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Sample records for metabolism human

  1. Glycogen metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; González-Lucán, Manuel; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Eva

    2016-06-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through transporters, phosphorylation of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate, isomerization to glucose 1-phosphate, and formation of uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose, which is the direct glucose donor for glycogen synthesis. Glycogenin catalyzes the formation of a short glucose polymer that is extended by the action of glycogen synthase. Glycogen branching enzyme introduces branch points in the glycogen particle at even intervals. Laforin and malin are proteins involved in glycogen assembly but their specific function remains elusive in humans. Glycogen is accumulated in the liver primarily during the postprandial period and in the skeletal muscle predominantly after exercise. In the cytosol, glycogen breakdown or glycogenolysis is carried out by two enzymes, glycogen phosphorylase which releases glucose 1-phosphate from the linear chains of glycogen, and glycogen debranching enzyme which untangles the branch points. In the lysosomes, glycogen degradation is catalyzed by α-glucosidase. The glucose 6-phosphatase system catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose, a necessary step for free glucose to leave the cell. Mutations in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism cause glycogen storage diseases.

  2. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Human Drug Metabolism, An Introduction, Second Edition provides an accessible introduction to the subject and will be particularly invaluable to those who already have some understanding of the life sciences...

  3. Metabolism of phthalates in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2007-01-01

    on the foetal testis and they are similar to those seen in humans with testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Therefore, exposure of the human foetus and infants to phthalates via maternal exposure is a matter of concern. The metabolic pathways of phthalate metabolites excreted in human urine are partly known for some...... phthalates, but our knowledge about metabolic distribution in the body and other biological fluids, including breast milk, is limited. Compared to urine, human breast milk contains relatively more of the hydrophobic phthalates, such as di-n-butyl phthalate and the longer-branched, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate...

  4. Glycogen metabolism in humans ? ??

    OpenAIRE

    Adeva-Andany, Mar?a M.; Gonz?lez-Luc?n, Manuel; Donapetry-Garc?a, Crist?bal; Fern?ndez-Fern?ndez, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodr?guez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through...

  5. Metabolism of phthalates in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2007-01-01

    Phthalates are synthetic compounds widely used as plasticisers, solvents and additives in many consumer products. Several animal studies have shown that some phthalates possess endocrine disrupting effects. Some of the effects of phthalates seen in rats are due to testosterone lowering effects...... on the foetal testis and they are similar to those seen in humans with testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Therefore, exposure of the human foetus and infants to phthalates via maternal exposure is a matter of concern. The metabolic pathways of phthalate metabolites excreted in human urine are partly known for some...... phthalates, but our knowledge about metabolic distribution in the body and other biological fluids, including breast milk, is limited. Compared to urine, human breast milk contains relatively more of the hydrophobic phthalates, such as di-n-butyl phthalate and the longer-branched, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate...

  6. Human metabolism of caesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics in Malmoe (Sweden); Falk, R. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (Sweden); Lauridsen, Bente [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Rahola, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland); Soogard-Hansen, J. [NRPA - Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    A study of the human biokinetics of caesium in two forms, i.) incorporated in foodstuff (137Cs in perch and mushrooms) and ii.) in ionic state ({sup 134}Cs in aqueous solution) has been carried out at the department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe, starting in 2001. The results of the pilot study were published in 2004, and a continuation of that study has now been carried out by means of NKS funding (NKS-B Cskinetik). The aim is to, i.) investigate whether Scandinavian populations exhibit shorter biological half-time of radiocaesium than other populations; ii.) extend the biokinetic study to additional human subjects from the other Nordic countries. Results from the continued study further indicate a near complete absorption of radiocaesium in the gastro-intestinal tract, be it in ion state or contained in food matrix. So far, the literature survey of Nordic studies on biokinetics of Cs suggests that the biological half time is somewhat shorter among Scandinavian males (84 days vs. ICRP-value of 110 days), although females do not exhibit any significant difference (64 days vs ICRP value of 65 days). (au)

  7. Human metabolism of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeaef, C.L.; Falk, R.; Lauridsen, Bente; Rahola, T.; Soogard-Hansen, J.

    2006-04-01

    A study of the human biokinetics of caesium in two forms, i.) incorporated in foodstuff (137Cs in perch and mushrooms) and ii.) in ionic state ( 134 Cs in aqueous solution) has been carried out at the department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe, starting in 2001. The results of the pilot study were published in 2004, and a continuation of that study has now been carried out by means of NKS funding (NKS-B Cskinetik). The aim is to, i.) investigate whether Scandinavian populations exhibit shorter biological half-time of radiocaesium than other populations; ii.) extend the biokinetic study to additional human subjects from the other Nordic countries. Results from the continued study further indicate a near complete absorption of radiocaesium in the gastro-intestinal tract, be it in ion state or contained in food matrix. So far, the literature survey of Nordic studies on biokinetics of Cs suggests that the biological half time is somewhat shorter among Scandinavian males (84 days vs. ICRP-value of 110 days), although females do not exhibit any significant difference (64 days vs ICRP value of 65 days). (au)

  8. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ... metabolism and its impact on patient welfare. After underlining the relationship between efficacy, toxicity and drug concentration, the book then considers how metabolizing systems operate and how they impact upon drug concentration...

  9. Human drug metabolism: an introduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    ..., both under drug pressure and during inhibition. Factors affecting drug metabolism, such as genetic polymorphisms, age and diet are discussed and how metabolism can lead to toxicity is explained. The book concludes with the role of drug metabolism in the commercial development of therapeutic agents as well as the pharmacology of some illicit drugs.

  10. Steroid metabolism by monkey and human spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Sehgal, A.; Pruthi, J.S.; Anand-Kumar, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa from monkey and human were washed and incubated with tritium labelled androgens or estradiol to study the pattern of spermatozoa steroid metabolism. When equal concentrations of steroid substrates were used for incubation, monkey and human spermatozoa showed very similar pattern of steroid conversion. Spermatozoa from both species converted testosterone mainly to androstenedione, but reverse conversion of androstenedione to testosterone was negligible. Estradiol-17 beta was converted mainly to estrone. The close similarity between the spermatozoa of monkey and men in their steroid metabolic pattern indicates that the rhesus monkey could be an useful animal model to study the effect of drugs on the metabolic pattern of human spermatozoa

  11. Neuroendocrine regulation of human bone metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The skeleton is perhaps the most multifunctional part of our body. It not only provides outer strength, a protective shell and enables locomotion, but it also hosts the bone marrow and serves many metabolic and endocrine functions. This thesis investigates two aspects of human bone metabolism,

  12. Inferring the metabolism of human orphan metabolites from their metabolic network context affirms human gluconokinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfsson, Óttar; Paglia, Giuseppe; Magnusdóttir, Manuela; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic network reconstructions define metabolic information within a target organism and can therefore be used to address incomplete metabolic information. In the present study we used a computational approach to identify human metabolites whose metabolism is incomplete on the basis of their detection in humans but exclusion from the human metabolic network reconstruction RECON 1. Candidate solutions, composed of metabolic reactions capable of explaining the metabolism of these compounds, were then identified computationally from a global biochemical reaction database. Solutions were characterized with respect to how metabolites were incorporated into RECON 1 and their biological relevance. Through detailed case studies we show that biologically plausible non-intuitive hypotheses regarding the metabolism of these compounds can be proposed in a semi-automated manner, in an approach that is similar to de novo network reconstruction. We subsequently experimentally validated one of the proposed hypotheses and report that C9orf103, previously identified as a candidate tumour suppressor gene, encodes a functional human gluconokinase. The results of the present study demonstrate how semi-automatic gap filling can be used to refine and extend metabolic reconstructions, thereby increasing their biological scope. Furthermore, we illustrate how incomplete human metabolic knowledge can be coupled with gene annotation in order to prioritize and confirm gene functions.

  13. Sexual dimorphism in human lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2005-04-01

    The existing work demonstrates that striking differences exist between men and women in lipid kinetics. These differences cannot be explained simply by the presence and action of sex hormones and are not always due to secondary, phenotypic traits that characterize men and women (e.g., body-composition, regional fat distribution). In fact, some of these secondary traits may even be the result of sexual dimorphism in metabolism, and being of female or male genotype also determines intermediary metabolism. This review provides an overview of the currently available information regarding sexual dimorphism in human lipid metabolism but does not provide an in-depth account of current knowledge (due to limited space); it will be a broad introduction to those interested in the field and will, hopefully, stimulate further efforts to unravel the secrets of male and female metabolism. What has been discovered so far regarding differences in lipid metabolism between men and women is likely only the tip of the iceberg; clearly, more work is necessary to fully understand human substrate metabolism and the implications the presence of sexual dimorphism in the control of substrate kinetics has on the prevention and treatment of disease.

  14. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  15. Science for Everyone; Fructose and Human Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Korkmaz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome and obesity have been widely affecting the communities. Impressive changes in daily life-style and nutritional habits are well known factors in the etiopathogenesis of those diseases. Fructose (fruit sugar that we were only able to consume via some natural products such as fruits and honey one century ago, today it has become nearly the main carbohydrate source of human daily energy need. However, it is hard to say that fructose is well known by human metabolism. Therefore, it is thought that elevated consumption ratio of fructose may have impact on the incidence of above-mentioned diseases. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(1.000: 1-4

  16. Redesign of the Human Metabolic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Lange, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently building a Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) at the Johnson Space Center as part of the Advanced Life Support Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF). The purpose of ARTEF is to evaluate Environmental Control and Life Support System Technologies for Advanced Missions. The HMS is needed to reproduce the primary metabolic effects of human respiration on an enclosed atmosphere when humans cannot be present and the impact of human presence on the system is required. A HMS was designed, built and successfully operated in 2000 but larger crew size requirements and the expense of upgrade of the current system necessitate redesign. This paper addresses the redesign. Several concepts were considered, ranging from chemical oxidation of a hydrocarbon like ethanol or ethyl acetate to carbon dioxide and water, oxidation of an iron-containing compound, or by using a fuel cell. For reasons of cost, simplicity, safety and other factors, the concept chosen includes: a molecular sieve packaged as an industrial oxygen concentrator to remove oxygen from the atmosphere, with direct carbon dioxide, water and heat injection. The water injection is done via heating water to steam with a heat exchanger and thermal effects are handled by directly adding heat to the air stream with a second heat exchanger. Both heat exchangers are supplied by a hot oil loop. The amount of oxygen removal, carbon dioxide addition, water addition and heat addition were calculated using metabolic profiles for respiration and heat, calculated using a series of empirical equations developed for International Space Station (ISS). Sketches of the Human Metabolic Simulator and the hot oil bath loop used to supply heat to the heat exchangers are included

  17. Human Liver Microsomal Metabolism of (+)-Discodermolide

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yun; Schreiber, Emanuel M.; Day, Billy W.

    2009-01-01

    The polyketide natural product (+)-discodermolide is a potent microtubule stabilizer that has generated considerable interest in its synthetic, medicinal and biological chemistry. It progressed to early clinical oncology trials where it showed some efficacy in terms some disease stabilization but also some indications of causing pneumotoxicity. Remarkably, there are no reports of its metabolism. Here, we examined its fate in mixed human liver microsomes. Due to limited availability of the age...

  18. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Takeda, H.; Melintescu, A.; Trivedi, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of 14 C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic 14 C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings

  19. A community-driven global reconstruction of human metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele, Ines; Swainston, Neil; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Hoppe, Andreas; Sahoo, Swagatika; Aurich, Maike K.; Haraldsdottir, Hulda; Mo, Monica L.; Rolfsson, Ottar; Stobbe, Miranda D.; Thorleifsson, Stefan G.; Agren, Rasmus; Bölling, Christian; Bordel, Sergio; Chavali, Arvind K.; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B.; Endler, Lukas; Hala, David; Hucka, Michael; Hull, Duncan; Jameson, Daniel; Jamshidi, Neema; Jonsson, Jon J.; Juty, Nick; Keating, Sarah; Nookaew, Intawat; Le Novère, Nicolas; Malys, Naglis; Mazein, Alexander; Papin, Jason A.; Price, Nathan D.; Selkov, Evgeni; Sigurdsson, Martin I.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Smallbone, Kieran; Sorokin, Anatoly; van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.; Weichart, Dieter; Goryanin, Igor; Nielsen, Jens; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kell, Douglas B.; Mendes, Pedro; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2013-01-01

    Multiple models of human metabolism have been reconstructed, but each represents only a subset of our knowledge. Here we describe Recon 2, a community-driven, consensus 'metabolic reconstruction', which is the most comprehensive representation of human metabolism that is applicable to computational

  20. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    Human bone blood flow and metabolism during physical exercise remains poorly characterised. In the present study we measured femoral bone blood flow and glucose uptake in young healthy subjects by positron emission tomography in three separate protocols. In six women, blood flow was measured...... in femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... exercise, and during intra-femoral infusion of high-dose adenosine. Bone glucose uptake was measured at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise in five men. The results indicate that isometric exercise increased femoral bone blood flow from rest (1.8 ± 0.6 ml/100g/min) to low intensity exercise (4.1 ± 1...

  1. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  2. Evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappaport, S.M.; Kim, S.; Lan, Q.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.; Waidyanatha, S.; Zhang, L.; Li, G.; Yin, S.; Hayes, R.B.; Rothman, N.; Smith, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent evidence has shown that humans metabolize benzene more efficiently at environmental air concentrations than at concentrations > 1 ppm. This led us to speculate that an unidentified metabolic pathway was mainly responsible for benzene metabolism at ambient levels. OBJECTIVE: We

  3. A compendium of inborn errors of metabolism mapped onto the human metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swagatika; Franzson, Leifur; Jonsson, Jon J; Thiele, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are hereditary metabolic defects, which are encountered in almost all major metabolic pathways occurring in man. Many IEMs are screened for in neonates through metabolomic analysis of dried blood spot samples. To enable the mapping of these metabolomic data onto the published human metabolic reconstruction, we added missing reactions and pathways involved in acylcarnitine (AC) and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) metabolism. Using literary data, we reconstructed an AC/FAO module consisting of 352 reactions and 139 metabolites. When this module was combined with the human metabolic reconstruction, the synthesis of 39 acylcarnitines and 22 amino acids, which are routinely measured, was captured and 235 distinct IEMs could be mapped. We collected phenotypic and clinical features for each IEM enabling comprehensive classification. We found that carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolism were most affected by the IEMs, while the brain was the most commonly affected organ. Furthermore, we analyzed the IEMs in the context of metabolic network topology to gain insight into common features between metabolically connected IEMs. While many known examples were identified, we discovered some surprising IEM pairs that shared reactions as well as clinical features but not necessarily causal genes. Moreover, we could also re-confirm that acetyl-CoA acts as a central metabolite. This network based analysis leads to further insight of hot spots in human metabolism with respect to IEMs. The presented comprehensive knowledge base of IEMs will provide a valuable tool in studying metabolic changes involved in inherited metabolic diseases.

  4. Metabolism of xenobiotics of human environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croom, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotics have been defined as chemicals to which an organism is exposed that are extrinsic to the normal metabolism of that organism. Without metabolism, many xenobiotics would reach toxic concentrations. Most metabolic activity inside the cell requires energy, cofactors, and enzymes in order to occur. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes can be divided into phase I, phase II, and transporter enzymes. Lipophilic xenobiotics are often first metabolized by phase I enzymes, which function to make xenobiotics more polar and provide sites for conjugation reactions. Phase II enzymes are conjugating enzymes and can directly interact with xenobiotics but more commonly interact with metabolites produced by phase I enzymes. Through both passive and active transport, these more polar metabolites are eliminated. Most xenobiotics are cleared through multiple enzymes and pathways. The relationship between chemical concentrations, enzyme affinity and quantity, and cofactor availability often determine which metabolic reactions dominate in a given individual. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding human metabolic physiology: a genome-to-systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Monica L; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2009-01-01

    The intricate nature of human physiology renders its study a difficult undertaking, and a systems biology approach is necessary to understand the complex interactions involved. Network reconstruction is a key step in systems biology and represents a common denominator because all systems biology research on a target organism relies on such a representation. With the recent development of genome-scale human metabolic networks, metabolic systems analysis is now possible and has initiated a shift towards human systems biology. Here, we review the important aspects of reconstructing a bottom-up human metabolic network, the network's role in modeling human physiology and the necessity for a community-based consensus reconstruction of human metabolism to be established.

  6. New paradigms for metabolic modeling of human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    review recent work on reconstruction of GEMs for human cell/tissue types and cancer, and the use of GEMs for identification of metabolic changes occurring in response to disease development. We further discuss how GEMs can be used for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. Finally......Abnormalities in cellular functions are associated with the progression of human diseases, often resulting in metabolic reprogramming. GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs) have enabled studying global metabolic reprogramming in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here we...

  7. Peroxisomes, lipid metabolism, and human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past few years, much has been learned about the metabolic functions of peroxisomes. These studies have shown that peroxisomes play a major role in lipid metabolism, including fatty acid beta-oxidation, etherphospholipid biosynthesis, and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation. This article describes

  8. Carboxylesterases in lipid metabolism: from mouse to human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Lian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mammalian carboxylesterases hydrolyze a wide range of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds, including lipid esters. Physiological functions of carboxylesterases in lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis in vivo have been demonstrated by genetic manipulations and chemical inhibition in mice, and in vitro through (overexpression, knockdown of expression, and chemical inhibition in a variety of cells. Recent research advances have revealed the relevance of carboxylesterases to metabolic diseases such as obesity and fatty liver disease, suggesting these enzymes might be potential targets for treatment of metabolic disorders. In order to translate pre-clinical studies in cellular and mouse models to humans, differences and similarities of carboxylesterases between mice and human need to be elucidated. This review presents and discusses the research progress in structure and function of mouse and human carboxylesterases, and the role of these enzymes in lipid metabolism and metabolic disorders.

  9. A compendium of inborn errors of metabolism mapped onto the human metabolic network.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Swagatika; Franzson, Leifur; Jonsson, Jon J; Thiele, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Efst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are hereditary metabolic defects, which are encountered in almost all major metabolic pathways occurring in man. Many IEMs are screened for in neonates through metabolomic analysis of dried blood spot samples. To enable the mapping of these metabolomic data onto the published human metabolic reconstruction, we added missing reactions and pathways involved in acylcarnitin...

  10. [Metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huixue; Tan, Zhenyuan; Deng, Jiagang; Liang, Qiuyun; Nong, Yumei; Song, Nianmei

    2011-02-01

    To study the metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro. Human intestinal bacteria and mangiferin were incubated under anaerobic conditions in vitro. The metabolite was separated and purified by D101 macroporous resin column and preparation high performance liquid chromatography, and its structure was identified by MS and NMR. After 12 h incubation with human intestinal bacteria, the content of mangiferin metabolite reached the maximum, and it was determined as 1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen by MS and NMR. Mangiferin can be metabolized in vitro by human intestinal bacteria into its aglycone (1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen).

  11. Human disorders of peroxisome metabolism and biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterham, Hans R.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are dynamic organelles that play an essential role in a variety of cellular catabolic and anabolic metabolic pathways, including fatty acid alpha- and beta-oxidation, and plasmalogen and bile acid synthesis. Defects in genes encoding peroxisomal proteins can result in a large variety of

  12. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Iain D.; Kennedy, Chris A.

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai—the world's most densely populated megacity—at 6.5 W m-2, surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m-2) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m-2). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  13. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Iain D; Kennedy, Chris A

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai-the world's most densely populated megacity-at 6.5 W m -2 , surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m -2 ) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m -2 ). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  14. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Merk, H.F.; Lockley, D.J.; Pendlington, R.U.; Pease, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental

  15. CardioNet: A human metabolic network suited for the study of cardiomyocyte metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlstädt Anja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of oxygen and nutrients in the coronary circulation is a crucial determinant of cardiac performance. Nutrient composition of coronary blood may significantly vary in specific physiological and pathological conditions, for example, administration of special diets, long-term starvation, physical exercise or diabetes. Quantitative analysis of cardiac metabolism from a systems biology perspective may help to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrient supply and efficiency of metabolic processes required for an adequate cardiac output. Results Here we present CardioNet, the first large-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte comprising 1793 metabolic reactions, including 560 transport processes in six compartments. We use flux-balance analysis to demonstrate the capability of the network to accomplish a set of 368 metabolic functions required for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the cell. Taking the maintenance of ATP, biosynthesis of ceramide, cardiolipin and further important phospholipids as examples, we analyse how a changed supply of glucose, lactate, fatty acids and ketone bodies may influence the efficiency of these essential processes. Conclusions CardioNet is a functionally validated metabolic network of the human cardiomyocyte that enables theorectical studies of cellular metabolic processes crucial for the accomplishment of an adequate cardiac output.

  16. Metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkael Symmonds

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals' attitudes to risk are profoundly influenced by metabolic state (hunger and baseline energy stores. Specifically, animals often express a preference for risky (more variable food sources when below a metabolic reference point (hungry, and safe (less variable food sources when sated. Circulating hormones report the status of energy reserves and acute nutrient intake to widespread targets in the central nervous system that regulate feeding behaviour, including brain regions strongly implicated in risk and reward based decision-making in humans. Despite this, physiological influences per se have not been considered previously to influence economic decisions in humans. We hypothesised that baseline metabolic reserves and alterations in metabolic state would systematically modulate decision-making and financial risk-taking in humans.We used a controlled feeding manipulation and assayed decision-making preferences across different metabolic states following a meal. To elicit risk-preference, we presented a sequence of 200 paired lotteries, subjects' task being to select their preferred option from each pair. We also measured prandial suppression of circulating acyl-ghrelin (a centrally-acting orexigenic hormone signalling acute nutrient intake, and circulating leptin levels (providing an assay of energy reserves. We show both immediate and delayed effects on risky decision-making following a meal, and that these changes correlate with an individual's baseline leptin and changes in acyl-ghrelin levels respectively.We show that human risk preferences are exquisitely sensitive to current metabolic state, in a direction consistent with ecological models of feeding behaviour but not predicted by normative economic theory. These substantive effects of state changes on economic decisions perhaps reflect shared evolutionarily conserved neurobiological mechanisms. We suggest that this sensitivity in human risk-preference to current metabolic state has

  17. Analyzing the regulation of metabolic pathways in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schramm Gunnar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor therapy mainly attacks the metabolism to interfere the tumor's anabolism and signaling of proliferative second messengers. However, the metabolic demands of different cancers are very heterogeneous and depend on their origin of tissue, age, gender and other clinical parameters. We investigated tumor specific regulation in the metabolism of breast cancer. Methods For this, we mapped gene expression data from microarrays onto the corresponding enzymes and their metabolic reaction network. We used Haar Wavelet transforms on optimally arranged grid representations of metabolic pathways as a pattern recognition method to detect orchestrated regulation of neighboring enzymes in the network. Significant combined expression patterns were used to select metabolic pathways showing shifted regulation of the aggressive tumors. Results Besides up-regulation for energy production and nucleotide anabolism, we found an interesting cellular switch in the interplay of biosynthesis of steroids and bile acids. The biosynthesis of steroids was up-regulated for estrogen synthesis which is needed for proliferative signaling in breast cancer. In turn, the decomposition of steroid precursors was blocked by down-regulation of the bile acid pathway. Conclusion We applied an intelligent pattern recognition method for analyzing the regulation of metabolism and elucidated substantial regulation of human breast cancer at the interplay of cholesterol biosynthesis and bile acid metabolism pointing to specific breast cancer treatment.

  18. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways--structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Pär

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-01-01

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  20. In silico prediction of xenobiotic metabolism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Fangping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism in humans is catalyzed by a few enzymes with broad substrate specificities, which provide the overall broad chemical specificity for nearly all xenobiotics that humans encounter. Xenobiotic metabolism are classified into functional group biotransformations. Based on bona fide reactions and negative examples for each reaction class, support vector machine (SVM) classifiers are built. The input to SVM is a set of atomic and molecular features to define the electrostatic, steric, energetic, geometrical and topological environment of the atoms in the reaction center under the molecule. Results show that the overall sensitivity and specificity of classifiers is around 87%.

  1. Cranberry juice suppressed the diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes, but not in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Kentarou; Tsuruoka, Shu-ichi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Gohki; Obi, Yuri; Kaneda, Tae; Takahashi, Masaki; Maekawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Fujimura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    AIM To investigate a potential interaction between cranberry juice and diclofenac, a substrate of CYP2C9. METHODS The inhibitory effect of cranberry juice on diclofenac metabolism was determined using human liver microsome assay. Subsequently, we performed a clinical trial in healthy human subjects to determine whether the repeated consumption of cranberry juice changed the diclofenac pharmacokinetics. RESULTS Cranberry juice significantly suppressed diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes. On the other hand, repeated consumption of cranberry juice did not influence the diclofenac pharmacokinetics in human subjects. CONCLUSIONS Cranberry juice inhibited diclofenac metabolism by human liver microsomes, but not in human subjects. Based on the present and previous findings, we think that although cranberry juice inhibits CYP2C9 activity in vitro, it does not change the pharmacokinetics of medications metabolized by CYP2C9 in clinical situations. PMID:19694738

  2. Metabolically active human brown adipose tissue derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francisco J; Holt, Dolly J; Vargas, Vanessa; Yockman, James; Boudina, Sihem; Atkinson, Donald; Grainger, David W; Revelo, Monica P; Sherman, Warren; Bull, David A; Patel, Amit N

    2014-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis in mammals. It is characterized by fat vacuoles 5-10 µm in diameter and expression of uncoupling protein one, central to the regulation of thermogenesis. In the human newborn, BAT depots are typically grouped around the vasculature and solid organs. These depots maintain body temperature during cold exposure by warming the blood before its distribution to the periphery. They also ensure an optimal temperature for biochemical reactions within solid organs. BAT had been thought to involute throughout childhood and adolescence. Recent studies, however, have confirmed the presence of active BAT in adult humans with depots residing in cervical, supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral, and suprarenal regions. While human pluripotent stem cells have been differentiated into functional brown adipocytes in vitro and brown adipocyte progenitor cells have been identified in murine skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue, multipotent metabolically active BAT-derived stem cells from a single depot have not been identified in adult humans to date. Here, we demonstrate a clonogenic population of metabolically active BAT stem cells residing in adult humans that can: (a) be expanded in vitro; (b) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential; and (c) functionally differentiate into metabolically active brown adipocytes. Our study defines a new target stem cell population that can be activated to restore energy homeostasis in vivo for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus: Coordinating Cellular Stress, Signaling, and Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Thomas; Alwine, James C

    2014-11-01

    Viruses face a multitude of challenges when they infect a host cell. Cells have evolved innate defenses to protect against pathogens, and an infecting virus may induce a stress response that antagonizes viral replication. Further, the metabolic, oxidative, and cell cycle state may not be conducive to the viral infection. But viruses are fabulous manipulators, inducing host cells to use their own characteristic mechanisms and pathways to provide what the virus needs. This article centers on the manipulation of host cell metabolism by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We review the features of the metabolic program instituted by the virus, discuss the mechanisms underlying these dramatic metabolic changes, and consider how the altered program creates a synthetic milieu that favors efficient HCMV replication and spread.

  4. Correlation between blood adenosine metabolism and sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Muñoz, M; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yááñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Rosenthal, L; Villalobos, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Chagoya De Sanchez, V

    1999-01-01

    Blood adenosine metabolism, including metabolites and metabolizing enzymes, was studied during the sleep period in human volunteers. Searching for significant correlations among biochemical parameters found: adenosine with state 1 of slow-wave sleep (SWS); activity of 5'-nucleotidase with state 2 of SWS; inosine and AMP with state 3-4 of SWS; and activity of 5'-nucleotidase and lactate with REM sleep. The correlations were detected in all of the subjects that presented normal hypnograms, but not in those who had fragmented sleep the night of the experiment. The data demonstrate that it is possible to obtain information of complex brain operations such as sleep by measuring biochemical parameters in blood. The results strengthen the notion of a role played by adenosine, its metabolites and metabolizing enzymes, during each of the stages that constitute the sleep process in humans.

  5. Ammonia metabolism during intense dynamic exercise and recovery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, T; Bangsbo, Jens; Gollnick, PD

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics for ammonia (NH3) metabolism in human skeletal muscle during and after intense one-legged exercise. Subjects (n = 8) performed dynamic leg extensor exercise to exhaustion (3.2 min). MuscleNH3 release increased rapidly to a maximum of 314 +/- 42 mumol/min and...

  6. Lipid metabolism in peroxisomes in relation to human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxisomes were long believed to play only a minor role in cellular metabolism but it is now clear that they catalyze a number of important functions. The importance of peroxisomes in humans is stressed by the existence of a group of genetic diseases in man in which one or more peroxisomal

  7. Diet-microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenburg, Justin L; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    are coming to light through a powerful combination of translation-focused animal models and studies in humans. A body of knowledge is accumulating that points to the gut microbiota as a mediator of dietary impact on the host metabolic status. Efforts are focusing on the establishment of causal relationships...

  8. Richness of human gut microbiome correlates with metabolic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Nielsen, Trine; Qin, Junjie

    2013-01-01

    We are facing a global metabolic health crisis provoked by an obesity epidemic. Here we report the human gut microbial composition in a population sample of 123 non-obese and 169 obese Danish individuals. We find two groups of individuals that differ by the number of gut microbial genes and thus...

  9. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders Associated with Human Immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection . This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. DATA SOURCE: Data were obtained from ...

  10. TXNIP Regulates Peripheral Glucose Metabolism in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Hemang; Carlsson, Emma; Chutkow, William A; Johansson, Lovisa E; Storgaard, Heidi; Poulsen, Pernille; Saxena, Richa; Ladd, Christine; Schulze, P. Christian; Mazzini, Michael J; Jensen, Christine Bjørn; Krook, Anna; Björnholm, Marie; Tornqvist, Hans; Zierath, Juleen R; Ridderstråle, Martin; Altshuler, David; Lee, Richard T; Vaag, Allan; Groop, Leif C; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2007-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by defects in insulin secretion and action. Impaired glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is believed to be one of the earliest features in the natural history of T2DM, although underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Methods and Findings We combined human insulin/glucose clamp physiological studies with genome-wide expression profiling to identify thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) as a gene whose expression is powerfully suppressed by insulin yet stimulated by glucose. In healthy individuals, its expression was inversely correlated to total body measures of glucose uptake. Forced expression of TXNIP in cultured adipocytes significantly reduced glucose uptake, while silencing with RNA interference in adipocytes and in skeletal muscle enhanced glucose uptake, confirming that the gene product is also a regulator of glucose uptake. TXNIP expression is consistently elevated in the muscle of prediabetics and diabetics, although in a panel of 4,450 Scandinavian individuals, we found no evidence for association between common genetic variation in the TXNIP gene and T2DM. Conclusions TXNIP regulates both insulin-dependent and insulin-independent pathways of glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle. Combined with recent studies that have implicated TXNIP in pancreatic β-cell glucose toxicity, our data suggest that TXNIP might play a key role in defective glucose homeostasis preceding overt T2DM. PMID:17472435

  11. TXNIP regulates peripheral glucose metabolism in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemang Parikh

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by defects in insulin secretion and action. Impaired glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is believed to be one of the earliest features in the natural history of T2DM, although underlying mechanisms remain obscure.We combined human insulin/glucose clamp physiological studies with genome-wide expression profiling to identify thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP as a gene whose expression is powerfully suppressed by insulin yet stimulated by glucose. In healthy individuals, its expression was inversely correlated to total body measures of glucose uptake. Forced expression of TXNIP in cultured adipocytes significantly reduced glucose uptake, while silencing with RNA interference in adipocytes and in skeletal muscle enhanced glucose uptake, confirming that the gene product is also a regulator of glucose uptake. TXNIP expression is consistently elevated in the muscle of prediabetics and diabetics, although in a panel of 4,450 Scandinavian individuals, we found no evidence for association between common genetic variation in the TXNIP gene and T2DM.TXNIP regulates both insulin-dependent and insulin-independent pathways of glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle. Combined with recent studies that have implicated TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cell glucose toxicity, our data suggest that TXNIP might play a key role in defective glucose homeostasis preceding overt T2DM.

  12. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  13. Cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Qvist, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), has been suggested to mediate septic encephalopathy through an effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. The effect of an intravenous bolus of endotoxin on global CBF, metabolism, and net flux of cytokines and catech...... cerebral flux of TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 did not differ significantly from zero. Thus, high circulating levels of TNF-alpha during human endotoxemia do not induce a direct reduction in cerebral oxidative metabolism.......The proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), has been suggested to mediate septic encephalopathy through an effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. The effect of an intravenous bolus of endotoxin on global CBF, metabolism, and net flux of cytokines...... of a reference endotoxin. Arterial TNF-alpha peaked at 90 minutes, coinciding with a peak in subjective symptoms. At this time, CBF and Paco were significantly reduced compared to baseline; the CBF decrease was readily explained by hypocapnia. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen remained unchanged, and the net...

  14. In Vitro Drug Metabolism by Human Carboxylesterase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Linnet, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) is the major hydrolase in human liver. The enzyme is involved in the metabolism of several important therapeutic agents, drugs of abuse, and endogenous compounds. However, no studies have described the role of human CES1 in the activation of two commonly prescribed...... a panel of therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse to assess their inhibition of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate by recombinant CES1 and human liver microsomes. The screening assay confirmed several known inhibitors of CES1 and identified two previously unreported inhibitors: the dihydropyridine...... calcium antagonist, isradipine, and the immunosuppressive agent, tacrolimus. CES1 plays a role in the metabolism of several drugs used in the treatment of common conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus; thus, there is a potential for clinically relevant drug-drug...

  15. Relevance of the Human Genome Project to inherited metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to identify the complete structure of the human genome. HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, facilitates international cooperation and exchange of information while the Genome Data Base will act as the on-line information retrieval and storage system for the huge amount of information being accumulated. The clinical register MIM (Mendelian Inheritance in Man) established by Victor McKusick is now an on-line resource that will allow biochemists working with inborn errors of metabolism to access the rapidly expanding body of knowledge. Biochemical and molecular genetics are complementary and should draw together to find solutions to the academic and clinical problems posed by inborn errors of metabolism.

  16. [Metabolism of nicousamide in rat and human liver in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Li; Hu, Jin-ping; Chen, Hui; Li, Yan

    2008-09-01

    This paper is aimed to study the metabolic kinetics of nicousamide in rat liver microsomes and cytosol and to identify the major metabolite and drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the metabolism of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes by selective inhibitors in vitro. The concentration of nicousamide was determined by HPLC-UV method. The metabolite of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes was isolated and identified by LC-MS/MS. The major metabolite of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes was identified to be 3-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxy-anilino-carbo-)-6-amino-7-hydroxy-8-methyl-coumarin (M1). The metabolite of nicousamide in rat plasma, urine, bile and liver was consistent with M1. The metabolism of nicousamide can be catalyzed by several reductases, including CYP450 reductases, cytochrome b5 reductases and CYP2C6 in rat liver microsomes, as well as xanthine oxidase and DT-diaphorase in rat liver cytosol.

  17. Shivering thermogenesis in humans: Origin, contribution and metabolic requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haman, François; Blondin, Denis P

    2017-01-01

    As endotherms, humans exposed to a compensable cold environment rely on an increase in thermogenic rate to counteract heat lost to the environment, thereby maintaining a stable core temperature. This review focuses primarily on the most important contributor of heat production in cold-exposed adult humans, shivering skeletal muscles. Specifically, it presents current understanding on (1) the origins of shivering, (2) the contribution of shivering to total heat production and (3) the metabolic requirements of shivering. Although shivering had commonly been measured as a metabolic outcome measure, considerable research is still needed to clearly identify the neuroanatomical structures and circuits that initiate and modulate shivering and drives the shivering patterns (continuous and burst shivering). One thing is clear, the thermogenic rate in humans can be maintained despite significant inter-individual differences in the thermogenic contribution of shivering, the muscles recruited in shivering, the burst shivering rate and the metabolic substrates used to support shivering. It has also become evident that the variability in burst shivering rate between individuals, despite not influencing heat production, does play a key role in orchestrating metabolic fuel selection in the cold. In addition, advances in our understanding of the thermogenic role of brown adipose tissue have been able to explain, at least in part, the large inter-individual differences in the contribution of shivering to total heat production. Whether these differences in the thermogenic role of shivering have any bearing on cold endurance and survival remains to be established. Despite the available research describing the relative thermogenic importance of shivering skeletal muscles in humans, the advancement in our understanding of how shivering is initiated and modulated is needed. Such research is critical to consider strategies to either reduce its role to improve occupational performance or

  18. Respiratory compensation to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mark; Alvarez, Naiara M; Trevino, Michael; Weinstein, Gary L

    2012-11-01

    There is limited and disparate information about the extent of the respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) that occurs in response to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans. Our aim was to examine the influence of the plasma bicarbonate concentration, the plasma base excess, and the arterial pH on the arterial carbon dioxide tension in 52 adult patients with primary metabolic alkalosis, mostly due to diuretic use or vomiting. Linear regression analysis was used to correlate degrees of alkalosis with arterial carbon dioxide tensions. In this alkalotic cohort, whose arterial plasma bicarbonate averaged 31.6 mEq/l, plasma base excess averaged 7.8 mEq/l, and pH averaged 7.48, both plasma bicarbonate and base excess correlated closely with arterial carbon dioxide tensions (r = 0.97 and 0.96, respectively; p metabolic alkalosis than has been reported in prior smaller studies.

  19. Metabolism of diazepam and related benzodiazepines by human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, W D; Watt, J A; McKinnon, G E; Reilly, P E

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of diazepam has been studied in vitro using microsomal preparations from five human livers. An HPLC method was developed for the assay of diazepam, its congeners and its metabolites. Various methods for the incorporation of diazepam into the incubation medium were explored. It was shown that the use of organic solvents or small quantities of hydrochloric acid enhanced the solubility of this substrate. However all of the organic solvents tested were associated with substantial (around 50%) inhibition of metabolism of diazepam by both major pathways (N-demethylation and C3-hydroxylation). The use of hydrochloric acid gave satisfactory solubilization of diazepam, but not of pinazepam, prazepam or halazepam. Detailed metabolic studies were conducted only for diazepam, using neither hydrochloric acid nor organic solvents in the incubation medium. Formation of N-desmethyl-diazepam increased approximately linearly with diazepam concentration to 200 microM, and did not show saturation. Formation of temazepam gave a curved profile over the same range of diazepam concentrations, suggestive of a sigmoidal relationship. Michaelis-Menten parameters could not be determined for either reaction, but intrinsic clearances for N-demethylation varied over a 6-fold range. Diazepam N-demethylation was apparently promoted by the inclusion of temazepam in the incubation medium, while C3-hydroxylation of diazepam was enhanced in the presence of N-desmethyldiazepam. Mephenytoin in the incubation mixture had no effect on diazepam metabolism by either pathway. The present studies have defined some of the methodological problems inherent in in vitro metabolic studies with benzodiazepines, and have shed further light on the metabolism of diazepam in vitro by human liver.

  20. Assessing the Metabolic Effects of Aromatherapy in Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatherapy, a form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM that uses essential oils through inhalation, is believed to enhance physical and spiritual conditions. Although clinical studies suggest that the use of essential oils may have therapeutic potential, evidence for the efficacy of aromatherapy in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous analytical methods that capture its identifiable impact on human biology. Here, we report a comprehensive metabolomics study that reveals metabolic changes in people after exposed to aroma inhalation for 10 continuous days. In this study, the metabolic alterations in urine of 31 females with mild anxiety symptoms exposed to aerial diffusion of aromas were measured by GC-TOF-MS and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analyses. A significant alteration of metabolic profile in subjects responsive to essential oil was found, which is characterized by the increased levels of arginine, homocysteine, and betaine, as well as decreased levels of alcohols, carbohydrates, and organic acids in urine. Notably, the metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and gut microbial metabolism were significantly altered. This study demonstrates that the metabolomics approach can capture the subtle metabolic changes resulting from exposure to essential oils, which may lead to an improved mechanistic understanding of aromatherapy.

  1. Metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene and n-hexane in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Hansen, S H

    1998-01-01

    This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane.......This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane....

  2. A mathematical model of the human metabolic system and metabolic flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, T; Wattis, J A D; King, J R; MacDonald, I A; Mazzatti, D J

    2014-09-01

    In healthy subjects some tissues in the human body display metabolic flexibility, by this we mean the ability for the tissue to switch its fuel source between predominantly carbohydrates in the postprandial state and predominantly fats in the fasted state. Many of the pathways involved with human metabolism are controlled by insulin and insulin-resistant states such as obesity and type-2 diabetes are characterised by a loss or impairment of metabolic flexibility. In this paper we derive a system of 12 first-order coupled differential equations that describe the transport between and storage in different tissues of the human body. We find steady state solutions to these equations and use these results to nondimensionalise the model. We then solve the model numerically to simulate a healthy balanced meal and a high fat meal and we discuss and compare these results. Our numerical results show good agreement with experimental data where we have data available to us and the results show behaviour that agrees with intuition where we currently have no data with which to compare.

  3. Human brain glycogen content and metabolism: implications on its role in brain energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Oz, Gülin; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Kumar, Anjali; Criego, Amy B; Benedict, Luke E; Rao, Jyothi P; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Van De Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Gruetter, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The adult brain relies on glucose for its energy needs and stores it in the form of glycogen, primarily in astrocytes. Animal and culture studies indicate that brain glycogen may support neuronal function when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate and/or during neuronal activation. However, the concentration of glycogen and rates of its metabolism in the human brain are unknown. We used in vivo localized 13C-NMR spectroscopy to measure glycogen content and turnover in the human brai...

  4. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...... to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... by muscle contraction to vasodilatory signals in the local vascular bed remains an important area of study....

  5. Temporal metabolic profiling of plasma during endotoxemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sleight, Kirsten E; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2013-12-01

    Endotoxemia induced by the administration of low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to healthy human volunteers is a well-established experimental protocol and has served as a reproducible platform for investigating the responses to systemic inflammation. Because metabolic composition of a tissue or body fluid is uniquely altered by stimuli and provides information about the dominant regulatory mechanisms at various cellular processes, understanding the global metabolic response to systemic inflammation constitutes a major part in this investigation complementing the studies undertaken so far in both clinical and systems biology fields. This article communicates the first proof-of-principle metabonomic analysis, which comprised global biochemical profiles in human plasma samples from healthy subjects given intravenous endotoxin at 2 ng/kg. Concentrations of a total of 366 plasma biochemicals were determined in archived blood samples collected from 15 endotoxin-treated subjects at five time points within 24 h after treatment and compared with control samples collected from four saline-treated subjects. Principal component analysis within this data set determined the sixth hour as a critical time point separating development and recovery phases of the LPS-induced metabolic changes. Consensus clustering of the differential metabolites identified two distinct subsets of metabolites that displayed common coherent profiles with opposing directionality. The first group of metabolites, which were mostly associated with pathways related to lipid metabolism, was upregulated within the first 6 h and downregulated by the 24th hour following LPS administration. The second group of metabolites, in contrast, was first downregulated until the sixth hour, then upregulated. Metabolites in this group were predominantly amino acids or their derivatives. In summary, nontargeted biochemical profiling and unsupervised multivariate analyses highlighted the prominent roles of lipid and protein

  6. Aspartate aminotransferase – key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Otto-Ślusarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ - nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms - cytoplasmic (AST1 and mitochondrial (AST2, that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys – 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs.

  7. Metabolism, Excretion and Mass Balance of Solithromycin in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLauchlin, Christopher; Schneider, Stephen E; Keedy, Kara; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Jamieson, Brian D

    2018-03-05

    Solithromycin, a novel macrolide and the first fluoroketolide, is being developed as a therapy for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, with a distinct mechanism that provides activity against macrolide-resistant bacteria. The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of solithromycin, were studied in healthy male subjects after oral administration of a single 800 mg (∼100 μCi) dose of [ 14 C]solithromycin. Solithromycin was well tolerated and absorption from the solution occurred with a median time to peak concentration of 4.0 hours. Solithromycin and the total radioactivity had similar profiles with no long-lived metabolites. The whole blood total radioactivity was approximately 75% of plasma total radioactivity. Recovery was essentially complete (mean 90.6%), with 76.5% and 14.1% of the dose recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged solithromycin (CEM-101) was the predominant circulating radioactive component in plasma (77% of the total radioactivity AUC) with two minor plasma metabolites, CEM-214 and CEM-122 ( N -acetyl CEM-101), each accounting for approximately 5% of the total radioactivity. Urinary excretion was predominantly as parent. Solithromycin was primarily eliminated in the feces after extensive metabolism via a complex metabolic pathway with CEM-262 as the major constituent (27.36% of administered dose). Overall oxidative pathways, presumably carried out mostly by CYP3A4, represented the majority of the metabolism with N -acetylation present to a lesser extent. No disproportionate human metabolites were observed. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Doxycycline alters metabolism and proliferation of human cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Ahler

    Full Text Available The tetracycline antibiotics are widely used in biomedical research as mediators of inducible gene expression systems. Despite many known effects of tetracyclines on mammalian cells-including inhibition of the mitochondrial ribosome-there have been few reports on potential off-target effects at concentrations commonly used in inducible systems. Here, we report that in human cell lines, commonly used concentrations of doxycycline change gene expression patterns and concomitantly shift metabolism towards a more glycolytic phenotype, evidenced by increased lactate secretion and reduced oxygen consumption. We also show that these concentrations are sufficient to slow proliferation. These findings suggest that researchers using doxycycline in inducible expression systems should design appropriate controls to account for potential confounding effects of the drug on cellular metabolism.

  9. Hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus and metabolic syndrome: interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Significant concerns have been raised about the metabolic effects of antiretroviral medication, including the classic triad of dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance (IR) and characteristic alterations in fat distribution (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy). Co-infection with hepatitis C appears to exacerbate IR, reduce serum lipids and induce prothrombotic changes in the treated human immunodeficiency virus patient. The effects of co-infection are complex. While combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events through promotion of dyslipidaemia, IR and fat redistribution, co-infection exacerbates IR while reducing serum lipids. Co-infection also promotes a prothrombotic state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation, which may enhance risk for cardiovascular disease. Consideration must be given to selection of appropriate treatment regimens and timing of therapy in co-infected patients to minimize metabolic derangements and, ultimately, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  10. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomand, A; Bucholz, B A; Clifford, A J; Duecker, S R; Johnson, H; Schneider, P D; Zulim, R A.

    1999-01-01

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkins disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer

  11. Arrhythmogenic and metabolic remodelling of failing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloschat, C R; Koppel, A C; Aras, K K; Brennan, J A; Holzem, K M; Efimov, I R

    2016-07-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The global burden of HF continues to rise, with prevalence rates estimated at 1-2% and incidence approaching 5-10 per 1000 persons annually. The complex pathophysiology of HF impacts virtually all aspects of normal cardiac function - from structure and mechanics to metabolism and electrophysiology - leading to impaired mechanical contraction and sudden cardiac death. Pharmacotherapy and device therapy are the primary methods of treating HF, but neither is able to stop or reverse disease progression. Thus, there is an acute need to translate basic research into improved HF therapy. Animal model investigations are a critical component of HF research. However, the translation from cellular and animal models to the bedside is hampered by significant differences between species and among physiological scales. Our studies over the last 8 years show that hypotheses generated in animal models need to be validated in human in vitro models. Importantly, however, human heart investigations can establish translational platforms for safety and efficacy studies before embarking on costly and risky clinical trials. This review summarizes recent developments in human HF investigations of electrophysiology remodelling, metabolic remodelling, and β-adrenergic remodelling and discusses promising new technologies for HF research. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  12. Human brain glycogen content and metabolism: implications on its role in brain energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Gülin; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Kumar, Anjali; Criego, Amy B; Benedict, Luke E; Rao, Jyothi P; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Van De Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Gruetter, Rolf

    2007-03-01

    The adult brain relies on glucose for its energy needs and stores it in the form of glycogen, primarily in astrocytes. Animal and culture studies indicate that brain glycogen may support neuronal function when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate and/or during neuronal activation. However, the concentration of glycogen and rates of its metabolism in the human brain are unknown. We used in vivo localized 13C-NMR spectroscopy to measure glycogen content and turnover in the human brain. Nine healthy volunteers received intravenous infusions of [1-(13)C]glucose for durations ranging from 6 to 50 h, and brain glycogen labeling and washout were measured in the occipital lobe for up to 84 h. The labeling kinetics suggest that turnover is the main mechanism of label incorporation into brain glycogen. Upon fitting a model of glycogen metabolism to the time courses of newly synthesized glycogen, human brain glycogen content was estimated at approximately 3.5 micromol/g, i.e., three- to fourfold higher than free glucose at euglycemia. Turnover of bulk brain glycogen occurred at a rate of 0.16 micromol.g-1.h-1, implying that complete turnover requires 3-5 days. Twenty minutes of visual stimulation (n=5) did not result in detectable glycogen utilization in the visual cortex, as judged from similar [13C]glycogen levels before and after stimulation. We conclude that the brain stores a substantial amount of glycogen relative to free glucose and metabolizes this store very slowly under normal physiology.

  13. Metabolism of dimethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in cultured human bronchi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Curtis C.; Autrup, Herman; Stoner, Gary D.

    1977-01-01

    The metabolic activation of several chemical classes of procarcinogens is being studied in cultured human bronchi. Previous studies have shown that carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are metabolically activated by the bronchial epithelium. In the study reported here, dimethylnitrosamine...... chemical carcinogens metabolized by human bronchus....

  14. Substrate availability and transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in human skeletal muscle during recovery from exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Osada, Takuya; Andersen, Lisbeth Tingsted

    2005-01-01

    In skeletal muscle of humans, transcription of several metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise when no food is consumed. To determine the potential influence of substrate availability on the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes during recovery from exercise, 9...... the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in skeletal muscle of humans during recovery from exercise....

  15. Hopping locomotion at different gravity: metabolism and mechanics in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavei, Gaspare; Minetti, Alberto E

    2016-05-15

    Previous literature on the effects of low gravity on the mechanics and energetics of human locomotion already dealt with walking, running, and skipping. The aim of the present study is to obtain a comprehensive view on that subject by including measurements of human hopping in simulated low gravity, a gait often adopted in many Apollo Missions and documented in NASA footage. Six subjects hopped at different speeds at terrestrial, Martian, and Lunar gravity on a treadmill while oxygen consumption and 3D body kinematic were sampled. Results clearly indicate that hopping is too metabolically expensive to be a sustainable locomotion on Earth but, similarly to skipping (and running), its economy greatly (more than ×10) increases at lower gravity. On the Moon, the metabolic cost of hopping becomes even lower than that of walking, skipping, and running, but the general finding is that gaits with very different economy on Earth share almost the same economy on the Moon. The mechanical reasons for such a decrease in cost are discussed in the paper. The present data, together with previous findings, will allow also to predict the aerobic traverse range/duration of astronauts when getting far from their base station on low gravity planets. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  17. Obesity-related metabolic dysfunction in dogs: a comparison with human metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvarijonaviciute Asta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, metabolic syndrome (MS has gained attention in human metabolic medicine given its associations with development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Canine obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and mild hypertension, but the authors are not aware of any existing studies examining the existence or prevalence of MS in obese dogs. Thirty-five obese dogs were assessed before and after weight loss (median percentage loss 29%, range 10-44%. The diagnostic criteria of the International Diabetes Federation were modified in order to define canine obesity-related metabolic dysfunction (ORMD, which included a measure of adiposity (using a 9-point body condition score [BCS], systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma cholesterol, plasma triglyceride, and fasting plasma glucose. By way of comparison, total body fat mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, whilst total adiponectin, fasting insulin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP were measured using validated assays. Results Systolic blood pressure (P = 0.008, cholesterol (P = 0.003, triglyceride (P = 0.018, and fasting insulin (P P = 0.001. However, hsCRP did not change with weight loss. Prior to weight loss, 7 dogs were defined as having ORMD, and there was no difference in total fat mass between these dogs and those who did not meet the criteria for ORMD. However, plasma adiponectin concentration was less (P = 0.031, and plasma insulin concentration was greater (P = 0.030 in ORMD dogs. Conclusions In this study, approximately 20% of obese dogs suffer from ORMD, and this is characterized by hypoadiponectinaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. These studies can form the basis of further investigations to determine path genetic mechanisms and the health significance for dogs, in terms of disease associations and outcomes of weight loss.

  18. Using the reconstructed genome-scale human metabolic network to study physiology and pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism plays a key role in many major human diseases. Generation of high-throughput omics data has ushered in a new era of systems biology. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions provide a platform to interpret omics data in a biochemically meaningful manner. The release of the global human metabolic network, Recon 1, in 2007 has enabled new systems biology approaches to study human physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. There are currently over 20 publications that utilize Reco...

  19. Bacterial metabolism of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, T C; Muller, M; Sztelma, K

    1992-05-01

    Evidence for transcellular bacterial metabolism of phagocyte-derived arachidonic acid was sought by exposing human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, prelabelled with [3H]arachidonic acid, to opsonized, stationary-phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa (bacteria-to-phagocyte ratio of 50:1) for 90 min at 37 degrees C. Control leukocytes were stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187 (5 microM) for 5 min. Radiochromatograms of arachidonic acid metabolites, extracted from A23187-stimulated cultures and then separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, revealed leukotriene B4, its omega-oxidation products, and 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid. In contrast, two major metabolite peaks, distinct from known polymorphonuclear leukocyte arachidonic acid products by high-performance liquid chromatography or by thin-layer chromatography, were identified in cultures of P. aeruginosa with [3H]arachidonic acid-labelled polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Respective chromatographic characteristics of these novel products were identical to those of two major metabolite peaks produced by incubation of stationary-phase P. aeruginosa with [3H]arachidonic acid. Production of the metabolites was dependent upon pseudomonal viability. UV spectral data were consistent with a conjugated diene structure. Metabolism of arachidonic acid by P. aeruginosa was not influenced by the presence of catalase, superoxide dismutase, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or ferrous ions but was inhibited by carbon monoxide, ketoconazole, and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane. Our data suggest that pseudomonal metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived arachidonic acid occurs during phagocytosis, probably by enzymatic epoxidation and hydroxylation via an oxygenase. By this means, potential proinflammatory effects of arachidonic acid or its metabolites may be modulated by P. aeruginosa at sites of infection in vivo.

  20. Fatty acid metabolism studies of human epidermal cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, C L; Dunham, W R

    1993-12-01

    Adult human epidermal keratinocytes grow rapidly in medium that is essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient. In this medium they exhibit decreased amounts of the fatty acids, 18:2, 20:3, 20:4, and contain increased amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids. [14C]- and [3H]acetate and radiolabeled fatty acids, 16:0, 18:2, and 20:4 were used to study the fatty acid metabolism of these cells. Label from acetate appeared in 14- to 20-carbon fatty acids, both saturated and monounsaturated. No label was seen in the essential fatty acid 18:2, 18:3, and 20:4. Radiolabel from [9, 10-3H]palmitic acid (16:0) was detected in 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, and 18:1. [14C]linoleic acid (18:2) was converted to 18:3, 20:2, 20:3, and 20:4, demonstrating delta 6 and delta 5 desaturase activity in keratinocytes. Label from acetate, 16:0, or 18:2 was found mostly in the cellular phospholipids while only one third of the label from [14C]arachidonic was found in the phospholipids. [14C]acetate and [14C]18:2 time course data were used to construct a model of the metabolism of these reactants, using coupled, first-order differential equations. The data show that EFA-deficient keratinocytes metabolize fatty acids using pathways previously found in liver; they suggest the positioning of 18:2 desaturase and 18:3 elongase near the plasma membrane; they indicate that for the synthesis of nonessential fatty acids the formation of 18:0 from 16:0 is the rate-determining step; and they show that the conversion of 18:2 to 20:3 is rapid. These experiments demonstrate a method to study lipid enzyme kinetics in living cells.

  1. Metabolic Effects of the Very-Low-Carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood "Villains" of Human Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During very low carbohydrate intake, the regulated and controlled production of ketone bodies causes a harmless physiological state known as dietary ketosis. Ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. In comparison with glucose, the ketone bodies are actually a very good respiratory fuel. Indeed, there is no clear requirement for dietary carbohydrates for human adults. Interestingly, the effects of ketone body metabolism suggest that mild ketosis may offer therapeutic potential in a variety of different common and rare disease states. Also, the recent landmark study showed that a very-low-carbohydrate diet resulted in a significant reduction in fat mass and a concomitant increase in lean body mass in normal-weight men. Contrary to popular belief, insulin is not needed for glucose uptake and utilization in man. Finally, both muscle fat and carbohydrate burn in an amino acid flame.

  2. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  3. Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K O'Hara

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is an essential metabolite utilized as a redox cofactor and enzyme substrate in numerous cellular processes. Elevated NAD+ levels have been observed in red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known regarding how the parasite generates NAD+. Here, we employed a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to confirm that P. falciparum lacks the ability to synthesize NAD+ de novo and is reliant on the uptake of exogenous niacin. We characterized several enzymes in the NAD+ pathway and demonstrate cytoplasmic localization for all except the parasite nicotinamidase, which concentrates in the nucleus. One of these enzymes, the P. falciparum nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (PfNMNAT, is essential for NAD+ metabolism and is highly diverged from the human homolog, but genetically similar to bacterial NMNATs. Our results demonstrate the enzymatic activity of PfNMNAT in vitro and demonstrate its ability to genetically complement the closely related Escherichia coli NMNAT. Due to the similarity of PfNMNAT to the bacterial enzyme, we tested a panel of previously identified bacterial NMNAT inhibitors and synthesized and screened twenty new derivatives, which demonstrate a range of potency against live parasite culture. These results highlight the importance of the parasite NAD+ metabolic pathway and provide both novel therapeutic targets and promising lead antimalarial compounds.

  4. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  5. Silibinin regulates lipid metabolism and differentiation in functional human adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio eBarbagallo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silibinin, a natural plant flavonoid, is the main active constituent found in milk thistle (Silybum marianum. It is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-neoplastic effect and suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silibinin on adipogenic differentiation and thermogenic capacity of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Silibinin (10 μM treatment, either at the beginning or at the end of adipogenic differentiation, resulted in an increase of SIRT-1, PPARα, Pgc-1α and UCPs gene expression. Moreover, silibinin administration resulted in a decrease of PPARγ, FABP4, FAS and MEST/PEG1 gene expression during the differentiation, confirming that this compound is able to reduce fatty acid accumulation and adipocyte size. Our data showed that silibinin regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism, inducing thermogenesis and promoting a brown remodelling in adipocyte. Taken together, our findings suggest that silibinin increases UCPs expression by stimulation of SIRT1, PPARα and Pgc-1α, improved metabolic parameters, decreased lipid mass leading to the formation of functional adipocytes.

  6. Glucose metabolism in cultured trophoblasts from human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, A.J.; Farmer, D.R.; Nelson, D.M.; Smith, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The development of appropriate placental trophoblast isolation and culture techniques enables the study of pathways of glucose utilization by this important cell layer in vitro. Trophoblasts from normal term placentas were isolated and cultured 24 hours and 72 hours in uncoated polystyrene culture tubes or tubes previously coated with a fibrin matrix. Trophoblasts cultured on fibrin are morphologically distinct from those cultured on plastic or other matrices and generally resemble in vivo syncytium. Cells were incubated up to 3 hours with 14 C-labeled glucose and reactions were stopped by addition of perchloric acid. 14 CO 2 production by trophoblasts increased linearly with time however the largest accumulation of label was in organic acids. Trophoblasts cultured in absence of fibrin utilized more glucose and accumulated more 14 C in metabolic products compared to cells cultured on fibrin. Glucose oxidation to CO 2 by the phosphogluconate (PG) pathway was estimated from specific yields of 14 CO 2 from [1- 14 C]-D-glucose and [6- 14 C]-D-glucose. Approximately 6% of glucose oxidation was by the PG pathway when cells were cultured on fibrin compared to approximately 1% by cells cultured in the absence of fibrin. The presence of a fibrin growth matrix appears to modulate the metabolism of glucose by trophoblast from human placenta in vitro

  7. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-11-03

    Passive exoskeletons that assist with human locomotion are often lightweight and compact, but are unable to provide net mechanical power to the exoskeletal wearer. In contrast, powered exoskeletons often provide biologically appropriate levels of mechanical power, but the size and mass of their actuator/power source designs often lead to heavy and unwieldy devices. In this study, we extend the design and evaluation of a lightweight and powerful autonomous exoskeleton evaluated for loaded walking in (J Neuroeng Rehab 11:80, 2014) to the case of unloaded walking conditions. The metabolic energy consumption of seven study participants (85 ± 12 kg body mass) was measured while walking on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s. Testing conditions included not wearing the exoskeleton and wearing the exoskeleton, in both powered and unpowered modes. When averaged across the gait cycle, the autonomous exoskeleton applied a mean positive mechanical power of 26 ± 1 W (13 W per ankle) with 2.12 kg of added exoskeletal foot-shank mass (1.06 kg per leg). Use of the leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 35 ± 13 W, which was an improvement of 10 ± 3% (p = 0.023) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. The results of this study highlight the advantages of developing lightweight and powerful exoskeletons that can comfortably assist the body during walking.

  8. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of 59 Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of 59 Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in 59 Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models

  9. Integrated transcriptional and metabolic profiling in human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-12-01

    In this meta-study, we aimed to integrate biological insights gained from two levels of -omics analyses on the response to systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide in humans. We characterized the interplay between plasma metabolite compositions and transcriptional response of leukocytes through integration of transcriptomics with plasma metabonomics. We hypothesized that the drastic changes in the immediate environment of the leukocytes might have an adaptive effect on shaping their transcriptional response in conjunction with the initial inflammatory stimuli. Indeed, we observed that leukocytes, most notably, tune the activity of lipid- and protein-associated processes at the transcriptional level in accordance with the fluctuations in metabolite compositions of surrounding plasma. A closer look into the transcriptional control of only metabolic pathways uncovered alterations in bioenergetics and defenses against oxidative stress closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and shifts in energy production observed during inflammatory processes.

  10. On the Metabolism of Exogenous Ketones in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Brianna J; Cox, Pete J; Evans, Rhys D; Santer, Peter; Miller, Jack J; Faull, Olivia K; Magor-Elliott, Snapper; Hiyama, Satoshi; Stirling, Matthew; Clarke, Kieran

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Currently there is considerable interest in ketone metabolism owing to recently reported benefits of ketosis for human health. Traditionally, ketosis has been achieved by following a high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diet, but adherence to such diets can be difficult. An alternative way to increase blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate (D-βHB) concentrations is ketone drinks, but the metabolic effects of exogenous ketones are relatively unknown. Here, healthy human volunteers took part in three randomized metabolic studies of drinks containing a ketone ester (KE); (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate, or ketone salts (KS); sodium plus potassium βHB. Methods and Results: In the first study, 15 participants consumed KE or KS drinks that delivered ~12 or ~24 g of βHB. Both drinks elevated blood D-βHB concentrations (D-βHB C max : KE 2.8 mM, KS 1.0 mM, P < 0.001), which returned to baseline within 3-4 h. KS drinks were found to contain 50% of the L-βHB isoform, which remained elevated in blood for over 8 h, but was not detectable after 24 h. Urinary excretion of both D-βHB and L-βHB was <1.5% of the total βHB ingested and was in proportion to the blood AUC. D-βHB, but not L-βHB, was slowly converted to breath acetone. The KE drink decreased blood pH by 0.10 and the KS drink increased urinary pH from 5.7 to 8.5. In the second study, the effect of a meal before a KE drink on blood D-βHB concentrations was determined in 16 participants. Food lowered blood D-βHB C max by 33% (Fed 2.2 mM, Fasted 3.3 mM, P < 0.001), but did not alter acetoacetate or breath acetone concentrations. All ketone drinks lowered blood glucose, free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations, and had similar effects on blood electrolytes, which remained normal. In the final study, participants were given KE over 9 h as three drinks ( n = 12) or a continuous nasogastric infusion ( n = 4) to maintain blood D-βHB concentrations greater than 1 mM. Both drinks and

  11. On the Metabolism of Exogenous Ketones in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna J. Stubbs

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Currently there is considerable interest in ketone metabolism owing to recently reported benefits of ketosis for human health. Traditionally, ketosis has been achieved by following a high-fat, low-carbohydrate “ketogenic” diet, but adherence to such diets can be difficult. An alternative way to increase blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate (D-βHB concentrations is ketone drinks, but the metabolic effects of exogenous ketones are relatively unknown. Here, healthy human volunteers took part in three randomized metabolic studies of drinks containing a ketone ester (KE; (R-3-hydroxybutyl (R-3-hydroxybutyrate, or ketone salts (KS; sodium plus potassium βHB.Methods and Results: In the first study, 15 participants consumed KE or KS drinks that delivered ~12 or ~24 g of βHB. Both drinks elevated blood D-βHB concentrations (D-βHB Cmax: KE 2.8 mM, KS 1.0 mM, P < 0.001, which returned to baseline within 3–4 h. KS drinks were found to contain 50% of the L-βHB isoform, which remained elevated in blood for over 8 h, but was not detectable after 24 h. Urinary excretion of both D-βHB and L-βHB was <1.5% of the total βHB ingested and was in proportion to the blood AUC. D-βHB, but not L-βHB, was slowly converted to breath acetone. The KE drink decreased blood pH by 0.10 and the KS drink increased urinary pH from 5.7 to 8.5. In the second study, the effect of a meal before a KE drink on blood D-βHB concentrations was determined in 16 participants. Food lowered blood D-βHB Cmax by 33% (Fed 2.2 mM, Fasted 3.3 mM, P < 0.001, but did not alter acetoacetate or breath acetone concentrations. All ketone drinks lowered blood glucose, free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations, and had similar effects on blood electrolytes, which remained normal. In the final study, participants were given KE over 9 h as three drinks (n = 12 or a continuous nasogastric infusion (n = 4 to maintain blood D-βHB concentrations greater than 1 mM. Both drinks

  12. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

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    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  13. Genetic and metabolic determinants of human epigenetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggarty, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics has emerged in recent years as one of the most important biological mechanisms linking exposures across the life course to long-term health. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the metabolic and genetic determinants of epigenetic variation in human populations. Epigenetic status is influenced by a range of environmental exposures, including diet and nutrition, social status, the early emotional environment, and infertility and its treatment. The period around conception is particularly sensitive to environmental exposures with evidence for effects on epigenetic imprinting within the offspring. Epigenetic status is also influenced by genotype, and genetic variation in methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and the DNA methytransferase and ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase proteins has been linked to the epigenetic status, biological function and disease. Epigenetics is at the heart of a series of feedback loops linking the environment to the human genome in a way that allows crosstalk between the genome and the environment it exists within. It offers the potential for modification of adverse epigenetic states resulting from events/exposures at earlier life stages. We need to better understand the nutritional programming of epigenetic states, the persistence of these marks in time and their effect on biological function and health in current and future generations.

  14. Metabolic Adaptation to Nutritional Stress in Human Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Miyo, Masaaki; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Sueda, Toshinori; Noguchi, Kozo; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Colvin, Hugh; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Gotoh, Noriko; Matsuda, Fumio; Satoh, Taroh

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells respond to their microenvironment, which can include hypoxia and malnutrition, and adapt their metabolism to survive and grow. Some oncogenes are associated with cancer metabolism via regulation of the related enzymes or transporters. However, the importance of metabolism and precise metabolic effects of oncogenes in colorectal cancer remain unclear. We found that colorectal cancer cells survived under the condition of glucose depletion, and their resistance to such conditions dep...

  15. Genome-Scale Reconstruction of the Human Astrocyte Metabolic Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mart?n-Jim?nez, Cynthia A.; Salazar-Barreto, Diego; Barreto, George E.; Gonz?lez, Janneth

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells of the central nervous system; they have a predominant role in maintaining brain metabolism. In this sense, abnormal metabolic states have been found in different neuropathological diseases. Determination of metabolic states of astrocytes is difficult to model using current experimental approaches given the high number of reactions and metabolites present. Thus, genome-scale metabolic networks derived from transcriptomic data can be used as a framework t...

  16. In vitro metabolism of genistein and tangeretin by human and murine cytochrome p450s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Rasmussen, Salka; Brøsen, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 3A4, 2C9 or 2D6 enzymes obtained from Escherichia coli and human liver microsomes samples were used to investigate the ability of human CYP enzymes to metabolize the two dietary flavonoids, genistein and tangeretin. Analysis of the metabolic profile from...... or hydroxylated at the 3'- and demethylated at the 4'-positions, respectively. Metabolism of tangeretin by recombinant CYP1A2, 3A4, 2136 and 2C9 resulted in metabolic profiles that qualitatively were identical to those observed in the human microsomes. Inclusion of the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine...... in the incubation mixture with human liver microsomes resulted in potent inhibition of tangeretin and genistein metabolism. Other isozymes-selective CYP inhibitors had only minor effects on tangeretin or genistein metabolism. Overall the presented observations suggest major involvement of CYP1A2 in the hepatic...

  17. Metabolic syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives : To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Prevalence of MetS was compared in patients who were not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART to patients who were on HAART. Materials and Methods: Seventy HIV positive cases were studied. Pregnant and lactating women, patients on drugs other than HAART known to cause metabolic abnormalities and those having diabetes or hypertension were excluded. Cases were evaluated for MetS by using National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel-III. Results: 47 cases were on HAART and 23 cases were not on HAART. Fasting Blood Glucose ≥100 mg/dl was present in 28.6% cases, out of whom 27.7% were on HAART and 30.4% were not on HAART (P = 0.8089. 12.9% cases had BP ≥130/≥85 mm Hg, out of whom 14.9% were on HAART and 8.7% were not on HAART (P = 0.4666. 42.9% cases had TG ≥150 mg/dl, out of whom 44.7% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.6894. HDL cholesterol was low (males <40 mg/dl, females <50 mg/dl in 50% cases, out of whom 55.3% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.2035. Conclusions: Prevalence of MetS was 20%. Majority of patients had only one component of MetS (32.9%. Low HDL was present in 50%, followed by raised triglycerides in 42.9%. Waist circumference was not increased in any of the patients. There was no statistically significant difference between those on HAART and those not on HAART in distribution of risk factors and individual components of MetS.

  18. Brain lactate metabolism in humans with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Carrera, Emmanuel; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. Thirty-one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxic (PbtO(2) 119 μmol/L) versus nonhyperglycolytic. Median per patient samples with elevated CMD lactate was 54% (interquartile range, 11%-80%). Lactate elevations were more often attributable to cerebral hyperglycolysis (78%; interquartile range, 5%-98%) than brain hypoxia (11%; interquartile range, 4%-75%). Mortality was associated with increased percentage of samples with elevated lactate and brain hypoxia (28% [interquartile range 9%-95%] in nonsurvivors versus 9% [interquartile range 3%-17%] in survivors; P=0.02) and lower percentage of elevated lactate and cerebral hyperglycolysis (13% [interquartile range, 1%-87%] versus 88% [interquartile range, 27%-99%]; P=0.07). Cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate production predicted good 6-month outcome (odds ratio for modified Rankin Scale score, 0-3 1.49; CI, 1.08-2.05; P=0.016), whereas increased lactate with brain hypoxia was associated with a reduced likelihood of good outcome (OR, 0.78; CI, 0.59-1.03; P=0.08). Brain lactate is frequently elevated in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, predominantly because of hyperglycolysis rather than hypoxia. A pattern of increased cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate was associated with good long-term recovery. Our data suggest that lactate may be used as an aerobic substrate by the injured human brain.

  19. Glucose Metabolism of Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the glucose metabolism of prostate cancer is modulated by androgen. We performed in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies of [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG accumulation in androgen-sensitive (CWR-22 and androgen-independent (PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts implanted in castrated and noncastrated male athymic mice. The growth pattern of the CWR-22 tumor was best approximated by an exponential function (tumor size in mm3 = 14.913 e0.108 × days, R2 = .96, n = 5. The growth pattern of the PC-3 tumor was best approximated by a quadratic function (tumor size in mm3 = 0.3511 × days2 + 49.418 × day −753.33, R2 = .96, n = 3. The FDG accumulation in the CWR-22 tumor implanted in the castrated mice was significantly lower, by an average of 55%, in comparison to that implanted in the noncastrated host (1.27 vs. 2.83, respectively, p < .05. The 3-week maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax was 0.99 ± 0.43 (mean ± SD for CWR-22 and 1.21 ± 0.32 for PC-3, respectively. The 5-week SUVmax was 1.22 ± 0.08 for CWR-22 and 1.35 ± 0.17 for PC-3, respectively. The background muscle SUVmax was 0.53 ± 0.11. Glucose metabolism was higher in the PC-3 tumor than in the CWR-22 tumor at both the 3-week (by 18% and the 5-week (by 9.6% micro-PET imaging sessions. Our results support the notions that FDG PET may be useful in the imaging evaluation of response to androgen ablation therapy and in the early prediction of hormone refractoriness in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

  20. Genome-scale modeling of human metabolism - a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Gatto, Francesco; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Altered metabolism is linked to the appearance of various human diseases and a better understanding of disease-associated metabolic changes may lead to the identification of novel prognostic biomarkers and the development of new therapies. Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) have been employed for studying human metabolism in a systematic manner, as well as for understanding complex human diseases. In the past decade, such metabolic models - one of the fundamental aspects of systems biology - have started contributing to the understanding of the mechanistic relationship between genotype and phenotype. In this review, we focus on the construction of the Human Metabolic Reaction database, the generation of healthy cell type- and cancer-specific GEMs using different procedures, and the potential applications of these developments in the study of human metabolism and in the identification of metabolic changes associated with various disorders. We further examine how in silico genome-scale reconstructions can be employed to simulate metabolic flux distributions and how high-throughput omics data can be analyzed in a context-dependent fashion. Insights yielded from this mechanistic modeling approach can be used for identifying new therapeutic agents and drug targets as well as for the discovery of novel biomarkers. Finally, recent advancements in genome-scale modeling and the future challenge of developing a model of whole-body metabolism are presented. The emergent contribution of GEMs to personalized and translational medicine is also discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Metabolic syndrome: is equine disease comparable to what we know in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, Antonia; Barton, Ann-Kristin; Schmitz, Robert R; Gehlen, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes similarities and differences between the metabolic syndromes in humans and equines, concerning the anatomy, symptoms, and pathophysiological mechanisms. In particular, it discusses the structure and distribution of adipose tissue and its specific metabolic pathways. Furthermore, this article provides insights and focuses on issues concerning laminitis in horses and cardiovascular diseases in humans, as well as their overlap. PMID:24894908

  2. Chimeric mice with humanized liver: Application in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics studies for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritomi, Yoichi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-02-01

    Predicting human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) is key to drug discovery. In particular, it is important to predict human PK, metabolite profiles and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Various methods have been used for such predictions, including in vitro metabolic studies using human biological samples, such as hepatic microsomes and hepatocytes, and in vivo studies using experimental animals. However, prediction studies using these methods are often inconclusive due to discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results, and interspecies differences in drug metabolism. Further, the prediction methods have changed from qualitative to quantitative to solve these issues. Chimeric mice with humanized liver have been developed, in which mouse liver cells are mostly replaced with human hepatocytes. Since human drug metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the liver of these mice, they are regarded as suitable models for mimicking the drug metabolism and PK observed in humans; therefore, these mice are useful for predicting human drug metabolism and PK. In this review, we discuss the current state, issues, and future directions of predicting human drug metabolism and PK using chimeric mice with humanized liver in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The FGF21 response to fructose predicts metabolic health and persists after bariatric surgery in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Fructose ingestion in obese humans stimulates FGF21 secretion, and this response is related to systemic metabolism. Further studies are needed to establish if FGF21 signaling is (pathophysiologically involved in fructose metabolism and metabolic health.

  4. METABOLISM OF 3 PHARMACOLOGICALLY ACTIVE-DRUGS IN ISOLATED HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES - ANALYSIS OF INTERSPECIES VARIABILITY AND COMPARISON WITH METABOLISM IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDKER, GW; VOS, RME; DELBRESSINE, LPC; SLOOFF, MJH; MEIJER, DKF; GROOTHUIS, GMM

    1. The metabolism of the three drugs (Org GB 94, Org 3770 and Org OD 14) was studied in isolated human and rat hepatocytes. The metabolic profiles in rat and human hepatocytes were compared with the available in vivo data in both species. 2. All three drugs were metabolized extensively under the

  5. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    The primitive cardiac tube starts beating 6-8 weeks post fertilization in the developing embryo. In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database. Fourteen fetal hearts from human fetuses between 10 and 18 weeks of gestational age (GA) were prospectively collected at the time of elective termination of pregnancy. RNA from recovered tissues was used for transcriptome analysis with Affymetrix 1.0 ST microarray chip. From the amassed data we investigated differences in cardiac development within the 10-18 GA period dividing the sample by GA in three groups: 10-12 (H1), 13-15 (H2) and 16-18 (H3) weeks. A fold change of 2 or above adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was used as initial cutoff to determine differential gene expression for individual genes. Test for enrichment to identify functional groups was carried out using the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Array analysis correctly identified the cardiac specific genes, and transcripts reported to be differentially expressed were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Single transcript and Ontology analysis showed first trimester heart expression of myosin-related genes to be up-regulated >5-fold compared with second trimester heart. In contrast the second trimester hearts showed further gestation-related increases in many genes involved in energy production and cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, fetal heart development during the first trimester was dominated by heart-specific genes coding for myocardial development and differentiation. During the second trimester, transcripts related to energy generation and cardiomyocyte communication for contractile coordination/proliferation were more dominant. Transcripts related to fatty acid metabolism can be seen as early as 10 weeks and clearly increase as the heart matures. Retinol

  6. Impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy on human milk and subsequent infant metabolic development: methodology and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Sylvia H; O'Connor, Deborah L; Retnakaran, Ravi; Hamilton, Jill K; Sermer, Mathew; Zinman, Bernard; Hanley, Anthony J

    2010-10-06

    Childhood obesity is on the rise and is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes later in life. Recent evidence indicates that abnormalities that increase risk for diabetes may be initiated early in infancy. Since the offspring of women with diabetes have an increased long-term risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes, the impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities on early nutrition and infant metabolic trajectories is of considerable interest. Human breast milk, the preferred food during infancy, contains not only nutrients but also an array of bioactive substances including metabolic hormones. Nonetheless, only a few studies have reported concentrations of metabolic hormones in human milk specifically from women with metabolic abnormalities. We aim to investigate the impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy on human milk hormones and subsequently on infant development over the first year of life. The objective of this report is to present the methodology and design of this study. The current investigation is a prospective study conducted within ongoing cohort studies of women and their offspring. Pregnant women attending outpatient obstetrics clinics in Toronto, Canada were recruited. Between April 2009 and July 2010, a total of 216 pregnant women underwent a baseline oral glucose tolerance test and provided medical and lifestyle history. Follow-up visits and telephone interviews are conducted and expected to be completed in October 2011. Upon delivery, infant birth anthropometry measurements and human breast milk samples are collected. At 3 and 12 months postpartum, mothers and infants are invited for follow-up assessments. Interim telephone interviews are conducted during the first year of offspring life to characterize infant feeding and supplementation behaviors. An improved understanding of the link between maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy and early infant nutrition may assist in the development of optimal prevention and intervention

  7. Impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy on human milk and subsequent infant metabolic development: methodology and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Jill K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity is on the rise and is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes later in life. Recent evidence indicates that abnormalities that increase risk for diabetes may be initiated early in infancy. Since the offspring of women with diabetes have an increased long-term risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes, the impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities on early nutrition and infant metabolic trajectories is of considerable interest. Human breast milk, the preferred food during infancy, contains not only nutrients but also an array of bioactive substances including metabolic hormones. Nonetheless, only a few studies have reported concentrations of metabolic hormones in human milk specifically from women with metabolic abnormalities. We aim to investigate the impact of maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy on human milk hormones and subsequently on infant development over the first year of life. The objective of this report is to present the methodology and design of this study. Methods/Design The current investigation is a prospective study conducted within ongoing cohort studies of women and their offspring. Pregnant women attending outpatient obstetrics clinics in Toronto, Canada were recruited. Between April 2009 and July 2010, a total of 216 pregnant women underwent a baseline oral glucose tolerance test and provided medical and lifestyle history. Follow-up visits and telephone interviews are conducted and expected to be completed in October 2011. Upon delivery, infant birth anthropometry measurements and human breast milk samples are collected. At 3 and 12 months postpartum, mothers and infants are invited for follow-up assessments. Interim telephone interviews are conducted during the first year of offspring life to characterize infant feeding and supplementation behaviors. Discussion An improved understanding of the link between maternal metabolic abnormalities in pregnancy and early infant nutrition may

  8. Proline and hydroxyproline metabolism: implications for animal and human nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazer, Fuller W.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Johnson, Gregory A.; Kim, Sung Woo; Knabe, Darrell A.; Li, Peng; Li, Xilong; McKnight, Jason R.; Satterfield, M. Carey; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Proline plays important roles in protein synthesis and structure, metabolism (particularly the synthesis of arginine, polyamines, and glutamate via pyrroline-5-carboxylate), and nutrition, as well as wound healing, antioxidative reactions, and immune responses. On a pergram basis, proline plus hydroxyproline are most abundant in collagen and milk proteins, and requirements of proline for whole-body protein synthesis are the greatest among all amino acids. Therefore, physiological needs for proline are particularly high during the life cycle. While most mammals (including humans and pigs) can synthesize proline from arginine and glutamine/glutamate, rates of endogenous synthesis are inadequate for neonates, birds, and fish. Thus, work with young pigs (a widely used animal model for studying infant nutrition) has shown that supplementing 0.0, 0.35, 0.7, 1.05, 1.4, and 2.1% proline to a proline-free chemically defined diet containing 0.48% arginine and 2% glutamate dose dependently improved daily growth rate and feed efficiency while reducing concentrations of urea in plasma. Additionally, maximal growth performance of chickens depended on at least 0.8% proline in the diet. Likewise, dietary supplementation with 0.07, 0.14, and 0.28% hydroxyproline (a metabolite of proline) to a plant protein-based diet enhanced weight gains of salmon. Based on its regulatory roles in cellular biochemistry, proline can be considered as a functional amino acid for mammalian, avian, and aquatic species. Further research is warranted to develop effective strategies of dietary supplementation with proline or hydroxyproline to benefit health, growth, and development of animals and humans. PMID:20697752

  9. Body weight setpoint, metabolic adaption and human starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozusko, F P

    2001-03-01

    A biological setpoint for fatness has been proposed in the medical literature. This body weight setpoint functions as a point of stable equilibrium. In an underfed state, with resulting weight loss, the body will reduce the relative energy expenditure by metabolic adaption which reduces the rate of weight loss. Previous mathematical models of energy expenditure and weight loss dynamics have not addressed this setpoint mechanism. The setpoint model has been proposed to quantify this biological process and is unique in predicting energy expenditure during weight loss as a function of the setpoint fat-free mass ratio and setpoint energy expenditure, eliminating the various controlling characteristics such as age, gender and heredity. The model is applied to the seminal Minnesota human semistarvation experiment and is used to predict weight vs time on an individual basis and the caloric requirements for weight maintenance at the reduced weight. Comparison is made with the Harris-Benedict equations and the Brody-Kleiber (W3/4) law.

  10. Altered placental tryptophan metabolic pathway in human fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Padma; Wallace, Euan M; Walker, David W

    2017-04-01

    Tryptophan is a substrate for kynurenine pathway metabolism in the placenta. We investigated if kynurenine metabolites change over gestation, if they are different between pregnancies with normal and fetal growth restriction (FGR), and if the oxygen environment modulated kynurenine pathway activity in the human placenta. Tryptophan, kynurenine, and downstream kynurenine metabolites were determined in maternal venous blood, umbilical cord blood, and placental samples obtained in 1st and 3rd trimester pregnancies including FGR, and in the media of placental explants incubated with 20% or 5-8% O 2 for 24, 48 or 72 h. All the major kynurenine metabolites were present in cord blood, and in general were higher than in maternal blood. IDO and TDO mRNA and protein expression, responsible for kynurenine production from tryptophan, were significantly lower in placentas from FGR pregnancies compared with control. Explants prepared from 1st and 3rd trimester placentas actively produced all the major kynurenine pathway metabolites which, together with expression of IDO, TDO, KYN-OHase and 3HAO mRNAs, were significantly lower after 24 h exposure to 5-8% O 2 compared to 20% O 2 CONCLUSIONS: Expression and activity of the kynurenine pathway is present in the placenta from early gestation, and is down-regulated by hypoxia and in FGR pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates...... cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral...

  12. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest; Brimfield, Alan A; Goldstein, Joyce E; Rose, Randy L; Wallace, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    .... The metabolism of chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, sulfur mustard, naphthalene and nonane as well as a number of their metabolites and related chemicals was investigated...

  13. Integrated analysis of transcript-level regulation of metabolism reveals disease-relevant nodes of the human metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Berninger, Philipp; Lin, Jake; Sauter, Thomas; Heinäniemi, Merja

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic diseases and comorbidities represent an ever-growing epidemic where multiple cell types impact tissue homeostasis. Here, the link between the metabolic and gene regulatory networks was studied through experimental and computational analysis. Integrating gene regulation data with a human metabolic network prompted the establishment of an open-sourced web portal, IDARE (Integrated Data Nodes of Regulation), for visualizing various gene-related data in context of metabolic pathways. Motivated by increasing availability of deep sequencing studies, we obtained ChIP-seq data from widely studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that association of metabolic genes with multiple transcription factors (TFs) enriched disease-associated genes. To demonstrate further extensions enabled by examining these networks together, constraint-based modeling was applied to data from human preadipocyte differentiation. In parallel, data on gene expression, genome-wide ChIP-seq profiles for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP) α, liver X receptor (LXR) and H3K4me3 and microRNA target identification for miR-27a, miR-29a and miR-222 were collected. Disease-relevant key nodes, including mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), were exposed from metabolic pathways predicted to change activity by focusing on association with multiple regulators. In both cell types, our analysis reveals the convergence of microRNAs and TFs within the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway, possibly providing an explanation for its downregulation in obese and diabetic conditions.

  14. Recon3D enables a three-dimensional view of gene variation in human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Sahoo, Swagatika; Zielinski, Daniel C.

    2018-01-01

    to functionally characterize mutations associated with disease, and identify metabolic response signatures that are caused by exposure to certain drugs. Recon3D represents the most comprehensive human metabolic network model to date, accounting for 3,288 open reading frames (representing 17% of functionally......Genome-scale network reconstructions have helped uncover the molecular basis of metabolism. Here we present Recon3D, a computational resource that includes three-dimensional (3D) metabolite and protein structure data and enables integrated analyses of metabolic functions in humans. We use Recon3D...

  15. Hepatic metabolism of toluene after gastrointestinal uptake in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Honoré Hansen, S

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of toluene and the influence of small doses of ethanol were measured in eight male volunteers after gastrointestinal uptake, the toluene concentration in alveolar air and the urinary excretion of hippuric acid and ortho-cresol being used as the measures of metabolism. During toluene...

  16. Truncal vagotomy does not affect postabsorptive glucose metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corssmit, E. P.; van Lanschot, J. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Endert, E.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of hepatic vagal denervation on the adaptation of glucose metabolism to short-term starvation (i.e., <24 h), glucose metabolism was studied after 16 and again after 22 h of fasting in postsurgical patients with truncal vagotomy (n = 9; radical resection of esophageal

  17. The role of gut microbiota in human metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis supports the hypothesis that gut microbiota can be viewed as an ‘exteriorised organ’ that contributes to energy metabolism and the modulation of our immune system. Following Koch’s postulates, it has now been shown that gut microbiota are associated with metabolic disease and that these

  18. Endocannabinoid metabolism in human glioblastomas and meningiomas compared to human non-tumour brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The endogenous levels of the two cannabinoid receptor ligands 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, and their respective congeners, monoacyl glycerols and N-acylethanolamines, as well as the phospholipid precursors of N-acylethanolamines, were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in...... in glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) tissue and meningioma (WHO grade I) tissue and compared with human non-tumour brain tissue. Furthermore, the metabolic turnover of N-acylethanolamines was compared by measurements of the enzymatic activity of N-acyltransferase, N...

  19. Dynamics of human whole body amino acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of regulation of the nitrogen metabolism in humans under various nutritional and physiological states was examined using stable isotopes. In the simultaneous continuous infusion of 1- [ 13 ] - leucine and α- [ 15 N]- lysine, their fluxed decreased when individuals received lower protein intake. The rates of oxidation and incorporation into body proteins of leucine changed in parallel with the protein intake. Such effects of diet on whole body leucine kinetics were modified by the energy state and dietary energy level. The nitrogen balance was also improved by an excess level of dietary energy. When the intake of dietary protein was lowered below the maintenance level, the whole body flux and de novo synthesis of glycine were lowered, but alanine synthesis was clearly increased. The intravenous infusion of glucose at 4 mg/kg.min, which causes increase in excess blood sugar and plasma insulin, increased the alanine flux, but had no effect on the glycine flux. The rate of albumin synthesis, determined by giving 15 N-glycine orally every 3 hr, decreased with the lowered intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. This explains why the serum albumin synthesis increases with the increase in the intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. The rate of whole body protein synthesis in young men receiving the L-amino acid diets providing with the required intake of specific amino acid was much lower than that in the men receiving the diets providing with generous intake of specific amino acid. Thus the control mechanism to maintain the homeostasis of body nitrogen and amino acids is related in some unknown way to the nutritional requirement of the hosts. (Kaihara, S.)

  20. Metabolic response to human growth hormone during prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felig, P; Marliss, E B; Cahill, G F

    1971-02-01

    The metabolic response to human growth hormone (HGH) was studied in five obese subjects in the fed state and during prolonged (5-6 wk) starvation. In the fed state (three subjects), HGH induced an elevation in basal serum insulin concentration, a minimal increase in blood and urine ketone levels, and a marked reduction in urinary nitrogen and potassium excretion resulting in positive nitrogen and potassium balance. In prolonged fasting (four subjects), HGH administration resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increase in serum insulin which preceded a 50% elevation in blood glucose. Persistence of the lipolytic effects of HGH was indicated by a rise in free fatty acids and glycerol. The response differed markedly from the fed state in that blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate levels rose by 20-40%, resulting in total blood ketone acid concentrations of 10-12 mmoles/liter, ketonuria of 150-320 mmoles/day, and increased urinary potassium loss. The subjects complained of nausea, vomiting, weakness, and myalgias. Despite a 50% reduction in urea excretion during HGH administration, total nitrogen loss remained unchanged as urinary ammonia excretion rose by 50% and correlated directly with the degree of ketonuria. It is concluded that in prolonged starvation (a) HGH may have a direct insulinotropic effect on the beta cell independent of alterations in blood glucose concentration, (b) persistence of the lipolytic action of HGH results in severe exaggeration of starvation ketosis and interferes with its anticatabolic action by necessitating increased urinary ammonia loss, and (c) failure of HGH to reduce net protein catabolism in starvation suggests that this hormone does not have a prime regulatory role in conserving body protein stores during prolonged fasting.

  1. Remodeling of Oxidative Energy Metabolism by Galactose Improves Glucose Handling and Metabolic Switching in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Eili Tranheim; Nikolić, Nataša; Bakke, Siril Skaret; Bogen, Kaja Kamilla; Aas, Vigdis; Thoresen, G. Hege; Rustan, Arild Christian

    2013-01-01

    Cultured human myotubes have a low mitochondrial oxidative potential. This study aims to remodel energy metabolism in myotubes by replacing glucose with galactose during growth and differentiation to ultimately examine the consequences for fatty acid and glucose metabolism. Exposure to galactose showed an increased [14C]oleic acid oxidation, whereas cellular uptake of oleic acid uptake was unchanged. On the other hand, both cellular uptake and oxidation of [14C]glucose increased in myotubes exposed to galactose. In the presence of the mitochondrial uncoupler carbonylcyanide p-trifluormethoxy-phenylhydrazone (FCCP) the reserve capacity for glucose oxidation was increased in cells grown with galactose. Staining and live imaging of the cells showed that myotubes exposed to galactose had a significant increase in mitochondrial and neutral lipid content. Suppressibility of fatty acid oxidation by acute addition of glucose was increased compared to cells grown in presence of glucose. In summary, we show that cells grown in galactose were more oxidative, had increased oxidative capacity and higher mitochondrial content, and showed an increased glucose handling. Interestingly, cells exposed to galactose showed an increased suppressibility of fatty acid metabolism. Thus, galactose improved glucose metabolism and metabolic switching of myotubes, representing a cell model that may be valuable for metabolic studies related to insulin resistance and disorders involving mitochondrial impairments. PMID:23560061

  2. Innovative methods to study human intestinal drug metabolism in vitro : Precision-cut slices compared with Ussing chamber preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhof, Esther G.; Ungell, Anna-Lena B.; Sjoberg, Asa K.; de Jager, Marina H.; Hilgendorf, Constanze; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2006-01-01

    Predictive in vitro methods to investigate drug metabolism in the human intestine using intact tissue are of high importance. Therefore, we studied the metabolic activity of human small intestinal and colon slices and compared it with the metabolic activity of the same human intestinal segments

  3. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  4. First-pass metabolism of ethanol in human beings: effect of intravenous infusion of fructose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Billinger, MH; Schäfer, C.

    2004-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of fructose has been shown to enhance reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reoxidation and, thereby, to enhance the metabolism of ethanol. In the current study, the effect of fructose infusion on first-pass metabolism of ethanol was studied in human volunteers. A......, results of the current study support the assumption that only a negligible part of first-pass metabolism of ethanol occurs in the stomach....

  5. Identification of the Consistently Altered Metabolic Targets in Human Hepatocellular CarcinomaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeribe Chike Nwosu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Cancer cells rely on metabolic alterations to enhance proliferation and survival. Metabolic gene alterations that repeatedly occur in liver cancer are largely unknown. We aimed to identify metabolic genes that are consistently deregulated, and are of potential clinical significance in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods: We studied the expression of 2,761 metabolic genes in 8 microarray datasets comprising 521 human HCC tissues. Genes exclusively up-regulated or down-regulated in 6 or more datasets were defined as consistently deregulated. The consistent genes that correlated with tumor progression markers (ECM2 and MMP9 (Pearson correlation P < .05 were used for Kaplan-Meier overall survival analysis in a patient cohort. We further compared proteomic expression of metabolic genes in 19 tumors vs adjacent normal liver tissues. Results: We identified 634 consistent metabolic genes, ∼60% of which are not yet described in HCC. The down-regulated genes (n = 350 are mostly involved in physiologic hepatocyte metabolic functions (eg, xenobiotic, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. In contrast, among consistently up-regulated metabolic genes (n = 284 are those involved in glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, nucleotide biosynthesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, proton transport, membrane lipid, and glycan metabolism. Several metabolic genes (n = 434 correlated with progression markers, and of these, 201 predicted overall survival outcome in the patient cohort analyzed. Over 90% of the metabolic targets significantly altered at the protein level were similarly up- or down-regulated as in genomic profile. Conclusions: We provide the first exposition of the consistently altered metabolic genes in HCC and show that these genes are potentially relevant targets for onward studies in preclinical and clinical contexts. Keywords: Liver Cancer, HCC, Tumor Metabolism

  6. Metabolic Adaptation to Nutritional Stress in Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyo, Masaaki; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Sueda, Toshinori; Noguchi, Kozo; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Colvin, Hugh; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Gotoh, Noriko; Matsuda, Fumio; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2016-12-07

    Tumor cells respond to their microenvironment, which can include hypoxia and malnutrition, and adapt their metabolism to survive and grow. Some oncogenes are associated with cancer metabolism via regulation of the related enzymes or transporters. However, the importance of metabolism and precise metabolic effects of oncogenes in colorectal cancer remain unclear. We found that colorectal cancer cells survived under the condition of glucose depletion, and their resistance to such conditions depended on genomic alterations rather than on KRAS mutation alone. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that those cells maintained tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and ATP production under such conditions. Furthermore, we identified pivotal roles of GLUD1 and SLC25A13 in nutritional stress. GLUD1 and SLC25A13 were associated with tumor aggressiveness and poorer prognosis of colorectal cancer. In conclusion, GLUD1 and SLC25A13 may serve as new targets in treating refractory colorectal cancer which survive in malnutritional microenvironments.

  7. Brain Lactate Metabolism in Humans With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Oddo M; Levine JM; Frangos S; Maloney-Wilensky E; Carrera E; Daniel RT; Levivier M; Magistretti PJ; LeRoux PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. METHODS: Thirty one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxi...

  8. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Laureen A.; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M.; van Nierop, F. Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R.; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A.; Mathôt, Ron A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug

  9. Cutaneous in vivo metabolism of topical lidocaine formulation in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolsted, K; Benfeldt, E; Kissmeyer, A-M

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the metabolising capacity of the human skin in relation to topically applied drugs and formulations. We chose lidocaine as a model compound since the metabolic pathways are well known from studies concerning hepatic metabolism following systemic drug administration. However...

  10. Effect of Cold Water Immersion on Metabolic Rate in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Greenwood

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cold water immersion is a widely used form of cryotherapy in the active population despite the limited knowledge on its physiological effects. From an injury standpoint, reducing metabolic rate is advantageous to prevent secondary injury. In contrast, increased metabolism can be beneficial in ridding the body of unwanted metabolites. This study looked to determine the effect of cold water immersion on metabolic rate.  Understanding this phenomenon will help determine appropriate clinical applications of cold water immersion and lead to a better understanding of cryotherapy in general. This study looked to determine the effect of cryotherapy in the form of waist deep cold water immersion at 9° C on metabolic rate. Methods: 10 participants from a university student population volunteered and completed a 15-minute treatment of waist deep cold water (9° C immersion. Metabolic rate measurements were taken using a Jaeger Oxycon Mobile Unit for 5 minutes prior to treatment, 15 minutes of treatment, and 5 minutes post treatment for a total of 25 minutes. Statistical analysis was completed using a one way repeated measures ANOVA test to compare treatment intervals to baseline intervals. Results: Cold water immersion resulted in elevated metabolic rates for 8 of 10 participants during the first 5 minutes of treatment and for 6 of 10 in the 5 minute post treatment (p < 0.05. A second statistical analysis excluding the first 30 second data point in the 5-10 and 20-25 minute treatments was used to account for movement in and out of the whirlpool. The second analysis showed the same results as the first with the exception of one participant who no longer displayed a statistically significant change in the 20-25 minute interval. Conclusion: These results indicate that cold water immersion should not be used as a measure of reducing secondary injury because of its potential to increase metabolic rate, but instead may have potential benefits in

  11. A global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Joseph J; Hazlett, Zachary S; Orlando, Robert A; Garver, William S

    2017-09-05

    It is generally accepted that the selection of gene variants during human evolution optimized energy metabolism that now interacts with our obesogenic environment to increase the prevalence of obesity. The purpose of this study was to perform a global evolutionary and metabolic analysis of human obesity gene risk variants (110 human obesity genes with 127 nearest gene risk variants) identified using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to enhance our knowledge of early and late genotypes. As a result of determining the mean frequency of these obesity gene risk variants in 13 available populations from around the world our results provide evidence for the early selection of ancestral risk variants (defined as selection before migration from Africa) and late selection of derived risk variants (defined as selection after migration from Africa). Our results also provide novel information for association of these obesity genes or encoded proteins with diverse metabolic pathways and other human diseases. The overall results indicate a significant differential evolutionary pattern for the selection of obesity gene ancestral and derived risk variants proposed to optimize energy metabolism in varying global environments and complex association with metabolic pathways and other human diseases. These results are consistent with obesity genes that encode proteins possessing a fundamental role in maintaining energy metabolism and survival during the course of human evolution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Treatment of human muscle cells with popular dietary supplements increase mitochondrial function and metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Roger A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a common pathology with increasing incidence, and is associated with increased mortality and healthcare costs. Several treatment options for obesity are currently available ranging from behavioral modifications to pharmaceutical agents. Many popular dietary supplements claim to enhance weight loss by acting as metabolic stimulators, however direct tests of their effect on metabolism have not been performed. Purpose This work identified the effects popular dietary supplements on metabolic rate and mitochondrial biosynthesis in human skeletal muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with popular dietary supplements at varied doses for 24 hours. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α, an important stimulator of mitochondrial biosynthesis, was quantified using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial content was measured using flow cytometry confirmed with confocal microscopy. Glycolytic metabolism was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR. Total relative metabolism was quantified using WST-1 end point assay. Results Treatment of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells with dietary supplements OxyElite Pro (OEP or Cellucore HD (CHD induced PGC-1α leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content. Glycolytic and oxidative capacities were also significantly increased following treatment with OEP or CHD. Conclusion This is the first work to identify metabolic adaptations in muscle cells following treatment with popular dietary supplements including enhanced mitochondrial biosynthesis, and glycolytic, oxidative and total metabolism.

  13. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Shimoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  14. Human myotubes from myoblast cultures undergoing senescence exhibit defects in glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan O; Just, Marlene; Rustan, Arild C

    2011-01-01

    that the observed metabolic defects accompany the induction of a senescent state. The main function of SCs is regeneration and skeletal muscle-build up. Thus, the metabolic defects observed during aging of SC-derived myotubes could have a role in sarcopenia, the gradual age-related loss of muscle mass and strength.......Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways...

  15. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  16. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...

  17. Absorption and metabolic fate of bioactive dietary benzoxazinoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Khem B; Laursen, Bente Birgitte; Gregersen, Per L

    2013-01-01

    SCOPE: Benzoxazinoids, which are natural compounds recently identified in mature whole grain cereals and bakery products, have been suggested to have a range of pharmacological properties and health-protecting effects. There are no published reports concerned with the absorption and metabolism of...

  18. Certain aspects of human metabolism during spaceflights of varying duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, A. I.; Popova, I. A.; Ushakov, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative analysis is made of hormone reactions after short and long term spaceflights. Endocrinological indicators from venous blood and daily urine samples of cosmonauts completing flights lasting from 7 to 237 days were examined. No pathological indicators were found in the metabolic shifts in the erythrocytes and disruption of the functional state of their membranes.

  19. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet eSangar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell.

  20. Regulation of Metabolic Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth

    sensitivity in type I muscle fibers possibly reflects a superior effect of insulin on metabolic signaling compared to type II muscle fibers. This was investigated in the present thesis by examining muscle biopsies from lean and obese healthy subjects as well as patients with type 2 diabetes. From these muscle...

  1. Formation of short chain fatty acids by the gut microbiota and their impact on human metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2016-05-03

    The formation of SCFA is the result of a complex interplay between diet and the gut microbiota within the gut lumen environment. The discovery of receptors, across a range of cell and tissue types for which short chain fatty acids SCFA appear to be the natural ligands, has led to increased interest in SCFA as signaling molecules between the gut microbiota and the host. SCFA represent the major carbon flux from the diet through the gut microbiota to the host and evidence is emerging for a regulatory role of SCFA in local, intermediary and peripheral metabolism. However, a lack of well-designed and controlled human studies has hampered our understanding of the significance of SCFA in human metabolic health. This review aims to pull together recent findings on the role of SCFA in human metabolism to highlight the multi-faceted role of SCFA on different metabolic systems.

  2. Reconstruction and Analysis of Human Kidney-Specific Metabolic Network Based on Omics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Di Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of the high-throughput data production, recent studies of tissue-specific metabolic networks have largely advanced our understanding of the metabolic basis of various physiological and pathological processes. However, for kidney, which plays an essential role in the body, the available kidney-specific model remains incomplete. This paper reports the reconstruction and characterization of the human kidney metabolic network based on transcriptome and proteome data. In silico simulations revealed that house-keeping genes were more essential than kidney-specific genes in maintaining kidney metabolism. Importantly, a total of 267 potential metabolic biomarkers for kidney-related diseases were successfully explored using this model. Furthermore, we found that the discrepancies in metabolic processes of different tissues are directly corresponding to tissue's functions. Finally, the phenotypes of the differentially expressed genes in diabetic kidney disease were characterized, suggesting that these genes may affect disease development through altering kidney metabolism. Thus, the human kidney-specific model constructed in this study may provide valuable information for the metabolism of kidney and offer excellent insights into complex kidney diseases.

  3. IL-6 selectively stimulates fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Mygind, Helene; Grøndahl, Thomas S

    2010-01-01

    and glucose metabolism and signaling of both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Eight healthy postabsorptive males were infused with either rhIL-6 or saline for 4 h, eliciting IL-6 levels of ~40 and ~1 pg/ml, respectively. Systemic, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue fat and glucose metabolism was assessed...... in systemic lipolysis. Adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid kinetics were unchanged with rhIL-6 compared with saline infusion. Conversely, rhIL-6 infusion caused an increase in skeletal muscle unidirectional fatty acid and glycerol release, indicative of an increase in lipolysis. The increased lipolysis...... in muscle could account for the systemic changes. Skeletal muscle signaling increased after 1 h of rhIL-6 infusion, indicated by a fourfold increase in the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3-to-STAT3 ratio, whereas no changes in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein...

  4. IL-6 selectively stimulates fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Mygind, Helene; Grøndahl, Thomas S

    2010-01-01

    and glucose metabolism and signaling of both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Eight healthy postabsorptive males were infused with either rhIL-6 or saline for 4 h, eliciting IL-6 levels of ∼40 and ∼1 pg/ml, respectively. Systemic, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue fat and glucose metabolism was assessed...... in systemic lipolysis. Adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid kinetics were unchanged with rhIL-6 compared with saline infusion. Conversely, rhIL-6 infusion caused an increase in skeletal muscle unidirectional fatty acid and glycerol release, indicative of an increase in lipolysis. The increased lipolysis...... in muscle could account for the systemic changes. Skeletal muscle signaling increased after 1 h of rhIL-6 infusion, indicated by a fourfold increase in the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3-to-STAT3 ratio, whereas no changes in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein...

  5. Proline and hydroxyproline metabolism: implications for animal and human nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Johnson, Gregory A.; Kim, Sung Woo; Knabe, Darrell A.; Li, Peng; Li, Xilong; McKnight, Jason R.; Satterfield, M. Carey; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Proline plays important roles in protein synthesis and structure, metabolism (particularly the synthesis of arginine, polyamines, and glutamate via pyrroline-5-carboxylate), and nutrition, as well as wound healing, antioxidative reactions, and immune responses. On a pergram basis, proline plus hydroxyproline are most abundant in collagen and milk proteins, and requirements of proline for whole-body protein synthesis are the greatest among all amino acids. Therefore, physiological needs for pr...

  6. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions: Anabolism (uh-NAB-uh-liz-um), or constructive metabolism, is all about building and storing. It ... in infants and young children. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue (tiredness), slow heart rate, excessive ...

  7. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  8. Temporal variations of adenosine metabolism in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Oksenberg, A; Vega-González, A; Villalobos, L; Rosenthal, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1996-08-01

    Eight diurnally active (06:00-23:00 h) subjects were adapted for 2 days to the room conditions where the experiments were performed. Blood sampling for adenosine metabolites and metabolizing enzymes was done hourly during the activity span and every 30 min during sleep. The results showed that adenosine and its catabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid), adenosine synthesizing (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and 5'-nucleotidase), degrading (adenosine deaminase) and nucleotide-forming (adenosine kinase) enzymes as well as adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) undergo statistically significant fluctuations (ANOVA) during the 24 h. However, energy charge was invariable. Glucose and lactate chronograms were determined as metabolic indicators. The same data analyzed by the chi-square periodogram and Fourier series indicated ultradian oscillatory periods for all the metabolites and enzymatic activities determined, and 24-h oscillatory components for inosine, hypoxanthine, adenine nucleotides, glucose, and the activities of SAH-hydrolase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine kinase. The single cosinor method showed significant oscillatory components exclusively for lactate. As a whole, these results suggest that adenosine metabolism may play a role as a biological oscillator coordinating and/or modulating the energy homeostasis and physiological status of erythrocytes in vivo and could be an important factor in the distribution of purine rings for the rest of the organism.

  9. Associations between Ionomic Profile and Metabolic Abnormalities in Human Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Peng; Yu, Danxia; Yu, Zhijie; Li, Huaixing; Sheng, Hongguang; Cai, Lu; Xue, Jun; Jing, Miao; Li, Yixue; Lin, Xu; Wang, Fudi

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies assessed effects of individual and multiple ions simultaneously on metabolic outcomes, due to methodological limitation. Methodology/Principal Findings By combining advanced ionomics and mutual information, a quantifying measurement for mutual dependence between two random variables, we investigated associations of ion modules/networks with overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in 976 middle-aged Chinese men and women. Fasting plasma ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Significant ion modules were selected by mutual information to construct disease related ion networks. Plasma copper and phosphorus always ranked the first two among three specific ion networks associated with overweight/obesity, MetS and T2DM. Comparing the ranking of ion individually and in networks, three patterns were observed (1) “Individual ion,” such as potassium and chrome, which tends to work alone; (2) “Module ion,” such as iron in T2DM, which tends to act in modules/network; and (3) “Module-individual ion,” such as copper in overweight/obesity, which seems to work equivalently in either way. Conclusions In conclusion, by using the novel approach of the ionomics strategy and the information theory, we observed potential associations of ions individually or as modules/networks with metabolic disorders. Certainly, these findings need to be confirmed in future biological studies. PMID:22719963

  10. Shared Selective Pressures on Fungal and Human Metabolic Pathways Lead to Divergent yet Analogous Genetic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidem, Haley R; McGary, Kriston L; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-06-01

    Reduced metabolic efficiency, toxic intermediate accumulation, and deficits of molecular building blocks, which all stem from disruptions of flux through metabolic pathways, reduce organismal fitness. Although these represent shared selection pressures across organisms, the genetic signatures of the responses to them may differ. In fungi, a frequently observed signature is the physical linkage of genes from the same metabolic pathway. In contrast, human metabolic genes are rarely tightly linked; rather, they tend to show tissue-specific coexpression. We hypothesized that the physical linkage of fungal metabolic genes and the tissue-specific coexpression of human metabolic genes are divergent yet analogous responses to the range of selective pressures imposed by disruptions of flux. To test this, we examined the degree to which the human homologs of physically linked metabolic genes in fungi (fungal linked homologs or FLOs) are coexpressed across six human tissues. We found that FLOs are significantly more correlated in their expression profiles across human tissues than other metabolic genes. We obtained similar results in analyses of the same six tissues from chimps, gorillas, orangutans, and macaques. We suggest that when selective pressures remain stable across large evolutionary distances, evidence of selection in a given evolutionary lineage can become a highly reliable predictor of the signature of selection in another, even though the specific adaptive response in each lineage is markedly different. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Minipig and Human Metabolism of Aldehyde Oxidase Substrates: In Vitro-In Vivo Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David J; Southall, Rosalind L; Li, Mingguang; Wright, Lisa M; Corfield, Lindsay J; Heeley, Thomas A; Bratby, Benjamin; Mannu, Ranbir; Johnson, Sarah L; Shaw, Victoria; Friett, Holly L; Blakeburn, Louise A; Kendrick, John S; Otteneder, Michael B

    2017-07-01

    The importance of aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is becoming increasingly recognized in the prediction of human pharmacokinetic parameters from animal data. The objectives of these studies were to ascertain whether an in vitro-in vivo correlation existed in the clearance and metabolic pathways of AOX substrates and to establish whether the minipig represented an appropriate non-rodent model for man in the pre-clinical development of drugs metabolized by AOX. Using the AOX substrates carbazeran, 6-deoxypenciclovir and zaleplon, clearance was estimated from in vitro depletion experiments with minipig and human liver cytosol and microsomes and scaled before comparison with data generated in parallel in vivo studies in minipigs. In vitro and in vivo metabolic pathways were characterized by LC-MS/MS. Scaling of in vitro metabolism data to predict in vivo clearance underestimated in vivo values, although the rank order of clearance for the three compounds was preserved. Prediction of human in vivo clearance from scaled minipig in vivo data produced results which correlated well with published clinical values. Overall, this study is the first to compare minipig in vitro metabolism data with in vivo pharmacokinetic data for compounds metabolized by AOX and provides a scientific rationale for the selection of this species as a model for humans in the development of drugs which are substrates of AOX.

  12. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  13. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P ...-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...

  14. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  15. Kinetics of adenylate metabolism in human and rat myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Tavenier (M.); A.C. Skladanowski (A.); R.A. de Abreu (Ronney); J.W. de Jong (Jan Willem)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPathways producing and converting adenosine have hardly been investigated in human heart, contrasting work in other species. We compared the kinetics of enzymes associated with purine degradation and salvage in human and rat heart cytoplasm assaying for adenosine deaminase, nucleoside

  16. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Unwin, Richard D; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  18. Iron metabolism study in humans by means of stable tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantone, M.C.; Molho, N.; Pirola, L.; Gambarini, G.; Hansen, C.; Roth, P.; Werner, E.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of iron metabolism in a female patient volunteer by administration of stable iron isotopes as tracers was performed. The applied methodology had already been tested in rabbits in comparison with radioactive tracer technique. The subject under study was given 58 Fe solution intravenously and about 45 min later 57 Fe solution orally. Ten blood samples were drawn at different times within 522 min from injection. Single iron isotopes content in plasma samples was determined by proton nuclear activation. A Compton suppressor system was utilized to improve the detector limits. The characteristic parameters of iron plasma clearance and of iron intestinal absorption were determined

  19. Effects of Gut Microbiota Manipulation by Antibiotics on Host Metabolism in Obese Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijnders, Dorien; Goossens, Gijs H; Hermes, Gerben D A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been implicated in obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, although evidence in humans is scarce. We investigated how gut microbiota manipulation by antibiotics (7-day administration of amoxicillin, vancomycin, or placebo) affects host metabolism in 57 obese, prediabetic men....... Vancomycin, but not amoxicillin, decreased bacterial diversity and reduced Firmicutes involved in short-chain fatty acid and bile acid metabolism, concomitant with altered plasma and/or fecal metabolite concentrations. Adipose tissue gene expression of oxidative pathways was upregulated by antibiotics...

  20. Ablation of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 resembles the human CACT metabolic myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    York, Brian; Reineke, Erin L.; Sagen, Jørn V.; Nikolai, Bryan C.; Zhou, Suoling; Louet, Jean-Francois; Chopra, Atul R.; Chen, Xian; Reed, Graham; Noebels, Jeffrey; Adesina, Adekunle M.; Yu, Hui; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of lipid substrates is essential for survival in fasting and other catabolic conditions, sparing glucose for the brain and other glucose-dependent tissues. Here we show Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 (SRC-3) plays a central role in long chain fatty acid metabolism by directly regulating carnitine/acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT) gene expression. Genetic deficiency of CACT in humans is accompanied by a constellation of metabolic and toxicity phenotypes including hypoketonemia, hypog...

  1. Clinical Aspects of Trace Elements: Zinc in Human Nutrition – Zinc Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Pluhator

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Although zinc has been the most intensely studied trace element, much remains to be learned about its metabolism. Little is known about the normal mechanisms of absorption and transport across the intestinal tract. In addition, numerous unknowns surround the intricacies of bodily zinc homeostasis. Part two of this five-part review presents current views on the normal intestinal absorption, intracellular and extracellular metabolism, transport, excretion and homeostasis of zinc in the human body. The alterations in zinc metabolism that occur with age and changing physiological conditions are also discussed.

  2. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted...... for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies....

  3. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    individual cell types within human adipose tissue interact to regulate adipose tissue physiology . Specifically, we have developed the molecular and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0251 TITLE: “Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2016 - 31 Aug 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal

  4. Evolutionary Medicine: The Ongoing Evolution of Human Physiology and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühli, Frank; van Schaik, Katherine; Henneberg, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    The field of evolutionary medicine uses evolutionary principles to understand changes in human anatomy and physiology that have occurred over time in response to environmental changes. Through this evolutionary-based approach, we can understand disease as a consequence of anatomical and physiological "trade-offs" that develop to facilitate survival and reproduction. We demonstrate how diachronic study of human anatomy and physiology is fundamental for an increased understanding of human health and disease. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  5. Inositol and human reproduction. From cellular metabolism to clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska, Ewa M; Czyzyk, Adam; Meczekalski, Blazej; Genazzani, Alessandro D

    2016-09-01

    Inositol is an organic compound of high biological importance that is widely distributed in nature. It belongs to the sugar family and is mainly represented by its two dominant stereoisomers: myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol that are found in the organism in the physiological serum ratio 40:1. Inositol and its derivatives are important components of the structural phospholipids of the cell membranes and are precursors of the second messengers of many metabolic pathways. A high concentration of myoinositol is found in the follicular fluid and in semen. Inositol deficiency and the impairment of the inositol-dependent pathways may play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and hypothyroidism. The results of the research also point out the potential beneficial role of inositol supplementation in polycystic ovarian syndrome and in the context of assisted reproduction technologies and in vitro fertilization. The main aim of the article is to overview the major inositol-dependent metabolic pathways and to discuss its importance for reproduction.

  6. Metabolism of fatty acids and lipid hydroperoxides in human body monitoring with Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qin-Zeng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of dietary fatty acids in human has been measured so far using human blood cells and stable-isotope labeled fatty acids, however, no direct data was available for human peripheral tissues and other major organs. To realize the role of dietary fatty acids in human health and diseases, it would be eager to develop convenient and suitable method to monitor fatty acid metabolism in human. Results We have developed the measurement system in situ for human lip surface lipids using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR – attenuated total reflection (ATR detection system with special adaptor to monitor metabolic changes of lipids in human body. As human lip surface lipids may not be much affected by skin sebum constituents and may be affected directly by the lipid constituents of diet, we could detect changes of FTIR-ATR spectra, especially at 3005~3015 cm-1, of lip surface polyunsaturated fatty acids in a duration time-dependent manner after intake of the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-containing triglyceride diet. The ingested DHA appeared on the lip surface and was detected by FTIR-ATR directly and non-invasively. It was found that the metabolic rates of DHA for male volunteer subjects with age 60s were much lower than those with age 20s. Lipid hydroperoxides were found in lip lipids which were extracted from the lip surface using a mixture of ethanol/ethylpropionate/iso-octane solvents, and were the highest in the content just before noon. The changes of lipid hydroperoxides were detected also in situ with FTIR-ATR at 968 cm-1. Conclusion The measurements of lip surface lipids with FTIR-ATR technique may advance the investigation of human lipid metabolism in situ non-invasively.

  7. FAK tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by AMPK and controls metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassiter, David G; Nylén, Carolina; Sjögren, Rasmus J O

    2018-01-01

    and the direct role of FAK on glucose and lipid metabolism. We hypothesised that insulin treatment and AMPK activation would have opposing effects on FAK phosphorylation and that gene silencing of FAK would alter metabolism. METHODS: Human muscle was treated with insulin or the AMPK-activating compound 5......-aminoimadazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) to determine FAK phosphorylation and glucose transport. Primary human skeletal muscle cells were used to study the effects of insulin or AICAR treatment on FAK signalling during serum starvation, as well as to determine the metabolic consequences of silencing...... in various non-muscle cell types and plays a regulatory role during skeletal muscle differentiation. The role of FAK in skeletal muscle in relation to insulin stimulation or AMPK activation is unknown. We examined the effects of insulin or AMPK activation on FAK phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle...

  8. The in vitro metabolism and bioactivation of 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) by human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, D A; Schnellmann, R G; Sipes, I G

    1986-09-01

    The nematocide, grain fumigant, and gasoline additive 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) is both a cellular and a genetic toxin that is metabolically activated in rats and mice by mixed function oxidases (MFO) as well as glutathione 5-transferases (GST). The purpose of this study was to determine whether DBE is similarly metabolized and bioactivated by human liver in vitro. Human liver microsomal and cytosolic metabolism of DBE was monitored by the production of aqueous-soluble metabolites from [14-C]-DBE. Reactive intermediates were detected as irreversibly bound adducts to protein or DNA. 1,2-Dibromoethane was metabolized by human liver cytosolic GST, microsomal GST, and microsomal MFO. Cytosolic GST activity (9 +/- 2 nmol/20 min/mg protein) was about four times greater than the other two activities. Only MFO activity resulted in adducts irreversibly bound to protein (1.5 +/- .4 nmol/20 min/mg protein) and was inhibited by the presence of glutathione. Both MFO and GST activity resulted in irreversibly bound adducts to DNA. Microsomal and cytosolic GST activity each produced about twice as many DNA adducts as microsomal MFO activity. These results suggest that human liver, like rat and mouse liver, metabolizes DBE to aqueous-soluble metabolites by both MFO and GST activity. Furthermore, each of these activities produces reactive metabolites that can irreversibly bind to cellular macromolecules.

  9. Critical assessment of human metabolic pathway databases: a stepping stone for future integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stobbe Miranda D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple pathway databases are available that describe the human metabolic network and have proven their usefulness in many applications, ranging from the analysis and interpretation of high-throughput data to their use as a reference repository. However, so far the various human metabolic networks described by these databases have not been systematically compared and contrasted, nor has the extent to which they differ been quantified. For a researcher using these databases for particular analyses of human metabolism, it is crucial to know the extent of the differences in content and their underlying causes. Moreover, the outcomes of such a comparison are important for ongoing integration efforts. Results We compared the genes, EC numbers and reactions of five frequently used human metabolic pathway databases. The overlap is surprisingly low, especially on reaction level, where the databases agree on 3% of the 6968 reactions they have combined. Even for the well-established tricarboxylic acid cycle the databases agree on only 5 out of the 30 reactions in total. We identified the main causes for the lack of overlap. Importantly, the databases are partly complementary. Other explanations include the number of steps a conversion is described in and the number of possible alternative substrates listed. Missing metabolite identifiers and ambiguous names for metabolites also affect the comparison. Conclusions Our results show that each of the five networks compared provides us with a valuable piece of the puzzle of the complete reconstruction of the human metabolic network. To enable integration of the networks, next to a need for standardizing the metabolite names and identifiers, the conceptual differences between the databases should be resolved. Considerable manual intervention is required to reach the ultimate goal of a unified and biologically accurate model for studying the systems biology of human metabolism. Our comparison

  10. The human gut microbiota: metabolism and perspective in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aline Corado; Hoffmann, Christian; Mota, João Felipe

    2018-04-18

    The gut microbiota has been recognized as an important factor in the development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and is considered an endocrine organ involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis and host immunity. Dysbiosis can change the functioning of the intestinal barrier and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) by allowing the passage of structural components of bacteria, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which activate inflammatory pathways that may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, intestinal dysbiosis can alter the production of gastrointestinal peptides related to satiety, resulting in an increased food intake. In obese people, this dysbiosis seems be related to increases of the phylum Firmicutes, the genus Clostridium, and the species Eubacterium rectale, Clostridium coccoides, Lactobacillus reuteri, Akkermansia muciniphila, Clostridium histolyticum, and Staphylococcus aureus.

  11. Partitioning the metabolic cost of human running: a task-by-task approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Christopher J; Kram, Rodger

    2014-12-01

    Compared with other species, humans can be very tractable and thus an ideal "model system" for investigating the metabolic cost of locomotion. Here, we review the biomechanical basis for the metabolic cost of running. Running has been historically modeled as a simple spring-mass system whereby the leg acts as a linear spring, storing, and returning elastic potential energy during stance. However, if running can be modeled as a simple spring-mass system with the underlying assumption of perfect elastic energy storage and return, why does running incur a metabolic cost at all? In 1980, Taylor et al. proposed the "cost of generating force" hypothesis, which was based on the idea that elastic structures allow the muscles to transform metabolic energy into force, and not necessarily mechanical work. In 1990, Kram and Taylor then provided a more explicit and quantitative explanation by demonstrating that the rate of metabolic energy consumption is proportional to body weight and inversely proportional to the time of foot-ground contact for a variety of animals ranging in size and running speed. With a focus on humans, Kram and his colleagues then adopted a task-by-task approach and initially found that the metabolic cost of running could be "individually" partitioned into body weight support (74%), propulsion (37%), and leg-swing (20%). Summing all these biomechanical tasks leads to a paradoxical overestimation of 131%. To further elucidate the possible interactions between these tasks, later studies quantified the reductions in metabolic cost in response to synergistic combinations of body weight support, aiding horizontal forces, and leg-swing-assist forces. This synergistic approach revealed that the interactive nature of body weight support and forward propulsion comprises ∼80% of the net metabolic cost of running. The task of leg-swing at most comprises ∼7% of the net metabolic cost of running and is independent of body weight support and forward propulsion. In

  12. [Metabolic detoxification of bakuchiol is mediated by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-fang; Shen, Guo-lin; Jiao, Shi-yong; Li, Hua; Wang, Qi

    2012-06-18

    To analyze cytochrome P450 (CYP) phenotyping for bakuchiol metabolism and study the mechanism of detoxification of bakuchiol by human liver microsomes (HLM) in vitro. The CYP phenotyping for bakuchiol metabolism was determined using HLM combined with CYP specific inhibitors and recombinant human CYP isoforms. The relative activities of CYP isoforms were determined by analyzing the formation of the substrate metabolites using HPLC-MS/MS, in presence or absence of 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) which was CYP enzymes' broad spectrum inhibitor. The residual concentrations of bakuchiol in microsomal incubates were determined using HPLC to investigate ABT's effect on the metabolism of bakuchiol. The effects of CYP enzymes on the nephrotoxicity of bakuchiol were investigated using human kidney-2(HK-2) by MTT assay, in presence or absence of ABT. CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 in HLM were involved in bakuchiol metabolism, among which CYP2C19 showed the highest metabolic rate. Co-incubation with ABT (2.5 mmol/L) could inhibit more than 90% of the enzyme activities for CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. ABT (2.5 mmol/L) could inhibit the HLM metabolism of bakuchiol with inhibition ratio 83.24%±2.13%. When preincubated with ABT, the metabolic detoxification of bakuchiol by HLM was significantly reduced (Pdetoxification of bakuchiol by HLM is associated with bakuchiol metabolism by CYP enzymes to form non toxic or lower toxic metabolites. The broad spectrum inhibitor of CYP could inverse the detoxification of HLM.

  13. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex......, since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed...

  14. A Simplified Model of Human Alcohol Metabolism That Integrates Biotechnology and Human Health into a Mass Balance Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Allen H. J.; Dimiduk, Kathryn; Daniel, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a simplified human alcohol metabolism model for a mass balance team project. Students explore aspects of engineering in biotechnology: designing/modeling biological systems, testing the design/model, evaluating new conditions, and exploring cutting-edge "lab-on-a-chip" research. This project highlights chemical engineering's impact on…

  15. Genetic interplay between human longevity and metabolic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häsler, Robert; Venkatesh, Geetha; Tan, Qihua

    2017-01-01

    Human longevity is a complex phenotype influenced by genetic and environmental components. Unraveling the contribution of genetic vs. nongenetic factors to longevity is a challenging task. Here, we conducted a large-scale RNA-sequencing-based expression quantitative trait loci study (e......QTL) with subsequent heritability analysis. The investigation was performed on blood samples from 244 individuals from Germany and Denmark, representing various age groups including long-lived subjects up to the age of 104 years. Our eQTL-based approach revealed for the first time that human longevity is associated...

  16. Mice with chimeric livers are an improved model for human lipoprotein metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa C S Ellis

    Full Text Available Rodents are poor model for human hyperlipidemias because total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels are very low on a normal diet. Lipoprotein metabolism is primarily regulated by hepatocytes and we therefore assessed whether chimeric mice extensively repopulated with human cells can model human lipid and bile acid metabolism.FRG [ F ah(-/- R ag2(-/-Il2r g (-/-] mice were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes. Serum lipoprotein lipid composition and distribution (VLDL, LDL, and HDL was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. Bile was analyzed by LC-MS or by GC-MS. RNA expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR.Chimeric mice displayed increased LDL and VLDL fractions and a lower HDL fraction compared to wild type, thus significantly shifting the ratio of LDL/HDL towards a human profile. Bile acid analysis revealed a human-like pattern with high amounts of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA. Control mice had only taurine-conjugated bile acids as expcted, but highly repopulated mice had glycine-conjugated cholic acid as found in human bile. RNA levels of human genes involved in bile acid synthesis including CYP7A1, and CYP27A1 were significantly upregulated as compared to human control liver. However, administration of recombinant hFGF19 restored human CYP7A1 levels to normal.Humanized-liver mice showed a typical human lipoprotein profile with LDL as the predominant lipoprotein fraction even on a normal diet. The bile acid profile confirmed presence of an intact enterohepatic circulation. Although bile acid synthesis was deregulated in this model, this could be fully normalized by FGF19 administration. Taken together these data indicate that chimeric FRG-mice are a useful new model for human lipoprotein and bile-acid metabolism.

  17. Multi-Copper Oxidases and Human Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashchenko, Ganna; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are a small group of enzymes that oxidize their substrate with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. Generally, multi-copper oxidases are promiscuous with regards to their reducing substrates and are capable of performing various functions in different species. To date, three multi-copper oxidases have been detected in humans—ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Each of these enzymes has a high specificity towards iron with the resulting ferroxidase activity being associated with ferroportin, the only known iron exporter protein in humans. Ferroportin exports iron as Fe2+, but transferrin, the major iron transporter protein of blood, can bind only Fe3+ effectively. Iron oxidation in enterocytes is mediated mainly by hephaestin thus allowing dietary iron to enter the bloodstream. Zyklopen is involved in iron efflux from placental trophoblasts during iron transfer from mother to fetus. Release of iron from the liver relies on ferroportin and the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin which is found in blood in a soluble form. Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen show distinctive expression patterns and have unique mechanisms for regulating their expression. These features of human multi-copper ferroxidases can serve as a basis for the precise control of iron efflux in different tissues. In this manuscript, we review the biochemical and biological properties of the three human MCOs and discuss their potential roles in human iron homeostasis. PMID:23807651

  18. Probiotic modulation of symbiotic gut microbial–host metabolic interactions in a humanized microbiome mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Wang, Yulan; Sprenger, Norbert; Yap, Ivan K S; Lundstedt, Torbjörn; Lek, Per; Rezzi, Serge; Ramadan, Ziad; van Bladeren, Peter; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-01-01

    The transgenomic metabolic effects of exposure to either Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotics have been measured and mapped in humanized extended genome mice (germ-free mice colonized with human baby flora). Statistical analysis of the compartmental fluctuations in diverse metabolic compartments, including biofluids, tissue and cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in relation to microbial population modulation generated a novel top-down systems biology view of the host response to probiotic intervention. Probiotic exposure exerted microbiome modification and resulted in altered hepatic lipid metabolism coupled with lowered plasma lipoprotein levels and apparent stimulated glycolysis. Probiotic treatments also altered a diverse range of pathways outcomes, including amino-acid metabolism, methylamines and SCFAs. The novel application of hierarchical-principal component analysis allowed visualization of multicompartmental transgenomic metabolic interactions that could also be resolved at the compartment and pathway level. These integrated system investigations demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling as a top-down systems biology driver for investigating the mechanistic basis of probiotic action and the therapeutic surveillance of the gut microbial activity related to dietary supplementation of probiotics. PMID:18197175

  19. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Cunninghamella Biotransformation--Similarities to Human Drug Metabolism and Its Relevance for the Drug Discovery Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piska, Kamil; Żelaszczyk, Dorota; Jamrozik, Marek; Kubowicz-Kwaśny, Paulina; Pękala, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Studies of drug metabolism are one of the most significant issues in the process of drug development, its introduction to the market and also in treatment. Even the most promising molecule may show undesirable metabolic properties that would disqualify it as a potential drug. Therefore, such studies are conducted in the early phases of drug discovery and development process. Cunninghamella is a filamentous fungus known for its catalytic properties, which mimics mammalian drug metabolism. It has been proven that C. elegans carries at least one gene coding for a CYP enzyme closely related to the CYP51 family. The transformation profile of xenobiotics in Cunninghamella spp. spans a number of reactions catalyzed by different mammalian CYP isoforms. This paper presents detailed data on similar biotransformation drug products in humans and Cunninghamella spp. and covers the most important aspects of preparative biosynthesis of metabolites, since this model allows to obtain metabolites in sufficient quantities to conduct the further detailed investigations, as quantification, structure analysis and pharmacological activity and toxicity testing. The metabolic activity of three mostly used Cunninghamella species in obtaining hydroxylated, dealkylated and oxidated metabolites of different drugs confirmed its convergence with human biotransformation. Though it cannot replace the standard methods, it can provide support in the field of biotransformation and identifying metabolic soft spots of new chemicals and in predicting possible metabolic pathways. Another aspect is the biosynthesis of metabolites. In this respect, techniques using Cunninghamella spp. seem to be competitive to the chemical methods currently used.

  1. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  2. Vitamin D3 Induces Tolerance in Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Intracellular Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bomfim Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic switches in various immune cell subsets enforce phenotype and function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3, induces human monocyte-derived tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC by metabolic reprogramming. Microarray analysis demonstrated that 1,25(OH2D3 upregulated several genes directly related to glucose metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Although OXPHOS was promoted by 1,25(OH2D3, hypoxia did not change the tolerogenic function of 1,25(OH2D3-treated DCs. Instead, glucose availability and glycolysis, controlled by the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, dictate the induction and maintenance of the 1,25(OH2D3-conditioned tolerogenic DC phenotype and function. This metabolic reprogramming is unique for 1,25(OH2D3, because the tolerogenic DC phenotype induced by other immune modulators did not depend on similar metabolic changes. We put forward that these metabolic insights in tolerogenic DC biology can be used to advance DC-based immunotherapies, influencing DC longevity and their resistance to environmental metabolic stress.

  3. Evaluation of renographic and metabolic parameters in human kidney transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. [Barcelone, Univ. (Spain). Lab. of Biophysics and Bioengineering; Vigues, F.; Franco, E. [Hospital of Bellvitge, Bellvitge (Spain). Service of Urology; Puchal, R. [Hospital of Bellvitge, Bellvitge (Spain). Service of Nuclear Medicine; Bartrons, R.; Ambrosio, S. [Barcelona, Univ. (Spain). Faculty of Odontology, Laboratory of Biochemistry

    1997-03-01

    Background: the aim of this work is to demonstrate that the value of the mean transit time (MTT) obtained from the {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 renogram deconvolution is related to the levels of adenine nucleotides determined in cortical biopsies from transplanted kidneys. Methods: the functional state was estimated by means of the MTT and the initial height (HO) of the renal retention function obtained from the {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 renogram deconvolution and by the measure of adenine nucleotides obtained from biopsies. We studied 30 kidney graft recipients, 25 normal functioning grafts (NFG) and 5 with acute tubular necrosis (ATN). Results: the MTT is significantly longer for ATN (p<0.001). The initial uptake values (HO) are significantly lower for ATN (p<0.001). The sum of adenine nucleotides (SAN) is significantly greater for NFG than for ATN (p<0.001). The values of the MTT seem to reflect the energy state of the cells in transplanted kidney. Conclusion: the analysis of MTT may be indicative of the functional metabolic recovery and thus it may be predictive of the renal graft function at least in the same extent than the biochemical analysis of a cortical renal biopsy immediately after blood reperfusion of the tissue.

  4. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  5. Characterization of the Usage of the Serine Metabolic Network in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahya Mehrmohamadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serine, glycine, one-carbon (SGOC metabolic network is implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but its general functions are unknown. We carried out a computational reconstruction of the SGOC network and then characterized its expression across thousands of cancer tissues. Pathways including methylation and redox metabolism exhibited heterogeneous expression indicating a strong context dependency of their usage in tumors. From an analysis of coexpression, simultaneous up- or downregulation of nucleotide synthesis, NADPH, and glutathione synthesis was found to be a common occurrence in all cancers. Finally, we developed a method to trace the metabolic fate of serine using stable isotopes, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and a mathematical model. Although the expression of single genes didn’t appear indicative of flux, the collective expression of several genes in a given pathway allowed for successful flux prediction. Altogether, these findings identify expansive and heterogeneous functions for the SGOC metabolic network in human cancer.

  6. Exercise in vivo marks human myotubes in vitro: Training-induced increase in lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Lund

    Full Text Available Physical activity has preventive as well as therapeutic benefits for overweight subjects. In this study we aimed to examine effects of in vivo exercise on in vitro metabolic adaptations by studying energy metabolism in cultured myotubes isolated from biopsies taken before and after 12 weeks of extensive endurance and strength training, from healthy sedentary normal weight and overweight men.Healthy sedentary men, aged 40-62 years, with normal weight (body mass index (BMI < 25 kg/m2 or overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 were included. Fatty acid and glucose metabolism were studied in myotubes using [14C]oleic acid and [14C]glucose, respectively. Gene and protein expressions, as well as DNA methylation were measured for selected genes.The 12-week training intervention improved endurance, strength and insulin sensitivity in vivo, and reduced the participants' body weight. Biopsy-derived cultured human myotubes after exercise showed increased total cellular oleic acid uptake (30%, oxidation (46% and lipid accumulation (34%, as well as increased fractional glucose oxidation (14% compared to cultures established prior to exercise. Most of these exercise-induced increases were significant in the overweight group, whereas the normal weight group showed no change in oleic acid or glucose metabolism.12 weeks of combined endurance and strength training promoted increased lipid and glucose metabolism in biopsy-derived cultured human myotubes, showing that training in vivo are able to induce changes in human myotubes that are discernible in vitro.

  7. Chemical reaction vector embeddings: towards predicting drug metabolism in the human gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Emily K; Acharya, Ambika; Rensi, Stefano E; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Bright, Roselie A; Altman, Russ B

    2018-01-01

    Bacteria in the human gut have the ability to activate, inactivate, and reactivate drugs with both intended and unintended effects. For example, the drug digoxin is reduced to the inactive metabolite dihydrodigoxin by the gut Actinobacterium E. lenta, and patients colonized with high levels of drug metabolizing strains may have limited response to the drug. Understanding the complete space of drugs that are metabolized by the human gut microbiome is critical for predicting bacteria-drug relationships and their effects on individual patient response. Discovery and validation of drug metabolism via bacterial enzymes has yielded >50 drugs after nearly a century of experimental research. However, there are limited computational tools for screening drugs for potential metabolism by the gut microbiome. We developed a pipeline for comparing and characterizing chemical transformations using continuous vector representations of molecular structure learned using unsupervised representation learning. We applied this pipeline to chemical reaction data from MetaCyc to characterize the utility of vector representations for chemical reaction transformations. After clustering molecular and reaction vectors, we performed enrichment analyses and queries to characterize the space. We detected enriched enzyme names, Gene Ontology terms, and Enzyme Consortium (EC) classes within reaction clusters. In addition, we queried reactions against drug-metabolite transformations known to be metabolized by the human gut microbiome. The top results for these known drug transformations contained similar substructure modifications to the original drug pair. This work enables high throughput screening of drugs and their resulting metabolites against chemical reactions common to gut bacteria.

  8. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Caffeine and human DNA metabolism: the magic and the mystery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, William K.; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Doherty, Sharon; Frank, Alexandra R.; Zhou Yingchun; Bryant, Miriam F.; Zhou Tong; Luche, Douglas D.; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Simpson, Dennis A.; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila

    2003-11-27

    The ability of caffeine to reverse cell cycle checkpoint function and enhance genotoxicity after DNA damage was examined in telomerase-expressing human fibroblasts. Caffeine reversed the ATM-dependent S and G2 checkpoint responses to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR), as well as the ATR- and Chk1-dependent S checkpoint response to ultraviolet radiation (UVC). Remarkably, under conditions in which IR-induced G2 delay was reversed by caffeine, IR-induced G1 arrest was not. Incubation in caffeine did not increase the percentage of cells entering the S phase 6-8 h after irradiation; ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p53 and transactivation of p21{sup Cip1/Waf1} post-IR were resistant to caffeine. Caffeine alone induced a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis. It inhibited the entry of human fibroblasts into S phase by 70-80% regardless of the presence or absence of wildtype ATM or p53. Caffeine also enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by UVC in XP variant fibroblasts. This effect was reversed by expression of DNA polymerase {eta}, indicating that translesion synthesis of UVC-induced pyrimidine dimers by DNA pol {eta} protects human fibroblasts against UVC genotoxic effects even when other DNA repair functions are compromised by caffeine.

  10. Caffeine and human DNA metabolism: the magic and the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, William K.; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Doherty, Sharon; Frank, Alexandra R.; Zhou Yingchun; Bryant, Miriam F.; Zhou Tong; Luche, Douglas D.; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Simpson, Dennis A.; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila

    2003-01-01

    The ability of caffeine to reverse cell cycle checkpoint function and enhance genotoxicity after DNA damage was examined in telomerase-expressing human fibroblasts. Caffeine reversed the ATM-dependent S and G2 checkpoint responses to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR), as well as the ATR- and Chk1-dependent S checkpoint response to ultraviolet radiation (UVC). Remarkably, under conditions in which IR-induced G2 delay was reversed by caffeine, IR-induced G1 arrest was not. Incubation in caffeine did not increase the percentage of cells entering the S phase 6-8 h after irradiation; ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p53 and transactivation of p21 Cip1/Waf1 post-IR were resistant to caffeine. Caffeine alone induced a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis. It inhibited the entry of human fibroblasts into S phase by 70-80% regardless of the presence or absence of wildtype ATM or p53. Caffeine also enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by UVC in XP variant fibroblasts. This effect was reversed by expression of DNA polymerase η, indicating that translesion synthesis of UVC-induced pyrimidine dimers by DNA pol η protects human fibroblasts against UVC genotoxic effects even when other DNA repair functions are compromised by caffeine

  11. Metabolic profiling detects early effects of environmental and lifestyle exposure to cadmium in a human population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis James K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'exposome' represents the accumulation of all environmental exposures across a lifetime. Top-down strategies are required to assess something this comprehensive, and could transform our understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Metabolic profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics defines an individual's metabolic phenotype, which is influenced by genotype, diet, lifestyle, health and xenobiotic exposure, and could also reveal intermediate biomarkers for disease risk that reflect adaptive response to exposure. We investigated changes in metabolism in volunteers living near a point source of environmental pollution: a closed zinc smelter with associated elevated levels of environmental cadmium. Methods High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (metabonomics was used to acquire urinary metabolic profiles from 178 human volunteers. The spectral data were subjected to multivariate and univariate analysis to identify metabolites that were correlated with lifestyle or biological factors. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine were also measured, using mass spectrometry, as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Results Six urinary metabolites, either associated with mitochondrial metabolism (citrate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 4-deoxy-erythronic acid or one-carbon metabolism (dimethylglycine, creatinine, creatine, were associated with cadmium exposure. In particular, citrate levels retained a significant correlation to urinary cadmium and smoking status after controlling for age and sex. Oxidative stress (as determined by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels was elevated in individuals with high cadmium exposure, supporting the hypothesis that heavy metal accumulation was causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows evidence that an NMR-based metabolic profiling study in an uncontrolled human population is capable of identifying intermediate biomarkers of response to toxicants at true environmental

  12. Quantitative time-course metabolomics in human red blood cells reveal the temperature dependence of human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James T; Zielinski, Daniel C; Yang, Laurence; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Broddrick, Jared T; Bordbar, Aarash; Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Palsson, Sirus; Gudmundsson, Sveinn; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2017-12-01

    The temperature dependence of biological processes has been studied at the levels of individual biochemical reactions and organism physiology ( e.g. basal metabolic rates) but has not been examined at the metabolic network level. Here, we used a systems biology approach to characterize the temperature dependence of the human red blood cell (RBC) metabolic network between 4 and 37 °C through absolutely quantified exo- and endometabolomics data. We used an Arrhenius-type model ( Q 10 ) to describe how the rate of a biochemical process changes with every 10 °C change in temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolomics data revealed that the same metabolic network-level trends previously reported for RBCs at 4 °C were conserved but accelerated with increasing temperature. We calculated a median Q 10 coefficient of 2.89 ± 1.03, within the expected range of 2-3 for biological processes, for 48 individual metabolite concentrations. We then integrated these metabolomics measurements into a cell-scale metabolic model to study pathway usage, calculating a median Q 10 coefficient of 2.73 ± 0.75 for 35 reaction fluxes. The relative fluxes through glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism pathways were consistent across the studied temperature range despite the non-uniform distributions of Q 10 coefficients of individual metabolites and reaction fluxes. Together, these results indicate that the rate of change of network-level responses to temperature differences in RBC metabolism is consistent between 4 and 37 °C. More broadly, we provide a baseline characterization of a biochemical network given no transcriptional or translational regulation that can be used to explore the temperature dependence of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A Human Hepatocyte-Bearing Mouse: An Animal Model to Predict Drug Metabolism and Effectiveness in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsutoshi Yoshizato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies to predict the efficacy and safety of drugs have conventionally been conducted almost exclusively in mice and rats as rodents, despite the differences in drug metabolism between humans and rodents. Furthermore, human (ℎ viruses such as hepatitis viruses do not infect the rodent liver. A mouse bearing a liver in which the hepatocytes have been largely repopulated with ℎ-hepatocytes would overcome some of these disadvantages. We have established a practical, efficient, and large-scale production system for such mice. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that these hepatocyte-humanized mice are a useful and reliable animal model, exhibiting ℎ-type responses in a series of in vivo drug processing (adsorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion experiments and in the infection and propagation of hepatic viruses. In this review, we present the current status of studies on chimeric mice and describe their usefulness in the study of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

  14. Metabolic Profile Determination of NBOMe Compounds Using Human Liver Microsomes and Comparison with Findings in Authentic Human Blood and Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal, Keith-Dane H; Scott, Karen S; Mohr, Amanda L A; Logan, Barry K

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) such as hallucinogenic NBOMes (N-methoxybenzyl derivatives of 2C phenethylamines) in the past few years into the recreational drug market has introduced various challenges in forensic analytical toxicology in regard to adequate and timely detection of these compounds. This is especially true in samples from individuals who have experienced severe and fatal intoxications. The aim of this research was to identify the major Phase I metabolites of selected NBOMe compounds to generate a predicted human metabolic pathway of these substances. An in vitro incubation method of pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) with four (4) NBOMes was used to identify major metabolites. These metabolic products were identified and confirmed from accurate mass findings of samples analyzed by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. The most common biotransformations observed among this group of NBOMes include O-demethylations at the three methoxy groups, hydroxylations and reduction at the amine group. Other metabolic products observed include positional isomers from various hydroxylation possibilities on the benzene ring and alkyl chains, and secondary metabolism resulting in multiple combinations of the reactions. Many of the major metabolites were subsequently identified in authentic human samples of blood and urine from drug users. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Metabolic effects of interleukin-6 in human splanchnic and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Dorthe; Simonsen, Lene; Bülow, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was infused intravenously for 2.5 h in seven healthy human volunteers at a dose giving rise to a circulating IL-6 concentration of approximately 35 ng l(-1). The metabolic effects of this infusion were studied in subcutaneous adipose tissue on the anterior abdominal wall...... and in the splanchnic tissues by the Fick principle after catheterizations of an artery, a subcutaneous vein draining adipose tissue, and a hepatic vein, and measurements of regional adipose tissue and splanchnic blood flows. In control studies without IL-6 infusion subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism was studied...... infusion. It is concluded that IL-6 elicits lipolytic effects in human adipose tissue in vivo, and that IL-6 also has effects on the splanchnic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism....

  16. Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette Juul

    2015-01-01

    The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological...... features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits...... in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35) from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days), including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine...

  17. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchus and cultured human pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Harris, C.C.; Stoner, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchial epithelium and pulmonary alveolar macrophages was studied. Explants of bronchus were prepared and pulmonary alveolar macrophages were isolated from peripheral lung by trypsinization and by differential adhesion to plastic tissue...... culture dishes. After 7 days in culture the bronchus explant and the macrophages were exposed to (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene, and the binding to cellular macromolecules was studied. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was determined by the release of tritiated water into the culture medium from metabolized...

  18. Metabolic mapping of functional activity in human subjects with the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.H.; Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1981-01-01

    The 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose technique was used to measure regional cerebral glucose utilization by human subjects during functional activation. Normal male volunteers subjected to one or more sensory stimuli exhibited focal increases in glucose metabolism in response to the stimulus. These results demonstrate that the technique is capable of providing functional maps in vivo related to both body region and submodality of sensory information in the human brain

  19. Cytochrome P450 isoform selectivity in human hepatic theobromine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Simon; Miners, John O

    1999-01-01

    Aims The plasma clearance of theobromine (TB; 3,7-dimethylxanthine) is known to be induced in cigarette smokers. To determine whether TB may serve as a model substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, or possibly other isoforms, studies were undertaken to identify the individual human liver microsomal CYP isoforms responsible for the conversion of TB to its primary metabolites. Methods The kinetics of formation of the primary TB metabolites 3-methylxanthine (3-MX), 7-methylxanthine (7-MX) and 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7-DMU) by human liver microsomes were characterized using a specific hplc procedure. Effects of CYP isoform-selective xenobiotic inhibitor/substrate probes on each pathway were determined and confirmatory studies with recombinant enzymes were performed to define the contribution of individual isoforms to 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU formation. Results The CYP1A2 inhibitor furafylline variably inhibited (0–65%) 7-MX formation, but had no effect on other pathways. Diethyldithiocarbamate and 4-nitrophenol, probes for CYP2E1, inhibited the formation of 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU by ≈55–60%, 35–55% and 85%, respectively. Consistent with the microsomal studies, recombinant CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 exhibited similar apparent Km values for 7-MX formation and CYP2E1 was further shown to have the capacity to convert TB to both 3-MX and 3,7-DMU. Conclusions Given the contribution of multiple isoforms to 3-MX and 7-MX formation and the negligible formation of 3,7-DMU in vivo, TB is of little value as a CYP isoform-selective substrate in humans. PMID:10215755

  20. Metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene and n-hexane in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Mølhave, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This human experimental study describes the mutual metabolic interaction between toluene, trichloroethylene, and n-hexane. METHODS: Eight healthy male volunteers were exposed to combinations of toluene (1.5 or 4 mg/min), trichloroethylene (1.5 or 4 mg/min), and n-hexane (0.3 or 1.0 mg...

  1. Relation between energy production and adenine nucleotide metabolism in human blood platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Gorter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The relation between ATP production and adenine nucleotide metabolism was investigated in human platelets which were starved by incubation in glucose-free, CN−-containing medium and subsequently incubated with different amounts of glucose. In the absence of mitochondrial energy production (blocked

  2. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CB...

  3. Human taurine metabolism: fluxes and fractional extraction rates of the gut, liver, and kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Siroen, Michiel P. C.; Wong, Leanne N.; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is involved in numerous biological processes. However, taurine plasma level decreases in response to pathological conditions, suggesting an increased need. Knowledge on human taurine metabolism is scarce and only described by arterial-venous differences across a single organ. Here we present

  4. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and

  5. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  6. Epigallocatechin gallate affects survival and metabolism of human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Francesca; Santoro, Marta; Guido, Carmela; Russo, Alessandra; Aquila, Saveria

    2012-11-01

    Green tea and its major constituent epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been extensively studied as potential treatment for a variety of diseases. We assessed the influence of EGCG on male fertilizing potential by analyzing different features of human sperm involved in capacitation process. Using human normozoospermic samples, we evaluated the effect of EGCG (2 μM, 20 μM, 60 μM) on sperm activities. Our results showed that lower doses of EGCG (from 2 to 20 μM) increased cholesterol efflux and tyrosine phosphorylation through the estrogen receptor (ER), since ICI 182,780, a specific ER antagonist, abrogated 20 μM EGCG effects. Besides, we evidenced that EGCG at similar concentrations, increased sperm motility, viability, and phosphorylation of proteins controlling cell survival such as Bcl2, Akt, and Src, via ER. Furthermore, we observed reduction of triglycerides content, induction of lipase, as well as the G6PDH activity. These results address to an increase in energy expenditure. On the contrary, treatment of 60 μM EGCG produced opposite effects that still appear after ICI cotreatment. These results provide a novel mechanism involving ERs through which low doses of EGCG exerted benefits to sperm physiology, also detected data evidence the adverse action of high EGCG concentrations probably related to its prooxidant and antiestrogenic potential. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Metabolic Modeling of Common Escherichia coli Strains in Human Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Dong Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent high-throughput sequencing has enabled the composition of Escherichia coli strains in the human microbial community to be profiled en masse. However, there are two challenges to address: (1 exploring the genetic differences between E. coli strains in human gut and (2 dynamic responses of E. coli to diverse stress conditions. As a result, we investigated the E. coli strains in human gut microbiome using deep sequencing data and reconstructed genome-wide metabolic networks for the three most common E. coli strains, including E. coli HS, UTI89, and CFT073. The metabolic models show obvious strain-specific characteristics, both in network contents and in behaviors. We predicted optimal biomass production for three models on four different carbon sources (acetate, ethanol, glucose, and succinate and found that these stress-associated genes were involved in host-microbial interactions and increased in human obesity. Besides, it shows that the growth rates are similar among the models, but the flux distributions are different, even in E. coli core reactions. The correlations between human diabetes-associated metabolic reactions in the E. coli models were also predicted. The study provides a systems perspective on E. coli strains in human gut microbiome and will be helpful in integrating diverse data sources in the following study.

  8. Metabolism of progesterone by human lymphocytes: production of neuroactive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leb, C R; Hu, F Y; Murphy, B E

    1997-12-01

    Although it has long been recognized that lymphocytes have the capacity to reduce cortisol at the C3, C5, and C20 positions, the specificity and the physiological variation of these reactions have received little attention. We have shown that such reactions also occur with progesterone. Lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The cells were incubated for 20 h with tritiated progesterone as radioactive tracer. After extractions into ethyl acetate, the residue was subjected to high performance liquid chromatography, and the radioactivities of the separated compounds were determined. Without cells, 95-97% of the tracer added was recovered in the progesterone peak, while in the presence of 4 x 10(6) lymphocytes, this was reduced to 45-90%. The metabolites obtained included at least 10 different compounds, including those corresponding in their retention times to the neuroactive 5 alpha and 5 beta dihydroprogesterones and their 3 alpha- and 3 beta- tetrahydroprogesterone derivatives. The conversion decreased with the addition of other steroids such as testosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone, suggesting that these steroids are metabolized by the same enzymes. When the cells from two pregnant patients were combined and incubated with tracer, and with and without nonradioactive progesterone, no peaks were detected by two progesterone radioimmunoassays in the absence of added nonradioactive progesterone, while in its presence three peaks corresponding to 5 alpha-dihydroprogesterone, 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnane-20-dione and 3 beta-hydroxy-5 alpha-pregnane-20-dione eluted before the P peak. Their identities were confirmed using the two different progesterone radioassays that cross-reacted with these metabolites. The highest mean conversion (44.7% +/- 3.2 SE) was found with the lymphocytes of pregnant women and with that of one lactating woman (50%). Conversions by lymphocytes of women in the follicular phase (29

  9. Estradiol stimulation of inositolphospholipid metabolism in human endometrial fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.; Imai, A.; Tamaya, T.

    1989-01-01

    Stimulated inositolphospholipid turnover has been proposed to constitute a signal-transducing mechanism in many cell types. To determine the inositolphospholipid turnover during stimulation by 17 beta-estradiol, the turnover kinetics of phospholipids was investigated in human endometrial fibroblasts. In cells incubated with [ 32 P] phosphate for 1 h, estradiol rapidly and persisitently (for at least 30 min) enhanced the rate of 32 P-labeling of phosphatidic acid (PA). On the other hand, after a lag time of 5 min, 32 P-labeling of phosphatidylinositol (PI) was also increased also. These sequential 32 P-labeling of PA and PI demonstrated that inositolphospholipid turnover was stimulated in fibroblasts exposed to estradiol. The rapid estrogen-stimulated inositolphospholipid turnover may not be through the mechanism associated with classical action of estrogen

  10. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids of human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Cattieu, K

    1982-10-01

    Human mononuclear (MN) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes were analyzed for their phospholipid, triglyceride, cholesterol and fatty acid content. The phospholipid/cholesterol ratio was 1.24 for both cells. MN cells contain more phosphatidylcholine (PC), but less phosphatidylserine (PS), Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SPH) than PMN cells when expressed as percent of total phospholipid. When expressed on the basis of lipid content per cell, MN cells contain less PS, PE and SPH but more triglyceride than PMN cells. PMN cells incorporate palmitic, stearic, linoleic and linolenic acids into their phospholipids, triglycerides or cholesterol esters. The incorporation into triglycerides was highest for all fatty acids. Of the phospholipids, the incorporation was highest into PC. Labeled fatty acids also were found in proteins which had been delipidized by exhaustive extraction with organic solvents. These represent tightly or covalently bound fatty acids. The incorporation [3H] palmitic acid into this protein fraction is stimulated by insulin.

  11. IMP metabolism in human skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullson, P. C.; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    1995-01-01

    This study addressed whether AMP deaminase (AMPD)myosin binding occurs with deamination during intense exercise in humans and the extent of purine loss from muscle during the initial minutes of recovery. Male subjects performed cycle exercise (265 +/- 2 W for 4.39 +/- 0.04 min) to stimulate muscle.......9 min postexercise it was 0.43 +/- 0.02 mmol/kg dry muscle. IMP decreased 2.1 +/- 0.3 mmol/kg dry muscle with no change in total adenylates. Total purines declined significantly (P purines to the circulation, whereas...... total purines were unchanged in the occluded leg. Regulation of muscle purine content is a dynamic process that must accommodate rapid changes due to degradation and efflux....

  12. In vitro metabolism of [14C]-toluene by human and rat liver microsomes and liver slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, D.E.; Moore, T.J.; Michener, S.R.; Powis, G.

    1990-01-01

    Toluene metabolites produced by liver microsomes from six human donors included benzylalcohol (Balc), benzaldehyde (Bald) and benzoic acid (Bacid). Microsomes from only one human donor metabolized toluene to p-cresol and o-cresol. Human liver microsomes also metabolized Balc to Bald. Balc metabolism required NADPH, was inhibited by carbon monoxide, and was decreased at a buffer pH of 10. Balc metabolism was not inhibited by ADP-ribose or sodium azide. These results suggest that cytochrome P450 is responsible for the in vitro metabolism of Balc by human liver microsomes. Toluene metabolites formed by human liver slices and released into the incubation media included hippuric acid, and Bacid. Cresols or cresol-conjugates were not detected in liver slice incubation media from any human donor. Toluene metabolism by human liver was compared to metabolism by comparable liver preparations from male Fischer F344 rats. Rates of toluene metabolism by human liver microsomes and liver slices were 9-fold and 1.3-fold greater than for rat liver, respectively. Covalent binding of toluene to human liver microsomes and liver slices was 21-fold and 4-fold greater than for comparable rat liver preparations. Covalent binding of toluene to human microsomes required NADPH, was significantly decreased by coincubation with 4 mM cysteine or 4 mM glutathione, and radioactivity associated with microsomes was decreased by subsequent digestion of microsomes with protease. These results suggest that toluene metabolism and covalent binding of toluene are underestimated if the male Fischer 344 rat is used as a model for human toluene metabolism

  13. Effects of superfoods on risk factors of metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of human intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Driessche, José J; Plat, Jogchum; Mensink, Ronald P

    2018-03-20

    Functional foods can be effective in the prevention of metabolic syndrome and subsequently the onset of cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes mellitus. More recently, however, another term was introduced to describe foods with additional health benefits: "superfoods", for which, to date, no generally accepted definition exists. Nonetheless, their consumption might contribute to the prevention of metabolic syndrome, for example due to the presence of potentially bioactive compounds. This review provides an overview of controlled human intervention studies with foods described as "superfoods" and their effects on metabolic syndrome parameters. First, an Internet search was performed to identify foods described as superfoods. For these superfoods, controlled human intervention trials were identified until April 2017 investigating the effects of superfood consumption on metabolic syndrome parameters: waist circumference or BMI, blood pressure, or concentrations of HDL cholesterol, triacylglycerol or glucose. Seventeen superfoods were identified, including a total of 113 intervention trials: blueberries (8 studies), cranberries (8), goji berries (3), strawberries (7), chili peppers (3), garlic (21), ginger (10), chia seed (5), flaxseed (22), quinoa (1), cocoa (16), maca (1), spirulina (7), wheatgrass (1), acai berries (0), hemp seed (0) and bee pollen (0). Overall, only limited evidence was found for the effects of the foods described as superfoods on metabolic syndrome parameters, since results were not consistent or the number of controlled intervention trials was limited. The inconsistencies might have been related to intervention-related factors, such as duration or dose. Furthermore, conclusions may be different if other health benefits are considered.

  14. A metabolic system-wide characterisation of the pig: a model for human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, Claire A; Lewis, Marie; Claus, Sandrine P; Beckonert, Olaf P; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Duncker, Swantje; Kochhar, Sunil; Rezzi, Serge; Lindon, John C; Bailey, Mick; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2011-09-01

    The pig is a single-stomached omnivorous mammal and is an important model of human disease and nutrition. As such, it is necessary to establish a metabolic framework from which pathology-based variation can be compared. Here, a combination of one and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR was used to provide a systems overview of porcine metabolism via characterisation of the urine, serum, liver and kidney metabolomes. The metabolites observed in each of these biological compartments were found to be qualitatively comparable to the metabolic signature of the same biological matrices in humans and rodents. The data were modelled using a combination of principal components analysis and Venn diagram mapping. Urine represented the most metabolically distinct biological compartment studied, with a relatively greater number of NMR detectable metabolites present, many of which are implicated in gut-microbial co-metabolic processes. The major inter-species differences observed were in the phase II conjugation of extra-genomic metabolites; the pig was observed to conjugate p-cresol, a gut microbial metabolite of tyrosine, with glucuronide rather than sulfate as seen in man. These observations are important to note when considering the translatability of experimental data derived from porcine models.

  15. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  16. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie C Matrka

    Full Text Available The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth.

  17. Polyamine Metabolism Is Sensitive to Glycolysis Inhibition in Human Neuroblastoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M. Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. PMID:25593318

  18. Polyamine metabolism is sensitive to glycolysis inhibition in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Associations of prenatal metabolic abnormalities with insulin and adiponectin concentrations in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Sylvia H; Hanley, Anthony J; Sermer, Mathew; Zinman, Bernard; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that metabolic hormones are present in human milk, but, to our knowledge, no studies have investigated the impact of maternal metabolic status assessed during pregnancy on insulin and adiponectin concentrations in milk. We aimed to investigate the associations of prenatal metabolic abnormalities with insulin and adiponectin in human milk and to compare the concentrations of these hormones in early and mature milk. Pregnant women aged ≥20 y with intention to breastfeed and without preexisting type 1 or 2 diabetes were recruited. Participants (n = 170) underwent a 3-h oral-glucose-tolerance test at 30 wk (95% CI: 25, 33 wk) gestation and donated early (the first week postpartum) and mature (3 mo postpartum) milk. Adiponectin and insulin concentrations in early milk were higher than those in mature milk (both P milk after covariate adjustment. Prenatal metabolic measures were not associated with milk adiponectin, but obstetrical measures that included nulliparity (0.171 ± 0.058; P = 0.004), longer duration of gestation (0.546 ± 0.146; P = 0.0002), and unscheduled cesarean delivery (0.387 ± 0.162; P = 0.02) were associated with higher adiponectin in early milk after covariate adjustment, including the time elapsed from delivery to milk collection. Maternal prenatal metabolic abnormalities are associated with high insulin concentrations in mature milk, whereas only obstetrical variables are associated with adiponectin concentrations in early milk.

  20. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Muraleedharan, Ranjithmenon; Lambert, Paul F.; Lane, Andrew N.; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2017-01-01

    The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth. PMID:28558019

  1. Framework and resource for more than 11,000 gene-transcript-protein-reaction associations in human metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays important roles in generating different transcripts from one gene, and consequently various protein isoforms. However, there has been no systematic approach that facilitates characterizing functional roles of protein isoforms in the context of the entire human metabolism....... Here, we present a systematic framework for the generation of gene-transcript-proteinreaction associations (GeTPRA) in the human metabolism. The framework in this study generated 11,415 GeTPRA corresponding to 1,106 metabolic genes for both principal and nonprincipal transcripts (PTs and NPTs......) of metabolic genes. The framework further evaluates GeTPRA, using a human genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) that is biochemically consistent and transcript-level data compatible, and subsequently updates the human GEM. A generic human GEM, Recon 2M. 1, was developed for this purpose, and subsequently updated...

  2. Microbial metaproteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome is not merely a collection of opportunistic parasites, but rather provides important functions to the host that are absolutely critical to many aspects of health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial metaproteomics provides the ability to characterize the human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities at a remarkably deep level, revealing information about microbiome development and stability as well as their interactions with their human host. Generally, microbial and human proteins can be extracted and then measured by high performance MS-based proteomics technology. Here, we review the field of human gut microbiome metaproteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems ranging from low-complexity model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the emerging gut microbiome in the GI tract of newborn human infants, and finally to an established gut microbiota in human adults. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Role of aminotransferases in glutamate metabolism of human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger, James J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lewis, Ian A. [Princeton University, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Human erythrocytes require a continual supply of glutamate to support glutathione synthesis, but are unable to transport this amino acid across their cell membrane. Consequently, erythrocytes rely on de novo glutamate biosynthesis from {alpha}-ketoglutarate and glutamine to maintain intracellular levels of glutamate. Erythrocytic glutamate biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutamine aminohydrolase (GA). Although the presence of these enzymes in RBCs has been well documented, the relative contributions of each pathway have not been established. Understanding the relative contributions of each biosynthetic pathway is critical for designing effective therapies for sickle cell disease, hemolytic anemia, pulmonary hypertension, and other glutathione-related disorders. In this study, we use multidimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple reaction mode mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) to measure the kinetics of de novo glutamate biosynthesis via AST, ALT, and GA in intact cells and RBC lysates. We show that up to 89% of the erythrocyte glutamate pool can be derived from ALT and that ALT-derived glutamate is subsequently used for glutathione synthesis.

  4. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better prediction of protein yield, demonstrates the effect of the different types of N-glycosylation of protein yield, and can be used to predict potential targets for strain improvement. The model represents a step towards a more complete description of protein production in P. pastoris, which is required for using these models to understand and optimize protein production processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Tribbles-1: a novel regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert C; Yenilmez, Batuhan O; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    The protein tribbles-1, encoded by the gene TRIB1, is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of multiple cellular and physiological processes in humans. Recent human genetic studies, as well as molecular biological approaches, have implicated this intriguing protein in the aetiology of multiple human diseases, including myeloid leukaemia, Crohn's disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidaemia and coronary artery disease (CAD). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have repeatedly identified variants at the genomic TRIB1 locus as being significantly associated with multiple plasma lipid traits and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in humans. The involvement of TRIB1 in hepatic lipid metabolism has been validated through viral-mediated hepatic overexpression of the gene in mice; increasing levels of TRIB1 decreased plasma lipids in a dose-dependent manner. Additional studies have implicated TRIB1 in the regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and NAFLD. The exact mechanisms of TRIB1 regulation of both plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenesis remain undetermined, although multiple signalling pathways and transcription factors have been implicated in tribbles-1 function. Recent reports have been aimed at developing TRIB1-based lipid therapeutics. In summary, tribbles-1 is an important modulator of human energy metabolism and metabolic syndromes and worthy of future studies aimed at investigating its potential as a therapeutic target. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell...

  7. Long Non-Coding RNAs Associated with Metabolic Traits in Human White Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs belong to a recently discovered class of molecules proposed to regulate various cellular processes. Here, we systematically analyzed their expression in human subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT and found that a limited set was differentially expressed in obesity and/or the insulin resistant state. Two lncRNAs herein termed adipocyte-specific metabolic related lncRNAs, ASMER-1 and ASMER-2 were enriched in adipocytes and regulated by both obesity and insulin resistance. Knockdown of either ASMER-1 or ASMER-2 by antisense oligonucleotides in in vitro differentiated human adipocytes revealed that both genes regulated adipogenesis, lipid mobilization and adiponectin secretion. The observed effects could be attributed to crosstalk between ASMERs and genes within the master regulatory pathways for adipocyte function including PPARG and INSR. Altogether, our data demonstrate that lncRNAs are modulators of the metabolic and secretory functions in human fat cells and provide an emerging link between WAT and common metabolic conditions. Keywords: White adipose tissue, Adipocytes, Long non-coding RNAs, Metabolic traits, Lipolysis, Adiponectin

  8. In vitro-in vivo correlation for intrinsic clearance for drugs metabolized by human aldehyde oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael; Jiang, Ying; Youdim, Kuresh; Obach, R Scott

    2010-08-01

    The ability to predict in vivo clearance from in vitro intrinsic clearance for compounds metabolized by aldehyde oxidase has not been demonstrated. To date, there is no established scaling method for predicting aldehyde oxidase-mediated clearance using in vitro or animal data. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that rats and dogs, two of the laboratory animal species commonly used to develop in vitro-in vivo correlations of clearance, differ from humans with regard to expression of aldehyde oxidase. The objective of this investigation was to develop an in vitro-in vivo correlation of intrinsic clearance for aldehyde oxidase, using 11 drugs known to be metabolized by this enzyme. The set consisted of methotrexate, XK-469, (+/-)-4-(4-cyanoanilino)-5,6-dihydro-7-hydroxy-7H-cyclopenta[d]pyrimidine (RS-8359), zaleplon, 6-deoxypenciclovir, zoniporide, O(6)-benzylguanine, N-[(2'-dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA), carbazeran, PF-4217903, and PF-945863. These compounds were assayed using two in vitro systems (pooled human liver cytosol and liver S-9 fractions) to calculate scaled unbound intrinsic clearance, and they were then compared with calculated in vivo unbound intrinsic clearance. The investigation provided a relative scale that can be used for in vitro-in vivo correlation of aldehyde oxidase clearance and suggests limits as to when a potential new drug candidate that is metabolized by this enzyme will possess acceptable human clearance, or when structural modification is required to reduce aldehyde oxidase catalyzed metabolism.

  9. Metabolic rate M  0.75 in human beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2014-11-01

    Human beings consume energy every day. Even at rest, energy is still needed for the working of the internal organs. This is achieved by the metabolism of consumed food in the presence of inhaled oxygen. During the resting state this is called the maintenance rate, and follows the mouse-to-elephant formula, Pmet = 70M0.75 kcal per day. Here, M is the body mass of the subject in kilograms. The heat generated in metabolism is lost through the body surface of the subject, so the metabolic rate should also be proportional to the body surface area. In other words, the body surface area in the case of a human being must also depend on M0.75. The present paper examines this issue by finding a relationship between human body surface area and its mass through a very simple model that can be easily understood and verified by physics students, who can also compare it with all the expressions for body surface area available in the literature. This will build confidence in the students that the heat generated from metabolism in fact dissipates through the surface of the body.

  10. Exercise in vivo marks human myotubes in vitro: Training-induced increase in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Jenny; Rustan, Arild C; Løvsletten, Nils G; Mudry, Jonathan M; Langleite, Torgrim M; Feng, Yuan Z; Stensrud, Camilla; Brubak, Mari G; Drevon, Christian A; Birkeland, Kåre I; Kolnes, Kristoffer J; Johansen, Egil I; Tangen, Daniel S; Stadheim, Hans K; Gulseth, Hanne L; Krook, Anna; Kase, Eili T; Jensen, Jørgen; Thoresen, G Hege

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity has preventive as well as therapeutic benefits for overweight subjects. In this study we aimed to examine effects of in vivo exercise on in vitro metabolic adaptations by studying energy metabolism in cultured myotubes isolated from biopsies taken before and after 12 weeks of extensive endurance and strength training, from healthy sedentary normal weight and overweight men. Healthy sedentary men, aged 40-62 years, with normal weight (body mass index (BMI) training intervention improved endurance, strength and insulin sensitivity in vivo, and reduced the participants' body weight. Biopsy-derived cultured human myotubes after exercise showed increased total cellular oleic acid uptake (30%), oxidation (46%) and lipid accumulation (34%), as well as increased fractional glucose oxidation (14%) compared to cultures established prior to exercise. Most of these exercise-induced increases were significant in the overweight group, whereas the normal weight group showed no change in oleic acid or glucose metabolism. 12 weeks of combined endurance and strength training promoted increased lipid and glucose metabolism in biopsy-derived cultured human myotubes, showing that training in vivo are able to induce changes in human myotubes that are discernible in vitro.

  11. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma metabolism of apolipoprotein A-IV in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiselli, G.; Krishnan, S.; Beigel, Y.; Gotto, A.M. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    As assessed by molecular sieve chromatography and quantitation by a specific radioimmunoassay, apoA-IV is associated in plasma with the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, to a high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction of smaller size than HDL3, and to the plasma lipoprotein-free fraction (LFF). In this study, the turnover of apoA-IV associated to the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, HDL and LFF was investigated in vivo in normal volunteers. Human apoA-IV isolated from the thoracic duct lymph chylomicrons was radioiodinated and incubated with plasma withdrawn from normal volunteers after a fatty meal. Radioiodinated apoA-IV-labeled triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, HDL, and LFF were then isolated by chromatography on an AcA 34 column. Shortly after the injection of the radioiodinated apoA-IV-labeled triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, most of the radioactivity could be recovered in the HDL and LFF column fractions. On the other hand, when radioiodinated apoA-IV-labeled HDL or LFF were injected, the radioactivity remained with the originally injected fractions at all times. The residence time in plasma of 125 I-labeled apoA-IV, when injected in association with HDL or LFF, was 1.61 and 0.55 days, respectively. When 125 I-labeled apoA-IV was injected as a free protein, the radioactivity distributed rapidly among the three plasma pools in proportion to their mass. The overall fractional catabolic rate of apoA-IV in plasma was measured in the three normal subjects and averaged 1.56 pools per day. The mean degradation rate of apoA-IV was 8.69 mg/kg X day

  13. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  14. Extra-metabolic energy use and the rise in human hyper-density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R.; Weinberger, Vanessa P.; Marquet, Pablo A.

    2017-03-01

    Humans, like all organisms, are subject to fundamental biophysical laws. Van Valen predicted that, because of zero-sum dynamics, all populations of all species in a given environment flux the same amount of energy on average. Damuth’s ’energetic equivalence rule’ supported Van Valen´s conjecture by showing a tradeoff between few big animals per area with high individual metabolic rates compared to abundant small species with low energy requirements. We use metabolic scaling theory to compare variation in densities and individual energy use in human societies to other land mammals. We show that hunter-gatherers occurred at densities lower than the average for a mammal of our size. Most modern humans, in contrast, concentrate in large cities at densities up to four orders of magnitude greater than hunter-gatherers, yet consume up to two orders of magnitude more energy per capita. Today, cities across the globe flux greater energy than net primary productivity on a per area basis. This is possible by importing enormous amounts of energy and materials required to sustain hyper-dense, modern humans. The metabolic rift with nature created by modern cities fueled largely by fossil energy poses formidable challenges for establishing a sustainable relationship on a rapidly urbanizing, yet finite planet.

  15. Impact of training state on fasting-induced regulation of adipose tissue metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertholdt, Lærke; Gudiksen, Anders; Stankiewicz, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Recruitment of fatty acids from adipose tissue is essential during fasting. However, the molecular mechanisms behind fasting-induced metabolic regulation in human adipose tissue and the potential impact of training state in this are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investig......Recruitment of fatty acids from adipose tissue is essential during fasting. However, the molecular mechanisms behind fasting-induced metabolic regulation in human adipose tissue and the potential impact of training state in this are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study...... was to investigate 1) fasting-induced regulation of lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in human adipose tissue as well as 2) the impact of training state on basal oxidative capacity and fasting-induced metabolic regulation in human adipose tissue. Untrained (VO2max 55ml......RNA content were higher in trained subjects than untrained subjects. In addition, trained subjects had higher adipose tissue hormone sensitive lipase Ser660 phosphorylation and adipose triglyceride lipase protein content as well as higher plasma free fatty acids concentration than untrained subjects during...

  16. Systems biology study of mucopolysaccharidosis using a human metabolic reconstruction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Diego A; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Herreño, Angélica; Barbosa, Hector; Herrera, Juliana; Ardila, Andrea; Barreto, George E; González, Janneth; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a group of lysosomal storage diseases (LSD), characterized by the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme responsible for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). This deficiency leads to the lysosomal accumulation of partially degraded GAG. Nevertheless, deficiency of a single lysosomal enzyme has been associated with impairment in other cell mechanism, such as apoptosis and redox balance. Although GAG analysis represents the main biomarker for MPS diagnosis, it has several limitations that can lead to a misdiagnosis, whereby the identification of new biomarkers represents an important issue for MPS. In this study, we used a system biology approach, through the use of a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction to understand the effect of metabolism alterations in cell homeostasis and to identify potential new biomarkers in MPS. In-silico MPS models were generated by silencing of MPS-related enzymes, and were analyzed through a flux balance and variability analysis. We found that MPS models used approximately 2286 reactions to satisfy the objective function. Impaired reactions were mainly involved in cellular respiration, mitochondrial process, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and ion exchange. Metabolic changes were similar for MPS I and II, and MPS III A to C; while the remaining MPS showed unique metabolic profiles. Eight and thirteen potential high-confidence biomarkers were identified for MPS IVB and VII, respectively, which were associated with the secondary pathologic process of LSD. In vivo evaluation of predicted intermediate confidence biomarkers (β-hexosaminidase and β-glucoronidase) for MPS IVA and VI correlated with the in-silico prediction. These results show the potential of a computational human metabolic reconstruction to understand the molecular mechanisms this group of diseases, which can be used to identify new biomarkers for MPS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Comparative Analyses of QTLs Influencing Obesity and Metabolic Phenotypes in Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer D Pant

    Full Text Available The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564 designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35 from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days, including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine 60k SNP Beadchip and a combined linkage disequilibrium-linkage analysis was used to identify genome-wide significant associations for collected phenotypes. We identified 229 QTLs which associated with adiposity- and metabolic phenotypes at genome-wide significant levels. Subsequently comparative analyses were performed to identify the extent of overlap between previously identified QTLs in both humans and pigs. The combined analysis of a large number of obesity phenotypes has provided insight in the genetic architecture of the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits indicating that QTLs underlying similar phenotypes are clustered in the genome. Our analyses have further confirmed that genetic heterogeneity is an inherent characteristic of obesity traits most likely caused by segregation or fixation of different variants of the individual components belonging to cellular pathways in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel

  18. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  19. Allometric Scaling and Cell Ratios in Multi-Organ in vitro Models of Human Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucciferri, Nadia; Sbrana, Tommaso; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent in vitro models able to recapitulate the physiological interactions between tissues in the body have enormous potential as they enable detailed studies on specific two-way or higher order tissue communication. These models are the first step toward building an integrated picture of systemic metabolism and signaling in physiological or pathological conditions. However, the rational design of in vitro models of cell–cell or cell–tissue interaction is difficult as quite often cell culture experiments are driven by the device used, rather than by design considerations. Indeed, very little research has been carried out on in vitro models of metabolism connecting different cell or tissue types in a physiologically and metabolically relevant manner. Here, we analyze the physiological relationship between cells, cell metabolism, and exchange in the human body using allometric rules, downscaling them to an organ-on-a-plate device. In particular, in order to establish appropriate cell ratios in the system in a rational manner, two different allometric scaling models (cell number scaling model and metabolic and surface scaling model) are proposed and applied to a two compartment model of hepatic-vascular metabolic cross-talk. The theoretical scaling studies illustrate that the design and hence relevance of multi-organ models is principally determined by experimental constraints. Two experimentally feasible model configurations are then implemented in a multi-compartment organ-on-a-plate device. An analysis of the metabolic response of the two configurations demonstrates that their glucose and lipid balance is quite different, with only one of the two models recapitulating physiological-like homeostasis. In conclusion, not only do cross-talk and physical stimuli play an important role in in vitro models, but the numeric relationship between cells is also crucial to recreate in vitro interactions, which can be extrapolated to the in vivo reality. PMID:25566537

  20. Allometric Scaling and Cell Ratios in Multi-Organ in vitro Models of Human Metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucciferri, Nadia; Sbrana, Tommaso; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent in vitro models able to recapitulate the physiological interactions between tissues in the body have enormous potential as they enable detailed studies on specific two-way or higher order tissue communication. These models are the first step toward building an integrated picture of systemic metabolism and signaling in physiological or pathological conditions. However, the rational design of in vitro models of cell–cell or cell–tissue interaction is difficult as quite often cell culture experiments are driven by the device used, rather than by design considerations. Indeed, very little research has been carried out on in vitro models of metabolism connecting different cell or tissue types in a physiologically and metabolically relevant manner. Here, we analyze the physiological relationship between cells, cell metabolism, and exchange in the human body using allometric rules, downscaling them to an organ-on-a-plate device. In particular, in order to establish appropriate cell ratios in the system in a rational manner, two different allometric scaling models (cell number scaling model and metabolic and surface scaling model) are proposed and applied to a two compartment model of hepatic-vascular metabolic cross-talk. The theoretical scaling studies illustrate that the design and hence relevance of multi-organ models is principally determined by experimental constraints. Two experimentally feasible model configurations are then implemented in a multi-compartment organ-on-a-plate device. An analysis of the metabolic response of the two configurations demonstrates that their glucose and lipid balance is quite different, with only one of the two models recapitulating physiological-like homeostasis. In conclusion, not only do cross-talk and physical stimuli play an important role in in vitro models, but the numeric relationship between cells is also crucial to recreate in vitro interactions, which can be extrapolated to the in vivo reality.

  1. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  2. Metabolism of oxycodone in human hepatocytes from different age groups and prediction of hepatic plasma clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eKorjamo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1 and 10 µM was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 hours, and 1 µM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 µM. Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. In general, this in vitro to in vivo extrapolation method provides valuable information on the maturation of oxycodone metabolism that can be utilized in the design of clinical pharmacokinetic studies in infants and young children.

  3. Metabolism of nitrogen-13 labelled ammonia in different conditions in dogs, human volunteers and transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormans, G.; Maes, A.; Langendries, W.; Nuyts, J.; Vrolix, M.; Vanhaecke, J.; Schiepers, C.; Roo, M. de; Mortelmans, L.; Verbruggen, A.

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the rate of metabolism of nitrogen-13 labelled ammonia ( 13 NH 3 ) in different conditions, we have determined the relative amount of unchanged 13 NH 3 in the blood of dogs, volunteers and transplant patients at different times following injection. In dogs, the determinations were made under basal conditions, during adenosine administration and after coronary occlusion. The results show that adenosine administration increases the metabolic rate whereas coronary occlusion does not affect 13 NH 3 metabolism. For both human volunteers and transplant patients the metabolic rate of 13 NH 3 was assessed under basal conditions and during adenosine administration. 13 NH 3 metabolism proceeds faster in transplant patients than in volunteers under both conditions. Adenosine administration causes a faster 13 NH 3 turnover in volunteers but not in transplant patients. Application of individual metabolite correction resulted in a 16% decrease in the calculated blood flow compared to uncorrected values. A smaller difference (5%) was observed between correction with mean metabolite values and individually acquired metabolite values. (orig.)

  4. In Vitro Disease Model of Microgravity Conditioning on Human Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jessica; Culbertson, C.; Zhang, Ye; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Sun, Wei

    2010-01-01

    NASA and its partners are committed to introducing appropriate new technology to enable learning and living safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time in a sustainable and possibly indefinite manner. In the responsible acquisition of that goal, life sciences is tasked to tune and advance current medical technology to prepare for human health and wellness in the space environment. The space environment affects the condition and function of biological systems from organ level function to shape of individual organelles. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of microgravity on kinetics of drug metabolism. This fundamental characterization is meaningful to (1) scientific understanding of the response of biology to microgravity and (2) clinical dosing requirements and pharmacological thresholds during long term manned space exploration. Metabolism kinetics of the anti-nausea drug promethazine (PMZ) were determined by an in vitro ground model of 3-dimensional aggregates of human hepatocytes conditioned to weightlessness using a rotating wall bioreactor. The authors observed up-regulated PMZ conversion in model microgravity conditions and attribute this to effect to model microgravity conditioning acting on metabolic mechanisms of the cells. Further work is necessary to determine which particular cellular mechanisms are governing the experimental observations, but the authors conclude kinetics of drug metabolism are responsive to gravitational fields and further study of this sensitivity would improve dosing of pharmaceuticals to persons exposed to a microgravity environment.

  5. In vitro percutaneous absorption and metabolism of Bisphenol A (BPA) through fresh human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Frank; Allan, Graham; Dimond, Stephen S; Waechter, John M; Beyer, Dieter

    2018-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume compound. It is mainly used as a monomer to make polymers for various applications including food-contact materials. The primary route of exposure to BPA in the general population is through oral intake (EFSA 2015) however, other potential sources of exposure have also been identified, such as dermal contact. In the present study, the percutaneous absorption through human skin has been investigated in an in vitro study according to OECD TG 428 (Skin Absorption: In Vitro Method). In order to investigate potential dermal BPA metabolism during absorption, radiolabelled BPA was applied to fresh, metabolically competent, human skin samples (ring labelled 14 C BPA concentrations tested were 2.4, 12, 60 and 300mg/L). Measured as total radioactivity the mean absorbed dose (receptor compartment) ranged from 1.7-3.6% of the applied doses and the dermal delivery (epidermis+dermis+receptor compartment), sometimes also named bioavailable dose was 16-20% of the applied doses, with the majority of the radioactivity associated with epidermis compared to dermis and receptor fluid. No metabolism was observed in any of the epidermis samples; however some metabolism was observed in dermis and receptor fluid samples with formation of BPA-glucuronide and BPA-sulfate, and some polar metabolites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-scale metabolic models applied to human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel J; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-11-01

    Advances in genome sequencing, high throughput measurement of gene and protein expression levels, data accessibility, and computational power have allowed genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) to become a useful tool for understanding metabolic alterations associated with many different diseases. Despite the proven utility of GEMs, researchers confront multiple challenges in the use of GEMs, their application to human health and disease, and their construction and simulation in an organ-specific and disease-specific manner. Several approaches that researchers are taking to address these challenges include using proteomic and transcriptomic-informed methods to build GEMs for individual organs, diseases, and patients and using constraints on model behavior during simulation to match observed metabolic fluxes. We review the challenges facing researchers in the use of GEMs, review the approaches used to address these challenges, and describe advances that are on the horizon and could lead to a better understanding of human metabolism. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1393. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  8. Network Thermodynamic Curation of Human and Yeast Genome-Scale Metabolic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties. PMID:25028891

  9. Insights on the human microbiome and its xenobiotic metabolism: what is known about its effects on human physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralau, Tewes; Sowada, Juliane; Luch, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Our microbiome harbours a metabolic capacity far beyond our own. Moreover, its gene pool is highly adaptable and subject to selective pressure, including host exposure to xenobiotics. Yet, the resulting adaptations do not necessarily follow host well-being and can therefore contribute to disease or unfavourable metabolite production. This review provides an overview of our host-microbiome relationship in light of bacterial (xenobiotic) metabolism, community dynamics, entero-endocrine crosstalk, dysbiosis and potential therapeutic targets. In addition, it will highlight the need for a systematic analysis of the microbiome's potential for substance toxification. The influence of our microbiota reaches from primary metabolites to secondary effects such as substrate competition or the activation of eukaryotic Phase I and Phase II enzymes. Further on it plays a hitherto underestimated role in drug metabolism, toxicity and pathogenesis. These effects are partly caused by entero-endocrine crosstalk and interference with eukaryotic regulatory networks. On first sight, the resulting concept of a metabolically competent microbiome adds enormous complexity to human physiology. Yet, the potential specificity of microbial targets harbours therapeutic promise for diseases such as diabetes, cancer and psychiatric disorders. A better physiological and biochemical understanding of the microbiome is thus of high priority for academia and biomedical research.

  10. Metabolic alterations in adipose tissue during the early phase of experimental endotoxemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhoener, P; Vietheer, A; Sayk, F; Schaaf, B; Lehnert, H; Dodt, C

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue plays an important role in energy homeostasis; however, there is only little knowledge about its metabolic activity during critical illness or sepsis. We assessed adipose tissue metabolic activity and local blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in otherwise healthy humans. In a prospective, placebo controlled and randomized experiment we measured changes in lactate, glycerol, and pyruvate concentrations in microdialysate samples of femoral adipose tissue after an intravenous bolus of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 4 ng/kg). Intravenous endotoxin caused an early and constant increase in interstitial pyruvate, while formation of lactate in adipose tissue was not affected. In contrast, lactate levels in serum were elevated significantly after 90 min (pendotoxemia. While adipose tissue is a major source of serum glycerol and lactate in humans during physiological conditions, it contributes only little to increased serum lactate and glycerol levels during endotoxemia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Human-Centered Development of an Online Social Network for Metabolic Syndrome Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Nava, Jefersson; Orozco-Sánchez, Paola A; López, Diego M; Ceron, Jesus D; Alvarez-Rosero, Rosa E

    2016-01-01

    According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), a quarter of the world's population has Metabolic Syndrome (MS). To develop (and assess the users' degree of satisfaction of) an online social network for patients who suffer from Metabolic Syndrome, based on the recommendations and requirements of the Human-Centered Design. Following the recommendations of the ISO 9241-210 for Human-Centered Design (HCD), an online social network was designed to promote physical activity and healthy nutrition. In order to guarantee the active participation of the users during the development of the social network, a survey, an in-depth interview, a focal group, and usability tests were carried out with people suffering from MS. The study demonstrated how the different activities, recommendations, and requirements of the ISO 9241-210 are integrated into a traditional software development process. Early usability tests demonstrated that the user's acceptance and the effectiveness and efficiency of the social network are satisfactory.

  12. Physical activity is associated with retained muscle metabolism in human myotubes challenged with palmitate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, C J; Bunprajun, T; Pedersen, B K

    2013-01-01

    . Metabolic differences were then investigated in the basal state or after chronic palmitate treatment. At basal, myocytes from sedentary individuals exhibited higher CD36 and HSP70 protein expression as well as elevated phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1......  The aim of this study was to investigate whether physical activity is associated with preserved muscle metabolism in human myotubes challenged with saturated fatty acids. Human muscle satellite cells were isolated from sedentary or active individuals and differentiated into myocytes in culture...... higher basal glucose uptake and palmitate promoted insulin resistance in sedentary myocytes. Importantly, myocytes from active individuals were partially protected from palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Palmitate treatment enhanced IRS1 serine307 phosphorylation in myocytes from sedentary individuals...

  13. The human body metabolism process mathematical simulation based on Lotka-Volterra model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliynyk, Andriy; Oliynyk, Eugene; Pyptiuk, Olexandr; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Szatkowska, Małgorzata; Uvaysova, Svetlana; Kozbekova, Ainur

    2017-08-01

    The mathematical model of metabolism process in human organism based on Lotka-Volterra model has beeng proposed, considering healing regime, nutrition system, features of insulin and sugar fragmentation process in the organism. The numerical algorithm of the model using IV-order Runge-Kutta method has been realized. After the result of calculations the conclusions have been made, recommendations about using the modeling results have been showed, the vectors of the following researches are defined.

  14. The metabolism of the human brain studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, T.; Ingvar, D.H.; Widen, L.

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents coverage of the use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study the human brain. The contributors assess new developments in high-resolution positron emission tomography, cyclotrons, radiochemistry, and tracer kinetic models, and explore the use of PET in brain energy metabolism, blood flow, and protein synthesis measurements, receptor analysis, and pH determinations, In addition, they discuss the relevance and applications of positron emission tomography from the perspectives of physiology, neurology, and psychiatry

  15. Metabolic Rate M[superscript 0.75] in Human Beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal. D. C.

    2014-01-01

    Human beings consume energy every day. Even at rest, energy is still needed for the working of the internal organs. This is achieved by the metabolism of consumed food in the presence of inhaled oxygen. During the resting state this is called the maintenance rate, and follows the mouse-to-elephant formula, P[subscript met] = 70M[superscript 0.75]…

  16. Metabolic reconstruction for metagenomic data and its application to the human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Abubucker

    Full Text Available Microbial communities carry out the majority of the biochemical activity on the planet, and they play integral roles in processes including metabolism and immune homeostasis in the human microbiome. Shotgun sequencing of such communities' metagenomes provides information complementary to organismal abundances from taxonomic markers, but the resulting data typically comprise short reads from hundreds of different organisms and are at best challenging to assemble comparably to single-organism genomes. Here, we describe an alternative approach to infer the functional and metabolic potential of a microbial community metagenome. We determined the gene families and pathways present or absent within a community, as well as their relative abundances, directly from short sequence reads. We validated this methodology using a collection of synthetic metagenomes, recovering the presence and abundance both of large pathways and of small functional modules with high accuracy. We subsequently applied this method, HUMAnN, to the microbial communities of 649 metagenomes drawn from seven primary body sites on 102 individuals as part of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP. This provided a means to compare functional diversity and organismal ecology in the human microbiome, and we determined a core of 24 ubiquitously present modules. Core pathways were often implemented by different enzyme families within different body sites, and 168 functional modules and 196 metabolic pathways varied in metagenomic abundance specifically to one or more niches within the microbiome. These included glycosaminoglycan degradation in the gut, as well as phosphate and amino acid transport linked to host phenotype (vaginal pH in the posterior fornix. An implementation of our methodology is available at http://huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/humann. This provides a means to accurately and efficiently characterize microbial metabolic pathways and functional modules directly from high

  17. Impaired insulin action in the human brain: causes and metabolic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Kullmann, Stephanie; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated that the human brain is an insulin-sensitive organ. Insulin regulates activity in a limited number of specific brain areas that are important for memory, reward, eating behaviour and the regulation of whole-body metabolism. Accordingly, insulin in the brain modulates cognition, food intake and body weight as well as whole-body glucose, energy and lipid metabolism. However, brain imaging studies have revealed that not everybody responds equally to insulin and that a substantial number of people are brain insulin resistant. In this Review, we provide an overview of the effects of insulin in the brain in humans and the relevance of the effects for physiology. We present emerging evidence for insulin resistance of the human brain. Factors associated with brain insulin resistance such as obesity and increasing age, as well as possible pathogenic factors such as visceral fat, saturated fatty acids, alterations at the blood-brain barrier and certain genetic polymorphisms, are reviewed. In particular, the metabolic consequences of brain insulin resistance are discussed and possible future approaches to overcome brain insulin resistance and thereby prevent or treat obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are outlined.

  18. Development of an Age- and Gender-specific Model for Strontium Metabolism in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shagina, N. B.; Degteva, M. O.; Tolstykh, E. I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a development of a new biokinetic model for strontium, which accounts for age and gender differences of metabolism in humans. This model was developed based on the long-term follow-up of the residents living on the banks of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) contaminated with 89,90Sr in 1950-1956. The new model uses the structure of ICRP model for strontium but model parameters have been estimated to account for age, gender and population differences in strontium retention and elimination. Estimates of age- and gender-specific model parameters were derived from (a) the results of long-term measurements of 90Sr-body burden for the Techa River population; (b) experimental studies of calcium and strontium metabolism in humans and (c) non-radiological data regarding bone metabolism (mineral content of the body, bone turnover, etc). As a result, the new model satisfactorily describes data on long-term retention of 90Sr in residents of the Techa River settlements of all ages and both genders and also data from studies during the period of global fallout in the UK and the USA and experimental data on strontium retention in humans. The new model can be used to calculate dose from 89,90Sr for the Techa River residents and also for other populations with similar parameters of skeletal maturation and also for other populations with similar parameters of skeletal maturation and involution. (Author) 27 refs

  19. Coordinated Expression of Phosphoinositide Metabolic Genes during Development and Aging of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley I Rapoport

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositides, lipid-signaling molecules, participate in diverse brain processes within a wide metabolic cascade.Gene transcriptional networks coordinately regulate the phosphoinositide cascade during human brain Development and Aging.We used the public BrainCloud database for human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to examine age-related expression levels of 49 phosphoinositide metabolic genes during Development (0 to 20+ years and Aging (21+ years.We identified three groups of partially overlapping genes in each of the two intervals, with similar intergroup correlations despite marked phenotypic differences between Aging and Development. In each interval, ITPKB, PLCD1, PIK3R3, ISYNA1, IMPA2, INPPL1, PI4KB, and AKT1 are in Group 1, PIK3CB, PTEN, PIK3CA, and IMPA1 in Group 2, and SACM1L, PI3KR4, INPP5A, SYNJ1, and PLCB1 in Group 3. Ten of the genes change expression nonlinearly during Development, suggesting involvement in rapidly changing neuronal, glial and myelination events. Correlated transcription for some gene pairs likely is facilitated by colocalization on the same chromosome band.Stable coordinated gene transcriptional networks regulate brain phosphoinositide metabolic pathways during human Development and Aging.

  20. Chemical synthesis of an indomethacin ester prodrug and its metabolic activation by human carboxylesterase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masato; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Fumiya; Yoshitsugu, Misaki; Haba, Masami; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2018-02-21

    It is necessary to consider the affinity of prodrugs for metabolic enzymes for efficient activation of the prodrugs in the body. Although many prodrugs have been synthesized with consideration of these chemical properties, there has been little study on the design of a structure with consideration of biological properties such as substrate recognition ability of metabolic enzymes. In this report, chemical synthesis and evaluation of indomethacin prodrugs metabolically activated by human carboxylesterase 1 (hCES1) are described. The synthesized prodrugs were subjected to hydrolysis reactions in solutions of human liver microsomes (HLM), human intestine microsomes (HIM) and hCES1, and the hydrolytic parameters were investigated to evaluate the hydrolytic rates of these prodrugs and to elucidate the substrate recognition ability of hCES1. It was found that the hydrolytic rates greatly change depending on the steric hindrance and stereochemistry of the ester in HLM, HIM and hCES1 solutions. Furthermore, in a hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by hCES1, the V max value of n-butyl thioester with chemically high reactivity was significantly lower than that of n-butyl ester. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modification of nucleotide metabolism in relationship with differentiation and in response to irradiation in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuang

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the metabolism of nucleotides in human tumour cells. The first part addresses the modifications of nucleotide (more specifically purine) metabolism in relationship with human melanoma cell proliferation and differentiation. The second part addresses the modifications of this metabolism in response to an irradiation in human colon tumour cells. For each part, the author proposes a bibliographic synthesis, and a presentation of studied cells and of methods used to grow cells, and respectively to proliferate and differentiate them or to irradiate them, and then discusses the obtained results [fr

  2. Regulation of homocysteine metabolism and methylation in human and mouse tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Natalie C.; Yang, Fan; Capecci, Louis M.; Gu, Ziyu; Schafer, Andrew I.; Durante, William; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism involves multiple enzymes; however, tissue Hcy metabolism and its relevance to methylation remain unknown. Here, we established gene expression profiles of 8 Hcy metabolic and 12 methylation enzymes in 20 human and 19 mouse tissues through bioinformatic analysis using expression sequence tag clone counts in tissue cDNA libraries. We analyzed correlations between gene expression, Hcy, S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) levels, and SAM/SAH ratios in mouse tissues. Hcy metabolic and methylation enzymes were classified into two types. The expression of Type 1 enzymes positively correlated with tissue Hcy and SAH levels. These include cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine-γ-lyase, paraxonase 1, 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferases and glycine N-methyltransferase. Type 2 enzyme expressions correlate with neither tissue Hcy nor SAH levels. These include SAH hydrolase, methionyl-tRNA synthase, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate:Hcy methyltransferase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, DNA methyltransferase 1/3a, isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases, and histone-lysine N-methyltransferase. SAH is the only Hcy metabolite significantly correlated with Hcy levels and methylation enzyme expression. We established equations expressing combined effects of methylation enzymes on tissue SAH, SAM, and SAM/SAH ratios. Our study is the first to provide panoramic tissue gene expression profiles and mathematical models of tissue methylation regulation.—Chen, N. C., Yang, F., Capecci, L. M., Gu, Z., Schafer, A. I., Durante, W., Yang, X.-F., Wang, H. Regulation of homocysteine metabolism and methylation in human and mouse tissues. PMID:20305127

  3. Diurnal variation of the human adipose transcriptome and the link to metabolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian (diurnal rhythm is an integral part of the physiology of the body; specifically, sleep, feeding behavior and metabolism are tightly linked to the light-dark cycle dictated by earth's rotation. Methods The present study examines the effect of diurnal rhythm on gene expression in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight to mildly obese, healthy individuals. In this well-controlled clinical study, adipose biopsies were taken in the morning, afternoon and evening from individuals in three study arms: treatment with the weight loss drug sibutramine/fasted, placebo/fed and placebo/fasted. Results The results indicated that diurnal rhythm was the most significant driver of gene expression variation in the human adipose tissue, with at least 25% of the genes having had significant changes in their expression levels during the course of the day. The mRNA expression levels of core clock genes at a specific time of day were consistent across multiple subjects on different days in all three arms, indicating robust diurnal regulation irrespective of potential confounding factors. The genes essential for energy metabolism and tissue physiology were part of the diurnal signature. We hypothesize that the diurnal transition of the expression of energy metabolism genes reflects the shift in the adipose tissue from an energy-expending state in the morning to an energy-storing state in the evening. Consistent with this hypothesis, the diurnal transition was delayed by fasting and treatment with sibutramine. Finally, an in silico comparison of the diurnal signature with data from the publicly-available Connectivity Map demonstrated a significant association with transcripts that were repressed by mTOR inhibitors, suggesting a possible link between mTOR signaling, diurnal gene expression and metabolic regulation. Conclusion Diurnal rhythm plays an important role in the physiology and regulation of energy metabolism in the adipose

  4. Serum metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hu; Peng, Jun-Sheng [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal and Anal Hospital), Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yao, Dong-Sheng [National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine,Ji Nan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yang, Zu-Li [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal and Anal Hospital), Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Liu, Huan-Liang [Institute of Gastroenterology,Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Zeng, Yi-Ke [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Sixth Affiliated Hospital (Gastrointestinal and Anal Hospital), Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Shi, Xian-Ping; Lu, Bi-Yan [Institute of Gastroenterology,Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2011-11-25

    Research on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis plays an important role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to non-invasively identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of human gastric cancer. The aims of this study were to explore the underlying metabolic mechanisms of gastric cancer and to identify biomarkers associated with morbidity. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the serum metabolites of 30 Chinese gastric cancer patients and 30 healthy controls. Diagnostic models for gastric cancer were constructed using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Acquired metabolomic data were analyzed by the nonparametric Wilcoxon test to find serum metabolic biomarkers for gastric cancer. The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer and non-cancer cohorts while the model failed to discriminate different pathological stages (I-IV) of gastric cancer patients. A total of 44 endogenous metabolites such as amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and steroids were detected, of which 18 differential metabolites were identified with significant differences. A total of 13 variables were obtained for their greatest contribution in the discriminating OPLS-DA model [variable importance in the projection (VIP) value >1.0], among which 11 metabolites were identified using both VIP values (VIP >1) and the Wilcoxon test. These metabolites potentially revealed perturbations of glycolysis and of amino acid, fatty acid, cholesterol, and nucleotide metabolism of gastric cancer patients. These results suggest that gastric cancer serum metabolic profiling has great potential in detecting this disease and helping to understand its metabolic mechanisms.

  5. Serum metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hu; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Yao, Dong-Sheng; Yang, Zu-Li; Liu, Huan-Liang; Zeng, Yi-Ke; Shi, Xian-Ping; Lu, Bi-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Research on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis plays an important role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to non-invasively identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of human gastric cancer. The aims of this study were to explore the underlying metabolic mechanisms of gastric cancer and to identify biomarkers associated with morbidity. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the serum metabolites of 30 Chinese gastric cancer patients and 30 healthy controls. Diagnostic models for gastric cancer were constructed using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Acquired metabolomic data were analyzed by the nonparametric Wilcoxon test to find serum metabolic biomarkers for gastric cancer. The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer and non-cancer cohorts while the model failed to discriminate different pathological stages (I-IV) of gastric cancer patients. A total of 44 endogenous metabolites such as amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and steroids were detected, of which 18 differential metabolites were identified with significant differences. A total of 13 variables were obtained for their greatest contribution in the discriminating OPLS-DA model [variable importance in the projection (VIP) value >1.0], among which 11 metabolites were identified using both VIP values (VIP >1) and the Wilcoxon test. These metabolites potentially revealed perturbations of glycolysis and of amino acid, fatty acid, cholesterol, and nucleotide metabolism of gastric cancer patients. These results suggest that gastric cancer serum metabolic profiling has great potential in detecting this disease and helping to understand its metabolic mechanisms

  6. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI......In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein......)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions....

  7. Identification of cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of paroxetine and estimation of their importance for human paroxetine metabolism using a population-based simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornil, Jakob; Jensen, Klaus Gjervig; Larsen, Frank; Linnet, Kristian

    2010-03-01

    We identify here for the first time the low-affinity cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms that metabolize paroxetine, using cDNA-expressed human P450s measuring substrate depletion and paroxetine-catechol (product) formation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were identified as paroxetine-catechol-forming P450 isoforms, and CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 were identified as metabolizing P450 isoforms by substrate depletion. Michaelis-Menten constants K(m) and V(max) were determined by product formation and substrate depletion. Using selective inhibitory studies and a relative activity factor approach for pooled and single-donor human liver microsomes, we confirmed involvement of the identified P450 isoforms for paroxetine-catechol formation at 1 and 20 muM paroxetine. In addition, we used the population-based simulator Simcyp to estimate the importance of the identified paroxetine-metabolizing P450 isoforms for human metabolism, taking mechanism-based inhibition into account. The amount of active hepatic CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 (not inactivated by mechanism-based inhibition) was also estimated by Simcyp. For extensive and poor metabolizers of CYP2D6, Simcyp-estimated pharmacokinetic profiles were in good agreement with those reported in published in vivo studies. Considering the kinetic parameters, inhibition results, relative activity factor calculations, and Simcyp simulations, CYP2D6 (high affinity) and CYP3A4 (low affinity) are most likely to be the major contributors to paroxetine metabolism in humans. For some individuals CYP1A2 could be of importance for paroxetine metabolism, whereas the importance of CYP2C19 and CYP3A5 is probably limited.

  8. Correlation network analysis reveals relationships between diet-induced changes in human gut microbiota and metabolic health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, T.; Stroeve, J.H.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Radonjic, M.; Roeselers, G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that the gut microbiota plays an important role in human metabolism and energy homeostasis and is therefore a relevant factor in the assessment of metabolic health and flexibility. Understanding of these host–microbiome interactions aids the design of nutritional

  9. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles H; Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Geraghty, Benjamin J; Perks, William J; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A; Connelly, Kim A

    2016-11-11

    Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized 13 C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by 13 C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1- 13 C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed 13 C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1- 13 C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean 13 C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1- 13 C]pyruvate, 56 for 13 C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1- 13 C]lactate. These results represent the first 13 C images of the human heart. The appearance of 13 C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Moringa oleifera Lam. improves lipid metabolism during adipogenic differentiation of human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, I; Vanella, L; Distefano, A; Nicolosi, D; Maravigna, A; Lazzarino, G; Di Rosa, M; Tibullo, D; Acquaviva, R; Li Volti, G

    2016-12-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam., a multipurpose tree, is used traditionally for its nutritional and medicinal properties. It has been used for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including inflammation, cancer and metabolic disorders. We investigated the effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. on adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and its impact on lipid metabolism and cellular antioxidant systems. We showed that Moringa oleifera Lam. treatment during adipogenic differentiation reduces inflammation, lipid accumulation and induces thermogenesis by activation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α). In addition, Moringa oleifera Lam. induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a well established protective and antioxidant enzyme. Finally Moringa oleifera Lam. significantly decreases the expression of molecules involved in adipogenesis and upregulates the expression of mediators involved in thermogenesis and lipid metabolism. Our results suggest that Moringa oleifera Lam. may promote the brown remodeling of white adipose tissue inducing thermogenesis and improving metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Tracing the fate of dietary fatty acids: metabolic studies of postprandial lipaemia in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    Most postprandial studies have investigated the response of a single meal, yet the ingestion of sequential meals is more typical in a Western society. The aim of this review is to explain how natural and stable isotope tracers of fatty acids have been used to investigate the metabolism of dietary fat after single and multiple meals, with a focus on in vivo measurements of adipose tissue metabolism. When stable isotope tracers are combined with arteriovenous difference measurements, very specific measurements of metabolic flux across tissues can be made. We have found that adipose tissue is a net importer of dietary fat for 5 h following a single test meal and for most of the day during a typical three-meal eating pattern. When dietary fat is cleared from plasma, some fatty acids 'spillover' into the plasma and contribute up to 50% of postprandial plasma NEFA concentrations. Therefore, plasma NEFA concentrations after a meal reflect the balance between intracellular and extracellular lipolysis in adipose tissue. This balance is altered after the acute ingestion of fructose. The enzyme lipoprotein lipase is a key modulator of fatty acid flux in adipose tissue and its rate of action is severely diminished in obese men. In conclusion, in vivo studies of human metabolism can quantify the way that adipose tissue fatty acid trafficking modulates plasma lipid concentrations. This has implications for the flux of fatty acids to tissues that are susceptible to ectopic fat deposition such as the liver and muscle.

  12. Metabolic and Pharmacokinetic Differentiation of STX209 and Racemic Baclofen in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymundo Sanchez-Ponce

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available STX209 is an exploratory drug comprising the single, active R-enantiomer of baclofen which is in later stage clinical trials for the treatment of fragile x syndrome (FXS and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. New clinical data in this article on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the R- and S-enantiomers of baclofen presents scientific evidence for stereoselective metabolism of only S-baclofen to an abundant oxidative deamination metabolite that is sterically resolved as the S-enantiomeric configuration. This metabolite undergoes some further metabolism by glucuronide conjugation. Consequences of this metabolic difference are a lower Cmax and lower early plasma exposure of S-baclofen compared to R-baclofen and marginally lower urinary excretion of S-baclofen after racemic baclofen administration. These differences introduce compound-related exposure variances in humans in which subjects dosed with racemic baclofen are exposed to a prominent metabolite of baclofen whilst subjects dosed with STX209 are not. For potential clinical use, our findings suggest that STX209 has the advantage of being a biologically defined and active enantiomer.

  13. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Škovierová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects.

  14. 1,3-Butadiene: I. Review of metabolism and the implications to human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Christopher R; Albertini, Richard J; Sweeney, Lisa M; Gargas, Michael L

    2010-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a multisite carcinogen in laboratory rodents following lifetime exposure, with mice demonstrating greater sensitivity than rats. In epidemiology studies of men in the styrene-butadiene rubber industry, leukemia mortality is associated with butadiene exposure, and this association is most pronounced for high-intensity BD exposures. Metabolism is an important determinant of BD carcinogenicity. BD is metabolized to several electrophilic intermediates, including epoxybutene (EB), diepoxybutane (DEB), and epoxybutane diol (EBD), which differ considerably in their genotoxic potency (DEB >> EB > EBD). Important species differences exist with respect to the formation of reactive metabolites and their subsequent detoxification, which underlie observed species differences in sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of BD. The modes of action for human leukemia and for the observed solid tumors in rodents are both likely related to the genotoxic potencies for one or more of these metabolites. A number of factors related to metabolism can also contribute to nonlinearity in the dose-response relationship, including enzyme induction and inhibition, depletion of tissue glutathione, and saturation of oxidative metabolism. A quantitative risk assessment of BD needs to reflect these species differences and sources of nonlinearity if it is to reflect the current understanding of the disposition of BD.

  15. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-10-20

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer.

  16. Effects of leucine, isoleucine, or threonine infusion on leucine metabolism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, W.F.; Haymond, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Leucine and/or its α-keto acid, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC), have been reported to spare protein in humans. To determine whether specific amino acid infusions affect whole-body protein metabolism as estimated by changes in leucine flux and oxidation, five groups of normal subjects were infused with saline, leucine, isoleucine, or threonine. Independent estimates of leucine metabolism were obtained using simultaneous infusions of [ 3 H]-leucine and α-[ 14 C]ketoisocaproate. Nearly identical results were obtained using either tracer compared with the saline controls. Compared with the saline controls, leucine infusion (1) had no effect on estimated rates of appearance of endogenous leucine, (2) stimulated leucine oxidation, (3) decreased plasma concentrations of other amino acids, and (4) stimulated nonoxidized leucine disappearance in a dose-dependent fashion. In contrast, isoleucine and threonine infusions had no effect on leucine metabolism. Assuming the validity of the isotope model employed, these data suggest that the purported anabolic effect of leucine infusion on whole-body protein metabolism is mediated via stimulation of protein synthesis rather than decreased proteolysis

  17. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škovierová, Henrieta; Vidomanová, Eva; Mahmood, Silvia; Sopková, Janka; Drgová, Anna; Červeňová, Tatiana; Halašová, Erika; Lehotský, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects. PMID:27775595

  18. Metabolic regulation and the anti-obesity perspectives of human brown fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Camilla; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-08-01

    Activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans increase glucose and fatty acid clearance as well as resting metabolic rate, whereas a prolonged elevation of BAT activity improves insulin sensitivity. However, substantial reductions in body weight following BAT activation has not yet been shown in humans. This observation raise the possibility for feedback mechanisms in adult humans in terms of a brown fat-brain crosstalk, possibly mediated by batokines, factors produced by and secreted from brown fat. Batokines also seems to be involved in BAT recruitment by stimulating proliferation and differentiation of brown fat progenitors. Increasing human BAT capacity could thus include inducing brown fat biogenesis as well as identifying novel batokines. Another attractive approach would be to induce a brown fat phenotype, the so-called brite or beige fat, within the white fat depots. In adult humans, white fat tissue transformation into beige has been observed in patients with pheochromocytoma, a norepinephrine-producing tumor. Interestingly, human beige fat is predominantly induced in regions that were BAT during early childhood, possibly reflecting that a presence of human beige progenitors is depot specific and originating from BAT. In conclusion, to utilize the anti-obesity potential of human BAT focus should be directed towards identifying novel regulators of brown and beige fat progenitor cells, as well as feedback mechanisms of BAT activation. This would allow for identification of novel anti-obesity targets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Similar metabolic responses in pigs and humans to breads with different contents and compositions of dietary fibers: a metabolomics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirstine Lykke; Hartvigsen, Merete; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2014-01-01

    respond similarly to a nutritional intervention. Using metabolomics, we compared the acute metabolic response to 4 test breads between conventional pigs (growing) and adult human subjects (with the metabolic syndrome). Design: Six catheterized pigs and 15 human subjects were tested in a randomized......Background: In nutritional studies, pigs are often used as models for humans because of nutritional and physiologic similarities. However, evidence supporting similar metabolic responses to nutritional interventions is lacking. Objective: The objective was to establish whether pigs and humans......, probably because of the higher doses of bread provided to the pigs (per kg body weight) and/or because of their growing status. Acute metabolic differences in these metabolites induced by the breads were, however, comparable between the 2 species. Conclusion: Our results indicate that pigs are a suitable...

  20. A Promising Therapeutic Target for Metabolic Diseases: Neuropeptide Y Receptors in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human neuropeptide Y (hNPY is one of the most widely expressed neurotransmitters in the human central and peripheral nervous systems. It consists of 36 highly conserved amino acid residues, and was first isolated from the porcine hypothalamus in 1982. While it is the most recently discovered member of the pancreatic polypeptide family (which includes neuropeptide Y, gut-derived hormone peptide YY, and pancreatic polypeptide, NPY is the most abundant peptide found in the mammalian brain. In order to exert particular functions, NPY needs to bind to the NPY receptor to activate specific signaling pathways. NPY receptors belong to the class A or rhodopsin-like G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family and signal via cell-surface receptors. By binding to GPCRs, NPY plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including cortical excitability, stress response, food intake, circadian rhythms, and cardiovascular function. Abnormal regulation of NPY is involved in the development of a wide range of diseases, including obesity, hypertension, atherosclerosis, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, and many cancers. Thus far, five receptors have been cloned from mammals (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, and y6, but only four of these (hY1, hY2, hY4, and hY5 are functional in humans. In this review, we summarize the structural characteristics of human NPY receptors and their role in metabolic diseases.

  1. The Ussing Chamber Assay to Study Drug Metabolism and Transport in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Beatrice; Mangelsen, Eva; Wingolf, Caroline; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Tannergren, Christer; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus

    2017-06-22

    The Ussing chamber is an old but still powerful technique originally designed to study the vectorial transport of ions through frog skin. This technique is also used to investigate the transport of chemical agents through the intestinal barrier as well as drug metabolism in enterocytes, both of which are key determinants for the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. More contemporary model systems, such as Caco-2 cell monolayers or stably transfected cells, are more limited in their use compared to the Ussing chamber because of differences in expression rates of transporter proteins and/or metabolizing enzymes. While there are limitations to the Ussing chamber assay, the use of human intestinal tissue remains the best laboratory test for characterizing the transport and metabolism of compounds following oral administration. Detailed in this unit is a step-by-step protocol for preparing human intestinal tissue, for designing Ussing chamber experiments, and for analyzing and interpreting the findings. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Use of 14CO2 ratios in metabolic assessment of human spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleran, A.L.; Mendez, C.M.; Kelleher, J.K.; Naz, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of 14 CO 2 production for [1- 14 C], [2- 14 C] and [3- 14 C] pyruvate indicates the metabolic fate of pyruvate. Assuming that all pyruvate oxidized enters the TCA cycle via pyruvate dehydrogenase, the ratio of steady state 14 CO 2 production, [2- 14 C] pyruvate: [3- 14 C] pyruvate, determines the probability that specific citrate carbons will complete a turn of the TCA cycle. Comparing this probability and the 14 CO 2 production from [1- 14 C] pyruvate estimates the flux pyruvate to products derived from acetate that do not enter the TCA cycle. Data was collected for human sperm metabolizing glutamine and pyruvate over a four-hour period. The ratio of 14 CO 2 production, [2- 14 C] pyruvate: [3- 14 C] pyruvate even when correction was made for the fact that not all carbon derived from [2- 14 C] pyruvate that enters the TCA cycle is converted to CO 2 . 14 CO 2 production from [U- 14 C] glutamine was linear for glutamine concentration below 0.5 mM. In conclusion, CO 2 ratios methods are applicable in metabolic analysis of small samples of human sperm where metabolite measurements are impractical

  3. Metabolic Effects of Inflammation on Vitamin A and Carotenoids in Humans and Animal Models123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lewis P; Ross, A Catharine; Stephensen, Charles B; Bohn, Torsten; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2017-01-01

    The association between inflammation and vitamin A (VA) metabolism and status assessment has been documented in multiple studies with animals and humans. The relation between inflammation and carotenoid status is less clear. Nonetheless, it is well known that carotenoids are associated with certain health benefits. Understanding these relations is key to improving health outcomes and mortality risk in infants and young children. Hyporetinolemia, i.e., low serum retinol concentrations, occurs during inflammation, and this can lead to the misdiagnosis of VA deficiency. On the other hand, inflammation causes impaired VA absorption and urinary losses that can precipitate VA deficiency in at-risk groups of children. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that high dietary carotenoid intake and elevated plasma concentrations are correlated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases; however, large-scale carotenoid supplementation trials have been unable to confirm the health benefits and in some cases resulted in controversial results. However, it has been documented that dietary carotenoids and retinoids play important roles in innate and acquired immunity and in the body’s response to inflammation. Although animal models have been useful in investigating retinoid effects on developmental immunity, it is more challenging to tease out the effects of carotenoids because of differences in the absorption, kinetics, and metabolism between humans and animal models. The current understanding of the relations between inflammation and retinoid and carotenoid metabolism and status are the topics of this review. PMID:28298266

  4. Metabolic Effects of Inflammation on Vitamin A and Carotenoids in Humans and Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lewis P; Ross, A Catharine; Stephensen, Charles B; Bohn, Torsten; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2017-03-01

    The association between inflammation and vitamin A (VA) metabolism and status assessment has been documented in multiple studies with animals and humans. The relation between inflammation and carotenoid status is less clear. Nonetheless, it is well known that carotenoids are associated with certain health benefits. Understanding these relations is key to improving health outcomes and mortality risk in infants and young children. Hyporetinolemia, i.e., low serum retinol concentrations, occurs during inflammation, and this can lead to the misdiagnosis of VA deficiency. On the other hand, inflammation causes impaired VA absorption and urinary losses that can precipitate VA deficiency in at-risk groups of children. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that high dietary carotenoid intake and elevated plasma concentrations are correlated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases; however, large-scale carotenoid supplementation trials have been unable to confirm the health benefits and in some cases resulted in controversial results. However, it has been documented that dietary carotenoids and retinoids play important roles in innate and acquired immunity and in the body's response to inflammation. Although animal models have been useful in investigating retinoid effects on developmental immunity, it is more challenging to tease out the effects of carotenoids because of differences in the absorption, kinetics, and metabolism between humans and animal models. The current understanding of the relations between inflammation and retinoid and carotenoid metabolism and status are the topics of this review. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Agarwal

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (P450 is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  6. Suppression of Microbial Metabolic Pathways Inhibits the Generation of the Human Body Odor Component Diacetyl by Staphylococcus spp

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Takeshi; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a key contributor to unpleasant odors emanating from the axillae, feet, and head regions. To investigate the mechanism of diacetyl generation on human skin, resident skin bacteria were tested for the ability to produce diacetyl via metabolism of the main organic acids contained in human sweat. L-lactate metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produced the highest amounts of diacetyl, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography...

  7. The stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets by hydrodynamic stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Sridhar; Mcintire, Larry V.; Hall, Elizabeth R.; Wu, Kenneth K.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of stimulating human platelets by thrombin and by hydrodynamic stresses on the platelets' arachidonic acid metabolism were investigated using (1-C-14)-arachidonic acid label and a specially designed viscometer that ensured laminar shear flow with a nearly uniform shear rate throughout the flow region. It was found that platelets activated by thrombin formed principally thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid and 12-hydroxy 5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). On the other hand, platelets activated by shear, formed only 12-HETE (although arachidonic acid metabolism was stimulated); no cyclooxygenase metabolites were detected. Results indicate that platelets may greatly increase their 12-HETE production when activated by passage through a high-stress region of the circulation, such as an atherosclerotic stenosis.

  8. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C......The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle......; control) or when severe hyperthermia had developed (core temperature = 39.5 degrees C; hyperthermia). The gCBF was similar after 15 min in the two trials, and it remained stable throughout control. In contrast, during hyperthermia gCBF decreased by 18% and was therefore lower in hyperthermia compared...

  9. Plasticity in mitochondrial cristae density allows metabolic capacity modulation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Gejl, Kasper D; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy production involves the movement of protons down a large electrochemical gradient through ATP synthase located on the folded inner membrane, known as cristae. In mammalian skeletal muscle, the density of cristae in mitochondria is thought to be constant. However, recent......-body level, muscle mitochondrial cristae density is a better predictor of maximal oxygen uptake rate than muscle mitochondrial volume. Our findings establish elevating mitochondrial cristae density as a regulatory mechanism for increasing metabolic power in human skeletal muscle. We propose...... that this mechanism allows evasion of the trade-off between cell occupancy by mitochondria and other cellular constituents and improved metabolic capacity and fuel catabolism during prolonged elevated energy requirements. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  10. Use of stable isotopes of selenium in human metabolic studies: development of analytical methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janghorbani, M.; Ting, B.T.; Young, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Use of stable isotopes of selenium in relation to enrichment of diets for studies of selenium absorption and metabolism in human subjects is discussed. A method based on radiochemical neutron activation analysis is described which allows accurate measurement of stable isotopes 74Se, 76Se, and 80Se in matrices (feces, plasma, red blood cells, and urine) of interest in metabolic studies. We show that these isotopes can routinely be measured with analytical precision and accuracy of 10% in samples of available size. This precision and accuracy is satisfactory for conduct of many nutritional experiments concerned with gastrointestinal absorption, plasma and red cell selenium turnover, and urinary excretion of the element, using an oral dose of 74Se. Original, experimental data are presented to illustrate the degree of enrichment of 74Se in feces, plasma, and urine after a single oral ingestion of 50 micrograms of the isotope with a breakfast meal in healthy young men

  11. Measurement of the metabolic burst in human neutrophils: a comparison between cytochrome c and NBT reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, J G

    1984-02-01

    Stimulation of human neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate results in a metabolic burst, which can be measured as an enhanced cytochrome c reduction or NBT reduction. There is more NBT reduction than cytochrome c reduction. When cytochrome c and NBT are simultaneously present the reduction of each is about the same as when either cytochrome c or NBT is present. Whereas cytochrome c reduction is completely annihilated by externally added superoxide dismutase, NBT reduction is diminished to a lesser extent under the same conditions. It is concluded that cytochrome c reduction only measures extracellularly released superoxide, whereas NBT may be reduced by extracellular superoxide or other molecules as well; thus NBT measures another aspect of the metabolic burst.

  12. Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Ekblom, Björn; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Larsen, Filip J

    2014-10-01

    The maximum power principle dictates that open biological systems tend to self-organize to a level of efficiency that allows maximal power production. Applying this principle to cellular energetics and whole-body physiology would suggest that for every metabolic challenge, an optimal efficiency exists that maximizes power production. On exposure to hypoxia, it would be favorable if metabolic efficiency would rapidly adjust so as to better preserve work performance. We tested this idea in humans by measuring metabolic efficiency and exercise tolerance under normoxic (Fio2=20.9%) and hypoxic (Fio2=16%) conditions, where Fio2 is fraction of inhaled oxygen. The results were compared with respirometric analyses of skeletal muscle mitochondria from the same individuals. We found that among healthy trained subjects (n=14) with a wide range of metabolic efficiency (ME), those with a high ME during normoxic exercise were able to better maintain exercise capacity (Wmax) in hypoxia. On hypoxic exposure, these subjects acutely decreased their efficiency from 19.2 to 17.4%, thereby likely shifting it closer to a degree of efficiency where maximal power production is achieved. In addition, mitochondria from these subjects had a lower intrinsic respiration compared to subjects that showed a large drop in Wmax in hypoxia An acute shift in efficiency was also demonstrated in isolated mitochondria exposed to physiological levels of hypoxia as P/O ratio increased from 0.9 to 1.3 with hypoxic exposure. These findings suggest the existence of a physiological adaptive response by which metabolic efficiency is dynamically optimized to maximize power production. © FASEB.

  13. Investigations on the role of hemoglobin in sulfide metabolism by intact human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Christopher L; Savitsky, Anton; Feelisch, Martin; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M

    2018-03-01

    In addition to their role as oxygen transporters, red blood cells (RBCs) contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis by regulating nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via interaction of hemoglobin (Hb) with nitrite and NO itself. RBCs were proposed to also participate in sulfide metabolism. Although Hb is known to react with sulfide, sulfide metabolism by intact RBCs has not been characterized so far. Therefore we explored the role of Hb in sulfide metabolism in intact human RBCs. We find that upon exposure of washed RBCs to sulfide, no changes in oxy/deoxyhemoglobin (oxy/deoxyHb) are observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy. However, sulfide reacts with methemoglobin (metHb), forming a methemoglobin-sulfide (metHb-SH) complex. Moreover, while metHb-SH is stable in cell-free systems even in the presence of biologically relevant thiols, it gradually decomposes to produce oxyHb, inorganic polysulfides and thiosulfate in intact cells, as detected by EPR and mass spectrometry. Taken together, our results demonstrate that under physiological conditions RBCs are able to metabolize sulfide via intermediate formation of a metHb-SH complex, which subsequently decomposes to oxyHb. We speculate that decomposition of metHb-SH is preceded by an inner-sphere electron transfer, forming reduced Hb (which binds oxygen to form oxyHb) and thiyl radical (a process we here define as "reductive sulfhydration"), which upon release, gives rise to the oxidized products, thiosulfate and polysulfides. Thus, not only is metHb an efficient scavenger and regulator of sulfide in blood, intracellular sulfide itself may play a role in keeping Hb in the reduced oxygen-binding form and, therefore, be involved in RBC physiology and function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene expression variability in human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications.

  15. Metabolism of eicosapentaenoic acid relative to arachidonic acid in the phospholipids of human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The platelet phospholipids of human subjects consuming fish or fish oil contain decreased levels of arachidonic acid (AA) and increased levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Furthermore, the ratio of AA/EPA in phosphatidylcholine (PC) is much lower than that in phosphatidylinositol (PI). This thesis examines the metabolic and remodeling pathways for fatty acid selectivity which might account for the decrease in arachidonate and the differences in AA/EPA ratios among the individual phospholipids PC, PI, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS). The incorporation of AA and EPA into the phospholipids of washed human platelets and human platelet microsomes was studied using radiolabeled fatty acids ((/sup 14/C)AA alone or (/sup 3/H)AA plus (/sup 14/C)EPA).

  16. Dynamic changes in cardiac fatty acid metabolism in the stunned human myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuki; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Katoh, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    The chronological changes or mechanisms in cardiac fatty acid metabolism under clinical conditions of hypoxia and ischemia have not been fully elucidated. 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) can be used with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to evaluate myocardial fatty acid metabolism. We investigated chronological changes in energy metabolism in the stunned human myocardium by means of 123 I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT. We conducted 123 I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT in 10 patients with stunned myocardium during the acute, subacute and chronic phases after onset. The left ventricle was divided into 9 regions on SPECT, and the degree of abnormalities in each region was scored in four grades from normal (0) to defect (4). We also examined wash-out rates on BMIPP images. The scores on early BMIPP images in the acute, subacute and chronic phases were 5.6±1.8, 13.4±3.5 and 2.5±1.1, respectively, and the score was highest in the subacute phase (p<0.001). Similarly, scores on the late images were 2.3±1.7, 18.3±4.5 and 4.7±2.6, respectively, and highest in the subacute phase (p<0.001). The wash-out rates (normal: 18.2±2.1%) in the acute, subacute and chronic phases were 12.1±4.8%, 44.9±10.0% and 23.1±4.6%, respectively, with the value being lowest during the acute phase (p<0.05), and highest during the subacute phase (p<0.001). There results suggested that fatty acid metabolism in the stunned human myocardium changes dynamically over time. (author)

  17. Rodent models to study the metabolic effects of shiftwork in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Loes eOpperhuizen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our current 24-hour society requires an increasing number of employees to work nightshifts with millions of people worldwide working during the evening or night. Clear associations have been found between shiftwork and the risk to develop metabolic health problems, such as obesity. An increasing number of studies suggest that the underlying mechanism includes disruption of the rhythmically organized body physiology. Normally, daily 24-hour rhythms in physiological processes are controlled by the central clock in the brain in close collaboration with peripheral clocks present throughout the body. Working schedules of shiftworkers greatly interfere with these normal daily rhythms by exposing the individual to contrasting inputs, i.e., at the one hand (dimlight exposure at night, nightly activity and eating and at the other hand daytime sleep and reduced light exposure. Several different animal models are being used to mimic shiftwork and study the mechanism responsible for the observed correlation between shiftwork and metabolic diseases. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the available animal studies with a focus on the four most relevant models that are being used to mimic human shiftwork: altered timing of 1 food intake, 2 activity, 3 sleep or 4 light exposure. For all studies we scored whether and how relevant metabolic parameters, such as bodyweight, adiposity and plasma glucose were affected by the manipulation. In the discussion, we focus on differences between shiftwork models and animal species (i.e., rat and mouse. In addition, we comment on the complexity of shiftwork as an exposure and the subsequent difficulties when using animal models to investigate this condition. In view of the added value of animal models over human cohorts to study the effects and mechanisms of shiftwork, we conclude with recommendations to improve future research protocols to study the causality between shiftwork and metabolic health problems using

  18. Rodent models to study the metabolic effects of shiftwork in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; Proper, Karin I.; Rodenburg, Wendy; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Our current 24-h society requires an increasing number of employees to work nightshifts with millions of people worldwide working during the evening or night. Clear associations have been found between shiftwork and the risk to develop metabolic health problems, such as obesity. An increasing number of studies suggest that the underlying mechanism includes disruption of the rhythmically organized body physiology. Normally, daily 24-h rhythms in physiological processes are controlled by the central clock in the brain in close collaboration with peripheral clocks present throughout the body. Working schedules of shiftworkers greatly interfere with these normal daily rhythms by exposing the individual to contrasting inputs, i.e., at the one hand (dim)light exposure at night, nightly activity and eating and at the other hand daytime sleep and reduced light exposure. Several different animal models are being used to mimic shiftwork and study the mechanism responsible for the observed correlation between shiftwork and metabolic diseases. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the available animal studies with a focus on the four most relevant models that are being used to mimic human shiftwork: altered timing of (1) food intake, (2) activity, (3) sleep, or (4) light exposure. For all studies we scored whether and how relevant metabolic parameters, such as bodyweight, adiposity and plasma glucose were affected by the manipulation. In the discussion, we focus on differences between shiftwork models and animal species (i.e., rat and mouse). In addition, we comment on the complexity of shiftwork as an exposure and the subsequent difficulties when using animal models to investigate this condition. In view of the added value of animal models over human cohorts to study the effects and mechanisms of shiftwork, we conclude with recommendations to improve future research protocols to study the causality between shiftwork and metabolic health problems using animal models

  19. Metabolic benefits of dietary prebiotics in human subjects: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellow, Nicole J; Coughlan, Melinda T; Reid, Christopher M

    2014-04-14

    Complex relationships exist between the gut microflora and their human hosts. Emerging evidence suggests that bacterial dysbiosis within the colon may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. The use of dietary prebiotic supplements to restore an optimal balance of intestinal flora may positively affect host metabolism, representing a potential treatment strategy for individuals with cardiometabolic disorders. The present review aimed to examine the current evidence supporting that dietary prebiotic supplementation in adults has beneficial effects on biochemical parameters associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, hepatic steatosis and low-grade chronic inflammation. Between January 2000 and September 2013, eight computer databases were searched for randomised controlled trials published in English. Human trials were included if at least one group received a dietary prebiotic intervention. In the present review, twenty-six randomised controlled trials involving 831 participants were included. Evidence indicated that dietary prebiotic supplementation increased self-reported feelings of satiety in healthy adults (standardised mean difference -0.57, 95% CI -1.13, -0.01). Prebiotic supplementation also significantly reduced postprandial glucose (-0.76, 95% CI -1.41, -0.12) and insulin (-0.77, 95% CI -1.50, -0.04) concentrations. The effects of dietary prebiotics on total energy intake, body weight, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations, gastric emptying times, insulin sensitivity, lipids, inflammatory markers and immune function were contradictory. Dietary prebiotic consumption was found to be associated with subjective improvements in satiety and reductions in postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Additional evidence is required before recommending prebiotic supplements to individuals with metabolic abnormalities. Large

  20. Tissue metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer assessed by 1H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Hailong; Deng, Pengchi; Liu, Chunqi; Li, Dandan; Jie, Hui; Zhang, Hu; Zhou, Zongguang; Zhao, Ying-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second most deadly cancer worldwide. Study on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis will play a significant role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer. In this study, we reported the metabolic profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human gastric cancer subjects (n = 125) and normal controls (n = 54) based on 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) together with multivariate statistical analyses (PCA, PLS-DA, OPLS-DA and ROC curve). The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer tissues and normal controls, and meanwhile, the model excellently discriminated the stage-related of tissue samples (stage I, 30; stage II, 46; stage III, 37; stage IV, 12) and normal controls. A total of 48 endogenous distinguishing metabolites (VIP > 1 and p < 0.05) were identified, 13 of which were changed with the progression of gastric cancer. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA, amino acids and choline metabolism, which were correlated with the occurrence and development of human gastric cancer. The receiver operating characteristic diagnostic AUC of OPLS-DA model between cancer tissues and normal controls was 0.945. And the ROC curves among different stages cancer subjects and normal controls were gradually improved, the corresponding AUC values were 0.952, 0.994, 0.998 and 0.999, demonstrating the robust diagnostic power of this metabolic profiling approach. As far as we know, the present study firstly identified the differential metabolites in various stages of gastric cancer tissues. And the AUC values were relatively high. So these results suggest that the metabolic profiling of gastric cancer tissues has great potential in detecting this disease and helping

  1. MicroRNA-211 Regulates Oxidative Phosphorylation and Energy Metabolism in Human Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Anupama; Lee, Bongyong; Boniface, Katia; Seneschal, Julien; Sahoo, Sanjaya K; Seki, Tatsuya; Wang, Chunyan; Das, Soumen; Han, Xianlin; Steppie, Michael; Seal, Sudipta; Taieb, Alain; Perera, Ranjan J

    2017-09-01

    Vitiligo is a common chronic skin disorder characterized by loss of epidermal melanocytes and progressive depigmentation. Vitiligo has complex immune, genetic, environmental, and biochemical causes, but the exact molecular mechanisms of vitiligo development and progression, particularly those related to metabolic control, are poorly understood. In this study we characterized the human vitiligo cell line PIG3V and the normal human melanocyte line HEM-l by RNA sequencing, targeted metabolomics, and shotgun lipidomics. Melanocyte-enriched microRNA-211, a known metabolic switch in nonpigmented melanoma cells, was severely down-regulated in vitiligo cell line PIG3V and skin biopsy samples from vitiligo patients, whereas its predicted targets PPARGC1A, RRM2, and TAOK1 were reciprocally up-regulated. microRNA-211 binds to PGC1-α 3' untranslated region locus and represses it. Although mitochondrial numbers were constant, mitochondrial complexes I, II, and IV and respiratory responses were defective in vitiligo cells. Nanoparticle-coated microRNA-211 partially augmented the oxygen consumption rate in PIG3V cells. The lower oxygen consumption rate, changes in lipid and metabolite profiles, and increased reactive oxygen species production observed in vitiligo cells appear to be partly due to abnormal regulation of microRNA-211 and its target genes. These genes represent potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human vitiligo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TCA cycle rewiring fosters metabolic adaptation to oxygen restriction in skeletal muscle from rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Daniele; Fania, Chiara; Torretta, Enrica; Viganò, Agnese; Moriggi, Manuela; Bravatà, Valentina; Caretti, Anna; Levett, Denny Z H; Grocott, Michael P W; Samaja, Michele; Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2017-08-29

    In mammals, hypoxic stress management is under the control of the Hypoxia Inducible Factors, whose activity depends on the stabilization of their labile α subunit. In particular, the skeletal muscle appears to be able to react to changes in substrates and O 2 delivery by tuning its metabolism. The present study provides a comprehensive overview of skeletal muscle metabolic adaptation to hypoxia in mice and in human subjects exposed for 7/9 and 19 days to high altitude levels. The investigation was carried out combining proteomics, qRT-PCR mRNA transcripts analysis, and enzyme activities assessment in rodents, and protein detection by antigen antibody reactions in humans and rodents. Results indicate that the skeletal muscle react to a decreased O 2 delivery by rewiring the TCA cycle. The first TCA rewiring occurs in mice in 2-day hypoxia and is mediated by cytosolic malate whereas in 10-day hypoxia the rewiring is mediated by Idh1 and Fasn, supported by glutamine and HIF-2α increments. The combination of these specific anaplerotic steps can support energy demand despite HIFs degradation. These results were confirmed in human subjects, demonstrating that the TCA double rewiring represents an essential factor for the maintenance of muscle homeostasis during adaptation to hypoxia.

  3. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the 13C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:24676563

  4. Human gut microbiota plays a role in the metabolism of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourova, Lenka; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Anzenbacherova, Eva

    2016-09-01

    The gut microbiome, an aggregate genome of trillions of microorganisms residing in the human gastrointestinal tract, is now known to play a critical role in human health and predisposition to disease. It is also involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and several recent studies have shown that the gut microbiota can affect the pharmacokinetics of orally taken drugs with implications for their oral bioavailability. Review of Pubmed, Web of Science and Science Direct databases for the years 1957-2016. Recent studies make it clear that the human gut microbiota can play a major role in the metabolism of xenobiotics and, the stability and oral bioavailability of drugs. Over the past 50 years, more than 30 drugs have been identified as a substrate for intestinal bacteria. Questions concerning the impact of the gut microbiota on drug metabolism, remain unanswered or only partially answered, namely (i) what are the molecular mechanisms and which bacterial species are involved? (ii) What is the impact of host genotype and environmental factors on the composition and function of the gut microbiota, (iii) To what extent is the composition of the intestinal microbiome stable, transmissible, and resilient to perturbation? (iv) Has past exposure to a given drug any impact on future microbial response, and, if so, for how long? Answering such questions should be an integral part of pharmaceutical research and personalised health care.

  5. The Human Stratum Corneum Prevents Small Gold Nanoparticle Penetration and Their Potential Toxic Metabolic Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are being used in multiple applications, ranging from biomedical and skin care products (e.g., sunscreen through to industrial manufacturing processes (e.g., water purification. The increase in exposure has led to multiple reports on nanoparticle penetration and toxicity. However, the correlation between nanoparticle size and its penetration without physical/chemical enhancers through the skin is poorly understood—with studies instead focusing primarily on skin penetration under disrupted conditions. In this paper, we investigate the penetration and metabolic effects of 10 nm, 30 nm, and 60 nm gold nanoparticles within viable excised human skin after 24-hour exposure using multiphoton tomograph-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. After 24 hour treatment with the 10, 30, and 60 nm gold nanoparticles, there was no significant penetration detected below the stratum corneum. Furthermore, there were no changes in metabolic output (total NAD(PH in the viable epidermis posttreatment correlating with lack of penetration of nanoparticles. These results are significant for estimating topical nanoparticle exposure in humans where other model systems may overestimate the exposure of nanoparticles to the viable epidermis. Our data shows that viable human skin resists permeation of small nanoparticles in a size range that has been reported to penetrate deeply in other skin models.

  6. Dietary nitrate reduces resting metabolic rate: a randomized, crossover study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Filip J; Schiffer, Tomas A; Ekblom, Björn; Mattsson, Mathias P; Checa, Antonio; Wheelock, Craig E; Nyström, Thomas; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2014-04-01

    Nitrate, which is an inorganic anion abundant in vegetables, increases the efficiency of isolated human mitochondria. Such an effect might be reflected in changes in the resting metabolic rate (RMR) and formation of reactive oxygen species. The bioactivation of nitrate involves its active accumulation in saliva followed by a sequential reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide, and other reactive nitrogen species. We studied effects of inorganic nitrate, in amounts that represented a diet rich in vegetables, on the RMR in healthy volunteers. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, we measured the RMR by using indirect calorimetry in 13 healthy volunteers after a 3-d dietary intervention with sodium nitrate (NaNO₃) or a placebo (NaCl). The nitrate dose (0.1 mmol · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹) corresponded to the amount in 200-300 g spinach, beetroot, lettuce, or other vegetable that was rich in nitrate. Effects of direct nitrite exposure on cell respiration were studied in cultured human primary myotubes. The RMR was 4.2% lower after nitrate compared with placebo administration, and the change correlated strongly to the degree of nitrate accumulation in saliva (r² = 0.71). The thyroid hormone status, insulin sensitivity, glucose uptake, plasma concentration of isoprostanes, and total antioxidant capacity were unaffected by nitrate. The administration of nitrite to human primary myotubes acutely inhibited respiration. Dietary inorganic nitrate reduces the RMR. This effect may have implications for the regulation of metabolic function in health and disease.

  7. Translational Targeted Proteomics Profiling of Mitochondrial Energy Metabolic Pathways in Mouse and Human Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Justina C; Ciapaite, Jolita; van Eunen, Karen; Niezen-Koning, Klary E; Matton, Alix; Porte, Robert J; Horvatovich, Peter; Bakker, Barbara M; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P

    2016-09-02

    Absolute measurements of protein abundance are important in the understanding of biological processes and the precise computational modeling of biological pathways. We developed targeted LC-MS/MS assays in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode to quantify over 50 mitochondrial proteins in a single run. The targeted proteins cover the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid β-oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, and the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Assays used isotopically labeled concatemers as internal standards designed to target murine mitochondrial proteins and their human orthologues. Most assays were also suitable to quantify the corresponding protein orthologues in rats. After exclusion of peptides that did not pass the selection criteria, we arrived at SRM assays for 55 mouse, 52 human, and 51 rat proteins. These assays were optimized in isolated mitochondrial fractions from mouse and rat liver and cultured human fibroblasts and in total liver extracts from mouse, rat, and human. The developed proteomics approach is suitable for the quantification of proteins in the mitochondrial energy metabolic pathways in mice, rats, and humans as a basis for translational research. Initial data show that the assays have great potential for elucidating the adaptive response of human patients to mutations in mitochondrial proteins in a clinical setting.

  8. Metabolic constraint imposes tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons in human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Despite a general trend for larger mammals to have larger brains, humans are the primates with the largest brain and number of neurons, but not the largest body mass. Why are great apes, the largest primates, not also those endowed with the largest brains? Recently, we showed that the energetic cost of the brain is a linear function of its numbers of neurons. Here we show that metabolic limitations that result from the number of hours available for feeding and the low caloric yield of raw foo...

  9. Linking skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism to the limits of human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushel, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, Bengt Saltin's contributions to our understanding of physiology of the circulation, the matching of the circulation to muscle metabolism, and the underlying mechanisms that set the limits for exercise performance were enormous. His research addressed the key questions in the field using sophisticated experimental methods including field expeditions. From the Dallas Bedrest Study to the 1-leg knee model to the physiology of lifelong training, his prodigious body of work was foundational in the field of exercise physiology and his leadership propelled integrative human physiology into the mainstream of biological sciences.

  10. Water Metabolism and Fluid Compartment Volumes in Humans at Altitude. A Compendium of Research (1914 - 1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Gay, E.; West, G. I.; Barnes, P. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    This compendium includes abstracts and synopses of clinical observations and of more basic studies involving physiological mechanisms concerning interaction of water metabolism and fluid compartment volumes in humans during altitude exposure. If the author's abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In other cases a more detailed synopsis of the paper was prepared under the subheadings Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Author and subject indices are provided, plus an additional selected bibliography of related work of those papers received after the volume was being prepared for publication. This volume includes material published from 1914 through 1995.

  11. Reconciled Rat and Human Metabolic Networks for Comparative Toxicogenomics and Biomarker Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    reactions. ETC, electron transport chain; PPP, pentose phosphate pathway. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS | DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14250 ARTICLE NATURE COMMUNICATIONS...CDCA) Alpha-muricholic acid (αMCA) x Beta-muricholic acid (βMCA) x Secondary bile acids Deoxycholic acid (DCA) Lithocholic acid ( LCA ) Hyocholic acid...than rats Neu5Ac Lewisa ManNAc Microbial metabolism MDCA Cyp3a18 Cyp3a18 CDCA LCA CDCA LCA SharedRat-specific Human-specific Figure 3 | Functional

  12. Roles of UGT, P450, and Gut Microbiota in the Metabolism of Epacadostat in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Jason; Young-Sciame, Ruth; Lee, Fiona; Bowman, Kevin J; Yang, Xiaoqing; Shi, Jack G; Nedza, Frank M; Frietze, William; Galya, Laurine; Combs, Andrew P; Yeleswaram, Swamy; Diamond, Sharon

    2016-10-01

    Epacadostat (EPA, INCB024360) is a first-in-class, orally active, investigational drug targeting the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). In Phase I studies, EPA has demonstrated promising clinical activity when used in combination with checkpoint modulators. When the metabolism of EPA was investigated in humans, three major, IDO1-inactive, circulating plasma metabolites were detected and characterized: M9, a direct O-glucuronide of EPA; M11, an amidine; and M12, N-dealkylated M11. Glucuronidation of EPA to form M9 is the dominant metabolic pathway, and in vitro, this metabolite is formed by UGT1A9. However, negligible quantities of M11 and M12 were detected when EPA was incubated with a panel of human microsomes from multiple tissues, hepatocytes, recombinant human cytochrome P450s (P450s), and non-P450 enzymatic systems. Given the reductive nature of M11 formation and the inability to define its source, the role of gut microbiota was investigated. Analysis of plasma from mice dosed with EPA following pretreatment with either antibiotic (ciprofloxacin) to inhibit gut bacteria or 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) to systemically inhibit P450s demonstrated that gut microbiota is responsible for the formation of M11. Incubations of EPA in human feces confirmed the role of gut bacteria in the formation of M11. Further, incubations of M11 with recombinant P450s showed that M12 is formed via N-dealkylation of M11 by CYP3A4, CYP2C19, and CYP1A2. Thus, in humans three major plasma metabolites of EPA were characterized: two primary metabolites, M9 and M11, formed directly from EPA via UGT1A9 and gut microbiota, respectively, and M12 formed as a secondary metabolite via P450s from M11. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Metabolism of N-nitrosamines by cultured human and rat esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrup, H; Stoner, G D

    1982-04-01

    The metabolism of several N-nitrosamines (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosoethylmethylamine, N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine, and N-nitrosopyrrolidine) in cultured human and rat esophagus has been investigated by measuring (a) CO2, (b) metabolites with an oxo group, and (c) metabolites bound to DNA. Both acyclic and cyclic N-nitrosamines were metabolized by rat esophagus. The highest level of metabolite binding was seen with N-nitrosobenzylmethylamine, an organotrophic carcinogen for the rat esophagus. The binding level was about 100-fold higher than in human esophagus. This compound methylated rat esophageal DNA at positions 7 and O6 of guanine. The level of benzylation in rat was one-tenth of the level of methylation. Formation of benzaldehyde exceeded that of formaldehyde plus CO2 by a factor of six, indicating that the methylene group was preferentially oxidized. N-Nitrosoethylmethylamine, another unsymmetrical N-nitrosamine, was preferentially oxidized by rat esophagus in the ethyl group, as shown by higher formation of CO2 and acetaldehyde from the compound labeled in the ethyl group. The highest binding level to DNA from this compound was observed with the methyl group. No binding was detected to human esophagus. N-Nitrosopyrrolidine was oxidized by both rat and human esophagus in the alpha position, as measured by the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative of 4-hydroxybutanal. Binding of metabolites of N-nitrosopyrrolidine to DNA was detected only in rat esophagus. As measured by the formation of both CO2 and formaldehyde, N-nitrosodimethylamine was metabolized by both human and rat esophagus. While most of the radioactivity associated with DNA was found to be incorporated into guanine and adenine, methylation of the guanine positions 7 and O6 was detected by chromatography of the hydrolyzed rat DNA. The results indicate significant quantitative and perhaps qualitative differences between cultured rat and human esophagus in

  14. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) perturbs alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism pathways in human neuroblastoma cells as determined by metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Ersson, Lisa; Haglöf, Jakob; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Brittebo, Eva

    2017-05-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that induces long-term cognitive deficits, as well as an increased neurodegeneration and intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rodents following short-time neonatal exposure and in vervet monkey brain following long-term exposure. It has also been proposed to be involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease in humans. The aim of this study was to identify metabolic effects not related to excitotoxicity or oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The effects of BMAA (50, 250, 1000 µM) for 24 h on cells differentiated with retinoic acid were studied. Samples were analyzed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy to detect altered intracellular polar metabolites. The analysis performed, followed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques, revealed significant perturbations in protein biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism pathways and citrate cycle. Of specific interest were the BMAA-induced alterations in alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and as well as alterations in various neurotransmitters/neuromodulators such as GABA and taurine. The results indicate that BMAA can interfere with metabolic pathways involved in neurotransmission in human neuroblastoma cells.

  15. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P; Ploner, Markus; Friston, Karl J; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-12

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using "eyes open" versus "eyes closed" conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders.

  16. Effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at the onset of submaximal exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, P J; Parolin, M L; Jones, N L; Heigenhauser, G J F

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at rest and during submaximal exercise. Subjects exercised on two occasions for 15 min at 55 % of their maximal oxygen uptake while either hyperventilating (R-Alk) or breathing normally (Con). Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 1 and 15 min of exercise. At rest, no effects on muscle metabolism were observed in response to R-Alk. In the first minute of exercise, there was a delayed activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in R-Alk compared with Con, resulting in a reduced rate of pyruvate oxidation. Also, glycogenolysis was higher in R-Alk compared with Con, which was attributed to a higher availability of the monoprotonated form of inorganic phosphate (Pi), resulting in an elevated rate of pyruvate production. The mismatch between pyruvate production and its oxidation resulted in net lactate accumulation. These effects were not seen after 15 min of exercise, with no further differences in muscle metabolism between conditions. The results from the present study suggest that respiratory alkalosis may play an important role in lactate accumulation during the transition from rest to exercise in acute hypoxic conditions, but that other factors mediate lactate accumulation during steady-state exercise. PMID:12356901

  17. Metabolism of acyclic and cyclic N-nitrosamines in cultured human bronchi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Curtis C.; Autrup, Herman; Stoner, Gary D.

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines was studied in normal-appearing bronchial specimens obtained from 4 patients. Explants of bronchi were cultured in a chemically defined medium for 7 days. N-Nitrosamines [N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), N,N'-dinitrosopiperaz......The metabolism of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines was studied in normal-appearing bronchial specimens obtained from 4 patients. Explants of bronchi were cultured in a chemically defined medium for 7 days. N-Nitrosamines [N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN), N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), N...... bronchial specimens, these N-nitrosamines and/or their metabolites bound to bronchial mucosal DNA and protein. Binding levels were higher to protein than to DNA. Binding levels of DNP were as high as those with the two acyclic N-nitrosamines DMN and DEN, but binding levels of NPy and NPd were lower. Human...... bronchus was shown to metabolize and bind acyclic and cyclic N-nitrosamines found in the environment and in tobacco smoke....

  18. Low-dose metabolism of benzene in humans: science and obfuscation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous air pollutant that causes human leukemia and hematotoxic effects. Although the mechanism by which benzene causes toxicity is unclear, metabolism is required. A series of articles by Kim et al. used air and biomonitoring data from workers in Tianjin, China, to investigate the dose-specific metabolism (DSM) of benzene over a wide range of air concentrations (0.03–88.9 p.p.m.). Kim et al. concluded that DSM of benzene is greatest at air concentrations benzene concentrations, Price et al. argued that Kim’s methods were inappropriate for assigning benzene exposures to low exposed subjects (based on measurements of urinary benzene) and for adjusting background levels of metabolites (based on median values from the 60 lowest exposed subjects). Price et al. then performed uncertainty analyses under alternative approaches, which led them to conclude that ‘… the Tianjin data appear to be too uncertain to support any conclusions …’ regarding the DSM of benzene. They also argued that the apparent low-dose metabolism of benzene could be explained by ‘lung clearance.’ In addressing these criticisms, we show that the methods and arguments presented by Price et al. are scientifically unsound and that their results are unreliable. PMID:23222815

  19. Study of cerebral metabolism of glucose in normal human brain correlated with age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The objective was to determine whether cerebral metabolism in various regions of the brain differs with advancing age by using 18F-FDG PET instrument and SPM software. Materials and Methods We reviewed clinical information of 295 healthy normal samples who were examined by a whole body GE Discovery LS PET-CT instrument in our center from Aug. 2004 to Dec. 2005.They (with the age ranging from 21 to 88; mean age+/-SD: 49.77+/-13.51) were selected with: (i)absence of clear focal brain lesions (epilepsy.cerebrovascular diseases etc);(ii) absence of metabolic diseases, such as hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and diabetes;(iii) absence of psychiatric disorders and abuse of drugs and alcohol. They were sub grouped into six groups with the interval of 10 years old starting from 21, and the gender, educational background and serum glucose were matched. All subgroups were compared to the control group of 31-40 years old (84 samples; mean age+/-SD: 37.15+/-2.63). All samples were injected with 18F-FDG (5.55MBq/kg), 45-60 minutes later, their brains were scanned for 10min. Pixel-by-pixel t-statistic analysis was applied to all brain images using the Statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) .The hypometabolic areas (p < 0. 01 or p<0.001, uncorrected) were identified in the Stereotaxic coordinate human brain atlas and three-dimensional localized by MNI Space utility (MSU) software. Results:Relative hypometabolic brain areas detected are mainly in the cortical structures such as bilateral prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus(BA22), parietal cortex (inferior parietal lobule and precuneus(BA40, insula(BA13)), parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala (p<0.01).It is especially apparent in the prefrontal cortex (BA9)and sensory-motor cortex(BA5, 7) (p<0.001), while basal ganglia and cerebellum remained metabolically unchanged with advancing age. Conclusions Regional cerebral metabolism of glucose shows a descent tendency with aging, especially in the prefrontal cortex (BA9)and

  20. Synergism between thrombin and adrenaline (epinephrine) in human platelets. Marked potentiation of inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, V M; Tysnes, O B; Holmsen, H

    1988-01-01

    We have studied synergism between adrenaline (epinephrine) and low concentrations of thrombin in gel-filtered human platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Suspensions of platelets, which did not contain added fibrinogen, were incubated at 37 degrees C to measure changes in the levels of 32P-labelled phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidate (PA), aggregation and dense-granule secretion after stimulation. Adrenaline alone (3.5-4.0 microM) did not cause a change in any parameter (phosphoinositide metabolism, aggregation and dense-granule secretion), but markedly enhanced the thrombin-induced responses over a narrow range of thrombin concentrations (0.03-0.08 units/ml). The thrombin-induced hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids by phospholipase C, which was measured as the formation of [32P]PA, was potentiated by adrenaline, as was the increase in the levels of [32P]PIP2 and [32P]PIP. The presence of adrenaline caused a shift to the left for the thrombin-induced changes in the phosphoinositide metabolism, without affecting the maximal levels of 32P-labelled compounds obtained. A similar shift by adrenaline in the dose-response relationship was previously demonstrated for thrombin-induced aggregation and dense-granule secretion. Also, the narrow range of concentrations of thrombin over which adrenaline potentiates thrombin-induced platelet responses is the same for changes in phosphoinositide metabolism and physiological responses (aggregation and dense-granule secretion). Our observations clearly indicate that adrenaline directly or indirectly influences thrombin-induced changes in phosphoinositide metabolism. PMID:2845924

  1. Environmental oxygen tension regulates the energy metabolism and self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forristal, Catherine E; Christensen, David R; Chinnery, Fay E; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Parry, Kate L; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman; Houghton, Franchesca D

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism is intrinsic to cell viability but surprisingly has been little studied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The current study aims to investigate the effect of environmental O2 tension on carbohydrate utilisation of hESCs. Highly pluripotent hESCs cultured at 5% O2 consumed significantly more glucose, less pyruvate and produced more lactate compared to those maintained at 20% O2. Moreover, hESCs cultured at atmospheric O2 levels expressed significantly less OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG than those maintained at 5% O2. To determine whether this difference in metabolism was a reflection of the pluripotent state, hESCs were cultured at 5% O2 in the absence of FGF2 for 16 hours leading to a significant reduction in the expression of SOX2. In addition, these cells consumed less glucose and produced significantly less lactate compared to those cultured in the presence of FGF2. hESCs maintained at 5% O2 were found to consume significantly less O2 than those cultured in the absence of FGF2, or at 20% O2. GLUT1 expression correlated with glucose consumption and using siRNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation was found to be directly regulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α at 5% O2. In conclusion, highly pluripotent cells associated with hypoxic culture consume low levels of O2, high levels of glucose and produce large amounts of lactate, while at atmospheric conditions glucose consumption and lactate production are reduced and there is an increase in oxidative metabolism. These data suggest that environmental O2 regulates energy metabolism and is intrinsic to the self-renewal of hESCs.

  2. Metabolism of 1,2-dibromoethane in the human fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A P; Edwards, J; Richards, I S

    1992-01-01

    1. Toxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane requires bioactivation via glutathione S-transferase. Since this enzyme is undetectable in the fetus of several laboratory animal species during early gestation, in vitro studies were carried out with human fetal liver to assess potential fetotoxicity. 2. Glutathione S-transferase occurs abundantly in the human fetal liver cytosol and its titer is equal to or exceeds that found in adult human liver when estimated using 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene as the second substrate. 3. Human fetal liver cytosolic glutathione S-transferase metabolized 1,2-dibromoethane with a high efficiency (mean +/- SD specific activity of 3.10 +/- 0.83 nmol/min/mg protein). This reaction was enzymatic in nature and the rate of conjugation was proportional to the concentration of reduced glutathione, 1,2-dibromoethane and the enzyme present in the reaction medium. 4. A significant bioactivation with a possibility of only limited detoxication via cytochrome P-450-dependent oxidation suggests that human fetus may be at greater risk from 1,2-dibromoethane toxicity than adult.

  3. Modulation of trichloroethylene in vitro metabolism by different drugs in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Rouhou, Mouna; Haddad, Sami

    2014-08-01

    Toxicological interactions with drugs have the potential to modulate the toxicity of trichloroethylene (TCE). Our objective is to identify metabolic interactions between TCE and 14 widely used drugs in human suspended hepatocytes and characterize the strongest using microsomal assays. Changes in concentrations of TCE and its metabolites were measured by headspace GC-MS. Results with hepatocytes show that amoxicillin, cimetidine, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and ranitidine caused no significant interactions. Naproxen and salicylic acid showed to increase both TCE metabolites levels, whereas acetaminophen, carbamazepine and erythromycin rather decreased them. Finally, diclofenac, gliclazide, sulphasalazine and valproic acid had an impact on the levels of only one metabolite. Among the 14 tested drugs, 5 presented the most potent interactions and were selected for confirmation with microsomes, namely naproxen, salicylic acid, acetaminophen, carbamazepine and valproic acid. Characterization in human microsomes confirmed interaction with naproxen by competitively inhibiting trichloroethanol (TCOH) glucuronidation (Ki=2.329 mM). Inhibition of TCOH formation was also confirmed for carbamazepine (partial non-competitive with Ki=70 μM). Interactions with human microsomes were not observed with salicylic acid and acetaminophen, similar to prior results in rat material. For valproic acid, interactions with microsomes were observed in rat but not in human. Inhibition patterns were shown to be similar in human and rat hepatocytes, but some differences in mechanisms were noted in microsomal material between species. Next research efforts will focus on determining the adequacy between in vitro observations and the in vivo situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux.

  5. Gene expression of 17beta-estradiol-metabolizing isozymes: comparison of normal human mammary gland to normal human liver and to cultured human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Leane; Wagner, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic activation of 17beta-estradiol (E2) to catechols and quinones together with lack of deactivation constitute risk factors in human breast carcinogenesis. E2-catchols are generated by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYPs). Deactivation of E2, E2-catechols, and E2-quinones is mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), sulfotransferase (SULT), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (QR) isozymes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to quantify mRNA levels of E2-metabolizing isozymes expressed in MCF-7 cells cultured in the presence/absence of steroids by reverse transcription/competitive PCR in relation to the housekeeping gene hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and compare them with expression levels in normal human mammary gland (MG) and liver tissue. CYP1A1, 1B1, SULT1A1, 1A2, membrane-bound and soluble COMT, GSTT1, QR1, and UGT2B7 were detected in both tissues and MCF-7 cells; however, most enzymes were expressed at least tenfold higher in liver. Yet, CYP1B1 was expressed as high in breast as in liver and UGTs were not detected in MCF-7 cells cultured with steroids. MCF-7 cells cultured steroid-free additionally expressed CYP1A2 as well as UGT1A4, 1A8, and 1A9. Normal human liver but not MG expressed CYP1A2, 3A4, UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A9, and SULT2A1. UGT1A8 was only detected in MCF7 cells but was not found in human liver. Thus, our study provides a comprehensive overview of expression levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes in a popular in vitro model and in human tissues, which will contribute to the interpretation of in vitro studies concerning the activation/deactivation of E2.

  6. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases. PMID:21318173

  7. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  8. Species differences between mouse, rat, dog, monkey and human CYP-mediated drug metabolism, inhibition and induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martignoni, Marcella; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; de Kanter, Ruben

    2006-01-01

    Animal models are commonly used in the preclinical development of new drugs to predict the metabolic behaviour of new compounds in humans. It is, however, important to realise that humans differ from animals with regards to isoform composition, expression and catalytic activities of

  9. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  10. Portuguese propolis disturbs glycolytic metabolism of human colorectal cancer in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis is a resin collected by bees from plant buds and exudates, which is further processed through the activity of bee enzymes. Propolis has been shown to possess many biological and pharmacological properties, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunostimulant and antitumor activities. Due to this bioactivity profile, this resin can become an alternative, economic and safe source of natural bioactive compounds. Antitumor action has been reported in vitro and in vivo for propolis extracts or its isolated compounds; however, Portuguese propolis has been little explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro antitumor activity of Portuguese propolis on the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15, assessing the effect of different fractions (hexane, chloroform and ethanol residual) of a propolis ethanol extract on cell viability, proliferation, metabolism and death. Methods Propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) was extracted with ethanol and sequentially fractionated in solvents with increasing polarity, n-hexane and chloroform. To assess cell viability, cell proliferation and cell death, Sulforhodamine B, BrDU incorporation assay and Anexin V/Propidium iodide were used, respectively. Glycolytic metabolism was estimated using specific kits. Results All propolis samples exhibited a cytotoxic effect against tumor cells, in a dose- and time-dependent way. Chloroform fraction, the most enriched in phenolic compounds, appears to be the most active, both in terms of inhibition of viability and cell death. Data also show that this cytotoxicity involves disturbance in tumor cell glycolytic metabolism, seen by a decrease in glucose consumption and lactate production. Conclusion Our results show that Portuguese propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) can be a potential therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer. PMID:23870175

  11. Rapamycin inhibits human laryngotracheal stenosis-derived fibroblast proliferation, metabolism, and function in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Daryan R; Ma, Garret; Samad, Idris; Ding, Dacheng; Pandian, Vinciya; Powell, Jonathan D; Horton, Maureen R; Hillel, Alexander T

    2015-05-01

    To determine if rapamycin inhibits the growth, function, and metabolism of human laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS)-derived fibroblasts. Controlled in vitro study. Tertiary care hospital in a research university. Fibroblasts isolated from biopsies of 5 patients with laryngotracheal stenosis were cultured. Cell proliferation, histology, gene expression, and cellular metabolism of LTS-derived fibroblasts were assessed in 4 conditions: (1) fibroblast growth medium, (2) fibroblast growth medium with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), (3) fibroblast growth medium with 10(-10) M (low-dose) rapamycin dissolved in DMSO, and (4) fibroblast growth medium with 10(-9) M (high-dose) rapamycin dissolved in DMSO. The LTS fibroblast count and DNA concentration were reduced after treatment with high-dose rapamycin compared to DMSO (P = .0007) and normal (P = .0007) controls. Collagen I expression decreased after treatment with high-dose rapamycin versus control (P = .0051) and DMSO (P = .0093) controls. Maximal respiration decreased to 68.6 pMoles of oxygen/min/10 mg/protein from 96.9 for DMSO (P = .0002) and 97.0 for normal (P = .0022) controls. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production decreased to 66.8 pMoles from 88.1 for DMSO (P = .0006) and 83.3 for normal (P = .0003) controls. Basal respiration decreased to 78.6 pMoles from 108 for DMSO (P = .0002) and 101 for normal (P = .0014) controls. Rapamycin demonstrated an anti-fibroblast effect by significantly reducing the proliferation, metabolism, and collagen deposition of human LTS fibroblast in vitro. Rapamycin significantly decreased oxidative phosphorylation of LTS fibroblasts, suggesting at a potential mechanism for the reduced proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, rapamycin's anti-fibroblast effects indicate a promising adjuvant therapy for the treatment of laryngotracheal stenosis. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  12. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  13. Dataset of the human homologues and orthologues of lipid-metabolic genes identified as DAF-16 targets their roles in lipid and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavender Yuen-Nam Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the review article entitled ‘Unravelling the role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer through the FOXO3-FOXM1 axis’ (Saavedra-Garcia et al., 2017 [24]. Here, we have matched the DAF-16/FOXO3 downstream genes with their respective human orthologues and reviewed the roles of these targeted genes in FA metabolism. The list of genes listed in this article are precisely selected from literature reviews based on their functions in mammalian FA metabolism. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans gene orthologues of the genes are obtained from WormBase, the online biological database of C. elegans. This dataset has not been uploaded to a public repository yet.

  14. Metabolism and transfer of the mycotoxin zearalenone in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmann, Bernadette; Mazallon, Michelle; Tep, Jonathan; Lecoeur, Sylvaine

    2008-10-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is found worldwide as contaminant in cereals and grains. It is implicated in reproductive disorders and hyperestrogenic syndromes in animals and humans exposed by food. We investigated metabolism and transfer of ZEA using the human Caco-2 cell line as a model of intestinal epithelial barrier. Cells exposed to 10-200 microM ZEA showed efficacious metabolism of the toxin. alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol were the measured preponderant metabolites (respectively 40.7+/-3.1% and 31.9+/-4.9% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA), whereas ZEA-glucuronide and alpha-zearalenol glucuronide were less produced (respectively 8.2+/-0.9% and 19.1+/-1.3% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA). Cell production of reduced metabolites was strongly inhibited by alpha-and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors, and Caco-2 cells exhibited alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I mRNA. After cell apical exposure to ZEA, alpha-zearalenol was preponderantly found at the basal side, whereas beta-zearalenol and both glucuronides were preferentially excreted at the apical side. As alpha-zearalenol shows the strongest estrogenic activity, the preferential production and basal transfer of this metabolite suggests that intestinal cells may contribute to the manifestation of zearalenone adverse effects.

  15. Genetic interplay between human longevity and metabolic pathways - a large-scale eQTL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, Robert; Venkatesh, Geetha; Tan, Qihua; Flachsbart, Friederike; Sinha, Anupam; Rosenstiel, Philip; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schreiber, Stefan; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene; Nebel, Almut

    2017-08-01

    Human longevity is a complex phenotype influenced by genetic and environmental components. Unraveling the contribution of genetic vs. nongenetic factors to longevity is a challenging task. Here, we conducted a large-scale RNA-sequencing-based expression quantitative trait loci study (eQTL) with subsequent heritability analysis. The investigation was performed on blood samples from 244 individuals from Germany and Denmark, representing various age groups including long-lived subjects up to the age of 104 years. Our eQTL-based approach revealed for the first time that human longevity is associated with a depletion of metabolic pathways in a genotype-dependent and independent manner. Further analyses indicated that 20% of the differentially expressed genes are influenced by genetic variants in cis. The subsequent study of twins showed that the transcriptional activity of a third of the differentially regulated genes is heritable. These findings suggest that longevity-associated biological processes such as altered metabolism are, to a certain extent, also the driving force of longevity rather than just a consequence of old age. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Systems biosynthesis of secondary metabolic pathways within the oral human microbiome member Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvanych, Rostyslav; Lukenda, Nikola; Li, Xiang; Kim, Janice J; Tharmarajah, Satheeisha; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive human commensal and pathogen, is commonly recognized as a primary causative agent in dental caries. Metabolic activity of this strain results in the creation of acids and secreted products are recognized as pathogenic factors and agents that promote immunomodulation by stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Products of secondary metabolic pathways of microorganisms from the human microbiome are increasingly investigated for their immunomodulatory functions. In this study, we sought to explore the metabolomic output of nonribosomal peptide pathways within the model S. mutans strain, S. mutans UA159, using a systems metabolomic approach to gain in-depth analysis on products created by this organism and probe these molecules for their immunomodulatory function. Comparative metabolomics and biosynthetic studies using wild-type and nonribosomal peptide deletion strains (within the mutanobactin biosynthetic locus), precursor feedings (fatty acid derivatives) led to the identification of 58 metabolites, 13 of which were structurally elucidated. In addition to these, an assembly line derailment product, mutanamide, was also identified and used to assess immunomodulatory properties of mutanobactins and actions relating to their previously reported functions describing hyphal inhibitory profiles in Candida albicans. The results of this study demonstrate both the complexity and the divergent roles of products stemming from this unique biosynthetic assembly line.

  17. Metabolic characteristics of Tanshinone I in human liver microsomes and S9 subcellular fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Fan, Yujuan; Su, Huizong; Wang, Qian; Li, Guo-Fu; Hu, Yiyang; Jiang, Jian; Tan, Bo; Qiu, Furong

    2018-02-05

    Tanshinone I (TSI) is a lipophilic diterpene in Salvia miltiorrhiza with versatile pharmacological activities. However, metabolic pathway of TSI in human is unknown. In this study, we determined major metabolites of TSI using a preparation of human liver microsomes (HLMs) by HPLC-UV and Q-Trap mass spectrometer. A total of 6 metabolites were detected, which indicated the presence of hydroxylation, reduction as well as glucuronidation. Selective chemical inhibition and purified cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoform screening experiments revealed that CYP2A6 was primarily responsible for TSI Phase I metabolism. Part of generated hydroxylated TSI was glucuronidated via several glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms including UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, as well as extrahepatic expressed isoforms UGT1A8 and UGT1A10. TSI could be reduced to a relatively unstable hydroquinone intermediate by NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and then immediately conjugated with glucuronic acid by a panel of UGTs, especially UGT1A9, UGT1A1 and UGT1A8. Additionally, NQO1 could also reduce hydroxylated TSI to a hydroquinone intermediate, which was immediately glucuronidated by UGT1A1. The study demonstrated that hydroxylation, reduction as well as glucuronidation were the major pathways for TSI biotransformation, and six metabolites generated by CYPs, NQO1 and UGTs were found in HLMs and S9 subcellular fractions.

  18. Ablation of steroid receptor coactivator-3 resembles the human CACT metabolic myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Brian; Reineke, Erin L; Sagen, Jørn V; Nikolai, Bryan C; Zhou, Suoling; Louet, Jean-Francois; Chopra, Atul R; Chen, Xian; Reed, Graham; Noebels, Jeffrey; Adesina, Adekunle M; Yu, Hui; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Stevens, Robert D; Wenner, Brett R; Ilkayeva, Olga; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B; O'Malley, Bert W

    2012-05-02

    Oxidation of lipid substrates is essential for survival in fasting and other catabolic conditions, sparing glucose for the brain and other glucose-dependent tissues. Here we show Steroid Receptor Coactivator-3 (SRC-3) plays a central role in long chain fatty acid metabolism by directly regulating carnitine/acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT) gene expression. Genetic deficiency of CACT in humans is accompanied by a constellation of metabolic and toxicity phenotypes including hypoketonemia, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and impaired neurologic, cardiac and skeletal muscle performance, each of which is apparent in mice lacking SRC-3 expression. Consistent with human cases of CACT deficiency, dietary rescue with short chain fatty acids drastically attenuates the clinical hallmarks of the disease in mice devoid of SRC-3. Collectively, our results position SRC-3 as a key regulator of β-oxidation. Moreover, these findings allow us to consider platform coactivators such as the SRCs as potential contributors to syndromes such as CACT deficiency, previously considered as monogenic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypoxia and the Presence of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Affect Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ackerstaff

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and metastasis are influenced by hypoxia, as well as by interactions between cancer cells and components of the stroma, such as endothelial cells. Here, we have used a magnetic resonance (MRcompatible invasion assay to further understand the effects of hypoxia on human prostate cancer cell invasion and metabolism in the presence and absence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Additionally, we compared endogenous activities of selected proteases related to invasion in PC-3 cells and HUVECs, profiled gene expression of PC-3 cells by microarray, evaluated cell proliferation of PC-3 cells and HUVECs by flow cytometry, under hypoxic and oxygenated conditions. The invasion of less-invasive DU-145 cells was not affected by either hypoxia or the presence of HUVECs. However, hypoxia significantly decreased the invasion of PC-3 cells. This hypoxia-induced decrease was attenuated by the presence of HUVECs, whereas under oxygenated conditions, HUVECs did not alter the invasion of PC-3 cells. Cell metabolism changed distinctly with hypoxia and invasion. The endogenous activity of selected extracellular proteases, although altered by hypoxia, did not fully explain the hypoxia-induced changes in invasion. Gene expression profiling indicated that hypoxia affects multiple cellular functions and pathways.

  20. Influence of a Gas Exchange Correction Procedure on Resting Metabolic Rate and Respiratory Quotient in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Jose E; Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of a gas exchange correction protocol on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and respiratory quotient (RQ), assessed by a Vmax Encore 29n metabolic cart (SensorMedics Co., Yorba Linda, California) in overnight fasted and fed humans, and to assess the predictive power of body size for corrected and uncorrected RMR. Healthy participants (23 M/29 F; 34 ± 9 years old; 26.3 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) ingested two 3-hour-apart glucose loads (75 g). Indirect calorimetry was conducted before and hourly over a 6-hour period. Immediately after indirect calorimetry assessment, gas exchange was simulated through high-precision mass-flow regulators, which permitted the correction of RMR and RQ values. Uncorrected and corrected RMR and RQ were directly related at each time over the 6-hour period. However, uncorrected versus corrected RMR was 6.9% ± 0.5% higher (128 ± 7 kcal/d; P exchange in humans over a 6-hour period is feasible and provides information of improved accuracy. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  1. Metabolism of vitamin D(3) by human CYP27A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, N; Sakaki, T; Ohta, M; Inouye, K

    2000-07-14

    Human vitamin D(3) 25-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and its enzymatic properties were revealed. The reconstituted system containing the membrane fraction prepared from the recombinant E. coli cells was examined for the metabolism of vitamin D(3). Surprisingly, at least eight forms of metabolites including the major product 25(OH)D(3) were observed. HPLC analysis and mass spectrometric analysis suggested that those metabolites were 25(OH)D(3), 26(OH)D(3), 27(OH)D(3), 24R,25(OH)(2)D(3), 1alpha, 25(OH)(2)D(3, )25,26(OH)(2)D(3) (25,27(OH)(2)D(3)), 27-oxo-D(3) and a dehydrogenated form of vitamin D(3). These results suggest that human CYP27A1 catalyzes multiple reactions and multiple-step metabolism toward vitamin D(3). The K(m) and V(max) values for vitamin D(3) 25-hydroxylation and 25(OH)D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylation were estimated to be 3.2 microM and 0.27 (mol/min/mol P450), and 3.5 microM and 0.021 (mol/min/mol P450), respectively. These kinetic studies have made it possible to evaluate a physiological meaning of each reaction catalyzed by CYP27A1. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Mechanistic studies of the metabolic chiral inversion of (R)-ibuprofen in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillie, T.A.; Adams, W.J.; Kaiser, D.G.; Olanoff, L.S.; Halstead, G.W.; Harpootlian, H.; Van Giessen, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic chiral inversion of R-(-)-ibuprofen has been studied in human subjects by means of specific deuterium labeling and stereoselective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology. After simultaneous p.o. administration of a mixture of R-(-)-ibuprofen (300 mg) and R-(-)-[3,3,3-2H3]ibuprofen (304 mg) to four adult male volunteers, the enantiomeric composition and deuterium content of the drug in serum, and of the drug and its principal metabolites in urine, were followed over a period of 24 hr. The results of these analyses indicated that: (1) conversion of R-(-)- to S-(+)-ibuprofen takes place with complete retention of deuterium at the beta-methyl (C-3) position; (2) chiral inversion of R-(-)-[2H3]ibuprofen is not subject to a discernible deuterium isotope effect; and (3) replacement of the beta-methyl hydrogen atoms by deuterium has no effect on any of the serum pharmacokinetic parameters for R-(-)- or S-(+)-ibuprofen. These data indicate that the process whereby R-(-)-ibuprofen undergoes metabolic inversion in human subjects does not involve 2,3-dehydroibuprofen as an intermediate, and that the underlying mechanism cannot, therefore, entail a desaturation/reduction sequence

  3. In silico analysis of human metabolism: Reconstruction, contextualization and application of genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Jun; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The arising prevalence of metabolic diseases calls for a holistic approach for analysis of the underlying nature of abnormalities in cellular functions. Through mathematic representation and topological analysis of cellular metabolism, GEnome scale metabolic Models (GEMs) provide a promising fram...

  4. Identification of Discriminating Metabolic Pathways and Metabolites in Human PBMCs Stimulated by Various Pathogenic Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xiang; Mardinoglu, Adil; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Li, Yang; Netea, Mihai G.; Groen, Albert K.

    2018-01-01

    Immunity and cellular metabolism are tightly interconnected but it is not clear whether different pathogens elicit specific metabolic responses. To address this issue, we studied differential metabolic regulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy volunteers challenged by

  5. Editor's Highlight: Variation in Methylmercury Metabolism and Elimination Status in Humans Following Fish Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel W; Jackson, Brian P; Punshon, Tracy; Scrimale, Thomas; Grier, Alex; Gill, Steven R; Love, Tanzy M; Watson, Gene E; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Rand, Matthew D

    2018-02-01

    Evaluating the potential for methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity relies on accurately predicting the mercury (Hg) body burden that results from eating fish. Hg body burden is directly determined by the slow elimination kinetics of MeHg in the human body (kel = 0.014 days-1 or t1/2 =50 days). Existing studies on MeHg half-life in humans demonstrate a wide range values (t1/2 = 30 to >150 days) and has lead to uncertainty in the derivation of a regulatory standard for acceptable daily oral intake. The causes of variation in MeHg toxicokinetics in humans remain little explored. Here we characterize variation in human MeHg metabolism and elimination rate (kel) in 37 adult volunteers who consumed 3 fish meals. We determined MeHg elimination rates via longitudinal Hg analysis in single hairs using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We also measured MeHg metabolism (biotransformation) via speciation of fecal Hg. We find an average kel = 0.0157 days-1 (t1/2 = 44 days) amongst a more than 2-fold variation in kel across the cohort (0.0248-0.0112 days-1; t1/2 = 28-62 days). Although MeHg biotransformation varied widely between individuals, it showed a positive association with elimination rates across the cohort. A more than 2-fold change in kel over a period of 2 years was seen in some individuals. In 2 individuals, who received antibiotic for unrelated health issues, elimination rate was seen to slow significantly. Associations of kel with age, body mass index, gender, and fish eating habits were not observed. We establish that a measure of methylmercury metabolism and eliminaiton status (MerMES) can reduce uncertainty in determining an individual's MeHg toxicokinetics subsequent to eating fish. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of clothianidin in human lymphocytes with or without metabolic activation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlı Şekeroğlu, Zülal; Şekeroğlu, Vedat; Uçgun, Ebru; Kontaş Yedier, Seval; Aydın, Birsen

    2018-02-26

    Clothianidin (CHN) is a broad-spectrum neonicotinoid insecticide. Limited studies have been carried out on the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of both CHN using different genotoxicity tests in human cells with or without human metabolic activation system (S9 mix). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of CHN and its metabolites on human lymphocyte cultures with or without S9 mix using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests. The cultures were treated with 25, 50, and 100 µg/ml of CHN in the presence (3 h treatment) and absence (48 h treatment) of S9 mix. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a solvent control. CHN showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects due to significant decreases in mitotic index (MI) and nuclear division index (NDI), and significant increases in the CAs, aberrant cells, and MN formation in the absence of S9 mix when compared with solvent control. However, CHN did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the presence of S9 mix. Our results indicated that CHN has cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic potential on human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures, but not its metabolites under the experimental conditions.

  7. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) induces apoptosis and alters metabolic enzyme activity in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Abby C.; Helliwell, Rachel J.A.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Paxton, James W.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Tingle, Malcolm D.

    2003-01-01

    The anti-HIV drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the drug of choice for preventing maternal-fetal HIV transmission during pregnancy. Our aim was to assess the cytotoxic effects of AZT on human placenta in vitro. The mechanisms of AZT-induced effects were investigated using JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and primary explant cultures from term and first-trimester human placentas. Cytotoxicity measures included trypan blue exclusion, MTT, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Apoptosis was measured with an antibody specific to cleaved caspase-3 and by rescue of cells by the general caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK. The effect of AZT on the activities of glutathione-S-transferase, β-glucuronidase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, and CYP reductase (CYPR) in the placenta was assessed using biochemical assays and immunoblotting. AZT increased ROS levels, decreased cellular proliferation rates, was toxic to mitochondria, and initiated cell death by a caspase-dependent mechanism in the human placenta in vitro. In the absence of serum, the effects of AZT were amplified in all the models used. AZT also increased the amounts of activity of GST, β-glucuronidase, and CYP1A, whereas UGT and CYPR were decreased. We conclude that AZT causes apoptosis in the placenta and alters metabolizing enzymes in human placental cells. These findings have implications for the safe administration of AZT in pregnancy with respect to the maintenance of integrity of the maternal-fetal barrier

  8. Inorganic tin compounds do not induce micronuclei in human lymphocytes in the absence of metabolic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damati, Artemis; Vlastos, Dimitris; Philippopoulos, Athanassios I; Matthopoulos, Demetrios P

    2014-04-01

    The genotoxic evaluation (in vitro analysis) of a series of eight inorganic tin(II) and tin(IV) compounds [tin(II) acetate, tin(II) chloride, tin(II) ethylhexanoate, tin(II) oxalate, tin(II) oxide, tin(IV) acetate, tin(IV) chloride and tin(IV) oxide], for the detection of micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes, was performed in the absence of metabolic activation by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Human lymphocytes were treated for over one cell cycle (31 hours), with concentrations ranging from 1 to 75 μM (1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 75 μM), of tin(II) and tin(IV) salts dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. The above-listed concentrations cover the values that have been detected in humans with no occupational exposure to tin compounds. The experimental results show the absence of genotoxicity for all inorganic compounds tested in the specific concentrations and experimental conditions. Cytotoxic effects of tin(II) and tin(IV) compounds were evaluated by the determination of cytokinesis block proliferation index and cytotoxicity percentage. Our observations on the cytotoxicity pattern of the tested tin(II) and tin(IV) compounds indicate that they are cytotoxic in several tested concentrations to human lymphocytes treated in vitro. The observed differences in cytotoxicity of each tested compound might reflect differences in their chemical structure.

  9. Metabolism of 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid by the human platelet. Formation of novel thromboxane analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazy, M

    1991-12-15

    Radiolabeled cis-(+-)-5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (5(6)-EpETrE) was incubated with a suspension of isolated human platelets in order to study its metabolic fate. The epoxide slowly disappeared from the suspension and was completely metabolized within 30 min. After extraction and analysis by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography, seven metabolites were found. Addition of either indomethacin (0.01 mM, cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or BW755C (0.1 mM, cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor) to the incubations blocked the formation of four and six metabolites, respectively, 1,2-Epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (inhibitor of microsomal epoxide hydrolase) failed to inhibit the formation of 5,6-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (5,6-DiHETrE), a hydrolysis product of the precursor 5(6)-EpETrE. The metabolites were characterized by UV spectroscopy, negative ion chemical ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and, in one instance, coelution with synthetic standard. Three primary platelet metabolites were structurally determined to be 5,6-epoxy-12-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, 5,6-epoxy-12-hydroxyheptadecadienoic acid, and a unique bicyclic metabolite, 5-hydroxy-6,9-epoxy-thromboxane B1, which originated from intramolecular hydrolysis of 5,6-epoxythromboxane-B1. This thromboxane analog was partially separated into stereoisomers and coeluted with the racemic synthetic standard in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Three other metabolites were characterized as 5,6,12-trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, 5,6,12-trihydroxyheptadecadienoic acid, and 5,6-dihydroxythromboxane-B1, and resulted from the hydrolysis of the corresponding epoxides rather than from the metabolism of 5,6-DiHETrE. The latter was not metabolized by platelet cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase. The biosynthesis of two cyclooxygenase metabolites indicated the formation of unstable 5,6-epoxythromboxane-A1 as an intermediate

  10. Metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klette, K L; Anderson, C J; Poch, G K; Nimrod, A C; ElSohly, M A

    2000-10-01

    The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) was investigated in liver microsomes and cyropreserved hepatocytes from humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that O-H-LSD is present in human urine at concentrations 16-43 times greater than LSD, the parent compound. Additionally, these studies have determined that O-H-LSD is not generated during the specimen extraction and analytical processes or due to parent compound degradation in aqueous urine samples. However, these studies have not been conclusive in demonstrating that O-H-LSD is uniquely produced during in vivo metabolism. Phase I drug metabolism was investigated by incubating human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes with LSD. The reaction was quenched at various time points, and the aliquots were extracted using liquid partitioning and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. O-H-LSD was positively identified in all human liver microsomal and human hepatocyte fractions incubated with LSD. In addition, O-H-LSD was not detected in any microsomal or hepatocyte fraction not treated with LSD nor in LSD specimens devoid of microsomes or hepatocytes. This study provides definitive evidence that O-H-LSD is produced as a metabolic product following incubation of human liver microsomes and hepatocytes with LSD.

  11. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  12. Vitamin A metabolism in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, T.C.; Ong, D.E. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, described as enterocyte-like in a number of studies, was examined for its ability to carry out the metabolism of vitamin A normally required in the absorptive process. Caco-2 cells contained cellular retinol-binding protein II, a protein which is abundant in human villus-associated enterocytes and may play an important role in the absorption of vitamin A. Microsomal preparations from Caco-2 cells contained retinal reductase, acyl-CoA-retinol acyltransferase (ARAT), and lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) activites, which have previously been proposed to be involved in the metabolism of dietary vitamin A in the enterocyte. When intact Caco-2 cells were provided with {beta}-carotene, retinyl acetate, or retinyl acetate, or retinol, synthesis of retinyl palmitoleate, oleate, palmitate, and small amounts of stearate resulted. However, exogenous retinyl palmitate or stearate was not used by Caco-2 cells as a source of retinol for ester synthesis. While there was a disproportionate synthesis of monoenoic fatty acid esters of retinol in Caco-2 cells compared to the retinyl esters typically found in human chylomicrons or the esters normally synthesized in rat intestine, the pattern was consistent with the substantial amount of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly 18:1 and 16:1, found in the sn-1 position of Caco-2 microsomal phosphatidylcholine, the fatty acyl donor for LRAT. Both ARAT and LRAT have been proposed to be responsible for retinyl ester synthesis in the enterocyte. These data suggest the LRAT may be the physiologically important enzyme for the esterification of retinol in Caco-2 cells.

  13. Calorie restriction-like effects of 30 days of resveratrol supplementation on energy metabolism and metabolic profile in obese humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Silvie; Konings, Ellen; Bilet, Lena; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; van de Weijer, Tineke; Goossens, Gijs H.; Hoeks, Joris; van der Krieken, Sophie; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kersten, Sander; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Kunz, Iris; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Blaak, Ellen E.; Auwerx, Johan; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind

  14. Calorie restriction-like effects of 30 days of resveratrol supplementation on energy metabolism and metabolic profile in obese humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Silvie; Konings, Ellen; Bilet, Lena; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Weijer, van de Tineke; Hoeks, Joris; Krieken, van der Sophie; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kersten, Sander; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; Goossens, Gijs H.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.; Kunz, Iris; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Blaak, Ellen E.; Auwerx, Johan; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound that profoundly affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here we treated 10 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol in a randomized

  15. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind

  16. Diversity of the cultivable human gut microbiome involved in gluten metabolism: isolation of microorganisms with potential interest for coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Herrán, Alexandra R; Nistal, Esther; Pérez-Andrés, Jenifer; Vaquero, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José María G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Gluten, a common component in the human diet, is capable of triggering coeliac disease pathogenesis in genetically predisposed individuals. Although the function of human digestive proteases in gluten proteins is quite well known, the role of intestinal microbiota in the metabolism of proteins is frequently underestimated. The aim of this study was the isolation and characterisation of the human gut bacteria involved in the metabolism of gluten proteins. Twenty-two human faecal samples were cultured with gluten as the principal nitrogen source, and 144 strains belonging to 35 bacterial species that may be involved in gluten metabolism in the human gut were isolated. Interestingly, 94 strains were able to metabolise gluten, 61 strains showed an extracellular proteolytic activity against gluten proteins, and several strains showed a peptidasic activity towards the 33-mer peptide, an immunogenic peptide in patients with coeliac disease. Most of the strains were classified within the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, mainly from the genera Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium and Bifidobacterium. In conclusion, the human intestine exhibits a large variety of bacteria capable of utilising gluten proteins and peptides as nutrients. These bacteria could have an important role in gluten metabolism and could offer promising new treatment modalities for coeliac disease. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polysaccharides utilization in human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: comparative genomics reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Godzik, Adam; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-12-12

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the human gut microbiota, is characterized by its ability to utilize a wide variety of polysaccharides using the extensive saccharolytic machinery that is controlled by an expanded repertoire of transcription factors (TFs). The availability of genomic sequences for multiple Bacteroides species opens an opportunity for their comparative analysis to enable characterization of their metabolic and regulatory networks. A comparative genomics approach was applied for the reconstruction and functional annotation of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Bacteroides genomes. Bioinformatics analysis of promoter regions revealed putative DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 31 orthologous TFs in the Bacteroides. Among the analyzed TFs there are 4 SusR-like regulators, 16 AraC-like hybrid two-component systems (HTCSs), and 11 regulators from other families. Novel DNA motifs of HTCSs and SusR-like regulators in the Bacteroides have the common structure of direct repeats with a long spacer between two conserved sites. The inferred regulatory network in B. thetaiotaomicron contains 308 genes encoding polysaccharide and sugar catabolic enzymes, carbohydrate-binding and transport systems, and TFs. The analyzed TFs control pathways for utilization of host and dietary glycans to monosaccharides and their further interconversions to intermediates of the central metabolism. The reconstructed regulatory network allowed us to suggest and refine specific functional assignments for sugar catabolic enzymes and transporters, providing a substantial improvement to the existing metabolic models for B. thetaiotaomicron. The obtained collection of reconstructed TF regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov).

  18. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  19. The human longevity gene homolog INDY and interleukin-6 interact in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Loeffelholz, Christian; Lieske, Stefanie; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Willmes, Diana M; Raschzok, Nathanael; Sauer, Igor M; König, Jörg; Fromm, Martin F; Horn, Paul; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Jordan, Jens; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bornstein, Stefan R; Stroehle, Peter; Harms, Christoph; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Helfand, Stephen L; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael; Shulman, Gerald I; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Püschel, Gerhard P; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2017-08-01

    Reduced expression of the Indy ("I am Not Dead, Yet") gene in lower organisms promotes longevity in a manner akin to caloric restriction. Deletion of the mammalian homolog of Indy (mIndy, Slc13a5) encoding for a plasma membrane-associated citrate transporter expressed highly in the liver, protects mice from high-fat diet-induced and aging-induced obesity and hepatic fat accumulation through a mechanism resembling caloric restriction. We studied a possible role of mIndy in human hepatic fat metabolism. In obese, insulin-resistant patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatic mIndy expression was increased and mIndy expression was also independently associated with hepatic steatosis. In nonhuman primates, a 2-year high-fat, high-sucrose diet increased hepatic mIndy expression. Liver microarray analysis showed that high mIndy expression was associated with pathways involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and immunological processes. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was identified as a regulator of mIndy by binding to its cognate receptor. Studies in human primary hepatocytes confirmed that IL-6 markedly induced mIndy transcription through the IL-6 receptor and activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and a putative start site of the human mIndy promoter was determined. Activation of the IL-6-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway stimulated mIndy expression, enhanced cytoplasmic citrate influx, and augmented hepatic lipogenesis in vivo. In contrast, deletion of mIndy completely prevented the stimulating effect of IL-6 on citrate uptake and reduced hepatic lipogenesis. These data show that mIndy is increased in liver of obese humans and nonhuman primates with NALFD. Moreover, our data identify mIndy as a target gene of IL-6 and determine novel functions of IL-6 through mINDY. Targeting human mINDY may have therapeutic potential in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. German Clinical

  20. Bofu-tsu-shosan, an oriental herbal medicine, exerts a combinatorial favorable metabolic modulation including antihypertensive effect on a mouse model of human metabolic disorders with visceral obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Azushima

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that metabolic dysfunction with visceral obesity is a major medical problem associated with the development of hypertension, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and dyslipidemia, and ultimately severe cardiovascular and renal disease. Therefore, an effective anti-obesity treatment with a concomitant improvement in metabolic profile is important for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction with visceral obesity. Bofu-tsu-shosan (BOF is one of oriental herbal medicine and is clinically available to treat obesity in Japan. Although BOF is a candidate as a novel therapeutic strategy to improve metabolic dysfunction with obesity, the mechanism of its beneficial effect is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated mechanism of therapeutic effects of BOF on KKAy mice, a model of human metabolic disorders with obesity. Chronic treatment of KKAy mice with BOF persistently decreased food intake, body weight gain, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. In addition, both tissue weight and cell size of white adipose tissue (WAT were decreased, with concomitant increases in the expression of adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors genes in WAT as well as the circulating adiponectin level by BOF treatment. Furthermore, gene expression of uncoupling protein-1, a thermogenesis factor, in brown adipose tissue and rectal temperature were both elevated by BOF. Intriguingly, plasma acylated-ghrelin, an active form of orexigenic hormone, and short-term food intake were significantly decreased by single bolus administration of BOF. These results indicate that BOF exerts a combinatorial favorable metabolic modulation including antihypertensive effect, at least partially, via its beneficial effect on adipose tissue function and its appetite-inhibitory property through suppression on the ghrelin system.

  1. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on nutrition and metabolism research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Stein, T Peter; Habold, Caroline; Coxam, Veronique; O' Gorman, Donal; Blanc, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition has multiple roles during space flight from providing sufficient nutrients to meet the metabolic needs of the body and to maintain good health, to the beneficial psychosocial aspects related to the meals. Nutrition is central to the functioning of the body; poor nutrition compromises all the physiological systems. Nutrition is therefore likely to have a key role in counteracting the negative effects of space flight (e.g., radiation, immune deficits, oxidative stress, and bone and muscle loss). As missions increase in duration, any dietary/nutritional deficiencies will become progressively more detrimental. Moreover, it has been recognized that the human diet contains, in addition to essential macronutrients, a complex array of naturally occurring bioactive micronutrients that may confer significant long-term health benefits. It is therefore critical that astronauts be adequately nourished during missions. Problems of nutritional origin are often treatable by simply providing the appropriate nutrients and adequate recommendations. This review highlights six key issues that have been identified as space research priorities in nutrition field: in-flight energy balance; altered feeding behavior; development of metabolic stress; micronutrient deficiency; alteration of gut microflora; and altered fluid and electrolytes balance. For each of these topics, relevance for space exploration, knowledge gaps and proposed investigations are described. Finally, the nutritional questions related to bioastronautics research are very relevant to multiple ground-based-related health issues. The potential spin-offs are both interesting scientifically and potentially of great clinical importance.

  2. Probing gender-specific metabolism differences in humans by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Sunil; Jacobs, Doris M; Ramadan, Ziad; Berruex, France; Fuerholz, Andreas; Fay, Laurent B

    2006-05-15

    The measurement of metabolite profiles that are interpreted to yield biomarkers using multivariate data analysis is now a well-established approach for gaining an improved understanding of the impact of genetic modifications, toxicological and therapeutic interventions, and exposure to stimuli (e.g., noxious agents, stressors, nutrients) on the network of transcripts, proteins, and metabolites present in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. This has been termed metabonomics. In this study, multivariate analysis of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of metabolite profiles of urine and plasma from 150 healthy humans revealed that in young people and/or individuals with low body mass indexes, females had higher rates of lipid biosynthesis than did males, whereas males had higher rates of protein turnover than did females. With increasing age, overall lipid biosynthesis decreased in females, whereas metabolism increasingly favored lipid synthesis over protein turnover in males. By relating the derived metabonomic data to known metabolic pathways and published biochemical data, it appears that females synthesize relatively more lipoproteins and unsaturated lipids than do males. Furthermore, the changes in lipid biosynthesis and urinary citrate excretion in females showed a positive correlation. Estrogen most likely plays an essential role in the regulation of, and communication between, protein and lipid biosynthesis by controlling pH in mitochondria and the cytoplasm and hence the observed altered citrate levels.

  3. Effects of Polyphenol Intake on Metabolic Syndrome: Current Evidences from Human Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors which severely increases the risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Several epidemiological studies have observed a negative association between polyphenol intake and MetS rates. Nevertheless, there are relatively small numbers of interventional studies evidencing this association. This review is focused on human interventional trials with polyphenols as polyphenol-rich foods and dietary patterns rich in polyphenols in patients with MetS. Current evidence suggests that polyphenol intake has the potential to alleviate MetS components by decreasing body weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose and by improving lipid metabolism. Therefore, high intake of polyphenol-rich foods such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, seasoning with aromatic plants, spices, and virgin olive oil may be the cornerstone of a healthy diet preventing the development and progression of MetS, although there is no polyphenol or polyphenol-rich food able to influence all MetS features. However, inconsistent results have been found in different trials, and more long-term randomized trials are warranted to develop public health strategies to decrease MetS rates. PMID:28894509

  4. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  5. Calorimetric study on human erythrocyte glycolysis. Heat production in various metabolic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakami, S; de Verdier, C H

    1976-06-01

    The heat production of human erythrocytes was measured on a flow microcalorimeter with simultaneous analyses of lactate and other metabolites. The heat production connected with the lactate formation was about 17 kcal (71 kJ) per mol lactate formed which corresponded to the sum of heat production due to the formation of lactate from glucose and the heat production due to neutralization. The heat production rate increased as the pH of the suspension increased, corresponding to the increase in lactate formation. Glycolytic inhibitors such as fluoride and monoiodoacetate caused a decrease in the rate of heat production, whereas arsenate induced a large transient increase in heat production associated with a transient increase in lactate formation. Decrease in pyruvate concentration was usually associated with increase in heat production, although the decreased pyruvate concentration was coupled with formation of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. When inosine, dihydroxyacetone or D-glyceraldehyde was used as a substrate, an increase in the heat production rate was observed. Addition of methylene blue caused an oxygen uptake which was accompanied by a remarkable increase in heat production rate corresponding to about 160 kcal (670 kJ) per mol oxygen consumed. The value for heat production in red cells in the above-mentioned metabolic conditions was considered in relation to earlier known data on free energy and enthalpy changes of the different metabolic steps in the glycolytic pathway.

  6. Cardiovascular and metabolic responses to tap water ingestion in young humans: does the water temperature matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, M; Grasser, E K; Dulloo, A G; Montani, J P

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water induces short-term cardiovascular and metabolic changes. These effects are considered to be triggered by gastric distension and osmotic factors, but little is known about the influence of water temperature. We determined, in a randomized crossover study, the acute cardiovascular and metabolic responses to 500 mL of tap water at 3 °C (cold), 22 °C (room) and 37 °C (body) in 12 young humans to ascertain an effect of water temperature. We measured continuous beat-to-beat haemodynamics, skin blood flux with laser-Doppler flowmetry and resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry starting with a 30-min baseline followed by a 4-min drink period and a subsequent 90-min post-drink observation. Ingestion of cold- and room-tempered water led to decreased heart rate (P body-tempered water. Drinking cold- and room-, but not body-tempered water, led to increased high frequency power of heart rate variability (P water increased energy expenditure over 90 min by 2.9% (P water to intra-abdominal temperature levels. Overall, ingestion of cold- and room-, but not body-tempered water reduced the workload to the heart through a reduction in heart rate and double product which could be mediated by an augmented cardiac vagal tone. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of the pattern of food intake on human energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboeket-van de Venne, W P; Westerterp, K R; Kester, A D

    1993-07-01

    The pattern of food intake can affect the regulation of body weight and lipogenesis. We studied the effect of meal frequency on human energy expenditure (EE) and its components. During 1 week ten male adults (age 25-61 years, body mass index 20.7-30.4 kg/m2) were fed to energy balance at two meals/d (gorging pattern) and during another week at seven meals/d (nibbling pattern). For the first 6 d of each week the food was provided at home, followed by a 36 h stay in a respiration chamber. O2 consumption and CO2 production (and hence EE) were calculated over 24 h. EE in free-living conditions was measured over the 2 weeks with doubly-labelled water (average daily metabolic rate, ADMR). The three major components of ADMR are basal metabolic rate (BMR), diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and EE for physical activity (ACT). There was no significant effect of meal frequency on 24 h EE or ADMR. Furthermore, BMR and ACT did not differ between the two patterns. DIT was significantly elevated in the gorging pattern, but this effect was neutralized by correction for the relevant time interval. With the method used for determination of DIT no significant effect of meal frequency on the contribution of DIT to ADMR could be demonstrated.

  8. Importance of Autophagy in Mediating Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Morphine-Induced Metabolic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Human Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Myosotys; Lapierre, Jessica; Ojha, Chet Raj; Estrada-Bueno, Hary; Dever, Seth M; Gewirtz, David A; Kashanchi, Fatah; El-Hage, Nazira

    2017-07-28

    Under physiological conditions, the function of astrocytes in providing brain metabolic support is compromised under pathophysiological conditions caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and opioids. Herein, we examined the role of autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway important for cellular homeostasis and survival, as a potential regulatory mechanism during pathophysiological conditions in primary human astrocytes. Blocking autophagy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting BECN1 , but not the Autophagy-related 5 ( ATG5 ) gene, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced intracellular calcium release. On the contrary, inducing autophagy pharmacologically with rapamycin further enhanced calcium release and significantly reverted HIV and morphine-decreased glutamate uptake. Furthermore, siBeclin1 caused an increase in HIV-induced nitric oxide (NO) release, while viral-induced NO in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin was decreased. HIV replication was significantly attenuated in astrocytes transfected with siRNA while significantly induced in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin. Silencing with siBeclin1, but not siATG5, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release, while secretion of IL-8 was significantly induced with rapamycin. Mechanistically, the effects of siBeclin1 in decreasing HIV-induced calcium release, viral replication, and viral-induced cytokine secretion were associated with a decrease in activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway.

  9. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Pruimboom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health.

  10. Acute Consumption of Flavan-3-ol-Enriched Dark Chocolate Affects Human Endogenous Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Luisa M; Philo, Mark; Colquhoun, Ian J; Tapp, Henri S; Saha, Shikha; Duthie, Garry G; Kemsley, E Kate; de Roos, Baukje; Kroon, Paul A; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle

    2017-07-07

    Flavan-3-ols and methylxanthines have potential beneficial effects on human health including reducing cardiovascular risk. We performed a randomized controlled crossover intervention trial to assess the acute effects of consumption of flavan-3-ol-enriched dark chocolate, compared with standard dark chocolate and white chocolate, on the human metabolome. We assessed the metabolome in urine and blood plasma samples collected before and at 2 and 6 h after consumption of chocolates in 42 healthy volunteers using a nontargeted metabolomics approach. Plasma samples were assessed and showed differentiation between time points with no further separation among the three chocolate treatments. Multivariate statistics applied to urine samples could readily separate the postprandial time points and distinguish between the treatments. Most of the markers responsible for the multivariate discrimination between the chocolates were of dietary origin. Interestingly, small but significant level changes were also observed for a subset of endogenous metabolites. 1 H NMR revealed that flavan-3-ol-enriched dark chocolate and standard dark chocolate reduced urinary levels of creatinine, lactate, some amino acids, and related degradation products and increased the levels of pyruvate and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, a phenolic compound of bacterial origin. This study demonstrates that an acute chocolate intervention can significantly affect human metabolism.

  11. Hypoxic Modulation of HLA-G Expression through the Metabolic Sensor HIF-1 in Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garziera, Marica; Scarabel, Lucia; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is considered an immune checkpoint molecule involved in tumor immune evasion. Hypoxia and the metabolic sensor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) are hallmarks of metastasization, angiogenesis, and intense tumor metabolic activity. The purpose of this review was to examine original in vitro studies carried out in human cancer cell lines, which reported data about HLA-G expression and HIF-1 mediated-HLA-G expression in response to hypoxia. The impact of HL...

  12. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic...... pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass...

  13. Effects of prolonged recombinant human erythropoietin administration on muscle membrane transport systems and metabolic marker enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C; Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L

    2007-01-01

    on the expression of muscle membrane transport proteins. Likewise, improvements in performance may involve upregulation of metabolic enzymes. Since Epo is known to augment performance we tested the effect of rHuEpo on some marker enzymes that are related to aerobic capacity. For these purposes eight subjects...... performance by approximately 54%. Membrane transport systems and carbonic anhydrases involved in pH regulation remained unchanged. Of the Na(+), K(+)-pump isoforms only the density of the alpha2 subunit was decreased (by 22%) after treatment. The marker enzymes cytochrom c and hexokinase remained unchanged......Adaptations to chronic hypoxia involve changes in membrane transport proteins. The underlying mechanism of this response may be related to concomitant occurring changes in erythropoietin (Epo) levels. We therefore tested the direct effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment...

  14. Lessons from "lower" organisms: what worms, flies, and zebrafish can teach us about human energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Schlegel

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A pandemic of metabolic diseases (atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and obesity, unleashed by multiple social and economic factors beyond the control of most individuals, threatens to diminish human life span for the first time in the modern era. Given the redundancy and inherent complexity of processes regulating the uptake, transport, catabolism, and synthesis of nutrients, magic bullets to target these diseases will be hard to find. Recent studies using the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the zebrafish Danio rerio indicate that these "lower" metazoans possess unique attributes that should help in identifying, investigating, and even validating new pharmaceutical targets for these diseases. We summarize findings in these organisms that shed light on highly conserved pathways of energy homeostasis.

  15. Comparative study of eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism by human platelets in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Schacky, C.; Siess, W.; Fischer, S.; Weber, P.C.

    1985-04-01

    During long-term dietary n-3 fatty acid supplementation, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is not incorporated into phosphatidylinositol or -serine of human platelets in vivo and is not detectable in phosphatidic acid upon stimulation with thrombin. However, EPA is released from platelet phospholipids and metabolized to thromboxane B3 (TXB3). In contrast, in vitro, platelets incorporate (/sup 14/C)EPA into phosphatidylinositol, whether they contain endogenous EPA in their cellular lipids or not. Following platelet stimulation, (/sup 14/C)EPA appears in phosphatidic acid, as free fatty acid, and is transformed to TXB3. The authors conclude that the fatty acid compositions of platelet phospholipid subclasses are regulated with a high degree of specificity in vivo. Qualitative differences exist between in vivo and in vitro uptake of EPA into platelet phospholipid subclasses. After in vivo incorporation, EPA is released by action of a phospholipase A2.

  16. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-04-05

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells.

  17. Nerve agent hydrolysis activity designed into a human drug metabolism enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Hemmert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus (OP nerve agents are potent suicide inhibitors of the essential neurotransmitter-regulating enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Due to their acute toxicity, there is significant interest in developing effective countermeasures to OP poisoning. Here we impart nerve agent hydrolysis activity into the human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1. Using crystal structures of the target enzyme in complex with nerve agent as a guide, a pair of histidine and glutamic acid residues were designed proximal to the enzyme's native catalytic triad. The resultant variant protein demonstrated significantly increased rates of reactivation following exposure to sarin, soman, and cyclosarin. Importantly, the addition of these residues did not alter the high affinity binding of nerve agents to this protein. Thus, using two amino acid substitutions, a novel enzyme was created that efficiently converted a group of hemisubstrates, compounds that can start but not complete a reaction cycle, into bona fide substrates. Such approaches may lead to novel countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning.

  18. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    , but not by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Furthermore, endurance training appears to lower the cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake and preserve cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. This is possibly related to an attenuated catecholamine response. Finally, exercise promotes brain health as evidenced......This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... as evidenced by pharmacological manipulation of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Cholinergic blockade by glycopyrrolate blocks the exercise-induced increase in the transcranial Doppler determined mean flow velocity (MCA Vmean). Conversely, alpha-adrenergic activation increases that expression of cerebral...

  19. Effects of chronic metabolic acidosis on splanchnic protein turnover and oxygen consumption in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessari, Paolo; Sofia, Antonella; Saffioti, Stefano; Vettore, Monica; Verzola, Daniela; Millioni, Renato; Puricelli, Lucia; Garibotto, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    Although metabolic acidosis stimulates protein catabolism, its effects on splanchnic protein turnover and energy expenditure have not been measured in human beings. We investigated the effects of chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on splanchnic protein dynamics and oxygen consumption in human beings by using a leucine tracer and mass-balance techniques. Five subjects were studied after 6 days of HCl-, CaCl(2)-, and NH(4)Cl-induced acidosis; 8 subjects served as controls. Blood samples were collected from the radial artery and the hepatic veins. Measurements were performed on plasma and whole-blood samples. Based on plasma measurements, subjects who had undergone CMA had lower rates of splanchnic proteolysis (-35%) and protein synthesis (-50%; P controls, as well as a negative leucine kinetic balance (-6.81 +/- 2.48 micromol/kg/min/1.73 m(2) body surface [BS](-1)), compared with the neutral balance in control plasma samples (0.76 +/- 2.11 micromol/kg/min/1.73; P control samples, and the net leucine kinetic balance was neutral in both groups (CMA, -0.69 +/- 1.57; controls, -0.74 +/- 3.45 micromol/kg/min/1.73). In CMA whole-blood measurements, splanchnic oxygen consumption (44.8 +/- 4.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) BS) was slightly lower than in controls (57.5 +/- 8.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) BS; P = NS). Splanchnic protein synthesis correlated with oxygen consumption (r = 0.82; P < .001). CMA reduces splanchnic protein turnover and results in a negative leucine balance--an effect that apparently is offset by the contribution of blood cells to organ leucine (and protein) dynamics. Protein synthesis is a major contributor (about 67%) to energy expenditure in splanchnic organs. 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient metabolic changes observed with proton MR spectroscopy in normal human brain after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, Francois; Rubin, Christophe; Grand, Sylvie; Kolodie, Helene; Le Bas, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the time course of the proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) variations due to radiation therapy on normal human brain. Methods and Materials: We followed 11 patients receiving an exclusive external radiation therapy for brain tumor for 8 months. They underwent proton MRS scans before any radiation exposure and 1, 4, and 8 months after they began the radiation therapy. The patients received 60 Gy in tumoral area fractionated over 6 weeks. The contralateral normal brain hemisphere received a radiation dose from 20 to 50 Gy. The main metabolite concentrations (N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), and lactate (Lac) were evaluated by the areas of the peaks after peak fitting. Normalized values (NV) were obtained by processing the ratio of the peak area of a given metabolite to the sum of all the spectrum peak areas; ratios (NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr) were processed. One patient, who received panencephalic radiotherapy (30 Gy) after metastasectomy from a primary kidney adenocarcinoma, has been monitored with 1 H-MRS eight times for 6 months to observe the onset of the metabolic changes. Results: Changes were observed in irradiated normal brain tissue 4 months after radiation therapy began: the NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr ratios and the NAA (NV) decreased while the Choline (NV) increased. Four months later, normal values were recovered. Conclusion: 1 H-MRS has the potentiality to detect and to evaluate in vivo early adverse metabolic effects of radiation therapy in the normal human brain. These changes are significant 4 months after the radiation therapy began and appear to resolve over time

  1. Prediction of metabolic drug clearance in humans: in vitro-in vivo extrapolation vs allometric scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiran, M R; Proctor, N J; Howgate, E M; Rowland-Yeo, K; Tucker, G T; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2006-07-01

    Previously in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) with the Simcyp Clearance and Interaction Simulator has been used to predict the clearance of 15 clinically used drugs in humans. The criteria for the selection of the drugs were that they are used as probes for the activity of specific cytochromes P450 (CYPs) or have a single CYP isoform as the major or sole contributor to their metabolism and that they do not exhibit non-linear kinetics in vivo. Where data were available for the clearance of the drugs in at least three animal species, the predictions from IVIVE have now been compared with those based on allometric scaling (AS). Adequate data were available for estimating oral clearance (CLp.o.) in 9 cases (alprazolam, sildenafil, caffeine, clozapine, cyclosporine, dextromethorphan, midazolam, omeprazole and tolbutamide) and intravenous clearance in 6 cases (CLi.v.) (cyclosporine, diclofenac, midazolam, omeprazole, theophylline and tolterodine). AS predictions were based on five different methods: (1) simple allometry (clearance versus body weight); (2) correction for maximum life-span potential (CL x MLP); (3) correction for brain weight (CL x BrW); (4) the use of body surface area; and (5) the rule of exponents. A prediction accuracy was indicated by mean-fold error and the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient. Predictions were considered successful if the mean-fold error was error range: 1.02-4.00). All five AS methods were accurate in 13, 11, 10, 10 and 14 cases, respectively. However, in some cases the error of AS exceeded fivefold. On the basis of the current results, IVIVE is more reliable than AS in predicting human clearance values for drugs mainly metabolized by CYP450 enzymes. This suggests that the place of AS methods in pre-clinical drug development warrants further scrutiny.

  2. Acute physiological effects of glucocorticoids on fuel metabolism in humans are permissive but not direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, Roland H; Anderson, Anna J; Ramage, Lynne E; Macfarlane, David P; de Beaux, Andrew C; Mole, Damian J; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R

    2017-06-01

    The effects of glucocorticoids on fuel metabolism are complex. Acute glucocorticoid excess promotes lipolysis but chronic glucocorticoid excess causes visceral fat accumulation. We hypothesized that interactions between cortisol and insulin and adrenaline account for these conflicting results. We tested the effect of cortisol on lipolysis and glucose production with and without insulin and adrenaline in humans both in vivo and in vitro. A total of 20 healthy men were randomized to low and high insulin groups (both n = 10). Subjects attended on 3 occasions and received low (c. 150 nM), medium (c. 400 nM) or high (c. 1400 nM) cortisol infusion in a randomized crossover design. Deuterated glucose and glycerol were infused intravenously along with a pancreatic clamp (somatostatin with replacement of glucagon, insulin and growth hormone) and adrenaline. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for analysis. In parallel, the effect of cortisol on lipolysis was tested in paired primary cultures of human subcutaneous and visceral adipocytes. In vivo, high cortisol increased lipolysis only in the presence of high insulin and/or adrenaline but did not alter glucose kinetics. High cortisol increased adipose mRNA levels of ATGL, HSL and CGI-58 and suppressed G0S2. In vitro, high cortisol increased lipolysis in the presence of insulin in subcutaneous, but not visceral, adipocytes. The acute lipolytic effects of cortisol require supraphysiological concentrations, are dependent on insulin and adrenaline and are observed only in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The resistance of visceral adipose tissue to cortisol's lipolytic effects may contribute to the central fat accumulation observed with chronic glucocorticoid excess. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Metabolic imaging of human kidney triglyceride content: reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Hammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantification of triglyceride content and to compare spectral quality and reproducibility without and with respiratory motion compensation in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Review Board of our institution approved the study protocol, and written informed consent was obtained. After technical optimization, a total of 20 healthy volunteers underwent renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the renal cortex both without and with respiratory motion compensation and volume tracking. After the first session the subjects were repositioned and the protocol was repeated to assess reproducibility. Spectral quality (linewidth of the water signal and triglyceride content were quantified. Bland-Altman analyses and a test by Pitman were performed. RESULTS: Linewidth changed from 11.5±0.4 Hz to 10.7±0.4 Hz (all data pooled, p<0.05, without and with respiratory motion compensation respectively. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session without respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.58±0.12% and 0.51±0.14% (P = NS. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session with respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.44±0.10% and 0.43±0.10% (P = NS between sessions and P = NS compared to measurements with respiratory motion compensation. Bland-Altman analyses showed narrower limits of agreement and a significant difference in the correlated variances (correlation of -0.59, P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Metabolic imaging of the human kidney using renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a feasible tool to assess cortical triglyceride content in humans in vivo and the use of respiratory motion compensation significantly improves spectral quality and reproducibility. Therefore, respiratory motion compensation seems a necessity for metabolic imaging of renal triglyceride content in vivo.

  4. Transcriptomic coordination in the human metabolic network reveals links between n-3 fat intake, adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Melissa J; Tierney, Audrey C; van Ommen, Ben; Daniel, Hannelore; Toomey, Sinead; Gjelstad, Ingrid M F; Gormley, Isobel C; Pérez-Martinez, Pablo; Drevon, Christian A; López-Miranda, Jose; Roche, Helen M

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the molecular link between diet and health is a key goal in nutritional systems biology. As an alternative to pathway analysis, we have developed a joint multivariate and network-based approach to analysis of a dataset of habitual dietary records, adipose tissue transcriptomics and comprehensive plasma marker profiles from human volunteers with the Metabolic Syndrome. With this approach we identified prominent co-expressed sub-networks in the global metabolic network, which showed correlated expression with habitual n-3 PUFA intake and urinary levels of the oxidative stress marker 8-iso-PGF(2α). These sub-networks illustrated inherent cross-talk between distinct metabolic pathways, such as between triglyceride metabolism and production of lipid signalling molecules. In a parallel promoter analysis, we identified several adipogenic transcription factors as potential transcriptional regulators associated with habitual n-3 PUFA intake. Our results illustrate advantages of network-based analysis, and generate novel hypotheses on the transcriptomic link between habitual n-3 PUFA intake, adipose tissue function and oxidative stress.

  5. R-Limonene metabolism in humans and metabolite kinetics after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Göen, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We studied the R-limonene (LMN) metabolism and elimination kinetics in a human in vivo study. Four volunteers were orally exposed to a single LMN dose of 100-130 µg kg -1 bw. In each case, one pre-exposure and subsequently all 24 h post-exposure urine samples were collected. From two subjects, blood samples were drawn up to 5 h after exposure. The parent compound was analysed in blood using headspace GC-MS. The metabolites cis- and trans-carveol (cCAR), perillyl alcohol (POH), perillic acid (PA), limonene-1,2-diol (LMN-1,2-OH), and limonene-8,9-diol (LMN-8,9-OH) were quantified in both blood and urine using GC-PCI-MS/MS. Moreover, GC-PCI-MS full-scan experiments were applied for identification of unknown metabolites in urine. In both matrices, metabolites reached maximum concentrations 1-2 h post-exposure followed by rapid elimination with half-lives of 0.7-2.5 h. In relation to the other metabolites, LMN-1,2-OH was eliminated slowest. Nonetheless, overall renal metabolite elimination was completed within the 24-h observation period. The metabolite amounts excreted via urine corresponded to 0.2 % (cCAR), 0.2 % (tCAR), <0.1 % (POH), 2.0 % (PA), 4.3 % (LMN-1,2-OH), and 32 % (LMN-8,9-OH) of the orally administered dose. GC-PCI-MS full-scan analyses revealed dihydroperillic acid (DHPA) as an additional LMN metabolite. DHPA was estimated to account for 5 % of the orally administered dose. The study revealed that human LMN metabolism proceeds fast and is characterised by oxidation mainly of the exo-cyclic double bond but also of the endo-cyclic double bond and of the methyl side chain. The study results may support the prediction of the metabolism of other terpenes or comparable chemical structures.

  6. Light Modulates Metabolic Pathways and Other Novel Physiological Traits in the Human Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gabriela L; Tuttobene, Marisel; Altilio, Matías; Martínez Amezaga, Maitena; Nguyen, Meaghan; Cribb, Pamela; Cybulski, Larisa E; Ramírez, María Soledad; Altabe, Silvia; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2017-05-15

    Light sensing in chemotrophic bacteria has been relatively recently ascertained. In the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii , light modulates motility, biofilm formation, and virulence through the blue-light-sensing-using flavin (BLUF) photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, light can induce a reduction in susceptibility to certain antibiotics, such as minocycline and tigecycline, in a photoreceptor-independent manner. In this work, we identified new traits whose expression levels are modulated by light in this pathogen, which comprise not only important determinants related to pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance but also metabolic pathways, which represents a novel concept for chemotrophic bacteria. Indeed, the phenylacetic acid catabolic pathway and trehalose biosynthesis were modulated by light, responses that completely depend on BlsA. We further show that tolerance to some antibiotics and modulation of antioxidant enzyme levels are also influenced by light, likely contributing to bacterial persistence in adverse environments. Also, we present evidence indicating that surfactant production is modulated by light. Finally, the expression of whole pathways and gene clusters, such as genes involved in lipid metabolism and genes encoding components of the type VI secretion system, as well as efflux pumps related to antibiotic resistance, was differentially induced by light. Overall, our results indicate that light modulates global features of the A. baumannii lifestyle. IMPORTANCE The discovery that nonphototrophic bacteria respond to light constituted a novel concept in microbiology. In this context, we demonstrated that light could modulate aspects related to bacterial virulence, persistence, and resistance to antibiotics in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii In this work, we present the novel finding that light directly regulates metabolism in this chemotrophic bacterium. Insights into the mechanism show the involvement of the photoreceptor BlsA. In

  7. Potent human uric acid transporter 1 inhibitors: in vitro and in vivo metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wempe MF

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael F Wempe,1 Janet W Lightner,2 Bettina Miller,1 Timothy J Iwen,1 Peter J Rice,1 Shin Wakui,3 Naohiko Anzai,4 Promsuk Jutabha,4 Hitoshi Endou51Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA; 3Department of Toxicology, Azabu University School of Veterinary Medicine, Chuo Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine, Mibu, Shimotsuga, Tochigi, Japan; 5Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Human uric acid transporter 1 (hURAT1; SLC22A12 is a very important urate anion exchanger. Elevated urate levels are known to play a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases, chronic renal disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Therefore, the development of potent uric acid transport inhibitors may lead to novel therapeutic agents to combat these human diseases. The current study investigates small molecular weight compounds and their ability to inhibit 14C-urate uptake in oocytes expressing hURAT1. Using the most promising drug candidates generated from our structure–activity relationship findings, we subsequently conducted in vitro hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetic (PK studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Compounds were incubated with rat liver microsomes containing cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid. In vitro metabolism and PK samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry methods. Independently, six different inhibitors were orally (capsule dosing or intravenously (orbital sinus administered to fasting male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected and analyzed; these data were used to compare in vitro and in vivo metabolism and to

  8. A human dietary arachidonic acid supplementation study conducted in a metabolic research unit: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G J; Kelley, D S; Emken, E A; Phinney, S D; Kyle, D; Ferretti, A

    1997-04-01

    While there are many reports of studies that fed arachidonic acid (AA) to animals, there are very few reports of AA feeding to humans under controlled conditions. This 130-d study was conceived as a controlled, symmetrical crossover design with healthy, adult male volunteers. They lived in the metabolic research unit (MRU) of the Western Human Nutrition Research (WHNRC) for the entire study. All food was prepared by the WHNRC kitchen. The basal (low-AA) diet consisted of natural foods (30 en% fat, 15 en% protein, and 55 en% carbohydrate), containing 210 mg/d of AA, and met the recommended daily allowance for all nutrients. The high-AA (intervention) diet was similar except that 1.5 g/d of AA in the form of a triglyceride containing 50% AA replaced an equal amount of high-oleic safflower oil in the basal diet. The subjects (ages 20 to 39) were within -10 to +20% of ideal body weight, nonsmoking, and not allowed alcohol in the MRU. Their exercise level was constant, and their body weights were maintained within 2% of entry level. Subjects were initially fed the low-AA diet for 15 d. On day 16, half of the subjects (group A) wee placed on the high-AA diet, and the other group (B) remained on the low-AA diets. On day 65, the two groups switched diets. On day 115, group B returned to the low-AA diet. This design, assuming no carryover effect, allowed us to merge the data from the two groups, with the data comparison days being 65 (low-AA) and 115 (high-AA) for group B and 130 (low-AA) and 65 (high-AA) for group A. The main indices studied were the fatty acid composition of the plasma, red blood cells, platelets, and adipose tissue; in vitro platelet aggregation, bleeding times, clotting factors; immune response as measured by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, cellular proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to various mitogens and antigens, natural killer cell activity, and response to measles/mumps/rubella and influenza vaccines; the

  9. The mRNA expression profile of metabolic genes relative to MHC isoform pattern in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Leick, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic profile of rodent muscle is generally reflected in the myosin heavy chain (MHC) fiber-type composition. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that metabolic gene expression is not tightly coupled with MHC fiber-type composition for all genes in human skeletal muscle...... was more than twofold higher in soleus and vastus than in triceps. Contrary, phosphofructokinase and total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was approximately three- and twofold higher in triceps than in both soleus and vastus. Expression of metabolic genes was assessed by determining the mRNA content...... of a broad range of metabolic genes. The triceps muscle had two- to fivefold higher MHC IIa, phosphofructokinase, and LDH A mRNA content and two- to fourfold lower MHC I, lipoprotein lipase, CD36, hormone-sensitive lipase, and LDH B and hexokinase II mRNA than vastus lateralis or soleus. Interestingly...

  10. Suppression of microbial metabolic pathways inhibits the generation of the human body odor component diacetyl by Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a key contributor to unpleasant odors emanating from the axillae, feet, and head regions. To investigate the mechanism of diacetyl generation on human skin, resident skin bacteria were tested for the ability to produce diacetyl via metabolism of the main organic acids contained in human sweat. L-lactate metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produced the highest amounts of diacetyl, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract (GGR) and α-tocopheryl-L-ascorbate-2-O-phosphate diester potassium salt (EPC-K1), a phosphate diester of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid, effectively inhibited diacetyl formation without bactericidal effects. Moreover, a metabolic flux analysis revealed that GGR and EPC-K1 suppressed diacetyl formation by inhibiting extracellular bacterial conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate or by altering intracellular metabolic flow into the citrate cycle, respectively, highlighting fundamentally distinct mechanisms by GGR and EPC-K1 to suppress diacetyl formation. These results provide new insight into diacetyl metabolism by human skin bacteria and identify a regulatory mechanism of diacetyl formation that can facilitate the development of effective deodorant agents.

  11. Suppression of microbial metabolic pathways inhibits the generation of the human body odor component diacetyl by Staphylococcus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hara

    Full Text Available Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione is a key contributor to unpleasant odors emanating from the axillae, feet, and head regions. To investigate the mechanism of diacetyl generation on human skin, resident skin bacteria were tested for the ability to produce diacetyl via metabolism of the main organic acids contained in human sweat. L-lactate metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produced the highest amounts of diacetyl, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract (GGR and α-tocopheryl-L-ascorbate-2-O-phosphate diester potassium salt (EPC-K1, a phosphate diester of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid, effectively inhibited diacetyl formation without bactericidal effects. Moreover, a metabolic flux analysis revealed that GGR and EPC-K1 suppressed diacetyl formation by inhibiting extracellular bacterial conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate or by altering intracellular metabolic flow into the citrate cycle, respectively, highlighting fundamentally distinct mechanisms by GGR and EPC-K1 to suppress diacetyl formation. These results provide new insight into diacetyl metabolism by human skin bacteria and identify a regulatory mechanism of diacetyl formation that can facilitate the development of effective deodorant agents.

  12. Hepatic SRC-1 Activity Orchestrates Transcriptional Circuitries of Amino Acid Pathways with Potential Relevance for Human Metabolic Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; York, Brian; Tang, Ke; Stashi, Erin; Bouguerra, Hichem; Zhou, Suoling; Yu, Hui; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Stevens, Robert D.; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism are increasingly recognized as being associated with, and serving as prognostic markers for chronic human diseases, such as cancer or type 2 diabetes. In the current study, a quantitative metabolomics profiling strategy revealed global impairment in amino acid metabolism in mice deleted for the transcriptional coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. Aberrations were hepatic in origin, because selective reexpression of SRC-1 in the liver of SRC-1 null mice largely restored amino acids concentrations to normal levels. Cistromic analysis of SRC-1 binding sites in hepatic tissues confirmed a prominent influence of this coregulator on transcriptional programs regulating amino acid metabolism. More specifically, SRC-1 markedly impacted tyrosine levels and was found to regulate the transcriptional activity of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of tyrosine catabolism. Consequently, SRC-1 null mice displayed low TAT expression and presented with hypertyrosinemia and corneal alterations, 2 clinical features observed in the human syndrome of TAT deficiency. A heterozygous missense variant of SRC-1 (p.P1272S) that is known to alter its coactivation potential, was found in patients harboring idiopathic tyrosinemia-like disorders and may therefore represent one risk factor for their clinical symptoms. Hence, we reinforce the concept that SRC-1 is a central factor in the fine orchestration of multiple pathways of intermediary metabolism, suggesting it as a potential therapeutic target that may be exploitable in human metabolic diseases and cancer. PMID:25148457

  13. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Normal variations in the isotopic composition of metabolically relevant transition metals in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heghe, L.; Cloquet, C.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cu, Fe and Zn are transition metals with great catalytic, structural and regulating importance in the human body. Hence, an aberrant metabolism of these elements can have serious implications on the health of a person. It is assumed that, due to differences in isotope fractionation, the isotopic composition of these elements in whole blood of patients can be different from that in blood of healthy subjects. Therefore, isotopic analysis of the element affected by the disease can be a promising approach for early diagnosis. A method for isotopic analysis of Cu, Fe and Zn in human whole blood was developed. The simultaneous chromatographic isolation of these elements and the conditions for isotope ratio measurement via multi-collector ICP - mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) were optimized. So far, only whole blood of supposedly healthy volunteers (reference population) was analyzed. Results for Fe confirmed the known differences in isotopic composition between male and female blood. It is also shown that other parameters can have influence as well, e.g., the isotopic composition of Zn seems to be governed by the diet.

  15. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. PMID:26370977

  16. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-09-08

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  17. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Kamiloglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  18. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  19. Quantitative analysis of energy metabolism in human muscle using SLOOP 31P-MR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.; Koestler, H.; Buchner, S.; Sandstede, J.; Hahn, D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Energy metabolism is vital for regular muscle function. In humans, in vivo analysis using 31 P-MR-spectroscopy (MRS) is mostly restricted to semiquantitative parameters due to technical demands. We applied spatial localization with optimal pointspread function (SLOOP) for quantification in human skeletal and cardiac muscle. Subjects/Methods: 10 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 were examined using a 1.5 T system (Magnetom VISION) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) for data collection. Concentrations of PCr, ATP and P i as well as PCr/ATP ratios were calculated by SLOOP. Results: Concentrations of PCr, ATP and P i were 29.9±3.4, 7.1±0.9 and 5.7±1.2 [mmol/kg] in normal skeletal muscle, corresponding to previously published studies. Two of the patients with a duration of disease longer than 10 years and a pronounced muscle weakness showed a significant decrease of PCr and ATP in skeletal muscle below 10 and 5 mmol/kg. One of these patients had an additional reduction of PCr in cardiac muscle. (orig.) [de

  20. Diet-gene interactions and PUFA metabolism: a potential contributor to health disparities and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H; Murphy, Robert C; Wilson, Bryan A; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C; Mathias, Rasika A

    2014-05-21

    The "modern western" diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  1. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H.; Murphy, Robert C.; Wilson, Bryan A.; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C.; Mathias, Rasika A.

    2014-01-01

    The “modern western” diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations. PMID:24853887

  2. Creatine Metabolism and Safety Profiles after Six-Week Oral Guanidinoacetic Acid Administration in Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M.; Niess, Barbara; Stojanovic, Marko; Obrenovic, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives; Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural precursor of creatine, yet the potential use of GAA as a nutritional additive for restoring creatine availability in humans has been limited by unclear efficacy and safety after exogenous GAA administration. The present study evaluated the effects of orally administered GAA on serum and urinary GAA, creatine and creatinine concentration, and on the occurrence of adverse events in healthy humans. Methods and Results; Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomized in a double-blind design to receive either GAA (2.4 grams daily) or placebo (PLA) by oral administration for 6 weeks. Clinical trial registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov, identification number NCT01133899. Serum creatine and creatinine increased significantly from before to after administration in GAA-supplemented participants (P creatine levels above 70 µmol/L. Conclusion; Exogenous GAA is metabolized to creatine, resulting in a significant increase of fasting serum creatine after intervention. GAA had an acceptable side-effects profile with a low incidence of biochemical abnormalities. PMID:23329885

  3. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  4. Mineral balance, experiment M071. [space flight effects on human mineral metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whedon, G. D.; Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Concern for the long term metabolic consequences of weightless flight was the basis for the conception of the Skylab medical experiment to measure mineral balance. Proper interpretation of obtained data that diminished atmospheric pressure has no appreciable effect, or at least no protective effect, on calcium metabolism. The absence of changes in calcium metabolism indicates that a stable baseline observation has been made for Skylab as far as the effects of atmosphere or calcium metabolism are concerned.

  5. The metabolic fate of the Anti-HIV active drug carrier succinylated human serum albumin after intravenous administration in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P J; Kuipers, M E; Smit, C; Beljaars, L; Ter Wiel, J; Meijer, D K

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolic fate of the intrinsically active (anti-HIV) drug carrier succinylated human serum albumin (Suc-HSA) was studied in rats. Suc-HSA was prepared by derivatizing HSA with 1,4-[C-14]-succinic anhydride, a modification by which all available epsilonNH2-groups in HSA were

  6. Maintenance of drug metabolism and transport functions in human precision-cut liver slices during prolonged incubation for 5 days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Vatakuti, Suresh; Schievink, Bauke; Merema, Marjolijn T.; Asplund, Annika; Synnergren, Jane; Aspegren, Anders; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    Human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS) are a valuable ex vivo model that can be used in acute toxicity studies. However, a rapid decline in metabolic enzyme activity limits their use in studies that require a prolonged xenobiotic exposure. The aim of the study was to extend the viability and

  7. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  8. The Effect of Various Inulins and Clostridium difficile on the Metabolic Activity of the Human Colonic Microbiota in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Meyer, P.D.; Venema, K.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of inulins with different average degree of polymerization (ranging from 3 to 25) on the metabolic activity of the human colonic microbiota with or without the addition of Clostridium difficile was investigated in vitro. The in vitro system used was a dynamic, computer-controlled model

  9. Molecular Characterization and Clinical Relevance of Metabolic Expression Subtypes in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Peng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metabolic reprogramming provides critical information for clinical oncology. Using molecular data of 9,125 patient samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we identified tumor subtypes in 33 cancer types based on mRNA expression patterns of seven major metabolic processes and assessed their clinical relevance. Our metabolic expression subtypes correlated extensively with clinical outcome: subtypes with upregulated carbohydrate, nucleotide, and vitamin/cofactor metabolism most consistently correlated with worse prognosis, whereas subtypes with upregulated lipid metabolism showed the opposite. Metabolic subtypes correlated with diverse somatic drivers but exhibited effects convergent on cancer hallmark pathways and were modulated by highly recurrent master regulators across cancer types. As a proof-of-concept example, we demonstrated that knockdown of SNAI1 or RUNX1—master regulators of carbohydrate metabolic subtypes—modulates metabolic activity and drug sensitivity. Our study provides a system-level view of metabolic heterogeneity within and across cancer types and identifies pathway cross-talk, suggesting related prognostic, therapeutic, and predictive utility. : Peng et al. analyze a cohort of 9,125 TCGA samples across 33 cancer types to characterize tumor subtypes based on the expression of seven metabolic pathways. They find metabolic expression subtypes are associated with patient survivals and suggest the therapeutic and predictive relevance of subtype-related master regulators. Keywords: The Cancer Genome Atlas, tumor subtypes, prognostic markers, somatic drivers, master regulator, therapeutic targets, drug sensitivity, carbohydrate metabolism

  10. Comparison of cerebral metabolism of glucose in normal human and cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine whether the cerebral metabolism in various regions of the normal human brain differs from those of cancer patients in aging by using 18F-FDG PET instrument and SPM software. Materials and Methods We reviewed clinical information of 295 healthy normal samples so called 'normal group' (ranging 21 to 88; mean age+/-SD: 50+/-14) and 290 cancer patients called 'cancer group' (ranging 21 to 85; mean age+/-SD: 54+/-14) who were examined by a whole body GE Discovery LS PET-CT instrument in our center from Aug. 2004 to Dec. 2005.They were selected with: (i) absence of clear focal brain lesions (epilepsy, cerebrovascular diseases etc.); (ii) absence of metabolic diseases, such as hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and diabetes; (iii) absence of psychiatric disorders and abuse of drugs and alcohol;( iiii) cancer patients were diagnosed definitely of variable cancers except brain cancer or brain metastasis. Both groups were sub grouped into six with the interval of 10 years old starting from 21, and the gender, educational background and serum glucose are matched. All 12 subgroups were compared to the subgroup of normal 31-40 years old called 'control subgroup' (84 samples; mean age+/-SD: 37.15+/- 2.63). All samples were injected with 18F-FDG (5.55MBq/kg), 45-60 minutes later; their brains were scanned for 10 minutes. Pixel-by-pixel t-statistic analysis was applied to all brain images using the Statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). The hypometabolic areas (p < 0. 01 or p<0.001, uncorrected) were identified in the Stereotaxic coordinate human brain atlas and three dimensional localized by MNI Space utility (MSU) software. Results:1.With increasing of age interval, similar hypometabolic brain areas are detected in both 'normal group' and 'cancer group', they are mainly in the cortical structures such as bilateral prefrontal cortex (BA9), superior temporal gyrus (BA22), parietal cortex (inferior parietal lobule and precuneus(BA40), insula (BA13

  11. Effects of Psychological Stress on Innate Immunity and Metabolism in Humans: A Systematic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Sushri; Aich, Palok

    2012-01-01

    Stress is perhaps easiest to conceptualize as a process which allows an organism to accommodate for the demands of its environment such that it can adapt to the prevailing set of conditions. Psychological stress is an important component with the potential to affect physiology adversely as has become evident from various studies in the area. Although these studies have established numerous effects of psychological stress on physiology, a global strategy for the correlation of these effects has yet to begin. Our comparative and systematic analysis of the published literature has unraveled certain interesting molecular mechanisms as clues to account for some of the observed effects of psychological stress on human physiology. In this study, we attempt to understand initial phase of the physiological response to psychological stress by analyzing interactions between innate immunity and metabolism at systems level by analyzing the data available in the literature. In light of our gene association-networks and enrichment analysis we have identified candidate genes and molecular systems which might have some associative role in affecting psychological stress response system or even producing some of the observed terminal effects (such as the associated physiological disorders). In addition to the already accepted role of psychological stress as a perturbation that can disrupt physiological homeostasis, we speculate that it is potentially capable of causing deviation of certain biological processes from their basal level activity after which they can return back to their basal tones once the effects of stress diminish. Based on the derived inferences of our comparative analysis, we have proposed a probabilistic mechanism for how psychological stress could affect physiology such that these adaptive deviations are sometimes not able to bounce back to their original basal tones, and thus increase physiological susceptibility to metabolic and immune imbalance. PMID:23028447

  12. Effects of psychological stress on innate immunity and metabolism in humans: a systematic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushri Priyadarshini

    Full Text Available Stress is perhaps easiest to conceptualize as a process which allows an organism to accommodate for the demands of its environment such that it can adapt to the prevailing set of conditions. Psychological stress is an important component with the potential to affect physiology adversely as has become evident from various studies in the area. Although these studies have established numerous effects of psychological stress on physiology, a global strategy for the correlation of these effects has yet to begin. Our comparative and systematic analysis of the published literature has unraveled certain interesting molecular mechanisms as clues to account for some of the observed effects of psychological stress on human physiology. In this study, we attempt to understand initial phase of the physiological response to psychological stress by analyzing interactions between innate immunity and metabolism at systems level by analyzing the data available in the literature. In light of our gene association-networks and enrichment analysis we have identified candidate genes and molecular systems which might have some associative role in affecting psychological stress response system or even producing some of the observed terminal effects (such as the associated physiological disorders. In addition to the already accepted role of psychological stress as a perturbation that can disrupt physiological homeostasis, we speculate that it is potentially capable of causing deviation of certain biological processes from their basal level activity after which they can return back to their basal tones once the effects of stress diminish. Based on the derived inferences of our comparative analysis, we have proposed a probabilistic mechanism for how psychological stress could affect physiology such that these adaptive deviations are sometimes not able to bounce back to their original basal tones, and thus increase physiological susceptibility to metabolic and immune

  13. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, F F; Marsh, H M; Haymond, M W

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation [( 14C]leucine) increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horber, F.F.; Marsh, H.M.; Haymond, M.W. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation {sup 14}C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.

  15. Unusual metabolic characteristics in skeletal muscles of transgenic rabbits for human lipoprotein lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viglietta Céline

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyses circulating triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. Thereby, LPL acts as a metabolic gate-keeper for fatty acids partitioning between adipose tissue for storage and skeletal muscle primarily for energy use. Transgenic mice that markedly over-express LPL exclusively in muscle, show increases not only in LPL activity, but also in oxidative enzyme activities and in number of mitochondria, together with an impaired glucose tolerance. However, the role of LPL in intracellular nutrient pathways remains uncertain. To examine differences in muscle nutrient uptake and fatty acid oxidative pattern, transgenic rabbits harboring a DNA fragment of the human LPL gene (hLPL and their wild-type littermates were compared for two muscles of different metabolic type, and for perirenal fat. Results Analyses of skeletal muscles and adipose tissue showed the expression of the hLPL DNA fragment in tissues of the hLPL group only. Unexpectedly, the activity level of LPL in both tissues was similar in the two groups. Nevertheless, mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate, measured ex vivo using [1-14C]oleate as substrate, was lower in hLPL rabbits than in wild-type rabbits for the two muscles under study. Both insulin-sensitive glucose transporter GLUT4 and muscle fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP contents were higher in hLPL rabbits than in wild-type littermates for the pure oxidative semimembranosus proprius muscle, but differences between groups did not reach significance when considering the fast-twitch glycolytic longissimus muscle. Variations in both glucose uptake potential, intra-cytoplasmic binding of fatty acids, and lipid oxidation rate observed in hLPL rabbits compared with their wild-type littermates, were not followed by any modifications in tissue lipid content, body fat, and plasma levels in energy-yielding metabolites. Conclusions Expression of intracellular binding proteins for both fatty acids and

  16. Pharmacokinetic models relevant to toxicity and metabolism for uranium in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Models to predict short and long term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney are reviewed and summarised. These are generally first order linear compartmental models or pseudo-pharmacokinetic models such as the retention model of the ICRP. Pharmacokinetic models account not only for transfer from blood to organs, but also recirculation from the organ to blood. The most recent information on mammalian and human metabolism of uranium is used to establish a revised model. The model is applied to the short term accumulation of uranium in the human kidney after a single rapid dosage to the blood, such as that obtained by inhaling UF6 or its hydrolysis products. It is shown that the maximum accumulation in the kidney under these conditions is less than the fraction of the material distributed from the blood to kidney if a true pharmacokinetic model is used. The best coefficients applicable to man in the authors' view are summarised in model V. For a half-time of two days in the mammalian kidney, the maximum concentration in kidney is 75% of that predicted by a retention model such as that used by the ICRP following a single acute intake. We conclude that one must use true pharmacokinetic models, which incorporate recirculation from the organs to the blood, in order to realistically predict time dependent uptake in the kidneys and other organs. Information is presented showing that the half-time for urinary excretion of soluble uranium in man after inhalation of UF6 is about one quarter of a day. (author)

  17. Influence of Sulforaphane Metabolites on Activities of Human Drug-Metabolizing Cytochrome P450 and Determination of Sulforaphane in Human Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanduchova, Alena; Tomankova, Veronika; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Anzenbacherova, Eva

    2016-12-01

    The influence of metabolites of sulforaphane, natural compounds present in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis italica) and in other cruciferous vegetables, on drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in human liver microsomes and possible entry of sulforaphane into human hepatic cells were investigated. Metabolites studied are compounds derived from sulforaphane by the mercapturic acid pathway (conjugation with glutathione and by following reactions), namely sulforaphane glutathione and sulforaphane cysteine conjugates and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their possible effect on four drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes, CYP3A4 (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation), CYP2D6 (bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation), CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation), and CYP2B6 (7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin O-deethylation), was tested. Inhibition of four prototypical CYP activities by sulforaphane metabolites was studied in pooled human liver microsomes. Sulforaphane metabolites did not considerably affect biological function of drug-metabolizing CYPs in human liver microsomes except for CYP2D6, which was found to be inhibited down to 73-78% of the original activity. Analysis of the entry of sulforaphane into human hepatocytes was done by cell disruption by sonication, methylene chloride extraction, and modified high-performance liquid chromatography method. The results have shown penetration of sulforaphane into the human hepatic cells.

  18. Metabolic reprogramming of human cells in response to oxidative stress: implications in the pathophysiology and therapy of mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are the organelles producing most of the energy and play important roles in a variety of biochemical functions in human cells. Mitochondrial defects can cause ATP deficiency and overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are the major hallmarks of mitochondrial diseases. Abundant evidence has suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction-elicited oxidative stress can play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria can respond to energy deficiency by the retrograde signaling to trigger a number of molecular events to help the human cells to cope with physiological or environmental changes. In this article, we first describe oxidative stress-induced cellular responses including metabolic adaptation, compensatory increase of mitochondrial biogenesis, upregulation of antioxidant enzymes, and alteration of protein acetylation in human cells with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this regard, we review recent findings to elucidate the mechanisms by which human cells motivate their mitochondria and the antioxidant defense system to respond to energy deficiency and oxidative stress, which contribute to the adaptive metabolic reprogramming in mitochondrial diseases. In addition, we emphasize the critical role of the activation of AMPK, Sirt1 and Sirt3 in the metabolic adaptation of human cells harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Recent studies have revealed that AMPK and sirtuins-mediated signaling pathways are involved in metabolic reprogramming, which is effected by upregulation of antioxidant defense system and mitochondrial protein acetylation, in human cells with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, we discuss several potential modulators of bioenergetic function such as coenzyme Q10, mitochondria-targeting antioxidants, resveratrol, and L-carnitine based on recent findings from studies on human cells and animal models of mitochondrial diseases. Elucidation of the signaling pathway of this adaptive response

  19. Mice lacking lipid droplet-associated hydrolase, a gene linked to human prostate cancer, have normal cholesterol ester metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kory, Nora; Grond, Susanne; Kamat, Siddhesh S

    2017-01-01

    Variations in the gene LDAH (C2ORF43), which encodes lipid droplet-associated hydrolase (LDAH), are among few loci associated with human prostate cancer. Homologs of LDAH have been identified as proteins of lipid droplets (LDs). LDs are cellular organelles that store neutral lipids, such as triac......Variations in the gene LDAH (C2ORF43), which encodes lipid droplet-associated hydrolase (LDAH), are among few loci associated with human prostate cancer. Homologs of LDAH have been identified as proteins of lipid droplets (LDs). LDs are cellular organelles that store neutral lipids......, such as triacylglycerols and sterol esters, as precursors for membrane components and as reservoirs of metabolic energy. LDAH is reported to hydrolyze cholesterol esters and to be important in macrophage cholesterol ester metabolism. Here, we confirm that LDAH is localized to LDs in several model systems. We generated...... a murine model in which Ldah is disrupted but found no evidence for a major function of LDAH in cholesterol ester or triacylglycerol metabolism in vivo, nor a role in energy or glucose metabolism. Our data suggest that LDAH is not a major cholesterol ester hydrolase, and an alternative metabolic function...

  20. Transcriptional Profiling Reveals a Common Metabolic Program in High-Risk Human Neuroblastoma and Mouse Neuroblastoma Sphere-Forming Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengling Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High-risk neuroblastoma remains one of the deadliest childhood cancers. Identification of metabolic pathways that drive or maintain high-risk neuroblastoma may open new avenues of therapeutic interventions. Here, we report the isolation and propagation of neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells with self-renewal and differentiation potential from tumors of the TH-MYCN mouse, an animal model of high-risk neuroblastoma with MYCN amplification. Transcriptional profiling reveals that mouse neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells acquire a metabolic program characterized by transcriptional activation of the cholesterol and serine-glycine synthesis pathways, primarily as a result of increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding factors and Atf4, respectively. This metabolic reprogramming is recapitulated in high-risk human neuroblastomas and is prognostic for poor clinical outcome. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the metabolic program markedly decreases the growth and tumorigenicity of both mouse neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells and human neuroblastoma cell lines. These findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for targeting the metabolic program of high-risk neuroblastoma.

  1. Effects of drugs in subtoxic concentrations on the metabolic fluxes in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, Jens; Noor, Fozia; Heinzle, Elmar

    2009-01-01

    Commonly used cytotoxicity assays assess the toxicity of a compound by measuring certain parameters which directly or indirectly correlate to the viability of the cells. However, the effects of a given compound at concentrations considerably below EC 50 values are usually not evaluated. These subtoxic effects are difficult to identify but may eventually cause severe and costly long term problems such as idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. We determined the toxicity of three hepatotoxic compounds, namely amiodarone, diclofenac and tacrine on the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 using an online kinetic respiration assay and analysed the effects of subtoxic concentrations of these drugs on the cellular metabolism by using metabolic flux analysis. Several changes in the metabolism could be detected upon exposure to subtoxic concentrations of the test compounds. Upon exposure to diclofenac and tacrine an increase in the TCA-cycle activity was observed which could be a signature of an uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation. The results indicate that metabolic flux analysis could serve as an invaluable novel tool for the investigation of the effects of drugs. The described methodology enables tracking the toxicity of compounds dynamically using the respiration assay in a range of concentrations and the metabolic flux analysis permits interesting insights into the changes in the central metabolism of the cell upon exposure to drugs.

  2. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after chronic tritiated water intakes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Lamothe, E.; Galeriu, D.

    2001-01-01

    Our earlier study of acute tritiated water intakes in humans has demonstrated that the dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium is less than 10% of the body water dose. To further demonstrate that the dose contribution from the organically bound tritium per unit intake of tritiated water is the same, regardless of whether the intake is acute (all at once) or chronic (spread over time), urine samples from six male radiation workers with chronic tritiated water intakes were collected and analyzed for tritium. These workers have a well-documented dose history and a well-controlled tritium bioassay database, providing assurance that their tritium intakes were in the form of tritiated water. Each month for a full calendar year, urine samples were collected from each exposed worker. The monthly concentration of tritium-in-urine for each exposed worker was no lower than 104 Bq L -1 but no higher than 105 Bq L -1 . These urine samples were analyzed for tritiated water and organically bound tritium to determine the ratio of these tritiated species in urine. The average ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine for each exposed worker was 330-129 (range, 297-589). In calculating the dose to these workers, we assumed that, under steady-state conditions, the ratio of the specific activity of tritium ( 3 H activity per gH) in the organic matter and water fractions of urine is representative of the ratio of the specific activity of tritium in the organic matter and water fractions of soft tissue. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium based on the ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine. The resulting average dose from the organically bound tritium was 6.9-3.1% (range, 4.7-9.9%) of the body water dose for the six male workers, and agrees well with the value obtained from our acute tritiated water intakes study in humans. The observed

  3. Development of Intrinsically Labeled Eggs and Poultry Meat for Use in Human Metabolic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Stephan; Beals, Joseph W; Parel, Justin T; Hanna, Christina D; Utterback, Pamela L; Dilger, Anna C; Ulanov, Alexander V; Li, Zhong; Paluska, Scott A; Moore, Daniel R; Parsons, Carl M; Burd, Nicholas A

    2016-07-01

    Stable isotope amino acids are regularly used as tracers to examine whole-body and muscle protein metabolism in humans. To accurately assess in vivo dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics, the amino acid tracer is required to be incorporated within the dietary protein food source (i.e., intrinsically labeled protein). We assessed the practicality of producing eggs and poultry meat intrinsically labeled with l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine through noninvasive oral tracer administration. A specifically formulated diet containing 0.52% leucine was supplemented with 0.3% l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine and subsequently fed to 3 laying hens (Lohmann LSL Whites) for 55 d. On day 55, the hens were slaughtered and their meat, bones, and organs were harvested to determine tissue labeling. In Expt. 1, 2 healthy young men [mean ± SEM age: 22 ± 1.5 y; mean ± SEM body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 23.7 ± 0.5] ingested 18 g l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine-labeled egg protein. In Expt. 2, 2 healthy young men (mean ± SEM age: 20.0 ± 0.0 y; mean ± SEM BMI: 26.4 ± 3.1) ingested 28 g l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine-labeled poultry meat protein. Plasma samples (Expts. 1 and 2) and muscle biopsies (Expt. 1) were collected before and after labeled-food ingestion. High tracer labeling [>20 mole percent excess (MPE)] in the eggs was obtained after 7 d and maintained throughout the feeding protocol (P meat was 9.6 ± 0.1 MPE. In Expts. 1 and 2, the consumption of labeled eggs and poultry meat protein increased plasma l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine enrichment, with mean ± SEM peak values of 6.7 ± 0.1 MPE and 4.0 ± 0.9 MPE, respectively. The mean ± SEM 5-h postprandial increase in myofibrillar l-[5,5,5-(2)H3]leucine enrichment after egg ingestion in healthy young men was 0.051 ± 0.008 MPE (Expt. 1). We demonstrated the feasibility of producing intrinsically labeled eggs and poultry meat for use in human metabolic research. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Environmental spread of microbes impacts the development of metabolic phenotypes in mice transplanted with microbial communities from humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Li; Bahl, Martin Iain; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2017-01-01

    -derived microbiotas in mice, factors affecting this process and resulting impact on metabolic health. We thus transplanted faecal microbiotas from humans (16 obese and 16 controls) separately into 64 germ-free Swiss Webster mice caged in pairs within four isolators, with two isolators assigned to each phenotype......Microbiota transplantation to germ-free animals is a powerful method to study involvement of gut microbes in the aetiology of metabolic syndrome. Owing to large interpersonal variability in gut microbiota, studies with broad coverage of donors are needed to elucidate the establishment of human......, thereby allowing us to explore the extent of microbial spread between cages in a well-controlled environment. Despite high group-wise similarity between obese and control human microbiotas, transplanted mice in the four isolators developed distinct gut bacterial composition and activity, body mass gain...

  5. Metagenomic systems biology and metabolic modeling of the human microbiome: from species composition to community assembly rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    The human microbiome is a key contributor to health and development. Yet little is known about the ecological forces that are at play in defining the composition of such host-associated communities. Metagenomics-based studies have uncovered clear patterns of community structure but are often incapable of distinguishing alternative structuring paradigms. In a recent study, we integrated metagenomic analysis with a systems biology approach, using a reverse ecology framework to model numerous human microbiota species and to infer metabolic interactions between species. Comparing predicted interactions with species composition data revealed that the assembly of the human microbiome is dominated at the community level by habitat filtering. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this habitat filtering cannot be accounted for by known host phenotypes or by the metabolic versatility of the various species. Here we provide a summary of our findings and offer a brief perspective on related studies and on future approaches utilizing this metagenomic systems biology framework.

  6. Enhanced metabolic function of human hepatocytes cryopreserved with low concentration me2so and polyol additives at -80C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B; Liu, B L; Zhou, X L; Shen, L; Huang, D H

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic function of cryopreserved cells, in addition to cell viability after thawing, is an important parameter in any successful cryopreservation protocol. Dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) is known to affect the differentiation of recovered cells. In this study, we report that sugars and sugar alcohols increases cell recovery, and also improves the metabolic function of human hepatocytes that are cryopreserved using low concentration Me2SO (5%). Three sugars (glucose, sucrose, and trehalose) and three sugar alcohols (xylitol, maltol, and sorbitol) have been tested. Cell viability after thaw and 24-h post-thaw attachment rate of cryopreserved human hepatocytes were assessed. Post-thaw metabolic activities (albumin, glucose, urea content) were measured, and cell proliferation was observed with inverted microscope. Cell viability, post-thaw attachment rate and metabolic activity of cryopreserved hepatocytes are enhanced by the addition of 0.4M sorbitol into 5% Me2SO solution. The study concludes that 5% Me2SO + 0.4M sorbitol can replace the 10% Me2SO method for cryopreservation of human hepatocytes at -80C freezer. The new solution may reduce the side effects on the patients and improve the safety of using cryopreserved hepatocytes.

  7. Insulin Plays a Permissive Role for the Vasoactive Effect of GIP Regulating Adipose Tissue Metabolism in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in combination with hyperinsulinemia increases blood flow and triglyceride (TAG) clearance in subcutaneous (sc) abdominal adipose tissue in lean humans. The present experiments were performed to further investigate the role...... of insulin for the vasoactive effect of GIP in adipose tissue metabolism and whether the vasodilatory effect of GIP is dependent on C-peptide. METHODS: Six lean healthy subjects were studied. The sc abdominal adipose tissue metabolism was assessed by Fick's principle during GIP infusion (1.5 pmol...

  8. Photo-oxidation products of skin surface squalene mediate metabolic and inflammatory responses to solar UV in human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kostyuk

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify endogenous lipid mediators of metabolic and inflammatory responses of human keratinocytes to solar UV irradiation. Physiologically relevant doses of solar simulated UVA+UVB were applied to human skin surface lipids (SSL or to primary cultures of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK. The decay of photo-sensitive lipid-soluble components, alpha-tocopherol, squalene (Sq, and cholesterol in SSL was analysed and products of squalene photo-oxidation (SqPx were quantitatively isolated from irradiated SSL. When administered directly to NHEK, low-dose solar UVA+UVB induced time-dependent inflammatory and metabolic responses. To mimic UVA+UVB action, NHEK were exposed to intact or photo-oxidised SSL, Sq or SqPx, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, and the product of tryptophan photo-oxidation 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ. FICZ activated exclusively metabolic responses characteristic for UV, i.e. the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR machinery and downstream CYP1A1/CYP1B1 gene expression, while 4-HNE slightly stimulated inflammatory UV markers IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS genes. On contrast, SqPx induced the majority of metabolic and inflammatory responses characteristic for UVA+UVB, acting via AhR, EGFR, and G-protein-coupled arachidonic acid receptor (G2A.Our findings indicate that Sq could be a primary sensor of solar UV irradiation in human SSL, and products of its photo-oxidation mediate/induce metabolic and inflammatory responses of keratinocytes to UVA+UVB, which could be relevant for skin inflammation in the sun-exposed oily skin.

  9. Effects of human immunodeficiency virus and metabolic complications on myocardial nutrient metabolism, blood flow, and oxygen consumption: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cade W Todd

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the general population, peripheral metabolic complications (MC increase the risk for left ventricular dysfunction. Human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV and combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART are associated with MC, left ventricular dysfunction, and a higher incidence of cardiovascular events than the general population. We examined whether myocardial nutrient metabolism and left ventricular dysfunction are related to one another and worse in HIV infected men treated with cART vs. HIV-negative men with or without MC. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study of myocardial glucose and fatty acid metabolism and left ventricular function in HIV+ and HIV-negative men with and without MC. Myocardial glucose utilization (GLUT, and fatty acid oxidation and utilization rates were quantified using 11C-glucose and 11C-palmitate and myocardial positron emission tomography (PET imaging in four groups of men: 23 HIV+ men with MC+ (HIV+/MC+, 42 ± 6 yrs, 15 HIV+ men without MC (HIV+/MC-, 41 ± 6 yrs, 9 HIV-negative men with MC (HIV-/MC+, 33 ± 5 yrs, and 22 HIV-negative men without MC (HIV-/MC-, 25 ± 6 yrs. Left ventricular function parameters were quantified using echocardiography. Results Myocardial glucose utilization was similar among groups, however when normalized to fasting plasma insulin concentration (GLUT/INS was lower (p Conclusion Men with metabolic complications, irrespective of HIV infection, had lower basal myocardial glucose utilization rates per unit insulin that were related to left ventricular diastolic impairments, indicating that well-controlled HIV infection is not an independent risk factor for blunted myocardial glucose utilization per unit of insulin. Trial Registration NIH Clinical Trials NCT00656851

  10. Acute physiological effects of glucocorticoids on fuel metabolism in humans are permissive but not direct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anna J.; Ramage, Lynne E.; Macfarlane, David P.; de Beaux, Andrew C.; Mole, Damian J.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The effects of glucocorticoids on fuel metabolism are complex. Acute glucocorticoid excess promotes lipolysis but chronic glucocorticoid excess causes visceral fat accumulation. We hypothesized that interactions between cortisol and insulin and adrenaline account for these conflicting results. We tested the effect of cortisol on lipolysis and glucose production with and without insulin and adrenaline in humans both in vivo and in vitro. Materials and methods A total of 20 healthy men were randomized to low and high insulin groups (both n = 10). Subjects attended on 3 occasions and received low (c. 150 nM), medium (c. 400 nM) or high (c. 1400 nM) cortisol infusion in a randomized crossover design. Deuterated glucose and glycerol were infused intravenously along with a pancreatic clamp (somatostatin with replacement of glucagon, insulin and growth hormone) and adrenaline. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for analysis. In parallel, the effect of cortisol on lipolysis was tested in paired primary cultures of human subcutaneous and visceral adipocytes. Results In vivo, high cortisol increased lipolysis only in the presence of high insulin and/or adrenaline but did not alter glucose kinetics. High cortisol increased adipose mRNA levels of ATGL, HSL and CGI‐58 and suppressed G0S2. In vitro, high cortisol increased lipolysis in the presence of insulin in subcutaneous, but not visceral, adipocytes. Conclusions The acute lipolytic effects of cortisol require supraphysiological concentrations, are dependent on insulin and adrenaline and are observed only in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The resistance of visceral adipose tissue to cortisol's lipolytic effects may contribute to the central fat accumulation observed with chronic glucocorticoid excess. PMID:28177189

  11. Oral glycotoxins are a modifiable cause of dementia and the metabolic syndrome in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weijing; Uribarri, Jaime; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Swamy, Shobha; Zhao, Zhengshan; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Simonaro, Calogera; Kuchel, George A; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Woodward, Mark; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2014-04-01

    Age-associated dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are currently epidemic. Neither their cause nor connection to the metabolic syndrome (MS) is clear. Suppression of deacetylase survival factor sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a key host defense, is a central feature of AD. Age-related MS and diabetes are also causally associated with suppressed SIRT1 partly due to oxidant glycotoxins [advanced glycation end products (AGEs)]. Changes in the modern diet include excessive nutrient-bound AGEs, such as neurotoxic methyl-glyoxal derivatives (MG). To determine whether dietary AGEs promote AD, we evaluated WT mice pair-fed three diets throughout life: low-AGE (MG(-)), MG-supplemented low-AGE (MG(+)), and regular (Reg) chow. Older MG(+)-fed mice, similar to old Reg controls, developed MS, increased brain amyloid-β42, deposits of AGEs, gliosis, and cognitive deficits, accompanied by suppressed SIRT1, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, AGE receptor 1, and PPARγ. These changes were not due to aging or caloric intake, as neither these changes nor the MS were present in age-matched, pair-fed MG(-) mice. The mouse data were enhanced by significant temporal correlations between high circulating AGEs and impaired cognition, as well as insulin sensitivity in older humans, in whom dietary and serum MG levels strongly and inversely associated with SIRT1 gene expression. The data identify a specific AGE (MG) as a modifiable risk factor for AD and MS, possibly acting via suppressed SIRT1 and other host defenses, to promote chronic oxidant stress and inflammation. Because SIRT1 deficiency in humans is both preventable and reversible by AGE reduction, a therapeutic strategy that includes AGE reduction may offer a new strategy to combat the epidemics of AD and MS.

  12. Altered Concentrations in Dyslipidemia Evidence a Role for ANGPTL8/Betatrophin in Lipid Metabolism in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Pascual-Corrales, Eider; Catalán, Victoria; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Romero, Sonia; Vila, Neus; Ibáñez, Patricia; Margall, María A; Silva, Camilo; Gil, María J; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-10-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (ANGPTL8)/betatrophin is a secreted protein initially involved in β-cell replication. Recent data in humans and mice models suggest that ANGPTL8/betatrophin is more related to lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to compare the circulating concentrations of ANGPTL8/betatrophin in individuals with dyslipidemia defined as having high or low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol or triglycerides, respectively. Serum concentrations of ANGPTL8/betatrophin were measured by an ELISA in 177 subjects. We studied two different selected case-control dyslipidemic cohorts including individuals with high (n = 43) or low (n = 46) circulating concentrations of HDL-cholesterol or with low (n = 48) or high (n = 40) levels of triglycerides. Circulating concentrations of ANGPTL8/betatrophin were significantly lower in individuals with dyslipidemia (P < .001) in both males (controls 27.8 ± 15.2 vs dyslipidemic 17.0 ± 11.2 ng/mL) and females (controls 50.0 ± 22.2 vs dyslipidemic 27.0 ± 16.5 ng/mL). The magnitude of the differences was higher in dyslipidemic patients with low HDL-cholesterol than in those with high triglyceride concentrations. ANGPTL8/betatrophin levels were lower in subjects with type 2 diabetes (P < .001), but the impact of type 2 diabetes vanished (P = .257) when the effect of dyslipidemia was included in the analysis. We conclude that serum ANGPTL8/betatrophin concentrations are altered in human dyslipidemia. ANGPTL8/betatrophin emerges as a potential player in dyslipidemia with a strong association with HDL-cholesterol and a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of dyslipidemia.

  13. Generalized decrease in brain glucose metabolism during fasting in humans studied by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redies, C.; Hoffer, L.J.; Beil, C.

    1989-01-01

    In prolonged fasting, the brain derives a large portion of its oxidative energy from the ketone bodies, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, thereby reducing whole body glucose consumption. Energy substrate utilization differs regionally in the brain of fasting rat, but comparable information has hitherto been unavailable in humans. We used positron emission tomography (PET) to study regional brain glucose and oxygen metabolism, blood flow, and blood volume in four obese subjects before and after a 3-wk total fast. Whole brain glucose utilization fell to 54% of control (postabsorptive) values (P less than 0.002). The whole brain rate constant for glucose tracer phosphorylation fell to 51% of control values (P less than 0.002). Both parameters decreased uniformly throughout the brain. The 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose lumped constant decreased from a control value of 0.57 to 0.43 (P less than 0.01). Regional blood-brain barrier transfer coefficients for glucose tracer, regional oxygen utilization, blood flow, and blood volume were unchanged

  14. Metabolic profiling of the human response to a glucose challenge reveals distinct axes of insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Oded; Wei, Ru; Wang, Thomas J; Ricciardi, Catherine; Lewis, Gregory D; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Carr, Steven A; Thadhani, Ravi; Gerszten, Robert E; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2008-01-01

    Glucose ingestion after an overnight fast triggers an insulin-dependent, homeostatic program that is altered in diabetes. The full spectrum of biochemical changes associated with this transition is currently unknown. We have developed a mass spectrometry-based strategy to simultaneously measure 191 metabolites following glucose ingestion. In two groups of healthy individuals (n=22 and 25), 18 plasma metabolites changed reproducibly, including bile acids, urea cycle intermediates, and purine degradation products, none of which were previously linked to glucose homeostasis. The metabolite dynamics also revealed insulin's known actions along four key axes—proteolysis, lipolysis, ketogenesis, and glycolysis—reflecting a switch from catabolism to anabolism. In pre-diabetics (n=25), we observed a blunted response in all four axes that correlated with insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that declines in glycerol and leucine/isoleucine (markers of lipolysis and proteolysis, respectively) jointly provide the strongest predictor of insulin sensitivity. This observation indicates that some humans are selectively resistant to insulin's suppression of proteolysis, whereas others, to insulin's suppression of lipolysis. Our findings lay the groundwork for using metabolic profiling to define an individual's 'insulin response profile', which could have value in predicting diabetes, its complications, and in guiding therapy. PMID:18682704

  15. Acrolein: sources, metabolism, and biomolecular interactions relevant to human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jan F; Maier, Claudia S

    2008-01-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is ubiquitously present in (cooked) foods and in the environment. It is formed from carbohydrates, vegetable oils and animal fats, amino acids during heating of foods, and by combustion of petroleum fuels and biodiesel. Chemical reactions responsible for release of acrolein include heat-induced dehydration of glycerol, retro-aldol cleavage of dehydrated carbohydrates, lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and Strecker degradation of methionine and threonine. Smoking of tobacco products equals or exceeds the total human exposure to acrolein from all other sources. The main endogenous sources of acrolein are myeloperoxidase-mediated degradation of threonine and amine oxidase-mediated degradation of spermine and spermidine, which may constitute a significant source of acrolein in situations of oxidative stress and inflammation. Acrolein is metabolized by conjugation with glutathione and excreted in the urine as mercapturic acid metabolites. Acrolein forms Michael adducts with ascorbic acid in vitro, but the biological relevance of this reaction is not clear. The biological effects of acrolein are a consequence of its reactivity towards biological nucleophiles such as guanine in DNA and cysteine, lysine, histidine, and arginine residues in critical regions of nuclear factors, proteases, and other proteins. Acrolein adduction disrupts the function of these biomacromolecules which may result in mutations, altered gene transcription, and modulation of apoptosis.

  16. Total Body Capacitance for Estimating Human Basal Metabolic Rate in an Egyptian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Abdel-Mageed, Samir; I. Mohamed, Ehab

    2016-01-01

    Determining basal metabolic rate (BMR) is important for estimating total energy needs in the human being yet, concerns have been raised regarding the suitability of sex-specific equations based on age and weight for its calculation on an individual or population basis. It has been shown that body cell mass (BCM) is the body compartment responsible for BMR. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between total body capacitance (TBC), which is considered as an expression for BCM, and BMR and to develop a formula for calculating BMR in comparison with widely used equations. Fifty healthy nonsmoking male volunteers [mean age (± SD): 24.93 ± 4.15 year and body mass index (BMI): 25.63 ± 3.59 kg/m2] and an equal number of healthy nonsmoking females matched for age and BMI were recruited for the study. TBC and BMR were measured for all participants using octopolar bioelectric impedance analysis and indirect calorimetry techniques, respectively. A significant regressing equation based on the covariates: sex, weight, and TBC for estimating BMR was derived (R=0.96, SEE=48.59 kcal, and P<0.0001), which will be useful for nutritional and health status assessment for both individuals and populations. PMID:27127453

  17. Hepatic energy metabolism in human diabetes mellitus, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Roden, Michael

    2013-10-15

    Alterations of hepatic mitochondrial function have been observed in states of insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients with overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can exhibit reduction in hepatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and impaired repletion of their hepatic ATP stores upon ATP depletion by fructose. Obesity and NAFLD may also associate with impaired ATP recovery after ATP-depleting challenges and augmented oxidative stress in the liver. On the other hand, patients with obesity or NAFLD can present with upregulated hepatic anaplerotic and oxidative fluxes, including β-oxidation and tricarboxylic cycle activity. The present review focuses on the methods and data on hepatic energy metabolism in various states of human insulin resistance. We propose that the liver can adapt to increased lipid exposition by greater lipid storing and oxidative capacity, resulting in increased oxidative stress, which in turn could deteriorate hepatic mitochondrial function in chronic insulin resistance and NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of specifically deuterium-labelled pregnanolone and pregnanediol sulphates for metabolic studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, T A; Sjövall, J; Herz, J E

    1975-10-01

    A synthesis is reported of 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one sulphate and the disulphate and 3-monosulphate of 5alpha-pregnane-3beta,20alpha-diol, labelled specifically with deuterium in high isotopic purity for metabolic studies in humans. Base-catalyzed equilibration of 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-25R-spirostan-12-one (hemcogenin, II) with deuterium oxide, followed by removal of the 12-keto group and degradation of the sapogenin side-chain afforded 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-[11,11-2H2]pregn-16-en-20-one (VII). Further deuterium atoms were introduced at the 3alpha and 20beta positions by reductions with sodium borodeuteride and lithium aluminum deuteride, respectively. These reactions led to 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-[3alpha,11,11-2H3]pregnan-20-one (X; isotopic purity 87.2%) and 5alpha-[3alpha,11,11,20beta-2H4]pregnane-3beta,20alpha-diol (XIV; isotopic purity 83.9%). The 3-sulphate of the pregnanolone and the 3,20-disulphate of the pregnanediol were prepared directly form the free alcohols, while the 3-monosulphate of the pregnanediol was obtained via 5alpha-[3alpha,11,11,20beta-2H4]pregnane-3beta,20alpha-diol 20-acetate (XVII).

  19. Efficacy of dietary supplementation with botanicals on carbohydrate metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, William T; Ye, Jianping; Wang, Zhong Q

    2008-06-01

    Botanical products are widely used in nutritional supplementation for promotion of health or prevention of diseases. With the high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism are common in the general population and obtaining glycemic control is important in reducing the complications of diabetes. If shown to be effective, botanical products have a unique position in potentially aiding the general public in regard to obesity and diabetes. They can be obtained "over-the-counter" and may have less side effects compared to many synthetic drugs. Although most of the popular botanicals have a long history in folk medicine, there is paucity of data regarding their efficacy and safety, particularly as it relates to human studies. In this review, we discuss the data that was available in the literature for nine botanicals that are frequently promoted to help manage blood glucose. They are Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia), Fenugreek (trigonella foenum graecum), Gymnema Sylvestre, Ivy Gourd (Coccinia indica), Nopal or Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia streptacantha), Ginseng, Aloe Vera, Russian Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), and Garlic (Allium sativum). The discussion is emphasized on the clinical aspect of these botanicals. Due to the lack of sufficient evidence from clinical studies for any of the botanicals reviewed, it is premature to actively recommend use of any particular herb to treat either glucose or other risk factors. Thus, well defined randomized clinical trials are warranted in this area.

  20. Design and Applications of Biodegradable Polyester Tissue Scaffolds Based on Endogenous Monomers Found in Human Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin G. Barrett

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic polyesters have deeply impacted various biomedical and engineering fields, such as tissue scaffolding and therapeutic delivery. Currently, many applications involving polyesters are being explored with polymers derived from monomers that are endogenous to the human metabolism. Examples of these monomers include glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, and lactic, sebacic, citric, succinic, α-ketoglutaric, and fumaric acids. In terms of mechanical versatility, crystallinity, hydrophobicity, and biocompatibility, polyesters synthesized partially or completely from these monomers can display a wide range of properties. The flexibility in these macromolecular properties allows for materials to be tailored according to the needs of a particular application. Along with the presence of natural monomers that allows for a high probability of biocompatibility, there is also an added benefit that this class of polyesters is more environmentally friendly than many other materials used in biomedical engineering. While the selection of monomers may be limited by nature, these polymers have produced or have the potential to produce an enormous number of successes in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Metabolism of rutin and poncirin by human intestinal microbiota and cloning of their metabolizing α-L-rhamnosidase from Bifidobacterium dentium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seo-Hyeon; Hyun, Yang-Jin; Shim, Juwon; Hong, Sung-Woon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To understand the metabolism of flavonoid rhamnoglycosides by human intestinal microbiota, we measured the metabolic activity of rutin and poncirin (distributed in many functional foods and herbal medicine) by 100 human stool specimens. The average α-Lrhamnosidase activities on the p-nitrophenyl-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, rutin, and poncirin subtrates were 0.10 ± 0.07, 0.25 ± 0.08, and 0.15 ± 0.09 pmol/min/mg, respectively. To investigate the enzymatic properties, α-L-rhamnosidase-producing bacteria were isolated from the specimens, and the α-L-rhamnosidase gene was cloned from a selected organism, Bifidobacterium dentium, and expressed in E. coli. The cloned α-L-rhamnosidase gene contained a 2,673 bp sequcence encoding 890 amino acid residues. The cloned gene was expressed using the pET 26b(+) vector in E. coli BL21, and the expressed enzyme was purified using Ni(2+)-NTA and Q-HP column chromatography. The specific activity of the purified α-L-rhamnosidase was 23.3 μmol/min/mg. Of the tested natural product constituents, the cloned α-L-rhamnosidase hydrolyzed rutin most potently, followed by poncirin, naringin, and ginsenoside Re. However, it was unable to hydrolyze quercitrin. This is the first report describing the cloning, expression, and characterization of α-L-rhamnosidase, a flavonoid rhamnoglycosidemetabolizing enzyme, from bifidobacteria. Based on these findings, the α-L-rhamnosidase of intestinal bacteria such as B. dentium seem to be more effective in hydrolyzing (1-->6) bonds than (1-->2) bonds of rhamnoglycosides, and may play an important role in the metabolism and pharmacological effect of rhamnoglycosides.

  2. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Emma L; Lane, James A E; Michalek, Ryan D; Karoly, Edward D; Parkinson, E Kenneth

    2016-12-07

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease.

  3. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 brea...

  4. Mechanisms underlying metabolic and neural defects in zebrafish and human multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanquan Song

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In humans, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF or electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH lead to MADD/glutaric aciduria type II, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by a broad spectrum of devastating neurological, systemic and metabolic symptoms. We show that a zebrafish mutant in ETFDH, xavier, and fibroblast cells from MADD patients demonstrate similar mitochondrial and metabolic abnormalities, including reduced oxidative phosphorylation, increased aerobic glycolysis, and upregulation of the PPARG-ERK pathway. This metabolic dysfunction is associated with aberrant neural proliferation in xav, in addition to other neural phenotypes and paralysis. Strikingly, a PPARG antagonist attenuates aberrant neural proliferation and alleviates paralysis in xav, while PPARG agonists increase neural proliferation in wild type embryos. These results show that mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an increase in aerobic glycolysis, affects neurogenesis through the PPARG-ERK pathway, a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Methylation, Glucuronidation, and Sulfonation of Daphnetin in Human Hepatic Preparations In Vitro: Metabolic Profiling, Pathway Comparison, and Bioactivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Si-Cheng; Xia, Yang-Liu; Hou, Jie; Ge, Guang-Bo; Zhang, Jiang-Wei; He, Yu-Qi; Wang, Jia-Yue; Qi, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that daphnetin is subject to glucuronidation in vitro. However, daphnetin metabolism is still poorly documented. This study aimed to investigate daphnetin metabolism and its consequent effect on the bioactivity. Metabolic profiles obtained by human liver S9 fractions and human hepatocytes showed that daphnetin was metabolized by glucuronidation, sulfonation, and methylation to form 6 conjugates which were synthesized and identified as 7-O-glucuronide, 8-O-glucuronide, 7-O-sulfate and 8-O-sulfate, 8-O-methylate, and 7-O-suflo-8-O-methylate. Regioselective 8-O-methylation of daphnetin was investigated using in silico docking calculations, and the results suggested that a close proximity (2.03 Å) of 8-OH to the critical residue Lysine 144 might be the responsible mechanism. Compared with glucuronidation and sulfonation pathways, the methylation of daphnetin had a high clearance rate (470 μL/min/mg) in human liver S9 fractions and contributed to a large amount (37.3%) of the methyl-derived metabolites in human hepatocyte. Reaction phenotyping studies showed the major role of SULT1A1, -1A2, and -1A3 in daphnetin sulfonation, and soluble COMT in daphnetin 8-O-methylation. Of the metabolites, only 8-O-methyldaphnetin exhibited an inhibitory activity on lymphocyte proliferation comparable to that of daphnetin. In conclusion, methylation is a crucial pathway for daphnetin clearance and might be involved in pharmacologic actions of daphnetin in humans. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two dimensional finite element method for metabolic effect in thermoregulation on human males and females skin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswati Acharya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To deal the implication of metabolic reaction relying on dermal thicknesses of males and females for temperature distribution on the layers of dermal part at various atmospheric temperatures. Methods: The mathematical model involving bioheat equation has been solved using finite element method and Crank-Nicolson technique to numerically investigate two dimensional temperature distributions. Initially, human dermal region under consideration is divided into six parts: stratum corneum, stratum germinativum, papillary region, reticular region, fatty layer and muscle part of subcutaneous tissue. Pennes bioheat equation is used considering the suitable physical and physiological parameters that affect the heat regulation in the layers. Computer simulation has been used for numerical results and graph of the temperatures profiles. Results: Lower percentage of muscle mass and higher percentage of adipose tissue in subcutaneous part of females result lower metabolic rate compared to males. Metabolism is considered as a heat source within the body tissue. The study delineates that when the metabolic heat generation S increases, body temperature rises and when S decreases, it goes down. In higher ambient temperature T∞ effect of S is lower as compared to lower T∞. Conclusions: Males and females would differ in their physiological responses in temperature distribution due to differences in metabolic heat production between genders. The thinner layers of males lead to higher values of skin temperature than thicker layer of females. Thickness plays a significant role in temperature distributions in human males and females body. Current understanding of human thermoregulation is based on male patterns; studies on women are still relatively rare and involve only small number of subjects. So it is still necessary for micro level study for temperature distribution model on the dermal layers of males and females.

  7. Sex- and age-dependent gene expression in human liver: An implication for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Takata, Ryo; Kito, Go; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2017-02-01

    Sex and age differences in hepatic expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes could cause variations in drug metabolism, but has not been fully elucidated, especially in Asian population. In this study, the global expression of human hepatic genes was analyzed by microarrays in 40 Japanese subjects (27 males and 13 females). Thirty-five sex-biased genes were identified (P age-biased genes in two age groups, age-biased genes were related to transcription regulation and cell death. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed the female-biased expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes BChE, CYP4X1, and SULT1E1 (≥1.5-fold, P drug-metabolizing enzyme genes indicated that expression of CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 in females in the ≥70 age group was less than in the age group (≥1.5-fold, P drug metabolism, with respect to sex and age. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Atorvastatin protects the proliferative ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells inhibited by angiotensin II by changing mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Ye, Ning; Guo, Xiaofan; Li, Zhao; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibits the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by changing mitochondrial energy metabolism, and whether atorvastatin has a protective role via restoration of endothelial function. HUVECs were treated with 1 µM Ang II alone or with 10 µM atorvastatin for 24 h. Proliferation was detected by MTT assay, cell counting, 5‑ethynyl‑2'‑deoxyuridine assay and real‑time cell analyzer. Mitochondrial energy metabolism including oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate were measured using a Seahorse metabolic flux analyzer. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected under fluorescence microscope following staining with tetramethylrhodamine. Respiratory chain complexes I‑V were detected using western blotting. The current study showed that Ang II inhibits the proliferation of HUVECs. Results from the Seahorse metabolic flux analyzer indicated that Ang II decreased basal oxygen consumption, maximal respiration capacity, spare respiration capacity, adenosine triphosphate‑linked respiration and non‑mitochondrial respiration. By contrast, Ang II increased the proton leak. Additionally, Ang II increased glycolysis, glycolytic capacity and non‑glycolytic acidification. Furthermore, these effects were all suppressed by atorvastatin. The results indicated that atorvastatin prevents cellular energy metabolism switching from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis induced by Ang II and protected the proliferative ability of HUVECs.

  9. Metabolism and disposition of [14C]brivanib alaninate after oral administration to rats, monkeys, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jiachang; Gan, Jinping; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Christopher, Lisa J; Arora, Vinod; Masson, Eric; Williams, Daphne; Pursley, Janice; Allentoff, Alban; Lago, Michael; Tran, Scott B; Iyer, Ramaswamy A

    2011-05-01

    Brivanib [(R)-1-(4-(4-fluoro-2-methyl-1H-indol-5-yloxy)-5-methylpyrrolo[1,2,4]triazin-6-yloxy)propan-2-ol, BMS-540215] is a potent and selective dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways. Its alanine prodrug, brivanib alaninate [(1R,2S)-2-aminopropionic acid 2-[4-(4-fluoro-2-methyl-1H-indol-5-yloxy)-5-methylpyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-6-yloxy]-1-methylethyl ester, BMS-582664], is currently under development as an oral agent for the treatment of cancer. This study describes the in vivo biotransformation of brivanib after a single oral dose of [(14)C]brivanib alaninate to intact rats, bile duct-cannulated (BDC) rats, intact monkeys, BDC monkeys, and humans. Fecal excretion was the primary route of elimination of drug-derived radioactivity in animals and humans. In BDC rats and monkeys, the majority of radioactivity was excreted in bile. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly and completely converted via hydrolysis to brivanib in vivo. The area under the curve from zero to infinity of brivanib accounted for 14.2 to 54.3% of circulating radioactivity in plasma in animals and humans, suggesting that metabolites contributed significantly to the total drug-related radioactivity. In plasma from animals and humans, brivanib was a prominent circulating component. All the metabolites that humans were exposed to were also present in toxicological species. On the basis of metabolite exposure and activity against VEGF and FGF receptors of the prominent human circulating metabolites, only brivanib is expected to contribute to the pharmacological effects in humans. Unchanged brivanib was not detected in urine or bile samples, suggesting that metabolic clearance was the primary route of elimination. The primary metabolic pathways were oxidative and conjugative metabolism of brivanib.

  10. Metabolism of BYZX in human liver microsomes and cytosol: identification of the metabolites and metabolic pathways of BYZX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Sheng, Rong; Hu, Yongzhou; Zeng, Su

    2013-01-01

    BYZX, [(E)-2-(4-((diethylamino)methyl)benzylidene)-5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydroinden-one], belongs to a series of novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and has been synthesized as a new chemical entity for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease symptoms. When incubated with human liver microsomes (HLMs), BYZX was rapidly transformed into its metabolites M1, M2, and M3. The chemical structures of these metabolites were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, which indicated that M1 was an N-desethylated and C = C hydrogenation metabolite of BYZX. M2 and M3 were 2 precursor metabolites, which resulted from the hydrogenation and desethylation of BYZX, respectively. Further studies with chemical inhibitors and human recombinant cytochrome P450s (CYPs), and correlation studies were performed. The results indicated that the N-desethylation of BYZX and M2 was mediated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. The reduced form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate was involved in the hydrogenation of BYZX and M3, and this reaction occurred in the HLMs and in the human liver cytosol. The hydrogenation reaction was not inhibited by any chemical inhibitors of CYPs, but it was significantly inhibited by some substrates of α,β-ketoalkene C = C reductases and their inhibitors such as benzylideneacetone, dicoumarol, and indomethacin. Our results suggest that α,β-ketoalkene C = C reductases may play a role in the hydrogenation reaction, but this issue requires further clarification.

  11. Parametric recursive system identification and self-adaptive modeling of the human energy metabolism for adaptive control of fat weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Őri, Zsolt P

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to facilitate indirect measurements of difficult to measure variables of the human energy metabolism on a daily basis. The model performs recursive system identification of the parameters of the metabolic model of the human energy metabolism using the law of conservation of energy and principle of indirect calorimetry. Self-adaptive models of the utilized energy intake prediction, macronutrient oxidation rates, and daily body composition changes were created utilizing Kalman filter and the nominal trajectory methods. The accuracy of the models was tested in a simulation study utilizing data from the Minnesota starvation and overfeeding study. With biweekly macronutrient intake measurements, the average prediction error of the utilized carbohydrate intake was -23.2 ± 53.8 kcal/day, fat intake was 11.0 ± 72.3 kcal/day, and protein was 3.7 ± 16.3 kcal/day. The fat and fat-free mass changes were estimated with an error of 0.44 ± 1.16 g/day for fat and -2.6 ± 64.98 g/day for fat-free mass. The daily metabolized macronutrient energy intake and/or daily macronutrient oxidation rate and the daily body composition change from directly measured serial data are optimally predicted with a self-adaptive model with Kalman filter that uses recursive system identification.

  12. Interplay between gut microbiota, its metabolites and human metabolism: Dissecting cause from consequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartstra, A. V.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Herrema, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alterations in gut microbiota composition and bacterial metabolites have been increasingly recognized to affect host metabolism and are at the basis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (DM2). Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (EEC's) sense gut luminal content and

  13. Differential glucose metabolism in mice and humans affected by McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L

    2016-01-01

    , which could lead to lower glycogen accumulation. In comparison, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and soleus had massive glycogen accumulation, but few, if any, changes or adaptations in glucose metabolism compared with wild-type mice. The findings suggest plasticity in glycogen metabolism...

  14. Enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; López-Maside, Laura; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Sixto-Leal, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) are structurally related to branched-chain fatty acids. Leucine is 2-amino-4-methyl-pentanoic acid, isoleucine is 2-amino-3-methyl-pentanoic acid, and valine is 2-amino-3-methyl-butanoic acid. Similar to fatty acid oxidation, leucine and isoleucine produce acetyl-coA. Additionally, leucine generates acetoacetate and isoleucine yields propionyl-coA. Valine oxidation produces propionyl-coA, which is converted into methylmalonyl-coA and succinyl-coA. Branched-chain aminotransferase catalyzes the first reaction in the catabolic pathway of branched-chain amino acids, a reversible transamination that converts branched-chain amino acids into branched-chain ketoacids. Simultaneously, glutamate is converted in 2-ketoglutarate. The branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain ketoacids to produce branched-chain acyl-coA intermediates, which then follow separate catabolic pathways. Human tissue distribution and function of most of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid catabolism is unknown. Congenital deficiencies of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism are generally rare disorders. Some of them are associated with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity and respiratory chain dysfunction that may contribute to their clinical phenotype. The biochemical phenotype is characterized by accumulation of the substrate to the deficient enzyme and its carnitine and/or glycine derivatives. It was established at the beginning of the twentieth century that the plasma level of the branched-chain amino acids is increased in conditions associated with insulin resistance such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. However, the potential clinical relevance of this elevation is uncertain.

  15. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  16. Nitrogen Metabolite Repression of Metabolism and Virulence in the Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I. Russel; Chow, Eve W. L.; Morrow, Carl A.; Djordjevic, Julianne T.; Fraser, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Proper regulation of metabolism is essential to maximizing fitness of organisms in their chosen environmental niche. Nitrogen metabolite repression is an example of a regulatory mechanism in fungi that enables preferential utilization of easily assimilated nitrogen sources, such as ammonium, to conserve resources. Here we provide genetic, transcriptional, and phenotypic evidence of nitrogen metabolite repression in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition to loss of transcriptional activation of catabolic enzyme-encoding genes of the uric acid and proline assimilation pathways in the presence of ammonium, nitrogen metabolite repression also regulates the production of the virulence determinants capsule and melanin. Since GATA transcription factors are known to play a key role in nitrogen metabolite repression, bioinformatic analyses of the C. neoformans genome were undertaken and seven predicted GATA-type genes were identified. A screen of these deletion mutants revealed GAT1, encoding the only global transcription factor essential for utilization of a wide range of nitrogen sources, including uric acid, urea, and creatinine—three predominant nitrogen constituents found in the C. neoformans ecological niche. In addition to its evolutionarily conserved role in mediating nitrogen metabolite repression and controlling the expression of catabolic enzyme and permease-encoding genes, Gat1 also negatively regulates virulence traits, including infectious basidiospore production, melanin formation, and growth at high body temperature (39°–40°). Conversely, Gat1 positively regulates capsule production. A murine inhalation model of cryptococcosis revealed that the gat1Δ mutant is slightly more virulent than wild type, indicating that Gat1 plays a complex regulatory role during infection. PMID:21441208

  17. Features of selenium metabolism in humans living under the conditions of North European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshukova, Olga; Potolitsyna, Natalya; Shadrina, Vera; Chernykh, Aleksei; Bojko, Evgeny

    2014-08-01

    Selenium supplementation and its effects on Northerners have been little studied. The aim of our study was to assess the selenium levels of the inhabitants of North European Russia, the seasonal aspects of selenium supplementation, and the interrelationships between selenium levels and the levels of thyroid gland hormones. To study the particular features of selenium metabolism in Northerners over the course of 1 year, 19 healthy male Caucasian volunteers (18-21 years old) were recruited for the present study. The subjects were military guards in a Northern European region of Russia (Syktyvkar, Russia, 62°N latitude) who spent 6-10-h outdoors daily. The study was conducted over a 12-month period. Selenium levels, glutathione peroxidase (GP) activity, as well as total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxin (T4), free thyroxin, free triiodothyronine, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, were determined in the blood serum. The study subjects showed low levels of plasma selenium throughout the year. We observed a noticeable decrease in plasma selenium levels during the period from May to August, with the lowest levels in July. Selenium levels in the military guards correlated with the levels of selenium-dependent GP enzyme activity throughout the year. Additionally, we demonstrated a significant correlation between selenium and pituitary-thyroid axis hormones (total T3, free T4, and TSH) in periods in which plasma selenium levels were lower than the established normal ranges. Over the course of 1 year, low levels of plasma selenium affect GP activity and thyroid hormone levels in humans living in North European Russia.

  18. Human absorption and metabolism of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol ingested as olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bock, Martin; Thorstensen, Eric B; Derraik, José G B; Henderson, Harold V; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2013-11-01

    Phenolic compounds derived from the olive plant (Olea europaea L.), particularly hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, have many beneficial effects in vitro. Olive leaves are the richest source of olive phenolic compounds, and olive leaf extract (OLE) is now a popular nutraceutical taken either as liquid or capsules. To quantify the bioavailability and metabolism of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol when taken as OLE, nine volunteers (five males) aged 42.8 ± 7.4 years were randomized to receive either capsulated or liquid OLE as a single lower (51.1 mg oleuropein, 9.7 mg hydroxytyrosol) or higher (76.6 mg oleuropein, 14.5 mg hydroxytyrosol) dose, and then the opposite strength (but same formulation) a week later. Plasma and urine samples were collected at fixed intervals for 24 h post-ingestion. Phenolic content was analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Conjugated metabolites of hydroxytyrosol were the primary metabolites recovered in plasma and urine after OLE ingestion. Peak oleuropein concentrations in plasma were greater following ingestion of liquid than capsule preparations (0.47 versus 2.74 ng/mL; p = 0.004), but no such effect was observed for peak concentrations of conjugated (sulfated and glucuronidated) hydroxytyrosol (p = 0.94). However, the latter peak was reached earlier with liquid preparation (93 versus 64 min; p = 0.031). There was a gender effect on the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, with males displaying greater plasma area under the curve for conjugated hydroxytyrosol (11,600 versus 2550 ng/mL; p = 0.048). All conjugated hydroxytyrosol metabolites were recovered in the urine within 8 h. There was wide inter-individual variation. OLE effectively delivers oleuropein and hydroxytrosol metabolites to plasma in humans. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Structure–metabolism relationships in human-AOX: Chemical insights from a large database of aza-aromatic and amide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Martina; Milani, Nicolò; Tortorella, Sara; Cucco, Andrea; Goracci, Laura; Brink, Andreas; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a metabolic enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of aldehyde and aza-aromatic compounds and the hydrolysis of amides, moieties frequently shared by the majority of drugs. Despite its key role in human metabolism, to date only fragmentary information about the chemical features responsible for AOX susceptibility are reported and only “very local” structure–metabolism relationships based on a small number of similar compounds have been developed. This study reports a more comprehensive coverage of the chemical space of structures with a high risk of AOX phase I metabolism in humans. More than 270 compounds were studied to identify the site of metabolism and the metabolite(s). Both electronic [supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations] and exposure effects were considered when rationalizing the structure–metabolism relationship. PMID:28373537

  20. Adaptive Changes in Basal Metabolic Rate in Humans in Different Eco-Geographical Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, Arkady L; Belkin, Victor Sh; Kalichman, Leonid; Kobyliansky, Eugene D

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to establish whether the human basal metabolic rate (BMR) shifts towards the reduction of vital functions as an adaptation response to extreme environmental conditions. Data was collected in arid and Extreme North zones. The arid zone samples included Bedouins living in the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, Turkmen students, the Pedagogical University of Chardzhou, Turkmenistan born Russians and Russian soldiers. Soldiers were divided into 3 groups according to the length of their tour of duty in the area: 1st group: up to six months, 2nd group: up to 2 years and the 3rd group: 3-5 years. The Extreme North samples comprised Chukchi natives, 1st generation Russian immigrants born in the area and 3 groups of soldiers comparable to the soldiers from Turkmenistan. BMR values of the new recruits had the highest values of total and relative BMR (1769 ± 16 and 28.3 ± 0.6, correspondingly). The total and relative BMR tended to decrease within a longer adaptation period. The BMR values of officers who served >3 years in Turkmenistan were very similar to the Turkmenistan born Russians (1730 ± 14 vs. 1726 ± 18 and 26.5 ± 0.6 vs. 27.3 ± 0.7, correspondingly). Similarly, in Chukotka, the highest relative BMR was found in the new recruits, serving up to 6 months (28.1 ± 0.7) and was significantly (p BMR was virtually similar in Russian officers serving > 3 years, compared to the middle-aged Chukchi or Chukotka-born Russians (25.8 ± 0.5 vs. 25.6 ± 0.5 and 25.5 ± 0.6, correspondingly). The BMR parameters demonstrated a stronger association with body weight than with age. In extreme environmental conditions, migrant populations showed a decrease in BMR, thus reducing its vital functions. The BMR reduction effect with the adequate adaptive transformation is likely to be the key strategy for developing programs to facilitate human and animal adaptation to extreme factors. This process is aimed at preserving the optimum energy balance and homeostasis while minimizing

  1. Effect of Curcuma longa on CYP2D6- and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of dextromethorphan in human liver microsomes and healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jenoobi, Fahad Ibrahim; Al-Thukair, Areej A; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Abbas, Fawkeya A; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A

    2015-03-01

    Effect of Curcuma longa rhizome powder and its ethanolic extract on CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 metabolic activity was investigated in vitro using human liver microsomes and clinically in healthy human subjects. Dextromethorphan (DEX) was used as common probe for CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 enzymes. Metabolic activity of CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 was evaluated through in vitro study; where microsomes were incubated with NADPH in presence and absence of Curcuma extract. In clinical study phase-I, six healthy human subjects received a single dose (30 mg) of DEX syrup, and in phase-II DEX syrup was administered with Curcuma powder. The enzyme CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 mediated O- and N-demethylation of dextromethorphan into dextrorphan (DOR) and 3-methoxymorphinan (3-MM), respectively. Curcuma extract significantly inhibited the formation of DOR and 3-MM, in a dose-dependent and linear fashion. The 100 μg/ml dose of curcuma extract produced highest inhibition, which was about 70 % for DOR and 80 % for 3-MM. Curcuma significantly increases the urine metabolic ratio of DEX/DOR but the change in DEX/3-MM ratio was statistically insignificant. Present findings suggested that curcuma significantly inhibits the activity of CYP2D6 in in vitro as well as in vivo; which indicates that curcuma has potential to interact with CYP2D6 substrates.

  2. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, S W; Akintola, A A; Roelfsema, F

    2015-01-01

    of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis...... hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring...... may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism....

  3. Regional fat metabolism in human splanchnic and adipose tissues; the effect of exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Bülow, Jens; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of splanchnic and adipose tissue in the regulation of fatty acid (FA) metabolism at rest, during 1 h of semi-recumbent cycle exercise at 60 % of maximal power output and 3 h of recovery. In six post-absorptive healthy volunteers catheters were placed...... in a radial artery, hepatic vein and a subcutaneous vein on the anterior abdominal wall. Whole body, and regional splanchnic and adipose tissue FA metabolism were measured by a constant infusion of the stable isotopes [U-(13)C]palmitate and [(2)H(5)]glycerol and according to Fick's principle. The whole body...... that adipose tissue can metabolize glycerol....

  4. Post-exercise adipose tissue and skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulla, N A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    metabolism during a 3 h post-exercise period. Six subjects were studied twice. In one experiment, they exercised for 90 min at 40% of maximal O2 consumption (VO2,max) and in the other experiment they exercised at 60% VO2,max for 60 min. For both experiments, catheters were inserted in an artery......, a subcutaneous abdominal vein and a femoral vein. Adipose tissue metabolism and skeletal muscle (leg) metabolism were measured using Fick's principle. The results show that the lipolytic rate in adipose tissue during exercise was the same in each experiment. Post-exercise, there was a very fast decrease...

  5. Energy expenditure in the etiology of human obesity: spendthrift and thrifty metabolic phenotypes and energy-sensing mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggi, P; Vinales, K L; Basolo, A; Santini, F; Krakoff, J

    2018-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human obesity is the result of dysregulation of the reciprocal relationship between food intake and energy expenditure (EE), which influences daily energy balance and ultimately leads to weight gain. According to principles of energy homeostasis, a relatively lower EE in a setting of energy balance may lead to weight gain; however, results from different study groups are contradictory and indicate a complex interaction between EE and food intake which may differentially influence weight change in humans. Recently, studies evaluating the adaptive response of one component to perturbations of the other component of energy balance have revealed both the existence of differing metabolic phenotypes ("spendthrift" and "thrifty") resulting from overeating or underfeeding, as well as energy-sensing mechanisms linking EE to food intake, which might explain the propensity of an individual to weight gain. The purpose of this review is to debate the role that human EE plays on body weight regulation and to discuss the physiologic mechanisms linking EE and food intake. An increased understanding of the complex interplay between human metabolism and food consumption may provide insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying weight gain, which may eventually lead to prevention and better treatment of human obesity.

  6. Inhibition of in vitro metabolism of testosterone in human, dog and horse liver microsomes to investigate species differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jana; Mevissen, Meike

    2015-04-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation was investigated in human, canine and equine liver microsomes and in human and canine single CYPs. The contribution of the CYP families 1, 2 and 3 was studied using chemical inhibitors. Testosterone metabolites were analyzed by HPLC. The metabolites androstenedione, 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone were found in microsomes of all species, but the pattern of metabolites varied within species. Androstenedione was more prominent in the animal species, and an increase over time was seen in equines. Testosterone hydroxylation was predominantly catalyzed by the CYP3A subfamily in all three species. While CYP2C9 did not metabolise testosterone, the canine ortholog CYP2C21 produced androstenedione. Quercetin significantly inhibited 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone in all species investigated, suggesting that CYP2C8 is involved in testosterone metabolism, whereas sulfaphenazole significantly inhibited the formation of 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone in human microsomes, at 60 min in equine microsomes, but not in canine microsomes. A contribution of CYP2B6 in testosterone metabolism was only found in human and equine microsomes. Inhibition of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 indicated its involvement in androstenedione formation in humans, increased androstenedione formation was found in equines and no involvement in canines. These findings provide improved understanding of differences in testosterone biotransformation in animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Arsenic Metabolism by Human Gut Microbiota upon In Vitro Digestion of Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Speciation analysis is essential when evaluating risks from arsenic (As) exposure. In an oral exposure scenario, the importance of presystemic metabolism by gut microorganisms has been evidenced with in vivo animal models and in vitro experiments with ...

  8. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr.; Gillin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep

  9. Impact of Weight Regain on Metabolic Disease Risk: A Review of Human Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Kroeger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary restriction interventions are effective for weight loss and reduction of chronic disease risk. Unfortunately, most people tend to regain much of this lost weight within one year after intervention. While some studies suggest that minor degrees of weight regain have no effect on metabolic disease risk parameters, other studies demonstrate a complete reversal in metabolic benefits. In light of these conflicting findings, it is of interest to determine how complete weight maintenance versus mild weight regain affects key risk parameters. These findings would have important clinical implications, as they could help identify a weight regain threshold that could preserve the metabolic benefits of weight loss. Accordingly, this review examined the impact of no weight regain versus mild regain on various metabolic disease risk parameters, including plasma lipids, blood pressure, glucose, and insulin concentrations, in adult subjects.

  10. Circadian rhythms and metabolic syndrome: from experimental genetics to human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Eleonore; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Bass, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome represents a spectrum of disorders that continue to increase across the industrialized world. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to metabolic syndrome and recent evidence has emerged to suggest that alterations in circadian systems and sleep participate in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we highlight studies at the intersection of clinical medicine and experimental genetics that pinpoint how perturbations of the internal ...

  11. Metabolic liver function in humans measured by 2-(18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose PET/CT-reproducibility and clinical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Fredslund, Kirstine P; Lykke Eriksen, Peter; Munk, Ole L

    2017-01-01

    Background: PET/CT with the radioactively labelled galactose analogue 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) can be used to quantify the hepatic metabolic function and visualise regional metabolic heterogeneity. We determined the day-to-day variation in humans with and without liver disease...

  12. Casein and soy protein meals differentially affect whole-body and splanchnic protein metabolism in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Jäkel, Martin; Soeters, Peter B

    2005-05-01

    Dietary protein quality is considered to be dependent on the degree and velocity with which protein is digested, absorbed as amino acids, and retained in the gut as newly synthesized protein. Metabolic animal studies suggest that the quality of soy protein is inferior to that of casein protein, but confirmatory studies in humans are lacking. The study objective was to assess the quality of casein and soy protein by comparing their metabolic effects in healthy human subjects. Whole-body protein kinetics, splanchnic leucine extraction, and urea production rates were measured in the postabsorptive state and during 8-h enteral intakes of isonitrogenous [0.42 g protein/(kg body weight . 8 h)] protein-based test meals, which contained either casein (CAPM; n = 12) or soy protein (SOPM; n = 10) in 2 separate groups. Stable isotope techniques were used to study metabolic effects. With enteral food intake, protein metabolism changed from net protein breakdown to net protein synthesis. Net protein synthesis was greater in the CAPM group than in the SOPM group [52 +/- 14 and 17 +/- 14 nmol/(kg fat-free mass (FFM) . min), respectively; P CAPM (P = 0.07). Absolute splanchnic extraction of leucine was higher in the subjects that consumed CAPM [306 +/- 31 nmol/(kg FFM . min)] vs. those that consumed SOPM [235 +/- 29 nmol/(kg FFM . min); P < 0.01]. In conclusion, a significantly larger portion of soy protein is degraded to urea, whereas casein protein likely contributes to splanchnic utilization (probably protein synthesis) to a greater extent. The biological value of soy protein must be considered inferior to that of casein protein in humans.

  13. Monocrotophos induces the expression and activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in pre-sensitized cultured human brain cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay K Tripathi

    Full Text Available The expression and metabolic profile of cytochrome P450s (CYPs is largely missing in human brain due to non-availability of brain tissue. We attempted to address the issue by using human brain neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (U373-MG cells. The expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B6 and 2E1 were carried out in the cells exposed to CYP inducers viz., 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC, cyclophosphamide (CPA, ethanol and known neurotoxicant- monocrotophos (MCP, a widely used organophosphorous pesticide. Both the cells show significant induction in the expression and CYP-specific activity against classical inducers and MCP. The induction level of CYPs was comparatively lower in MCP exposed cells than cells exposed to classical inducers. Pre-exposure (12 h of cells to classical inducers significantly added the MCP induced CYPs expression and activity. The findings were concurrent with protein ligand docking studies, which show a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR, PXR and AHR. Similarly, the known CYP inducers- 3-MC, CPA and ethanol have also shown significantly high docking scores with all the three studied CYP regulators. The expression of CYPs in neuronal and glial cells has suggested their possible association with the endogenous physiology of the brain. The findings also suggest the xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities of these cells against MCP, if received a pre-sensitization to trigger the xenobiotic metabolizing machinery. MCP induced CYP-specific activity in neuronal cells could help in explaining its effect on neurotransmission, as these CYPs are known to involve in the synthesis/transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of CYPs in glial cells is also of significance as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The data provide better understanding of the metabolizing capability of the human brain cells against

  14. Evidence for Intramyocardial Disruption of Lipid Metabolism and Increased Myocardial Ketone Utilization in Advanced Human Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Kenneth C; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Aziz, Moez; Mesaros, Clementina; Worth, Andrew J; Wang, Linda L; Javaheri, Ali; Blair, Ian A; Margulies, Kenneth B; Rame, J Eduardo

    2016-02-23

    The failing human heart is characterized by metabolic abnormalities, but these defects remains incompletely understood. In animal models of heart failure there is a switch from a predominance of fatty acid utilization to the more oxygen-sparing carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies have reported decreases in myocardial lipid content, but the inclusion of diabetic and nondiabetic patients obscures the distinction of adaptations to metabolic derangements from adaptations to heart failure per se. We performed both unbiased and targeted myocardial lipid surveys using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy in nondiabetic, lean, predominantly nonischemic, advanced heart failure patients at the time of heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation. We identified significantly decreased concentrations of the majority of myocardial lipid intermediates, including long-chain acylcarnitines, the primary subset of energetic lipid substrate for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report for the first time significantly reduced levels of intermediate and anaplerotic acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) species incorporated into the Krebs cycle, whereas the myocardial concentration of acetyl-CoA was significantly increased in end-stage heart failure. In contrast, we observed an increased abundance of ketogenic β-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, in association with increased myocardial utilization of β-hydroxybutyrate. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the gene encoding succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid-CoA transferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for myocardial oxidation of β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate. These findings indicate increased ketone utilization in the severely failing human heart independent of diabetes mellitus, and they support the role of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel and myocardial ketone oxidation as a key metabolic adaptation in the failing human heart. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. DEPTOR-mTOR Signaling Is Critical for Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation Homeostasis of Lymphocytes in Human PBMC Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-bing Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal immune response of the body against substances and tissues causes autoimmune diseases, such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Irregular lipid metabolism and inflammation may be a significant cause of autoimmune diseases. Although much progress has been made, mechanisms of initiation and proceeding of metabolic and inflammatory regulation in autoimmune disease have not been well-defined. And novel markers for the detection and therapy of autoimmune disease are urgent. mTOR signaling is a central regulator of extracellular metabolic and inflammatory processes, while DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR is a natural inhibitor of mTOR. Here, we report that overexpression of DEPTOR reduces mTORC1 activity in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Combination of DEPTOR overexpression and mTORC2/AKT inhibitors effectively inhibits lipogenesis and inflammation in lymphocytes of PBMC culture. Moreover, DEPTOR knockdown activates mTORC1 and increases lipogenesis and inflammations. Our findings provide a deep insight into the relationship between lipid metabolism and inflammations via DEPTOR-mTOR pathway and imply that DEPTOR-mTOR in lymphocytes of PBMC culture has the potential to be as biomarkers for the detection and therapies of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Extracellular matrix metabolism disorder induced by mechanical strain on human parametrial ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jie; Li, Bingshu; Liu, Cheng; Guo, Wenjun; Hong, Shasha; Tang, Jianming; Hong, Li

    2017-05-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a global health problem that may seriously impact the quality of life of the sufferer. The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms underlying alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism in the pathogenesis of POP, by investigating the expression of ECM components in human parametrial ligament fibroblasts (hPLFs) subject to various mechanical strain loads. Fibroblasts derived from parametrial ligaments were cultured from patients with POP and without malignant tumors, who underwent vaginal hysterectomy surgery. Fibroblasts at generations 3‑6 of exponential phase cells were selected, and a four‑point bending device was used for 0, 1,333 or 5,333 µ mechanical loading of cells at 0.5 Hz for 4 h. mRNA and protein expression levels of collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1), collagen type III α 1 chain (COL3A1), elastin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) ‑2 and ‑9, and transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Under increased mechanical strain (5,333 µ), mRNA and protein expression levels of COL1A1, COL3A1 elastin and TGF‑β1 decreased, particularly COL1A1; however, mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP‑2 and ‑9 were significantly increased, compared with the control group (0 µ strain). Following 1,333 µ mechanical strain, mRNA and protein expression levels of COL1A1, COL3A1 elastin and MMP‑2 increased, and MMP‑9 decreased, whereas no significant differences were observed in TGF‑β1 mRNA and protein expression levels. In conclusion, ECM alterations may be involved in pathogenesis of POP, with decreased synthesis and increased degradation of collagen and elastin. Furthermore, the TGF‑β1 signaling pathway may serve an important role in this process and thus may supply a new target and strategy for understanding the etiology and therapy of POP.

  17. Biconnectivity of the cellular metabolism: A cross-species study and its implication for human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of stability during perturbations is essential for living organisms, and cellular networks organize multiple pathways to enable elements to remain connected and communicate, even when some pathways are broken. Here, we evaluated the biconnectivity of the metabolic networks of 506 species in terms of the clustering coefficients and the largest biconnected components (LBCs), wherein a biconnected component (BC) indicates a set of nodes in which every pair is connected by more than one path. Via comparison with the rewired networks, we illustrated how biconnectivity in cellular metabolism is achieved on small and large scales. Defining the biconnectivity of individual metabolic compounds by counting the number of species in which the compound belonged to the LBC, we demonstrated that biconnectivity is significantly correlated with the evolutionary age and functional importance of a compound. The prevalence of diseases associated with each metabolic compound quantifies the compounds vulnerability, i.e., the likelihood that it will cause a metabolic disorder. Moreover, the vulnerability depends on both the biconnectivity and the lethality of the compound. This fact can be used in drug discovery and medical treatments. PMID:26490723

  18. Current knowledge of microRNA-mediated regulation of drug metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masataka; Nakajima, Miki

    2018-05-02

    Understanding the factors causing inter- and intra-individual differences in drug metabolism potencies is required for the practice of personalized or precision medicine, as well as for the promotion of efficient drug development. The expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes is controlled by transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors, epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation, and post-translational modification. In addition to such regulation mechanisms, recent studies revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous ~22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression through the translational repression and degradation of mRNAs, significantly contribute to post-transcriptional regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Areas covered: This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding miRNAs-dependent regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transcriptional factors and its physiological and clinical significance. We also describe recent advances in miRNA-dependent regulation research, showing that the presence of pseudogenes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and RNA editing affects miRNA targeting. Expert opinion: It is unwavering fact that miRNAs are critical factors causing inter- and intra-individual differences in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Consideration of miRNA-dependent regulation would be a helpful tool for optimizing personalized and precision medicine.

  19. A Simple Exoskeleton That Assists Plantarflexion Can Reduce the Metabolic Cost of Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Philippe; Derave, Wim; Galle, Samuel; De Clercq, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though walking can be sustained for great distances, considerable energy is required for plantarflexion around the instant of opposite leg heel contact. Different groups attempted to reduce metabolic cost with exoskeletons but none could achieve a reduction beyond the level of walking without exoskeleton, possibly because there is no consensus on the optimal actuation timing. The main research question of our study was whether it is possible to obtain a higher reduction in metabolic cost by tuning the actuation timing. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured metabolic cost by means of respiratory gas analysis. Test subjects walked with a simple pneumatic exoskeleton that assists plantarflexion with different actuation timings. We found that the exoskeleton can reduce metabolic cost by 0.18±0.06 W kg−1 or 6±2% (standard error of the mean) (p = 0.019) below the cost of walking without exoskeleton if actuation starts just before opposite leg heel contact. Conclusions/Significance The optimum timing that we found concurs with the prediction from a mathematical model of walking. While the present exoskeleton was not ambulant, measurements of joint kinetics reveal that the required power could be recycled from knee extension deceleration work that occurs naturally during walking. This demonstrates that it is theoretically possible to build future ambulant exoskeletons that reduce metabolic cost, without power supply restrictions. PMID:23418524

  20. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression: impact of diet, sex, metabolic status, and cis genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Viguerie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic