    Noise parameters of AlGaAs/GaAs and InGaP/GaAs HBTs were measured in microwave frequency range and modeled using the small-signal equivalent circuit approach. Correlated current noise sources in the base and collector currents with thermal noise in the circuit resistive elements were accounted for by the model and yielded good agreement with the measured data. This enabled an extraction of the different noise source contributions to minimum noise figure (NFmin) in AlGaAs/GaAs and InGaP/GaAs HBTs. Decomposition of the (NFmin) in to the different contributors showed that the main noise sources in investigated HBTs are correlated base and collector current shot noise. The observed minimum of NFmin versus frequency at lower collector current is explained by the reduction of the emitter/base junction shot noise component due to the spike in the emitter/base junction and associated accumulation of the quasi-thermalized electrons forming a space charge, which screens the electron transfer through the barrier. The bias (VCE) increase creates an efficient electric field in collector/base junction, capable of 'washing out' the accumulated charge. Such shot noise reduction in HBTs could be exploited in the LNA for the RF application.

  20. Quantitative determination of five metabolites of aspirin by UHPLC-MS/MS coupled with enzymatic reaction and its application to evaluate the effects of aspirin dosage on the metabolic profile.

    Li, Jian-Ping; Guo, Jian-Ming; Shang, Er-Xin; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Bu-Chang; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Zhi-Shu; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2017-05-10

    Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin, ASA) is a famous drug for cardiovascular diseases in recent years. Effects of ASA dosage on the metabolic profile have not been fully understood. The purpose of our study is to establish a rapid and reliable method to quantify ASA metabolites in biological matrices, especially for glucuronide metabolites whose standards are not commercially available. Then we applied this method to evaluate the effects of ASA dosage on the metabolic and excretion profile of ASA metabolites in rat urine. Salicylic acid (SA), gentisic acid (GA) and salicyluric acid (SUA) were determined directly by UHPLC-MS/MS, while salicyl phenolic glucuronide (SAPG) and salicyluric acid phenolic glucuronide (SUAPG) were quantified indirectly by measuring the released SA and SUA from SAPG and SUAPG after β-glucuronidase digestion. SUA and SUAPG were the major metabolites of ASA in rat urine 24h after ASA administration, which accounted for 50% (SUA) and 26% (SUAPG). When ASA dosage was increased, the contributions dropped to 32% and 18%, respectively. The excretion of other three metabolites (GA, SA and SAPG) however showed remarkable increases by 16%, 6% and 4%, respectively. In addition, SUA and SUAPG were mainly excreted in the time period of 12-24h, while GA was excreted in the earlier time periods (0-4h and 4-8h). SA was mainly excreted in the time period of 0-4h and 12-24h. And the excretion of SAPG was equally distributed in the four time periods. We went further to show that the excretion of five metabolites in rat urine was delayed when ASA dosage was increased. In conclusion, we have developed a rapid and sensitive method to determine the five ASA metabolites (SA, GA, SUA, SAPG and SUAPG) in rat urine. We showed that ASA dosage could significantly influence the metabolic and excretion profile of ASA metabolites in rat urine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrical compensation by Ga vacancies in Ga2O3

    Korhonen, Esa; Tuomisto, F.; Gogova, D.; Wagner, G.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Schewski, R.; Albrecht, M.

    2015-01-01

    The authors have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the vacancy defects in undoped and Si-doped Ga2O3 thin films. The results show that Ga vacancies are formed efficiently during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth of Ga2O3 thin films. Their concentrations are high enough to fully account for the electrical compensation of Si doping. This is in clear contrast to another n-type transparent semiconducting oxide In2O3, where recent results show that n-type conductivity is n...

  2. On the effect of N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN built-in junctions in the n-GaN layer for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes.

    Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ju, Zhen Gang; Zhang, Xue Liang; Ji, Yun; Hasanov, Namig; Zhu, Binbin; Lu, Shunpeng; Zhang, Yiping; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-01-13

    N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN/P-GaN/N-GaN (NPNPN-GaN) junctions embedded between the n-GaN region and multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are systematically studied both experimentally and theoretically to increase the performance of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) in this work. In the proposed architecture, each thin P-GaN layer sandwiched in the NPNPN-GaN structure is completely depleted due to the built-in electric field in the NPNPN-GaN junctions, and the ionized acceptors in these P-GaN layers serve as the energy barriers for electrons from the n-GaN region, resulting in a reduced electron over flow and enhanced the current spreading horizontally in the n- GaN region. These lead to increased optical output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) from the proposed device.

  3. Detecting Beer Intake by Unique Metabolite Patterns.

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Bech, Lene; Lund, Erik; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-12-02

    Evaluation of the health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1), 18 participants were given, one at a time, four different test beverages: strong, regular, and nonalcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort, and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e., N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum of iso-α-acids and tricyclohumols) and the production process (i.e., pyro-glutamyl proline and 2-ethyl malate), was selected to establish a compliance biomarker model for detection of beer intake based on MSt1. The model predicted the MSt2 samples collected before and up to 12 h after beer intake correctly (AUC = 1). A biomarker model including four metabolites representing both beer raw materials and production steps provided a specific and accurate tool for measurement of beer consumption.

  4. Plant metabolites and nutritional quality of vegetables.

    Hounsome, N; Hounsome, B; Tomos, D; Edwards-Jones, G

    2008-05-01

    Vegetables are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and cholesterol-lowering compounds. Despite a large amount of information on this topic, the nutritional quality of vegetables has not been defined. Historically, the value of many plant nutrients and health-promoting compounds was discovered by trial and error. By the turn of the century, the application of chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance allowed quantitative and qualitative measurements of a large number of plant metabolites. Approximately 50000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants, and it is predicted that the final number will exceed 200000. Most of them have unknown function. Metabolites such as carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, vitamins, hormones, flavonoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation, and defense. Besides the importance for the plant itself, such metabolites determine the nutritional quality of food, color, taste, smell, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunostimulating, and cholesterol-lowering properties. This review is focused on major plant metabolites that characterize the nutritional quality of vegetables, and methods of their analysis.

  5. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  6. Functional metabolite assemblies—a review

    Aizen, Ruth; Tao, Kai; Rencus-Lazar, Sigal; Gazit, Ehud

    2018-05-01

    Metabolites are essential for the normal operation of cells and fulfill various physiological functions. It was recently found that in several metabolic disorders, the associated metabolites could self-assemble to generate amyloid-like structures, similar to canonical protein amyloids that have a role in neurodegenerative disorders. Yet, assemblies with typical amyloid characteristics are also known to have physiological function. In addition, many non-natural proteins and peptides presenting amyloidal properties have been used for the fabrication of functional nanomaterials. Similarly, functional metabolite assemblies are also found in nature, demonstrating various physiological roles. A notable example is the structural color formed by guanine crystals or fluorescent crystals in feline eyes responsible for enhanced night vision. Moreover, some metabolites have been used for the in vitro fabrication of functional materials, such as glycine crystals presenting remarkable piezoelectric properties or indigo films used to assemble organic semi-conductive electronic devices. Therefore, we believe that the study of metabolite assemblies is not only important in order to understand their role in normal physiology and in pathology, but also paves a new route in exploring the fabrication of organic, bio-compatible materials.

  7. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth of GaN layers using Ga2O vapor obtained from Ga and H2O vapor

    Sumi, Tomoaki; Taniyama, Yuuki; Takatsu, Hiroaki; Juta, Masami; Kitamoto, Akira; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Isemura, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed growth of GaN layers using Ga 2 O vapor synthesized from Ga and H 2 O vapor. In this process, we employed H 2 O vapor instead of HCl gas in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) to synthesize Ga source gas. In the synthesis reaction of Ga 2 O, a Ga 2 O 3 whisker formed and covered Ga, which impeded the synthesis reaction of Ga 2 O. The formation of the Ga 2 O 3 whisker was suppressed in H 2 ambient at high temperatures. Then, we adopted this process to supply a group III precursor and obtained an epitaxial layer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement revealed that the epitaxial layer was single-crystalline GaN. Growth rate increased linearly with Ga 2 O partial pressure and reached 104 µm/h. (author)

  9. Effect of GaN buffer polarization on electron distribution of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    He, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Degang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The formation of 2DEG in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is discussed in detail. A misunderstanding about the 2DEG sheet density expression is clarified. It is predicted by theoretical analysis and validated by self-consistent Schrodinger–Poisson numerical simulation that under the force of GaN polarization, large amounts of electrons will accumulate at the GaN/substrate interface in AlGaN/GaN/substrate HEMT structure. - Highlights: • The formation of 2DEG in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is discussed in detail. • Self-consistent Schrodinger–Poisson numerical simulation is used to modulate the AlGaN/GaN/substrate structure. • It is predicted by that large amounts of electrons will accumulate at the GaN/substrate interface.

  10. Effect of GaN buffer polarization on electron distribution of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    He, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Degang, E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Xiang

    2016-06-15

    The formation of 2DEG in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is discussed in detail. A misunderstanding about the 2DEG sheet density expression is clarified. It is predicted by theoretical analysis and validated by self-consistent Schrodinger–Poisson numerical simulation that under the force of GaN polarization, large amounts of electrons will accumulate at the GaN/substrate interface in AlGaN/GaN/substrate HEMT structure. - Highlights: • The formation of 2DEG in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is discussed in detail. • Self-consistent Schrodinger–Poisson numerical simulation is used to modulate the AlGaN/GaN/substrate structure. • It is predicted by that large amounts of electrons will accumulate at the GaN/substrate interface.

  11. Assessment of Ga2O3 technology

    2016-09-15

    this article has given the emerging technology of GaN a valuable push in term of encouragement to stay with it while the painful technology development...Ga2O3 α-Ga2O3 β-Ga2O3 β-Ga2O3 β-Ga2O3 poly - Ga2O3 β-Ga2O3 Epi-layer Growth Method MBE (ozone) MBE (ozone) MBE (ozone) Mist-CVD MBE (ozone... pains to treat the wafer surface with BCl3 RIE to create charges at the interface. The gate contact was also barely a Schottky contact evidenced by

  12. Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions.

    Barnes, Ryan C; Krenek, Kimberly A; Meibohm, Bernd; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Talcott, Stephen T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Antisites and anisotropic diffusion in GaAs and GaSb

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-10-02

    The significant diffusion of Ga under Ga-rich conditions in GaAs and GaSb is counter intuitive as the concentration of Ga vacancies should be depressed although Ga vacancies are necessary to interpret the experimental evidence for Ga transport. To reconcile the existence of Ga vacancies under Ga-rich conditions, transformation reactions have been proposed. Here, density functional theory is employed to calculate the formation energies of vacancies on both sublattices and the migration energy barriers to overcome the formation of the vacancy-antisite defect. Transformation reactions enhance the vacancy concentration in both materials and migration energy barriers indicate that Ga vacancies will dominate.

  14. GA microwave window development

    Moeller, C.P.; Kasugai, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1994-10-01

    The GA prototype distributed window was tested in a 32 mm diam. waveguide system at a power density suitable for a MW gyrotron, using the JAERI/Toshiba 110 GHz long pulse internal converter gyrotron in the JAERI test stand. The presence of the untilted distributed window had no adverse effect on the gyrotron operation. A pulse length of 10 times the calculated thermal equilibrium time (1/e time) of 30 msec was reached, and the window passed at least 750 pulses greater than 30 msec and 343 pulses greater than 60 msec. Beyond 100 msec, the window calorimetry reached steady state, allowing the window dissipation to be measured in a single pulse. The measured loss of 4.0% agrees both with the estimated loss, on which the stress calculations are based, and with the attenuation measured at low power in the HE 11 mode. After the end of the tests, the window was examined; no evidence of arcing air coating was found in the part of the window directly illuminated by the microwaves, although there was discoloration in a recess containing an optical diagnostic which outgassed, causing a local discharge to occur in that recess. Finally, there was no failure of the metal-sapphire joints during a total operating time of 50 seconds consisting of pulses longer than 30 msec

  15. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S.

    1990-01-01

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and β-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6'exomethylene SV (I), 6'CH 2 OH-SV (II), 6'COOH-SV (III) and a β-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6' is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However 3 H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding 14 C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man

  16. Metabolite production by species of Stemphylium

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Rossman, Amy; Andersen, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    metabolites were found to be important for distinguishing species, while some unknown metabolites were also found to have important roles in distinguishing species of Stemphylium. This study is the first of its kind to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium across the whole genus.......Morphology and phylogeny has been used to distinguish members of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Stemphylium. A third method for distinguishing species is by chemotaxonomy. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium via HPLC-UV-MS analysis, while...

  17. Animal bioavailability of defined xenobiotic lignin metabolites

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Arjmand, M.; Gennity, I.; Winkler, R.; Struble, C.B.; Aschbacher, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    Lignin has been recognized as a major component of bound pesticide residues in plants and is thought to be undigestible in animals. Two defined ring-U- 14 C-labeled chloroaniline/lignin metabolites have now been fed to rats, where a release of ∼66% of the bound xenobiotic occurred in the form of simple chloroaniline derivatives. The observed high degree of bioavailability indicates that bound pesticidal residues may possess ecotoxicological significance. In parallel studies, the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was more efficient, and a soil system was much less efficient, in the degradation of the [ring-U- 14 C]chloroaniline/lignin metabolites

  18. /sup 67/Ga lung scan

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.; Pick, R.

    1977-03-21

    Twenty-three patients with clinical signs of pulmonary embolic disease and lung infiltrates were studied to determine the value of gallium citrate /sup 67/Ga lung scan in differentiating embolic from inflammatory lung disease. In 11 patients without angiographically proved embolism, only seven had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. In seven of these 11 patients, the /sup 67/Ga concentration indicated inflammatory disease. In the 12 patients with angiographically proved embolic disease, six had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. None had an accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the area of pulmonary infiltrate. Thus, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are of limited value when lung infiltrates are present. In contrast, the accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the lung indicates an inflammatory process. Gallium imaging can help select those patients with lung infiltrates who need angiography.

  19. Organic metabolites produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain ...

    Identification and action of several antibacterial metabolites produced by a fish pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3 from marine ecosystem of Goa has been demonstrated. Antibacterial activity of the crude cell extract of the test bacterium has been evaluated against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains such as ...

  20. Chemical composition, secondary metabolites, in vitro gas ...

    Chemical composition, secondary metabolites, in vitro gas production characteristics and acceptability study of some forage for ruminant feeding in South-Western Nigeria. ... Chemical composition and qualitative analysis of saponins, phenol and steroids of the plants were determined. In vitro gas production (IVGP) was ...

  1. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Alternaria spp. are cosmopolitan mould fungi and can be found in soils ... the secondary metabolites products from A. alternata and ..... Zone of inhibition (mm) of test bacterial strains to fungal products and standard antibiotics. Fungal ... marine actinomycetes from pulicat, Muttukadu, and Ennore estuaries.

  2. Identification of a new metabolite of GHB

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Tortzen, Christian; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an important analyte in clinical and forensic toxicology with a narrow detection window of 3-6 h. In the search of improved detection methods, the existence in vivo of a glucuronated GHB metabolite (GHB-GLUC) was hypothesized. Chemically pure standards of GHB...

  3. Streptopyrrole: An antimicrobial metabolite from Streptomyces armeniacus

    Breinholt, J.; Gürtler, Hanne; Kjær, Anders

    1998-01-01

    A colourless, crystalline metabolite, C14H12ClNO4, named streptopyrrole, has been isolated from submerged fermentation cultures of Streptomyces armeniacus by extraction, followed by chromatographic purification. Its tricyclic molecular framework, seemingly without natural product precedents. as w...

  4. Microbial metabolism part 13 metabolites of hesperetin

    The fungal culture, Mucor ramannianus (ATCC 2628) transformed hesperitin to four metabolites: 4'-methoxy -5, 7, 8, 3'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (8-hydroxyhesperetin), 5, 7, 3', 4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (eriodictyol), 4'-methoxy-5, 3'-dihydroxyflavanone 7-sulfate (hesperetin 7-sulfate) and 5, 7, 3'-tri...

  5. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...

  6. Variability of Secondary Metabolites of the Species Cichorium intybus L. from Different Habitats

    Nenad M. Zlatić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of this paper is to show the influence of soil characteristics on the quantitative variability of secondary metabolites. Analysis of phenolic content, flavonoid concentrations, and the antioxidant activity was performed using the ethanol and ethyl acetate plant extracts of the species Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae. The samples were collected from one saline habitat and two non-saline habitats. The values of phenolic content from the samples taken from the saline habitat ranged from 119.83 to 120.83 mg GA/g and from non-saline habitats from 92.44 to 115.10 mg GA/g. The amount of flavonoids in the samples from the saline locality varied between 144.36 and 317.62 mg Ru/g and from non-saline localities between 86.03 and 273.07 mg Ru/g. The IC50 values of antioxidant activity in the samples from the saline habitat ranged from 87.64 to 117.73 μg/mL and from 101.44 to 125.76 μg/mL in the samples from non-saline habitats. The results confirmed that soil types represent a significant influence on the quantitative content of secondary metabolites. The greatest concentrations of phenols and flavonoids and the highest level of antioxidant activity were found in the samples from saline soil. This further corroborates the importance of saline soil as an ecological factor, as it is proven to give rise to increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and related antioxidant activity.

  7. Circulating prostacyclin metabolites in the dog

    Taylor, B.M.; Shebuski, R.J.; Sun, F.F.

    1983-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the concentration of prostacyclin (PGI2) metabolites in the blood of the dog. After a bolus i.v. dose of [11 beta- 3 H]PGI2 (5 micrograms/kg) into each of five dogs, blood samples were withdrawn at 0.33, 0.67, 1, 3, 5, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min postdrug administration. Plasma samples were extracted and the radioactive components were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography with autoradiofluorography and radio-high-performance liquid chromatography. The compounds were identified by comparing their mobility with synthetic standards; only parallel responses observed in both tests constituted positive identification. Seven metabolites were identified by these two techniques: 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha; 6-keto-PGE1; 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF 1 alpha; 2,3-dinor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha; and 2,3,18,19-tetranor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha. Several additional compounds, both polar and nonpolar in nature, which did not co-chromatograph with any of our standards were also detected. Early samples consisted predominantly of 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha and other 20-carbon metabolites. By 30 min, the predominant metabolites were the 16- and 18-carbon dicarboxylic acids. By 60 min, 85% of the radioactivity was associated with two unidentified polar compounds. The evidence suggests that 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha probably reflects only the transient levels of freshly entering PGI2 in the circulation, whereas levels of the most polar metabolites (e.g., dihydro-diketo-carboxyl tetranor-PGF 2 alpha) may be a better measure of the overall PGI2 presence due to its longer half-life in circulation

  8. An update on organohalogen metabolites produced by basidiomycetes

    Field, J.A.; Wijnberg, J.B.P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Basidiomycetes are an ecologically important group of higher fungi known for their widespread capacity to produce organohalogen metabolites. To date, 100 different organohalogen metabolites (mostly chlorinated) have been identified from strains in 70 genera of Basidiomycetes. This manuscript

  9. Rationalization and prediction of in vivo metabolite exposures: The role of metabolite kinetics, clearance predictions and in vitro parameters

    Lutz, Justin D.; Fujioka, Yasushi; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Due to growing concerns over toxic or active metabolites, significant efforts have been focused on qualitative identification of potential in vivo metabolites from in vitro data. However, limited tools are available to quantitatively predict their human exposures. Areas covered in this review Theory of clearance predictions and metabolite kinetics is reviewed together with supporting experimental data. In vitro and in vivo data of known circulating metabolites and their parent drugs was collected and the predictions of in vivo exposures of the metabolites were evaluated. What the reader will gain The theory and data reviewed will be useful in early identification of human metabolites that will circulate at significant levels in vivo and help in designing in vivo studies that focus on characterization of metabolites. It will also assist in rationalization of metabolite-to-parent ratios used as markers of specific enzyme activity. Take home message The relative importance of a metabolite in comparison to the parent compound as well as other metabolites in vivo can only be predicted using the metabolites in vitro formation and elimination clearances, and the in vivo disposition of a metabolite can only be rationalized when the elimination pathways of that metabolite are known. PMID:20557268

  10. Metabolite coupling in genome-scale metabolic networks

    Palsson Bernhard Ø

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemically detailed stoichiometric matrices have now been reconstructed for various bacteria, yeast, and for the human cardiac mitochondrion based on genomic and proteomic data. These networks have been manually curated based on legacy data and elementally and charge balanced. Comparative analysis of these well curated networks is now possible. Pairs of metabolites often appear together in several network reactions, linking them topologically. This co-occurrence of pairs of metabolites in metabolic reactions is termed herein "metabolite coupling." These metabolite pairs can be directly computed from the stoichiometric matrix, S. Metabolite coupling is derived from the matrix ŜŜT, whose off-diagonal elements indicate the number of reactions in which any two metabolites participate together, where Ŝ is the binary form of S. Results Metabolite coupling in the studied networks was found to be dominated by a relatively small group of highly interacting pairs of metabolites. As would be expected, metabolites with high individual metabolite connectivity also tended to be those with the highest metabolite coupling, as the most connected metabolites couple more often. For metabolite pairs that are not highly coupled, we show that the number of reactions a pair of metabolites shares across a metabolic network closely approximates a line on a log-log scale. We also show that the preferential coupling of two metabolites with each other is spread across the spectrum of metabolites and is not unique to the most connected metabolites. We provide a measure for determining which metabolite pairs couple more often than would be expected based on their individual connectivity in the network and show that these metabolites often derive their principal biological functions from existing in pairs. Thus, analysis of metabolite coupling provides information beyond that which is found from studying the individual connectivity of individual

  11. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolite Depletion Affects Flux Profiling of Cell Lines

    Nilsson, A.; Haanstra, J. R.; Teusink, B.

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying the rate of consumption and release of metabolites (i.e., flux profiling) has become integral to the study of cancer. The fluxes as well as the growth of the cells may be affected by metabolite depletion during cultivation.......Quantifying the rate of consumption and release of metabolites (i.e., flux profiling) has become integral to the study of cancer. The fluxes as well as the growth of the cells may be affected by metabolite depletion during cultivation....

  13. Atomic-scale structure of irradiated GaN compared to amorphised GaP and GaAs

    Ridgway, M.C.; Everett, S.E.; Glover, C.J.; Kluth, S.M.; Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Hussain, Z.S.; Llewellyn, D.J.; Foran, G.J.; Azevedo, G. de M.

    2006-01-01

    We have compared the atomic-scale structure of ion irradiated GaN to that of amorphised GaP and GaAs. While continuous and homogenous amorphised layers were easily achieved in GaP and GaAs, ion irradiation of GaN yielded both structural and chemical inhomogeneities. Transmission electron microscopy revealed GaN crystallites and N 2 bubbles were interspersed within an amorphous GaN matrix. The crystallite orientation was random relative to the unirradiated epitaxial structure, suggesting their formation was irradiation-induced, while the crystallite fraction was approximately constant for all ion fluences beyond the amorphisation threshold, consistent with a balance between amorphisation and recrystallisation processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the Ga K-edge showed short-range order was retained in the amorphous phase for all three binary compounds. For ion irradiated GaN, the stoichiometric imbalance due to N 2 bubble formation was not accommodated by Ga-Ga bonding in the amorphous phase or precipitation of metallic Ga but instead by a greater reduction in Ga coordination number

  14. Identifying diseases-related metabolites using random walk.

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Tianyi; Zhang, Ningyi; Zang, Tianyi; Zhang, Jun; Cheng, Liang

    2018-04-11

    Metabolites disrupted by abnormal state of human body are deemed as the effect of diseases. In comparison with the cause of diseases like genes, these markers are easier to be captured for the prevention and diagnosis of metabolic diseases. Currently, a large number of metabolic markers of diseases need to be explored, which drive us to do this work. The existing metabolite-disease associations were extracted from Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) using a text mining tool NCBO annotator as priori knowledge. Next we calculated the similarity of a pair-wise metabolites based on the similarity of disease sets of them. Then, all the similarities of metabolite pairs were utilized for constructing a weighted metabolite association network (WMAN). Subsequently, the network was utilized for predicting novel metabolic markers of diseases using random walk. Totally, 604 metabolites and 228 diseases were extracted from HMDB. From 604 metabolites, 453 metabolites are selected to construct the WMAN, where each metabolite is deemed as a node, and the similarity of two metabolites as the weight of the edge linking them. The performance of the network is validated using the leave one out method. As a result, the high area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.7048) is achieved. The further case studies for identifying novel metabolites of diabetes mellitus were validated in the recent studies. In this paper, we presented a novel method for prioritizing metabolite-disease pairs. The superior performance validates its reliability for exploring novel metabolic markers of diseases.

  15. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and... degradation of less than 10 percent in a 30-day period. (b) Contaminants and impurities. The presence in any...

  16. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine

    Jacobs, D.M.; Spiesser, L.; Garnier, M.; Roo, de N.; Dorsten, van F.; Hollebrands, B.; Velzen, van E.; Draijer, R.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has

  17. Metabolite profiling with HPLC-ICP-MS as a tool for in vivo characterization of imaging probes.

    Boros, Eszter; Pinkhasov, Omar R; Caravan, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Current analytical methods for characterizing pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) probes are limited. Alternative methods to study tracer metabolism are needed. The study objective was to assess the potential of high performance liquid chromatography - inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) for quantification of molecular probe metabolism and pharmacokinetics using stable isotopes. Two known peptide-DOTA conjugates were chelated with nat Ga and nat In. Limit of detection of HPLC-ICP-MS for 69 Ga and 115 In was determined. Rats were administered 50-150 nmol of Ga- and/or In-labeled probes, blood was serially sampled, and plasma analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS using both reverse phase and size exclusion chromatography. The limits of detection were 0.16 pmol for 115 In and 0.53 pmol for 69 Ga. Metabolites as low as 0.001 %ID/g could be detected and transchelation products identified. Simultaneous administration of Ga- and In-labeled probes allowed the determination of pharmacokinetics and metabolism of both probes in a single animal. HPLC-ICP-MS is a robust, sensitive and radiation-free technique to characterize the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of imaging probes.

  18. Influence of AlGaN/GaN superlattice inserted structure on the performance of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    Wang, C.-L.; Tsai, M.-C.; Gong, J.-R.; Liao, W.-T.; Lin, P.-Y.; Yen, K.-Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Lin, H.-Y.; Hwang, S.-K.

    2007-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to explore the effect of Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/GaN short-period superlattice (SPSL)-inserted structures in the GaN under layer on the performance of In 0.2 Ga 0.8 N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs). The Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/GaN SPSL-inserted LEDs were found to exhibit improved materials and device characteristics including decrements in ideality factor and reverse leakage current. The results of etch pit counts reveal that SPSL-induced threading dislocation density reduction in the SPSL-inserted In 0.2 Ga 0.8 N/GaN MQW LED structures enables the improved LED performance

  19. Identification of drug metabolites in human plasma or serum integrating metabolite prediction, LC-HRMS and untargeted data processing

    Jacobs, P.L.; Ridder, L.; Ruijken, M.; Rosing, H.; Jager, N.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Bas, R.R.; Dongen, W.D. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Comprehensive identification of human drug metabolites in first-in-man studies is crucial to avoid delays in later stages of drug development. We developed an efficient workflow for systematic identification of human metabolites in plasma or serum that combines metabolite prediction,

  20. Opposing effects of external gibberellin and Daminozide on Stevia growth and metabolites.

    Karimi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Javad; Ahmadi, Ali; Abbasi, Alireza; Pompeiano, Antonio; Tavarini, Silvia; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo; Angelini, Luciana G

    2015-01-01

    Steviol glycosides (SVglys) and gibberellins are originated from the shared biosynthesis pathway in Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni). In this research, two experiments were conducted to study the opposing effects of external gibberellin (GA3) and Daminozide (a gibberellin inhibitor) on Stevia growth and metabolites. Results showed that GA3 significantly increased the stem length and stem dry weight in Stevia. Total soluble sugar content increased while the SVglys biosynthesis was decreased by external GA3 applying in Stevia leaves. In another experiment, the stem length was reduced by Daminozide spraying on Stevia shoots. The Daminozide did not affect the total SVglys content, while in 30 ppm concentration, significantly increased the soluble sugar production in Stevia leaves. Although the gibberellins biosynthesis pathway has previously invigorated in Stevia leaf, the Stevia response to external gibberellins implying on high precision regulation of gibberellins biosynthesis in Stevia and announces that Stevia is able to kept endogenous gibberellins in a low quantity away from SVglys production. Moreover, the assumption that the internal gibberellins were destroyed by Daminozide, lack of Daminozide effects on SVglys production suggests that gibberellins biosynthesis could not act as a competitive factor for SVglys production in Stevia leaves.

  1. The neurotoxicity of pyridinium metabolites of haloperidol

    Agnieszka Górska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haloperydol is a butyrophenone, typical neuroleptic agent characterized as a high antipsychotics effects in the treatment of schizophrenia and in palliative care to alleviation many syndromes, such as naursea, vomiting and delirium. Clinical problems occurs during and after administration of the drug are side effects, particularly extrapyrramidal symptoms (EPS. The neurotoxicity of haloperydol may be initiated by the cationic metabolites of haloperydol, HPP+, RHPP+, formed by oxidation and reduction pathways. These metabolites are transported by human organic cation transporters (hOCT to several brain structures for exapmle, in substantia nigra, striatum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus. After reaching the dopaminergic neurons inhibits mitochondrial complex I, evidence for free radical involvement, thus leading to neurodegeneration.

  2. Vitamin D metabolites in human milk

    Weisman, Y.; Bawnik, J.C.; Eisenberg, Z.; Spirer, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The concentrations of unconjugated 25-OHD, 24, 25(OH)2D, and 1,25(OH)2D were measured in human milk by competitive protein-binding radioassays following successive preparative Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and HPLC. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of 25-OHD was 0.37 +/- 0.03 ng/ml, of 24,25(OH)2D was 24.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml, and of 1,25(OH)2D was 2.2 +/-0.1 pg/ml. The concentration of 25-OHD3 in milk as determined by HPLC and UV detection at 254 nm was 0.27 +/- 0.08 ng/ml. The milk concentrations of vitamin D metabolites did not correlate with the maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The total amounts of unconjugated vitamin D metabolites correspond to the known low bioassayable vitamin D antirachitic activity in human milk

  3. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    Michele Greque de Morais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences.

  4. InGaP/InGaAsN/GaAs NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor

    Chang, P. C.; Baca, A. G.; Li, N. Y.; Xie, X. M.; Hou, H. Q.; Armour, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have demonstrated a functional NpN double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) using InGaAsN for the base layer. The InGaP/In 0.03 Ga 0.97 As 0.99 N 0.01 /GaAs DHBT has a low V ON of 0.81 V, which is 0.13 V lower than in a InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). The lower turn-on voltage is attributed to the smaller band gap (1.20 eV) of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-grown In 0.03 Ga 0.97 As 0.99 N 0.01 base layer. GaAs is used for the collector; thus the breakdown voltage (BV CEO ) is 10 V, consistent with the BV CEO of InGaP/GaAs HBTs of comparable collector thickness and doping level. To alleviate the current blocking phenomenon caused by the larger conduction band discontinuity between InGaAsN and GaAs, a graded InGaAs layer with δ doping is inserted at the base-collector junction. The improved device has a peak current gain of seven with ideal current-voltage characteristics. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  5. Comparison of electrical characteristic between AlN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky diodes

    Lü Yuan-Jie; Feng Zhi-Hong; Gu Guo-Dong; Dun Shao-Bo; Yin Jia-Yun; Han Ting-Ting; Cai Shu-Jun; Lin Zhao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ni/Au Schottky contacts on AlN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures are fabricated. Based on the measured current—voltage and capacitance—voltage curves, the electrical characteristics of AlN/GaN Schottky diode, such as Schottky barrier height, turn-on voltage, reverse breakdown voltage, ideal factor, and the current-transport mechanism, are analyzed and then compared with those of an AlGaN/GaN diode by self-consistently solving Schrödinger's and Poisson's equations. It is found that the dislocation-governed tunneling is dominant for both AlN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes. However, more dislocation defects and a thinner barrier layer for AlN/GaN heterostructure results in a larger tunneling probability, and causes a larger leakage current and lower reverse breakdown voltage, even though the Schottky barrier height of AlN/GaN Schottky diode is calculated to be higher that of an AlGaN/GaN diode. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. Hydrolysis of benzonitrile herbicides by soil actinobacteria and metabolite toxicity

    Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Franc, M.; Pelantová, Helena; Kubáč, David; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Šulc, Miroslav; Bhalla, T. C.; Macková, M.; Lovecká, P.; Janů, P.; Demnerová, K.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2011), s. 761-770 ISSN 0923-9820 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA5/043; GA MŠk OC09046; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA AV ČR IAA500200708; GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : nitrilase * benzonitrile herbicides * chloroxynil Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.017, year: 2011

  7. Hydrolysis of benzonitrile herbicides by soil actinobacteria and metabolite toxicity

    Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Franc, M.; Pelantová, Helena; Kubáč, David; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Šulc, Miroslav; Bhalla, T. C.; Macková, M.; Lovecká, P.; Janů, P.; Demnerová, K.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2010), s. 761-770 ISSN 0923-9820 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA5/043; GA MŠk OC09046; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA AV ČR IAA500200708; GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Benzonitrile herbicides * nitrilase * Chloroxynil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.012, year: 2010

  8. Fabrication of p-type porous GaN on silicon and epitaxial GaN

    Bilousov, Oleksandr V.; Geaney, Hugh; Carvajal, Joan J.; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Parbrook, Peter J.; Giguere, A.; Drouin, D.; Diaz, Francesc; Aguilo, Magdalena; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2013-01-01

    Porous GaN layers are grown on silicon from gold or platinum catalyst seed layers, and self-catalyzed on epitaxial GaN films on sapphire. Using a Mg-based precursor, we demonstrate p-type doping of the porous GaN. Electrical measurements for p-type GaN on Si show Ohmic and Schottky behavior from gold and platinum seeded GaN, respectively. Ohmicity is attributed to the formation of a Ga2Au intermetallic. Porous p-type GaN was also achieved on epitaxial n-GaN on sapphire, and transport measurem...

  9. Anomalous disorder-related phenomena in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well heterosystems

    Hu, Y.-J.; Huang, Y.-W.; Fang, C.-H.; Wang, J.-C.; Chen, Y.-F.; Nee, T.-E.

    2010-01-01

    The influences of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures with InGaN/GaN and GaN barriers on carrier confinement were investigated. The degree of disordering over a broad range of temperatures from 20 to 300 K was considered. The optical and electrical properties were strongly influenced by structural and compositional disordering of the InGaN/GaN MQW heterostructures. To compare the degree of disordering we examined the temperature dependence of the luminescence spectra and electrical conductance contingent on the Berthelot-type mechanisms in the InGaN/GaN MQW heterostructures. We further considered carrier transport in the InGaN/GaN disordered systems, probability of carrier tunneling, and activation energy of the transport mechanism for devices with InGaN/GaN and GaN barriers. The optical properties of InGaN/GaN disordered heterosystems can be interpreted from the features of the absorption spectra. The anomalous temperature-dependent characteristics of the disordered InGaN/GaN MQW structures were attributable to the enhancement of the exciton confinement.

  10. Role of metabolites of cyclophosphamide in cardiotoxicity

    Kurauchi, Koichiro; Nishikawa, Takuro; Miyahara, Emiko; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Background The dose-limiting toxic effect of cyclophosphamide (CY) is cardiotoxicity. The pathogenesis of myocardial damage is poorly understood, and there is no established means of prevention. In previous studies, we suggested that for CY-induced cardiotoxicity, whereas acrolein is the key toxic metabolite, carboxyethylphosphoramide mustard (CEPM) is protective. We sought to verify that acrolein is the main cause of cardiotoxicity and to investigate whether aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), wh...

  11. Fungal Anticancer Metabolites: Synthesis Towards Drug Discovery.

    Barbero, Margherita; Artuso, Emma; Prandi, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Fungi are a well-known and valuable source of compounds of therapeutic relevance, in particular of novel anticancer compounds. Although seldom obtainable through isolation from the natural source, the total organic synthesis still remains one of the most efficient alternatives to resupply them. Furthermore, natural product total synthesis is a valuable tool not only for discovery of new complex biologically active compounds but also for the development of innovative methodologies in enantioselective organic synthesis. We undertook an in-depth literature searching by using chemical bibliographic databases (SciFinder, Reaxys) in order to have a comprehensive insight into the wide research field. The literature has been then screened, refining the obtained results by subject terms focused on both biological activity and innovative synthetic procedures. The literature on fungal metabolites has been recently reviewed and these publications have been used as a base from which we consider the synthetic feasibility of the most promising compounds, in terms of anticancer properties and drug development. In this paper, compounds are classified according to their chemical structure. This review summarizes the anticancer potential of fungal metabolites, highlighting the role of total synthesis outlining the feasibility of innovative synthetic procedures that facilitate the development of fungal metabolites into drugs that may become a real future perspective. To our knowledge, this review is the first effort to deal with the total synthesis of these active fungi metabolites and demonstrates that total chemical synthesis is a fruitful means of yielding fungal derivatives as aided by recent technological and innovative advancements. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. New antitumour fungal metabolites from Alternaria porri.

    Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Rangsan, Jakaphan; Siripong, Pongpan; Tip-Pyang, Santi

    2009-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the onion pathogenic fungus Alternaria porri resulted in the isolation of two new phthalides named zinnimide (2) and deprenylzinnimide (8), along with a new bianthraquinone, alterporriol F (10). The structures of the new metabolites were characterised by spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation. Of the new compounds isolated, alterporriol F was highly cytotoxic towards HeLa and KB cells, with IC(50) values of 6.5 and 7.0 microg mL(-1).

  13. Phthalate Metabolites, Consumer Habits and Health Effects

    Peter Wallner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates are multifunctional chemicals used in a wide variety of consumer products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether levels of urinary phthalate metabolites in urine samples of Austrian mothers and their children were associated with consumer habits and health indicators. Within an Austrian biomonitoring survey, urine samples from 50 mother-child pairs of five communities (two-stage random stratified sampling were analysed. The concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites were determined, and a questionnaire was administered. Monoethyl phthalate (MEP, mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP, mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP, monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP, mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (5OH-MEHP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (5oxo-MEHP, mono-(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl phthalate (5cx-MEPP, and 3-carboxy-mono-propyl phthalate (3cx-MPP could be quantified in the majority of samples. Significant correlations were found between the use of hair mousse, hair dye, makeup, chewing gum, polyethylene terephthalate (PET bottles and the diethyl phthalate (DEP metabolite MEP. With regard to health effects, significant associations of MEP in urine with headache, repeated coughing, diarrhoea, and hormonal problems were observed. MBzP was associated with repeated coughing and MEHP was associated with itching.

  14. Natural metabolites for parasitic weed management.

    Vurro, Maurizio; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Zermane, Nadjia

    2009-05-01

    Compounds of natural origin, such as phytotoxins produced by fungi or natural amino acids, could be used in parasitic weed management strategies by interfering with the early growth stages of the parasites. These metabolites could inhibit seed germination or germ tube elongation, so preventing attachment to the host plant, or, conversely, stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host, contributing to a reduction in the parasite seed bank. Some of the fungal metabolites assayed were very active even at very low concentrations, such as some macrocyclic trichothecenes, which at 0.1 microM strongly suppressed the germination of Orobanche ramosa L. seeds. Interesting results were also obtained with some novel toxins, such as phyllostictine A, highly active in reducing germ tube elongation and seed germination both of O. ramosa and of Cuscuta campestris Yuncker. Among the amino acids tested, methionine and arginine were particularly interesting, as they were able to suppress seed germination at concentrations lower than 1 mM. Some of the fungal metabolites tested were also able to stimulate the germination of O. ramosa seeds. The major findings in this research field are described and discussed.

  15. Phthalate Metabolites, Consumer Habits and Health Effects.

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Hohenblum, Philipp; Scharf, Sigrid; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2016-07-15

    Phthalates are multifunctional chemicals used in a wide variety of consumer products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether levels of urinary phthalate metabolites in urine samples of Austrian mothers and their children were associated with consumer habits and health indicators. Within an Austrian biomonitoring survey, urine samples from 50 mother-child pairs of five communities (two-stage random stratified sampling) were analysed. The concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites were determined, and a questionnaire was administered. Monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (5OH-MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (5oxo-MEHP), mono-(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl) phthalate (5cx-MEPP), and 3-carboxy-mono-propyl phthalate (3cx-MPP) could be quantified in the majority of samples. Significant correlations were found between the use of hair mousse, hair dye, makeup, chewing gum, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles and the diethyl phthalate (DEP) metabolite MEP. With regard to health effects, significant associations of MEP in urine with headache, repeated coughing, diarrhoea, and hormonal problems were observed. MBzP was associated with repeated coughing and MEHP was associated with itching.

  16. Metabolite profiling of Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid.

    Christian Czech

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of cognitive functions. Today the diagnosis of AD relies on clinical evaluations and is only late in the disease. Biomarkers for early detection of the underlying neuropathological changes are still lacking and the biochemical pathways leading to the disease are still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the metabolic changes resulting from the disease phenotype by a thorough and systematic metabolite profiling approach. For this purpose CSF samples from 79 AD patients and 51 healthy controls were analyzed by gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. In total 343 different analytes have been identified. Significant changes in the metabolite profile of AD patients compared to healthy controls have been identified. Increased cortisol levels seemed to be related to the progression of AD and have been detected in more severe forms of AD. Increased cysteine associated with decreased uridine was the best paired combination to identify light AD (MMSE>22 with specificity and sensitivity above 75%. In this group of patients, sensitivity and specificity above 80% were obtained for several combinations of three to five metabolites, including cortisol and various amino acids, in addition to cysteine and uridine.

  17. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel diodes in GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunctions

    Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Wenjun; Islam, S. M.; Pourang, Kasra; Fay, Patrick [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep, E-mail: djena@cornell.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Departments of ECE and MSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-10-19

    By the insertion of thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers into Nitrogen-polar GaN p-n junctions, polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions are studied. The reverse-bias interband Zener tunneling current is found to be weakly temperature dependent, as opposed to the strongly temperature-dependent forward bias current. This indicates tunneling as the primary reverse-bias current transport mechanism. The Indium composition in the InGaN layer is systematically varied to demonstrate the increase in the interband tunneling current. Comparing the experimentally measured tunneling currents to a model helps identify the specific challenges in potentially taking such junctions towards nitride-based polarization-induced tunneling field-effect transistors.

  18. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  19. Polarization-induced Zener tunnel diodes in GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunctions

    Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Wenjun; Islam, S. M.; Pourang, Kasra; Fay, Patrick; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-01-01

    By the insertion of thin In x Ga 1−x N layers into Nitrogen-polar GaN p-n junctions, polarization-induced Zener tunnel junctions are studied. The reverse-bias interband Zener tunneling current is found to be weakly temperature dependent, as opposed to the strongly temperature-dependent forward bias current. This indicates tunneling as the primary reverse-bias current transport mechanism. The Indium composition in the InGaN layer is systematically varied to demonstrate the increase in the interband tunneling current. Comparing the experimentally measured tunneling currents to a model helps identify the specific challenges in potentially taking such junctions towards nitride-based polarization-induced tunneling field-effect transistors

  20. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  1. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols

    Farhana R. Pinu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  2. Performance Analysis of GaN Capping Layer Thickness on GaN/AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors.

    Sharma, N; Periasamy, C; Chaturvedi, N

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation of the impact of GaN capping layer and AlGaN layer thickness on the two-dimensional (2D)-electron mobility and the carrier concentration which was formed close to the AlGaN/GaN buffer layer for Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN and GaN/Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures deposited on sapphire substrates. The results of our analysis clearly indicate that expanding the GaN capping layer thickness from 1 nm to 100 nm prompts an increment in the electron concentration at hetero interface. As consequence of which drain current was additionally increments with GaN cap layer thicknesses, and eventually saturates at approximately 1.85 A/mm for capping layer thickness greater than 40 nm. Interestingly, for the same structure, the 2D-electron mobility, decrease monotonically with GaN capping layer thickness, and saturate at approximately 830 cm2/Vs for capping layer thickness greater than 50 nm. A device with a GaN cap layer didn't exhibit gate leakage current. Furthermore, it was observed that the carrier concentration was first decrease 1.03 × 1019/cm3 to 6.65 × 1018/cm3 with AlGaN Layer thickness from 5 to 10 nm and after that it increases with the AlGaN layer thickness from 10 to 30 nm. The same trend was followed for electric field distributions. Electron mobility decreases monotonically with AlGaN layer thickness. Highest electron mobility 1354 cm2/Vs were recorded for the AlGaN layer thickness of 5 nm. Results obtained are in good agreement with published experimental data.

  3. Spin injection in epitaxial MnGa(111)/GaN(0001) heterostructures

    Zube, Christian; Malindretos, Joerg; Watschke, Lars; Zamani, Reza R.; Disterheft, David; Ulbrich, Rainer G.; Rizzi, Angela; Iza, Michael; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2018-01-01

    Ferromagnetic MnGa(111) layers were grown on GaN(0001) by molecular beam epitaxy. MnGa/GaN Schottky diodes with a doping level of around n = 7 × 1018 cm-3 were fabricated to achieve single step tunneling across the metal/semiconductor junction. Below the GaN layer, a thin InGaN quantum well served as optical spin detector ("spin-LED"). For electron spin injection from MnGa into GaN and subsequent spin transport through a 45 nm (70 nm) thick GaN layer, we observe a circular polarization of 0.3% (0.2%) in the electroluminescence at 80 K. Interface mixing, spin polarization losses during electrical transport in the GaN layer, and spin relaxation in the InGaN quantum well are discussed in relation with the low value of the optically detected spin polarization.

  4. Automated synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of [{sup 68}Ga]Ga-AMBA, and the synthesis and characterization of {sup nat}Ga-AMBA and [{sup 67}Ga]Ga-AMBA

    Cagnolini, Aldo; Chen Jianqing; Ramos, Kimberly; Marie Skedzielewski, Tina; Lantry, Laura E.; Nunn, Adrian D.; Swenson, Rolf E. [Ernst Felder Laboratories, Bracco Research USA Inc., 305 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Linder, Karen E., E-mail: karen.e.linder@gmail.co [Ernst Felder Laboratories, Bracco Research USA Inc., 305 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Ga-AMBA (Ga-DO3A-CH{sub 2}CO-G-[4-aminobenzoyl]-QWAVGHLM-NH{sub 2}) is a bombesin-like agonist with high affinity for gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRP-R). Syntheses for {sup nat}Ga-AMBA, [{sup 67}Ga]Ga-AMBA and [{sup 68}Ga]Ga-AMBA were developed. The preparation of HPLC-purified and Sep-Pak purified [{sup 68}Ga]Ga-AMBA were fully automated, using the built-in radiodetector of the Tracerlab FX F-N synthesizer to monitor fractionated {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator elution and purification. The total synthesis time, including the fractional elution of the generator, was 20 min for Sep-Pak purified material and 40 min for HPLC-purified [{sup 68}Ga]Ga-AMBA. Both [{sup 67}Ga]Ga-AMBA and [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-AMBA showed comparable high affinity for GRP-R in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 in vitro (k{sub D}=0.46{+-}0.07; 0.44{+-}0.08 nM), high internalization (78; 77%) and low efflux from cells at 2 h (2.4{+-}0.7; 2.9{+-}1.8%). Biodistribution results in PC-3 tumor-bearing male nude mice showed comparable uptake for [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-, [{sup 111}In]In-, [{sup 67}Ga]Ga- and [{sup 68}Ga]Ga-AMBA.

  5. Capacitance properties and simulation of the AlGaN/GaN Schottky heterostructure

    Harmatha, Ladislav; Ľubica, Stuchlíková; Juraj, Racko; Juraj, Marek; Juraj, Pecháček; Peter, Benko; Michal, Nemec; Juraj, Breza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dependences of CV characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN structure on frequency and temperature variations. • Identification of electrical activity of defects by capacitance DLTS. • Simulating the properties of the GaN/Al 0.2 GaN 0.8 /GaN Schottky heterostructure. - Abstract: The paper presents the results of capacitance measurements on GaN/AlGaN/GaN Schottky heterostructures grown on an Al 2 O 3 substrate by Low-Pressure Metal–Organic Vapour-Phase Epitaxy (LP-MOVPE). Dependences of the capacitance–voltage (CV) characteristics on the frequency of the measuring signal allow analysing the properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. Exact location of the hetero-interface below the surface (20 nm) was determined from the concentration profile. Temperature variations of the CV curves reveal the influence of bulk defects in GaN and of the traps at the AlGaN/GaN interface. Electrical activity of these defects was characterized by capacitance Deep Level Transient Fourier Spectroscopy (DLTFS). Experimental results of CV measurements were supported by simulating the properties of the GaN/Al 0.2 GaN 0.8 /GaN Schottky heterostructure in dependence on the influence of the concentration of donor-like traps in GaN and of the temperature upon the CV curves

  6. Growth of InGaN multiple quantum wells and GaN eplilayer on GaN substrate

    Lee, Sung-Nam; Paek, H.S.; Son, J.K.; Sakong, T.; Yoon, E.; Nam, O.H.; Park, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated that the surface morphology of GaN epilayers was significantly affected by the surface tilt orientation of GaN substrate. Surface morphologies of GaN epilayers on GaN substrates show three types: mirror, wavy, and hillock. These surface morphologies are dependent on the surface orientation of GaN substrates. It is found that the hillock morphology of GaN epilayer was formed on the GaN substrate with surface tilt orientation less than 0.1 o . As the surface tilt angle increased to 0.35 o , the surface morphology varied from hillock to wavy morphology. Above a surface tilt angle of 0.4 o , surface morphology changed to the mirror-like type morphology. Additionally, these three types of GaN surface morphology also affected the optical quality of GaN epilayers as well as InGaN multiple quantum wells on GaN substrates by non-uniform In incorporation on the different surface morphologies of GaN epilayers

  7. New Methodology for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Topological Metabolite Identification Carbon Efficiency (tMICE).

    Sanchon-Lopez, Beatriz; Everett, Jeremy R

    2016-09-02

    A new, simple-to-implement and quantitative approach to assessing the confidence in NMR-based identification of known metabolites is introduced. The approach is based on a topological analysis of metabolite identification information available from NMR spectroscopy studies and is a development of the metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE) method. New topological metabolite identification indices are introduced, analyzed, and proposed for general use, including topological metabolite identification carbon efficiency (tMICE). Because known metabolite identification is one of the key bottlenecks in either NMR-spectroscopy- or mass spectrometry-based metabonomics/metabolomics studies, and given the fact that there is no current consensus on how to assess metabolite identification confidence, it is hoped that these new approaches and the topological indices will find utility.

  8. Carrier confinement effects of InxGa1-xN/GaN multi quantum disks with GaN surface barriers grown in GaN nanorods

    Park, Youngsin; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A.; Kim, Nammee; Jo, Yongcheol; Lee, Seung W.; Yang, Woochul; Im, Hyunsik

    2018-04-01

    Structural and optical properties of InxGa1-xN/GaN multi quantum disks (QDisks) grown on GaN nanorods by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Two types of InGaN QDisks were grown: a pseudo-3D confined InGaN pillar-type QDisks embedded in GaN nanorods; and QDisks in flanged cone type GaN nanorods. The PL emission peak and excitation dependent PL behavior of the pillar-type Qdisks differ greatly from those of the flanged cone type QDisks. Time resolved PL was carried out to probe the differences in charge carrier dynamics. The results suggest that by constraining the formation of InGaN QDisks within the centre of the nanorod, carriers are restricted from migrating to the surface, decreasing the surface recombination at high carrier densities.

  9. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between aquatic invertebrates

    Carrasco Navarro, V.; Leppänen, M.T.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.; Godoy Olmos, S.

    2013-01-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was studied using Gammarus setosus as a predator and the invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius as prey. The results obtained by liquid scintillation counting confirmed that the pyrene metabolites produced by the aquatic invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius were transferred to G. setosus through the diet. More detailed analyses by liquid chromatography discovered that two of the metabolites produced by C. riparius appeared in the chromatograms of G. setosus tissue extracts, proving their trophic transfer. These metabolites were not present in chromatograms of G. setosus exclusively exposed to pyrene. The present study supports the trophic transfer of PAH metabolites between benthic macroinvertebrates and common species of an arctic amphipod. As some PAH metabolites are more toxic than the parent compounds, the present study raises concerns about the consequences of their trophic transfer and the fate and effects of PAHs in natural environments. - Highlights: ► The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between invertebrates was evaluated. ► Biotransformation of pyrene by L. variegatus and C. riparius is different. ► Metabolites produced by L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus. ► Specifically, two metabolites produced by C. riparius were transferred. - Some of the pyrene metabolites produced by the model invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus through the diet, proving their trophic transfer.

  10. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design.

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G; Henry, Christopher S; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G.; Henry, Christopher S.; Bruner, Steven D.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects.

  12. InGaN/GaN Nanowire LEDs and Lasers

    Zhao, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The large specific surface, and the associated high density of surface states was found to limit the light output power and quantum efficiency of nanowire-array devices, despite their potential for addressing the “green-gap” and efficiency-droop issues. The phonon and carrier confinement in nanowires also led to junction heating, and reduced heat dissipation. In this paper, we will present our studies on effective surface states passivation in InGaN/GaN quantum-disks (Qdisks)-in-nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers grown on silicon (Si), as well as our recent work on nanowires LEDs grown on bulk-metal, a non-conventional substrate.

  13. AlGaAs/InGaAs/AlGaAs double pulse doped pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor structures on InGaAs substrates

    Hoke, W. E.; Lyman, P. S.; Mosca, J. J.; McTaggart, R. A.; Lemonias, P. J.; Beaudoin, R. M.; Torabi, A.; Bonner, W. A.; Lent, B.; Chou, L.-J.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1997-10-01

    Double pulse doped AlGaAs/InGaAs/AlGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) structures have been grown on InxGa1-xAs (x=0.025-0.07) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. A strain compensated, AlGaInAs/GaAs superlattice was used for improved resistivity and breakdown. Excellent electrical and optical properties were obtained for 110-Å-thick InGaAs channel layers with indium concentrations up to 31%. A room temperature mobility of 6860 cm2/V s with 77 K sheet density of 4.0×1012cm-2 was achieved. The InGaAs channel photoluminescence intensity was equivalent to an analogous structure on a GaAs substrate. To reduce strain PHEMT structures with a composite InGaP/AlGaAs Schottky layer were also grown. The structures also exhibited excellent electrical and optical properties. Transmission electron micrographs showed planar channel interfaces for highly strained In0.30Ga0.70As channel layers.

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of InGaN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures using a parametric dielectric function model

    Wagner, J.; Ramakrishnan, A.; Obloh, H.; Kunzer, M.; Koehler, K.; Johs, B.

    2000-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been used for the characterization of AlGaN/GaN and InGaN/GaN heterostructures. The resulting pseudodielectric function spectra were analyzed using a multilayer approach, describing the dielectric functions of the individual layers by a parametric oscillator model. From this analysis, the dielectric function spectra of GaN, Al x Ga 1-x N (x le 0.16), and In 0.13 Ga 0.87 N were deduced. Further, the dependence of the Al x Ga 1-x N band gap energy on the Al mole fraction was derived and compared with photoluminescence data recorded on the same material. The SE band gap data are compatible with a bowing parameter close to 1 eV for the composition dependence of the Al x Ga 1-x N gap energy. Finally, the parametric dielectric functions have been used to model the pseudodielectric function spectrum of a complete GaN/AlGaN/InGaN LED structure

  15. Bipolar characteristics of AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN double heterojunction structure with AlGaN as buffer layer

    Peng, Enchao; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Hongling; Wang, Cuimei; Yin, Haibo; Chen, Hong; Feng, Chun; Jiang, Lijuan; Hou, Xun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •2DEG and 2DHG coexist in the AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN DH-structure. •The sheet densities of 2DEG and 2DHG vary with buffer Al content and GaN thickness. •The conditions for the disappearance of 2DHG are discussed. •Increasing buffer Al content provides better electron confinement. •Dislocation scattering is reduced in the DH-structure. -- Abstract: This is a theoretical study of AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN double heterojunction (DH) structure with AlGaN as buffer layer. Our calculation shows that as the buffer Al content increases, though two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) sheet density decreases, the channel back-barrier caused by polarization-induced electric field in GaN provides better electron confinement. And under certain conditions the DH-structure shows bipolar characteristics, with an additional two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) formed at GaN/AlGaN interface. The influence of the buffer Al content and GaN channel thickness on the 2DEG and 2DHG sheet densities are investigated, and the conditions for the disappearance of 2DHG are discussed. Also, the mobility inhibited by dislocation scattering is enhanced in DH-structure due to the enhancement of screening effect of the 2DEG

  16. Gold free contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Hajlasz, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Transistors and diodes based on AlGaN/GaN are suitable candidates for high-voltage and high-speed electronics due to the GaN material properties such as wide bandgap, large breakdown field, high electron saturation velocity and good thermal conductivity. When thin AlGaN layer is grown epitaxially on

  17. Gas sensing with AlGaN/GaN 2DEG channels

    Offermans, P.; Vitushinsky, R.; Crego-Calama, M.; Brongersma, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN shows great promise as a generic platform for (bio-)chemical sensing because of its robustness and intrinsic sensitivity to surface charge or dipoles. Here, we employ the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the interface of AlGaN/GaN layers grown on Si substrates for the

  18. Exploring the radiosynthesis and in vitro characteristics of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9

    Jensen, Svend Borup; Käkelä, Meeri; Jødal, Lars

    2017-01-01

    (Siglec-9) "CARLSLSWRGLTLCPSK" bind to VAP-1 and hence makes the radioactive analogues of this compound ([68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9) interesting as a non-invasive visualizing marker of inflammation. Three different approaches to the radiosynthesis of [68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 are presented and compared...

  19. Characterization of GaN/AlGaN epitaxial layers grown

    GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers are grown by a metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) system. The crystalline quality of these epitaxially grown layers is studied by different characterization techniques. PL measurements indicate band edge emission peak at 363.8 nm and 312 nm for GaN and AlGaN layers ...

  20. Exciton binding energy in wurtzite InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Jae; Kim, Hwa-Min

    2004-01-01

    The internal field and carrier density effects on the exciton binding energies in wurtzite (WZ) InGaN/GaN quantum-well (QW) structures are investigated using the multiband effective-mass theory, and are compared with those obtained from the at-band model and with those of GaN/AlGaN QW structures. The exciton binding energy is significantly reduced with increasing sheet carrier density, suggesting that excitons are nearly bleached at densities around 10 12 cm -2 for both InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN QW structures. With the inclusion of the internal field, the exciton binding energy is substantialy reduced compared to that of the at-band model in the investigated region of the wells. This can be explained by a decrease in the momentum matrix element and an increase in the inverse screening length due to the internal field. The exciton binding energy of the InGaN/GaN structure is smaller than that of the GaN/AlGaN structure because InGaN/GaN structures have a smaller momentum matrix element and a larger inverse screening length than GaN/AlGaN structures.

  1. InGaAs and GaAsSb strain reducing layers covering InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Hospodková, Alice; Hulicius, Eduard; Pangrác, Jiří; Oswald, Jiří; Vyskočil, Jan; Kuldová, Karla; Šimeček, Tomislav; Hazdra, P.; Caha, O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 8 (2010), 1383-1387 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100719; GA ČR GA202/09/0676; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : low dimensional structures * photoluminescence * low-pressure MOVPE * InAs/GaAs quantum dots * semiconducting III/V materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.737, year: 2010

  2. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors with Multi-MgxNy/GaN Buffer

    Chang, P. C.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, Z. H.; Chang, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer. Compared with conventional HEMT devices with a low-temperature GaN buffer, smaller gate and source-drain leakage current could be achieved with this new buffer design. Consequently, the electron mobility was larger for the proposed device due to the reduction of defect density and the corresponding improvement of crystalline quality as result of using the multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer.

  3. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors with Multi-MgxNy/GaN Buffer

    P. C. Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer. Compared with conventional HEMT devices with a low-temperature GaN buffer, smaller gate and source-drain leakage current could be achieved with this new buffer design. Consequently, the electron mobility was larger for the proposed device due to the reduction of defect density and the corresponding improvement of crystalline quality as result of using the multi-MgxNy/GaN buffer.

  4. ECV profiling of GaAs and GaN HEMT heterostructures

    Yakovlev, G.; Zubkov, V.

    2018-03-01

    AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs and AlGaN/GaN HEMT heterostructures were investigated by means of electrochemical capacitance-voltage technique. A set of test structures were fabricated using various doping techniques: standard doping, δ-doping GaAs pHEMT and nondoping GaN HEMT. The concentration profiles of free charge carriers across the samples were experimentally obtained. The QW filling was analyzed and compared for different mechanisms of emitter doping and 2DEG origins.

  5. Thermogenic effects of sibutramine and its metabolites

    Connoley, Ian P; Liu, Yong-Ling; Frost, Ian; Reckless, Ian P; Heal, David J; Stock, Michael J

    1999-01-01

    The thermogenic activity of the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor sibutramine (BTS 54524; Reductil) was investigated by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) in rats treated with sibutramine or its two pharmacologically-active metabolites. Sibutramine caused a dose-dependent rise in VO2, with a dose of 10 mg kg−1 of sibutramine or its metabolites producing increases of up to 30% that were sustained for at least 6 h, and accompanied by significant increases (0.5–1.0°C) in body temperature. Based on the accumulation in vivo of radiolabelled 2-deoxy-[3H]-glucose, sibutramine had little or no effect on glucose utilization in most tissues, but caused an 18 fold increase in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Combined high, non-selective doses (20 mg kg−1) of the β-adrenoceptor antagonists, atenolol and ICI 118551, inhibited completely the VO2 response to sibutramine, but the response was unaffected by low, β1-adrenoceptor-selective (atenolol) or β2-adrenoceptor-selective (ICI 118551) doses (1 mg kg−1). The ganglionic blocking agent, chlorisondamine (15 mg kg−1), inhibited completely the VO2 response to the metabolites of sibutramine, but had no effect on the thermogenic response to the β3-adrenoceptor-selective agonist BRL 35135. Similar thermogenic responses were produced by simultaneous injection of nisoxetine and fluoxetine at doses (30 mg kg−1) that had no effect on VO2 when injected individually. It is concluded that stimulation of thermogenesis by sibutramine requires central reuptake inhibition of both serotonin and noradrenaline, resulting in increased efferent sympathetic activation of BAT thermogenesis via β3-adrenoceptor, and that this contributes to the compound's activity as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:10217544

  6. Temperature Dependence of the Energy Band Diagram of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    Yanli Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of the energy band diagram of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was investigated by theoretical calculation and experiment. Through solving Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently by using the Silvaco Atlas software, the energy band diagram with varying temperature was calculated. The results indicate that the conduction band offset of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure decreases with increasing temperature in the range of 7 K to 200 K, which means that the depth of quantum well at AlGaN/GaN interface becomes shallower and the confinement of that on two-dimensional electron gas reduces. The theoretical calculation results are verified by the investigation of temperature dependent photoluminescence of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure. This work provides important theoretical and experimental basis for the performance degradation of AlGaN/GaN HEMT with increasing temperature.

  7. Study of GaN nanorods converted from β-Ga2O3

    Li, Yuewen; Xiong, Zening; Zhang, Dongdong; Xiu, Xiangqian; Liu, Duo; Wang, Shuang; Hua, Xuemei; Xie, Zili; Tao, Tao; Liu, Bin; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2018-05-01

    We report here high-quality β-Ga2O3 nanorods (NRs) grown on sapphire substrates by hydrothermal method. Ammoniating the β-Ga2O3 NRs results in strain-free wurtzite gallium nitride (GaN) NRs. It was shown by XRD and Raman spectroscopy that β-Ga2O3 was partially converted to GaN/β-Ga2O3 at 1000 °C and then completely converted to GaN NRs at 1050 °C, as confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). There is no band-edge emission of β-Ga2O3 in the cathodoluminescence spectrum, and only a deep-level broad emission observed at 3.68-3.73 eV. The band edge emission (3.39 eV) of GaN NRs converted from β-Ga2O3 can also be observed.

  8. Ohmic contacts to n+-GaN capped AlGaN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Wang Liang; Mohammed, Fitih M.; Ofuonye, Benedict; Adesida, Ilesanmi

    2007-01-01

    Investigations of Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contact formation, premetallization plasma treatment effects, and interfacial reactions for n + -GaN capped AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures are presented. Ti thickness played an important role in determining contact performance. Transmission electron microscopy studies confirmed that thick Ti layer was necessary to fully consume the GaN cap and the top of AlGaN to enable a higher tunneling current flow. A direct correlation of plasma treatment conditions with I-V linearity, current level, and contact performance was established. The plasma-affected region is believed to extend over 20 nm into the AlGaN and GaN

  9. Analysis of arsenical metabolites in biological samples.

    Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli; Drobna, Zuzana; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J

    2009-11-01

    Quantitation of iAs and its methylated metabolites in biological samples provides dosimetric information needed to understand dose-response relations. Here, methods are described for separation of inorganic and mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals by thin layer chromatography. This method has been extensively used to track the metabolism of the radionuclide [(73)As] in a variety of in vitro assay systems. In addition, a hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometric method is described for the quantitation of arsenicals in biological samples. This method uses pH-selective hydride generation to differentiate among arsenicals containing trivalent or pentavalent arsenic.

  10. Durability testing of the high-capacity GA-4/GA-9 trailer

    Zimmer, A.; Lyon, T.

    1995-01-01

    GA designed trailers to transport the GA-4 and GA-9 LWT from-reactor spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. GA designed and fabricated the GA-9 trailer to ANSI N14.30 requirements and is now performing a durability test at the AlliedSignal Automotive Proving Grounds. The trailer, simulated cask and tractor. The test program objective is to evaluate and improve, as necessary, the trailer's durability, reliability and performance

  11. [Identification of saponins from Panax notoginseng in metabolites of rats].

    Shen, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yin; Qiu, Shou-Bei; Zhu, Fen-Xia; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Tang, Dao-Quan; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-01

    UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS was used to identify metabolites in rat blood, urine and feces after the administration of n-butanol extract derived from steamed notoginseng. The metabolic process of saponins came from steamed notoginseng was analyzed. The metabolites were processed by PeakView software, and identified according to the structural characteristics of prototype compounds and the accurate qualitative and quantitative changes of common metabolic pathways. Four saponins metabolites were identified based on MS/MS information of metabolites, namely ginsenoside Rh₄, Rk₃, Rk₁, Rg₅,and their 15 metabolites were verified. The metabolic pathways of the four ginsenosides in n-butanol extract included glucuronidation, desugar, sulfation, dehydromethylation, and branch loss. The metabolites of main active saponin components derived from steamed Panax notoginseng were analyzed from the perspective of qualitative analysis. And the material basis for the efficacy of steamed notoginseng was further clarified. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. Modeling and optimization of a double-well double-barrier GaN/AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diode

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Bo; Gong, Min; Shi, Ruiying

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a GaN layer as a sub-quantum well for an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) on device performance has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. The introduction of the GaN layer as the sub-quantum well turns the dominant transport mechanism of RTD from the 3D-2D model to the 2D-2D model and increases the energy difference between tunneling energy levels. It can also lower the effective height of the emitter barrier. Consequently, the peak current and peak-to-valley current difference of RTD have been increased. The optimal GaN sub-quantum well parameters are found through analyzing the electrical performance, energy band, and transmission coefficient of RTD with different widths and depths of the GaN sub-quantum well. The most pronounced electrical parameters, a peak current density of 5800 KA/cm2, a peak-to-valley current difference of 1.466 A, and a peak-to-valley current ratio of 6.35, could be achieved by designing RTD with the active region structure of GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N/GaN/Al0.2Ga0.8 N (3 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm/1.5 nm).

  13. A latex metabolite benefits plant fitness under root herbivore attack

    Huber, M.; Epping, J.; Gronover, C.S.; Fricke, J.; Aziz, Z.; Brillatz, T.; Swyers, M.; Köllner, T.G.; Vogel, H.; Hammerbacher, A.; Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Robert, C.A.M.; Verhoeven, K.; Preite, V.; Gershenzon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major n...

  14. Novel pyrazine metabolites found in polymyxin biosynthesis by Paenibacillus polymyxa

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, Anne M; Lauritsen, Frants R

    2003-01-01

    A complex mixture of methyl-branched alkyl-substituted pyrazines was found in the growth medium of the polymyxin-producing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa, and of these, seven are new natural compounds. A total of 19 pyrazine metabolites were identified. The dominant metabolite was 2...... supplementation. The other pyrazine metabolites, all related pyrazines with either one, two or three alkyl substituents, were identified by means of their mass spectral data and/or co-elution with authentic standards....

  15. Cyanobacteria as Cell Factories to Produce Plant Secondary Metabolites

    Xue, Yong; He, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria represent a promising platform for the production of plant secondary metabolites. Their capacity to express plant P450 proteins, which have essential functions in the biosynthesis of many plant secondary metabolites, makes cyanobacteria ideal for this purpose, and their photosynthetic capability allows cyanobacteria to grow with simple nutrient inputs. This review summarizes the advantages of using cyanobacteria to transgenically produce plant secondary metabolites. Some techniq...

  16. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  17. Photoluminescence study of the nitrogen content effect on GaAs/GaAs1-xNx/GaAs/AlGaAs: (Si) quantum well

    Hamdouni, A.; Bousbih, F.; Ben bouzid, S.; Aloulou, S.; Harmand, J.C.; Chtourou, R.

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of nitrogen content in modulation-doped GaAs/GaAs 1-x N x /GaAs/GaAlAs:(Si) quantum well using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The samples were grown on GaAs (001) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy with different nitrogen compositions. The variation of the nitrogen composition from 0.04% to 0.32% associated to the bi-dimensional electron gas gives a new interaction mode between the nitrogen localized states and the GaAs 1-x N x /GaAs energies levels. The red-shift observed in photoluminescence spectra as function of nitrogen content has been interpreted in the frame of the band anticrossing model

  18. Stimulated emission in heterostructures with double InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells, grown on GaAs and Ge/Si(001) substrates

    Yablonsky, A. N., E-mail: yablonsk@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Morozov, S. V.; Gaponova, D. M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Shengurov, V. G.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Baidus’, N. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Krasil’nik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    We report the observation of stimulated emission in heterostructures with double InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells, grown on Si(001) substrates with the application of a relaxed Ge buffer layer. Stimulated emission is observed at 77 K under pulsed optical pumping at a wavelength of 1.11 μm, i.e., in the transparency range of bulk silicon. In similar InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures grown on GaAs substrates, room-temperature stimulated emission is observed at 1.17 μm. The results obtained are promising for integration of the structures into silicon-based optoelectronics.

  19. Exometabolomic Analysis of Cross-Feeding Metabolites.

    Lubbe, Andrea; Bowen, Benjamin P; Northen, Trent

    2017-10-04

    Microbial consortia have the potential to perform complex, industrially important tasks. The design of microbial consortia requires knowledge of the substrate preferences and metabolic outputs of each member, to allow understanding of potential interactions such as competition and beneficial metabolic exchange. Here, we used exometabolite profiling to follow the resource processing by a microbial co-culture of two biotechnologically relevant microbes, the bacterial cellulose degrader Cellulomonas fimi, and the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We characterized the substrate preferences of the two strains on compounds typically found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This allowed prediction that specific sugars resulting from hemicellulose polysaccharide degradation by C. fimi may serve as a cross-feeding metabolites to Y. lipolytica in co-culture. We also showed that products of ionic liquid-treated switchgrass lignocellulose degradation by C. fimi were channeled to Y. lipolytica in a co-culture. Additionally, we observed metabolites, such as shikimic acid accumulating in the co-culture supernatants, suggesting the potential for producing interesting co-products. Insights gained from characterizing the exometabolite profiles of individual and co-cultures of the two strains can help to refine this interaction, and guide strategies for making this an industrially viable co-culture to produce valuable products from lignocellulose material.

  20. Urinary estrogen metabolites and breast cancer

    Dallal, Cher M; Stone, Roslyn A; Cauley, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Circulating estrogens are associated with increased breast cancer risk, yet the role of estrogen metabolites in breast carcinogenesis remains unclear. This combined analysis of 5 published studies evaluates urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16a-hydroxyestrone (16a-OHE1......), and their ratio (2:16a-OHE1) in relation to breast cancer risk. ¿Methods: Primary data on 726 premenopausal women (183 invasive breast cancer cases and 543 controls) and 1,108 postmenopausal women (385 invasive breast cancer cases and 723 controls) were analyzed. Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured using...... premenopausal 2:16a-OHE1 was suggestive of reduced breast cancer risk overall (study-adjusted ORIIIvsI=0.80; 95% CI: 0.49-1.32) and for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) subtype (ORIIIvsI=0.33; 95% CI: 0.13-0.84). Among postmenopausal women, 2:16a-OHE1 was unrelated to breast cancer risk (study-adjusted ORIIIvs...

  1. Function of plant defense secondary metabolite in cytokinin degradation

    Frébortová, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2010), s. 523-525 ISSN 1559-2316 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/05/0448; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytokinin dehydrogenace * 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one * phenoxyl radiál Subject RIV: EF - Botanics http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/psb/article/10965/

  2. Reparation and Immunomodulating Properties of Bacillus sp. Metabolites from Permafrost.

    Kalenova, L F; Melnikov, V P; Besedin, I M; Bazhin, A S; Gabdulin, M A; Kolyvanova, S S

    2017-09-01

    An ointment containing metabolites of Bacillus sp. microorganisms isolated from permafrost samples was applied onto the skin wound of BALB/c mice. Metabolites isolated during culturing of Bacillus sp. at 37°C produced a potent therapeutic effect and promoted wound epithelialization by 30% in comparison with the control (ointment base) and by 20% in comparison with Solcoseryl. Treatment with Bacillus sp. metabolites stimulated predominantly humoral immunity, reduced the time of wound contraction and the volume of scar tissue, and promoted complete hair recovery. These metabolites can be considered as modulators of the wound process with predominance of regeneration mechanisms.

  3. Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    Shu, Xiang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Yu, Danxia; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jia, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 -10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer. © 2018 UICC.

  4. Novel pyrazine metabolites found in polymyxin biosynthesis by Paenibacillus polymyxa

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, Anne M; Lauritsen, Frants R

    2003-01-01

    A complex mixture of methyl-branched alkyl-substituted pyrazines was found in the growth medium of the polymyxin-producing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa, and of these, seven are new natural compounds. A total of 19 pyrazine metabolites were identified. The dominant metabolite was 2,5-diisoprop......A complex mixture of methyl-branched alkyl-substituted pyrazines was found in the growth medium of the polymyxin-producing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa, and of these, seven are new natural compounds. A total of 19 pyrazine metabolites were identified. The dominant metabolite was 2...

  5. Two new Np--Ga phases: α-NpGa2 and metastable m-NpGa2

    Giessen, B.C.; Elliott, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Following an earlier study of metastable Np-rich Np--Ga alloys, rapidly quenched Np--Ga alloys with 63 to 80 at. pct. Ga were prepared and studied. Two new NpGa 2 phases, both with an AlB 2 type structure, were found: α-NpGa 2 , with a = 4.246A, c = 4.060A, c/a = 0.956, and m-NpGa 2 , with a = 4.412A, c = 3.642A, c/a = 0.825. While m-NpGa 2 was observed only in very fast quenched (splat cooled) samples and appears to be metastable, α-NpGa 2 is probably an equilibrium phase. In a splat cooled alloy with 75 at. pct. Ga, another, unidentified, metastable phase was observed. Crystal chemical discussions of atomic volumes, interatomic distances and axial ratios are given; the volume difference between the two forms of NpGa 2 is correlated with a valence change of Np

  6. Biologically Active Metabolites Produced by the Basidiomycete Quambalaria cyanescens

    Stodůlková, Eva; Císařová, I.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Chudíčková, Milada; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Pavlů, B.; Černý, J.; Flieger, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2015) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-16565S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ENDOPHYTIC FUNGUS * SP NOV * NAPHTHOQUINONE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  7. Effects of space flight on DNA mutation and secondary metabolites of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.)

    GAO WenYuan; LI KeFeng; YAN Shuo; GAO XiuMei; HU LiMin

    2009-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) seeds were flown on a recoverable satellite for 18 days(the average radiation dose in the flight recovery module was 0.102 mGy/d, the distance from flight apogee to earth was 350 km, gravity 10~(-6)). After returning to earth, the seeds were germinated and grown to maturity. The parallel ground-based seeds were also planted under the same conditions. The leaves of licorice were used for inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis and the two main secondary metabolites in one-year-old roots were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Among 22 random primers used in this experiment, 6 primers generated different DNA band types. Analysis of HPLC showed that the content of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and liquiritin (LQ) in the roots from seeds flown in space was respectively 2.19, 1.18 times higher than that of the control group. The results demonstrated that the extraterrestrial environment induced mutagenic effects on licorice and affected its secondary metabolites. These changes indicated that extraterrestrial orbit is possible means of breeding of licorice so as to preserve this endangered medicinal plant.

  8. Effects of space flight on DNA mutation and secondary metabolites of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.)

    2009-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) seeds were flown on a recoverable satellite for 18 days(the average radiation dose in the flight recovery module was 0.102 mGy/d, the distance from flight apogee to earth was 350 km, gravity 10-6). After returning to earth, the seeds were germinated and grown to maturity. The parallel ground-based seeds were also planted under the same conditions. The leaves of licorice were used for inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis and the two main secondary me-tabolites in one-year-old roots were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Among 22 random primers used in this experiment, 6 primers generated different DNA band types. Analysis of HPLC showed that the content of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and liquiritin (LQ) in the roots from seeds flown in space was respectively 2.19, 1.18 times higher than that of the control group. The results demonstrated that the extraterrestrial environment induced mutagenic effects on licorice and affected its secondary metabolites. These changes indicated that extraterrestrial orbit is possible means of breeding of licorice so as to preserve this endangered medicinal plant.

  9. Density Functional Theory Study on Defect Feature of AsGaGaAs in Gallium Arsenide

    Deming Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the defect feature of AsGaGaAs defect in gallium arsenide clusters in detail by using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT. Our calculations reveal that the lowest donor level of AsGaGaAs defect on the gallium arsenide crystal surface is 0.85 eV below the conduction band minimum, while the lowest donor level of the AsGaGaAs defect inside the gallium arsenide bulk is 0.83 eV below the bottom of the conduction band, consistent with gallium arsenide EL2 defect level of experimental value (Ec-0.82 eV. This suggests that AsGaGaAs defect is one of the possible gallium arsenide EL2 deep-level defects. Moreover, our results also indicate that the formation energies of internal AsGaGaAs and surface AsGaGaAs defects are predicted to be around 2.36 eV and 5.54 eV, respectively. This implies that formation of AsGaGaAs defect within the crystal is easier than that of surface. Our results offer assistance in discussing the structure of gallium arsenide deep-level defect and its effect on the material.

  10. Synthesis of Linezolid Metabolites PNU-142300 and PNU-142586 toward the Exploration of Metabolite-Related Events.

    Hanaya, Kengo; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Yokoyama, Yuta; Kizu, Junko; Shoji, Mitsuru; Sugai, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Linezolid (1) is an oxazolidinone antibiotic that is partially metabolized in vivo via ring cleavage of its morpholine moiety to mainly form two metabolites, PNU-142300 (2) and PNU-142586 (3). It is supposed that accumulation of 2 and 3 in patients with renal insufficiency may cause thrombocytopenia, one of the adverse effects of linezolid. However, the poor availability of 2 and 3 has hindered further investigation of the clinical significance of the accumulation of these metabolites. In this paper, we synthesized metabolites 2 and 3 via a common synthetic intermediate, 4; this will encourage further exploration of events related to these metabolites and lead to improved clinical use of linezolid.

  11. Identification of metabolites of the tryptase inhibitor CRA-9249: observation of a metabolite derived from an unexpected hydroxylation pathway.

    Yu, Walter; Dener, Jeffrey M; Dickman, Daniel A; Grothaus, Paul; Ling, Yun; Liu, Liang; Havel, Chris; Malesky, Kimberly; Mahajan, Tania; O'Brian, Colin; Shelton, Emma J; Sperandio, David; Tong, Zhiwei; Yee, Robert; Mordenti, Joyce J

    2006-08-01

    The metabolites of the tryptase inhibitor CRA-9249 were identified after exposure to liver microsomes. CRA-9249 was found to be degraded rapidly in liver microsomes from rabbit, dog, cynomolgus monkey, and human, and less rapidly in microsomes from rat. The key metabolites included cleavage of an aryl ether, in addition to an unexpected hydroxylation of the amide side chain adjacent to the amide nitrogen. The chemical structures of both metabolites were confirmed by synthesis and comparison to material isolated from the liver microsomes. Several suspected hydroxylated metabolites were also synthesized and analyzed as part of the structure identification process.

  12. Energetics of Mg incorporation at GaN(0001) and GaN(0001¯) surfaces

    Sun, Qiang; Selloni, Annabella; Myers, T. H.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2006-04-01

    By using density functional calculations in the generalized gradient approximation, we investigate the energetics of Mg adsorption and incorporation at GaN(0001) and GaN(0001¯) surfaces under various Ga and Mg coverage conditions as well as in presence of light or electron beam-induced electronic excitation. We find significant differences in Mg incorporation between Ga- and N-polar surfaces. Mg incorporation is easier at the Ga-polar surface, but high Mg coverages are found to cause important distortions which locally change the polarity from Ga to N polar. At the N-rich and moderately Ga-rich GaN(0001) surface, 0.25 ML of Mg substituting Ga in the top bilayer strongly reduce the surface diffusion barriers of Ga and N adatoms, in agreement with the surfactant effect observed in experiments. As the Mg coverage exceeds 0.5 ML, partial incorporation in the subsurface region (second bilayer) becomes favorable. A surface structure with 0.5 ML of incorporated Mg in the top bilayer and 0.25 ML in the second bilayer is found to be stable over a wide range of Ga chemical potential. At the Ga bilayer-terminated GaN(0001) surface, corresponding to Ga-rich conditions, configurations where Mg is incorporated in the interface region between the metallic Ga bilayer and the underlying GaN bilayer appear to be favored. At the N-polar surface, Mg is not incorporated under N-rich or moderately Ga-rich conditions, whereas incorporation in the adlayer may take place under Ga-rich conditions. In the presence of light or electron beam induced excitation, energy differences between Mg incorporated at the surface and in deeper layers are reduced so that the tendency toward surface segregation is also reduced.

  13. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb – UMR 5221, CNRS and University Montpellier, Case courier 074, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe [CRHEA-CNRS Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  14. Characterization of Urinary Phthalate Metabolites Among Custodians

    Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Simcox, Nancy J.; Wakai, Sara; Lu, Chensheng; Garza, Jennifer L.; Cherniack, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in consumer, personal care, and cleaning products, have been linked to adverse health effects. Our goal was to characterize urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and to identify work and nonwork sources among custodians using traditional cleaning chemicals and ‘green’ or environmentally preferable products (EPP). Sixty-eight custodians provided four urine samples on a workday (first void, before shift, end of shift, and before bedtime) and trained observers recorded cleaning tasks and types of products used (traditional, EPP, or disinfectant) hourly over the work shifts. Questionnaires were used to assess personal care product use. Four different phthalate metabolites [monoethyl phthalate (MEP), monomethyl phthalate (MMP), mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), and monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP)] were quantified using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Geometric means (GM) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for creatinine-adjusted urinary phthalate concentrations. Mixed effects univariate and multivariate modeling, using a random intercept for each individual, was performed to identify predictors of phthalate metabolites including demographics, workplace factors, and personal care product use. Creatinine-adjusted urinary concentrations [GM (95% CI)] of MEP, MMP, MEHP, and MBzP were 107 (91.0–126), 2.69 (2.18–3.30), 6.93 (6.00–7.99), 8.79 (7.84–9.86) µg g−1, respectively. An increasing trend in phthalate concentrations from before to after shift was not observed. Creatinine-adjusted urinary MEP was significantly associated with frequency of traditional cleaning chemical intensity in the multivariate model after adjusting for potential confounding by demographics, workplace factors, and personal care product use. While numerous demographics, workplace factors, and personal care products were statistically significant univariate predictors of MMP, MEHP, and MBzP, few

  15. Self-diffusion in 69Ga121Sb/71Ga123Sb isotope heterostructures

    Bracht, H.; Nicols, S. P.; Haller, E. E.; Silveira, Juan Pedro; Briones Fernández-Pola, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Gallium and antimony self-diffusion experiments have been performed in undoped 69Ga121Sb/71Ga123Sb isotope heterostructures at temperatures between 571 and 708 °C under Sb- and Ga-rich ambients. Ga and Sb profiles measured with secondary ion mass spectrometry reveal that Ga diffuses faster than Sb by several orders of magnitude. This strongly suggests that the two self-atom species diffuse independently on their own sublattices. Experimental results lead us to conclude that Ga and Sb diffusio...

  16. Secondary Metabolite Profiles and Mating Populations of Fusarium species in Section Liseola Associated with Bakanae Disease of Rice

    Nur Ain Izzati, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 25 strains of Fusarium species that belong to F. fujikuroi (a pathogen of bakanae disease, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. subglutinans and F. verticillioides were isolated from rice plants showing typical bakanae symptoms in Malaysia and Indonesia and screened for their secondary metabolites. The objectives of the studies were to determine the physiological variability based on production of moniliformin (MON, fumonisin (FB1, gibberellic acid (GA3 and fusaric acid (FA as well as to ascertain the mating populations (MPs within the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex based on their ability to produce perithecia and viable ascospores. Production of GA3 could be used to separate F. fujikuroi that belongs to MP-C from other species. In crosses with seven standard testers of MPs, 76% of strains could be assigned to at least one of the G. fujikuroi species complex namely MP-A (G. moniliformis, MP-B (G. sacchari, MP-C (G. fujikuroi and MP-D (G. intermedia. Single strain (M3237P that was assigned as MP-C, and has also been identified morphologically as F. fujikuroi was also crossed-fertile with MP-D tester. The secondary metabolites profiles and the presence of MP-A, MP-B, MP-C and MP-D strains on samples of bakanae-infected rice plants are new records in Malaysia.

  17. Encapsulates for Food Bioconversions and Metabolite Production

    Breguet, Véronique; Vojinovic, Vojislav; Marison, Ian W.

    The control of production costs in the food industry must be very strict as a result of the relatively low added value of food products. Since a wide variety of enzymes and/or cells are employed in the food industry for starch processing, cheese making, food preservation, lipid hydrolysis and other applications, immobilization of the cells and/or enzymes has been recognized as an attractive approach to improving food processes while minimizing costs. This is due to the fact that biocatalyst immobilization allows for easier separation/purification of the product and reutilization of the biocatalyst. The advantages of the use of immobilized systems are many, and they have a special relevance in the area of food technology, especially because industrial processes using immobilized biosystems are usually characterized by lower capital/energy costs and better logistics. The main applications of immobilization, related to the major processes of food bioconversions and metabolite production, will be described and discussed in this chapter.

  18. Formation of reactive metabolites from benzene

    Snyder, R.; Jowa, L.; Witz, G.; Kalf, G.; Rushmore, T.

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver mitoplasts were incubated first with [ 3 H]dGTP, to form DNA labeled in G, and then with [ 14 C]benzene. The DNA was isolated and upon isopycnic density gradient centrifugation in CsCl yielded a single fraction of DNA labeled with both [ 3 H] and [ 14 C]. These data are consistent with the covalent binding of one or more metabolites of benzene to DNA. The DNA was enzymatically hydrolyzed to deoxynucleosides and chromatographed to reveal at least seven deoxyguanosine adducts. Further studies with labeled deoxyadenine revealed one adduct on deoxyadenine. [ 3 H]Deoxyguanosine was reacted with [ 14 C]hydroquinone or benzoquinone. The product was characterized using uv, fluorescence, mass and NMR spectroscopy. A proposed structure is described. (orig.)

  19. Engineering of secondary metabolite production in streptomycetes

    Robertsen, Helene Lunde; Gram, Lone

    Streptomycetes are known for their ability to produce a range of different secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, immunosuppressive, anti-fungals, and anti-cancer compounds. Of these compounds, antibiotics play an important role in the clinics for treatment of both mild and severe bacterial...... the computational prediction of suitable 20 bp protospacers for the single guide RNAs and a USER-cloning method for construction of the CRISPR plasmids. Additional improvement to the system was achieved through the development of an optimised USER assembly workflow for cheaper and faster plasmid construction....... The workflow was verified by manual knock-down of two biosynthetic gene clusters in model organism Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), which confirmed the applicability of the system. A second part of the thesis was devoted to engineering of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, which is a known producer of the narrow...

  20. Ga and Pt NMR study of UPtGa sub 5 and UNiGa sub 5

    Kato, H; Tokunaga, Y; Tokiwa, Y; Ikeda, S; Onuki, Y; Kambe, S; Walstedt, R E

    2003-01-01

    Ga and Pt NMR measurements have been carried out for two isomorphs compounds, UPtGa sub 5 and UNiGa sub 5 , which exhibit different magnetic structures below T sub N. Knight shift K measurements in the paramagnetic region are reported here. The transferred hyperfine coupling constants at Ga and Pt sites are determined. The temperature independent part K sub 0 of K, which probes the conduction electron polarization at the ligand site, has been successfully evaluated. A nearly identical conduction electron structure in the paramagnetic region is suggested for these two compounds. The origin of the different magnetic structures is discussed.

  1. Methionine Metabolites in Patients With Sepsis.

    Wexler, Orren; Gough, Michael S; Morgan, Mary Anne M; Mack, Cynthia M; Apostolakos, Michael J; Doolin, Kathleen P; Mooney, Robert A; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Pietropaoli, Anthony P

    2018-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by microvascular dysfunction and thrombophilia. Several methionine metabolites may be relevant to this sepsis pathophysiology. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) serves as the methyl donor for trans-methylation reactions. S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is the by-product of these reactions and serves as the precursor to homocysteine. Relationships between plasma total homocysteine concentrations (tHcy) and vascular disease and thrombosis are firmly established. We hypothesized that SAM, SAH, and tHcy levels are elevated in patients with sepsis and associated with mortality. This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study consisting of 109 patients with sepsis and 50 control participants without acute illness. The study was conducted in the medical and surgical intensive care units of the University of Rochester Medical Center. Methionine, SAM, SAH, and tHcy concentrations were compared in patients with sepsis versus control participants and in sepsis survivors versus nonsurvivors. Patients with sepsis had significantly higher plasma SAM and SAH concentrations than control participants (SAM: 164 [107-227] vs73 [59-87 nM], P sepsis patients compared to healthy control participants (4 [2-6]) vs 7 [5-9] μM; P = .04). In multivariable analysis, quartiles of SAM, SAH, and tHcy were independently associated with sepsis ( P = .006, P = .05, and P Sepsis nonsurvivors had significantly higher plasma SAM and SAH concentrations than survivors (SAM: 223 [125-260] vs 136 [96-187] nM; P = .01; SAH: 139 [81-197] vs 86 [55-130] nM, P = .006). Plasma tHcy levels were similar in survivors vs nonsurvivors. The associations between SAM or SAH and hospital mortality were no longer significant after adjusting for renal dysfunction. Methionine metabolite concentrations are abnormal in sepsis and linked with clinical outcomes. Further study is required to determine whether these abnormalities have pathophysiologic significance.

  2. Photoluminescence characterization of GaAs/GaAs0.64P0.19Sb0.17/GaAs heterostructure

    Chen, J.Y.; Chen, B.H.; Huang, Y.S.; Chin, Y.C.; Tsai, H.S.; Lin, H.H.; Tiong, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial characteristics of GaAs/GaAs 0.64 P 0.19 Sb 0.17 GaAs heterostructures and emission properties of a quaternary GaAs 0.64 P 0.19 Sb 0.17 layer were studied by excitation-power- and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The GaAs-to-GaAsPSb upper interface related emission feature and signals from GaAsPSb and GaAs were observed and characterized. The upper interface related emission peak was attributed to the radiative recombination of spatially separated electron–hole pairs and suggesting the type-II alignment at the GaAs/GaAsPSb interface. The localized excitonic emission feature of GaAsPSb revealed a blueshift due to the saturation effect of localized states and showed a fast thermal-quench with the increase of temperature. The temperature variation of the band edge emission signal of GaAsPSb was found to follow that of GaAs closely. -- Highlights: ► PL characterization of GaAs/GaAsPSb/GaAs heterostructure. ► Type-II alignment at the GaAs/GaAsPSb interface. ► Near-band-edge emission lines of GaAsPSb

  3. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack

    Huber, M.; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, C.; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Kollner, T.G.; Vogel, H.; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A.M.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Preite, V.; Gershenzon, J.; Erb, M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under

  4. Pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children

    Kaijser, G. P.; de Kraker, J.; Bult, A.; Underberg, W. J.; Beijnen, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children was investigated. The patients received various doses of ifosfamide, mostly by continuous infusion, over several days. The penetration of ifosfamide and its metabolites into the cerebrospinal fluid was also studied in four cases.

  5. Effect of metabolites produced by Trichoderma species against ...

    Metabolites released from Trichoderma viride, T. polysporum, T. hamatum and T. aureoviride were tested in culture medium against Ceratocystis paradoxa, which causes black seed rot in oil palm sprouted seeds. The Trichoderma metabolites had similar fungistatic effects on the growth of C. paradoxa except those from T.

  6. Prototype of an intertwined secondary-metabolite supercluster

    Phillipp Wiemann; Chun-Jun. Guo; Jonathan M. Palmer; Relebohile Sekonyela; Clay C.C. Wang; Nancy P. Keller

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark trait of fungal secondary-metabolite gene clusters is well established, consisting of contiguous enzymatic and often regulatory gene(s) devoted to the production of a metabolite of a specific chemical class. Unexpectedly, we have found a deviation from this motif in a subtelomeric region of Aspergillus fumigatus. This region, under the...

  7. Metabolite characterization in serum samples from normal healthy ...

    Metabolite characterization in serum samples from normal healthy human subjects by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. D Misra, U Bajpai. Abstract. One and two dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been employed to characterize the various metabolites of serum control healthy samples. Two dimensional heteronuclear ...

  8. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were...

  9. UV-guided isolation of fungal metabolites by HSCCC

    Dalsgaard, P.W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2005-01-01

    Analytical standardised reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) data can be helpful in finding a suitable solvent combination for isolation of fungal metabolites by high-speed counter current chromatography. Analysis of the distribution coefficient (K-D) of fungal metabolites in a series...... peptides from a crude fungal extract....

  10. Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolites: more than just aflatoxins

    Aspergillus flavus is best known for producing the family of potent carcinogenic secondary metabolites known as aflatoxins. However, this opportunistic plant and animal pathogen also produces numerous other secondary metabolites, many of which have also been shown to be toxic. While about forty of t...

  11. Synthesis of an Albendazole Metabolite: Characterization and HPLC Determination

    Mahler, Graciela; Davyt, Danilo; Gordon, Sandra; Incerti, Marcelo; Nunez, Ivana; Pezaroglo, Horacio; Scarone, Laura; Serra, Gloria; Silvera, Mauricio; Manta, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, students are introduced to the synthesis of an albendazole metabolite obtained by a sulfide oxidation reaction. Albendazole as well as its metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, are used as anthelmintic drugs. The oxidation reagent is H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] in acetic acid. The reaction is environmental friendly,…

  12. AlGaN nanocolumns and AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Ulloa, J.M.; Calleja, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Calleja, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.; Ploog, K.H. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    This work reports on the characterization of hexagonal, single crystal AlGaN nanocolumns with diameters in the range of 30 to 100 nm grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates. The change of the flux ratio between the Al and the total III-element controls the alloy composition. The Al composition trend versus the Al flux is consistent both with the E{sub 2} phonon energy values measured by inelastic light scattering and the luminescence emission peaks position. High quality low dimensional AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN heterostructures with five GaN quantum discs, 2 and 4 nm thick, embedded into the AlGaN columns, were designed in order to study the quantum confinement effects. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Characteristics study of 2DEG transport properties of AlGaN/GaN and AlGaAs/GaAs-based HEMT

    Lenka, T. R.; Panda, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Growth of wide bandgap material over narrow bandgap material, results into a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the heterointerface due to the conduction band discontinuity. In this paper the 2DEG transport properties of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is discussed and its effect on various characteristics such as 2DEG density, C-V characteristics and Sheet resistances for different mole fractions are presented. The obtained results are also compared with AlGaAs/GaAs-based HEMT for the same structural parameter as like AlGaN/GaN-based HEMT. The calculated results of electron sheet concentration as a function of the Al mole fraction are in excellent agreement with some experimental data available in the literature.

  14. Role of AlGaN/GaN interface traps on negative threshold voltage shift in AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Malik, Amit; Sharma, Chandan; Laishram, Robert; Bag, Rajesh Kumar; Rawal, Dipendra Singh; Vinayak, Seema; Sharma, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-04-01

    This article reports negative shift in the threshold-voltage in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with application of reverse gate bias stress. The device is biased in strong pinch-off and low drain to source voltage condition for a fixed time duration (reverse gate bias stress), followed by measurement of transfer characteristics. Negative threshold voltage shift after application of reverse gate bias stress indicates the presence of more carriers in channel as compared to the unstressed condition. We propose the presence of AlGaN/GaN interface states to be the reason of negative threshold voltage shift, and developed a process to electrically characterize AlGaN/GaN interface states. We verified the results with Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) ATLAS simulation and got a good match with experimental measurements.

  15. Novel urinary metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol in rats

    Chiku, S.; Hamamura, K.; Nakamura, T.

    1984-01-01

    A novel metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol was isolated from the urine of rats given d-3,4-[ 3 H 2 ]-delta-tocopherol intravenously. The metabolite was collected from the urine of rats given d-delta-tocopherol in the same manner as that of the labeled compound. It was found that the metabolites consisted of sulfate conjugates. The portion of the major metabolite released with sulfatase was determined to be 2,8-dimethyl-2-(2'-carboxyethyl)-6-chromanol by infrared spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and mass spectra. The proposed structure was confirmed by comparing the analytical results with those of a synthetically derived compound. As a result of the structural elucidation of this novel metabolite, a pathway for the biological transformation of delta-tocopherol is proposed which is different from that of alpha-tocopherol. A characteristic feature of the pathway is the absence of any opening of the chroman ring throughout the sequence

  16. Loss of metabolites from monkey striatum during PET with FDOPA

    Cumming, P; Munk, O L; Doudet, D

    2001-01-01

    diffusion of [(18)F]fluorodopamine metabolites from brain. Consequently, time-radioactivity recordings of striatum are progressively influenced by metabolite loss. In linear analyses, the net blood-brain clearance of FDOPA (K(D)(i), ml g(-1) min(-1)) can be corrected for this loss by the elimination rate...... constant k(Lin)(cl) (min(-1)). Similarly, the DOPA decarboxylation rate constant (k(D)(3), min(-1)) calculated by compartmental analysis can also be corrected for metabolite loss by the elimination rate constant k(DA)(9) (min(-1)). To compare the two methods, we calculated the two elimination rate...... of the estimate was substantially improved upon correction for metabolite loss. The rate constants for metabolite loss were higher in MPTP-lesioned monkey striatum than in normal striatum. The high correlation between individual estimates of k(Lin)(cl) and k(DA)(9) suggests that both rate constants reveal loss...

  17. Yeast synthetic biology for high-value metabolites.

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Juan; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, high-value metabolites have been produced through direct extraction from natural biological sources which are inefficient, given the low abundance of these compounds. On the other hand, these high-value metabolites are usually difficult to be synthesized chemically, due to their complex structures. In the last few years, the discovery of genes involved in the synthetic pathways of these metabolites, combined with advances in synthetic biology tools, has allowed the construction of increasing numbers of yeast cell factories for production of these metabolites from renewable biomass. This review summarizes recent advances in synthetic biology in terms of the use of yeasts as microbial hosts for the identification of the pathways involved in the synthesis, as well as for the production of high-value metabolites. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  18. (1) H-MRS processing parameters affect metabolite quantification

    Bhogal, Alex A; Schür, Remmelt R; Houtepen, Lotte C

    2017-01-01

    investigated the influence of model parameters and spectral quantification software on fitted metabolite concentration values. Sixty spectra in 30 individuals (repeated measures) were acquired using a 7-T MRI scanner. Data were processed by four independent research groups with the freedom to choose their own...... + NAAG/Cr + PCr and Glu/Cr + PCr, respectively. Metabolite quantification using identical (1) H-MRS data was influenced by processing parameters, basis sets and software choice. Locally preferred processing choices affected metabolite quantification, even when using identical software. Our results......Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) can be used to quantify in vivo metabolite levels, such as lactate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu). However, there are considerable analysis choices which can alter the accuracy or precision of (1) H-MRS metabolite quantification...

  19. Comparison of MOVPE grown GaAs, InGaAs and GaAsSb covering layers for different InAs/GaAs quantum dot applications

    Zíková, Markéta; Hospodková, Alice; Pangrác, Jiří; Oswald, Jiří; Hulicius, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 464, Apr (2017), s. 59-63 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : MOVPE * quantum dot * strain reducing layer * InAs * GaAsSb * InGaAs Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  20. Lithium compensation of GaAs

    Alexiev, D.; Tavendale, A.J.

    1988-08-01

    Defects generated following Li diffusion into GaAs were studied by optical deep level transient spectroscopy (ODLTS) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). In an exploratory series of experiments, the effect of Li diffusion on existing trap spectra, defect generation and as a means for the compensation of GaAs was studied. The variables included diffusion temperature, initial trap spectra of GaAs and annealing periods. Detailed measurements of trap energies were made

  1. Cation disorder in Ga1212.

    Greenwood, K B; Ko, D; Vander Griend, D A; Sarjeant, G M; Milgram, J W; Garrity, E S; DeLoach, D I; Poeppelmeier, K R; Salvador, P A; Mason, T O

    2000-07-24

    Substitution of calcium for strontium in LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb) materials at ambient pressure and 975 degrees C results in complete substitution of calcium for strontium in the lanthanum and praseodymium systems and partial substitution in the other lanthanide systems. The calcium saturation level depends on the size of the Ln cation, and in all cases, a decrease in the lattice parameters with calcium concentration was observed until a common, lower bound, average A-cation size is reached. Site occupancies from X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments for LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (x = 0 and x = 2) confirm that the A-cations distribute between the two blocking-layer sites and the active-layer site based on size. A quantitative link between cation distribution and relative site-specific cation enthalpy for calcium, strontium, and lanthanum within the gallate structure is derived. The cation distribution in other similar materials can potentially be modeled.

  2. GaN Bulk Growth and Epitaxy from Ca-Ga-N Solutions, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR proposal addresses the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of gallium nitride (GaN) films using nitrogen-enriched metal solutions. Growth of GaN from solutions...

  3. Tunable High efficiency Resonant Tunneling GaN/AlGaN MQW UV Detectors

    Wang, W. B; Zhang, S. K; Alfano, R. R

    2005-01-01

    ...)-based UV photodetectors. During the grant period, more than twenty six GaN/AlGaN MQW phoptodetectors with different types of device structures and control samples have been fabricated and investigated to achieve the proposed...

  4. InGaN nanoinclusions in an AlGaN matrix

    Sizov, V. S.; Tsatsul'nikov, A. F.; Lundin, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    GaN-based structures with InGaN quantum dots in the active region emitting in the near-ultraviolet region are studied. In this study, two types of structures, namely, with InGaN quantum dots in a GaN or AlGaN matrix, are compared. Photoluminescence spectra are obtained for both types of structures in a temperature range of 80-300 K and at various pumping densities, and electroluminescence spectra are obtained for light-emitting (LED) structures with various types of active region. It is shown that the structures with quantum dots in the AlGaN matrix are more stable thermally due to the larger localization energy compared with quantum dots in the GaN matrix. Due to this, the LED structures with quantum dots in an AlGaN matrix are more effective.

  5. Development of Passivation Technology for Improved GaN/AlGaN HEMT Performance and Reliability

    Abernathy, C. R; Hunter-Edwards, Angela

    2005-01-01

    .... As part of the recipe development we have studied fundamental characteristics of the native oxides on GaN and AlGaN surfaces using XPS and compared the results to oxides generated by exposure to UV...

  6. Nanomaterial disordering in AlGaN/GaN UV LED structures

    Shabunina, E I; Levinshtein, M E; Kulagina, M M; Petrov, V N; Ratnikov, V V; Smirnova, I N; Troshkov, S I; Shmidt, N M; Kurin, S Yu; Makarov, Yu N; Chernyakov, A E; Usikov, A S; Helava, H

    2015-01-01

    Multifractal analysis was applied to characterize quantitatively nanostructural disordering in HVPE-grown AlGaN/GaN UV LED structures. A higher level of leakage currents shunting the active region of LEDs by an extended defect system is correlated with higher values of multifractal parameters (MFs). As a result, the concentration of injected carriers participating in radiative recombination in the active region is reduced. MFs and the conductivity of quasi-ohmic shunts localized in an extended defect system are higher in AlGaN/GaN structures than in InGaN/GaN structures. It is one of the reasons behind the low external quantum efficiency of AlGaN/GaN UV LEDs. (paper)

  7. Urinary excretion of androgen metabolites, comparison with excretion of radioactive metabolites after injection of [4-14C]testosterone

    Deslypere, J.P.; Sayed, A.; Vermeulen, A.; Wiers, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of age on the metabolic pattern of [4- 14 C]testosterone was studied in 20 young and 8 elderly males and compared to the metabolic pattern of endogenous androgens; the latter was also studied in 16 young and 8 elderly women. In both young and elderly males, androsterone and aetiocholanolone glucuronide represent 65% of [4- 14 C]testosterone metabolites: together with their suephoconjugates as well as with 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α, 17β-diol they represent even more than 75% of total urinary metabolites. The 5α/5β ratio of metabolites of [4- 14 C]testosterone was significantly (P 14 C]testosterone metabolites was generally higher than the ratio of metabolites of endogenous androgens, suggesting that the transformation of T to ring A saturated metabolites occurs at least partially in another compartment than the transformation of DHEA to these metabolites. For both [4- 14 C]testosterone and endogenous androgen metabolites we observed a statistically significant reduction of the 5α/5β ratio with age, a general phenomenon in both males and females. This reduction concern also 11-OH-androst-4-ene-3.17-dione metabolism. Neither sex hormone levels, nor specific binding seems to determine this age dependent shift; neither is there convincing evidence for latent hypothyroisism or liver dysfunction in the elderly. An age associated primary decrease of the 5α-reductase activity seems the most likely explanation. (author)

  8. Reducing Threshold of Multi Quantum Wells InGaN Laser Diode by Using InGaN/GaN Waveguide

    Abdullah, Rafid A.; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    2010-07-01

    ISE TCAD (Integrated System Engineering Technology Computer Aided Design) software simulation program has been utilized to help study the effect of using InGaN/GaN as a waveguide instead of conventional GaN waveguide for multi quantum wells violet InGaN laser diode (LD). Simulation results indicate that the threshold of the LD has been reduced by using InGaN/GaN waveguide where InGaN/GaN waveguide increases the optical confinement factor which leads to increase the confinement carriers at the active region of the LD.

  9. Self-consistent simulation of carrier confinement characteristics in (AlyGa1−yN/AlN)SLs/GaN/(InxGa1−xN/GaN)MQW/GaN heterostructures

    Ding Jieqin; Wang Xiaoliang; Xiao Hongling; Wang Cuimei; Yin Haibo; Chen Hong; Feng Chun; Jiang Lijuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present calculations of carrier confinement characteristics. ► An optimization of In x Ga 1−x N/GaN multiquantum-well (MQW) was made. ► 2DEG sheet carrier density in designed heterostructure is greatly increased. ► Interface roughness and alloy disorder scattering reduced. ► Carrier mobility will be improved in designed heterostructure. - Abstract: We present calculations of carrier confinement characteristics in (Al y Ga 1−y N/AlN)SLs/GaN/(In x Ga 1−x N/GaN)MQW/GaN heterojunction structure in the presence of spontaneous and piezoelectrically induced polarization effects. The calculations were made using a self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger, Poisson, potential and charge balance equations. An optimization of In x Ga 1−x N/GaN multiquantum-well (MQW) was made firstly including thickness of GaN channel, InGaN, and indium composition of In x Ga 1−x N in order to increase carrier density and mobility, and the influence of pairs of AlGaN/AlN superlattices (SLs) and InGaN/GaN MQWs on structure was discussed. Theoretical calculations clearly indicate that the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) sheet carrier density in designed heterostructure is greatly increased due to the enhancing of carrier confinement compared to those in conventional AlGaN/GaN one at the similar Al composition. Furthermore, the calculated carrier distribution shows that carrier mobility will be improved by reducing interface roughness and alloy disorder scattering in designed heterostructure.

  10. Strain-balanced InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Hosalli, A. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures suffer from a high amount of compressive strain in the InGaN wells and the accompanied piezoelectric field resulting in both a blue shift in emission and a reduction of emission intensity. We report the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN “strain-balanced” multiple quantum wells (SBMQWs) grown on thick In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N templates for x > y by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. SBMQWs consist of alternating layers of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N wells and GaN barriers under compressive and tensile stress, respectively, which have been lattice matched to a thick In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N template. Growth of the In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N template is also detailed in order to achieve thick, relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N grown on GaN without the presence of V-grooves. When compared to conventional In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN MQWs grown on GaN, the SBMQW structures exhibit longer wavelength emission and higher emission intensity for the same InN mole fraction due to a reduction in the well strain and piezoelectric field. By matching the average lattice constant of the MQW active region to the lattice constant of the In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N template, essentially an infinite number of periods can be grown using the SBMQW growth method without relaxation-related effects. SBMQWs can be utilized to achieve longer wavelength emission in light emitting diodes without the use of excess indium and can be advantageous in addressing the “green gap.”.

  11. Growth and characterization of Ga(As,N) and (In,Ga)(As,N)

    Mussler, G.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the MBE growth and characterization of Ga(As,N) and (In,Ga)(As,N). The work commences with the optimization of the Ga(As,N) growth. Owing to a large miscibility gap of GaN in GaAs, the incorporation of nitrogen into GaAs causes a structural degradation that is dependent on the substrate temperature, the nitrogen concentration, and the quantum well thickness. Another problem related to the growth of Ga(As,N) are point defects that have a detrimental influence on optical properties. A thermal treatment of Ga(As,N) reduces the concentration of these point defects. This leads to a substantial improvement of optical properties. We will show that nitrogen split interstitials that incorporate into gallium and arsenic vacancies may be attributed to these point defects. A thermal treatment of Ga(As,N) at high temperatures, on the contrary, results in a creation of extended defects which are detrimental to optical properties. We show that the temperature of the thermal treatment that yields the highest photoluminescence intensity is nitrogen concentration-dependent. The growth of (In,Ga)(As,N) is similar with respect to Ga(As,N). Again, one has to face a high miscibility gap of (In,Ga)N in (In,Ga)As that results in a structural degradation. A thermal treatment of (In,Ga)(As,N) is also beneficial for improving optical properties. We show that a thermal treatment of (In,Ga)As results in an indium diffusion that is suppressed by the incorporation of nitrogen. The characterization of (In,Ga)(As,N) edge emitting lasers shows emission at wavelengths up to 1366 nm. With higher nitrogen concentrations, there is a strong increase of the threshold current density and a decrease of the output power

  12. Fabrication of InGaN/GaN nanopillar light-emitting diode arrays

    Ou, Yiyu; Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Haiyan

    Nanopillar InGaN/GaN green light-emitting diode arrays were fabricated by using self-assembled nanopatterning and dry etching process. Both internal and external quantum efficiency were increased due to strain relaxation and enhanced light extraction.......Nanopillar InGaN/GaN green light-emitting diode arrays were fabricated by using self-assembled nanopatterning and dry etching process. Both internal and external quantum efficiency were increased due to strain relaxation and enhanced light extraction....

  13. Steady-state metabolite concentrations reflect a balance between maximizing enzyme efficiency and minimizing total metabolite load.

    Naama Tepper

    Full Text Available Steady-state metabolite concentrations in a microorganism typically span several orders of magnitude. The underlying principles governing these concentrations remain poorly understood. Here, we hypothesize that observed variation can be explained in terms of a compromise between factors that favor minimizing metabolite pool sizes (e.g. limited solvent capacity and the need to effectively utilize existing enzymes. The latter requires adequate thermodynamic driving force in metabolic reactions so that forward flux substantially exceeds reverse flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a method, metabolic tug-of-war (mTOW, which computes steady-state metabolite concentrations in microorganisms on a genome-scale. mTOW is shown to explain up to 55% of the observed variation in measured metabolite concentrations in E. coli and C. acetobutylicum across various growth media. Our approach, based strictly on first thermodynamic principles, is the first method that successfully predicts high-throughput metabolite concentration data in bacteria across conditions.

  14. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    Jančič, Sašo; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Kocev, Dragi

    2016-01-01

    the genome data analysis of W. mellicola (previously W. sebi sensu lato) and W. ichthyophaga revealed a low number of secondary metabolites clusters, a substantial number of secondary metabolites were detected at different conditions. Machine learning analysis of the obtained dataset showed that NaCl has...... of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known...... to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although...

  15. Resonant circular photogalvanic effect in GaN/AlGaN heterojunctions

    Wittmann, B.; Golub, L. E.; Danilov, S. N.; Karch, J.; Reitmaier, C.; Kvon, Z. D.; Vinh, N. Q.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Murdin, B.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    The resonant circular photogalvanic effect is observed in wurtzite (0001)-oriented GaN low-dimensional structures excited by infrared radiation. The current is induced by angular-momentum transfer of photons to the photoexcited electrons at resonant intersubband optical transitions in a GaN/AlGaN

  16. Recessed insulator and barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT: A novel structure ...

    2017-03-08

    Mar 8, 2017 ... AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor; breakdown voltage; output power density; short channel effect ... is an n-type heavily doped Al0.32Ga0.68N while the ..... [15] S E J Mahabadi, A A Orouji, P Keshavarzi and H A.

  17. Characterization of GaN/AlGaN epitaxial layers grown by ...

    GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers are grown by a metalorganic chemical ... reported by introducing annealing of the GaN layer in nitrogen [5], Fe doping [6], .... [2] Y F Wu, S M Wood, R P Smith, S Sheppard, S T Allen, P Parikh and J Milligan,.

  18. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green (λ=524 nm) laser

    Zhang, Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching

  19. High resolution x-ray diffraction analyses of GaN/LiGaO{sub 2}

    Matyi, R.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1999-05-21

    Lithium gallate (LiGaO{sub 2}) is gaining increasing attention as a potential substrate for the growth of the important semiconductor GaN. In order to better understand this material we have performed high-resolution double- and triple-axis x-ray diffraction analyses of both the starting LiGaO{sub 2} and GaN/LiGaO{sub 2} following epitaxial growth. A high-resolution triple-axis reciprocal space map of the substrate showed a sharp, well-defined crystal truncation rod and a symmetric streak of intensity perpendicular to q{sub 002}, suggesting high structural quality with mosaic spread. Triple-axis scans following GaN growth showed (1) the development of isotropic diffuse scatter around the LiGaO{sub 2} (002) reflection, (2) the presence of a semi-continuous intensity streak between the LiGaO{sub 2} (002) and GaN (0002) reflections, and (3) a compact pattern of diffuse scatter around the GaN (0002) reflection that becomes increasingly anisotropic as the growth temperature is increased. These results suggest that LiGaO{sub 2} permits the epitaxial growth of GaN with structural quality that may be superior to that observed when growth is performed on SiC or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (author)

  20. Characterization of a Ga-assisted GaAs nanowire array solar cell on si substrate

    Boulanger, J. P.; Chia, A. C. E.; Wood, B.

    2016-01-01

    A single-junction core-shell GaAs nanowire (NW) solar cell on Si (1 1 1) substrates is presented. A Ga-assisted vapor–liquid–solid growth mechanism was used for the formation of a patterned array of radial p-i-n GaAs NWs encapsulated in AlInP passivation. Novel device fabrication utilizing facet-...

  1. Exploring the radiosynthesis and in vitro characteristics of [68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9.

    Jensen, Svend B; Käkelä, Meeri; Jødal, Lars; Moisio, Olli; Alstrup, Aage K O; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Roivainen, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Vascular adhesion protein 1 is a leukocyte homing-associated glycoprotein, which upon inflammation rapidly translocates from intracellular sources to the endothelial cell surface. It has been discovered that the cyclic peptide residues 283-297 of sialic acid-binding IgG-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) "CARLSLSWRGLTLCPSK" bind to vascular adhesion protein 1 and hence makes the radioactive analogues of this compound ([ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9) interesting as a noninvasive visualizing marker of inflammation. Three different approaches to the radiosynthesis of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 are presented and compared with previously published methods. A simple, robust radiosynthesis of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 with a yield of 62% (non decay-corrected) was identified, and it had a radiochemical purity >98% and a specific radioactivity of 35 MBq/nmol. Furthermore, the protein binding and stability of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 were analyzed in vitro in mouse, rat, rabbit, pig, and human plasma and compared with in vivo pig results. The plasma in vitro protein binding of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 was the lowest in the pig followed by rabbit, human, rat, and mouse. It was considerably higher in the in vivo pig experiments. The in vivo stability in pigs was lower than the in vitro stability. Despite considerable species differences, the observed characteristics of [ 68 Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 are suitable as a positron emission tomography tracer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Unknown

    of GaN devices based on silicon is the thermal mismatch of GaN and Si, which generates cracks. In 1998, the .... Considerable research is being carried out on GaN HEMTs at present. ... by InGaN/GaN multiquantum well in MOVPE was first.

  3. White emission from non-planar InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs grown on GaN template with truncated hexagonal pyramids.

    Lee, Ming-Lun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Tu, Shang-Ju; Chen, P C; Lai, Wei-Chih; Sheu, Jinn-Kong

    2015-04-06

    Non-planar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures are grown on a GaN template with truncated hexagonal pyramids (THPs) featuring c-plane and r-plane surfaces. The THP array is formed by the regrowth of the GaN layer on a selective-area Si-implanted GaN template. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the InGaN/GaN epitaxial layers regrown on the THPs exhibit different growth rates and indium compositions of the InGaN layer between the c-plane and r-plane surfaces. Consequently, InGaN/GaN MQW light-emitting diodes grown on the GaN THP array emit multiple wavelengths approaching near white light.

  4. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  5. Metabolomics and Cheminformatics Analysis of Antifungal Function of Plant Metabolites.

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Rajagopalan, NandhaKishore; Tulpan, Dan; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-09-30

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum , is a devastating disease of wheat. Partial resistance to FHB of several wheat cultivars includes specific metabolic responses to inoculation. Previously published studies have determined major metabolic changes induced by pathogens in resistant and susceptible plants. Functionality of the majority of these metabolites in resistance remains unknown. In this work we have made a compilation of all metabolites determined as selectively accumulated following FHB inoculation in resistant plants. Characteristics, as well as possible functions and targets of these metabolites, are investigated using cheminformatics approaches with focus on the likelihood of these metabolites acting as drug-like molecules against fungal pathogens. Results of computational analyses of binding properties of several representative metabolites to homology models of fungal proteins are presented. Theoretical analysis highlights the possibility for strong inhibitory activity of several metabolites against some major proteins in Fusarium graminearum , such as carbonic anhydrases and cytochrome P450s. Activity of several of these compounds has been experimentally confirmed in fungal growth inhibition assays. Analysis of anti-fungal properties of plant metabolites can lead to the development of more resistant wheat varieties while showing novel application of cheminformatics approaches in the analysis of plant/pathogen interactions.

  6. Metabolites of alectinib in human: their identification and pharmacological activity

    Mika Sato-Nakai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two metabolites (M4 and M1b in plasma and four metabolites (M4, M6, M1a and M1b in faeces were detected through the human ADME study following a single oral administration of [14C]alectinib, a small-molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, to healthy subjects. In the present study, M1a and M1b, which chemical structures had not been identified prior to the human ADME study, were identified as isomers of a carboxylate metabolite oxidatively cleaved at the morpholine ring. In faeces, M4 and M1b were the main metabolites, which shows that the biotransformation to M4 and M1b represents two main metabolic pathways for alectinib. In plasma, M4 was a major metabolite and M1b was a minor metabolite. The contribution to in vivo pharmacological activity of these circulating metabolites was assessed from their in vitro pharmacological activity and plasma protein binding. M4 had a similar cancer cell growth inhibitory activity and plasma protein binding to that of alectinib, suggesting its contribution to the antitumor activity of alectinib, whereas the pharmacological activity of M1b was insignificant.

  7. Metabolite Profiling of Candidatus Liberibacter Infection in Hamlin Sweet Oranges.

    Hung, Wei-Lun; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-18

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), is considered the most serious citrus disease in the world. CLas infection has been shown to greatly affect metabolite profiles in citrus fruits. However, because of uneven distribution of CLas throughout the tree and a minimum bacterial titer requirement for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection, the infected trees may test false negative. To prevent this, metabolites of healthy Hamlin oranges (CLas-) obtained from the citrus undercover protection systems (CUPS) were investigated. Comparison of the metabolite profile of juice obtained from CLas- and CLas+ (asymptomatic and symptomatic) trees revealed significant differences in both volatile and nonvolatile metabolites. However, no consistent pattern could be observed in alcohols, esters, sesquiterpenes, sugars, flavanones, and limonoids as compared to previous studies. These results suggest that CLas may affect metabolite profiles of citrus fruits earlier than detecting infection by PCR. Citric acid, nobiletin, malic acid, and phenylalanine were identified as the metabolic biomarkers associated with the progression of HLB. Thus, the differential metabolites found in this study may serve as the biomarkers of HLB in its early stage, and the metabolite signature of CLas infection may provide useful information for developing a potential treatment strategy.

  8. Multicharacterization approach for studying InAl(Ga)N/Al(Ga)N/GaN heterostructures for high electron mobility transistors

    Naresh-Kumar, G., E-mail: naresh.gunasekar@strath.ac.uk; Trager-Cowan, C. [Dept of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Morales, M.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A.; Cavalcoli, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica Astronomia, Università di Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Skuridina, D.; Vogt, P.; Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Behmenburg, H.; Giesen, C.; Heuken, M. [AIXTRON SE, Kaiserstr. 98, 52134 Herzogenrath (Germany); Gamarra, P.; Di Forte-Poisson, M. A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Patriarche, G. [LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Vickridge, I. [Institut des NanoSciences, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 75015 Paris (France)

    2014-12-15

    We report on our multi–pronged approach to understand the structural and electrical properties of an InAl(Ga)N(33nm barrier)/Al(Ga)N(1nm interlayer)/GaN(3μm)/ AlN(100nm)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) heterostructure grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). In particular we reveal and discuss the role of unintentional Ga incorporation in the barrier and also in the interlayer. The observation of unintentional Ga incorporation by using energy dispersive X–ray spectroscopy analysis in a scanning transmission electron microscope is supported with results obtained for samples with a range of AlN interlayer thicknesses grown under both the showerhead as well as the horizontal type MOVPE reactors. Poisson–Schrödinger simulations show that for high Ga incorporation in the Al(Ga)N interlayer, an additional triangular well with very small depth may be exhibited in parallel to the main 2–DEG channel. The presence of this additional channel may cause parasitic conduction and severe issues in device characteristics and processing. Producing a HEMT structure with InAlGaN as the barrier and AlGaN as the interlayer with appropriate alloy composition may be a possible route to optimization, as it might be difficult to avoid Ga incorporation while continuously depositing the layers using the MOVPE growth method. Our present work shows the necessity of a multicharacterization approach to correlate structural and electrical properties to understand device structures and their performance.

  9. Multicharacterization approach for studying InAl(GaN/Al(GaN/GaN heterostructures for high electron mobility transistors

    G. Naresh-Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on our multi–pronged approach to understand the structural and electrical properties of an InAl(GaN(33nm barrier/Al(GaN(1nm interlayer/GaN(3μm/ AlN(100nm/Al2O3 high electron mobility transistor (HEMT heterostructure grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE. In particular we reveal and discuss the role of unintentional Ga incorporation in the barrier and also in the interlayer. The observation of unintentional Ga incorporation by using energy dispersive X–ray spectroscopy analysis in a scanning transmission electron microscope is supported with results obtained for samples with a range of AlN interlayer thicknesses grown under both the showerhead as well as the horizontal type MOVPE reactors. Poisson–Schrödinger simulations show that for high Ga incorporation in the Al(GaN interlayer, an additional triangular well with very small depth may be exhibited in parallel to the main 2–DEG channel. The presence of this additional channel may cause parasitic conduction and severe issues in device characteristics and processing. Producing a HEMT structure with InAlGaN as the barrier and AlGaN as the interlayer with appropriate alloy composition may be a possible route to optimization, as it might be difficult to avoid Ga incorporation while continuously depositing the layers using the MOVPE growth method. Our present work shows the necessity of a multicharacterization approach to correlate structural and electrical properties to understand device structures and their performance.

  10. Growth of (20 anti 21)AlGaN, GaN and InGaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Ploch, S.; Wernicke, T.; Rass, J.; Pristovsek, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Green InGaN-based laser diodes on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates have recently demonstrated performances exceeding those of conventional (0001) oriented devices. However little is known regarding the growth parameters. We have investigated growth of AlGaN, GaN and InGaN on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates by MOVPE. Smooth GaN layers with a rms roughness <0.5 nm were obtained by low growth temperatures and reactor pressures. The layers exhibit undulations along [10 anti 14] similar to the GaN substrate. AlGaN and InGaN layers exhibit an increased surface roughness. Undulation bunching was observed and attributed to reduced adatom surface mobility due to the binding energy of Al and the low growth temperature for InGaN respectively or strain relaxation. AlGaN and InGaN heterostructures on (20 anti 21)GaN relax by layer tilt accompanied by formation of misfit dislocations, due to shear strain of the unit cell. This relaxation mechanism leads to a reduced critical layer thickness of (20 anti 21)AlGaN layers and InGaN multi quantum wells (MQW) in comparison to (0001). PL spectral broadening of 230 meV of (20 anti 21)InGaN single QWs emitting at 415 nm can be reduced by increased growth temperature or increased number of QWs with reduced thickness.

  11. Direct detection of glucuronide metabolites of lidocaine in sheep urine.

    Doran, Gregory S; Smith, Alistair K; Rothwell, Jim T; Edwards, Scott H

    2018-02-15

    The anaesthetic lidocaine is metabolised quickly to produce a series of metabolites, including several hydroxylated metabolites, which are further metabolised by addition of a glucuronic acid moiety. Analysis of these glucuronide metabolites in urine is performed indirectly by cleaving the glucuronic acid group using β-glucuronidase. However, direct analysis of intact glucuronide conjugates is a more straightforward approach as it negates the need for long hydrolysis incubations, and minimises the oxidation of sensitive hydrolysis products, while also distinguishing between the two forms of hydroxylated metabolites. A method was developed to identify three intact glucuronides of lidocaine in sheep urine using LC-MS/MS, which was further confirmed by the synthesis of glucuronide derivatives of 3OH-MEGX and 4OH-LIDO. Direct analysis of urine allowed the detection of the glucuronide metabolites of hydroxylidocaine (OH-LIDO), hydroxyl-monoethylglycinexylidide (OH-MEGX), and hydroxy-2,6-xylidine (OH-XYL). Analysis of urine before and after β-glucuronidase digestion showed that the efficiency of hydrolysis of these glucuronide metabolites may be underestimated in some studies. Analysis of urine in the current study from three different sheep with similar glucuronide metabolite concentrations resulted in different hydrolysis efficiencies, which may have been a result of different levels of substrate binding by matrix components, preventing enzyme cleavage. The use of direct analysis of intact glucuronides has the benefit of being less influenced by these matrix effects, while also allowing analysis of unstable metabolites like 4OH-XYL, which rapidly oxidises after hydrolysis. Additionally, direct analysis is less expensive and less time consuming, while providing more information about the status of hydroxylated metabolites in urine. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Benzene: a case study in parent chemical and metabolite interactions.

    Medinsky, M A; Kenyon, E M; Schlosser, P M

    1995-12-28

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol for example) is apparently necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus, the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. However, zonal localization of Phase I and Phase II enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus regulates this competition. Biologically-based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans.

  13. Metal-interconnection-free integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Liu, Chao; Cai, Yuefei; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Jun; Lau, Kei May, E-mail: eekmlau@ust.hk [Photonics Technology Center, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-05-04

    We report a metal-interconnection-free integration scheme for InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combining selective epi removal (SER) and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) techniques. SER of HEMT epi was carried out first to expose the bottom unintentionally doped GaN buffer and the sidewall GaN channel. A LED structure was regrown in the SER region with the bottom n-type GaN layer (n-electrode of the LED) connected to the HEMTs laterally, enabling monolithic integration of the HEMTs and LEDs (HEMT-LED) without metal-interconnection. In addition to saving substrate real estate, minimal interface resistance between the regrown n-type GaN and the HEMT channel is a significant improvement over metal-interconnection. Furthermore, excellent off-state leakage characteristics of the driving transistor can also be guaranteed in such an integration scheme.

  14. AlGaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    Cirlin, G E; Reznik, R R; Shtrom, I V

    2017-01-01

    The data on growth peculiarities and physical properties of GaAs insertions embedded in AlGaAs nanowires grown on different (1 1 1) substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented. The influence of nanowires growth conditions on structural and optical properties is studied in detail...

  15. Properties and Bibliography of GaSe

    1994-02-01

    Musaev, A. E. Bakhyshev, N. M. Gasanly and L. G. Musaeva . (1975). "Anisotropy of the optical constants of GaS and GaSe near the absorption edge." Sov...Phys. Semiconductors. 9 94-95 Russian ref.: Fiz. Tekh. Poluprovodn. 9 142-145 (January 1975). Akhundov, G. A., L. G. Musaeva and M. D. Khomutova

  16. Metal-interconnection-free integration of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Liu, Chao; Cai, Yuefei; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Jun; Lau, Kei May

    2015-01-01

    We report a metal-interconnection-free integration scheme for InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by combining selective epi removal (SER) and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) techniques. SER of HEMT epi was carried out first to expose the bottom unintentionally doped GaN buffer and the sidewall GaN channel. A LED structure was regrown in the SER region with the bottom n-type GaN layer (n-electrode of the LED) connected to the HEMTs laterally, enabling monolithic integration of the HEMTs and LEDs (HEMT-LED) without metal-interconnection. In addition to saving substrate real estate, minimal interface resistance between the regrown n-type GaN and the HEMT channel is a significant improvement over metal-interconnection. Furthermore, excellent off-state leakage characteristics of the driving transistor can also be guaranteed in such an integration scheme

  17. 70Ge, 72Ge, 74Ge, 76Ge(d,3He)69Ga, 71Ga, 73Ga, 75Ga reactions at 26 MeV

    Rotbard, G.; La Rana, G.; Vergnes, M.; Berrier, G.; Kalifa, J.; Guilbaut, G.; Tamisier, R.

    1978-01-01

    The 70 Ge, 72 Ge, 74 Ge, 76 Ge(d, 3 He) 69 Ga, 71 Ga, 73 Ga, 75 Ga reactions have been studied at 26 MeV with 15 keV resolution (F.W.H.M), using the Orsay MP tandem accelerator and a split pole magnetic spectrometer. The spectroscopic factors are determined for 15 levels in 69 Ga and 11 levels in each of the 3 other Ga isotopes. Level schemes are proposed for the practically unknown 73 Ga and 75 Ga. Very simple model wave functions previously proposed for Ge nuclei are seen to reproduce quite well the measured occupation numbers for the proton orbitals. Anomalies in these occupation numbers are observed between Z=31 and 32 and between N=40 and 42, this last one corresponding to the structural transition observed recently in a comparison of the (p,t) and (t,p) reactions. These anomalies could be related to changes in the nuclear shape

  18. Radiative and non-radiative recombination in GaInN/GaN quantum wells; Strahlende und nichtstrahlende Rekombination in GaInN/GaN-Quantenfilmen

    Netzel, C.

    2007-02-08

    The studies presented in this thesis deal with the occurence of V defectsin GaInN/GaN quantum film structures grown by means of organometallic gas phase epitaxy, and the effects, which have the V defects respectively the GaInN quantum films on the V-defect facets on the emission and recombination properties of the whole GaInN/GaN quantum film structure. The V-defects themselves, inverse pyramidal vacancies with hexagonal base in the semiconductor layers, arise under suitable growth conditions around the percussion violations, which extend in lattice-mismatched growth of GaN on the heterosubstrates sapphire or silicon carbide starting in growth direction through the crystal. If GaInN layers are grown over V-defect dispersed layers on the (1-101) facets of the V defects and the (0001) facets, the growth front of the structure, different growth velocities are present, which lead to differently wide GaInN quantum films on each facets.

  19. Natural occurrence of fungi and fungal metabolites in moldy tomatoes

    Andersen, B.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    Fresh tomatoes, homegrown and from supermarkets, with developing fungal lesions were collected. Each lesion was sampled, and the resulting fungal cultures were identified morphologically, and extracted for analyzes of secondary metabolites. The tomatoes were incubated at 25 degreesC for a week....... extracted, and analyzed for fungal metabolites. Extracts from pure cultures were compared with extracts from the moldy tomatoes and fungal metabolite standards in two HPLC systems with DAD and FLD detection. The results showed that Penicillium tularense, Stemphylium eturmiunum. and S. cf. lycopersici were...

  20. In Vitro Analysis of Metabolite Transport Proteins.

    Roell, Marc-Sven; Kuhnert, Franziska; Zamani-Nour, Shirin; Weber, Andreas P M

    2017-01-01

    The photorespiratory cycle is distributed over four cellular compartments, the chloroplast, peroxisomes, cytoplasm, and mitochondria. Shuttling of photorespiratory intermediates between these compartments is essential to maintain the function of photorespiration. Specific transport proteins mediate the transport across biological membranes and represent important components of the cellular metabolism. Although significant progress was made in the last years on identifying and characterizing new transport proteins, the overall picture of intracellular metabolite transporters is still rather incomplete. The photorespiratory cycle requires at least 25 transmembrane transport steps; however to date only plastidic glycolate/glycerate transporter and the accessory 2-oxoglutarate/malate and glutamate/malate transporters as well as the mitochondrial transporter BOU1 have been identified. The characterization of transport proteins and defining their substrates and kinetics are still major challenges.Here we present a detailed set of protocols for the in vitro characterization of transport proteins. We provide protocols for the isolation of recombinant transport protein expressed in E. coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the extraction of total leaf membrane protein for in vitro analysis of transporter proteins. Further we explain the process of reconstituting transport proteins in artificial lipid vesicles and elucidate the details of transport assays.

  1. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), DDT Metabolites and Pregnancy Outcomes

    Kezios, Katrina L.; Liu, Xinhua; Cirillo, Piera M.; Cohn, Barbara A.; Kalantzi, Olga I.; Wang, Yunzhu; Petreas, Myrto X.; Park, June-Soo; Factor-Litvak, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are persistent endocrine disruptors. OCPs cross the placenta; this prenatal exposure has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We investigated associations between prenatal exposure to OCPs and gestational age and birth weight in 600 infants born between 1960 and 1963. The primary OCP was 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p′-DDT), its primary metabolite, 1,1′-dichloro-2,2'-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene(p,p′-DDE) and the contaminant, 1,1,1-trichloro-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-(o-chlorophenyl)-ethane (o,p′-DDT). Regression analysis indicated that for each natural log unit increase in p,p′-DDT, birth weight increased by 274 grams (95% CI 122, 425) when controlling for p,p′-DDE and o,p′-DDT. At a given level of p,p′-DDT exposure, o,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE were associated with decreased birth weight. p,p′-DDE was negatively associated with length of gestation, controlling for p,p′-DDT and o,p′-DDT. These findings suggest opposing associations between exposure to p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE and birth weight. We did not find evidence to support mediation by maternal thyroid hormone status nor that the association differed by sex. PMID:23142753

  2. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  3. Dietary Metabolites and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Sho Hasegawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary contents and their metabolites are closely related to chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. Advanced glycated end products (AGEs are a type of uremic toxin produced by glycation. AGE accumulation is not only the result of elevated glucose levels or reduced renal clearance capacity, but it also promotes CKD progression. Indoxyl sulfate, another uremic toxin derived from amino acid metabolism, accumulates as CKD progresses and induces tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerular sclerosis. Specific types of amino acids (d-serine or fatty acids (palmitate are reported to be closely associated with CKD progression. Promising therapeutic targets associated with nutrition include uremic toxin absorbents and inhibitors of AGEs or the receptor for AGEs (RAGE. Probiotics and prebiotics maintain gut flora balance and also prevent CKD progression by enhancing gut barriers and reducing uremic toxin formation. Nrf2 signaling not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also reduces elevated AGE levels. Bardoxolone methyl, an Nrf2 activator and NF-κB suppressor, has been tested as a therapeutic agent, but the phase 3 clinical trial was terminated owing to the high rate of cardiovascular events. However, a phase 2 trial has been initiated in Japan, and the preliminary analysis reveals promising results without an increase in cardiovascular events.

  4. Interface and transport properties of GaN/graphene junction in GaN-based LEDs

    Wang Liancheng; Zhang Yiyun; Liu Zhiqiang; Guo Enqing; Yi Xiaoyan; Wang Junxi; Wang Guohong; Li Xiao; Zhu Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    A normalized circular transmission line method pattern with uniform interface area was developed to obtain contact resistances of p-, u-, n-GaN/graphene contacts (p, u and n represent p-type doped, unintentionally doped and n-type doped, respectively) and N-polar u-, n-GaN/graphene contacts in GaN-based LEDs. The resistances of the graphene/GaN contacts were mainly determined by the work function gap and the carrier concentration in GaN. Annealing caused diffusion of metal atoms and significantly influenced the interface transport properties.

  5. Device Performance and Reliability Improvements of AlGaBN/GaN/Si MOSFET

    2016-02-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0037 Device Performance and Reliablity Improvements of AlGaBN/GaN/Si MOSFET Robert Wallace UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS Final...GaN/Si MOSFET 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4069 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert Wallace 5d.  PROJECT...AOARD Grant FA2386-14-1-4069 Device Performance and Reliability Improvements of AlGaN/GaN/Si MOSFET US 12 month extension (2014 – 2015) for current

  6. Density of Ga2O3 Liquid

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The density of Ga2O3 liquid in equilibrium with air has been measured at 18000 to 19000C using an Ir double-bob Archimedean method. The data yield the following description of the density of Ga2O3 liquid: ρ= 4.8374(84)–0.00065(12)(T −18500C). This density-temperature relationship is compared with the partial molar volume of Ga2O3 in glasses in the systems CaO–Ga2O3–SiO2 and Na2O–Ga2O3–SiO2, corrected to the glass transition temperature using thermal expansivities. The comparison illustrates t...

  7. Study of 67Ga scan in sarcoidosis

    Han Lijun; Qu Wanyin; Liu Xiuqin

    1997-01-01

    Gallium scan and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme assay (SACE) were compared in patients with sarcoidosis. The examination of 67 Ga scan, SACE determination, pulmonary function test, chest CT and chest X-ray in 24 cases with sarcoidosis were studied. The results revealed that 4 of 24 cases had obviously high uptake of 67 Ga exceeding hepatic activity (3+) in clinical active stage, 3 patients had resembling the Greek letter lambda, symmetrically located in bilateral hilar lymph nodes, and among them two had an uptake of 67 Ga in the bilateral lacrimal and parotid gland simulating 'Panda Face'. 8 of 20 cases with inactive sarcoidosis had an abnormal 67 Ga scan (1+). In those patients with normal SACE level but increased uptake of 67 Ga, active stage of disease was demonstrated and steroid therapy was indicated. Gallium scan is a valuable method for the staging of its activity and evaluation of the therapeutic effect in the follow-up patients with sarcoidosis

  8. Self-diffusion in 69Ga121Sb/71Ga123Sb isotope heterostructures

    Bracht, H.; Nicols, S. P.; Haller, E. E.; Silveira, J. P.; Briones, F.

    2001-05-01

    Gallium and antimony self-diffusion experiments have been performed in undoped 69Ga121Sb/71Ga123Sb isotope heterostructures at temperatures between 571 and 708 °C under Sb- and Ga-rich ambients. Ga and Sb profiles measured with secondary ion mass spectrometry reveal that Ga diffuses faster than Sb by several orders of magnitude. This strongly suggests that the two self-atom species diffuse independently on their own sublattices. Experimental results lead us to conclude that Ga and Sb diffusion are mediated by Ga vacancies and Sb interstitials, respectively, and not by the formation of a triple defect proposed earlier by Weiler and Mehrer [Philos. Mag. A 49, 309 (1984)]. The extremely slow diffusion of Sb up to the melting temperature of GaSb is proposed to be a consequence of amphoteric transformations between native point defects which suppress the formation of those native defects which control Sb diffusion. Preliminary experiments exploring the effect of Zn indiffusion at 550 °C on Ga and Sb diffusion reveal an enhanced intermixing of the Ga isotope layers compared to undoped GaSb. However, under the same conditions the diffusion of Sb was not significantly affected.

  9. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-02-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ˜332 meV to ˜294 meV at 80 A/cm2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  10. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-01-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ∼332 meV to ∼294 meV at 80 A/cm 2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs

  11. GaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with AlN/GaN/InGaN multiple quantum wells.

    Chang, Hung-Ming; Lai, Wei-Chih; Chen, Wei-Shou; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2015-04-06

    We demonstrate indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride/aluminum nitride (AlN/GaN/InGaN) multi-quantum-well (MQW) ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve light output power. Similar to conventional UV LEDs with AlGaN/InGaN MQWs, UV LEDs with AlN/GaN/InGaN MQWs have forward voltages (V(f)'s) ranging from 3.21 V to 3.29 V at 350 mA. Each emission peak wavelength of AlN/GaN/InGaN MQW UV LEDs presents 350 mA output power greater than that of the corresponding emission peak wavelength of AlGaN/InGaN MQW UV LEDs. The light output power at 350mA of AlN/GaN/InGaN MQWs UV LEDs with 375 nm emission wavelength can reach around 26.7% light output power enhancement in magnitude compared to the AlGaN/InGaN MQWs UV LEDs with same emission wavelength. But 350mA light output power of AlN/GaN/InGaN MQWs UV LEDs with emission wavelength of 395nm could only have light output power enhancement of 2.43% in magnitude compared with the same emission wavelength AlGaN/InGaN MQWs UV LEDs. Moreover, AlN/GaN/InGaN MQWs present better InGaN thickness uniformity, well/barrier interface quality and less large size pits than AlGaN/InGaN MQWs, causing AlN/GaN/InGaN MQW UV LEDs to have less reverse leakage currents at -20 V. Furthermore, AlN/GaN/InGaN MQW UV LEDs have the 2-kV human body mode (HBM) electrostatic discharge (ESD) pass yield of 85%, which is 15% more than the 2-kV HBM ESD pass yield of AlGaN/InGaN MQW UV LEDs of 70%.

  12. Clinical evaluation of 67Ga gut accumulation in 67Ga scintigraphy

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Ohno, Akiko; Watanabe, Youichi; Ishigaki, Takeo.

    1994-01-01

    Accumulation of 67 Ga in gut was evaluated in 67 Ga scintigraphy retrospectively in 30 patients (32 examinations). TIBC and UIBC were examined in all patients on the day when their scintigraphies were performed. Blood transfusion or Fe administration 2 months before 67 Ga scintigraphies were not carried out in any patient. Fifty percents (6/12) of male, and 40% (8/20) of female patients showed 67 Ga accumulation in gut. There was significant correlation between 67 Ga accumulation in gut and low ion-saturation ratio for transferrin. Excretion of 67 Ga bound with transferrin from liver was thought to be an important factor of 67 ga accumulation in gut. (author)

  13. Prioritizing Candidate Disease Metabolites Based on Global Functional Relationships between Metabolites in the Context of Metabolic Pathways

    Yang, Haixiu; Xu, Yanjun; Han, Junwei; Li, Jing; Su, Fei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Dongguo; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Identification of key metabolites for complex diseases is a challenging task in today's medicine and biology. A special disease is usually caused by the alteration of a series of functional related metabolites having a global influence on the metabolic network. Moreover, the metabolites in the same metabolic pathway are often associated with the same or similar disease. Based on these functional relationships between metabolites in the context of metabolic pathways, we here presented a pathway-based random walk method called PROFANCY for prioritization of candidate disease metabolites. Our strategy not only takes advantage of the global functional relationships between metabolites but also sufficiently exploits the functionally modular nature of metabolic networks. Our approach proved successful in prioritizing known metabolites for 71 diseases with an AUC value of 0.895. We also assessed the performance of PROFANCY on 16 disease classes and found that 4 classes achieved an AUC value over 0.95. To investigate the robustness of the PROFANCY, we repeated all the analyses in two metabolic networks and obtained similar results. Then we applied our approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and found that a top ranked candidate was potentially related to AD but had not been reported previously. Furthermore, our method was applicable to prioritize the metabolites from metabolomic profiles of prostate cancer. The PROFANCY could identify prostate cancer related-metabolites that are supported by literatures but not considered to be significantly differential by traditional differential analysis. We also developed a freely accessible web-based and R-based tool at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/PROFANCY. PMID:25153931

  14. Characteristics of AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN double heterojunction HEMTs with an improved breakdown voltage

    Ma Juncai; Zhang Jincheng; Xue Junshuai; Lin Zhiyu; Liu Ziyang; Xue Xiaoyong; Ma Xiaohua; Hao Yue

    2012-01-01

    We studied the performance of AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction high electron mobility transistors (DH-HEMTs) with an AlGaN buffer layer, which leads to a higher potential barrier at the backside of the two-dimensional electron gas channel and better carrier confinement. This, remarkably, reduces the drain leakage current and improves the device breakdown voltage. The breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction HEMTs (∼100 V) was significantly improved compared to that of conventional AlGaN/GaN HEMTs (∼50 V) for the device with gate dimensions of 0.5 × 100 μm and a gate—drain distance of 1 μm. The DH-HEMTs also demonstrated a maximum output power of 7.78 W/mm, a maximum power-added efficiency of 62.3% and a linear gain of 23 dB at the drain supply voltage of 35 V at 4 GHz. (semiconductor devices)

  15. Characterization and identification of in vitro metabolites of ...

    trap orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitap MS). Results: Nine metabolites of (-)-epicatechin were characterized on the basis of high resolution mass measurement, MS spectra and literature data. Based on their structures, the major ...

  16. Metabolites: messengers between the microbiota and the immune system.

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The mammalian intestine harbors one of the largest microbial densities on Earth, necessitating the implementation of control mechanisms by which the host evaluates the state of microbial colonization and reacts to deviations from homeostasis. While microbial recognition by the innate immune system has been firmly established as an efficient means by which the host evaluates microbial presence, recent work has uncovered a central role for bacterial metabolites in the orchestration of the host immune response. In this review, we highlight examples of how microbiota-modulated metabolites control the development, differentiation, and activity of the immune system and classify them into functional categories that illustrate the spectrum of ways by which microbial metabolites influence host physiology. A comprehensive understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites shape the human immune system is critical for the rational design of therapies for microbiota-driven diseases. © 2016 Levy et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Ruta graveolens Extracts and Metabolites against Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Ayil-Gutiérrez, Benjamin A; Villegas-Mendoza, Jesús M; Santes-Hernndez, Zuridai; Paz-González, Alma D; Mireles-Martínez, Maribel; Rosas-García, Ninfa M; Rivera, Gildardo

    2015-11-01

    The biological activity of Ruta graveolens leaf tissue extracts obtained with different solvents (ethyl acetate, ethanol, and water) and metabolites (psoralen, 2- undecanone and rutin) against Spodoptera frugiperda was evaluated. Metabolites levels in extracts were quantified by HPLC and GC. Ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts showed 94% and 78% mortality, respectively. Additionally, psoralen metabolite showed a high mortality as cypermethrin. Metabolite quantification in extracts shows the presence of 2-undecanone (87.9 µmoles mg(-1) DW), psoralen (3.6 µmoles mg(-1) DW) and rutin (0.001 pmoles mg(-1) DW). We suggest that these concentrations of 2-undecanone and psoralen in R. graveolens leaf tissue extracts could be responsible for S. frugiperda mortality.

  18. Metabolome analysis - mass spectrometry and microbial primary metabolites

    Højer-Pedersen, Jesper Juul

    2008-01-01

    , and therefore sample preparation is critical for metabolome analysis. The three major steps in sample preparation for metabolite analysis are sampling, extraction and concentration. These three steps were evaluated for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with primary focus on analysis of a large number...... of metabolites by one method. The results highlighted that there were discrepancies between different methods. To increase the throughput of cultivation, S. cerevisiae was grown in microtitier plates (MTPs), and the growth was found to be comparable with cultivations in shake flasks. The carbon source was either...... a theoretical metabolome. This showed that in combination with the specificity of MS up to 84% of the metabolites can be identified in a high-accuracy ESI-spectrum. A total of 66 metabolites were systematically analyzed by positive and negative ESI-MS/MS with the aim of initiating a spectral library for ESI...

  19. Isolation and identification of two galangin metabolites from rat urine ...

    Isolation and identification of two galangin metabolites from rat urine and determination of their in vitro hypolipidemic activity. Xuguang Zhang, Shouqian Cheng, Hailong Li, Xiaopo Zhang, Feng Chen, Youbin Li, Junqing Zhang, Yinfeng Tan ...

  20. Metabolite Signatures of Metabolic Risk Factors and their Longitudinal Changes

    Yin, X.; Subramanian, S.; Willinger, C.M.; Chen, G.; Juhasz, P.; Courchesne, P.; Chen, B.H.; Li, X.; Hwang, S.J.; Fox, C.S.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Muntendam, P.; Fuster, V.; Bobeldijk-Pastorova, I.; Sookoian, S.C.; Pirola, C.J.; Gordon, N.; Adourian, A.; Larson, M.G.; Levy, D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Metabolic dysregulation underlies key metabolic risk factors—obesity, dyslipidemia, and dysglycemia. Objective: To uncover mechanistic links between metabolomic dysregulation and metabolic risk by testing metabolite associations with risk factors cross-sectionally and with risk factor

  1. β-Orcinol Metabolites from the Lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta

    Panagiota Papadopoulou

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Four new β-orcinol metabolites, hypotrachynic acid (1, deoxystictic acid (2, cryptostictinolide (3 and 8 ́-methylconstictic acid (4 along with the metabolites 8 ́-methylstictic acid (5, 8 ́-methylmenegazziaic acid (6, stictic acid (7, 8 ́-ethylstictic acid (8 and atranorin (9, that have been previously described, were isolated for the first time from the tissue extracts of the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta (Flörke Hale. The structures of the new metabolites were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. Radical scavenging activity (RSA of the metabolites isolated in adequate amounts, was evaluated using luminol chemiluminescence and comparison with Trolox®.

  2. Detection of mastitis pathogens by analysis of volatile bacterial metabolites

    Hettinga, K.A.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to detect mastitis pathogens based on their volatile metabolites was studied. Milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis, caused by Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli were collected. In

  3. Characterization and identification of in vitro metabolites of ...

    Characterization and identification of in vitro metabolites of (-)-epicatechin using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rui Jun Cai, Xiao Ling Yin, Jing Liu, Da Xu Qin, Gui Zhen Zhao ...

  4. Screening of diseases associated with abnormal metabolites for ...

    Dina A. Ghoraba

    2013-12-09

    Dec 9, 2013 ... IEMs to evaluate the efficiency of HPLC in detecting abnormal metabolites in urine samples. ... the initial screening of organic acid disorders and many other disease ..... Although a chromatogram from a patient with gross.

  5. A Review of the Secondary Metabolites and Biological Activities of ...

    School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia ... ulcers. A wide range of secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, diterpenes, flavones, phenolics, and triterpenes .... potency than the synthetic antioxidant.

  6. Secondary metabolites of the argan tree (Morocco) may have ...

    Administrator

    knowledge, researchers are screening metabolites of this rare plant to identify bioactive compounds for .... or 29 carbon atoms. ... argan oil does not absorb oxygen to form hydroperoxides ..... dioxide: superiority to alpha-tocopherol. Proc. Nat.

  7. Extraction and applications of cyanotoxins and other cyanobacterial secondary metabolites.

    Haque, Fatima; Banayan, Sara; Yee, Josephine; Chiang, Yi Wai

    2017-09-01

    The rapid proliferation of cyanobacteria in bodies of water has caused cyanobacterial blooms, which have become an increasing cause of concern, largely due to the presence of toxic secondary metabolites (or cyanotoxins). Cyanotoxins are the toxins produced by cyanobacteria that may be harmful to surrounding wildlife. They include hepatotoxins, neurotoxins and dermatotoxins, and are classified based on the organs they affect. There are also non-toxic secondary metabolites that include chelators and UV-absorbing compounds. This paper summarizes the optimal techniques for secondary metabolite extraction and the possible useful products that can be obtained from cyanobacteria, with additional focus given to products derived from secondary metabolites. It becomes evident that the potential for their use as biocides, chelators, biofuels, biofertilizers, pharmaceuticals, food and feed, and cosmetics has not yet been comprehensively studied or extensively implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie

    2010-01-01

    Parabens are preservatives used in a wide range of cosmetic products, including products for children, and some are permitted in foods. However, there is concern for endocrine disrupting effects. This paper critically discusses the conclusions of recent reviews and original research papers...... and provides an overview of studies on toxicokinetics. After dermal uptake, parabens are hydrolyzed and conjugated and excreted in urine. Despite high total dermal uptake of paraben and metabolites,little intact paraben can be recovered in blood and urine. Paraben metabolites may play a role in the endocrine...... disruption seen in experimental animals and studies are needed to determine human levels of parabens and metabolites. Overall, the estrogenic burden of parabens and their metabolites in blood may exceed the action of endogenous estradiol in childhood and the safety margin for propylparaben is very low when...

  9. IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY OF BTEX METABOLITES IN HELA CELL LINES

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied exte...

  10. Synthesis of deuterium labeled ketamine metabolite dehydronorketamine-d₄.

    Sulake, Rohidas S; Chen, Chinpiao; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lua, Ahai-Chang

    2011-10-01

    A convenient synthesis of ketamine metabolite dehydronorketamine-d(4), starting from commercially available deuterium labeled bromochlorobenzene, was achieved. Key steps include Grignard reaction, regioselective hydroxybromination, Staudinger reduction, and dehydrohalogenation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Uncorrelated electron-hole transition energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    Haddou El Ghazi; Anouar Jorio and Izeddine Zorkani

    2013-01-01

    The electron (hole) energy and uncorrelated 1S e - 1S h electron-hole transition in Core(GaN)|well(In x Ga 1-x N)|shell(GaN) spherical QDQW nanoparticles is investigated as a function of the inner and the outer radii. The calculations are performed within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and the finite parabolic potential confinement barrier in which two confined parameters are taking account. The Indium composition effect is also investigated. A critical value of the outer and the inner ratio is obtained which constitutes the turning point of two indium composition behaviors. (author)

  12. Double pulse doped InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor heterostructures

    Egorov, A. Yu.; Gladyshev, A. G.; Nikitina, E. V.; Denisov, D. V.; Polyakov, N. K.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gorbazevich, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Double pulse doped (δ-doped) InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) heterostructures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using a multiwafer technological system. The room-temperature electron mobility was determined by the Hall method as 6550 and 6000 cm 2 /(V s) at sheet electron densities of 3.00 x 10 12 and 3.36 x 10 12 cm -2 , respectively. HEMT heterostructures fabricated in a single process feature high uniformity of structural and electrical characteristics over the entire area of wafers 76.2 mm in diameter and high reproducibility of characteristics from process to process.

  13. Metabolite profiles and the risk of developing diabetes

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies allow the high-throughput profiling of metabolic status from a blood specimen (metabolomics). We investigated whether metabolite profiles could predict the development of diabetes. Among 2,422 normoglycemic individuals followed for 12 years, 201 developed diabetes. Amino acids, amines, and other polar metabolites were profiled in baseline specimens using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cases and controls were matched for age, body mass index and fasting g...

  14. Investigation of tritium incorporation by means of excreted metabolites

    Biro, T.; Szilagyi, M.

    1978-01-01

    The commonly accepted urine analysis by liquid scintillation method was applied for whole body dose estimating. After the separation of metabolite fractions the organically bound tritium in urine could be measured. Urine samples from workers repeatedly exposed to tritium incorporation during the chemical processing of various labeled compounds have been collected and analyzed. The time dependence of tritium activity in certain metabolites was found to be characteristic, significantly differing from the 3 H concentration curve of the native or treated urine sample. (Auth.)

  15. Investigation of metabolites for estimating blood deposition time.

    Lech, Karolina; Liu, Fan; Davies, Sarah K; Ackermann, Katrin; Ang, Joo Ern; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Raynaud, Florence J; Hoveijn, Igor; Hut, Roelof A; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Trace deposition timing reflects a novel concept in forensic molecular biology involving the use of rhythmic biomarkers for estimating the time within a 24-h day/night cycle a human biological sample was left at the crime scene, which in principle allows verifying a sample donor's alibi. Previously, we introduced two circadian hormones for trace deposition timing and recently demonstrated that messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers significantly improve time prediction accuracy. Here, we investigate the suitability of metabolites measured using a targeted metabolomics approach, for trace deposition timing. Analysis of 171 plasma metabolites collected around the clock at 2-h intervals for 36 h from 12 male participants under controlled laboratory conditions identified 56 metabolites showing statistically significant oscillations, with peak times falling into three day/night time categories: morning/noon, afternoon/evening and night/early morning. Time prediction modelling identified 10 independently contributing metabolite biomarkers, which together achieved prediction accuracies expressed as AUC of 0.81, 0.86 and 0.90 for these three time categories respectively. Combining metabolites with previously established hormone and mRNA biomarkers in time prediction modelling resulted in an improved prediction accuracy reaching AUCs of 0.85, 0.89 and 0.96 respectively. The additional impact of metabolite biomarkers, however, was rather minor as the previously established model with melatonin, cortisol and three mRNA biomarkers achieved AUC values of 0.88, 0.88 and 0.95 for the same three time categories respectively. Nevertheless, the selected metabolites could become practically useful in scenarios where RNA marker information is unavailable such as due to RNA degradation. This is the first metabolomics study investigating circulating metabolites for trace deposition timing, and more work is needed to fully establish their usefulness for this forensic purpose.

  16. Evaluation of Medical Metabolites in Boraginaceae Family

    Golnaz Taravati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Boraginaceae family is known as a medicinal plant classified in dicotyledons.  It is originated from Asia (Middle East. The aim of this study was to evaluate ingredient between 4 species of Boraginaceae family based on physiological & phytochemical traits as well as seed fatty acid contents.  4 species (E. russicum, E. italicum, E. amoenum, and B. officinalis were evaluated carefully. All seeds were cultivated in identical conditions in a greenhouse in Tehran to assesse parameters such as tannins, phenols, anthocyanin, total protein, seed oil contents, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, and Catalase (CAT activity. Analysis of oil from seeds of EchiumL. determined 7 different fatty acids including Linolenic acid (35.1%, Linoleic acid (16.8%, Oleic acid (16.6% and Arachidonic acid (15.5% as major fatty acids, while stearic acid (4.42%, Palmitic acid (6.22%, Gama-Linolenic acid (6.04% were the minor fatty acids extracted from seeds. Low protein content was observed in E. russicum(70 mg/g and maximum level of protein was in B. officinalis(91mg/g. E. amoenum had maximum phenols (38mg/g whereas E. russicum had minimum (26 mg/g. For total phenol, B. officinalis had maxium phenols (8.1mg/g whereas E. italicum had minimum (3.9mg/g. Anthocyanins: E. russicum had maximum anthocyanins (65 mg/g whereas B. officinalis had minimum (41 mg/g. In conclusion, it can be said that different species had different amounts of secondary metabolites so that no regular relation would be detected among plant species that we studied

  17. Tolerance of GaAs as an original substrate for HVPE growth of free standing GaN

    Suzuki, Mio; Sato, T.; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F.

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate possibility of thick GaN growth on a GaAs substrate by halide vapar phase epitaxy (HVPE), GaN was grown on GaAs(111)/Ti wafer with Ti deposited by E-gun. It was found that surface treatment of the GaAs substrate by HF solution deteriorated greatly the tolerence of GaAs and that Ti can protected GaAs from erosion by NH3. By depositing Ti on GaAs(111)A surface, a millor-like GaN layer could be grown at 1000 °C for 1 hour without serious deterioration of the original GaAs substrate. By increasing the growth rate, a thick free standing GaN will be obtained with GaAs as an original substrate in near future.

  18. Tolerance of GaAs as an original substrate for HVPE growth of free standing GaN

    Suzuki, Mio; Sato, T.; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F. [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Applied Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate possibility of thick GaN growth on a GaAs substrate by halide vapar phase epitaxy (HVPE), GaN was grown on GaAs(111)/Ti wafer with Ti deposited by E-gun. It was found that surface treatment of the GaAs substrate by HF solution deteriorated greatly the tolerance of GaAs and that Ti can protected GaAs from erosion by NH{sub 3}. By depositing Ti on GaAs(111)A surface, a mirror-like GaN layer could be grown at 1000 C for 1 hour without serious deterioration of the original GaAs substrate. By increasing the growth rate, a thick free standing GaN will be obtained with GaAs as an original substrate in near future. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with an AlGaN layer grown directly on reactive-ion-etched GaN showing a high electron mobility (>1300 cm2 V-1 s-1)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Makino, Shinya; Kanatani, Keito; Kuzuhara, Masaaki

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the metal-organic-vapor-phase-epitaxial growth behavior and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN structures prepared by the growth of an AlGaN layer on a reactive-ion-etched (RIE) GaN surface without regrown GaN layers were investigated. The annealing of RIE-GaN surfaces in NH3 + H2 atmosphere, employed immediately before AlGaN growth, was a key process in obtaining a clean GaN surface for AlGaN growth, that is, in obtaining an electron mobility as high as 1350 cm2 V-1 s-1 in a fabricated AlGaN/RIE-GaN structure. High-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) were successfully fabricated with AlGaN/RIE-GaN wafers. With decreasing density of dotlike defects observed on the surfaces of AlGaN/RIE-GaN wafers, both two-dimensional electron gas properties of AlGaN/RIE-GaN structures and DC characteristics of HEMTs were markedly improved. Since dotlike defect density was markedly dependent on RIE lot, rather than on growth lot, surface contaminations of GaN during RIE were believed to be responsible for the formation of dotlike defects and, therefore, for the inferior electrical properties.

  20. 67Ga imaging in Hodgkin's disease

    Huys, J.; Schelstraete, K.; Simons, M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to answer the question if 67 Ga imaging has a practical utility for the management of the patient with Hodgkin's disease, 108 scans performed on 60 patients were reviewed. When used during the initial staging of the disease or during restaging because of recurrences, 67 Ga imaging-at least in our experience-gave many false negative results in the cervical, axillary and inguinal areas, whereas the majority of true positive scans was found at the mediastinal level (including the lower mediastinum), and also in the lung parenchyma and the upper epigastric regions. Because of its lack of sensitivity, 67 Ga imaging cannot replace other staging procedures, but nevertheless is a valuable adjunctive test, as it can identify tumor localization that may have remained undetected by other methods. Fifty-four scans were performed to monitor treatment with radiation therapy or chemotherapeutic agents. Disappearance or decreases of 67 Ga uptake after treatment usually corresponded to a disappearance or regression of the tumor as ascertained by other methods. When the treatment was shown to be ineffective, 67 Ga uptake persisted or even became more prominent. When during follow-up, a new concentration of 67 Ga appeared at the original location or elsewhere, a relapse was extremely likely. However, one must be aware of false positive images. In our material, no correlation was found between the intensity of the 67 Ga uptake and the histological subtypes of Hodgkin's disease. Neither did we observe any relation to the blood sedimentation rate or serum iron levels

  1. Metabolite identification through multiple kernel learning on fragmentation trees.

    Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2014-06-15

    Metabolite identification from tandem mass spectrometric data is a key task in metabolomics. Various computational methods have been proposed for the identification of metabolites from tandem mass spectra. Fragmentation tree methods explore the space of possible ways in which the metabolite can fragment, and base the metabolite identification on scoring of these fragmentation trees. Machine learning methods have been used to map mass spectra to molecular fingerprints; predicted fingerprints, in turn, can be used to score candidate molecular structures. Here, we combine fragmentation tree computations with kernel-based machine learning to predict molecular fingerprints and identify molecular structures. We introduce a family of kernels capturing the similarity of fragmentation trees, and combine these kernels using recently proposed multiple kernel learning approaches. Experiments on two large reference datasets show that the new methods significantly improve molecular fingerprint prediction accuracy. These improvements result in better metabolite identification, doubling the number of metabolites ranked at the top position of the candidates list. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    Lu Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology.

  3. Identification of Unique Metabolites of the Designer Opioid Furanyl Fentanyl.

    Goggin, Melissa M; Nguyen, An; Janis, Gregory C

    2017-06-01

    The illicit drug market has seen an increase in designer opioids, including fentanyl and methadone analogs, and other structurally unrelated opioid agonists. The designer opioid, furanyl fentanyl, is one of many fentanyl analogs clandestinely synthesized for recreational use and contributing to the fentanyl and opioid crisis. A method has been developed and validated for the analysis of furanyl fentanyl and furanyl norfentanyl in urine specimens from pain management programs. Approximately 10% of samples from a set of 500 presumptive heroin-positive urine specimens were found to contain furanyl fentanyl, with an average concentration of 33.8 ng/mL, and ranging from 0.26 to 390 ng/mL. Little to no furanyl norfentanyl was observed; therefore, the furanyl fentanyl specimens were further analyzed by untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify other metabolites. Multiple metabolites, including a dihydrodiol metabolite, 4-anilino-N-phenethyl-piperidine (4-ANPP) and a sulfate metabolite were identified. The aim of the presented study was to identify the major metabolite(s) of furanyl fentanyl and estimate their concentrations for the purpose of toxicological monitoring. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  5. Computational study of GaAs1-xNx and GaN1-yAsy alloys and arsenic impurities in GaN

    Laaksonen, K; Komsa, H-P; Arola, E; Rantala, T T; Nieminen, R M

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties of As-rich GaAs 1-x N x and N-rich GaN 1-y As y alloys in a large composition range using first-principles methods. We have systematically investigated the effect of the impurity atom configuration near both GaAs and GaN sides of the concentration range on the total energies, lattice constants and bandgaps. The N (As) atoms, replacing substitutionally As (N) atoms in GaAs (GaN), cause the surrounding Ga atoms to relax inwards (outwards), making the Ga-N (Ga-As) bond length about 15% shorter (longer) than the corresponding Ga-As (Ga-N) bond length in GaAs (GaN). The total energies of the relaxed alloy supercells and the bandgaps experience large fluctuations within different configurations and these fluctuations grow stronger if the impurity concentration is increased. Substituting As atoms with N in GaAs induces modifications near the conduction band minimum, while substituting N atoms with As in GaN modifies the states near the valence band maximum. Both lead to bandgap reduction, which is at first rapid but later slows down. The relative size of the fluctuations is much larger in the case of GaAs 1-x N x alloys. We have also looked into the question of which substitutional site (Ga or N) As occupies in GaN. We find that under Ga-rich conditions arsenic prefers the substitutional N site over the Ga site within a large range of Fermi level values

  6. GaN-based blue laser diodes

    Miyajima, Takao; Yanashima, Katsunori; Funato, Kenji; Asatsuma, Tsunenori; Kobayashi, Toshimasa [CT Development Centre, CNC, Sony Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan); Tojyo, Tsuyoshi; Asano, Takeharu; Kijima, Satoru; Hino, Tomonori; Takeya, Motonobu; Uchida, Shiro; Ikeda, Masao [Sony Shiroishi Semiconductor Inc., Shiroishi, Miyagi (Japan); Tomiya, Shigetaka [Environment and Analyhsis Technology Department, Sony Corporation, Hodogaya, Yokohama (Japan)

    2001-08-13

    We report our recent progress on GaN-based high-power laser diodes (LDs), which will be applied as a light source in high-density optical storage systems. We have developed raised-pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (RP-MOCVD), which can reduce the threading-dislocation density in the GaN layer to several times 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}, and demonstrated continuous-wave (cw) operation of GaN-based LD grown by RP-MOCVD. Furthermore, we found that the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique is useful for further reducing threading-dislocation density to 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} and reducing the roughness of the cleaved facet. By using this growth technique and optimizing device parameters, the lifetime of LDs was improved to more than 1000 hours under 30 mW cw operation at 60 deg. C. Our results proved that reducing both threading-dislocation density and consumption power is a valid approach to realizing a practical GaN-based LD. On the other hand, the practical GaN-based LD was obtained when threading-dislocation density in ELO-GaN was only reduced to 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}, which is a relatively small reduction as compared with threading-dislocation density in GaAs- and InP-based LDs. We believe that the multiplication of non-radiative centres is very slow in GaN-based LDs, possibly due to the innate character of the GaN-based semiconductor itself. (author)

  7. Growth and properties of the MOVPE GaAs/InAs/GaAsSb quantum dot structures

    Hospodková, Alice; Oswald, Jiří; Pangrác, Jiří; Kuldová, Karla; Zíková, Markéta; Vyskočil, Jan; Hulicius, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 480, Jan (2016), 14-22 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15286S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum dot * band alignment * InAs/GaAs * GaAsSb * MOVPE * luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2016

  8. GaAs/AlAs/InGaP heterostructure: a versatile material basis for cantilever designs

    Gregušová, Dagmar; Kúdela, Róbert; Eliáš, Peter; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír; Kostič, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and initial mechanical testing of cantilevers with tips based on a GaAs/In 0.485 Ga 0.515 P/AlAs heterostructure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. They were produced using a dedicated technological process based on (1) the formation of integrated tips through an AlAs-assisted surface sacrificial wet-etching process and (2) the GaAs cantilever release fully protected between two InGaP etch-stop layers. 2 µm thick InGaP/GaAs/InGaP cantilevers had integrated pyramidal tips with the sides at ∼45° to (1 0 0). Metallic elements were processed close to the tip apexes using non-standard optical lithography. The cantilever release was accomplished using photolithography, Ar ion milling of InGaP and wet chemical etching of GaAs via resist layers deposited by a draping technique. A tip–cantilever prototype with length, width and thickness of 150, 35 and 2 µm, respectively, exhibited a resonance frequency of 66.2 kHz, which correlated well with a theoretical value of 57 kHz for a GaAs cantilever of identical dimensions. (technical note)

  9. Sub-monolayer Deposited InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Heterostructures and Lasers

    Xu, Zhangcheng

    2004-01-01

    deposition, the deposition of a short-period InAs/GaAs superlattice on GaAs (100) surface with an InAs effective thickness of less than 1 monolayer (ML), results in the formatioin of nanometer scale (In,Ga)As QDs of a non-SK class.In this thesis, the SML InGaAs/GaAs QDs are formed by 10 cycles of alternate......The fabrication, characterization and exploitation of self-assembled quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted much attention not only in basic research, but also by the promising device applications such as QD lasers. The Stranski-Krastanow (SK) growth and the submonolayer (SML) deposition...... deposition of 0.5 ML InAs and 2.5 MLGaAs. The growth, structure, and optical properties of SML InGaAs/GaAs QD heterostructures are investigated in detail. SML InGaAs/GaAs QD lasers lasing even at room temperature have been successfully realized. The gain properties of SML InGaAs QD lasers are studied...

  10. An improved EEHEMT model for kink effect on AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Cao Meng-Yi; Lu Yang; Chen Yong-He; Zheng Jia-Xin; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue; Wei Jia-Xing; Li Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new current expression based on both the direct currect (DC) characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN high election mobility transistor (HEMT) and the hyperbolic tangent function tanh is proposed, by which we can describe the kink effect of the AlGaN/GaN HEMT well. Then, an improved EEHEMT model including the proposed current expression is presented. The simulated and measured results of I–V, S-parameter, and radio frequency (RF) large-signal characteristics are compared for a self-developed on-wafer AlGaN/GaN HEMT with ten gate fingers each being 0.4-μm long and 125-μm wide (Such an AlGaN/GaN HEMT is denoted as AlGaN/GaN HEMT (10 × 125 μm)). The improved large signal model simulates the I–V characteristic much more accurately than the original one, and its transconductance and RF characteristics are also in excellent agreement with the measured data. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Preparation of silybin phase II metabolites: Streptomyces catalyzed glucuronidation

    Charrier, C.; Azerad, R.; Marhol, Petr; Purchartová, K.; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 102, APR 2014 (2014), s. 167-173 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13041; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/0662 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Silybin diastereomers * Silibinin * Silymarin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.128, year: 2014

  12. Extracellular carbohydrate metabolites from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    Pospíšil, Stanislav; Sedmera, Petr; Halada, Petr; Petříček, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, - (2007), s. 768-771 ISSN 0163-3864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0285 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : streptomyces coelicolor * cultivation * spectroscopic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2007

  13. Secondary Metabolites Produced during the Germination of Streptomyces coelicolor

    Čihák, M.; Kameník, Zdeněk; Šmídová, Klára; Bergman, N.; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Petříčková, Kateřina; Bobek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, DEC 13 (2017), č. článku 2495. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : spore germination * Streptomyces * cell signaling Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  14. Carrier quenching in InGaP/GaAs double heterostructures

    Wells, Nathan P., E-mail: nathan.p.wells@aero.org; Driskell, Travis U.; Hudson, Andrew I.; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Lotshaw, William T. [The Aerospace Corporation, Physical Sciences Laboratories, P.O. Box 92957, Los Angeles, California 90009 (United States); Forbes, David V.; Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Labs, Rochester Institute of Technology, 156 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Photoluminescence measurements on a series of GaAs double heterostructures demonstrate a rapid quenching of carriers in the GaAs layer at irradiance levels below 0.1 W/cm{sup 2} in samples with a GaAs-on-InGaP interface. These results indicate the existence of non-radiative defect centers at or near the GaAs-on-InGaP interface, consistent with previous reports showing the intermixing of In and P when free As impinges on the InGaP surface during growth. At low irradiance, these defect centers can lead to sub-ns carrier lifetimes. The defect centers involved in the rapid carrier quenching can be saturated at higher irradiance levels and allow carrier lifetimes to reach hundreds of nanoseconds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a nearly three orders of magnitude decrease in carrier lifetime at low irradiance in a simple double heterostructure. Carrier quenching occurs at irradiance levels near the integrated Air Mass Zero (AM0) and Air Mass 1.5 (AM1.5) solar irradiance. Additionally, a lower energy photoluminescence band is observed both at room and cryogenic temperatures. The temperature and time dependence of the lower energy luminescence is consistent with the presence of an unintentional InGaAs or InGaAsP quantum well that forms due to compositional mixing at the GaAs-on-InGaP interface. Our results are of general interest to the photovoltaic community as InGaP is commonly used as a window layer in GaAs based solar cells.

  15. Ga vacancy induced ferromagnetism enhancement and electronic structures of RE-doped GaN

    Zhong Guohua; Zhang Kang; He Fan; Ma Xuhang; Lu Lanlan; Liu Zhuang; Yang Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    Because of their possible applications in spintronic and optoelectronic devices, GaN dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) doped by rare-earth (RE) elements have attracted much attention since the high Curie temperature was obtained in RE-doped GaN DMSs and a colossal magnetic moment was observed in the Gd-doped GaN thin film. We have systemically studied the GaN DMSs doped by RE elements (La, Ce-Yb) using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of density functional theory and adding the considerations of the electronic correlation and the spin-orbital coupling effects. We have studied the electronic structures of DMSs, especially for the contribution from f electrons. The origin of magnetism, magnetic interaction and the possible mechanism of the colossal magnetic moment were explored. We found that, for materials containing f electrons, electronic correlation was usually strong and the spin-orbital coupling was sometimes crucial in determining the magnetic ground state. It was found that GaN doped by La was non-magnetic. GaN doped by Ce, Nd, Pm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Tm are stabilized at antiferromagnetic phase, while GaN doped by other RE elements show strong ferromagnetism which is suitable materials for spintronic devices. Moreover, we have identified that the observed large enhancement of magnetic moment in GaN is mainly caused by Ga vacancies (3.0μB per Ga vacancy), instead of the spin polarization by magnetic ions or originating from N vacancies. Various defects, such as substitutional Mg for Ga, O for N under the RE doping were found to bring a reduction of ferromagnetism. In addition, intermediate bands were observed in some systems of GaN:RE and GaN with intrinsic defects, which possibly opens the potential application of RE-doped semiconductors in the third generation high efficiency photovoltaic devices.

  16. Comparison of damage introduced into GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures using selective dry etch recipes

    Green, R T; Luxmoore, I J; Houston, P A; Ranalli, F; Wang, T; Parbrook, P J; Uren, M J; Wallis, D J; Martin, T

    2009-01-01

    A SiCl 4 /SF 6 dry etch plasma recipe is presented giving a selectivity of 14:1 between GaN and AlGaN. Using a leakage test structure, which enables bulk and surface leakage components to be identified independently, the optimized recipe is compared to an un-etched sample and devices recessed using a Cl 2 /Ar/O 2 -based plasma chemistry. Devices etched using the SiCl 4 /SF 6 recipe demonstrated reduced bulk and surface leakage currents when operated over a wide range of temperatures. Consequently the SiCl 4 /SF 6 recipe is identified as most suitable for the fabrication of gate recessed AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

  17. Phonon replica dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers and AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Alderighi, D.; Vinattieri, A.; Colocci, M. [Ist. Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Firenze (Italy); Dipt. di Fisica and LENS, Firenze (Italy); Bogani, F. [Ist. Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Firenze (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica, Firenze (Italy); Gottardo, S. [Dipt. di Fisica and LENS, Firenze (Italy); Grandjean, N.; Massies, J. [Centre de Recherche sur l' Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, CNRS, Valbonne (France)

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the exciton and phonon replica dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers and AlGaN/GaN quantum wells (QW) by means of picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A non-exponential decay is observed both at the zero phonon line (ZPL) and at the n = 1 LO replica. Time-resolved spectra unambiguously assign the replica to the free exciton A recombination. Optical migration effects are detected both in the epilayer and the QWs samples and disappear as the temperature increases up to 60-90 K. Even though the sample quality is comparable to state-of-the-art samples, localization effects dominate the exciton dynamics at low temperature in the studied GaN based structures. (orig.)

  18. Role of electronic correlations in Ga

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2011-06-13

    An extended around mean field (AMF) functional for less localized pelectrons is developed to quantify the influence of electronic correlations in α-Ga. Both the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation are known to mispredict the Ga positional parameters. The extended AMF functional together with an onsite Coulomb interaction of Ueff=1.1 eV, as obtained from constraint LDA calculations, reduces the deviations by about 20%. The symmetry lowering coming along with the electronic correlations turns out to be in line with the Ga phase diagram.

  19. Gallium adsorption on (0001) GaN surfaces

    Adelmann, Christoph; Brault, Julien; Mula, Guido; Daudin, Bruno; Lymperakis, Liverios; Neugebauer, Joerg

    2003-01-01

    We study the adsorption behavior of Ga on (0001) GaN surfaces combining experimental specular reflection high-energy electron diffraction with theoretical investigations in the framework of a kinetic model for adsorption and ab initio calculations of energy parameters. Based on the experimental results we find that for substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes typically used in molecular-beam epitaxy of GaN, finite equilibrium Ga surface coverages can be obtained. The measurement of a Ga/GaN adsorption isotherm allows the quantification of the equilibrium Ga surface coverage as a function of the impinging Ga flux. In particular, we show that a large range of Ga fluxes exists, where 2.5±0.2 monolayers (in terms of the GaN surface site density) of Ga are adsorbed on the GaN surface. We further demonstrate that the structure of this adsorbed Ga film is in good agreement with the laterally contracted Ga bilayer model predicted to be most stable for strongly Ga-rich surfaces [Northrup et al., Phys. Rev. B 61, 9932 (2000)]. For lower Ga fluxes, a discontinuous transition to Ga monolayer equilibrium coverage is found, followed by a continuous decrease towards zero coverage; for higher Ga fluxes, Ga droplet formation is found, similar to what has been observed during Ga-rich GaN growth. The boundary fluxes limiting the region of 2.5 monolayers equilibrium Ga adsorption have been measured as a function of the GaN substrate temperature giving rise to a Ga/GaN adsorption phase diagram. The temperature dependence is discussed within an ab initio based growth model for adsorption taking into account the nucleation of Ga clusters. This model consistently explains recent contradictory results of the activation energy describing the critical Ga flux for the onset of Ga droplet formation during Ga-rich GaN growth [Heying et al., J. Appl. Phys. 88, 1855 (2000); Adelmann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 9638 (2002).

  20. Asymmetric quantum-well structures for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes

    Yang, Lin' an, E-mail: layang@xidian.edu.cn; Li, Yue; Wang, Ying; Xu, Shengrui; Hao, Yue [State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2016-04-28

    Asymmetric quantum-well (QW) structures including the asymmetric potential-barrier and the asymmetric potential-well are proposed for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). Theoretical investigation gives that an appropriate decrease in Al composition and thickness for emitter barrier as well as an appropriate increase of both for collector barrier can evidently improve the negative-differential-resistance characteristic of RTD. Numerical simulation shows that RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick GaN well sandwiched by a 1.3-nm-thick Al{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N emitter barrier and a 1.7-nm-thick Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N collector barrier can yield the I-V characteristic having the peak current (Ip) and the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) of 0.39 A and 3.6, respectively, about double that of RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N for both barriers. It is also found that an introduction of InGaN sub-QW into the diode can change the tunneling mode and achieve higher transmission coefficient of electron. The simulation demonstrates that RTD with a 2.8-nm-thick In{sub 0.03}Ga{sub 0.97}N sub-well in front of a 2.0-nm-thick GaN main-well can exhibit the I-V characteristic having Ip and PVCR of 0.07 A and 11.6, about 7 times and double the value of RTD without sub-QW, respectively. The purpose of improving the structure of GaN-based QW is to solve apparent contradiction between the device structure and the device manufacturability of new generation RTDs for sub-millimeter and terahertz applications.

  1. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine metabolite...

  2. Improved interface quality and luminescence capability of InGaN/GaN quantum wells with Mg pretreatment

    Wu, Zhengyuan; Shen, Xiyang; Xiong, Huan; Li, Qingfei; Kang, Junyong; Fang, Zhilai [Xiamen University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Semiconductors and Efficient Devices, Department of Physics, Xiamen (China); Lin, Feng; Yang, Bilan; Lin, Shilin [San' an Optoelectronics Co., Ltd, Xiamen (China); Shen, Wenzhong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Tong-Yi [Shanghai University, Shanghai University Materials Genome Institute and Shanghai Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-15

    Interface modification of high indium content InGaN/GaN quantum wells was carried out by Mg pretreatment of the GaN barrier surface. The indium in the Mg-pretreated InGaN layer was homogeneously distributed, making the interfaces abrupt. The improved interface quality greatly enhanced light emission capacity. The cathodoluminescence intensity of the Mg-pretreated InGaN/GaN quantum wells was correspondingly much stronger than those of the InGaN/GaN quantum wells without Mg pretreatment. (orig.)

  3. Barrier layer engineering: Performance evaluation of E-mode InGaN/AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Majumdar, Shubhankar; Das, S.; Biswas, D.

    2015-08-01

    Impact on DC characteristics of InGaN/AlGaN/GaN HEMT due to variation in the hetero-structure parameters i.e. molar fraction of Al and thickness of AlGaN barrier layer is presented in this paper. Gate controllability over the channel is dependent on barrier layer thickness, and molar fraction has an impact on band offset and 2DEG, which further affects the current. HEMT device that is simulated in SILVACO has InGaN cap layer of 2 nm thickness with 15% In molar fraction, variation of Al percentage and thickness of the AlGaN barrier layer are taken as 15-45% and 5-20nm, respectively. A tremendous change in threshold voltage (Vth), maximum transconductance (Gmmax) and subthreshold swing is found due to variation in hetero-structure parameter of barrier layer and the values are typically 1.3-0.1 V, 0.6-0.44 S/mm and 75-135 mV/dec respectively.

  4. Theoretical study of electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of Ga 3Sn, GaSn 3, and their ions

    Zhu, Xiaolei

    2007-01-01

    Ground and excited states of mixed gallium stannide tetramers (Ga 3Sn, Ga 3Sn +, Ga 3Sn -, GaSn 3, GaSn 3+, and GaSn 3-) are investigated employing the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF), density function theory (DFT), and the coupled-cluster single and double substitution (including triple excitations) (CCSD(T)) methods. The ground states of Ga 3Sn, Ga 3Sn +, and Ga 3Sn - are found to be the 2A 1, 3B 1, and 1A 1 states in C2v symmetry with a planar quadrilateral geometry, respectively. The ground states of GaSn 3 and GaSn 3- is predicted to be the 2A 1 and 1A 1 states in C2v point group with a planar quadrilateral structure, respectively, while the ground state of GaSn 3+ is the 1A 1 state with ideal triangular pyramid C3v geometry. Equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, binding energies, electron affinities, ionization energies, and other properties of Ga 3Sn and GaSn 3 are computed and discussed. The anion photoelectron spectra of Ga 3Sn - and GaSn 3- are also predicted. It is interesting to find that the amount of charge transfer between Ga and Sn 2 atoms in the 1A 1 state of GaSn 3+ greatly increases upon electron ionization from the 2A 1 state of GaSn 3, which may be caused by large geometry change. On the other hand, the results of the low-lying states of Ga 3Sn and GaSn 3 are compared with those of Ga 3Si and GaSi 3.

  5. Metabolite Biometrics for the Differentiation of Individuals.

    Hair, Mindy E; Mathis, Adrianna I; Brunelle, Erica K; Halámková, Lenka; Halámek, Jan

    2018-04-17

    as the fields of homeland security and cybersecurity for personal authentication via unlocking mechanisms in smart devices that monitor metabolites. Through further development and analysis, this concept also has the potential to be clinically applicable in monitoring the health of individuals based on particular biomarker combinations.

  6. Elimination of trench defects and V-pits from InGaN/GaN structures

    Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Grzanka, Ewa; Czernecki, Robert; Schiavon, Dario; Leszczyński, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy was studied as a function of the growth temperature of the GaN quantum barriers (QBs). We observed the formation of basal stacking faults (BSFs) in GaN QBs grown at low temperature. The presence of BSFs terminated by stacking mismatch boundaries (SMBs) leads to the opening of the structure at the surface into a V-shaped trench loop. This trench may form above an SMB, thereby terminating the BSF, or above a junction between the SMB and a subsequent BSF. Fewer BSFs and thus fewer trench defects were observed in GaN QBs grown at temperatures higher than 830 °C. Further increase in the growth temperature of the GaN QBs led to the suppression of the threading dislocation opening into V-pits

  7. Modeling and simulation of InGaN/GaN quantum dots solar cell

    Aissat, A.; Benyettou, F.; Vilcot, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, quantum dots have attracted attention in the field of optoelectronics, and are used to overcome the limits of a conventional solar cell. Here, an In 0.25 Ga 0.75 N/GaN Quantum Dots Solar Cell has been modeled and simulated using Silvaco Atlas. Our results show that the short circuit current increases with the insertion of the InGaN quantum dots inside the intrinsic region of a GaN pin solar cell. In contrary, the open circuit voltage decreases. A relative optimization of the conversion efficiency of 54.77% was achieved comparing a 5-layers In 0.25 Ga 0.75 N/GaN quantum dots with pin solar cell. The conversion efficiency begins to decline beyond 5-layers quantum dots introduced. Indium composition of 10 % improves relatively the efficiency about 42.58% and a temperature of 285 K gives better conversion efficiency of 13.14%.

  8. Modeling and simulation of InGaN/GaN quantum dots solar cell

    Aissat, A.; Benyettou, F.; Vilcot, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    Currently, quantum dots have attracted attention in the field of optoelectronics, and are used to overcome the limits of a conventional solar cell. Here, an In0.25Ga0.75N/GaN Quantum Dots Solar Cell has been modeled and simulated using Silvaco Atlas. Our results show that the short circuit current increases with the insertion of the InGaN quantum dots inside the intrinsic region of a GaN pin solar cell. In contrary, the open circuit voltage decreases. A relative optimization of the conversion efficiency of 54.77% was achieved comparing a 5-layers In0.25Ga0.75N/GaN quantum dots with pin solar cell. The conversion efficiency begins to decline beyond 5-layers quantum dots introduced. Indium composition of 10 % improves relatively the efficiency about 42.58% and a temperature of 285 K gives better conversion efficiency of 13.14%.

  9. Epitaxial nanowire formation in metamorphic GaAs/GaPAs short-period superlattices

    Zheng, Nan; Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip

    2017-07-01

    Metamorphic growth presents routes to novel nanomaterials with unique properties that may be suitable for a range of applications. We discuss self-assembled, epitaxial nanowires formed during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of metamorphic GaAs/GaPAs short-period superlattices. The heterostructures incorporate strain-engineered GaPAs compositional grades on 6°-B miscut GaAs substrates. Lateral diffusion within the SPS into vertically aligned, three-dimensional columns results in nanowires extending along A directions with a lateral period of 70-90 nm. The microstructure is probed by transmission electron microscopy to confirm the presence of coherent GaAs nanowires within GaPAs barriers. The compositional profile is inferred from analysis of {200} dark-field image contrast and lattice images.

  10. Formation of columnar (In,Ga)As quantum dots on GaAs(100)

    He, J.; Noetzel, R.; Offermans, P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Gong, Q.; Hamhuis, G.J.; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Columnar (In,Ga)As quantum dots (QDs) with homogeneous composition and shape in the growth direction are realized by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs(100) substrates. The columnar (In,Ga)As QDs are formed on InAs seed QDs by alternating deposition of thin GaAs intermediate layers and monolayers of InAs with extended growth interruptions after each layer. The height of the columnar (In,Ga)As QDs is controlled by varying the number of stacked GaAs/InAs layers. The structural and optical properties are studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. With increase of the aspect ratio of the columnar QDs, the emission wavelength is redshifted and the linewidth is reduced

  11. MOVPE growth of violet GaN LEDs on β-Ga2O3 substrates

    Li, Ding; Hoffmann, Veit; Richter, Eberhard; Tessaro, Thomas; Galazka, Zbigniew; Weyers, Markus; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-11-01

    We report that a H2-free atmosphere is essential for the initial stage of metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of GaN on β-Ga2O3 to prevent the surface from damage. A simple growth method is proposed that can easily transfer established GaN growth recipes from sapphire to β-Ga2O3 with both (-2 0 1) and (1 0 0) orientations. This method features a thin AlN nucleation layer grown below 900 °C in N2 atmosphere to protect the surface of β-Ga2O3 from deterioration during further growth under the H2 atmosphere. Based on this, we demonstrate working violet vertical light emitting diodes (VLEDs) on n-conductive β-Ga2O3 substrates.

  12. 60Co gamma radiation effect on AlGaN//AlN/GaN HEMT devices

    Wang Yanping; Luo Yinhong; Wang Wei; Zhang Keying; Guo Hongxia; Guo Xiaoqiang; Wang Yuanming

    2013-01-01

    The testing techniques and experimental methods of the 60 Co gamma irradiation effect on AlGaN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are established. The degradation of the electrical properties of the device under the actual radiation environment are analyzed theoretically, and studies of the total dose effects of gamma radiation on AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs at three different radiation bias conditions are carried out. The degradation patterns of the main parameters of the AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMTs at different doses are then investigated, and the device parameters that were sensitive to the gamma radiation induced damage and the total dose level induced device damage are obtained. (authors)

  13. Strong correlation and ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)N

    Filippetti, A.; Spaldin, N.A.; Sanvito, S.

    2005-01-01

    The band energies of the ferromagnetic diluted magnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)N are calculated using a self-interaction-free approach which describes covalent and strongly correlated electrons without adjustable parameters. Both materials are half-metallic, although the contribution of Mn-derived d states to the bands around the Fermi energy is very different in the two cases. In (Ga,Mn)As the bands are strongly p-d hybridized, with a dominance of As p states. In contrast in (Ga,Mn)N the Fermi energy lies within three flat bands of mainly d character that are occupied by two electrons. Thus the Mn ion in (Ga,Mn)N behaves as a deep trap acceptor, with the hole at 1.39 eV above the GaN valence band top, and is in excellent agreement with the experimental data

  14. Botulinum toxin detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Chu, B. H.; Chen, K. H.; Chang, C. Y.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Pearton, S. J.; Ramage, J.; Hooten, D.; Dabiran, A.; Chow, P. P.; Ren, F.

    2008-12-01

    Antibody-functionalized, Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect botulinum toxin. The antibody was anchored to the gate area through immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when the target toxin in a buffer was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. We could detect a range of concentrations from 1to10ng/ml. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of field-deployable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for botulinum toxin detection.

  15. Next Generation Sequencing Bulk Segregant Analysis of Potato Support that Differential Flux into the Cholesterol and Stigmasterol Metabolite Pools Is Important for Steroidal Glycoalkaloid Content

    Kaminski, Kacper Piotr; Kørup, Kirsten; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Potatoes and other Solanaceae species produce biologically active secondary metabolites called steroidal glycoalkaloids (GAs) which have antimicrobial, fungicidal, antiviral and insecticidal properties. GAs are, however, also toxic to animals and humans. Compared to wild species of potato, the el......, sterol 24-C-methyltransferase (SMT1), sterol desaturase (SD) and C-4 sterol methyl oxidase (SMO) genes were found, all encoding critical enzymes in the synthesis of the GAs precursor cholesterol........ Knowledge of metabolic pathways leading to the synthesis of GAs, as well as of the genes that are responsible for the observed differences in plant and tuber GA content is only partial. The primary purpose of this study was to identify genomic regions and candidate genes responsible for differential GA...

  16. Amphoteric arsenic in GaN

    Wahl, U; Araújo, J P; Rita, E; Soares, JC

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the lattice location of implanted arsenic in GaN by means of conversion electron emission channeling from radioactive $^{73}$As. We give direct evidence that As is an amphoteric impurity, thus settling the long-standing question as to whether it prefers cation or anion sites in GaN. The amphoteric character of As and the fact that As$\\scriptstyle_{Ga}\\,$ " anti-sites ” are not minority defects provide additional aspects to be taken into account for an explanantion of the so-called “ miscibility gap ” in ternary GaAs$\\scriptstyle_{1-x}$N$\\scriptstyle_{x}$ compounds, which cannot be grown with a single phase for values of $x$ in the range 0.1<${x}$< 0.99.

  17. 2015 Cook & Tift County (GA) Lidar

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Tift and Cook Counties GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task NOAA Contract No. EA133C-11-CQ-0010 Woolpert Order No. 75271...

  18. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p-n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    Mughal, Asad J.; Young, Erin C.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Back, Joonho; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-12-01

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p-n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm-3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10-3-3.4 × 10-3 Ω·cm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  19. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p–n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    Mughal, Asad J.

    2017-11-27

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p–n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm−3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10−3–3.4 × 10−3 Ωcenterdotcm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  20. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p–n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    Mughal, Asad J.; Young, Erin C.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Back, Joonho; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p–n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm−3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10−3–3.4 × 10−3 Ωcenterdotcm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  1. Photoconductive GaN UV Detectors

    Baranowski, Jacek

    1999-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Warsaw as follows: The contractor will investigate the growth of GaN material using atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method (MOCVD...

  2. Data processing system of GA and PPPL

    Oshima, Takayuki

    2001-11-01

    Results of research in 1997 to General Atomics (GA) and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are reported. The author visited the computer system of fusion group in GA. He joined the tokamak experiment in DIII-D, especially on the demonstration of the remote experiment inside U.S., and investigated the data processing system of DIII-D and the computer network, etc. After the visit to GA, He visited PPPL and exchanged the information about the equipment of remote experiment between JAERI and PPPL based on the US-Japan fusion energy research cooperation. He also investigated the data processing system of TFTR tokamak, the computer network and so on. Results of research of the second visit to GA in 2000 are also reported, which describes a rapid progress of each data processing equipment by the advance on the computer technology in just three years. (author)

  3. Atomic ordering in GaAsP

    Chen, G. S.; Jaw, D. H.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1991-04-01

    CuPt type ordering, which consists of a monolayer compositional modulation along one of the 4 directions in the lattice, was studied using transmission electron microscopy for GaAs1-xPx with values of x extending from 0.25 to 0.85. The samples were grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy on nominal (001) GaAs substrates that were misoriented by varying amounts in three directions. No CuPt type ordering was observed for GaAs1-xPx with x ≤0.35, while ordering was found to occur for 0.4≤x≤0.85. The direction of substrate misorientation has a major effect on the determination of which of the four possible CuPt variants are formed for 0.4≤x≤0.85. Two variants, with ordering on the (1¯11) and (11¯1) planes, appear for epilayers grown on substrates oriented exactly on the (001) plane and for substrates misoriented by 6° towards the [110] direction. Only one variant, with ordering on the (1¯11) plane, appears for epilayers grown on substrates misoriented by 6° towards [1¯10]. These ordering-induced spots observed in transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns for GaAsP occur only for the [110] cross section. From TED studies of GaInP grown on similar substrates, we conclude that the CuPt variants in GaAsP are exactly the same as for GaInP. Further evidence supporting this conclusion was obtained by growing first a layer of GaInP followed by a layer of GaAsP. High-resolution dark field electron micrographs show domains of the same variants in both layers. A mechanism describing the formation of the specific ordered variant for both GaAsP and GaInP is proposed. From studies of ordering in a strain-layer superlattice, the strain due to lattice mismatch was found to play no significant role in the propagation of ordered domains. Microtwins, also generated due to lattice mismatch, can act as domain boundaries and prevent the propagation of the ordered domains.

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Monolithic AlGaAs/InGaAs Tandem Solar Cell

    Samia SLIMANI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing conventional III-V junctions we report a classical calculation of conduction and valence band edge and the electron and hole densities. It is shown that the optimum performance can be achieved by employing AlGaAs /AlGaAs/InGaAs monolithic cascade solar cells, we have established these calculations by solving the Poisson equation within the framework of the Nextnano.

  5. Development of the GA-4 and GA-9 legal weight truck spent fuel casks

    Grenier, R.M.; Meyer, R.J.; Mings, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has designed two new truck casks under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Cask System Development Program. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks, when licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, will transport intact spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactor sites to a monitored retrievable storage facility or permanent repository. (J.P.N.)

  6. Crystal Structures of GaN Nanodots by Nitrogen Plasma Treatment on Ga Metal Droplets

    Yang-Zhe Su

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN is one of important functional materials for optoelectronics and electronics. GaN exists both in equilibrium wurtzite and metastable zinc-blende structural phases. The zinc-blende GaN has superior electronic and optical properties over wurtzite one. In this report, GaN nanodots can be fabricated by Ga metal droplets in ultra-high vacuum and then nitridation by nitrogen plasma. The size, shape, density, and crystal structure of GaN nanodots can be characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The growth parameters, such as pre-nitridation treatment on Si surface, substrate temperature, and plasma nitridation time, affect the crystal structure of GaN nanodots. Higher thermal energy could provide the driving force for the phase transformation of GaN nanodots from zinc-blende to wurtzite structures. Metastable zinc-blende GaN nanodots can be synthesized by the surface modification of Si (111 by nitrogen plasma, i.e., the pre-nitridation treatment is done at a lower growth temperature. This is because the pre-nitridation process can provide a nitrogen-terminal surface for the following Ga droplet formation and a nitrogen-rich condition for the formation of GaN nanodots during droplet epitaxy. The pre-nitridation of Si substrates, the formation of a thin SiNx layer, could inhibit the phase transformation of GaN nanodots from zinc-blende to wurtzite phases. The pre-nitridation treatment also affects the dot size, density, and surface roughness of samples.

  7. Investigation of localization effect in GaN-rich InGaN alloys and ...

    Abstract. The temperature-dependent PL properties of GaN-rich InxGa1−xN alloys is investigated and S-shaped temperature dependence is observed in all InGaN samples. It is found that the origin of localization effect in samples. A and B are different from that in sample C. For samples A and B, In content fluctuations ...

  8. Simplified 2DEG carrier concentration model for composite barrier AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Das, Palash; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2014-01-01

    The self consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations is used along with the total charge depletion model and applied with a novel approach of composite AlGaN barrier based HEMT heterostructure. The solution leaded to a completely new analytical model for Fermi energy level vs. 2DEG carrier concentration. This was eventually used to demonstrate a new analytical model for the temperature dependent 2DEG carrier concentration in AlGaN/GaN HEMT

  9. Site-controlled InGaN/GaN single-photon-emitting diode

    Zhang, Lei; Deng, Hui, E-mail: dengh@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Ku, Pei-Cheng, E-mail: peicheng@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-04-11

    We report single-photon emission from electrically driven site-controlled InGaN/GaN quantum dots. The device is fabricated from a planar light-emitting diode structure containing a single InGaN quantum well, using a top-down approach. The location, dimension, and height of each single-photon-emitting diode are controlled lithographically, providing great flexibility for chip-scale integration.

  10. Tracer kinetic modelling of receptor data with mathematical metabolite correction

    Burger, C.; Buck, A.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitation of metabolic processes with dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and tracer kinetic modelling relies on the time course of authentic ligand in plasma, i.e. the input curve. The determination of the latter often requires the measurement of labelled metabilites, a laborious procedure. In this study we examined the possibility of mathematical metabolite correction, which might obviate the need for actual metabolite measurements. Mathematical metabilite correction was implemented by estimating the input curve together with kinetic tissue parameters. The general feasibility of the approach was evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation using a two tissue compartment model. The method was then applied to a series of five human carbon-11 iomazenil PET studies. The measured cerebral tissue time-activity curves were fitted with a single tissue compartment model. For mathematical metabolite correction the input curve following the peak was approximated by a sum of three decaying exponentials, the amplitudes and characteristic half-times of which were then estimated by the fitting routine. In the simulation study the parameters used to generate synthetic tissue time-activity curves (K 1 -k 4 ) were refitted with reasonable identifiability when using mathematical metabolite correciton. Absolute quantitation of distribution volumes was found to be possible provided that the metabolite and the kinetic models are adequate. If the kinetic model is oversimplified, the linearity of the correlation between true and estimated distribution volumes is still maintained, although the linear regression becomes dependent on the input curve. These simulation results were confirmed when applying mathematical metabolite correction to the 11 C iomazenil study. Estimates of the distribution volume calculated with a measured input curve were linearly related to the estimates calculated using mathematical metabolite correction with correlation coefficients >0.990. (orig./MG)

  11. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  12. Enhanced photo(geno)toxicity of demethylated chlorpromazine metabolites

    Palumbo, Fabrizio [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Lainez, Guillermo [Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS) La Fe, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Avenida de Fernando Abril Martorell 106, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Limones-Herrero, Daniel [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Coloma, M. Dolores; Escobar, Javier [Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS) La Fe, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Avenida de Fernando Abril Martorell 106, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Jiménez, M. Consuelo [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Miranda, Miguel A., E-mail: mmiranda@qim.upv.es [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); and others

    2016-12-15

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is an anti-psychotic drug widely used to treat disorders such as schizophrenia or manic-depression. Unfortunately, CPZ exhibits undesirable side effects such as phototoxic and photoallergic reactions in humans. In general, the influence of drug metabolism on this type of reactions has not been previously considered in photosafety testing. Thus, the present work aims to investigate the possible photo(geno)toxic potential of drug metabolites, using CPZ as an established reference compound. In this case, the metabolites selected for the study are demethylchlorpromazine (DMCPZ), didemethylchlorpromazine (DDMCPZ) and chlorpromazine sulfoxide (CPZSO). The demethylated CPZ metabolites DMCPZ and DDMCPZ maintain identical chromophore to the parent drug. In this work, it has been found that the nature of the aminoalkyl side chain modulates the hydrophobicity and the photochemical properties (for instance, the excited state lifetimes), but it does not change the photoreactivity pattern, which is characterized by reductive photodehalogenation, triggered by homolytic carbon-chlorine bond cleavage with formation of highly reactive aryl radical intermediates. Accordingly, these metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the 3T3 NRU assay; their photo-irritation factors are even higher than that of CPZ. The same trend is observed in photogenotoxicity studies, both with isolated and with cellular DNA, where DMCPZ and DDMCPZ are more active than CPZ itself. In summary, side-chain demethylation of CPZ, as a consequence of Phase I biotransformation, does not result a photodetoxification. Instead, it leads to metabolites that exhibit in an even enhanced photo(geno)toxicity. - Highlights: • Demethylated CPZ metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the NRU assay. • Single cell electrophoresis (Comet Assay) confirms the photodamage to cellular DNA. • DNA single strand breaks formation is observed on agarose gel electrophoresis.

  13. Enhanced photo(geno)toxicity of demethylated chlorpromazine metabolites

    Palumbo, Fabrizio; Garcia-Lainez, Guillermo; Limones-Herrero, Daniel; Coloma, M. Dolores; Escobar, Javier; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is an anti-psychotic drug widely used to treat disorders such as schizophrenia or manic-depression. Unfortunately, CPZ exhibits undesirable side effects such as phototoxic and photoallergic reactions in humans. In general, the influence of drug metabolism on this type of reactions has not been previously considered in photosafety testing. Thus, the present work aims to investigate the possible photo(geno)toxic potential of drug metabolites, using CPZ as an established reference compound. In this case, the metabolites selected for the study are demethylchlorpromazine (DMCPZ), didemethylchlorpromazine (DDMCPZ) and chlorpromazine sulfoxide (CPZSO). The demethylated CPZ metabolites DMCPZ and DDMCPZ maintain identical chromophore to the parent drug. In this work, it has been found that the nature of the aminoalkyl side chain modulates the hydrophobicity and the photochemical properties (for instance, the excited state lifetimes), but it does not change the photoreactivity pattern, which is characterized by reductive photodehalogenation, triggered by homolytic carbon-chlorine bond cleavage with formation of highly reactive aryl radical intermediates. Accordingly, these metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the 3T3 NRU assay; their photo-irritation factors are even higher than that of CPZ. The same trend is observed in photogenotoxicity studies, both with isolated and with cellular DNA, where DMCPZ and DDMCPZ are more active than CPZ itself. In summary, side-chain demethylation of CPZ, as a consequence of Phase I biotransformation, does not result a photodetoxification. Instead, it leads to metabolites that exhibit in an even enhanced photo(geno)toxicity. - Highlights: • Demethylated CPZ metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the NRU assay. • Single cell electrophoresis (Comet Assay) confirms the photodamage to cellular DNA. • DNA single strand breaks formation is observed on agarose gel electrophoresis.

  14. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS2 and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    Atuchin, V.V.; Isaenko, L.I.; Kesler, V.G.; Lobanov, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS 2 have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference Δ 2p (S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value Δ 2p (S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS 2 is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS 2 . This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS 2 and AgGaS 2 .

  15. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS{sub 2} and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    Atuchin, V.V., E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.r [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, 13, Lavrentieva Ave., Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, L.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Laboratory of Physical Bases of Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Lobanov, S.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-14

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS{sub 2} have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS{sub 2} is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS{sub 2}. This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS{sub 2} and AgGaS{sub 2}.

  16. Investigation of the current collapse induced in InGaN back barrier AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Wan Xiaojia; Wang Xiaoliang; Xiao Hongling; Feng Chun; Jiang Lijuan; Qu Shenqi; Wang Zhanguo; Hou Xun

    2013-01-01

    Current collapses were studied, which were observed in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with and without InGaN back barrier (BB) as a result of short-term bias stress. More serious drain current collapses were observed in InGaN BB AlGaN/GaN HEMTs compared with the traditional HEMTs. The results indicate that the defects and surface states induced by the InGaN BB layer may enhance the current collapse. The surface states may be the primary mechanism of the origination of current collapse in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs for short-term direct current stress. (semiconductor devices)

  17. Meningiomas: A Comparative Study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for Molecular Imaging in Mice

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Mateos-Pérez, Jose María; Oteo, Marta; Romero, Eduardo; Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three 68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues (68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE) using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts. Methods The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN). 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L) and tumor-to-muscle (T/M) SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt) was determined. Results Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTANOC than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than 68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of 68Ga-DOTATOC. Conclusions This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of 68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas. PMID:25369268

  18. AlGaN/GaN field effect transistors for power electronics—Effect of finite GaN layer thickness on thermal characteristics

    Hodges, C., E-mail: chris.hodges@bristol.ac.uk; Anaya Calvo, J.; Kuball, M. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Stoffels, S.; Marcon, D. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-11-11

    AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors with a 150 nm thick GaN channel within stacked Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers were investigated using Raman thermography. By fitting a thermal simulation to the measured temperatures, the thermal conductivity of the GaN channel was determined to be 60 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}, over 50% less than typical GaN epilayers, causing an increased peak channel temperature. This agrees with a nanoscale model. A low thermal conductivity AlGaN buffer means the GaN spreads heat; its properties are important for device thermal characteristics. When designing power devices with thin GaN layers, as well as electrical considerations, the reduced channel thermal conductivity must be considered.

  19. Enhanced optical output power of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes grown on a silicon (111) substrate with a nanoporous GaN layer.

    Lee, Kwang Jae; Chun, Jaeyi; Kim, Sang-Jo; Oh, Semi; Ha, Chang-Soo; Park, Jung-Won; Lee, Seung-Jae; Song, Jae-Chul; Baek, Jong Hyeob; Park, Seong-Ju

    2016-03-07

    We report the growth of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on a silicon (111) substrate with an embedded nanoporous (NP) GaN layer. The NP GaN layer is fabricated by electrochemical etching of n-type GaN on the silicon substrate. The crystalline quality of crack-free GaN grown on the NP GaN layer is remarkably improved and the residual tensile stress is also decreased. The optical output power is increased by 120% at an injection current of 20 mA compared with that of conventional LEDs without a NP GaN layer. The large enhancement of optical output power is attributed to the reduction of threading dislocation, effective scattering of light in the LED, and the suppression of light propagation into the silicon substrate by the NP GaN layer.

  20. Meningiomas: a comparative study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for molecular imaging in mice.

    María Luisa Soto-Montenegro

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three (68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues ((68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts.The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN. (68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L and tumor-to-muscle (T/M SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt was determined.Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTANOC than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than (68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of (68Ga-DOTATOC.This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and (68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of (68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates

    Li Yanbo; Zhang Yang; Zhang Yuwei; Wang Baoqiang; Zhu Zhanping; Zeng Yiping

    2012-01-01

    We report on the growth of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We investigate the influence of the GaAs substrate surface treatment, growth temperature, and V/III flux ratios on the crystal quality and the surface morphology of GaSb epilayers. Comparing to Ga-rich GaAs surface preparation, the Sb-rich GaAs surface preparation can promote the growth of higher-quality GaSb material. It is found that the crystal quality, electrical properties, and surface morphology of the GaSb epilayers are highly dependent on the growth temperature, and Sb/Ga flux ratios. Under the optimized growth conditions, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high quality GaSb layers on GaAs substrates. The p-type nature of the unintentionally doped GaSb is studied and from the growth conditions dependence of the hole concentrations of the GaSb, we deduce that the main native acceptor in the GaSb is the Ga antisite (Ga Sb ) defect.

  2. Current transport in graphene/AlGaN/GaN vertical heterostructures probed at nanoscale.

    Fisichella, Gabriele; Greco, Giuseppe; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2014-08-07

    Vertical heterostructures combining two or more graphene (Gr) layers separated by ultra-thin insulating or semiconductor barriers represent very promising systems for next generation electronics devices, due to the combination of high speed operation with wide-range current modulation by a gate bias. They are based on the specific mechanisms of current transport between two-dimensional-electron-gases (2DEGs) in close proximity. In this context, vertical devices formed by Gr and semiconductor heterostructures hosting an "ordinary" 2DEG can be also very interesting. In this work, we investigated the vertical current transport in Gr/Al(0.25)Ga(0.75)N/GaN heterostructures, where Gr is separated from a high density 2DEG by a ∼ 24 nm thick AlGaN barrier layer. The current transport from Gr to the buried 2DEG was characterized at nanoscale using conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). From these analyses, performed both on Gr/AlGaN/GaN and on AlGaN/GaN reference samples using AFM tips with different metal coatings, the Gr/AlGaN Schottky barrier height ΦB and its lateral uniformity were evaluated, as well as the variation of the carrier densities of graphene (ngr) and AlGaN/GaN 2DEG (ns) as a function of the applied bias. A low Schottky barrier (∼ 0.40 eV) with excellent spatial uniformity was found at the Gr/AlGaN interface, i.e., lower compared to the measured values for metal/AlGaN contacts, which range from ∼ 0.6 to ∼ 1.1 eV depending on the metal workfunction. The electrical behavior of the Gr/AlGaN contact has been explained by Gr interaction with AlGaN donor-like surface states located in close proximity, which are also responsible of high n-type Gr doping (∼ 1.3 × 10(13) cm(-2)). An effective modulation of ns by the Gr Schottky contact was demonstrated by capacitance analysis under reverse bias. From this basic understanding of transport properties in Gr/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, novel vertical field effect

  3. Behavior of misfit dislocations in semipolar InGaN/GaN grown by MOVPE

    Kuwahara, Takaaki [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kuwano, Noriyuki [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kurisu, Akihiko; Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    A microstructure in an InGaN/GaN layer grown at the semipolar direction was observed in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to analyze the behaviour of dislocations. A (11 anti 22) GaN layer was first deposited on a maskless r (1 anti 102)-plane patterned-substrate, and then an In{sub x} Ga{sub 1-x}N (x =0.10, 0.24) was overgrown to be about 1 {mu}m in thickness. Dislocations near the interface of InGaN/GaN are classified into several types: 1 Threading dislocations lying on (0001). 2. Misfit dislocations lying on the interface of InGaN/GaN. 3. Dislocations along [1 anti 100] at a certain distance from the interface. 4. Dislocations newly formed at the interface and developing along [11 anti 20] on (0001). 5. Partial dislocations accompanied with a stacking fault on (0001). It was found that the misfit dislocations are arrayed in pairs at the direction along [1 anti 100] on the interface of (11 anti 22). Burgers vector of the misfit dislocations was found to be B = <2 anti 1 anti 13>/3. In case of B = [ anti 1 anti 123]/3, they are edge dislocations. The densities of dislocations and stacking faults increase with the In-content in InGaN. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Binding of biexcitons in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs superlattices

    Mizeikis, Vygantas; Birkedal, Dan; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    1997-01-01

    Properties of the heavy-hole excitons and biexcitons in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As superlattices are studied using linear and nonlinear optical techniques. In superlattices with miniband halfwidths less than the exciton binding energy, the biexciton binding energy is found to be the same as in the noninte......Properties of the heavy-hole excitons and biexcitons in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As superlattices are studied using linear and nonlinear optical techniques. In superlattices with miniband halfwidths less than the exciton binding energy, the biexciton binding energy is found to be the same...

  5. Self-organized formation of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings.

    Timm, R; Eisele, H; Lenz, A; Ivanova, L; Balakrishnan, G; Huffaker, D L; Dähne, M

    2008-12-19

    Ring-shaped GaSb/GaAs quantum dots, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, were studied using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. These quantum rings have an outer shape of a truncated pyramid with baselengths around 15 nm and heights of about 2 nm but are characterized by a clear central opening extending over about 40% of the outer baselength. They form spontaneously during the growth and subsequent continuous capping of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots due to the large strain and substantial As-for-Sb exchange reactions leading to strong Sb segregation.

  6. Growth mechanism of InGaN nanodots on three-dimensional GaN structures

    Park, Donghwy; Min, Daehong; Nam, Okhyun [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Convergence Center for Advanced Nano-Semiconductor (CANS), Korea Polytechnic University (KPU), Siheung-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we investigated the growth mechanism of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanodots (NDs) and an InGaN layer, which were simultaneously formed on a three-dimensional (3D) gallium nitride (GaN) structure, having (0001) polar, (11-22) semi-polar, and (11-20) nonpolar facets. We observed the difference in the morphological and compositional properties of the InGaN structures. From the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images, it can be seen that the InGaN NDs were formed only on the polar and nonpolar facets, whereas an InGaN layer was formed on the semi-polar facet. The indium composition variation in all the InGaN structures was observed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The different growth mechanism can be explained by two reasons: (i) The difference in the diffusivities of indium and gallium adatoms at each facet of 3D GaN structure; and (ii) the difference in the kinetic Wulff plots of polar, semi-polar, and nonpolar GaN planes. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. GA-4/GA-9 honeycomb impact limiter tests and analytical model

    Koploy, M.A.; Taylor, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has a test program underway to obtain data on the behavior of a honeycomb impact limiter. The program includes testing of small samples to obtain basic information, as well as testing of complete 1/4-scale impact limiters to obtain load-versus-deflection curves for different crush orientations. GA has used the test results to aid in the development of an analytical model to predict the impact limiter loads. The results also helped optimize the design of the impact limiters for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks

  8. Groove-type channel enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN MIS HEMT with combined polar and nonpolar AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Duan Xiao-Ling; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Xiao Ming; Zhao Yi; Ning Jing; Hao Yue

    2016-01-01

    A novel groove-type channel enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN MIS high electron mobility transistor (GTCE-HEMT) with a combined polar and nonpolar AlGaN/GaN heterostucture is presented. The device simulation shows a threshold voltage of 1.24 V, peak transconductance of 182 mS/mm, and subthreshold slope of 85 mV/dec, which are obtained by adjusting the device parameters. Interestingly, it is possible to control the threshold voltage accurately without precisely controlling the etching depth in fabrication by adopting this structure. Besides, the breakdown voltage ( V B ) is significantly increased by 78% in comparison with the value of the conventional MIS-HEMT. Moreover, the fabrication process of the novel device is entirely compatible with that of the conventional depletion-mode (D-mode) polar AlGaN/GaN HEMT. It presents a promising way to realize the switch application and the E/D-mode logic circuits. (paper)

  9. Determination of 68Ga production parameters by different reactions ...

    Gallium-68 (1/2 = 68 min, + = 89%) is an important positron-emitting radionuclide for positron emission tomography and used in nuclear medicine for diagnosing tumours. This study gives a suitable reaction to produce 68Ga. Gallium-68 excitation function via 68Zn(, ) 68Ga, 68Zn(, 2) 68Ga, 70Zn(, 3) 68Ga and ...

  10. Tumor Targeting via Sialic Acid: [68Ga]DOTA-en-pba as a New Tool for Molecular Imaging of Cancer with PET.

    Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Gaitanis, Anastasios; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Paravatou-Petsotas, Maria; Aime, Silvio; Jiménez-Juárez, Rogelio; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Djanashvili, Kristina; Bouziotis, Penelope

    2018-02-20

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of Ga-68-labeled macrocycle (DOTA-en-pba) conjugated with phenylboronic vector for tumor recognition by positron emission tomography (PET), based on targeting of the overexpressed sialic acid (Sia). The imaging reporter DOTA-en-pba was synthesized and labeled with Ga-68 at high efficiency. Cell binding assay on Mel-C and B16-F10 melanoma cells was used to evaluate melanin production and Sia overexpression to determine the best model for demonstrating the capability of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba to recognize tumors. The in vivo PET imaging was done with B16-F10 tumor-bearing SCID mice injected with [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba intravenously. Tumor, blood, and urine metabolites were assessed to evaluate the presence of a targeting agent. The affinity of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba to Sia was demonstrated on B16-F10 melanoma cells, after the production of melanin as well as Sia overexpression was proved to be up to four times higher in this cell line compared to that in Mel-C cells. Biodistribution studies in B16-F10 tumor-bearing SCID mice showed blood clearance at the time points studied, while uptake in the tumor peaked at 60 min post-injection (6.36 ± 2.41 % ID/g). The acquired PET images were in accordance with the ex vivo biodistribution results. Metabolite assessment on tumor, blood, and urine samples showed that [ 68 Ga]DOTA-en-pba remains unmetabolized up to at least 60 min post-injection. Our work is the first attempt for in vivo imaging of cancer by targeting overexpression of sialic acid on cancer cells with a radiotracer in PET.

  11. Endogenous gibberellins in Arabidopsis thaliana and possible steps blocked in the biosynthetic pathways of the semidwarf ga4 and ga5 mutants

    Talon, M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Koornneef, M.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty gibberellins (GAs) have been identified in extracts from shoots of the Landsberg erecta line of Arabidopsis thaliana by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats retention indices. Eight of them are members of the early-13-hydroxylation pathway (GA 53 , GA 44 , GA 19 , GA 17 , GA 20 , GA 1 , GA 29 , and GA 8 ), six are members of the early-3-hydroxylation pathway (GA 37 , GA 27 , GA 36 , GA 13 , GA 4 , and GA 34 ), and the remaining six are members of the non-3,13-hydroxylation pathway (GA 12 , GA 15 , GA 24 , GA 25 , GA 9 , and GFA 51 ). Seven of these GAs were quantified in the Landsberg erecta line of Arabidopsis and in the semidwarf ga4 and ga5 mutants by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring (SIM) using internal standards. The relative levels of the remaining 13 GAs were compared by the use of ion intensities only. The growth-response data, as well as the accumulation of GA 9 in the ga4 mutant, indicate that GA 9 is not active in Arabidopsis, but it must be 3β-hydroxytlated to GA 4 to become bioactive. It is concluded that the reduced levels of the 3β-hydroxy-GAs, GA 1 and GA 4 , are the cause of the semidwarf growth habit of both mutants

  12. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  13. New secondary metabolites of phenylbutyrate in humans and rats.

    Kasumov, Takhar; Brunengraber, Laura L; Comte, Blandine; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Jobbins, Kathryn; Thomas, Katherine; David, France; Kinman, Renee; Wehrli, Suzanne; Dahms, William; Kerr, Douglas; Nissim, Itzhak; Brunengraber, Henri

    2004-01-01

    Phenylbutyrate is used to treat inborn errors of ureagenesis, malignancies, cystic fibrosis, and thalassemia. High-dose phenylbutyrate therapy results in toxicity, the mechanism of which is unexplained. The known metabolites of phenylbutyrate are phenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, and phenylbutyrylglutamine. These are excreted in urine, accounting for a variable fraction of the dose. We identified new metabolites of phenylbutyrate in urine of normal humans and in perfused rat livers. These metabolites result from interference between the metabolism of phenylbutyrate and that of carbohydrates and lipids. The new metabolites fall into two categories, glucuronides and phenylbutyrate beta-oxidation side products. Two questions are raised by these data. First, is the nitrogen-excreting potential of phenylbutyrate diminished by ingestion of carbohydrates or lipids? Second, does competition between the metabolism of phenylbutyrate, carbohydrates, and lipids alter the profile of phenylbutyrate metabolites? Finally, we synthesized glycerol esters of phenylbutyrate. These are partially bioavailable in rats and could be used to administer large doses of phenylbutyrate in a sodium-free, noncaustic form.

  14. Some Metabolites Act as Second Messengers in Yeast Chronological Aging

    Karamat Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating the longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining cellular processes. The concentrations of the key metabolites that affect yeast chronological aging are controlled spatially and temporally. Here, we analyze mechanisms through which the spatiotemporal dynamics of changes in the concentrations of the key metabolites influence yeast chronological lifespan. Our analysis indicates that a distinct set of metabolites can act as second messengers that define the pace of yeast chronological aging. Molecules that can operate both as intermediates of yeast metabolism and as second messengers of yeast chronological aging include reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glycerol, trehalose, hydrogen peroxide, amino acids, sphingolipids, spermidine, hydrogen sulfide, acetic acid, ethanol, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerol. We discuss several properties that these second messengers of yeast chronological aging have in common with second messengers of signal transduction. We outline how these second messengers of yeast chronological aging elicit changes in cell functionality and viability in response to changes in the nutrient, energy, stress, and proliferation status of the cell.

  15. Bioactive Metabolites from Pathogenic and Endophytic Fungi of Forest Trees.

    Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Linaldeddu, Benedetto Teodoro; Scanu, Bruno; Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio

    2018-01-01

    Fungi play an important role in terrestrial ecosystems interacting positively or negatively with plants. These interactions are complex and the outcomes are different depending on the fungal lifestyles, saprotrophic, mutualistic or pathogenic. Furthermore, fungi are well known for producing secondary metabolites, originating from different biosynthetic pathways, which possess biological properties of considerable biotechnological interest. Among the terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests represent an enormous reservoir of fungal diversity. This review will highlight the goldmine of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophytic fungi of forest trees with focus on their biological activities. A structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature was undertaken using a research discovery application providing access to a large and authoritative source of references. The papers selected were examined and the main results were reported and discussed. Two hundred forthy-one papers were included in the review, outlined a large number of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophiltic fungi and their biological activities, including phytotoxic, antifungal, antioomycetes, antibacterial, brine shrimp lethality, mosquito biting deterrence and larvicidal, cytotoxic, antiproliferative and many other bioactivities. The findings of this review confirm the importance of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophytic fungi from forest plants growing in temperate regions as an excellent prospects to discover compounds with new bioactivities and mode of actions. In addition, the potential of some metabolites as a source of new drugs and biopesticides is underlined. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. A modular modulation method for achieving increases in metabolite production.

    Acerenza, Luis; Monzon, Pablo; Ortega, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the production of overproducing strains represents a great challenge. Here, we develop a modular modulation method to determine the key steps for genetic manipulation to increase metabolite production. The method consists of three steps: (i) modularization of the metabolic network into two modules connected by linking metabolites, (ii) change in the activity of the modules using auxiliary rates producing or consuming the linking metabolites in appropriate proportions and (iii) determination of the key modules and steps to increase production. The mathematical formulation of the method in matrix form shows that it may be applied to metabolic networks of any structure and size, with reactions showing any kind of rate laws. The results are valid for any type of conservation relationships in the metabolite concentrations or interactions between modules. The activity of the module may, in principle, be changed by any large factor. The method may be applied recursively or combined with other methods devised to perform fine searches in smaller regions. In practice, it is implemented by integrating to the producer strain heterologous reactions or synthetic pathways producing or consuming the linking metabolites. The new procedure may contribute to develop metabolic engineering into a more systematic practice. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  18. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Salgado, R.; Oehmen, A.; Carvalho, G.; Noronha, J.P.; Reis, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: ► Clofibric acid is biodegradable. ► Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. ► Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. ► The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L −1 ), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  19. Detection of mastitis pathogens by analysis of volatile bacterial metabolites.

    Hettinga, K A; van Valenberg, H J F; Lam, T J G M; van Hooijdonk, A C M

    2008-10-01

    The ability to detect mastitis pathogens based on their volatile metabolites was studied. Milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis, caused by Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli were collected. In addition, samples from cows without clinical mastitis and with low somatic cell count (SCC) were collected for comparison. All mastitis samples were examined by using classical microbiological methods, followed by headspace analysis for volatile metabolites. Milk from culture-negative samples contained a lower number and amount of volatile components compared with cows with clinical mastitis. Because of variability between samples within a group, comparisons between pathogens were not sufficient for classification of the samples by univariate statistics. Therefore, an artificial neural network was trained to classify the pathogen in the milk samples based on the bacterial metabolites. The trained network differentiated milk from uninfected and infected quarters very well. When comparing pathogens, Staph. aureus produced a very different pattern of volatile metabolites compared with the other samples. Samples with coagulase-negative staphylococci and E. coli had enough dissimilarity with the other pathogens, making it possible to separate these 2 pathogens from each other and from the other samples. The 2 streptococcus species did not show significant differences between each other but could be identified as a different group from the other pathogens. Five groups can thus be identified based on the volatile bacterial metabolites: Staph. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci (Strep. uberis and Strep. dysgalactiae as one group), E. coli, and uninfected quarters.

  20. Fetal Serum Metabolites Are Independently Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Yong-Ping Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Gestational diabetes (GDM might be associated with alterations in the metabolomic profile of affected mothers and their offspring. Until now, there is a paucity of studies that investigated both, the maternal and the fetal serum metabolome in the setting of GDM. Mounting evidence suggests that the fetus is not just passively affected by gestational disease but might play an active role in it. Metabolomic studies performed in maternal blood and fetal cord blood could help to better discern distinct fetal from maternal disease interactions. Methods: At the time of birth, serum samples from mothers and newborns (cord blood samples were collected and screened for 163 metabolites utilizing tandem mass spectrometry. The cohort consisted of 412 mother/child pairs, including 31 cases of maternal GDM. Results: An initial non-adjusted analysis showed that eight metabolites in the maternal blood and 54 metabolites in the cord blood were associated with GDM. After Benjamini-Hochberg (BH procedure and adjustment for confounding factors for GDM, fetal phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C 32: 1 and proline still showed an independent association with GDM. Conclusions: This study found metabolites in cord blood which were associated with GDM, even after adjustment for established risk factors of GDM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an independent association between fetal serum metabolites and maternal GDM. Our findings might suggest a potential effect of the fetal metabolome on maternal GDM.

  1. Fungal and bacterial metabolites in commercial poultry feed from Nigeria.

    Ezekiel, C N; Bandyopadhyay, R; Sulyok, M; Warth, B; Krska, R

    2012-08-01

    Metabolites of toxigenic fungi and bacteria occur as natural contaminants (e.g. mycotoxins) in feedstuffs making them unsafe to animals. The multi-toxin profiles in 58 commercial poultry feed samples collected from 19 districts in 17 states of Nigeria were determined by LC/ESI-MS/MS with a single extraction step and no clean-up. Sixty-three (56 fungal and seven bacterial) metabolites were detected with concentrations ranging up to 10,200 µg kg⁻¹ in the case of aurofusarin. Fusarium toxins were the most prevalent group of fungal metabolites, whereas valinomycin occurred in more than 50% of the samples. Twelve non-regulatory fungal and seven bacterial metabolites detected and quantified in this study have never been reported previously in naturally contaminated stored grains or finished feed. Among the regulatory toxins in poultry feed, aflatoxin concentrations in 62% of samples were above 20 µg kg⁻¹, demonstrating high prevalence of unsafe levels of aflatoxins in Nigeria. Deoxynivalenol concentrations exceeded 1000 µg kg⁻¹ in 10.3% of samples. Actions are required to reduce the consequences from regulatory mycotoxins and understand the risks of the single or co-occurrence of non-regulatory metabolites for the benefit of the poultry industry.

  2. Influence of Cremophor EL and genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel and its metabolites using a mechanism-based model.

    Fransson, Martin N; Gréen, Henrik; Litton, Jan-Eric; Friberg, Lena E

    2011-02-01

    The formulation vehicle Cremophor EL has previously been shown to affect paclitaxel kinetics, but it is not known whether it also affects the kinetics of paclitaxel metabolites. This information may be important for understanding paclitaxel metabolism in vivo and in the investigation of the role of genetic polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes CYP2C8 and CYP3A4/CYP3A5 and the ABCB1 transporter. In this study we used the population pharmacokinetic approach to explore the influence of predicted Cremophor EL concentrations on paclitaxel (Taxol) metabolites. In addition, correlations between genetic polymorphisms and enzyme activity with clearance of paclitaxel, its two primary metabolites, 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel and p-3'-hydroxypaclitaxel, and its secondary metabolite, 6α-p-3'-dihydroxypaclitaxel were investigated. Model building was based on 1156 samples from a study with 33 women undergoing paclitaxel treatment for gynecological cancer. Total concentrations of paclitaxel were fitted to a model described previously. One-compartment models characterized unbound metabolite concentrations. Total concentrations of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel and p-3'-hydroxypaclitaxel were strongly dependent on predicted Cremophor EL concentrations, but this association was not found for 6α-p-3'-dihydroxypaclitaxel. Clearance of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel (fraction metabolized) was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the ABCB1 allele G2677T/A. Individuals carrying the polymorphisms G/A (n = 3) or G/G (n = 5) showed a 30% increase, whereas individuals with polymorphism T/T (n = 8) showed a 27% decrease relative to those with the polymorphism G/T (n = 17). The correlation of G2677T/A with 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel has not been described previously but supports other findings of the ABCB1 transporter playing a part in paclitaxel metabolism.

  3. Cubic AlGaN/GaN structures for device application

    Schoermann, Joerg

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this work was the growth and the characterization of cubic GaN, cubic AlGaN/GaN heterostructures and cubic AlN/GaN superlattice structures. Reduction of the surface and interface roughness was the key issue to show the potential for the use of cubic nitrides in futur devices. All structures were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on free standing 3C-SiC (001) substrates. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction was first investigated to determine the Ga coverage of c-GaN during growth. Using the intensity of the electron beam as a probe, optimum growth conditions were found when a 1 monolayer coverage is formed at the surface. GaN samples grown under these conditions reveal excellent structural properties. On top of the c-GaN buffer c-AlGaN/GaN single and multiple quantum wells were deposited. The well widths ranged from 2.5 to 7.5 nm. During growth of Al{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N/GaN quantum wells clear reflection high energy electron diffraction oscillations were observed indicating a two dimensional growth mode. We observed strong room-temperature, ultraviolet photoluminescence at about 3.3 eV with a minimum linewidth of 90 meV. The peak energy of the emission versus well width is reproduced by a square-well Poisson- Schroedinger model calculation. We found that piezoelectric effects are absent in c-III nitrides with a (001) growth direction. Intersubband transition in the wavelength range from 1.6 {mu}m to 2.1 {mu}m was systematically investigated in AlN/GaN superlattices (SL), grown on 100 nm thick c-GaN buffer layers. The SLs consisted of 20 periods of GaN wells with a thickness between 1.5 nm and 2.1 nm and AlN barriers with a thickness of 1.35 nm. The first intersubband transitions were observed in metastable cubic III nitride structures in the range between 1.6 {mu}m and 2.1 {mu}m. (orig.)

  4. Growth and characterization of GaAs-GaSb III-V pseudo-binary nanoparticles

    Schamp, C.T. [Cerium Laboratories, Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Jesser, W.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 116 Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The GaAs-GaSb pseudo-binary materials system presents an interesting challenge for growth because of 1) the existence of a miscibility gap in the solid-solid portion of the equilibrium phase diagram, and 2) the large differences in vapor pressure between the column III element, Ga, and the column V elements, As and Sb. To overcome these challenges in the growth of GaAs, GaSb, and Ga{sub 50}As{sub x}Sb{sub 50-x} alloy nanoparticles, single- and dual-target pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques were implemented using an Nd:YAG laser operated with a harmonic generator to utilize the second harmonic wavelength (532 nm) and a combination of the fundamental and the second harmonic wavelengths (1064 nm+532 nm). The nanoparticles were collected on amorphous carbon films for subsequent characterization by transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows that single phase GaAs-rich Ga{sub 50}As{sub x}Sb{sub 50-x} (28>x>50) nanoparticles and nanocrystalline films have been formed through dual-target, single-wavelength (532 nm) pulsed laser ablation. Interestingly, through the ablation of the single component targets, two-phase particles were also found to form. These two phase particles resemble ''nano-ice cream cones'' with solid cones of either GaAs or GaSb with a spherical ''ice cream'' ball of Ga located at the wide portion of the cone, which is either an amorphous phase or liquid phase. Through an analysis by STEM-EDX spectroscopy, these particles are found to be consistant with this model. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Photoelectric characteristics of metal-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-GaAs structures

    Kalygina, V. M., E-mail: Kalygina@ngs.ru; Vishnikina, V. V.; Petrova, Yu. S.; Prudaev, I. A.; Yaskevich, T. M. [National Research Tomsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the effect of thermal annealing in argon and of oxygen plasma processing on the photoelectric properties of GaAs-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Me structures. Gallium-oxide films are fabricated by photostimulated electrochemical oxidation of epitaxial gallium-arsenide layers with n-type conductivity. The as-deposited films were amorphous, but their processing in oxygen plasma led to the nucleation of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallites. The unannealed films are nontransparent in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) ranges and there is no photocurrent in structures based on them. After annealing at 900°C for 30 min, the gallium-oxide films contain only β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallites and become transparent. Under illumination of the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-GaAs structures with visible light, the photocurrent appears. This effect can be attributed to radiation absorption in GaAs. The photocurrent and its voltage dependence are determined by the time of exposure to the oxygen plasma. In the UV range, the sensitivity of the structures increases with decreasing radiation wavelength, starting at λ ≤ 230 nm. This is due to absorption in the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. Reduction in the structure sensitivity with an increase in the time of exposure to oxygen plasma can be caused by the incorporation of defects both at the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-GaAs interface and in the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} film.

  6. First-principles electronic structure of Mn-doped GaAs, GaP, and GaN semiconductors

    Schulthess, T C [Computer Science and Mathematics Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Temmerman, W M [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Szotek, Z [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Svane, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petit, L [Computer Science and Mathematics Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States)

    2007-04-23

    We present first-principles electronic structure calculations of Mn-doped III-V semiconductors based on the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) as well as the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD). We find that it is crucial to use a self-interaction free approach to properly describe the electronic ground state. The SIC-LSD calculations predict the proper electronic ground state configuration for Mn in GaAs, GaP, and GaN. Excellent quantitative agreement with experiment is found for the magnetic moment and p-d exchange in (GaMn)As. These results allow us to validate commonly used models for magnetic semiconductors. Furthermore, we discuss the delicate problem of extracting binding energies of localized levels from density functional theory calculations. We propose three approaches to take into account final state effects to estimate the binding energies of the Mn d levels in GaAs. We find good agreement between computed values and estimates from photoemission experiments.

  7. A new wire fabrication processing using high Ga content Cu-Ga compound in V3Ga compound superconducting wire

    Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Nishimura, Arata; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Iijima, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Takao

    2007-01-01

    A superconducting magnet system is also one of the important components in an advanced magnetic confinement fusion reactor. Then it is required to have a higher magnetic field property to confine and maintain steady-sate burning deuterium (D)-tritium (T) fusion plasma in the large interspace during the long term operation. Burning plasma is sure to generate 14 MeV fusion neutrons during deuterium-tritium reaction, and fusion neutrons will be streamed and penetrated to superconducting magnet through large ports with damping neutron energy. Therefore, it is necessary to consider carefully not only superconducting property but also neutron irradiation property in superconducting materials for use in a future fusion reactor, and a 'low activation and high field superconducting magnet' will be required to realize the fusion power plant beyond International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). V-based superconducting material has a much shorter decay time of induced radioactivity compared with the Nb-based materials. We thought that the V 3 Ga compound was one of the most promising materials for the 'low activation and higher field superconductors' for an advanced fusion reactor. However, the present critical current density (J c ) property of V 3 Ga compound wire is insufficient for apply to fusion magnet applications. We investigated a new route PIT process using a high Ga content Cu-Ga compound in order to improve the superconducting property of the V 3 Ga compound wire. (author)

  8. First-principles electronic structure of Mn-doped GaAs, GaP, and GaN semiconductors

    Schulthess, T C; Temmerman, W M; Szotek, Z; Svane, A; Petit, L

    2007-01-01

    We present first-principles electronic structure calculations of Mn-doped III-V semiconductors based on the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) as well as the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD). We find that it is crucial to use a self-interaction free approach to properly describe the electronic ground state. The SIC-LSD calculations predict the proper electronic ground state configuration for Mn in GaAs, GaP, and GaN. Excellent quantitative agreement with experiment is found for the magnetic moment and p-d exchange in (GaMn)As. These results allow us to validate commonly used models for magnetic semiconductors. Furthermore, we discuss the delicate problem of extracting binding energies of localized levels from density functional theory calculations. We propose three approaches to take into account final state effects to estimate the binding energies of the Mn d levels in GaAs. We find good agreement between computed values and estimates from photoemission experiments

  9. 68Ga-triacetylfusarinine C and 68Ga-ferrioxamine E for Aspergillus infection imaging: uptake specificity in various microorganisms

    Petrik, M.; Haas, H. de; Laverman, P.; Schrettl, M.; Franssen, G.M.; Blatzer, M.; Decristoforo, C.

    2014-01-01

    (68)Ga-triacetylfusarinine C ((68)Ga-TAFC) and (68)Ga-ferrioxamine E ((68)Ga-FOXE) showed excellent targeting properties in Aspergillus fumigatus rat infection model. Here, we report on the comparison of specificity towards different microorganisms and human lung cancer cells (H1299).The in vitro

  10. Spin-polarized electron tunneling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface

    Andresen, S.E.; Sørensen, B.S.; Lindelof, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Spin-polarized electron coupling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface was investigated. The injection of spin-polarized electrons was detected as circular polarized emission from a GaInAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode. The angular momentum selection rules were simplified...

  11. Red to near-infrared emission from InGaN/GaN quantum-disks-in-nanowires LED

    Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Shen, Chao; Jahangir, Shafat; Janjua, Bilal; Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Kang, Chun Hong; Syed, Ahad A.; Li, Jingqi; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-01-01

    The InGaN/GaN quantum-disks-in-nanowire light-emitting diode (LED) with emission centered at ~830nm, the longest emission wavelength ever reported in the InGaN/GaN system, and spectral linewidth of 290nm, has been fabricated with p-side-down on a Cu substrate.

  12. AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with a low sub-threshold swing on free-standing GaN wafer

    Xinke Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs with low sub-threshold swing SS on free-standing GaN wafer. High quality AlGaN/GaN epi-layer has been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD on free-standing GaN, small full-width hall maximum (FWHM of 42.9 arcsec for (0002 GaN XRD peaks and ultralow dislocation density (∼104-105 cm-2 were obtained. Due to these extremely high quality material properties, the fabricated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs achieve a low SS (∼60 mV/decade, low hysteresis of 54 mV, and high peak electron mobility μeff of ∼1456 cm2V-1s-1. Systematic study of materials properties and device characteristics exhibits that GaN-on-GaN AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are promising candidate for next generation high power device applications.

  13. Oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol in the fetal Syrian golden hamster

    Maydl, R.; Metzler, M.

    1984-01-01

    14 C-Diethylstilbestrol was administered orally, intraperitoneally, and intrafetally to 15-day pregnant hamsters at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and the radioactivity was determined in the fetus, placenta, and maternal liver after 6 hours. Significant amounts of radioactivity were found in these tissues in every case, indicating maternal-fetal and fetal-maternal transfer of diethylstilbestrol. Part of the radioactivity found in the tissues could not be extracted even after excessive washing. This implied the presence of reactive metabolites. In the fetal and placental extracts, eight oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol were identified by mass fragmentography as hydroxy- and methoxy-derivatives of diethylstilbestrol, pseudodiethylstilbestrol, and dienestrol. The presence of oxidative metabolites in the hamster fetus and the covalent binding to tissue macromolecules are possibly associated with the fetotoxic effects of diethylstilbestrol

  14. Intact penetratin metabolite permeates across Caco-2 monolayers

    Birch, Ditlev; Christensen, Malene Vinther; Stærk, Dan

    . Previous studies have demonstrated that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) may be used as carriers in order to improve the bioavailability of a therapeutic cargo like insulin after oral administration. Penetratin, a commonly used CPP, has been shown to increase the uptake of insulin across Caco-2 cell......-2 cells cultured on permeable filter inserts and in cell lysates, respectively. The epithelial permeation of penetratin and the formed metabolites was assessed by using Caco-2 monolayers cultured on permeable filter inserts. Results Preliminary data revealed that at least one specific metabolite...... is formed upon both intracellular and extracellular degradation of penetratin (figure 1A). Following incubation with epithelium for 4 hours, the metabolite permeated the Caco-2 monolayer and the concentration increased approximately 10-fold when compared to a sample collected following 15 minutes...

  15. Emerging New Strategies for Successful Metabolite Identification in Metabolomics

    Bingol, Ahmet K.; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Mouzhe; Bruschweiler, Rafael

    2016-02-26

    NMR is a very powerful tool for the identification of known and unknown (or unnamed) metabolites in complex mixtures as encountered in metabolomics. Known compounds can be reliably identified using 2D NMR methods, such as 13C-1H HSQC, for which powerful web servers with databases are available for semi-automated analysis. For the identification of unknown compounds, new combinations of NMR with MS have been developed recently that make synergistic use of the mutual strengths of the two techniques. The use of chemical additives to the NMR tube, such as reactive agents, paramagnetic ions, or charged silica nanoparticles, permit the identification of metabolites with specific physical chemical properties. In the following sections, we give an overview of some of the recent advances in metabolite identification and discuss remaining challenges.

  16. Bioactive secondary metabolites from marine microbes for drug discovery.

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani

    2012-01-01

    The isolation and extraction of novel bioactive secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms have a biomedical potential for future drug discovery as the oceans cover 70% of the planet's surface and life on earth originates from sea. Wide range of novel bioactive secondary metabolites exhibiting pharmacodynamic properties has been isolated from marine microorganisms and many to be discovered. The compounds isolated from marine organisms (macro and micro) are important in their natural form and also as templates for synthetic modifications for the treatments for variety of deadly to minor diseases. Many technical issues are yet to overcome before wide-scale bioprospecting of marine microorganisms becomes a reality. This chapter focuses on some novel secondary metabolites having antitumor, antivirus, enzyme inhibitor, and other bioactive properties identified and isolated from marine microorganisms including bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and cyanobacteria, which could serve as potentials for drug discovery after their clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota and microbial metabolites in Parkinson's Disease.

    Sun, Meng-Fei; Shen, Yan-Qin

    2018-04-26

    Gut microbial dysbiosis and alteration of microbial metabolites in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been increasingly reported. Dysbiosis in the composition and abundance of gut microbiota can affect both the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system (CNS), indicating the existence of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and thereby causing CNS diseases. Disturbance of the microbiota-gut-brain axis has been linked to specific microbial products that are related to gut inflammation and neuroinflammation. Future directions should therefore focus on the exploration of specific gut microbes or microbial metabolites that contribute to the development of PD. Microbiota-targeted interventions, such as antibiotics, probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation, have been shown to favorably affect host health. In this review, recent findings regarding alterations and the role of gut microbiota and microbial metabolites in PD are summarized, and potential molecular mechanisms and microbiota-targeted interventions in PD are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Antagonism of presynaptic dopamine receptors by phenothiazine drug metabolites

    Nowak, J.Z.; Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z.; Dahl, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    Electrically evoked release of dopamine from the caudate nucleus is reduced by the dopamine receptor agonists, apomorphine and bromocriptine, and facilitated by neuroleptic drugs, which act as dopamine autoreceptor antagonists. The potencies of chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, levomepromazine and their hydroxy-metabolites in modulating electrically evoked release of dopamine were examined by superfusion of rabbit caudate nucleus slices pre-incubated with 3 H-dopamine. O-Desmethyl levomepromazine, 3-hydroxy- and 7-hydroxy metabolites of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine facilitated electrically evoked release of 3 H-dopamine, having potencies similar to that of the parent compounds. 7-Hydroxy fluphenazine was less active than fluphenazine in this system. These results indicate that phenolic metabolites of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine, but not of fluphenazine, may contribute to effects of the drugs mediated by presynaptic dopamine receptors

  19. Electronic passivation of n- and p-type GaAs using chemical vapor deposited GaS

    Tabib-Azar, Massood; Kang, Soon; Macinnes, Andrew N.; Power, Michael B.; Barron, Andrew R.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the electronic passivation of n- and p-type GaAs using CVD cubic GaS. Au/GaS/GaAs-fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures exhibit classical high-frequency capacitor vs voltage (C-V) behavior with well-defined accumulation and inversion regions. Using high- and low-frequency C-V, the interface trap densities of about 10 exp 11/eV per sq cm on both n- and p-type GaAs are determined. The electronic condition of GaS/GaAs interface did not show any deterioration after a six week time period.

  20. Raman Scattering analysis of InGaAs and AlGaAs superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Oeztuerk, N.; Bahceli, S.

    2010-01-01

    InGaAs/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and investigated by X-ray diffraction and micro Raman spectroscopy. Phonon modes are investigated in backscattering from (001) surface. In the measured micro Raman spectrum for both structure, phonon peaks can be resolved for GaAs. These are longitudinal optical (LO) mode at 293 cm - 1 and 294 cm - 1 for InGaAs and AlGaAs, respectively.

  1. Significant performance enhancement in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor by high-κ organic dielectric

    Ze-Gao, Wang; Yuan-Fu, Chen; Cao, Chen; Ben-Lang, Tian; Fu-Tong, Chu; Xing-Zhao, Liu; Yan-Rong, Li

    2010-01-01

    The electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with and without high-κ organic dielectrics are investigated. The maximum drain current I D max and the maximum transconductance g m max of the organic dielectric/AlGaN/GaN structure can be enhanced by 74.5%, and 73.7% compared with those of the bare AlGaN/GaN HEMT, respectively. Both the threshold voltage V T and g m max of the dielectric/AlGaN/GaN HEMT are strongly dielectric-constant-dependent. Our results suggest that it is promising to significantly improve the performance of the AlGaN/GaN HEMT by introducing the high-κ organic dielectric. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Misfit dislocation reduction in InGaAs epilayers grown on porous GaAs substrates

    Dimitrakopulos, G.P.; Bazioti, C.; Grym, Jan; Gladkov, Petar; Hulicius, Eduard; Pangrác, Jiří; Pacherová, Oliva; Komninou, Ph.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, Jul (2014), s. 89-93 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12GR034 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : compound semiconductors * InGaAs * porous substrate * misfit dislocations * strain Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  3. Integrated photonic platform based on semipolar InGaN/GaN multiple section laser diodes

    Shen, Chao

    2017-11-30

    The challenges to realizing III-nitride photonic integrated circuit (PIC) are discussed. Utilizing InGaN-based multi-section laser diode (LD) on semipolar GaN substrate, the seamless on-chip integration of III-nitride waveguide photodetector (WPD) in the visible regime has been demonstrated.

  4. Robust X-band LNAs in AlGaN/GaN technology

    Janssen, J.P.B.; Heijningen, M. van; Visser, G.C.; Rodenburg, M.; Johnson, H.K.; Uren, M.J.; Morvan, E.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    Gallium-Nitride technology is known for its high power density and power amplifier designs, but is also very well suited to realise robust receiver components. This paper presents the design, realisation and measurement of two robust AlGaN/GaN low noise amplifiers. The two versions have been

  5. Robust X-band LNAs in AlGaN/GaN technology

    Janssen, J.P.B.; van Heiningen, M.; Visser, G.C.; Rodenburg, M.; Johnson, H.K.; Uren, M.J.; Morvan, E.; van Vliet, Frank Edward

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Gallium-Nitride technology is known for its high power density and power amplifier designs, but is also very well suited to realise robust receiver components. This paper presents the design, realisation and measurement of two robust AlGaN/GaN low noise amplifiers. The two versions have

  6. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Hajlasz, M.; Donkers, J.J.T.M.; Sque, S.J.; Heil, S.B.S.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Rietveld, F.J.R.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact

  7. Characterization of recessed Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN

    Hajlasz, M.; Donkers, J.J.T.M.; Sque, S.J.; Heil, S.B.S.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Rietveld, F.J.R.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    In this work the choice of appropriate test structures and characterization methods for recessed Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN is discussed. It is shown that, in the worst-case scenario, the prevailing assumption of identical sheet resistance between and under the contacts can lead to errors of up to

  8. Integrated photonic platform based on semipolar InGaN/GaN multiple section laser diodes

    Shen, Chao; Lee, Changmin; Ng, Tien Khee; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    The challenges to realizing III-nitride photonic integrated circuit (PIC) are discussed. Utilizing InGaN-based multi-section laser diode (LD) on semipolar GaN substrate, the seamless on-chip integration of III-nitride waveguide photodetector (WPD) in the visible regime has been demonstrated.

  9. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Cooke, David

    We studied the THz conductivity of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs)by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. A nonexponential carrier density decay is observed due to the restoration of a built-in piezoelectric field. Terahertz conductivity spectra show a nonmetallic behavior of the carriers....

  10. Collective Behavior of Interwell Excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs Double Quantum Wells

    Larionov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2000-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectra of interwell excitons in double GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (n-i-n structures) have been investigated (an interwell excition in these systems is an electron-hole pair spatially separated by a narrow AlAs barrier). Under resonance excitation by circular polarized light...

  11. Coherent dynamics of interwell excitons in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs superlattices

    Mizeikis, V.; Birkedal, Dan; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    1997-01-01

    Coherent exciton dynamics in a GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs narrow-miniband superlattice is studied by spectrally resolved transient four-wave mixing. Coherent optical properties of the investigated structure are found to be strongly affected by the existence of two different heavy-hole excitonic states. One...

  12. Stability of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures after hydrogen plasma treatment

    Babchenko, O., E-mail: oleg.babchenko@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering SAV, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Dzuba, J.; Lalinský, T. [Institute of Electrical Engineering SAV, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vojs, M. [Institute of Electronics and Photonics STU, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vincze, A. [International Laser Centre, Ilkovičova 3, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ižák, T. [Institute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague (Czech Republic); Vanko, G. [Institute of Electrical Engineering SAV, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • AlGaN/GaNheterostructures with electric contacts were treated by hydrogen plasma. • No surface degradation after treatment was detected by SEM. • Hydrogen plasma caused increasing of sheet resistance up to 3.5 times after 60 min. • Incorporation of hydrogen in AlGaN sub-surface region was observed by SIMS. • Electrical measurements indicate hydrogen induced Schottky barrier lowering. - Abstract: We report on the investigation of low temperature (300 °C) hydrogen plasma treatment influence on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. This issue was raised in the frame of study on processes related to hybrid integration of diamond with GaN-based devices. At the same time, the capabilities of thin SiN{sub x} covering were investigated. The samples were exposed to low pressure hydrogen plasma ignited in the linear plasma system at low temperature. We analyze the surface morphology of samples by scanning electron microscopy while microstructural changes down to AlGaN/GaN interface were studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The sheet resistance, monitored using circular transmission line measurements, increases more than 3.5 times after 60 min treatment. The basic transport properties of the fabricated circular high electron mobility transistors after H{sub 2} plasma treatment were analyzed. The sheet resistance increasing was attributed to the decrease of effective mobility. Whilst, the observed Schottky barrier lowering indicates necessity of gate contact protection.

  13. Spin injection from Co2MnGa into an InGaAs quantum well

    Hickey, M. C.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Holmes, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated spin injection from a full Heusler alloy Co2MnGa thin film into a (100) InGaAs quantum well in a semiconductor light-emitting diode structure at a temperature of 5 K. The detection is performed in the oblique Hanle geometry, allowing quantification of the effective spin lifet...

  14. Radiative and non-radiative recombination in GaInN/GaN quantum wells

    Netzel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis deal with the occurence of V defectsin GaInN/GaN quantum film structures grown by means of organometallic gas phase epitaxy, and the effects, which have the V defects respectively the GaInN quantum films on the V-defect facets on the emission and recombination properties of the whole GaInN/GaN quantum film structure. The V-defects themselves, inverse pyramidal vacancies with hexagonal base in the semiconductor layers, arise under suitable growth conditions around the percussion violations, which extend in lattice-mismatched growth of GaN on the heterosubstrates sapphire or silicon carbide starting in growth direction through the crystal. If GaInN layers are grown over V-defect dispersed layers on the (1-101) facets of the V defects and the (0001) facets, the growth front of the structure, different growth velocities are present, which lead to differently wide GaInN quantum films on each facets

  15. Micro-photoluminescence of GaAs/AlGaAs triple concentric quantum rings.

    Abbarchi, Marco; Cavigli, Lucia; Somaschini, Claudio; Bietti, Sergio; Gurioli, Massimo; Vinattieri, Anna; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2011-10-31

    A systematic optical study, including micro, ensemble and time resolved photoluminescence of GaAs/AlGaAs triple concentric quantum rings, self-assembled via droplet epitaxy, is presented. Clear emission from localized states belonging to the ring structures is reported. The triple rings show a fast decay dynamics, around 40 ps, which is expected to be useful for ultrafast optical switching applications.

  16. Photoluminescence studies of individual and few GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    Young, M.P.; Woodhead, C.S.; Roberts, J.; Noori, Y.J.; Noble, M.T.; Krier, A.; Smakman, E.P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Hayne, M.; Young, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical studies of individual and few GaSb quantum rings embedded in a GaAs matrix. Contrary to expectation for type-II confinement, we measure rich spectra containing sharp lines. These lines originate from excitonic recombination and are observed to have resolution-limited full-width at

  17. Carrier dynamics in submonolayer InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Zhang, Yating; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2006-01-01

    Carrier dynamics of submonolayer InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) were studied by microphotoluminecence (MPL), selectively excited photoluminescence (SEPL), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL). MPL and SEPL show the coexistence of localized and delocalized states, and different local phonon...

  18. Multilayer self-organization of InGaAs quantum wires on GaAs surfaces

    Wang, Zhiming M.; Kunets, Vasyl P.; Xie, Yanze Z.; Schmidbauer, Martin; Dorogan, Vitaliy G.; Mazur, Yuriy I.; Salamo, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular-Beam Epitaxy growth of multiple In 0.4 Ga 0.6 As layers on GaAs (311)A and GaAs (331)A has been investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Photoluminescence. On GaAs (311)A, uniformly distributed In 0.4 Ga 0.6 As quantum wires (QWRs) with wider lateral separation were achieved, presenting a significant improvement in comparison with the result on single layer [H. Wen, Z.M. Wang, G.J. Salamo, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84 (2004) 1756]. On GaAs (331)A, In 0.4 Ga 0.6 As QWRs were revealed to be much straighter than in the previous report on multilayer growth [Z. Gong, Z. Niu, Z. Fang, Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 1140]. These observations are discussed in terms of the strain-field interaction among multilayers, enhancement of surface mobility at high temperature, and surface stability of GaAs (311)A and (331)A surfaces.

  19. InAlGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells: line widths, transition energies and segregation

    Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of InAlCaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells pseudomorphically grown on GaAs using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transition energies, measured with photoluminescence (PL), are modelled solving the Schrodinger equation, and taking into account segregation in the group...

  20. A localized orbital description of ideal vacancies in GaP and GaSb

    Erbarut, E.; Tomak, M.

    1986-10-01

    Gaussian orbitals of s and p symmetry and an empirical pseudopotential Hamiltonian is employed for the study of electronic structures of ideal vacancies in GaP and GaSb. A reasonably accurate description of band structures and densities of states are attained. (author)

  1. Achieving Room Temperature Orange Lasing Using InGaP/InAlGaP Diode Laser

    Al-Jabr, Ahmad

    2015-09-28

    We demonstrated the first orange laser diode at room temperature with a decent total output power of ∼46mW and lasing wavelength of 608nm, using a novel strain-induced quantum well intermixing in InGaP/InAlGaP red laser structure.

  2. Ka-Band AlGaN/GaN HEMT high power and driver amplifier MMICs

    Heijningen, M. van; Vliet, F.E. van; Quay, R.; Raay, F. van; Kiefer, R.; Mueller, S.; Krausse, D.; Seelmann-Eggebert, M.; Mikulla, M.; Schlechtweg, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the MMIC technology, design and characterization of a high power amplifier and driver amplifier MMIC at 30 GHz in AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology are presented. The MMICs are designed using CPW technology on a 390 μm thick SiC substrate. The measured small-signal gain of the driver is 14 dB

  3. Exciton dynamics in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells

    Litvinenko, K.; Birkedal, Dan; Lyssenko, V. G.

    1999-01-01

    The changes induced in the optical absorption spectrum of a GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum well due to a photoexcited carrier distribution are reexamined. We use a femtosecond pump-probe technique to excite excitons and free electron-hole pairs. We find that for densities up to 10(11) cm(-2...

  4. GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si with low threading dislocation density

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Vaisman, Michelle; Lang, Jordan; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-01-01

    GaAsP on Si tandem cells represent a promising path towards achieving high efficiency while leveraging the Si solar knowledge base and low-cost infrastructure. However, dislocation densities exceeding 10"8 cm"−"2 in GaAsP cells on Si have historically hampered the efficiency of such approaches. Here, we report the achievement of low threading dislocation density values of 4.0–4.6 × 10"6 cm"−"2 in GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si, comparable with more established metamorphic solar cells on GaAs. Our GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si exhibit high open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency, allowing them to significantly surpass the power conversion efficiency of previous devices. The results in this work show a realistic path towards dual-junction GaAsP on Si cells with efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  5. AlGaN/InGaN Nitride Based Modulation Doped Field Effect Transistor

    Blair, S

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the proposed work is to investigate the potential advantages of the InGaN channel as a host of the 2DEG and to address the material related problems facing this ternary alloy in the AlGaN...

  6. Potential of small-molecule fungal metabolites in antiviral chemotherapy.

    Roy, Biswajit G

    2017-08-01

    Various viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, influenza, and hepatitis, have emerged as leading causes of human death worldwide. Scientific endeavor since invention of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of pox virus in 1967 resulted in better understanding of virus replication and development of various novel therapeutic strategies. Despite considerable advancement in every facet of drug discovery process, development of commercially viable, safe, and effective drugs for these viruses still remains a big challenge. Decades of intense research yielded a handful of natural and synthetic therapeutic options. But emergence of new viruses and drug-resistant viral strains had made new drug development process a never-ending battle. Small-molecule fungal metabolites due to their vast diversity, stereochemical complexity, and preapproved biocompatibility always remain an attractive source for new drug discovery. Though, exploration of therapeutic importance of fungal metabolites has started early with discovery of penicillin, recent prediction asserted that only a small percentage (5-10%) of fungal species have been identified and much less have been scientifically investigated. Therefore, exploration of new fungal metabolites, their bioassay, and subsequent mechanistic study bears huge importance in new drug discovery endeavors. Though no fungal metabolites so far approved for antiviral treatment, many of these exhibited high potential against various viral diseases. This review comprehensively discussed about antiviral activities of fungal metabolites of diverse origin against some important viral diseases. This also highlighted the mechanistic details of inhibition of viral replication along with structure-activity relationship of some common and important classes of fungal metabolites.

  7. Measurement of hydroxylated PCB metabolites for Slovakia maternal blood serums

    Park, J.S.; Athanasiadou, M; Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Charles, J.; Zhao, G.; Hertz-Picciotto, I. [California Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Petrik, J.; Kocan, A; Trnovec, T. [Bratislava Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2005-07-01

    Although it is known that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have adverse impacts on human health, it is not clear if human health impacts are caused by the PCBs or their related hydroxylated (OH) PCB metabolite compounds. This study measured OH-PCB metabolites in the maternal blood serum specimens from the Svidnik and Michalovce areas in eastern Slovakia where PCBs were intensively produced and inadequately disposed. The aim of the study was to characterize and quantify levels of specific OH-PCB metabolites in Slovakian maternal serums exposed to high environmental PCB levels. All specimens were analyzed for PCBs, and a subset of the samples was analyzed for OH-PCB metabolites. The Wallenburg blood extraction method was adopted to separate the OH-PCBs from the blood serums. Final eluates and calibration standards were spiked with PCB209 as an injection standard before gas chromatography (GC) analysis. OH-PCBs in the samples range from 75{+-}9 per cent to 101{+-}11 per cent. Median concentrations of OH-PCB metabolites of Michalovce samples were approximately twice as high as for the Svidnik samples. Concentrations of OH-PCBs of Michalovce blood samples were comparable to samples obtained from northern Canadian female Inuit and Faroe Island females, and were considered to be among the highest OH-PCB concentrations obtained in human blood. It was concluded that further research is needed to understand the placental transfer of OH-PCBs to the fetus, as well as epidemiological approaches to determine the relationship between the exposure of OH-PCB metabolites and child development. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis in metabolic networks.

    Kiparissides, A; Hatzimanikatis, V

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of large metabolomics datasets enhances the need for computational methodologies that can organize the data in a way that can lead to the inference of meaningful relationships. Knowledge of the metabolic state of a cell and how it responds to various stimuli and extracellular conditions can offer significant insight in the regulatory functions and how to manipulate them. Constraint based methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA), are commonly used to estimate the flow of metabolites through genome-wide metabolic networks, making it possible to identify the ranges of flux values that are consistent with the studied physiological and thermodynamic conditions. However, unless key intracellular fluxes and metabolite concentrations are known, constraint-based models lead to underdetermined problem formulations. This lack of information propagates as uncertainty in the estimation of fluxes and basic reaction properties such as the determination of reaction directionalities. Therefore, knowledge of which metabolites, if measured, would contribute the most to reducing this uncertainty can significantly improve our ability to define the internal state of the cell. In the present work we combine constraint based modeling, Design of Experiments (DoE) and Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) into the Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis (TMSA) method. TMSA ranks metabolites comprising a metabolic network based on their ability to constrain the gamut of possible solutions to a limited, thermodynamically consistent set of internal states. TMSA is modular and can be applied to a single reaction, a metabolic pathway or an entire metabolic network. This is, to our knowledge, the first attempt to use metabolic modeling in order to provide a significance ranking of metabolites to guide experimental measurements. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier

  9. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities

  10. InGaN/GaN multilayer quantum dots yellow-green light-emitting diode with optimized GaN barriers.

    Lv, Wenbin; Wang, Lai; Wang, Jiaxing; Hao, Zhibiao; Luo, Yi

    2012-11-07

    InGaN/GaN multilayer quantum dot (QD) structure is a potential type of active regions for yellow-green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The surface morphologies and crystalline quality of GaN barriers are critical to the uniformity of InGaN QD layers. While GaN barriers were grown in multi-QD layers, we used improved growth parameters by increasing the growth temperature and switching the carrier gas from N2 to H2 in the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. As a result, a 10-layer InGaN/GaN QD LED is demonstrated successfully. The transmission electron microscopy image shows the uniform multilayer InGaN QDs clearly. As the injection current increases from 5 to 50 mA, the electroluminescence peak wavelength shifts from 574 to 537 nm.

  11. GaSb and GaSb/AlSb Superlattice Buffer Layers for High-Quality Photodiodes Grown on Commercial GaAs and Si Substrates

    Gutiérrez, M.; Lloret, F.; Jurczak, P.; Wu, J.; Liu, H. Y.; Araújo, D.

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this work is the integration of InGaAs/GaSb/GaAs heterostructures, with high indium content, on GaAs and Si commercial wafers. The design of an interfacial misfit dislocation array, either on GaAs or Si substrates, allowed growth of strain-free devices. The growth of purposely designed superlattices with their active region free of extended defects on both GaAs and Si substrates is demonstrated. Transmission electron microscopy technique is used for the structural characterization and plastic relaxation study. In the first case, on GaAs substrates, the presence of dopants was demonstrated to reduce several times the threading dislocation density through a strain-hardening mechanism avoiding dislocation interactions, while in the second case, on Si substrates, similar reduction of dislocation interactions is obtained using an AlSb/GaSb superlattice. The latter is shown to redistribute spatially the interfacial misfit dislocation array to reduce dislocation interactions.

  12. N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor formed on sapphire substrate with minimal step bunching

    Prasertsuk, Kiattiwut; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Takeshi; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Suemitsu, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) gate N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) on a (0001) sapphire substrate, which can be expected to operate with lower on-resistance and more easily work on the pinch-off operation than an N-polar AlGaN/GaN HEMT, was fabricated. For suppressing the step bunching and hillocks peculiar in the N-polar growth, a sapphire substrate with an off-cut angle as small as 0.8° was introduced and an N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN HEMT without the step bunching was firstly obtained by optimizing the growth conditions. The previously reported anisotropy of transconductance related to the step was eliminated. The pinch-off operation was also realized. These results indicate that this device is promising.

  13. Metabolite variability in Caribbean sponges of the genus Aplysina

    Monica Puyana

    Full Text Available Abstract Sponges of the genus Aplysina are among the most common benthic animals on reefs of the Caribbean, and display a wide diversity of morphologies and colors. Tissues of these sponges lack mineralized skeletal elements, but contain a dense spongin skeleton and an elaborate series of tyrosine-derived brominated alkaloid metabolites that function as chemical defenses against predatory fishes, but do not deter some molluscs. Among the earliest marine natural products to be isolated and identified, these metabolites remain the subject of intense interest for commercial applications because of their activities in various bioassays. In this study, crude organic extracts from 253 sponges from ten morphotypes among the species Aplysina archeri,Aplysina bathyphila,Aplysina cauliformis,Aplysina fistularis,Aplysina fulva,A. insularis, and Aplysina lacunosa were analyzed by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS to characterize the pattern of intra- and interspecific variabilities of the twelve major secondary metabolites present therein. Patterns across Aplysina species ranged from the presence of mostly a single compound, fistularin-3, in A. cauliformis, to a mixture of metabolites present in the other species. These patterns did not support the biotransformation hypothesis for conversion of large molecular weight molecules to smaller ones for the purpose of enhanced defense. Discriminant analyses of the metabolite data revealed strong taxonomic patterns that support a close relationship between A. fistularis,A. fulva and A. insularis, while two morphotypes of A. cauliformis (lilac creeping vs. brown erect were very distinct. Two morphotypes of A. lacunosa, one with hard tissue consistency, the other soft and thought to belong to a separate genus (Suberea, had very similar chemical profiles. Of the twelve metabolites found among samples, variation in fistularin-3, dideoxyfistularin-3 and hydroxyaerothionin provided the most predictive

  14. Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease Using Metabolite Profiling

    Havelund, Jesper F; Heegaard, Niels H H; Færgeman, Nils J K

    2017-01-01

    Biomarker research in Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been dominated by measuring dopamine metabolites or alpha-synuclein in cerebrospinal fluid. However, these markers do not allow early detection, precise prognosis or monitoring of disease progression. Moreover, PD is now considered a multifa......) and purine metabolism (uric acid) are also altered in most metabolite profiling studies in PD......., the potential as a biomarker and the significance of understanding the pathophysiology of PD. Many of the studies report alterations in alanine, branched-chain amino acids and fatty acid metabolism, all pointing to mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan...

  15. Accurate prediction of secondary metabolite gene clusters in filamentous fungi

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Klitgaard, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Biosynthetic pathways of secondary metabolites from fungi are currently subject to an intense effort to elucidate the genetic basis for these compounds due to their large potential within pharmaceutics and synthetic biochemistry. The preferred method is methodical gene deletions to identify...... used A. nidulans for our method development and validation due to the wealth of available biochemical data, but the method can be applied to any fungus with a sequenced and assembled genome, thus supporting further secondary metabolite pathway elucidation in the fungal kingdom....

  16. Diversity of secondary metabolites from Genus Artocarpus (Moraceae

    ALIEFMAN HAKIM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hakim A. 2010. The diversity of secondary metabolites from Genus Artocarpus (Moraceae. Nusantara Bioscience 2:146-156. Several species of the Artocarpus genus (Moraceae have been investigated their natural product. The secondary metabolites successfully being isolatad from Artocarpus genus consist of terpenoid, flavonoids, stilbenoid, arylbenzofuran, neolignan, and adduct Diels-Alder. Flavonoid group represent the compound which is the most found from Artocarpus plant. The flavonoids compound which are successfully isolated from Artocarpus plant consist of the varied frameworks like chalcone, flavanone, flavan-3-ol, simple flavone, prenylflavone, oxepinoflavone, pyranoflavone, dihydrobenzoxanthone, furanodihydrobenzoxanthone, pyranodihydrobenzoxanthone, quinonoxanthone, cyclopentenoxanthone, xanthonolide, dihydroxanthone.

  17. Improved profiling of estrogen metabolites by orbitrap LC/MS

    Li, Xingnan; Franke, Adrian A.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen metabolites are important biomarkers to evaluate cancer risks and metabolic diseases. Due to their low physiological levels, a sensitive and accurate method is required, especially for the quantitation of unconjugated forms of endogenous steroids and their metabolites in humans. Here, we evaluated various derivatives of estrogens for improved analysis by orbitrap LC/MS in human serum samples. A new chemical derivatization reagent was applied modifying phenolic steroids to form 1-methylimidazole-2-sulfonyl adducts. The method significantly improves the sensitivity 2–100 fold by full scan MS and targeted selected ion monitoring MS over other derivatization methods including, dansyl, picolinoyl, and pyridine-3-sulfonyl products. PMID:25543003

  18. Sulfate Metabolites of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl in Whole Poplar Plants

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2012-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) has been proven to be transformed into hydroxylated metabolites of PCB3 (OH-PCB3s) in whole poplar plants in our previous work. However, hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs, including OH-PCB3s, as the substrates of sulfotransferases have not been studied in many organisms including plants in vivo. Poplar (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) was used to investigate the further metabolism from OH-PCB3s to PCB3 sulfates because it is a model plant and one that is frequently...

  19. Loss of metabolites from monkey striatum during PET with FDOPA

    Cumming, P; Munk, O L; Doudet, D

    2001-01-01

    constants using data recorded during 240 min of FDOPA circulation in normal monkeys and in monkeys with unilateral 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesions. Use of the extended models increased the magnitudes of K(D)(i) and k(D)(3) in striatum; in the case of k(D)(3), variance...... of the estimate was substantially improved upon correction for metabolite loss. The rate constants for metabolite loss were higher in MPTP-lesioned monkey striatum than in normal striatum. The high correlation between individual estimates of k(Lin)(cl) and k(DA)(9) suggests that both rate constants reveal loss...

  20. Two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Li, J.Z.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X.; Khan, M.A.; Chen, Q.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system by an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been further confirmed by measuring its electrical properties. The effect of persistent photoconductivity (PPC) has been observed and its unique features have been utilized to study the properties of 2DEG formed by the AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Sharp electronic transitions from the first to the second subbands in the 2DEG channel have been observed by monitoring the 2DEG carrier mobility as a function of carrier concentration through the use of PPC. These results are expected to have significant implications on field-effect transistor and high electron mobility transistor applications based on the GaN system. copyright 1997 American Vacuum Society

  1. Near-field microscopy of waveguide architectures of InGaN/GaN diode lasers

    Friede, Sebastian; Tomm, Jens W.; Kühn, Sergei; Hoffmann, Veit; Wenzel, Hans; Weyers, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Waveguide (WG) architectures of 420 nm emitting InGaN/GaN diode lasers are analyzed by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy using a nearfield scanning optical microscope that scans along their front facets. The components of the ‘optical active cavity’, quantum wells, WGs, and cladding layers are individually inspected with a spatial resolution of ∼100 nm. Separate analysis of the p- and n-sections of the WG was achieved, and reveals defect levels in the p-part. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the homogeneity of the n-WG section directly affects the quantum wells that are grown on top of this layer. Substantially increased carrier capture efficiencies into InGaN/GaN-WGs compared to GaN-WGs are demonstrated.

  2. A hole accelerator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Zhu, Binbin; Zhang, Yiping; Lu, Shunpeng; Zhang, Xueliang; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been significantly limited by the insufficient hole injection, and this is caused by the inefficient p-type doping and the low hole mobility. The low hole mobility makes the holes less energetic, which hinders the hole injection into the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) especially when a p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) is adopted. In this work, we report a hole accelerator to accelerate the holes so that the holes can obtain adequate kinetic energy, travel across the p-type EBL, and then enter the MQWs more efficiently and smoothly. In addition to the numerical study, the effectiveness of the hole accelerator is experimentally shown through achieving improved optical output power and reduced efficiency droop for the proposed InGaN/GaN LED.

  3. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    Bietti, Sergio; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Fedorov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E A =1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D 0  = 0.53(×2.1±1) cm 2 s −1 that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  4. Optimization of the GaAs et GaAs/Si annealing using halogen lamp flashes

    Blanck, H.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the work is to check whether the flash annealing of GaAs and GaAs/Si, using halogen lamps, allows an improvement in the results obtained by usual methods. The electrical activation, defects behavior and results uniformity are studied. The results on the activation and diffusion of implanted impurities are shown to be equivalent to those obtained with classical annealing methods. However, residual impurities (or defects) diffusion phenomena are restrained by the flash annealing technique. The Hall effect cartographic measurements showed an improvement of the uniformity of the implanted coating surface resistance. Flash annealing is a suitable method for the Si activation in GaAs. It allows an improvement of the GaAs results obtained with standard techniques, as well as the formation, by means of ion implantation, of active zones in the GaAs/Si layers [fr

  5. Strain-dependent magnetic anisotropy in GaMnAs on InGaAs templates

    Daeubler, Joachim; Glunk, Michael; Schwaiger, Stephan; Dreher, Lukas; Schoch, Wladimir; Sauer, Rolf; Limmer, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We have systematically studied the influence of strain on the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs by means of HRXRD reciprocal space mapping and angle-dependent magnetotransport. For this purpose, a series of GaMnAs layers with Mn contents of {proportional_to}5% was grown by low-temperature MBE on relaxed InGaAs/GaAs templates with different In concentrations, enabling us to vary the strain in the GaMnAs layers continuously from tensile to compressive, including the unstrained state. Considering both, as-grown and annealed samples, the anisotropy parameter describing the uniaxial out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy has been found to vary linearly with hole density and strain. As a consequence, the out-of-plane direction gradually undergoes a transition from a magnetic hard axis to a magnetic easy axis from compressive to tensile strain.

  6. GaMnAs on patterned GaAs(001) substrates: Growth and magnetotransport

    Daeubler, Joachim; Glunk, Michael; Hummel, Thomas; Schoch, Wladimir; Limmer, Wolfgang; Sauer, Rolf [Institut fuer Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A new type of GaMnAs microstructures with laterally confined electronic and magnetic properties has been realized in a bottom-up procedure by growing GaMnAs films on [1 anti 10]-oriented ridge structures with (113)A sidewalls and (001) top layers prepared on GaAs(001) substrates. Previous studies on planar GaMnAs samples have revealed different incorporation of Mn and excess As in (001) and (113)A layers. Accordingly, temperature- and field-dependent magnetotransport measurements on the overgrown ridge structures clearly demonstrate the coexistence of electronic and magnetic properties specific for (001) and (113)A GaMnAs in one single sample. This introduces an additional degree of freedom in the development of new functional structures.

  7. Angular dependent XPS study of surface band bending on Ga-polar n-GaN

    Huang, Rong; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Yanfei; Zhu, Yafeng; Huang, Zengli; Li, Fangsen; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Liqun; Zhang, Shuming; Dingsun, An; Yang, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Surface band bending and composition of Ga-polar n-GaN with different surface treatments were characterized by using angular dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Upward surface band bending of varying degree was observed distinctly upon to the treatment methods. Besides the nitrogen vacancies, we found that surface states of oxygen-containing absorbates (O-H component) also contribute to the surface band bending, which lead the Fermi level pined at a level further closer to the conduction band edge on n-GaN surface. The n-GaN surface with lower surface band bending exhibits better linear electrical properties for Ti/GaN Ohmic contacts. Moreover, the density of positively charged surface states could be derived from the values of surface band bending.

  8. Noise performance in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs under high drain bias

    Pang Lei; Pu Yan; Lin Xinyu; Wang Liang; Liu Jian

    2009-01-01

    The advent of fully integrated GaN PA-LNA circuits makes it meaningful to investigate the noise performance under high drain bias. However, noise performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs under high bias has not received worldwide attention in theoretical studies due to its complicated mechanisms. The noise value is moderately higher and its rate of increase is fast with increasing high voltage. In this paper, several possible mechanisms are proposed to be responsible for it. Impact ionization under high electric field incurs great fluctuation of carrier density, which increases the drain diffusion noise. Besides, higher gate leakage current related shot noise and a more severe self-heating effect are also contributors to the noise increase at high bias. Analysis from macroscopic and microscopic perspectives can help us to design new device structures to improve noise performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs under high bias. (semiconductor devices)

  9. Nanoscale investigation of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors.

    Fontserè, A; Pérez-Tomás, A; Placidi, M; Llobet, J; Baron, N; Chenot, S; Cordier, Y; Moreno, J C; Jennings, M R; Gammon, P M; Fisher, C A; Iglesias, V; Porti, M; Bayerl, A; Lanza, M; Nafría, M

    2012-10-05

    AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are devices which are strongly influenced by surface properties such as donor states, roughness or any kind of inhomogeneity. The electron gas is only a few nanometers away from the surface and the transistor forward and reverse currents are considerably affected by any variation of surface property within the atomic scale. Consequently, we have used the technique known as conductive AFM (CAFM) to perform electrical characterization at the nanoscale. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT ohmic (drain and source) and Schottky (gate) contacts were investigated by the CAFM technique. The estimated area of these highly conductive pillars (each of them of approximately 20-50 nm radius) represents around 5% of the total contact area. Analogously, the reverse leakage of the gate Schottky contact at the nanoscale seems to correlate somehow with the topography of the narrow AlGaN barrier regions producing larger currents.

  10. Does GaH5 exist?

    Speakman, Lucas D.; Turney, Justin M.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2005-11-01

    The existence or nonexistence of GaH5 has been widely discussed [N. M. Mitzel, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 42, 3856 (2003)]. Seven possible structures for gallium pentahydride have been systematically investigated using ab initio electronic structure theory. Structures and vibrational frequencies have been determined employing self-consistent field, coupled cluster including all single and double excitations (CCSD), and CCSD with perturbative triples levels of theory, with at least three correlation-consistent polarized-valence-(cc-pVXZ and aug-cc-pVXZ) type basis sets. The X˜A'1 state for GaH5 is predicted to be weakly bound complex 1 between gallane and molecular hydrogen, with Cs symmetry. The dissociation energy corresponding to GaH5→GaH3+H2 is predicted to be De=2.05kcalmol-1. The H-H stretching fundamental is predicted to be v =4060cm-1, compared to the tentatively assigned experimental feature of Wang and Andrews [J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 11371 (2003)] at 4087cm-1. A second Cs structure 2 with nearly equal energy is predicted to be a transition state, corresponding to a 90° rotation of the H2 bond. Thus the rotation of the hydrogen molecule is essentially free. However, hydrogen scrambling through the C2v structure 3 seems unlikely, as the activation barrier for scrambling is at least 30kcalmol-1 higher in energy than that for the dissociation of GaH5 to GaH3 and H2. Two additional structures consisting of GaH3 with a dihydrogen bond perpendicular to gallane (C3v structure 4) and an in-plane dihydrogen bond [Cs(III) structure 5] were also examined. A C3v symmetry second-order saddle point has nearly the same energy as the GaH3+H2 dissociation limit, while the Cs(III) structure 5 is a transition structure to the C3v structure. The C4v structure 6 and the D3h structure 7 are much higher in energy than GaH3+H2 by 88 and 103kcalmol-1, respectively.

  11. Indications for scintigraphy with 67Ga

    Plechl, S.C.; Berges, G.; Blut, J.; Bohle, H.; Gessat, C.; Hethey, B.; Linneborn, G.; Ostermann, W.; Prack, G.; Scheitza, B.

    1976-01-01

    The validity and exactness of 67 Ga scintigraphy was tested in more than 70 patients by a comparison with clinical, radiological and histological findings as well as with scintigraphs obtained with other nuclides. It was found that 67 Ga scintigraphy is a good and often even a vital supplementation to the other methods. Its main field of application, according to the authors' obervations, is the differential diagnosis of three-dimensional changes in the thorax region, in particular the diagnosis of malignant tumours of the lungs in combination with X-ray examinations. Furthermore, 67 Ga may be of use in localization diagnoses of non-malignant changes, e.g. abscesses. 67 Ga scintigraphy, which is non-hazardous and does not involve discomfort to the patients, appears to be particularly useful for course control after surgical treatment of breast cancer and for early diagnoses of metastases, provided that examination starts early enough and is repeated at regular intervals, not only in the soft parts but also in the skeleton. The question whether 67 Ga scintigraphy may be a substitute for scintigraphy with other nuclides in these fields still remains to be solved. (orig.) [de

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces; Rastertunnelmikroskopie und -spektroskopie an GaN- und InGaN-Oberflaechen

    Krueger, David

    2009-12-02

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  13. Implantation doping of GaN

    Zolper, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ion implantation has played an enabling role in the realization of many high performance photonic and electronic devices in mature semiconductor materials systems such as Si and GaAs. This can also be expected to be the case in III-Nitride based devices as the material quality continues to improve. This paper reviews the progress in ion implantation processing of the III-Nitride materials, namely, GaN, AlN, InN and their alloys. Details are presented of the successful demonstrations of implant isolation as well as n- and p-type implantation doping of GaN. Implant doping has required activation annealing at temperatures in excess of 1,000 C. The nature of the implantation induced damage and its response to annealing is addressed using Rutherford Backscattering. Finally, results are given for the first demonstration of a GaN device fabricated using ion implantation doping, a GaN junction field effect transistor (JFET)

  14. The Effect of the number of InGaN/GaN pairs on the photoelectrochemical properties of InGaN/GaN multi quantum wells

    Bae, Hyojung; Park, Jun-Beom [Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, Katsushi [Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, The University of Kitakyushu, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Lee, Hyo-Jong [Materials Science and Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 49315 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hyun [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Joellabuk-do 55324 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang-Wan; Lee, June Key [Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun-Seok, E-mail: jsha@jnu.ac.kr [Optoelectronics Convergence Research Center, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The 1–5 period InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures were grown on sapphire. • The photoelectrochemical properties of these structures were investigated. • The saturated photocurrent density increased with increasing number of QW pairs. • But, it was different in the stability of the photoanode. • We reported the reason for this difference. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of the number of quantum well (QW) pairs on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of InGaN/GaN multi-QW structures (MQWs) were investigated. MQW samples were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and their structural characteristics were confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the optical properties of MQWs may be related to the PEC properties. The cyclic voltammetry data revealed that the saturated photocurrent density increased with increasing number of QW pairs; the photocurrent density of MQW5 was twice that of an nGaN reference. However, in the chronoamperometry measurement of the photoanode stability, MQWs with 3 QWs displayed the highest photocurrent stability, although the saturated photocurrent density was highest for MQW5. This was also confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy of the surface morphology after PEC measurements. The stability and photocurrent density may be attributed to the quality of crystallinity of the MQWs.

  15. Ga-67 imaging in pediatric oncology

    Edeling, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    One hundred sixty-nine children suspected of having malignant disease were examined by Ga-67 scintigraphy. In 99 children with untreated diseases at the time of examination, abnormal accumulation of Ga-67 was found in 51 patients, including 40 with malignant tumor. Forty-three negative results were obtained in children with benign disorders. Five false-negative results were obtained in patients with neuroblastoma of the adrenal gland. In 70 children with malignant diseases treated before the examination, abnormal accumulation of Ga-67 was seen in 40 patients, including 38 with malignant disease and two with no clinical evidence of recurrence. Normal results were obtained in 30 patients, including 11 still suffering from malignant disease. The results of Ga-67 scintigraphy in all of the children were evaluated qualitatively. For the final diagnosis of malignant disease, diagnostic specificity was 86% and diagnostic sensitivity 79%. The prevalence of malignant disease was 56%. It is concluded that Ga-67 scintigraphy should be used for primary visualization and control of malignant tumors in children

  16. Indications for scintigraphy with /sup 67/Ga

    Plechl, S C; Berges, G; Blut, J; Bohle, H; Gessat, C; Hethey, B; Linneborn, G; Ostermann, W; Prack, G; Scheitza, B [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Krankenanstalten Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-06-01

    The validity and exactness of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy was tested in more than 70 patients by a comparison with clinical, radiological and histological findings as well as with scintigraphs obtained with other nuclides. It was found that /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy is a good and often even a vital supplementation to the other methods. Its main field of application, according to the authors' obervations, is the differential diagnosis of three-dimensional changes in the thorax region, in particular the diagnosis of malignant tumours of the lungs in combination with X-ray examinations. Furthermore, /sup 67/Ga may be of use in localization diagnoses of non-malignant changes, e.g. abscesses. /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy, which is non-hazardous and does not involve discomfort to the patients, appears to be particularly useful for course control after surgical treatment of breast cancer and for early diagnoses of metastases, provided that examination starts early enough and is repeated at regular intervals, not only in the soft parts but also in the skeleton. The question whether /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy may be a substitute for scintigraphy with other nuclides in these fields still remains to be solved.

  17. Two-dimensional electron and hole gases in GaN/AlGaN heterostructures; Zweidimensionale Elektronen- und Loechergase in GaN/AlGaN-Heterostrukturen

    Link, A.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis is to investigate the electronic properties of electron and hole gases in GaN/AlGaN heterostructures. Particularly, a deeper and broadened understanding of scattering mechanisms and transport properties is in the focus of this work. The main experimental techniques used for this purpose are the study of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect and Hall measurements at low temperatures. By means of these magnetotransport measurements, a series of GaN/AlGaN heterostructures with different Al content of the AlGaN barrier were investigated. Since the sheet carrier density of the 2DEG in these semiconductor structures is strongly dependent on the Al content (n{sub s}=2 x 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}), the variation of transport parameters was determined as a function of sheet carrier concentration. First, from the temperature dependence of the SdH oscillations the effective transport mass was calculated. A Hall bar structure with an additional gate contact was used as an alternative to tune the carrier density of a 2DEG system independent of varying structural parametes such as Al content. Thus, the scattering mechanisms were investigated in the carrier density region between 3 x 10{sup 12} and 9.5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. The transport properties of subband electrons were studied for a 2DEG system with two occupied subbands. (orig.)

  18. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in sugarcane

    S.C. França

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of genes related to secondary metabolism was extracted from the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database and was used to investigate both the gene expression pattern of key enzymes regulating the main biosynthetic secondary metabolism pathways and the major classes of metabolites involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental and developmental cues. The SUCEST database was constructed with tissues in different physiological conditions which had been collected under varied situation of environmental stress. This database allows researchers to identify and characterize the expressed genes of a wide range of putative enzymes able to catalyze steps in the phenylpropanoid, isoprenoid and other pathways of the special metabolic mechanisms involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental changes. Our results show that sugarcane cDNAs encoded putative ultra-violet induced sesquiterpene cyclases (SC; chalcone synthase (CHS, the first enzyme in the pathway branch for flavonoid biosynthesis; isoflavone synthase (IFS, involved in plant defense and root nodulation; isoflavone reductase (IFR, a key enzyme in phenylpropanoid phytoalexin biosynthesis; and caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of lignin cell wall precursors. High levels of CHS transcripts from plantlets infected with Herbaspirillum rubri or Gluconacetobacter diazotroficans suggests that agents of biotic stress can elicit flavonoid biosynthesis in sugarcane. From this data we have predicted the profile of isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in sugarcane and pointed the branches of secondary metabolism activated during tissue-specific stages of development and the adaptive response of sugarcane to agents of biotic and abiotic stress, although our assignment of enzyme function should be confirmed by careful biochemical and genetic supporting evidence.Este trabalho foi realizado com os objetivos de gerar uma coleção de genes

  19. Near-surface depletion of antimony during the growth of GaAsSb and GaAs/GaAsSb nanowires

    Kauko, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van, E-mail: a.helvoort@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Fimland, B. O.; Munshi, A. M. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Grieb, T.; Müller, K.; Rosenauer, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Bremen, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-10-14

    The near-surface reduction of the Sb mole fraction during the growth of GaAsSb nanowires (NWs) and GaAs NWs with GaAsSb inserts has been studied using quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A model for diffusion of Sb in the hexagonal NWs was developed and employed in combination with the quantitative STEM analysis. GaAsSb NWs grown by Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and GaAs/GaAsSb NWs grown by Ga- and Au-assisted MBE were investigated. At the high temperatures employed in the NW growth, As-Sb exchange at and outward diffusion of Sb towards the surface take place, resulting in reduction of the Sb concentration at and near the surface in the GaAsSb NWs and the GaAsSb inserts. In GaAsSb NWs, an increasing near-surface depletion of Sb was observed towards the bottom of the NW due to longer exposure to the As beam flux. In GaAsSb inserts, an increasing change in the Sb concentration profile was observed with increasing post-insert axial GaAs growth time, resulting from a combined effect of radial GaAs overgrowth and diffusion of Sb. The effect of growth temperature on the diffusion of Sb in the GaAsSb inserts was identified. The consequences of these findings for growth optimization and the optoelectronic properties of GaAsSb are discussed.

  20. Two-dimensional simulation of GaAsSb/GaAs quantum dot solar cells

    Kunrugsa, Maetee

    2018-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) simulation of GaAsSb/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells is presented. The effects of As mole fraction in GaAsSb QDs on the performance of the solar cell are investigated. The solar cell is designed as a p-i-n GaAs structure where a single layer of GaAsSb QDs is introduced into the intrinsic region. The current density–voltage characteristics of QD solar cells are derived from Poisson’s equation, continuity equations, and the drift-diffusion transport equations, which are numerically solved by a finite element method. Furthermore, the transition energy of a single GaAsSb QD and its corresponding wavelength for each As mole fraction are calculated by a six-band k · p model to validate the position of the absorption edge in the external quantum efficiency curve. A GaAsSb/GaAs QD solar cell with an As mole fraction of 0.4 provides the best power conversion efficiency. The overlap between electron and hole wave functions becomes larger as the As mole fraction increases, leading to a higher optical absorption probability which is confirmed by the enhanced photogeneration rates within and around the QDs. However, further increasing the As mole fraction results in a reduction in the efficiency because the absorption edge moves towards shorter wavelengths, lowering the short-circuit current density. The influences of the QD size and density on the efficiency are also examined. For the GaAsSb/GaAs QD solar cell with an As mole fraction of 0.4, the efficiency can be improved to 26.2% by utilizing the optimum QD size and density. A decrease in the efficiency is observed at high QD densities, which is attributed to the increased carrier recombination and strain-modified band structures affecting the absorption edges.

  1. Adsorption of tetrabutylammonium cations on negatively charged surfaces of the Hg, Ga, In-Ga, Tl-Ga electrodes

    Damaskin, B.B.; Baturina, O.A.; Vykhodtseva, L.N.; Emets, V.V.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    The differential capacitance curves in the 0.05M Na 2 SO 4 + [(C 4 H 9 ) 4 N]BF 4 aqueous solutions on the electrodes of mercury gallium and also of the In-Ga and Tl-Ga alloys are obtained. The adsorption parameters of the tetrabutylammonium cations on each of the electrodes within the frames of two parallel condensers model, supplemented by the Frumkin isotherm are calculated. The conclusion is made that different adsorption behaviour of the (C 4 H 9 ) 4 N + cations on the gallium subgroup metals by the electrodes high negative charges is related to nonuniform electrochemical work of the output electrons [ru

  2. Lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaN on a patterned GaN-on-silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    Wang, Yongjin; Hu, Fangren; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We report here the lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of GaN on a patterned GaN-on-silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth with radio frequency nitrogen plasma as a gas source. Two kinds of GaN nanostructures are defined by electron beam lithography and realized on a GaN substrate by fast atom beam etching. The epitaxial growth of GaN by MBE is performed on the prepared GaN template, and the selective growth of GaN takes place with the assistance of GaN nanostructures. The LEO of GaN produces novel GaN epitaxial structures which are dependent on the shape and the size of the processed GaN nanostructures. Periodic GaN hexagonal pyramids are generated inside the air holes, and GaN epitaxial strips with triangular section are formed in the grating region. This work provides a promising way for producing novel GaN-based devices by the LEO of GaN using the MBE technique

  3. 71Ga Chemical Shielding and Quadrupole Coupling Tensors of the Garnet Y(3)Ga(5)O(12) from Single-Crystal (71)Ga NMR

    Vosegaard, Thomas; Massiot, Dominique; Gautier, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    A single-crystal (71)Ga NMR study of the garnet Y(3)Ga(5)O(12) (YGG) has resulted in the determination of the first chemical shielding tensors reported for the (71)Ga quadrupole. The single-crystal spectra are analyzed in terms of the combined effect of quadrupole coupling and chemical shielding ...

  4. Ga originated kink-and-tail Zn diffusion profiles in InGaAsP and InGaAlAs alloys during MOVPE regrowth

    Kitatani, T.; Okamoto, K.; Uchida, K.; Tanaka, S.

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the diffusion characteristics of Zn in ternary and quaternary alloys of InGaAsP and InGaAlAs, which are important materials in long-wavelength optical communication devices. The measured Zn diffusion profiles of InGaAs, InGaAsP, and InGaAlAs showed kink-and-tail shapes in which Zn concentration fell abruptly at first and then decreased slowly, whereas those of InP and InAlAs showed only abrupt decreases. Thus, only Ga-containing alloys had tail-like profiles. Since this tail was well described by the group-V vacancy related defect model, we deduced that its mechanism is closely related with group-V vacancies in Ga-related bonds such as GaP or GaAs. Furthermore, we demonstrated the possibility that many more group-V vacancies originated from GaP bonds than from GaAs bonds, indicating the difficulty in crystal growth of high quality alloys that have GaP components.

  5. Physical and electrical characterizations of AlGaN/GaN MOS gate stacks with AlGaN surface oxidation treatment

    Yamada, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kenta; Nozaki, Mikito; Shih, Hong-An; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Anda, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Tetsuzo; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2018-06-01

    The impacts of inserting ultrathin oxides into insulator/AlGaN interfaces on their electrical properties were investigated to develop advanced AlGaN/GaN metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) gate stacks. For this purpose, the initial thermal oxidation of AlGaN surfaces in oxygen ambient was systematically studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our physical characterizations revealed that, when compared with GaN surfaces, aluminum addition promotes the initial oxidation of AlGaN surfaces at temperatures of around 400 °C, followed by smaller grain growth above 850 °C. Electrical measurements of AlGaN/GaN MOS capacitors also showed that, although excessive oxidation treatment of AlGaN surfaces over around 700 °C has an adverse effect, interface passivation with the initial oxidation of the AlGaN surfaces at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 °C was proven to be beneficial for fabricating high-quality AlGaN/GaN MOS gate stacks.

  6. Biological monitoring of arsenic exposure of gallium arsenide- and inorganic arsenic-exposed workers by determination of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in urine and hair

    Yamauchi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Mashiko, M.; Yamamura, Y. (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    In an attempt to establish a method for biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure, the chemical species of arsenic were measured in the urine and hair of gallium arsenide (GaAs) plant and copper smelter workers. Determination of urinary inorganic arsenic concentration proved sensitive enough to monitor the low-level inorganic arsenic exposure of the GaAs plant workers. The urinary inorganic arsenic concentration in the copper smelter workers was far higher than that of a control group and was associated with high urinary concentrations of the inorganic arsenic metabolites, methylarsonic acid (MAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). The results established a method for exposure level-dependent biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure. Low-level exposures could be monitored only by determining urinary inorganic arsenic concentration. High-level exposures clearly produced an increased urinary inorganic arsenic concentration, with an increased sum of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites (inorganic arsenic + MAA + DMAA). The determination of urinary arsenobetaine proved to determine specifically the seafood-derived arsenic, allowing this arsenic to be distinguished clearly from the arsenic from occupational exposure. Monitoring arsenic exposure by determining the arsenic in the hair appeared to be of value only when used for environmental monitoring of arsenic contamination rather than for biological monitoring.

  7. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD - Metabolic stability, biodistribution, and dosimetry data from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis

    Haubner, Roland; Rangger, Christine; Decristoforo, Clemens; Virgolini, Irene J. [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Finkenstedt, Armin; Zoller, Heinz [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Internal Medicine II, Innsbruck (Austria); Stegmayr, Armin [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); FH Gesundheit/University of Applied Sciences Tyrol, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    This study was designed to determine safety, tolerability, and radiation burden of a [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD-PET for imaging integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} expression in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver cirrhosis. Moreover, metabolic stability and biokinetic data were compiled. After injection of 154-184 MBq [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD three consecutive PET/CT scans were acquired starting 8.3 ± 2.1, 36.9 ± 2.8, and 75.1 ± 3.4 min after tracer injection. For metabolite analysis, blood and urine samples were analyzed by HPLC. For dosimetry studies, residence time VOIs were placed in the corresponding organs. The OLINDA/EXM program was used to estimate the absorbed radiation dose. The radiopharmaceutical was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse effects were observed. No metabolites could be detected in blood (30 and 60 min p.i.) and urine (60 min p.i.). [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD showed rapid and predominantly renal elimination. Background radioactivity in blood, intestine, lung, and muscle tissue was low (%ID/l 60 min p.i. was 0.56 ± 0.43, 0.54 ± 0.39, 0.22 ± 0.05, and 0.16 ± 0.8, respectively). The calculated effective dose was 21.5 ± 5.4 μSv/MBq, and the highest absorbed radiation dose was found for the urinary bladder wall (0.26 ± 0.09 mSv/MBq). No increased uptake of the tracer was found in HCC compared with the background liver tissue. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD uptake in the HCCs lesions was not sufficient to use this tracer for imaging these tumors. [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD was well tolerated and metabolically stable. Due to rapid renal excretion, background radioactivity was low in most of the body, resulting in low radiation burden and indicating the potential of [{sup 68}Ga]NODAGA-RGD PET for non-invasive determination of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} expression. (orig.)

  8. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal: Computational tools to facilitate synthetic biology of secondary metabolite production

    Tilmann Weber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are among the most important sources of lead molecules for drug discovery. With the development of affordable whole-genome sequencing technologies and other ‘omics tools, the field of natural products research is currently undergoing a shift in paradigms. While, for decades, mainly analytical and chemical methods gave access to this group of compounds, nowadays genomics-based methods offer complementary approaches to find, identify and characterize such molecules. This paradigm shift also resulted in a high demand for computational tools to assist researchers in their daily work. In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http://www.secondarymetabolites.org is introduced to provide a one-stop catalog and links to these bioinformatics resources. In addition, an outlook is presented how the existing tools and those to be developed will influence synthetic biology approaches in the natural products field.

  9. Spin injection into GaAs

    Endres, Bernhard

    2013-11-01

    In this work spin injection into GaAs from Fe and (Ga,Mn)As was investigated. For the realization of any spintronic device the detailed knowledge about the spin lifetime, the spatial distribution of spin-polarized carriers and the influence of electric fields is essential. In the present work all these aspects have been analyzed by optical measurements of the polar magneto-optic Kerr effect (pMOKE) at the cleaved edge of the samples. Besides the attempt to observe spin pumping and thermal spin injection into n-GaAs the spin solar cell effect is demonstrated, a novel mechanism for the optical generation of spins in semiconductors with potential for future spintronic applications. Also important for spin-based devices as transistors is the presented realization of electrical spin injection into a two-dimensional electron gas.

  10. The gamma ray spectrometer GA.SP

    Bazzacco, D [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1992-08-01

    GA.SP is a general purpose 4{pi} detector array for advanced {gamma}-spectroscopy and, in the same time, a suitable system for reaction mechanism studies. The detector is sited at the LNL Tandem+Linac accelerator and has been built as a joint project of INFN Padova, LNL, Milano and Firenze. The array consists of 40 Compton suppressed HPGe detectors and of a 4{pi} calorimeter composed of 80 BGO crystals. The detector houses a reaction chamber of 34 cm diameter where a charged particles multiplicity filter composed of 40 Si detectors is going to be installed. Evaporation residues produced in the centre of GA.SP can be injected into the recoil mass spectrometer (RMS, named CAMEL) in use at LNL, without the need to remove any of the gamma detectors. The coupled operation of GA.SP, RMS and Si ball will give a unique instrument for identification and study of weak reaction channels. (author). 6 figs.

  11. The gamma ray spectrometer GA.SP

    Bazzacco, D.

    1992-01-01

    GA.SP is a general purpose 4π detector array for advanced γ-spectroscopy and, in the same time, a suitable system for reaction mechanism studies. The detector is sited at the LNL Tandem+Linac accelerator and has been built as a joint project of INFN Padova, LNL, Milano and Firenze. The array consists of 40 Compton suppressed HPGe detectors and of a 4π calorimeter composed of 80 BGO crystals. The detector houses a reaction chamber of 34 cm diameter where a charged particles multiplicity filter composed of 40 Si detectors is going to be installed. Evaporation residues produced in the centre of GA.SP can be injected into the recoil mass spectrometer (RMS, named CAMEL) in use at LNL, without the need to remove any of the gamma detectors. The coupled operation of GA.SP, RMS and Si ball will give a unique instrument for identification and study of weak reaction channels. (author). 6 figs

  12. Ethanol surface chemistry on MBE-grown GaN(0001), GaOx/GaN(0001), and Ga2O3(2 \\xAF 01 )

    Kollmannsberger, Sebastian L.; Walenta, Constantin A.; Winnerl, Andrea; Knoller, Fabian; Pereira, Rui N.; Tschurl, Martin; Stutzmann, Martin; Heiz, Ueli

    2017-09-01

    In this work, ethanol is used as a chemical probe to study the passivation of molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaN(0001) by surface oxidation. With a high degree of oxidation, no reaction from ethanol to acetaldehyde in temperature-programmed desorption experiments is observed. The acetaldehyde formation is attributed to a mechanism based on α -H abstraction from the dissociatively bound alcohol molecule. The reactivity is related to negatively charged surface states, which are removed upon oxidation of the GaN(0001) surface. This is compared with the Ga2O3(2 ¯ 01 ) single crystal surface, which is found to be inert for the acetaldehyde production. These results offer a toolbox to explore the surface chemistry of nitrides and oxynitrides on an atomic scale and relate their intrinsic activity to systems under ambient atmosphere.

  13. Ethanol surface chemistry on MBE-grown GaN(0001), GaOx/GaN(0001), and Ga2O3(2¯01).

    Kollmannsberger, Sebastian L; Walenta, Constantin A; Winnerl, Andrea; Knoller, Fabian; Pereira, Rui N; Tschurl, Martin; Stutzmann, Martin; Heiz, Ueli

    2017-09-28

    In this work, ethanol is used as a chemical probe to study the passivation of molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaN(0001) by surface oxidation. With a high degree of oxidation, no reaction from ethanol to acetaldehyde in temperature-programmed desorption experiments is observed. The acetaldehyde formation is attributed to a mechanism based on α-H abstraction from the dissociatively bound alcohol molecule. The reactivity is related to negatively charged surface states, which are removed upon oxidation of the GaN(0001) surface. This is compared with the Ga 2 O 3 (2¯01) single crystal surface, which is found to be inert for the acetaldehyde production. These results offer a toolbox to explore the surface chemistry of nitrides and oxynitrides on an atomic scale and relate their intrinsic activity to systems under ambient atmosphere.

  14. Determination of Ga-67 disintegration rate

    Fonseca, Katia A.; Koskinas, Maria F.; Dias, Mauro S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the consequences of the production by IPEN of new radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine, as the case of Ga-67, is the need of new standard sources of the radionuclide obtained in a fast and simple way. The Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radionuclideos at IPEN has a well-type ionization chamber system, the most suitable for this purpose. In order to calibrate this system it was necessary to standardize Ga-67 solutions by an absolute system. The present work gives details on the Ga-67 disintegration rate determination by an 4 π β-γ coincidence system, gamma spectrometry using an HPGe detector and measurements using a 1383A - type ionization chamber, in order to check the consistency in the adopted methodology. (author)

  15. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic rates of acetyl salicylic acid and its metabolites in an Otomi ethnic group of Mexico.

    Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Flores-Pérez, Janett; Guillé-Pérez, Adrian; Vargas, Arturo

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic differences of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolites: gentisic acid (GA), salicylic acid (SA) and salicyluric acid (SUA) between Otomies and Mesticians healthy subjects. Design. Ten Otomies and 10 Mesticians were included. After a single dose of aspirin given orally (15 mg/kg), blood and urine samples were collected at different times. Results. Pharmacokinetic parameters of salicylates showed significant differences, except distribution volume of SA, and elimination half-life of SUA. Metabolic rates of ASA showed significant differences for all rates between both groups. On the other hand, percentages of dose excreted were more reduced for SA and SUA for the Otomies than for the Mesticians. Conclusion. Results reflect differences in the hydrolysis way i.e. from ASA to SA and aromatic hydroxylation i.e. from SA to GA, which were slower in Otomies subjects, showing a possible pharmacokinetic differences about the capabilities of ASA biotransformation as a consequence of ethnic differences.

  16. Subnanosecond photoconductive switching in GaAs

    Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.; Griffin, K.L.

    1991-04-01

    We are conducting research in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating microwave pulses with amplitudes up to 50 kV. This technology has direct application to impulse radar and HPM sources. We are exploiting the very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) to explore the potential of GaAs as an on-off switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). In addition, we are exploring the potential GaAs to act as a closing switch in ``avalanche`` mode at high fields. We have observed switch closing times of less than 200 psec with a 100 psec duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 psec with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm. If the field is increased and the laser energy decreased, the laser can be used to trigger photoconductive switches into ``avalanche`` mode of operation in which carrier multiplication occurs. This mode of operation is quite promising since the switches close in less than 1 nsec while realizing significant energy gain (ratio of electrical energy in the pulse to optical trigger energy). We are currently investigating both large area (1 sq cm) and small area (< 1 sq mm) switches illuminated by GaAlAs laser diodes at 900 nm and Nd:YAG lasers at 1.06 micrometers. Preliminary results indicate that the closing time of the avalanche switches depends primarily on the material properties of the devices with closing times of 300--1300 psec at voltages of 6--35 kV. We will present experimental results for linear, lock on and avalanche mode operation of GaAs photoconductive switches and how these pulses may be applied to microwave generation. 3 refs.

  17. Subnanosecond photoconductive switching in GaAs

    Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.; Griffin, K.L.

    1991-04-01

    We are conducting research in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating microwave pulses with amplitudes up to 50 kV. This technology has direct application to impulse radar and HPM sources. We are exploiting the very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) to explore the potential of GaAs as an on-off switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). In addition, we are exploring the potential GaAs to act as a closing switch in avalanche'' mode at high fields. We have observed switch closing times of less than 200 psec with a 100 psec duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 psec with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm. If the field is increased and the laser energy decreased, the laser can be used to trigger photoconductive switches into avalanche'' mode of operation in which carrier multiplication occurs. This mode of operation is quite promising since the switches close in less than 1 nsec while realizing significant energy gain (ratio of electrical energy in the pulse to optical trigger energy). We are currently investigating both large area (1 sq cm) and small area (< 1 sq mm) switches illuminated by GaAlAs laser diodes at 900 nm and Nd:YAG lasers at 1.06 micrometers. Preliminary results indicate that the closing time of the avalanche switches depends primarily on the material properties of the devices with closing times of 300--1300 psec at voltages of 6--35 kV. We will present experimental results for linear, lock on and avalanche mode operation of GaAs photoconductive switches and how these pulses may be applied to microwave generation. 3 refs.

  18. Subnanosecond photoconductive switching in GaAs

    Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.; Griffin, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    We are conducting research in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating microwave pulses with amplitudes up to 50 kV. This technology has direct application to impulse radar and HPM sources. We are exploiting the very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) to explore the potential of GaAs as an on-off switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). In addition, we are exploring the potential of GaAs to act as a closing switch in avalanche'' mode at high fields. We have observed switch closing times of less than 200 psec with 100 psec duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 psec with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm. If the field is increased and the laser energy decreased, the laser can be used to trigger photoconductive switches into an avalanche'' mode of operation in which carrier multiplication occurs. This mode of operation is quite promising since the switches close in less than 1 nsec while realizing significant energy gain (ratio of electrical energy in the pulse to optical trigger energy). We are currently investigating both large are (1 sq cm) and small area (<1 sq mm) switches illuminated by GaAlAs laser diodes at 900 nm and Nd:YAG lasers at 1.06 micrometers. Preliminary results indicate that the closing time of the avalanche switches depends primarily on the material properties of the devices with closing times of 300--1300 psec at voltages of 6-35 kV. We will present experimental results for linear, lock on and avalanche mode operation of GaAs photoconductive switches and how these pulses may be applied to microwave generation. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Subnanosecond photoconductive switching in GaAs

    Druce, R. L.; Pocha, M. D.; Griffin, K. L.

    1991-04-01

    We are conducting research in photoconductive switching for the purpose of generating microwave pulses with amplitudes up to 50 kV. This technology has direct application to impulse radar and HPM sources. We are exploiting the very fast recombination rates of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) to explore the potential of GaAs as an on-off switch when operating in the linear mode (the linear mode is defined such that one carrier pair is generated for each photon absorbed). In addition, we are exploring the potential GaAs to act as a closing switch in 'avalanche' mode at high fields. We have observed switch closing times of less than 200 psec with a 100 psec duration laser pulse and opening times of less than 400 psec with neutron irradiated GaAs at fields of tens of kV/cm. If the field is increased and the laser energy decreased, the laser can be used to trigger photoconductive switches into 'avalanche' mode of operation in which carrier multiplication occurs. This mode of operation is quite promising since the switches close in less than 1 nsec while realizing significant energy gain (ratio of electrical energy in the pulse to optical trigger energy). We are currently investigating both large area (1 sq cm) and small area (less than 1 sq mm) switches illuminated by GaAlAs laser diodes at 900 nm and Nd:YAG lasers at 1.06 micrometers. Preliminary results indicate that the closing time of the avalanche switches depends primarily on the material properties of the devices with closing times of 300-1300 psec at voltages of 6-35 kV. We will present experimental results for linear, lock on, and avalanche mode operation of GaAs photoconductive switches and how these pulses may be applied to microwave generation.

  20. Dielectric function and electro-optical properties of (Al,Ga)N/GaN-heterostructures; Dielektrische Funktion und elektrooptische Eigenschaften von (Al,Ga)N/GaN-Heterostrukturen

    Buchheim, Carsten

    2010-04-23

    In this work extensive investigations on nitride semiconductors by optical spectroscopy are presented. The ordinary and the extraordinary component of the dielectric function of GaN in the spectral range from 1.2 to 9.8 eV is shown for the first time. It is demonstrated, that the transparent spectral range is clearly influenced by higher energetic critical points of the band structure. The optical selection rules for GaN and AlN are verified considering the actual strain state. The change of the valence band ordering of AlN in comparison to GaN is proven and the crystal field splitting is estimated for AlN. The ordinary dielectric function of AlGaN is determined for different Al contents. The data are used for developing an analytical model, which includes excitonic effects and bowings. It allows the calculation of the dielectric function for arbitrary alloy compositions. (GaN/)AlGaN/GaN heterostructures are investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry as well as by photoreflectance and electroreflectance. The optical data yields the electric field strengths of the individual layers to determine the density of the two-dimensional carrier gases at the heterointerfaces with high accuracy. The surface potential is calculated from the combination of experiments and Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. Its dependency on the Al content is quantified. For the special case of thick cap layers the coexistence of electron and hole gases in one sample is experimentally proven for the first time. Several interband transitions between quantized states in AlN/GaN superlattices are observed by electroreflectance. The comparison to quantum mechanical calculations demonstrates the influence of strain and electrical fields (quantum confined Stark effect). For both the ratio of the thicknesses of quantum wells and barriers is crucial. From the dielectric function of the superlattices it becomes obvious, that quantum size effects are not only important for the vicinity of the bandgap, but