WorldWideScience

Sample records for metabolic therapy practice

  1. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  2. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfa Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

  3. METABOLIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Zavaliy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the world experience of metabolic therapy use in the treatment of ischemic stroke. The issue still remains prominent. The reasonability of prescribing metabolic drugs is not completely clear, its effectiveness has not been fully proved, despite numerous studies which show only trends. The article presents an overview of the most popular drugs of different pharmacological groups with a metabolic effect which affect different parts of the ischemic cascade. Ethylmethylhydroxypyridine succinate and cytoflavin have predominantly antihypoxic effect, improve functional outcome and neurological functions, and normalize overall well-being and adaptation. Cerebrolysin is a complex of low molecular weight biologically active peptides derived from the pig’s brain. It has a multimodal effect on the brain, helps to reduce the volume of cerebral infarction, restores neurologic functions and improves the functional outcome. Cortexin is a mixture of cattle brain polypeptides, also has a complex action that provides the most complete reversion of neurological deficit, improves cognitive functions and the functional outcome, reduces the level of paroxysmal convulsive readiness and improves bioelectric activity of the brain. Citicoline is a precursor of cell membrane key ultrastructures, contributes to significant reduction in the volume of cortical brain damage, improves cholinergic transmission, which results in better clinical outcome, even despite the questionable impact on the neurological status. Choline Alfoscerate is a precursor of choline, and the use of the drug significantly limits the growth of the cerebral infarction area starting from the first day of therapy, leads to reversion of neurological symptoms and achievement of rehabilitation goals. Actovegin is deproteinized derivative of calf blood, activates metabolism in tissues, improves trophism and stimulates regeneration. In a large study, it was shown that Actovegin improved

  4. Metabolic complications associated with HIV protease inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, David

    2003-01-01

    HIV protease inhibitors were introduced into clinical practice over 7 years ago as an important component of combination antiretroviral drug regimens which in many ways revolutionised the treatment of HIV infection. The significant improvements in prognosis that have resulted from the use of these regimens, combined with the need for lifelong treatment, have increasingly focused attention on the adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs and on the metabolic complications of HIV protease inhibitors in particular. In this review, the cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterised by triglyceride-rich dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance associated with HIV protease inhibitor therapy are considered, along with implications for cardiovascular risk in patients affected by these complications. Toxicity profiles of individual drugs within the HIV protease inhibitor class are examined, as there is an increased recognition of significant intra-class differences both in terms of absolute risk of metabolic complications as well as the particular metabolic phenotype associated with these drugs. Guidelines for clinical assessment and treatment are emphasised, along with pathophysiological mechanisms that may provide a rational basis for the treatment of metabolic complications. Finally, these drug-specific effects are considered within the context of HIV-specific effects on lipid metabolism as well as lifestyle factors that have contributed to a rapidly increasing incidence of similar metabolic syndromes in the general population. These data highlight the importance of individualising patient management in terms of choice of antiretroviral regimen, assessment of metabolic outcomes and use of therapeutic interventions, based on the assessment of baseline (pre-treatment) metabolic status as well as the presence of potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Theory and Practice in Feminist Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan Amelia

    1977-01-01

    Traces the development feminist therapy. Discusses lack of definitions and systematic studies in the literature. Reports on research study, based on interviews with feminist therapists, which explores the nature and practice of this emerging mode of therapy. (Author/SMR)

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy practice in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olekseev, Aleksey; Ungvari, Gabor S; Gazdag, Gábor

    2014-09-01

    Patterns of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use have recently been extensively surveyed in Central-Eastern Europe. However, data from post-USSR countries are limited. This study aimed to survey ECT practice in Ukraine. All psychiatric services in Ukraine were identified and contacted to obtain information on the use of ECT in 2011 using a 22-item questionnaire. Of the 146 psychiatric inpatient facilities, only 5 confirmed that they performed ECT in 2011. Three other services also performed ECT but refused to provide further information. In the only private psychiatric institute where ECT was offered, 14.28% of inpatients received this treatment in 2011, whereas the corresponding figure in the 6 public psychiatric facilities was a mere 0.4%. Three centers used unmodified ECT, and only 2 centers had equipment that monitored electroencephalogram. In 7 services, in line with international recommendations, affective disorders were the first indications for ECT in Ukraine, whereas uncommon indications such as anorexia or Parkinsonism were also reported. This was the first survey of ECT practice conducted in Ukraine. The provision of ECT in only 8 centers is clearly insufficient for a large country such as Ukraine, which is reflected in the low rate of inpatients treated with ECT. The very limited availability of this effective treatment modality should be addressed by the Ukrainian health authorities.

  7. Theoretical model for the evolution of the activity of the liquid waste containers from iodine metabolic therapy practice. Comparison with the real data from our hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Rubio, A.; Luis-Simon Florencio, Javier; Sanchez-Carmona, G.; Herrador-Cordoba, M.; Gonzalez-Torres, I.

    2006-01-01

    Therapy with radiopharmaceuticals has evolved in such a way that it has reached to also have a great weight within the techniques of handling of the diseases not only thyroid diseases but also in the treatment of the pain, or in cases of metastasis. The therapy with I 131 continues being the one of greater importance. The spill and evacuation of the remainders produced by the patients are a question of great impact to environment and the public health. For that reason the detailed study of this problem, increased with the introduction of new isotopes (Sm 153), is of great interest for the radiological safety. (authors)

  8. Theoretical model for the evolution of the activity of the liquid waste containers from iodine metabolic therapy practice. Comparison with the real data from our hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Rubio, A.; Luis-Simon Florencio, Javier; Sanchez-Carmona, G.; Herrador-Cordoba, M.; Gonzalez-Torres, I. [Hospital Virgen del Rocio, Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Therapy with radiopharmaceuticals has evolved in such a way that it has reached to also have a great weight within the techniques of handling of the diseases not only thyroid diseases but also in the treatment of the pain, or in cases of metastasis. The therapy with I 131 continues being the one of greater importance. The spill and evacuation of the remainders produced by the patients are a question of great impact to environment and the public health. For that reason the detailed study of this problem, increased with the introduction of new isotopes (Sm 153), is of great interest for the radiological safety. (authors)

  9. Campaign best practice in intravenous therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Wayne; Murphy, Jayne; Shakespeare, David; Kelly, Chris; Fox, Louise; Kelly, Matthew

    Intravenous therapy is an integral part of nursing care but is associated with a high risk of infection. This article outlines a campaign that aimed to increase awareness of best practice for IV therapy and reduce the risks of healthcare-associated IV infections in hospital and community settings.

  10. metabolic disturbances associated with antiretroviral therapy and hn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CT scans for visceral fat and mid-thigh measures. Therapy has been ... confusion relating to metabolic disturbances is the absence of universally .... Neuronal growth hormone and gammapentone have ... triglycerides and fatty acids. Note that ...

  11. Gestalt therapy: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A

    Gestalt therapy, a particular type of psychotherapy, draws on existential and various Eastern philosophies, and aims to enable the individual to seek his or her own solutions to personal problems. Literally translated as 'whole', Gestalt focuses the individual to appreciate and experience the present. This article examines the Gestalt theory and considers its application to a terminally ill client and his wife.

  12. Treatment, Therapy and Management of Metabolic Epilepsy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lin Lin Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic epilepsy is a metabolic abnormality which is associated with an increased risk of epilepsy development in affected individuals. Commonly used antiepileptic drugs are typically ineffective against metabolic epilepsy as they do not address its root cause. Presently, there is no review available which summarizes all the treatment options for metabolic epilepsy. Thus, we systematically reviewed literature which reported on the treatment, therapy and management of metabolic epilepsy from four databases, namely PubMed, Springer, Scopus and ScienceDirect. After applying our inclusion and exclusion criteria as per the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines, we reviewed a total of 43 articles. Based on the reviewed articles, we summarized the methods used for the treatment, therapy and management of metabolic epilepsy. These methods were tailored to address the root causes of the metabolic disturbances rather than targeting the epilepsy phenotype alone. Diet modification and dietary supplementation, alone or in combination with antiepileptic drugs, are used in tackling the different types of metabolic epilepsy. Identification, treatment, therapy and management of the underlying metabolic derangements can improve behavior, cognitive function and reduce seizure frequency and/or severity in patients.

  13. Thrombolytic therapy of acute myocardial infarction alters collagen metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, N B; Hansen, S S; Jensen, L T

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to monitor collagen metabolism after thrombolytic therapy. Sequential measurements of serum aminoterminal type-III procollagen propeptide (S-PIIINP) and carboxyterminal type-I procollagen propeptide (S-PICP) were made in 62 patients suspected of acute myocardial.......05). A less pronounced S-PIIINP increase was noted with tissue-plasminogen activator than with streptokinase. Thrombolytic therapy induces collagen breakdown regardless of whether acute myocardial infarction is confirmed or not. With confirmed acute myocardial infarction collagen metabolism is altered...... for at least 6 months. Furthermore, fibrin-specific and nonspecific thrombolytic agents appear to affect collagen metabolism differently....

  14. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  15. Radionuclide therapy practice and facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Clarke, S.E.M.; Fischer, M.; Chatal, J.F.; Lewington, V.J.; Nilsson, S.; Troncone, L.; Vieira, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a questionnaire the EANM Task Group Radionuclide Therapy in 1993 collected data on the current practice of radionuclide therapy in European countries. Subsequently, at the request of the EANM Executive Committee, the EANM Radionuclide Therapy Committee has made an inventory of the distribution of facilities for radionuclide therapy and undertaken an assessment of the total number of patients treated throughout Europe and of the types of treatment provides, with the aim of supporting the development of policy to adjust the available capacity to the needs by the year 2000. For this purpose, a second, more detailed questionnaire was sent out the members and national advisors of the Committee (see below), who gathered the data for each country that was a member of the EANM at the time. It is concluded that a wide bariation in therapy practice exists across Europe, particularly in the utilisation of radionuclide therapy, the requirement and availability of proper isolation facilities and the background training of those undertaking therapy. More uniform guidelines and legislation are required, although changes in legislation may have a significant impact in some countries. Although there is wide variation in the therapies used in each country, one the whole it appears that there is an underutilisation of nuclear medicine as a therapeutic modality. A rapidly increasing role may be expected, in particular for oncological indications requiring high-dose radionuclide treatment. Therefore there is an urgent need for a greater number of isolation beds in dedicated centers throughout Europe

  16. Electroconvulsive Therapy Practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark Wilkinson; Morrison, John; Jones, Paul Anthony

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in New Zealand. A 53-item questionnaire was sent to all services providing ECT as of December 2015. Electroconvulsive therapy was provided by 16 services covering 15 district health boards funded by the New Zealand government. No private facilities provided ECT. All services providing ECT responded to an online survey questionnaire. Rates of ECT utilization were low relative to similar countries. Survey results indicated ECT was practiced to an overall good standard. Several resource and logistical issues potentially contributing to low ECT utilization were identified. Electroconvulsive therapy in New Zealand is provided using modern equipment and practices. However, overall rates of utilization remain low, perhaps as a result of controversy surrounding ECT and some resourcing issues.

  17. Contemporary Play Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Charles E., Ed.; Gerard Kaduson, Heidi, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This highly practical book presents current developments in play therapy, including innovative applications for particular problems and populations. Contributors first discuss the latest ideas and techniques emerging from object-relations, experiential, dynamic, and narrative perspectives. Next, research evaluating the effectiveness of play…

  18. Hormone Therapy in Clinical Equine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Patrick M

    2016-12-01

    A wide variety of hormone therapies are used in clinical practice in the reproductive management of horses. The goal of this article is to review therapeutic options for a variety of clinical indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic Signaling and Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by...which makes them attractive therapeutic targets. However, the development of targeted agents in lung cancer is still in its infancy, despite the...notion that metabolites can act as signaling molecules in distant metabolic pathways is gaining significant attentionand support (Figure 1A). Some of the

  20. Practical Radiobiology for Proton Therapy Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2017-12-01

    Practical Radiobiology for Proton Therapy Planning covers the principles, advantages and potential pitfalls that occur in proton therapy, especially its radiobiological modelling applications. This book is intended to educate, inform and to stimulate further research questions. Additionally, it will help proton therapy centres when designing new treatments or when unintended errors or delays occur. The clear descriptions of useful equations for high LET particle beam applications, worked examples of many important clinical situations, and discussion of how proton therapy may be optimized are all important features of the text. This important book blends the relevant physics, biology and medical aspects of this multidisciplinary subject. Part of Series in Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology.

  1. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  2. Contamination with iodine-131 in metabolic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Luis, J.; Gomez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Herrador, M.; Rogriguez, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    High-dose radioactive iodine therapy using 131 I is the treatment of choice for patients with thyroid cancer following thyroidectomy. Because of the large amount of activity which is excreted during hospitalization, contamination harzard from 131 I excretion via perspiration, saliva, breath and urine may arise. In twelve patients treated with doses of 131 I ranging from 1.85-7.4GBq activity levels were measured in room surface, the toilet, patients saliva and skin. Removable activity from skin reached a maximum at 24h post-therapy. Removable activity from room surfaces exceed the level of contamination which requires clean-up in a public area during patient's hospitalization. The relatively high activities present in the saliva and skin of these patients emphasizes the need for all individuals coming in contact with these patients to be made aware of the contamination hazard present. (author)

  3. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  4. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María M. Adeva-Andany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated.

  5. Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankiv

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, the possibility of early and rapid progress of complications, a large number of undiagnosed cases and disappointing forecasts of the World Health Organization on the prospects of DM spreading in the world, timely and accurate diagnosis of carbohydrate metabolism disorders is important. The criteria for the diagnosis of carbohydrate metabolism and DM are shown in the article. The article includes a new consensus on the staging of type 1 DM and a discussion of a proposed unifying diabetes classification scheme that focuses on β-cell dysfunction and disease stage as indicated by glucose status. Modern recommendations 2017 of the American Diabetes Association are shown in relation to the criteria of diagnostics of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus. The value of insulin resistance and functional state of pancreatic β-cells is underlined in determination of type 2 DM duration. A plan of type 2 DM management is brought.

  6. The practice of electroconvulsive therapy in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliora, Styliani C; Braga, Raphael J; Petrides, Georgios; Chatzimanolis, John; Papadimitriou, George N; Zervas, Iannis M

    2013-09-01

    To describe the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Greece. A survey was conducted during the academic year 2008-2009. Electroconvulsive therapy use was investigated for 2007. All civilian institutions providing inpatient care were included. Centers that provided ECT completed a 57-item questionnaire. Centers that did not offer ECT completed a 13-item questionnaire. Fifty-five (82.1%) of 67 institutions responded. Electroconvulsive therapy was offered in 18 hospitals. Only 2 of 10 university hospitals offered ECT. Overall, 137 patients were treated with 1271 sessions in 2007. Only 1.47% discontinued treatment owing to adverse events. There were no deaths. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis (41.3%) among those receiving ECT, followed by major depression (28.9%), bipolar depression (9.1%), catatonia (4.1%), suicidal ideation (3.3%), and schizoaffective disorder (2.5%). Physicians considered major depression (93.8%), catatonia (86.5%), schizophrenia (56.3%), and mania (50%) the most appropriate indications. Written informed consent was required in 77.8% of the institutions, whereas the rest required verbal consent. Bilateral ECT was the preferred electrode placement (88.9%). Modified ECT was used exclusively. Propofol was the preferred anesthetic (44.4%), followed by thiopental (38.9%). Seven (38.9%) of 18 hospitals used a fixed stimulus dose at first treatment. Five (27.8%) of 18 hospitals used the half-age method. Continuation/maintenance ECT was used in 33.3% of the hospitals. Outpatient ECT was seldom used. Lack of training, difficult access to anesthesiology, billing issues, and stigma were cited as the main impediments to the practice of ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy is practiced in moderate numbers in Greece and almost exclusively on an inpatient basis. Lack of training and lack of availability of anesthesiologists were cited as the most common obstacles to providing ECT.

  7. Process for massage therapy practice and essential assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann Blair; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-07-01

    Little evidence exists about processes in massage therapy practice. Investigating current frameworks is warranted. This qualitative study is a secondary data analysis using grounded theory to understand how massage therapy experts describe massage therapy practice. 31 massage therapy experts were invited to a 2-day symposium to discuss best practices for the profession. Through qualitative analysis, memoing, and discussion, the data were summarized into themes. Three themes were identified around massage therapy practice: 1) client centered, 2) structure for practice, and 3) influencing factors. Each theme is clarified and expanded. Conceptual models were developed for research and clinical practice and a definition for massage therapy practice was identified. Challenges and limitations are discussed. The goal of providing these models is to give massage therapists tools to deliver the best possible care. The models need testing to see if they help advance the profession. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulation of the metabolic response in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    morbidity. Effective afferent neural blockade with continuous epidural local anesthetic techniques inhibits a major part of the endocrine metabolic response, leading to improved protein economy but without important effects on inflammatory or immunologic responses. In contrast, pain treatment with other...... modalities such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids has only a small inhibitory effect on endocrine metabolic responses. Preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid therapy provides additional pain relief and improves pulmonary function, but it reduces the inflammatory response (acute......-phase proteins, cytokines, hyperthermia) and immune function. Minimally invasive surgery leaves the endocrine metabolic responses largely unaltered but reduces the inflammatory response and immune suppression. Thus several techniques are available to modify the stress responses in elective surgery patients...

  9. CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES: THE POSSIBILITIES AND EFFICIENCY OF METABOLIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Ya. Umarova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic brain ischemia is accompanied by complex metabolic rearrangements in the neurons. The ability of the cells to survive is largely determined by the presence of energy substrates and oxygen, the synthesis of neurotransmitters, and some other factors. The increasedpersistence of nerve tissue in ischemia and chances of recovering the impaired function can be achieved by the use of neuroprotective and neurotrophic agents. The efficiency of neurometabolic therapy is considered using Ceraxon and Actovegin as an example. It is emphasized that theefficiency of their administration can be achieved by the mandatory concurrent use of a wide range of nondrug treatments.

  10. Metabolic Syndromes Associated with HIV: Mitigating the Side Effects of Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, William W.; Sattler, Fred R.

    2001-01-01

    HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with such metabolic disorders as AIDS wasting syndrome, metabolic dysregulation, and abnormalities of serum lipids. Adjunctive therapies (e.g., diet and antilipid therapy); risk factor modification (e.g., smoking cessation and blood pressure control); aerobic exercise;…

  11. Ketogenic Diets: New Advances for Metabolism-Based Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite myriad anticonvulsants available and in various stages of development, there are thousands of children and adults with epilepsy worldwide still refractory to treatment and not candidates for epilepsy surgery. Many of these patients will now turn to dietary therapies such as the ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet, modified Atkins diet, and low glycemic index treatment. Recent Findings In the past several years, neurologists are finding new indications to use these dietary treatments, perhaps even as first-line therapy, including infantile spasms, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome), Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus (including FIRES syndrome). Adults are also one of the most rapidly growing populations being treated nowadays; a group of patients previously not typically offered these treatments. In 2009, two controlled trials of the ketogenic diet were published as well as an International Expert Consensus Statement on dietary treatment of epilepsy. Ketogenic diets are also now being increasingly studied for neurologic conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer disease and cancer. Insights from basic science research have helped elucidate the mechanisms by which metabolism-based therapy may be helpful, both in terms of an anticonvulsant and possibly neuroprotective effect. Summary Dietary therapy for epilepsy continues to grow in popularity worldwide, with expanding use for adults and conditions other than epilepsy. PMID:22322415

  12. Evidence-based music therapy practice: an integral understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The American Music Therapy Association has recently put into action a plan called its Research Strategic Priority, with one of its central purposes to advance the music therapy field through research promoting Evidence-Based Practice of music therapy. The extant literature on music therapy practice, theory, and research conveys a range of very different perspectives on what may count as the "evidence" upon which practice is based. There is therefore a need to conceptualize evidence-based music therapy practice in a multifaceted, yet coherent and balanced way. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a framework based upon four distinct epistemological perspectives on evidence-based music therapy practice that together represent an integral understanding.

  13. Practical approach for the study of metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Macedo

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available First year students in Physical Education must understand metabolic regulation to comprehend thewhole integration of biochemical pathways in attempt to establish the relation with exercise. Thiswhole view is not easy to learn and the task becomes even harder with the lack of time at theend of course, when normally the students think about metabolic integration. Trying to get thestudents attention to this important issue, we developed practical works beginning in the middle ofthe course, in parallel with theory classes. Blood and urine were collected for metabolite analysis ineach practice. The students were divided in groups (10 students and they created the protocols in formthat they only have been guided and directed by the teacher and monitors. The practical activitiesand biochemical analysis were: six 30m sprints with dierent recovery times (blood lactate and meanvelocities, lactate removal from muscle to blood after high intensity exercise (blood lactate, anaerobicthreshold (blood lactate and heart rate, the eect of glycogen depletion after high and moderateintensity exercises (plasma glucose and urea concentrations and low carbohydrate diet vs. normaldiet (plasma glucose and urine ketone bodies. After data collection, discussion and interpretation, thestudents presented orally each work in the same order above. Each presentation had the focus on themetabolic pathways involved in each practice. Group 1: phosphocreatine utilization and resynthesis.Group 2: anaerobic glycolysis, lactate production and removal. Group 3: transition between anaerobicglycolysis and oxidative metabolism. In attempt to promote the integration between muscle and liver-Group 4: protein catabolism after high intensity exercise with low muscular glycogen concentration(transamination, Cori Cycle and gluconeogenesis. Group 5: liver ketogenesis in low carbohydratediet. This sequence was intended to promote the comprehension of integrated metabolism. As a nalactivity, the

  14. Acetazolamide Therapy for Metabolic Alkalosis in Pediatric Intensive Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carolina; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Toledo, Blanca; Cortejoso, Lucía; Gil-Ruiz, Maite Augusta

    2016-12-01

    Patients in PICUs frequently present hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis secondary to loop diuretic treatment, especially those undergoing cardiac surgery. This study evaluates the effectiveness of acetazolamide therapy for metabolic alkalosis in PICU patients. Retrospective, observational study. A tertiary care children's hospital PICU. Children receiving at least a 2-day course of enteral acetazolamide. None. Demographic variables, diuretic treatment and doses of acetazolamide, urine output, serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine, acid-base excess, pH, and use of mechanical ventilation during treatment were collected. Patients were studied according to their pathology (postoperative cardiac surgery, decompensated heart failure, or respiratory disease). A total of 78 episodes in 58 patients were identified: 48 were carried out in cardiac postoperative patients, 22 in decompensated heart failure, and eight in respiratory patients. All patients received loop diuretics. A decrease in pH and PCO2 in the first 72 hours, a decrease in serum HCO3 (mean, 4.65 ± 4.83; p alkalosis secondary to diuretic therapy. Cardiac postoperative patients present a significant increase in urine output after acetazolamide treatment.

  15. Metabolic oxidative stress in cancer biology and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) exhibit increased glycolysis and pentose cycle activity. These metabolic alterations were thought to arise from damage to the respiratory mechanism and cancer cells were thought to compensate for this defect by increasing glycolysis (Science 132:309). In addition to its role in ATP production, glucose metabolism results in the formation of pyruvate and NADPH which both play an integral role in peroxide detoxification (Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 899:349). Recently, cancer cells have been shown to have enhanced susceptibility to glucose deprivation-induced oxidative stress, relative to normal cells, that is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS; Biochem.J. 418:29-37). These results support the hypothesis that cancer cells may have a defect in mitochondrial respiration leading to increased steady-state levels of ROS (i.e., O 2 and H 2 O 2 ) and glucose metabolism may be increased to provide reducing equivalents to compensate for this defect. The application of these findings to developing new combined modality cancer therapy protocols will be discussed. (author)

  16. An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William B.; Gfeller, Kate E.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    "An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice, Third Edition," provides a comprehensive overview of the practice of music therapy for the 21st century. It looks at where we have been, where we are today, and where we might be in the future. Combining sound pedagogy with recent research findings, this new edition has been updated and…

  17. Care of the cancer survivor: metabolic syndrome following hormone-modifying therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Redig, Amanda J.; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates metabolic syndrome as a long-term cancer risk factor but also suggests that certain cancer therapies may increase patients’ risk of developing metabolic syndrome secondary to cancer therapy. In particular, breast cancer and prostate cancer are driven in part by sex hormones, thus treatment for both diseases is often based on hormone-modifying therapy. Androgen suppression therapy in men with prostate cancer is associated with dyslipidemia, increasing risk of cardi...

  18. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  19. The feminist/emotionally focused therapy practice model: an integrated approach for couple therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatcher, C A; Bogo, M

    2001-01-01

    Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) is a well-developed, empirically tested practice model for couple therapy that integrates systems, experiential, and attachment theories. Feminist family therapy theory has provided a critique of biased assumptions about gender at play in traditional family therapy practice and the historical absence of discussions of power in family therapy theory. This article presents an integrated feminist/EFT practice model for use in couple therapy, using a case from practice to illustrate key concepts. Broadly, the integrated model addresses gender roles and individual emotional experience using a systemic framework for understanding couple interaction. The model provides practitioners with a sophisticated, comprehensive, and relevant practice approach for working with the issues and challenges emerging for contemporary heterosexual couples.

  20. Play Therapy: Practice, Issues, and Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, Linda E.; Morrison, Mary O.

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is an effective means of responding to the mental health needs of young children and is widely accepted as a valuable and developmentally appropriate intervention. The authors discuss the importance of play in development, the therapeutic benefits of play, the rich history of play therapy, and recent research and current issues and…

  1. Play Therapy Practices among Elementary School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dee C.; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Warren, E. Scott; Balkin, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    When elementary school counselors have a solid developmental understanding of children, play therapy might be one counseling intervention that they use with their students. Landreth (2002) has promoted the use of play therapy in schools by explaining that its objective is to help children get ready to profit from what teachers have to offer. Play…

  2. Voice Therapy Practices and Techniques: A Survey of Voice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter B.; Larson, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-three voice disorder therapists' ratings of statements regarding voice therapy practices indicated that vocal nodules are the most frequent disorder treated; vocal abuse and hard glottal attack elimination, counseling, and relaxation were preferred treatment approaches; and voice therapy is more effective with adults than with children.…

  3. Reconceptualising manual therapy skills in contemporary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabey, Martin; Hall, Toby; Hebron, Clair

    2017-01-01

    With conflicting evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual therapy calls have arisen within some quarters of the physiotherapy profession challenging the continued use of manual skills for assessment and treatment. A reconceptualisation of the importance of manual examination findings is put...

  4. Voicework in Music Therapy : Research and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Felicity; Uhlig, S.

    2011-01-01

    ‘Baker and Uhlig’s new book gives many salient examples of innovative vocal techniques and methods that can be used with different populations. This much needed and timely new book will add to the literature base of vocal music therapy as well as making a valuable contribution to our field by

  5. Endoluminal weight loss and metabolic therapies: current and future techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christine; Khashab, Mouen A; Kalloo, Anthony N; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a public health epidemic associated with a number of comorbidities, most notably type 2 diabetes and hypertension, as well as elevated all-cause mortality. The treatment for obesity and its associated comorbidities has most recently expanded into the field of bariatric endoscopy. This field bridges a gap between lifestyle counseling with or without pharmaceutical treatment and the most effective treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery. Because of its minimally invasive nature, bariatric endoscopic therapy has the potential to appeal to the large sector of the obese population that resists surgery, as well as those early in the onset of obesity. To date, five endoscopic devices have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of obesity, and many more are in development, undergoing clinical trials, or being used around the world. Here, we present the current state of the field, highlight recent developments, and describe the clinical outcomes of these minimally invasive procedures in terms of weight loss, improvement in metabolic profile, and reduction in comorbidities. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Problem solving therapy - use and effectiveness in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David

    2012-09-01

    Problem solving therapy (PST) is one of the focused psychological strategies supported by Medicare for use by appropriately trained general practitioners. This article reviews the evidence base for PST and its use in the general practice setting. Problem solving therapy involves patients learning or reactivating problem solving skills. These skills can then be applied to specific life problems associated with psychological and somatic symptoms. Problem solving therapy is suitable for use in general practice for patients experiencing common mental health conditions and has been shown to be as effective in the treatment of depression as antidepressants. Problem solving therapy involves a series of sequential stages. The clinician assists the patient to develop new empowering skills, and then supports them to work through the stages of therapy to determine and implement the solution selected by the patient. Many experienced GPs will identify their own existing problem solving skills. Learning about PST may involve refining and focusing these skills.

  7. Fieldwork practice for learning: Lessons from occupational therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Fieldwork practice forms a vital part of occupational therapy (OT) education and contributes significantly to competent practice and students' clinical reasoning. Students' learning is positively or negatively influenced by their fieldwork experience. Objective. To explore the views and experiences of final-year OT ...

  8. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  9. Advanced practice for therapy radiographers - A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this discussion paper is to explore issues related to advanced practice for therapy radiographers. Key themes: The paper will focus on key themes that have impacted on advanced practice for therapy radiographers such as government initiatives and policy, confounding terminology associated with advanced practice such as role extension, role expansion, role development, and expert practice. The theory and development of expert practice is explored and paralleled to existing roles in therapy using the Benner model to define stages of professional development and competence. Evidence for advanced practice, and education and training will also be explored. All of these issues will be considered within the perspective of the current clinical and political environment that therapy radiographers operate in. Conclusions: The application of advanced practice can and should incorporate elements of role extension and role development, with some tangible skills ladder to guide and shape the development of potential consultant practitioners. There is a need to identify the current position of advanced practice nationally, and to monitor existing and emerging roles, possibly though a longitudinal study. The skill mix as a whole within departments need to be part of an ongoing evaluation with close collaboration between the professional body, departmental managers and higher education institutes to develop curricula to support existing and emerging roles. There are also key lessons to be learned from other professions with more experience with advanced practitioners if recruitment and retention is not going to continue to be a problem

  10. Digoxin therapy: textbooks, theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J K; Grahame-Smith, D G

    1976-08-01

    Recommendations for correct therapy with digoxin from twenty-five sources are reviewed. Some recommendations may be unsuitable for use with high bioavailability tablets; some are accompanied by insufficient data relating to factors affecting both the response to digoxin and its handling by the body. Guidelines based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles are suggested to help decide optimal digoxin treatment schedules in the presence and absence of non-cardiac disease.

  11. Integrating Occupational Therapy Specific Assessments in Practice: Exploring Practitioner Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Asaba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Occupational therapists sometimes find it challenging to integrate client-centered and occupational therapy specific assessments in practice. The aim of this study was to explore the use of occupational therapy specific assessments such as the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS among occupational therapists in Sweden and Japan. Methods. Interviews and qualitative thematic analyses were utilized. Findings. Four themes are reported: (1 use it or lose it, (2 simply no space until after hours, (3 biggest barriers can be colleagues, and (4 being more specific: communication. Conclusion. In keeping with previous studies, occupational therapists often find it challenging to implement client-centered and occupation-based assessment tools into practice. However, more work is needed to understand how best practices can be incorporated into a changing occupational therapy daily practice.

  12. Reconceptualising manual therapy skills in contemporary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Hall, Toby; Hebron, Clair; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Christensen, Steffan Wittrup; Moloney, Niamh

    2017-06-01

    With conflicting evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual therapy calls have arisen within some quarters of the physiotherapy profession challenging the continued use of manual skills for assessment and treatment. A reconceptualisation of the importance of manual examination findings is put forward, based upon a contemporary understanding of pain science, rather than considering these skills only in terms of how they should "guide" manual therapy interventions. The place for manual examination findings within complex, multidimensional presentations is considered using vignettes describing the presentations of five people with low back pain. As part of multidimensional, individualised management, the balance of evidence relating to the effectiveness, mechanisms of action and rationale for manual skills is discussed. It is concluded that if manual examination and therapeutic skills are used in a manner consistent with a contemporary understanding of pain science, multidimensional patient profiles and a person-centred approach, their selective and judicious use still has an important role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a Novel Targeted RNAi Delivery Technology inTherapies for Metabolic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    report Impact on other disciplines: Nothing to report Impact on technology transfer: Nothing to report Impact on society : Nothing to report 5. CHANGES...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0569 TITLE: Development of a Novel Targeted RNAi Delivery Technology in Therapies for Metabolic Diseases PRINCIPAL...COVERED 30Sep2016 - 29Sep2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of a Novel Targeted RNAi Delivery Technology in Therapies for Metabolic Diseases 5a

  14. E-therapy: practical, ethical, and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhal-Baugus, M

    2001-10-01

    E-therapy is a term that has been coined to describe the process of interacting with a therapist online in ongoing conversations over time when the client and counselor are in separate or remote locations and utilize electronic means to communicate with each other. It is a relatively new modality of assisting individuals resolve life and relationship issues. E-therapy utilizes the power and convenience of the internet to allow simultaneous (synchronous) and time-delayed (asynchronous) communication between an individual and a professional. For the purposes of this paper, e-therapy is defined as a licensed mental health care professional providing mental health services via e-mail, video conferencing, virtual reality technology, chat technology, or any combination of these. It does not include self-help methods such as public bulletin boards or private listservs. E-therapy is not psychotherapy or psychological counseling per se since it does to presume to diagnose or treat mental or medical disorders. However, e-therapy is flexible enough to also address many difficulties which clients present to the online therapist. As in other types of therapy, such as bibliotherapy, occupational therapy, and rehabilitation therapy), e-therapy does assist a person in addressing specific concerns with specific skills. This article examines the following issues of e-therapy. First, the types of e-therapy and related services are described to provide a background for the article. Second, the ethical codes which have been adopted by three major professional organizations (American Counseling Association, National Board for Certified Counselors, and the International Society for Mental Health Online) pertaining to e-therapy are summarized for professional and consumer use. Finally, the practical, ethical, and legal issues of e-therapy services are discussed fully.

  15. Role of Sonographic Imaging in Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy practice is grounded in the delivery of occupation-centered, patient-driven treatments that engage clients in the process of doing to improve health. As emerging technologies, such as medical imaging, find their way into rehabilitation practice, it is imperative that occupational therapy practitioners assess whether and how these tools can be incorporated into treatment regimens that are dually responsive to the medical model of health care and to the profession’s foundation in occupation. Most medical imaging modalities have a discrete place in occupation-based intervention as outcome measures or for patient education; however, sonographic imaging has the potential to blend multiple occupational therapy practice forms to document treatment outcomes, inform clinical reasoning, and facilitate improved functional performance when used as an accessory tool in direct intervention. Use of medical imaging is discussed as it relates to occupational foundations and the professional role within the context of providing efficient, effective patient-centered rehabilitative care. PMID:25871607

  16. [Theory and practice of Pavlov Sleep Therapy in the GDR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Doreen; Steinberg, Holger

    2011-10-01

    The following study describes theoretical foundations and practical application of Pavlov Sleep Therapy within the GDR in the 1950s and earlier 1960s. Implementing the sleeping treatment as a psychiatric therapy examplifies how the ideological guideline to integrate Pavlov's teachings was converted into medical practice in the GDR. One of the protagonists of this approach was Dietfried Müller-Hegemann in Leipzig. Although being successful with some diseases such as fatigue, its practical application ceased after several cases of death that were brought in connection with the sleep treatment. Indirectly this discontinuation of Pavlov Sleep Therapy also terminated Müller-Hegemann's academic career. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The nervous system and metabolic dysregulation: emerging evidence converges on ketogenic diet therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Ruskin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A link between metabolism and brain function is clear. Since ancient times, epileptic seizures were noted as treatable with fasting, and historical observations of the therapeutic benefits of fasting on epilepsy were confirmed nearly 100 years ago. Shortly thereafter a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet debuted as a therapy to reduce seizures. This strict regimen could mimic the metabolic effects of fasting while allowing adequate caloric intake for ongoing energy demands. Today, ketogenic diet therapy, which forces predominantly ketone-based rather than glucose-based metabolism, is now well-established as highly successful in reducing seizures. More recently, cellular metabolic dysfunction in the nervous system has been recognized as existing side-by-side with nervous system disorders - although often with much less obvious cause-and-effect as the relationship between fasting and seizures. Rekindled interest in metabolic and dietary therapies for brain disorders complements new insight into their mechanisms and broader implications. Here we describe the emerging relationship between a ketogenic diet and adenosine as a way to reset brain metabolism and neuronal activity and disrupt a cycle of dysfunction. We also provide an overview of the effects of a ketogenic diet on cognition and recent data on the effects of a ketogenic diet on pain, and explore the relative time course quantified among hallmark metabolic changes, altered neuron function and altered animal behavior assessed after diet administration. We predict continued applications of metabolic therapies in treating dysfunction including and beyond the nervous system.

  18. The Nervous System and Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges on Ketogenic Diet Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    A link between metabolism and brain function is clear. Since ancient times, epileptic seizures were noted as treatable with fasting, and historical observations of the therapeutic benefits of fasting on epilepsy were confirmed nearly 100 years ago. Shortly thereafter a high fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) debuted as a therapy to reduce seizures. This strict regimen could mimic the metabolic effects of fasting while allowing adequate caloric intake for ongoing energy demands. Today, KD therapy, which forces predominantly ketone-based rather than glucose-based metabolism, is now well-established as highly successful in reducing seizures. Cellular metabolic dysfunction in the nervous system has been recognized as existing side-by-side with nervous system disorders – although often with much less obvious cause-and-effect as the relationship between fasting and seizures. Rekindled interest in metabolic and dietary therapies for brain disorders complements new insight into their mechanisms and broader implications. Here we describe the emerging relationship between a KD and adenosine as a way to reset brain metabolism and neuronal activity and disrupt a cycle of dysfunction. We also provide an overview of the effects of a KD on cognition and recent data on the effects of a KD on pain, and explore the relative time course quantified among hallmark metabolic changes, altered neuron function and altered animal behavior assessed after diet administration. We predict continued applications of metabolic therapies in treating dysfunction including and beyond the nervous system. PMID:22470316

  19. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...... with the disfiguring body-alterations known as HALS. More recently, however, regimens containing nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have attracted attention. Reviewing switch studies regarding metabolic parameters and body shape changes, certain trends emerge. Switching from PI, the metabolic...

  20. Impact of metabolic syndrome on ST segment resolution after thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Saatçı Yaşar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It has been shown that metabolic syndrome is associated with poor short-term outcome and poor long-term survival in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We aimed to investigate the effect of metabolic syndrome on ST segment resolution in patients received thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction.Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 161 patients, who were admitted to our clinics with acute ST-elevated-myocardial infarction and received thrombolytic therapy within 12 hours of chest pain. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Resolution of ST segment elevation was assessed on the baseline and 90-minute electrocardiograms. ST segment resolution ≥70% was defined as complete resolution.Results: Metabolic syndrome was found in 56.5% of patients. The proportion of patients with metabolic syndrome who achieved complete ST segment resolution after thrombolysis was significantly lower than that of patients without metabolic syndrome (32.9% versus 58.6%, p=0.001. On multivariate analysis metabolic syndrome was the only independent predictor of ST segment resolution (p=0.01, Odds ratio=2.543, %95 CI:1.248-5.179Conclusion: The patients with metabolic syndrome had lower rates of complete ST segment resolution after thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction. This finding may contribute to the higher morbidity and mortality of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  1. Occupational therapy in Australian acute hospitals: A modified practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing changes to health-care funding Australia wide continue to influence how occupational therapists practise in acute hospitals. This study describes the practice challenges experienced by Western Australian acute care occupational therapists. Then, it explores if and how acute care occupational therapists are modifying their practice in response to these practice changes. This study used a qualitative grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 13 purposively selected acute care occupational therapists from four Western Australian metropolitan hospitals. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method to provide detailed descriptions of acute care occupational therapy practice and to generate theory. Five conceptual categories were developed. The first two addressed practice challenges: pragmatic organisational influences on client care and establishing a professional identity within the multidisciplinary team. Three categories related to therapist responses are as follows: becoming the client advocate, being the facilitator and applying clinical reasoning. Finally, modified practice was identified as the core category which explains the process whereby acute care occupational therapists are ensuring they remain relevant and authentic in the acute care context. Western Australian acute care occupational therapists are practising in a highly complex health context that presents many challenges. They are responding by using a modified form of practice that ensures occupational therapy skills remain relevant within the narrow confines of this health setting. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Improvisation as an adaptive strategy for occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusen, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT As health care environments become increasingly complex, practitioners must develop new adaptive skills to master practice. The idea of using theatrical improvisation (improv) in health care is relatively new. Occupational therapy students were taught a module of improvisational techniques as part of an academic seminar, learning improvisation rules, and enacting solutions to typical daily professional challenges. The purpose of this article is to recommend improvisational techniques as an adaptive skill to effectively blend art and science for occupational therapy practice in fast-paced and unpredictable health care environments.

  3. Innovative physical therapy practice: a qualitative verification of factors that support diffusion of innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabus, Carla; Spake, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    New ideas, methods, and technologies spread through cultures through typical patterns described by diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory. Professional cultures, including the physical therapy profession, have distinctive features and traditions that determine the adoption of practice innovation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) proposes a framework of innovation implementation specific to health care services. While the CFIR has been applied to medical and nursing practice, it has not been extended to rehabilitation professions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to verify the CFIR factors in outpatient physical therapy practice. Through a nomination process of area rehabilitation managers and area directors of clinical education, 2 exemplar, outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. A total of 18 physical therapists (PTs), including 3 owners and a manager, participated in the study. The 2 clinics served as case studies within a qualitative approach of directed content analysis. Data were collected through observation, spontaneous, unstructured questioning, workflow analysis, structured focus group sessions, and artifact analysis including clinical documents. Focus group data were transcribed. All the data were analyzed and coded among 4 investigators. Through data analysis and alignment with literature in DOI theory in health care practice, the factors that determine innovation adoption were verified. The phenomena of implementation in PT practice are largely consistent with models of implementation in health care service. Within the outpatient practices studied, patient-centered care and collaborative learning were foundational elements to diffusion of an innovation. Innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice can be understood as a social process situated within the culture of the physical therapy professional that follows predictable patterns that strongly align with

  4. The effects of intermittent, CD4-guided antiretroviral therapy on body composition and metabolic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Esteban; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Grund, Birgit; Thomas, Avis; Gibert, Cynthia; Shlay, Judith; Drummond, Fraser; Pearce, Daniel; Edwards, Simon; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Carr, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of decreased antiretroviral therapy exposure on body fat and metabolic parameters. Design: Substudy of the Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapy study, in which participants were randomized to intermittent CD4-guided [Drug Conservation (DC) group] or

  5. Organization of diagnostic and therapy consulting practice in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Following topics will be discussed. Role of the Medical Physicist in diagnostic/therapy. Difference in educational background of currently practicing medical physicists. QA programs. Calibrations of beams, dosemeters, chambers. Standard labs. Importance of professional organizations. Importance of professional certifications. Setting up a private consulting practice in the US. Importance of paperwork, is a 'bureaucracy'a problem? Comparing advantages and disadvantage of working as physicist for a consulting group and for health care institution

  6. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  7. FDG PET in non-pharmacological therapy in Alzheimer's disease; cerebral metabolic increase correlates with clinical improvement after cognitive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Park, Seong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    In management of AD, pharmacological treatment alone using acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) is general consensus, and provides beneficial effect to prolong their progression. Combined non-pharmacological therapy, especially cognitive therapy is recently having attention with expectation of improvement in cognitive ability. This study examined the effect of combined cognitive therapy in AD patients who were maintaining AChEI using FDG PET. Four patients (689 yrs) who diagnosed as probable Alzheimer's disease based on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria participated in this study. 12-week cognitive therapy comprised seven fields to enhance orientation, memory, recall, visuo-motor organization, categorization and behavior modification/sequencing. They received 45-minute sessions twice per week with maintaining their previous medication. Clinical improvement was assessed by comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Two FDG PET studies were performed before cognitive therapy and in the middle of the therapy, and compared to evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy to cerebral metabolism. Two of 4 patients whose initial cognitive impairment was milder had clinical improvement after 12 weeks, the rest who were more severely impaired failed to have clinical improvement. Regional cerebral hypometabolism on initial PET was correlated with their functional status. Follow up PET of two responders demonstrated the increases in regional metabolism in the temporal and/or frontal cortex, which was associated their functional improvement. Cerebral metabolism in poor responders were minimally increased or no changed. This preliminary data suggests that cognitive therapy is potentially useful to stabilize or improve cognitive and functional performance in AD patients with relatively mild cognitive dysfunction. And FDG PET could demonstrate possible candidates for cognitive therapy and the effect of the therapy

  8. The Radiation Therapy Oncology in the context of oncological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasdorf, P.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the radiation therapy oncology in the context of oncological practice. The radiotherapy is a speciality within medicine that involves the generation, application and dissemination of knowledge about the biology, causes, prevention and treatment of the cancer and other pathologies by ionising radiation

  9. Psychotherapy: a profile of current occupational therapy practice in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Sandra E; Tryssenaar, Joyce; Good, Colleen R; Detwiler, Lisa M

    2013-12-01

    Psychotherapy can be an important part of psychosocial occupational therapy practice; however, it requires specialized training to achieve and maintain competence. Regulation varies by province, and in Ontario, occupational therapists were recently authorized to perform psychotherapy. The purpose of this study was to explore the psychotherapy practice, training, and support needs of Ontario occupational therapists. An online survey was sent to occupational therapists who had clients with mental health or chronic pain issues, asking about their expertise and support needs in relation to nine psychotherapy approaches. Of the 331 therapists who responded, there were variations in the nature and frequency of psychotherapy practice. Experienced therapists in outpatient settings were more likely to practice psychotherapy, and cognitive-behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness were the most common approaches. Supervision and training varied, with many therapists interested in occupational therapy-specific training. Recommendations for a framework of support include education about the nature of psychotherapy, training and supervision guidelines, and advocacy for occupational therapy and psychotherapy.

  10. Practical management of adverse events related to apomorphine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Henriksen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The potential for adverse events is often cited as a barrier to the use of subcutaneous apomorphine therapy (intermittent injections and continuous infusion) in the management of Parkinson's disease. However, with proactive management most adverse effects are manageable if reported and tackled...... titration, initiation and long-term treatment, and discuss practical management strategies....

  11. Books as therapy | Ellis | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 58, No 5 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Books as therapy. Chris Ellis. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE ...

  12. Spirit in Motion: Developing a Spiritual Practice in Drama Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Douglas Philip

    This document describes the theoretical and experiential process of utilizing a variety of action-oriented approaches for the development of a spiritual practice within the field of drama therapy. It explores the nature of the self from a variety of psychological perspectives, and introduces the concept of an ontologically- and…

  13. Innovative physical therapy practice: a qualitative verification of factors that support diffusion of innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabus C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Carla Sabus,1 Ellen Spake2 1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 2Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO, USA Background and purpose: New ideas, methods, and technologies spread through cultures through typical patterns described by diffusion of innovation (DOI theory. Professional cultures, including the physical therapy profession, have distinctive features and traditions that determine the adoption of practice innovation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR proposes a framework of innovation implementation specific to health care services. While the CFIR has been applied to medical and nursing practice, it has not been extended to rehabilitation professions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to verify the CFIR factors in outpatient physical therapy practice.Design: Through a nomination process of area rehabilitation managers and area directors of clinical education, 2 exemplar, outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. A total of 18 physical therapists (PTs, including 3 owners and a manager, participated in the study.Methods: The 2 clinics served as case studies within a qualitative approach of directed content analysis. Data were collected through observation, spontaneous, unstructured questioning, ­workflow analysis, structured focus group sessions, and artifact analysis including clinical documents. Focus group data were transcribed. All the data were analyzed and coded among 4 investigators.Results: Through data analysis and alignment with literature in DOI theory in health care practice, the factors that determine innovation adoption were verified. The phenomena of implementation in PT practice are largely consistent with models of implementation in health care service. Within the outpatient practices studied, patient-centered care and collaborative learning were foundational

  14. Potential utility of combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan for metabolic derangements in Zucker Fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajioka, T; Miura, K; Kitahara, Y; Yamagishi, S

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with insulin resistance and has been recognized as a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance and/or impaired early-phase insulin secretion are major determinants of postprandial hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the potential utility of combination therapy with telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker and nateglinide, a rapid-onset/short-duration insulinotropic agent, for the treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia and metabolic derangements in Zucker Fatty (ZF) rats. ZF rats fed twice daily were given vehicle, 50 mg/kg of nateglinide, 5 mg/kg of telmisartan, or both for 6 weeks. Combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan for 2 weeks ameliorated postprandial hyperglycemia in ZF rats fed twice daily. Furthermore, 6-week treatment with nateglinide and telmisartan not only decreased fasting plasma insulin, triglycerides, and free fatty acid levels, but also improved the responses of blood glucose to insulin and subsequently reduced the decremental glucose areas under the curve in the ZF rats. Combination therapy also restored the decrease of plasma adiponectin levels in the ZF rats. Monotherapy with nateglinide or telmisartan alone didnot significantly improve these metabolic parameters. These observations demonstrate that combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan may improve the metabolic derangements by ameliorating early phase of insulin secretion as well as insulin resistance in ZF rats fed twice daily. Our present findings suggest that the combination therapy with nateglinide and telmisartan could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  15. Technical basis of radiation therapy. Practical clinical applications. 5. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Seymour H. [Karolinska Institutet Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncol-Pathol; Perez, Carlos A. [Washington Univ. Medical Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Purdy, James A. [California Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Poortmans, Philip [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    This well-received book, now in its fifth edition, is unique in providing a detailed description of the technological basis of radiation therapy. Another novel feature is the collaborative writing of the chapters by North American and European authors. This considerably broadens the book's perspective and increases its applicability in daily practice throughout the world. The book is divided into two sections. The first covers basic concepts in treatment planning, including essential physics and biological principles related to time-dose-fractionation, and explains the various technological approaches to radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and high and low dose rate brachytherapy. Issues relating to quality assurance, technology assessment, and cost-benefit analysis are also reviewed. The second part of the book discusses in depth the practical clinical applications of the different radiation therapy techniques in a wide range of cancer sites. All of the chapters have been written by leaders in the field. This book will serve to instruct and acquaint teachers, students, and practitioners in the various fields of oncology with the basic technological factors and approaches in radiation therapy. (orig.)

  16. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  17. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  19. Targeting Metabolic Symbiosis to Overcome Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pisarsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the approval of several anti-angiogenic therapies, clinical results remain unsatisfactory, and transient benefits are followed by rapid tumor recurrence. Here, we demonstrate potent anti-angiogenic efficacy of the multi-kinase inhibitors nintedanib and sunitinib in a mouse model of breast cancer. However, after an initial regression, tumors resume growth in the absence of active tumor angiogenesis. Gene expression profiling of tumor cells reveals metabolic reprogramming toward anaerobic glycolysis. Indeed, combinatorial treatment with a glycolysis inhibitor (3PO efficiently inhibits tumor growth. Moreover, tumors establish metabolic symbiosis, illustrated by the differential expression of MCT1 and MCT4, monocarboxylate transporters active in lactate exchange in glycolytic tumors. Accordingly, genetic ablation of MCT4 expression overcomes adaptive resistance against anti-angiogenic therapy. Hence, targeting metabolic symbiosis may be an attractive avenue to avoid resistance development to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients.

  20. The theory, practice, and measurement of Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Kimberly Sena; Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna; Magee, Wendy L.

    2013-01-01

    from an understanding of music perception and cognition. Given the diversity of practice, there are several key challenges for the discipline. One is developing a theory-based clinical and research approach. This supports a deeper understanding of the complex music stimulus and therapeutic interactions......Music therapy is a clinical healthcare discipline that draws its evidence base from music neuroscience and psychology to improve the health and well-being in individuals from varied clinical populations. Working with individuals across the lifespan, evidence-based therapeutic methods are developed...... of interest. This symposium will bring together some of the latest research from the discipline of music therapy relating to the clinical needs of complex neurological and psychiatric populations. The papers offer diverse perspectives reflecting interdisciplinary influences on the theory and practice of music...

  1. Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for the Complexities of Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Knecht-Sabres DHS, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the effect of a unique amalgam of adult learning methodologies near the end of the occupational therapy (OT students’ didactic education as a means to enhance readiness for clinical practice. Results of quantitative and qualitative data analysis indicated that the use of standardized patients, in combination with a sequential, semistructured, and progressively challenging series of client cases, in an OT adult practice (intervention course, improved the students’ self-perception of their level of comfort and skill on various foundational, yet essential, OT-related competencies.

  2. Evidence - based medicine/practice in sports physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Robert C; Lehecka, B J

    2012-10-01

    A push for the use of evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence-based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision-making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well-being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence-based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy.

  3. Metabolic syndrome among individuals with heroin use disorders on methadone therapy: Prevalence, characteristics, and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Robles, María José; Torrens, Marta; Samos, Pilar; Roquer, Albert; Martires, Paula K; Sanvisens, Arantza; Muga, Roberto; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2018-01-02

    Observational studies have reported a high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in subjects on methadone therapy; there are, however, limited data about metabolic syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and related factors in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy. A cross-sectional study in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy at a drug abuse outpatient center. Medical examinations and laboratory analyses after a 12-hour overnight fast were recorded. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. One hundred and twenty-two subjects were included, with a mean age of 46.1 ± 9 years, a median body mass index (BMI) of 25.3 kg/m 2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 21.2-28), and 77.9% were men. Median exposure to methadone therapy was 13 years (IQR: 5-20). Overweight and obesity were present in 29.5% and 17.2% of the participants, respectively. Metabolic syndrome components were low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (51.6%), hypertriglyceridemia (36.8%), high blood pressure (36.8%), abdominal obesity (27.0%), and raised blood glucose levels (18.0%). Abdominal obesity was more prevalent in women (52% vs. 20%, P = >0.01) and high blood pressure more prevalent in men (41.1% vs. 22.2%, P = .07). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 29.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16.6-31.8). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, BMI (per 1 kg/m 2 increase odds ratio [OR]: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.27-1.76) and exposure time to methadone therapy (per 5 years of treatment increase OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.28-1.48) were associated with metabolic syndrome. Overweight and metabolic syndrome are prevalent findings in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy. Of specific concern is the association of methadone exposure with metabolic syndrome. Preventive measures and clinical routine screening should be

  4. Record of Occupational Therapy interventional practice in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbieri Bombarda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of records in the professional practice of occupational therapy, it is necessary to instill a more insightful look at the effectiveness of practitioners’ notes, as well as encourage the development of research–oriented documentary practice. The preparation of records arises from the need to have information from the service as a means of guidance and oversight of the service provided and on the adopted technical responsibility, as well as from the fact that the notes are a valuable data providing resource for research. The present study sought to identify and characterize occupational therapists in the state of Sao Paulo who work in inclusive education and how the records of their interventional practices are performed. A structured questionnaire as a tool available on the website for specific predetermined time was used as the study instrument, and the obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants were 55 occupational therapists working in the inclusive education process registered in the 3rd region of the Regional Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy. The results demonstrated that free narrative was the most commonly used registration model and that information related to the process of custody of notes was fragmented. These data showed weakness in the systematization of records, which is believed to result in improvement of the profession, a factor that demonstrates the necessity and temporality of the scientific production on this issue.

  5. Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapies by Metabolic Symbiosis in Renal Cell Carcinoma PDX Models and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Jiménez-Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiangiogenic drugs are used clinically for treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC as a standard first-line treatment. Nevertheless, these agents primarily serve to stabilize disease, and resistance eventually develops concomitant with progression. Here, we implicate metabolic symbiosis between tumor cells distal and proximal to remaining vessels as a mechanism of resistance to antiangiogenic therapies in patient-derived RCC orthoxenograft (PDX models and in clinical samples. This metabolic patterning is regulated by the mTOR pathway, and its inhibition effectively blocks metabolic symbiosis in PDX models. Clinically, patients treated with antiangiogenics consistently present with histologic signatures of metabolic symbiosis that are exacerbated in resistant tumors. Furthermore, the mTOR pathway is also associated in clinical samples, and its inhibition eliminates symbiotic patterning in patient samples. Overall, these data support a mechanism of resistance to antiangiogenics involving metabolic compartmentalization of tumor cells that can be inhibited by mTOR-targeted drugs.

  6. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa.

  7. The metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with prostate cancer on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Juan; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Alvarez-Ossorio, José L; Pesqueira, Daniel; Tabernero, Angel; Gómez Veiga, Francisco; Lorente, José A; Porras, Mariano; Lobato, Juan J; Ribal, María J; Planas, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy may promote the development of the metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer. We assessed the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome and its components during the first year of androgen deprivation therapy. This observational, multicenter, prospective study included 539 patients with prostate cancer scheduled to receive 3-month depot luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for more than 12 months. Waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profile, blood pressure and fasting glucose were evaluated at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. The metabolic syndrome was assessed according to NCEP ATP III criteria (2001) and 4 other definitions (WHO 1998, AACE 2003, AHA/NHLBI 2005 and IDF 2005). At 6 and 12 months after the initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, significant increases were observed in waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. No significant changes in blood pressure 130/85 or greater were detected. A nonsignificant increase of 3.9% in the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome (ATP III) was observed (22.9% at baseline vs 25.5% and 26.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at baseline varied according to the definition used, ranging from 9.4% (WHO) to 50% (IDF). At 12 months significant increases in prevalence were observed with the WHO (4.1%) and AHA/NHLBI (8.1%) definitions. Androgen deprivation therapy produces significant early effects on waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. The prevalence of and increase in the metabolic syndrome depend on the defining criteria. Counseling patients on the prevention, early detection and treatment of specific metabolic alterations is recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Distinguishing integrative from eclectic practice in cognitive behavioral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Alexandra M; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2013-09-01

    In psychotherapy research, practice, and training, there remains marked controversy about the merits of theoretical purism (i.e., model specific), versus integration, as well as how such principles may be represented in practice. Adding to the confusion is that many attributes of the therapeutic relationship, processes in therapy, and techniques have been popularized in the context of one or two theoretical approaches, but are incorporated into the practice of many approaches. This article demonstrates the various ways in which three core interventions (i.e., activity scheduling, self-monitoring, and identification, evaluation, and modification of thoughts) can be applied within the context of different cognitive and behavioral therapeutic models. It also demonstrates the role of in-session therapist language in describing the theoretical basis and processes underpinning therapeutic interventions. Case examples are presented to illustrate therapy provided by two hypothetical clinicians, Therapist A and Therapist B. Whether or not a practitioner elects to practice integrative psychotherapy, we advocate for consistency in the theoretical approach through the course of a service for a particular patient. Implications are outlined and discussed within the context of the current state of cognitive and behaviorally focused psychotherapies and integrative psychotherapy. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Hematopoietic Gene Therapies for Metabolic and Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2017-10-01

    Increasingly, patients affected by metabolic diseases affecting the central nervous system and neuroinflammatory disorders receive hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the attempt to slow the course of their disease, delay or attenuate symptoms, and improve pathologic findings. The possible replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells by the transplanted cell progeny contributes to clinical benefit. Genetic engineering of the cells to be transplanted (hematopoietic stem cell) may endow the brain myeloid progeny of these cells with enhanced or novel functions, contributing to therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perspectives on the Nutritional Management of Metabolic Syndrome in Asia: People, Practice and Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chee Huei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Asian countries have a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, also associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Healthcare expenditure varies among Asian countries, and is influenced by poverty factor and large populations. The effect of metabolic syndrome on nutritional management in Asia demonstrates the essential for clinicians to equalize the needs for higher standards of dietetics practice; as they execute optimal care processes with the aim of improving outcomes, alongside setting of workforce limitations, inadequate expertise in metabolic syndrome nutrition practice, as well as ethnic diversity among Asians. This paper presents some aspects of dietetics practice and the possibility that an alteration in practice is mandatory if dietitians are to play an active role in preventing or decelerating the evolution of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Metabolic response to glatiramer acetate therapy in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia De Riccardis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone is a random copolymer of glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine used for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Its mechanism of action has not been already fully elucidated, but it seems that GA has an immune-modulatory effect and neuro-protective properties. Lymphocyte mitochondrial dysfunction underlines the onset of several autoimmune disorders. In MS first diagnosis patients, CD4+, the main T cell subset involved in the pathogenesis of MS, undergo a metabolic reprogramming that consist in the up-regulation of glycolysis and in the down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. Currently, no works exist about CD4+ T cell metabolism in response to GA treatment. In order to provide novel insight into the potential use of GA in MS treatment, blood samples were collected from 20 healthy controls (HCs and from 20 RR MS patients prior and every 6 months during the 12 months of GA administration. GA treated patients' CD4+ T cells were compared with those from HCs analysing their mitochondrial activity through polarographic and enzymatic methods in association with their antioxidant status, through the analysis of SOD, GPx and CAT activities. Altogether, our findings suggest that GA is able to reduce CD4+ T lymphocytes' dysfunctions by increasing mitochondrial activity and their response to oxidative stress.

  12. Metabolic response to glatiramer acetate therapy in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riccardis, Lidia; Ferramosca, Alessandra; Danieli, Antonio; Trianni, Giorgio; Zara, Vincenzo; De Robertis, Francesca; Maffia, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone) is a random copolymer of glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine used for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Its mechanism of action has not been already fully elucidated, but it seems that GA has an immune-modulatory effect and neuro-protective properties. Lymphocyte mitochondrial dysfunction underlines the onset of several autoimmune disorders. In MS first diagnosis patients, CD4 + , the main T cell subset involved in the pathogenesis of MS, undergo a metabolic reprogramming that consist in the up-regulation of glycolysis and in the down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. Currently, no works exist about CD4 + T cell metabolism in response to GA treatment. In order to provide novel insight into the potential use of GA in MS treatment, blood samples were collected from 20 healthy controls (HCs) and from 20 RR MS patients prior and every 6 months during the 12 months of GA administration. GA treated patients' CD4 + T cells were compared with those from HCs analysing their mitochondrial activity through polarographic and enzymatic methods in association with their antioxidant status, through the analysis of SOD, GPx and CAT activities. Altogether, our findings suggest that GA is able to reduce CD4 + T lymphocytes' dysfunctions by increasing mitochondrial activity and their response to oxidative stress.

  13. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Danish patients with HIV infection: the effect of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B R; Petersen, J; Haugaard, S B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a subject of debate. We investigated the prevalence of MS in a cohort of Danish HIV-infected patients and estimated the effect of the various classes of antiretroviral...

  14. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...... of the antidiabetics metformin or glitazones to high dose recombinant human growth hormone therapy or switching antiretroviral regimen. When looking at the effect of switching therapy, focus has been addressed to protease inhibitor (PI) based regimens, as PI was the first component of HAART recognized to be correlated...

  15. Metabolic Disorders: From Principles to Practice | Aruoma | Archives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Metabolic Disorders: From Principles to ...

  16. Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The Muscular Metabolic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Jaussaud

    2011-01-01

    245±140 seconds (=.01. Peak VO2, VE/VCO2, peak circulatory power and NYHA were improved after CRT (13±4 to16±5 ml/kg/min (<.05, 45±16 to 39±13 (<.01, 1805±844 to 2225±1171 mmHg.ml/kg/min (<.01 and 3±0.35 to 1.88±0.4 (=.01. In addition, left ventricular ejection fraction and end-systolic volumes were improved from 24±8 to 29±7% (<.01 and from 157±69 to 122±55 ml (<.01. Conclusion. We suggest that CRT leads to an increase in oxidative muscular metabolism and postponed anaerobic threshold reducing exaggerated hyperventilation during exercise.

  17. Systemic relational therapy and the case from the clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Rožič

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present article are represented the principal guidelines of the systemic relational model of psychotherapy and an example of clinical practice where the pacient was incluced in this kind of therapy. In the essence of systemic relational model there is a person which is captured in the repetition of old patterns in spite of its painfulness and hardness. Captured and helpless in old patterns, the person not only repeats but also recreates them, because they promise safety, belonging and connectedness. From the review of the therapy it is evident that behind the pacient's concrete problems stands her family system to which she is loyal in the way that only deepens her distress. By the increasing the responsability for herself, for her feelings and her acts, it increases the pacient's funcionality, too.

  18. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousins JL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Joyce L Cousins,1–3 Peter AB Wark,3–5 Vanessa M McDonald2–5 1Faculty of Arts, Nursing and Theology, Avondale College of Higher Education, Sydney, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, 3Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, 4School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, 5Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia Abstract: Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, type II respiratory failure, oxygen therapy, prescribing, hypoxia, hypercapnia

  19. [Effects of progestogens on the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates. Practical consequences (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghéron, G

    Estrogens which are one of the components of contraceptive less than pills greater than are incriminated in many cardiovascular accidents. These occur as a result of metabolic disorders (involving lipids and carbohydrates), of modifications in coagulation factors, etc. The possible influence of progestogens was ignored for a long time. The widespread use of these compounds, prescribed for contraception as well as during hormonal replacement therapy for absolute or relative luteinic insufficiency, makes careful monitoring of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism imperative. This position is strengthened by a preliminary review of the literature which leads to several conclusions concerning lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  20. Exosome-derived microRNAs in cancer metabolism: possible implications in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Marco; Lee, Wan; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2017-01-20

    Malignant progression is greatly affected by dynamic cross-talk between stromal and cancer cells. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have key roles in cell-cell communication by transferring nucleic acids and proteins to target cells and tissues. Recently, MicroRNAs (miRs) and their delivery in exosomes have been implicated in physiological and pathological processes. Tumor-delivered miRs, interacting with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, modulate tumor progression, angiogenesis, metastasis and immune escape. Altered cell metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of different types of tumor rely on mitochondrial metabolism by triggering adaptive mechanisms to optimize their oxidative phosphorylation in relation to their substrate supply and energy demands. Exogenous exosomes can induce metabolic reprogramming by restoring the respiration of cancer cells and supress tumor growth. The exosomal miRs involved in the modulation of cancer metabolism may be potentially utilized for better diagnostics and therapy.

  1. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  2. Role of metabolic stress for enhancing muscle adaptations: Practical applications

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas, Marcelo Conrado; Gerosa-Neto, Jose; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; Lira, Fabio Santos; Rossi, Fabr?cio Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic stress is a physiological process that occurs during exercise in response to low energy that leads to metabolite accumulation [lactate, phosphate inorganic (Pi) and ions of hydrogen (H+)] in muscle cells. Traditional exercise protocol (i.e., Resistance training) has an important impact on the increase of metabolite accumulation, which influences hormonal release, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell swelling. Changes in acute exercise routines, such as intensit...

  3. NAD+ salvage pathway in cancer metabolism and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Barry E; Sharif, Tanveer; Martell, Emma; Dai, Cathleen; Kim, Youra; Lee, Patrick W K; Gujar, Shashi A

    2016-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is an essential coenzyme for various physiological processes including energy metabolism, DNA repair, cell growth, and cell death. Many of these pathways are typically dysregulated in cancer cells, making NAD + an intriguing target for cancer therapeutics. NAD + is mainly synthesized by the NAD + salvage pathway in cancer cells, and not surprisingly, the pharmacological targeting of the NAD + salvage pathway causes cancer cell cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Several studies have described the precise consequences of NAD + depletion on cancer biology, and have demonstrated that NAD+ depletion results in depletion of energy levels through lowered rates of glycolysis, reduced citric acid cycle activity, and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. Additionally, depletion of NAD + causes sensitization of cancer cells to oxidative damage by disruption of the anti-oxidant defense system, decreased cell proliferation, and initiation of cell death through manipulation of cell signaling pathways (e.g., SIRT1 and p53). Recently, studies have explored the effect of well-known cancer therapeutics in combination with pharmacological depletion of NAD + levels, and found in many cases a synergistic effect on cancer cell cytotoxicity. In this context, we will discuss the effects of NAD + salvage pathway inhibition on cancer cell biology and provide insight on this pathway as a novel anti-cancer therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Teaching Effectiveness: Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. OBrien PhD, MS.MEdL, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical educators must examine the ability of teaching methodologies to prepare students for clinical practice. Two types of assessment methods commonly used in medical education include the Short Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE and the Integrated Performance Procedural Instrument (IPPI. The use of these methods in occupational therapy (OT education is less understood. With the increasing number of students enrolled in programs, faculty face challenges to examine how clinical competence is established using data to determine teaching effectiveness. This study examines two educational methodologies used in OT curriculum: the long written case study (IPPI and short performance-based OSCE. The authors describe the effectiveness of each examination as it relates to student performance in clinical practice (as measured by the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation [FWPE]. The findings obtained from separate focus group sessions with faculty and students further provide insight into the advantages and disadvantages of the educational methodologies.

  5. The effects of home oxygen therapy on energy metabolism in patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırıcı Berber, Nurcan; Yetkin, Özkan; Kılıç, Talat; Berber, Ilhami; Özgel, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    Background COPD is preventable and treatable and is characterized by completely nonreversible airflow obstruction. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of long-term oxygen therapy on patients with stage 4 COPD who were followed up and treated at the polyclinic or clinic service. We evaluated the effects of oxygen therapy on energy metabolism and physical activity in patients with COPD. Methods Nineteen patients with COPD (16 male/3 female), treated with oxygen therapy for the first time, were included in this study. Analysis of arterial blood gases and pulmonary function test was performed. Metabolic Holter device (SenseWear® Armband) was placed pre- and post-oxygen therapy on the patients’ arm for at least 3 days. This device captures Holter data in a digitized electronic system, and the daily average value was calculated from the data. Results Post-oxygen treatment showed a significant increase in energy expenditure by patients with COPD (pretreatment, 1,497±596 joule; posttreatment, 2,977±5,985 joule; P=0.044). Moreover, number of steps during walking (pretreatment, 2,056±256; posttreatment, 2,120±195; P=0.03), resting (pretreatment, 6.36±3.31 hours; posttreatment, 3.47±2.19 hours; P<0.03), and sleeping (pretreatment, 4.23±2.13 hours; posttreatment, 2.33±1.42 hours; P<0.00) showed significant differences. Increased daily energy expenditure in patients with respiratory failure was detected with long-term oxygen therapy. In addition, the immobility of patients decreased and duration of physical activity increased in patients with COPD. Conclusion In this study, positive effects of long-term oxygen therapy have been demonstrated with respect to energy metabolism and physical activity of patients with COPD. Thus, we recommend that medication adherence and long-term oxygen therapy should begin early in patients with COPD.

  6. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Matthew; Barry, Tamara; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Seeley, Anna; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) / stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR.

  7. Metabolic therapy of thyroid by 131I and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, I.; Caussin, J.; Smeesters, P.; Wambersie, A.; Beckers, C.

    1997-01-01

    The recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 60) to be applied in the European Union from the year 2000 imply a limit of the annual dose of 1 mSv for public as well as the compliance with the dose constraints. In order to verify the possibility of observing these new standards without losing the very favourable cost-profit of the 131 I therapy in thyroiditis, 73 members of patient families treated by radioiodine were surveyed by direct dosimetry. A number of 22 patients afflicted with thyroid cancer received doses of 3700 to 7400 MBq and 18 hyperthyroid patients received 200 to 600 MBq. Dosemeters mounted around the neck were carried for 2-3 weeks by 35 spouses and 38 children 4 months to 25 years old. The residual thyroid radioactivity and the T 1/2 of 131 I were measured by gamma chambers in every patients. In the group of patients with thyroid cancers the effective T 1/2 is 2.2 days. The doses measured in families are lower than 1 mSv in any spouses and lower than 0.3 mSv in all the children except one. In hyperthyroid patients the effective T 1/2 is 6.2 days. The average dose received is 1.04 mSv (0.05-5.2) for spouses and 0.13 mSv (0.04-3.1) for children. These direct dosimetry data are reliable and allow to propose reasonable and efficient restrictions which will not compromise neither the efficiency of treatment or the environment safety

  8. Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy—Implications for Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlke Heydemann

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas regarding muscle pathologies. In addition, new experiments and manuscripts continually reveal additional highly intricate, reciprocal interactions between metabolism and muscle. These reciprocal interactions include exercise, age, sex, diet, and pathologies including atrophy, hypoxia, obesity, diabetes, and muscle myopathies. Central to this review are the metabolic changes that occur in the skeletal muscle cells of muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models. Many of these metabolic changes are pathogenic (inappropriate body mass changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels, and increased Ca2+ and others are compensatory (increased phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK, increased slow fiber numbers, and increased utrophin. Therefore, reversing or enhancing these changes with therapies will aid the patients. The multiple therapeutic targets to reverse or enhance the metabolic pathways will be discussed. Among the therapeutic targets are increasing pAMPK, utrophin, mitochondrial number and slow fiber characteristics, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Because new data reveals many additional intricate levels of interactions, new questions are rapidly arising. How does muscular dystrophy alter metabolism, and are the changes compensatory or pathogenic? How does metabolism affect muscular dystrophy? Of course, the most profound question is whether clinicians can therapeutically target nutrition and metabolism for muscular dystrophy patient benefit? Obtaining the answers to these questions will greatly aid patients with muscular dystrophy.

  9. Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy-Implications for Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydemann, Ahlke

    2018-06-20

    The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas regarding muscle pathologies. In addition, new experiments and manuscripts continually reveal additional highly intricate, reciprocal interactions between metabolism and muscle. These reciprocal interactions include exercise, age, sex, diet, and pathologies including atrophy, hypoxia, obesity, diabetes, and muscle myopathies. Central to this review are the metabolic changes that occur in the skeletal muscle cells of muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models. Many of these metabolic changes are pathogenic (inappropriate body mass changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, and increased Ca 2+ ) and others are compensatory (increased phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK), increased slow fiber numbers, and increased utrophin). Therefore, reversing or enhancing these changes with therapies will aid the patients. The multiple therapeutic targets to reverse or enhance the metabolic pathways will be discussed. Among the therapeutic targets are increasing pAMPK, utrophin, mitochondrial number and slow fiber characteristics, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Because new data reveals many additional intricate levels of interactions, new questions are rapidly arising. How does muscular dystrophy alter metabolism, and are the changes compensatory or pathogenic? How does metabolism affect muscular dystrophy? Of course, the most profound question is whether clinicians can therapeutically target nutrition and metabolism for muscular dystrophy patient benefit? Obtaining the answers to these questions will greatly aid patients with muscular dystrophy.

  10. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  11. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension attending a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Ahmad, M; Matrook, F; Nasir, L; Froelicher, E S

    2010-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is being reported more frequently in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Patients with hypertension attending family practice clinics in the University of Jordan Hospital between February and July 2006 were assessed for the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its individual components. Of 345 patients studied, 65% had metabolic syndrome. Females were more likely to meet Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria for the diagnosis. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent component of metabolic syndrome in males, while low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high waist circumference ranked first and second in females. Primary care providers should be alert to the importance of screening patients with hypertension for metabolic syndrome to prevent and manage these combined conditions.

  12. Update on metabolism and nutrition therapy in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, E; Burghi, G; Manzanares, W

    Major burn injury triggers severe oxidative stress, a systemic inflammatory response, and a persistent hypermetabolic and hypercatabolic state with secondary sarcopenia, multiorgan dysfunction, sepsis and an increased mortality risk. Calorie deficit, negative protein balance and antioxidant micronutrient deficiency after thermal injury have been associated to poor clinical outcomes. In this context, personalized nutrition therapy with early enteral feeding from the start of resuscitation are indicated. Over the last four decades, different nutritional and pharmacological interventions aimed at modulating the immune and metabolic responses have been evaluated. These strategies have been shown to be able to minimize acute malnutrition, as well as modulate the immunoinflammatory response, and improve relevant clinical outcomes in this patient population. The purpose of this updating review is to summarize the most current evidence on metabolic response and nutrition therapy in critically ill burn patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic therapy of multimorbid patients with arterial hypertension and inflammatory diseases of a parodentium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Sycheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AH is accompanied by deep metabolic and functional violations in organism tissue, including also the parodentium. The special attention is drawn by efficiency of the metabolic preparations possessing multimodal actions and allowing carrying out therapy of a number of states. The preparation of L-carnitine which is a perspective remedy for patients with AH associated with Inflammatory Deseased of Parodentium belongs to such means. In work studying of clinical efficiency and mechanisms action of L-carnitine in patients with AH and inflammatory diseases of parodentium was carried out. 70 patients with AH associated with IPD were divided into groups by way of simple randomization: a group with inclusion of a L-carnitine into the treatment and a control group, receiving only standard therapy. In the conducted research high antioxidant activity of the preparation is confirmed and the effect of L-carnitine normalizing tissue microcirculation is noted.

  14. A prospective study of monitoring practices for metabolic disease in antipsychotic-treated community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkinson Helen MO

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe mental illness are at increased risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. A number of recent guidelines and consensus statements recommend stringent monitoring of metabolic function in individuals receiving antipsychotic drugs. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 106 community-treated psychiatric patients from across the diagnostic spectrum from the Northeast of England to investigate changes in metabolic status and monitoring practices for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We undertook detailed anthropometric and metabolic assessment at baseline and follow-up, and examined clinical notes and hospital laboratory records to ascertain monitoring practices. Results A high prevalence of undiagnosed and untreated metabolic disease was present at baseline assessment. Mean follow-up time was 599.3 (SD ± 235.4 days. Body mass index (p 50% of subjects had neither blood glucose nor lipids monitored during the follow-up period. Conclusion This cohort has a high prevalence of metabolic disease and heightened cardiovascular risk. Despite the publication of a number of recommendations regarding physical health screening in this population, monitoring rates are poor, and physical health worsened during the follow-up period.

  15. Facilitating Transfer of Skills and Strategies in Occupational Therapy Practice: Practical Application of Transfer Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babulal, Ganesh M; Foster, Erin R; Wolf, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    In Occupational Therapy (OT) practice, practitioners assume that the skills and strategies taught to clients during rehabilitation will transfer to performance and participation in everyday life. Despite transfer serving as a practice foundation, outcome studies conclude that this assumption of transfer is not occurring and it often results in decreased efficacy of rehabilitation. This paper investigated key aspects of transfer and found concepts in the psychology literature that can support transfer of skills and strategies in OT. Six key principles proposed from educational psychology can serve as a guide for practitioners to better train for transfer. In this paper, we discuss the six principles and apply concepts from psychology. Each principle is supported with examples of how they may be incorporated OT practice. If occupational therapists understand these principles and implement them in treatment, the efficacy of treatment may improve for many populations.

  16. Metabolic effect of combined telmisartan and nifedipine CR therapy in patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Shimizu,1,4 Fumiyasu Yamasaki,4 Takashi Furuno,1,4 Toru Kubo,1 Takayuki Sato,3,4 Yoshinori Doi,1 Tetsuro Sugiura21Medicine and Geriatrics, 2Clinical Laboratory, 3Cardiovascular Control, Kochi Medical, School, Nankoku, Japan; 4Section of Cardiology, Inoue Hospital, Takaoka, JapanBackground: In addition to exerting a blood pressure (BP-lowering effect, telmisartan produces favorable metabolic effects via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activation. While a combination of telmisartan and a calcium channel blocker is often used to achieve a target BP level, the metabolic effects of this drug combination remain unclear. Therefore, this study evaluated the metabolic effects of telmisartan plus nifedipine controlled release (CR therapy, in hypertensive patients without metabolic disease.Methods: Sixteen patients with essential hypertension, who had not undergone antihypertensive therapy in the previous 6 months, were studied. Patients were initiated on telmisartan (40 mg/day. If their office BP was not reduced to 140/90 mmHg after 6 weeks, nifedipine CR (20–40 mg per day was added for 18 weeks. The other patients whose BP had achieved the target of 140/90 mmHg, continued only telmisartan.Results: Telmisartan reduced BP (174 ± 13/92 ± 10 to 143 ± 22/78 ± 11 mmHg; P < 0.01 at 6 weeks in 16 patients, but eight patients did not achieve target BP levels and required addition of nifedipine. Telmisartan also resulted in a reduction in the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (1.30 ± 0.65 to 1.10 ± 0.42; P < 0.05 at 6 weeks, but did not affect adiponectin or leptin levels. Addition of nifedipine (n = 8 resulted in a reduction in BP (158 ± 18/80 ± 13 to 131 ± 8/73 ± 13 mmHg; P < 0.01 at 18 weeks, but did not affect the HOMA-IR (1.10 ± 0.40 to 1.02 ± 0.56; ns. In patients who did not require addition of nifedipine (n = 8, BP levels remained nearly identical at 18 weeks (127 ± 13/73 ± 9 to 128 ± 13/68 ± 8

  17. A call for sustainable practice in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Carole W; Dorsey, Julie A; Gitlow, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The ability of the earth to sustain health among humans and in the natural world is under threat from overpopulation, environmental degradation, and climate change. These global threats are anticipated to harm health and human occupation in many direct and indirect ways. Strategies are needed to mitigate the effects of these threats and to build individual and community capacities to foster resilience. This paper links issues of sustainability with occupational therapy philosophy and discusses how employing a sustainability lens with professional reasoning can help practitioners integrate sustainability into their practice. Human occupation is inseparable from the environments in which people live. Human occupation has caused the current environmental crisis, and targeted human action is required to safeguard future health and well-being. Occupational therapists have an ethical obligation to use professional reasoning strategies that, taken collectively, can help to build a sustainable and resilient future.

  18. Contemporary use and practice of electroconvulsive therapy worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Jarosh-von Schweder, Lindy; Høie, Bjørg

    2012-01-01

    To explore contemporary (from 1990) utilization and practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) worldwide. Systematic search (limited to studies published 1990 and after) was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed, and EBSCO/Cinahl. Primary data-based studies/surveys with reported ECT utilization and practice in psychiatric institutions internationally, nationally, and regionally; city were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria, and extracted ECT utilization and practice data from those retrieved in full text. Seventy studies were included, seven from Australia and New Zealand, three Africa, 12 North and Latin America, 33 Europe, and 15 Asia. Worldwide ECT differences and trends were evident, average number ECTs administered per patient were eight; unmodified (without anesthesia) was used in Asia (over 90%), Africa, Latin America, Russia, Turkey, Spain. Worldwide preferred electrode placement was bilateral, except unilateral at some places (Europe and Australia/New Zealand). Although mainstream was brief-pulse wave, sine-wave devices were still used. Majority ECT treated were older women with depression in Western countries, versus younger men with schizophrenia in Asian countries. ECT under involuntary conditions (admissions), use of ambulatory-ECT, acute first line of treatment, as well as administered by other professions (geriatricians, nurses) were noted by some sites. General trends were only some institutions within the same country providing ECT, training inadequate, and guidelines not followed. Mandatory reporting and overall country ECT register data were sparse. Many patients are still treated with unmodified ECT today. Large global variation in ECT utilization, administration, and practice advocates a need for worldwide sharing of knowledge about ECT, reflection, and learning from each other's experiences. PMID:22741102

  19. Integrating pharmacogenomics into pharmacy practice via medication therapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    To explore the application and integration of pharmacogenomics in pharmacy clinical practice via medication therapy management (MTM) to improve patient care. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) Personalized Health Care Initiative, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pharmacogenomics activity, and findings from the Utilizing E-Prescribing Technologies to Integrate Pharmacogenomics into Prescribing and Dispensing Practices Stakeholder Workshop, convened by the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) on March 5, 2009. Participants at the Stakeholder Workshop included diverse representatives from pharmacy, medicine, pathology, health information technology (HIT), standards, science, academia, government, and others with a key interest in the clinical application of pharmacogenomics. In 2006, HHS initiated the Personalized Health Care Initiative with the goal of building the foundation for the delivery of gene-based care, which may prove to be more effective for large patient subpopulations. In the years since the initiative was launched, drug manufacturers and FDA have begun to incorporate pharmacogenomic data and applications of this information into the drug development, labeling, and approval processes. New applications and processes for using this emerging pharmacogenomics data are needed to effectively integrate this information into clinical practice. Building from the findings of a stakeholder workshop convened by APhA and the advancement of the pharmacist's collaborative role in patient care through MTM, emerging roles for pharmacists using pharmacogenomic information to improve patient care are taking hold. Realizing the potential role of the pharmacist in pharmacogenomics through MTM will require connectivity of pharmacists into the electronic health record infrastructure to permit the exchange of pertinent health information among all members of a patient's health care team. Addressing current barriers, concerns, and system limitations and developing

  20. Systemic therapy and the social relational model of disability: enabling practices with people with intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Haydon-Laurelut, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Therapy has been critiqued for personalizing the political (Kitzinger, 1993). The social-relational model (Thomas, 1999) is one theoretical resource for understanding the practices of therapy through a political lens. The social model(s) have viewed therapy with suspicion. This paper highlights – using composite case examples and the authors primary therapeutic modality, systemic therapy – some systemic practices with adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) that enact a position that it is s...

  1. Transdermal hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: A review of metabolic effects and drug delivery technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W Kopper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nathan W Kopper, Jennifer Gudeman, Daniel J ThompsonKV Pharmaceutical, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS associated with menopause can cause significant discomfort and decrease the quality of life for women in the peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages of life. Hormone therapy (HT is the mainstay of treatment for menopausal symptoms and is currently the only therapy proven effective for VMS. Numerous HT options are available to treat VMS, including estrogen-only and estrogen-progestogen combination products to meet the needs of both hysterectomized and nonhysterectomized women. In addition to selecting an appropriate estrogen or estrogen-progestogen combination, consideration should be given to the route of administration to best suit the needs of the patient. Delivery systems for hormone therapy include oral tablets, transdermal patches, transdermal topical (nonpatch products, and intravaginal preparations. Oral is currently the most commonly utilized route of administration in the United States. However, evidence suggests that oral delivery may lead to some undesirable physiologic effects caused by significant gut and hepatic metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery may mitigate some of these effects by avoiding gut and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Advantages of transdermal delivery include the ability to administer unmetabolized estradiol directly to the blood stream, administration of lower doses compared to oral products, and minimal stimulation of hepatic protein production. Several estradiol transdermal delivery technologies are available, including various types of patches, topical gels, and a transdermal spray.Keywords: estradiol, hormone therapy, menopause, transdermal drug delivery, vasomotor symptoms

  2. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with HIV in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombo, Bernardo; Alkhalil, Imran; Golden, Marjorie P; Fotjadhi, Irma; Ravi, Sreedhar; Virata, Michael; Lievano, Marta; Diez, Jose; Ghantous, Andre; Donohue, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) as the standard of care for HIV disease, there has been a precipitous decline in the death rate due to HIV/ AIDS. The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in HIV infected patients. Retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study of 259 patients with HIV infection treated with cART from an urban community hospital. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was defined using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Study patients were included regardless of the duration of cART. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27% using IDF criteria and 26% using ATP III criteria. Logistic regression analysis found an association between treatment with the protease inhibitor darunavir and metabolic syndrome. (OR 3.32 with 95% confidence interval between 1.54 and 7.15). There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity in HIV patients treated with cART, especially those taking the protease inhibitor darunavir.

  3. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced.

  4. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  5. Cardiac ryanodine receptor in metabolic syndrome: is JTV519 (K201 future therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer UD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available U Deniz DincerDepartment of Pharmacology, Ufuk University School of Medicine. Mevlana Bulvari, Balgat, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. This multifaceted syndrome is often accompanied by a hyperdynamic circulatory state characterized by increased blood pressure, total blood volume, cardiac output, and metabolic tissue demand. Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. One of the main and frequent complications seen in metabolic syndrome is cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints of cardiometabolic risk are coronary and peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and stroke. Alterations in expression and/or functioning of several key proteins involved in regulating and maintaining ionic homeostasis can cause cardiac disturbances. One such group of proteins is known as ryanodine receptors (intracellular calcium release channels, which are the major channels through which Ca2+ ions leave the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to cardiac muscle contraction. The economic cost of metabolic syndrome and its associated complications has a significant effect on health care budgets. Improvements in body weight, blood lipid profile, and hyperglycemia can reduce cardiometabolic risk. However, constant hyperadrenergic stimulation still contributes to the burden of disease. Normalization of the hyperdynamic circulatory state with conventional therapies is the most reasonable therapeutic strategy to date. JTV519 (K201 is a newly developed 1,4-benzothiazepine drug with antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective properties. It appears to be very effective in not only preventing but also in reversing the characteristic myocardial changes and preventing

  6. Metabolic syndrome is associated with poor treatment response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hafsa; Gill, Uzma; Raza, Abida; Gill, Muzaffar L

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection is caused by an RNA virus. HCV infection is considered to induce systemic disease that causes steatosis, alters lipid metabolism, and results in metabolic syndrome. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic outcome in HCV genotype 3 patients with metabolic syndrome. A total of 621 HCV-positive patients who visited the hospital for treatment were screened. Among these, 441 patients were enrolled for antiviral therapy. These enrolled patients were assessed for metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Group A included patients with metabolic syndrome and group B included patients without metabolic syndrome. All patients received peginterferon-α2a (180 μg/week) and ribavirin (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in chronic HCV patients was 37.9%. We observed that metabolic syndrome was more common among female compared with male participants (43.9 vs. 28.8%, P=0.005). It was found that sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were significantly higher in the patients in group B (without metabolic syndrome) compared with the patients in group A who had metabolic syndrome (72.2 vs. 43.7%, Pmetabolic syndrome and a correlation of metabolic syndrome with nonresponse to antiviral therapy was observed. An interesting correlation among metabolic syndrome, age, and SVR was found: with age, SVR decreases, while metabolic syndrome increases. Metabolic syndrome has an influence on therapeutic outcomes in terms of SVR. Moreover, this information can identify patients who might have a low chance of attaining an SVR and a timely decision may protect the patients from the adverse effects of therapy.

  7. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  8. The Future of Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology: Towards a Systematic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikramaditya G.; De Mey, Marjan; Lim, Chin Giaw; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology promises to revolutionize conventional chemical manufacturing in the years ahead, largely owing to the excellent progress in our ability to re-engineer cellular metabolism. However, most successes of metabolic engineering have been confined to over-producing natively synthesized metabolites in E. coli and S. cerevisiae. A major reason for this development has been the descent of metabolic engineering, particularly secondary metabolic engineering, to a collection of demonstrations rather than a systematic practice with generalizable tools. Synthetic biology, a more recent development, faces similar criticisms. Herein, we attempt to lay down a framework around which bioreaction engineering can systematize itself just like chemical reaction engineering. Central to this undertaking is a new approach to engineering secondary metabolism known as ‘multivariate modular metabolic engineering’ (MMME), whose novelty lies in its assessment and elimination of regulatory and pathway bottlenecks by re-defining the metabolic network as a collection of distinct modules. After introducing the core principles of MMME, we shall then present a number of recent developments in secondary metabolic engineering that could potentially serve as its facilitators. It is hoped that the ever-declining costs of de novo gene synthesis; the improved use of bioinformatic tools to mine, sort and analyze biological data; and the increasing sensitivity and sophistication of investigational tools will make the maturation of microbial metabolic engineering an autocatalytic process. Encouraged by these advances, research groups across the world would take up the challenge of secondary metabolite production in simple hosts with renewed vigor, thereby adding to the range of products synthesized using metabolic engineering. PMID:22629571

  9. The future of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology: towards a systematic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikramaditya G; De Mey, Marjan; Lim, Chin Giaw; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Industrial biotechnology promises to revolutionize conventional chemical manufacturing in the years ahead, largely owing to the excellent progress in our ability to re-engineer cellular metabolism. However, most successes of metabolic engineering have been confined to over-producing natively synthesized metabolites in E. coli and S. cerevisiae. A major reason for this development has been the descent of metabolic engineering, particularly secondary metabolic engineering, to a collection of demonstrations rather than a systematic practice with generalizable tools. Synthetic biology, a more recent development, faces similar criticisms. Herein, we attempt to lay down a framework around which bioreaction engineering can systematize itself just like chemical reaction engineering. Central to this undertaking is a new approach to engineering secondary metabolism known as 'multivariate modular metabolic engineering' (MMME), whose novelty lies in its assessment and elimination of regulatory and pathway bottlenecks by re-defining the metabolic network as a collection of distinct modules. After introducing the core principles of MMME, we shall then present a number of recent developments in secondary metabolic engineering that could potentially serve as its facilitators. It is hoped that the ever-declining costs of de novo gene synthesis; the improved use of bioinformatic tools to mine, sort and analyze biological data; and the increasing sensitivity and sophistication of investigational tools will make the maturation of microbial metabolic engineering an autocatalytic process. Encouraged by these advances, research groups across the world would take up the challenge of secondary metabolite production in simple hosts with renewed vigor, thereby adding to the range of products synthesized using metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of MP4 Therapy Videos on Adherence to Voice Therapy Home Practice in Children With Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Maia N; van Leer, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Voice disorders in children are often treated with behavioral voice therapy, which requires home practice of exercises. Previous studies with adults demonstrated increased practice frequency when patients were given videos of a clinician and patient performing therapy tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine whether videos of practice exercises would increase adherence to therapy in children. The study used a randomized double crossover research design. Twenty-eight patients, aged 6-18, referred for voice therapy were included in the study. Two conditions were alternated on a weekly basis: standard-of-care therapy and standard-of-care therapy with video models added. Participants recorded practice frequency and participated in semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed for themes. Participants practiced an average of 1.79 times per day without videos and 1.72 with videos (P = 0.743), indicating no significant difference between conditions. There was also no age group effect (P = 0.314). Qualitative analysis of interview responses established the following themes: (1) I knew how to do my exercises, (2) I didn't like seeing/hearing myself, (3) Videos helped me remember to practice, (4) I didn't like the video player itself, (5) The videos didn't make a difference with practice, and (6) Practicing was no fun. Video models of therapy tasks do not appear to influence adherence to home practice frequency in children with voice disorders, in contrast to findings in adults. Videos were found useful by several participants as reminders to practice. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Practice of Behavioral Activation in Cognitive-behavioral Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Nobuki

    2015-01-01

    An approach focusing on behavioral activation (BA) was adopted in the cognitive therapy of A. T. Beck, and it came to be considered that BA can play an important role in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. Therefore, in recent years, BA based on clinical behavior analysis has been developed as a new treatment (Martell, et al.). The core characteristics are as follows: 1) focusing attention on context in daily life to promote the behavior control of patients and avoidance of a hatred experience ; 2) breaking the vicious circle; 3) promoting the behavior according to the purpose that the patients originally expect; 4) recognizing a relationship between behavior and the situation (contingency), thereby recovering self-efficacy tied to the long-term results that one originally expects. This does not increase pleasant activity at random when the patient is inactive, or give a sense of accomplishment. We know that depression is maintained by conducting functional analysis of detailed life behavior, and encourage the patients to have healthy behavior according to individual values. We help them to complete schedules regardless of mood and reflect on the results patiently. It is considered that those processes are important. BA may be easy to apply in clinical practice and effective for the chronic cases, or the patients in a convalescent stage. Also, in principle in the CBT for major depression, it may be effective that behavioral activation is provided in an early stage, and cognitive reconstruction in a latter stage. However, an approach to carry out functional analysis by small steps with careful activity monitoring is essential when the symptoms are severe. Furthermore, it should be considered that the way of psychoeducation requires caution because we encourage rest in the treatment of depression in our country. In particular, we must be careful not to take an attitude that an inactive behavior pattern is unproductive only based model cases.

  12. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Travillian, Ravensara S.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. Purpose To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. Setting A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Participants Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Design Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Results Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. Discussion The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Conclusions Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues. PMID:27648109

  13. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-09-01

    Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues.

  14. Assessment of adjuvant ademetionine therapy for the bilirubin metabolism and target organ function of neonatal jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of adjuvant ademetionine (SAMe therapy on the bilirubin metabolism and target organ function of neonatal jaundice. Methods: A total of 68 children who were diagnosed with neonatal jaundice in Hubei Jianghan Oilfield General Hospital between March 2015 and April 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the SAMe group who received ademetionine combined with blue ray irradiation and the control group who received blue ray irradiation. The serum contents of bilirubin metabolism indexes and target organ injury markers before treatment as well as 3 d and 7 d after treatment. Results: 3 d and 7 d after treatment, serum TBIL, ALT, AST, GGT, TBA, CK-MB, cTnT, MYO, HBDH, NSE, S100B and GFAP levels of both groups were lower than those before treatment, and serum TBIL, ALT, AST, GGT, TBA, CK-MB, cTnT, MYO, HBDH, NSE, S100B and GFAP levels of SAMe group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Adjuvant ademetionine therapy can improve the bilirubin metabolism of neonatal jaundice and reduce the central nerve, myocardial and liver injury.

  15. The effect of long term combined yoga practice on the basal metabolic rate of healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra HR

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different procedures practiced in yoga have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the basal metabolic rate when studied acutely. In daily life however, these procedures are usually practiced in combination. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the net change in the basal metabolic rate (BMR of individuals actively engaging in a combination of yoga practices (asana or yogic postures, meditation and pranayama or breathing exercises for a minimum period of six months, at a residential yoga education and research center at Bangalore. Methods The measured BMR of individuals practicing yoga through a combination of practices was compared with that of control subjects who did not practice yoga but led similar lifestyles. Results The BMR of the yoga practitioners was significantly lower than that of the non-yoga group, and was lower by about 13 % when adjusted for body weight (P Conclusion This study shows that there is a significantly reduced BMR, probably linked to reduced arousal, with the long term practice of yoga using a combination of stimulatory and inhibitory yogic practices.

  16. Association of nicotine metabolism and sex with relapse following varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Anaïs; Dobrinas, Maria; Gholamrezaee, Mehdi; Lubomirov, Rubin; Cornuz, Jacques; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine is metabolized into cotinine and then into trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, mainly by cytochrome P450 2A6. Recent studies reported better effectiveness of varenicline in women and in nicotine normal metabolizers phenotypically determined by nicotine-metabolite ratio. Our objective was to study the influence of nicotine-metabolite ratio, CYP2A6 genotype and sex on the response to nicotine replacement therapy and varenicline. Data were extracted from a longitudinal study which included smokers participating in a smoking cessation program. Response to treatment was defined by the absence of relapse when a set threshold of reduction in cigarettes per day relative to the week before the study was no more reached. The analysis considered total and partial reduction defined by a diminution of 100% and of 90% in cigarettes per day, respectively. The hazard ratio of relapsing was estimated in multivariate Cox regression models including the sex and the nicotine metabolism determined by the phenotype or by CYP2A6 genotyping (rs1801272 and rs28399433). In the normal metabolizers determined by phenotyping and in women, the hazard ratio for relapsing was significantly lower with varenicline for a partial decrease (HR = 0.33, 95% CI [0.12, 0.89] and HR = 0.20, 95% CI [0.04, 0.91], respectively) and nonsignificantly lower for a total cessation (HR = 0.45, 95% CI [0.20, 1.0] and HR = 0.38, 95% CI [0.14, 1.0]). When compared with the normal metabolizers determined by phenotyping, the hazard ratio for a partial decrease was similar in the normal metabolizers determined by genotyping (HR = 0.42, 95% CI [0.18, 0.94]) while it was significantly lower with varenicline for a total cessation (HR = 0.50, 95% CI [0.26, 0.98]). Women and normal nicotine metabolizers may benefit more from varenicline over nicotine replacement therapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Targeting the pre-receptor metabolism of cortisol as a novel therapy in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercole, Laura L; Stewart, Paul M

    2010-10-01

    Due to its impact upon health and the economy, the mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and the metabolic syndrome are under intense scrutiny. In addition to understanding the pathogenesis of disease it is important to design and trial novel therapies. Patients with cortisol excess, Cushing's syndrome, have a phenotype similar to that of the metabolic syndrome and as a result there is much interest the manipulation of glucocorticoid (GC) action as a therapeutic strategy. Intracellular GC levels are regulated by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby increasing local GC action. There is an abundance of data implicating 11β-HSD1 in the pathogenesis of obesity, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome and 11β-HSD1 is an attractive therapeutic target. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitors, which do not act upon 11β-HSD2 (which inactivates cortisol to cortisone) are in development. So far studies have primarily been carried out in rodents, with results showing improvements in metabolic profile. Data are now beginning to emerge from human studies and the results are promising. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  19. Beyond Practice: A Postmodern Feminist Perspective on Art Therapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Helene

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the failure of art therapy, as a profession, to integrate feminism and gender issues into art therapy literature and research. Examines whether there are research methodologies that are less gender biased than others and which methods are best suited to art therapy. (SNR)

  20. [Application of continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower extremity ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianping; Wang, Tengke; Zhang, Jinglan

    2014-09-16

    To summarize the experiences of using continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower limb ischemia. Retrospective study of patients diagnosed acute lower limb ischemia with surgical treatment between January 2008 and December 2013, among which 22 patients with myonephropathic metabolic syndrome received continuous renal replacement therapy. Summarize the change tendency of myoglobin, urine volume and serum creatinine levels during treatment and analysis the condition changes and prognosis of the patients. Among them, 2 patients were amputated and two died after surgery. The major causes of death were acute renal failure, metabolic acidosis, circulation failure and liver failure, etc. Myoglobin was significantly higher at Day 1 after surgery than that was before surgery (P metabolic syndrome, early targeted continuous renal replacement therapy may decrease the serum concentrations of myoglobin and CK, improve urine volume, maintain homeostasis, prevent renal function deterioration and improve the prognosis of patients. And it is highly recommended.

  1. Common Ground of Two Paradigms: Incorporating Critical Theory into Current Art Therapy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Clinical art therapy and studio-based community art therapy represent two major paradigms in art therapy practice. This viewpoint explores how critical theory can be incorporated into both paradigms and result in common ground between them. Critical theory encompasses an understanding of oppression in psychological, social, and cultural contexts…

  2. Effect of rosuvastatin intensification therapy on blood lipid metabolism, adipocytokines and plaque stability after PCI in ACS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Quan Sun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of rosuvastatin intensification therapy on blood lipid metabolism, adipocytokines and plaque stability after PCI in ACS patients. Methods: ACS patients who received PCI in the hospital between July 2015 and January 2017were reviewed and divided into the routine dose group (n=60 who received rosuvastatin routine dose therapy after PCI and the intensification therapy group (n=46 who received rosuvastatin intensification therapy after PCI. The differences in blood lipid metabolism, adipocytokines and plaque stability were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before PCI, the differences in blood lipid metabolism, adipocytokines and plaque stability were not statistically significant between the two groups. 1 month after PCI, lipid metabolism indexes HDL-C and ApoA1 levels in peripheral blood of intensification therapy group were higher than those of routine dose group while LDL-C and ApoB levels were lower than those of routine dose group; adipocytokines APN and Leptin levels in serum were higher than those of routine dose group while Resistin level was lower than that of routine dose group; plaque stability- related indexes ICAM-1, MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were lower than those of routine dose group. Conclusion: Rosuvastatin intensification therapy after PCI could effectively regulate the lipid metabolism and increase the plaque stability in ACS patients.

  3. [Metabolic alkalosis despite hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia. Interpretation and therapy with help of the Stewart concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, D; Hofmann-Kiefer, K; Jacob, M; Conzen, P; Rehm, M

    2008-02-01

    Acid-base disturbances are commonly found in critically ill patients and are often associated with fatal complications. The basis of a successful treatment is a thorough understanding of the causes of these disorders. The "classical methods" to explain acid-base disorders--pH, base excess and bicarbonate concentration--mostly do not provide a causal correlation to the underlying pathology. An unusual case of a combined respiratory-metabolic disorder with hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia is presented. An acidosis masked by hypochloremic and hypoalbuminemic alkalosis was identified with the help of Stewart's concept and finally permitted a successful therapy. The modern Stewart concept provides enhanced information, enabling an exact diagnosis and causal therapy even in complex cases.

  4. A practical three-dimensional dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Pengyi; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There is a pressing need for a practical three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system, convenient for clinical use, and with the accuracy and resolution to enable comprehensive verification of the complex dose distributions typical of modern radiation therapy. Here we introduce a dosimetry system that can achieve this challenge, consisting of a radiochromic dosimeter (PRESAGE trade mark sign ) and a commercial optical computed tomography (CT) scanning system (OCTOPUS trade mark sign ). PRESAGE trade mark sign is a transparent material with compelling properties for dosimetry, including insensitivity of the dose response to atmospheric exposure, a solid texture negating the need for an external container (reducing edge effects), and amenability to accurate optical CT scanning due to radiochromic optical contrast as opposed to light-scattering contrast. An evaluation of the performance and viability of the PRESAGE trade mark sign /OCTOPUS, combination for routine clinical 3D dosimetry is presented. The performance of the two components (scanner and dosimeter) was investigated separately prior to full system test. The optical CT scanner has a spatial resolution of ≤1 mm, geometric accuracy within 1 mm, and high reconstruction linearity (with a R 2 value of 0.9979 and a standard error of estimation of ∼1%) relative to independent measurement. The overall performance of the PRESAGE trade mark sign /OCTOPUS system was evaluated with respect to a simple known 3D dose distribution, by comparison with GAFCHROMIC[reg] EBT film and the calculated dose from a commissioned planning system. The 'measured' dose distribution in a cylindrical PRESAGE trade mark sign dosimeter (16 cm diameter and 11 cm height) was determined by optical-CT, using a filtered backprojection reconstruction algorithm. A three-way Gamma map comparison (4% dose difference and 4 mm distance to agreement), between the PRESAGE trade mark sign , EBT and calculated dose distributions, showed full agreement in

  5. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  6. Metabolic syndrome in family practice in Jordan: a study of high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Masa'd, D

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, and its components, as defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Jordanian patients attending a family practice clinic for management of cardiovascular risk factors. The sample was 730 randomly selected patients aged > or = 25 years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 37.4% (31.7% in men; 41.0% in women). The prevalence increased with age in the total sample and in both sexes. High waist circumference showed the highest prevalence in the total sample (61.6%). Among females it ranked as the first criterion (73.5%). High serum triglyceride level showed the highest prevalence in males (50.2%). Differences between the sexes were significant. Family practitioners should be alerted to the importance of multiple risk factors in the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Glycogen metabolism has a key role in the cancer microenvironment and provides new targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zois, Christos E; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells and contributes to their adaption within the tumour microenvironment and resistance to anticancer therapies. Recently, glycogen metabolism has become a recognised feature of cancer cells since it is upregulated in many tumour types, suggesting that it is an important aspect of cancer cell pathophysiology. Here, we provide an overview of glycogen metabolism and its regulation, with a focus on its role in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells under stress conditions such as hypoxia, glucose deprivation and anticancer treatment. The various methods to detect glycogen in tumours in vivo as well as pharmacological modulators of glycogen metabolism are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic value of targeting glycogen metabolism as a strategy for combinational approaches in cancer treatment.

  8. Workplace diaries promoting reflective practice in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Naomi; Dempsey, Shane E.; Warren-Forward, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Competency standards usually describe that radiation therapists are expected to display characteristics of reflective practice. Many radiation therapists may be unequipped to undertake reflective practice or produce evidence of reflective practice due to limited understanding of the process. There are many models to guide practitioners in their reflective journeys, however, the literature describing reflective practice can appear confusing. This paper will discuss the role of reflective practice, provide a definition for reflective practice and define concepts central to reflective journaling or workplace diaries. The paper will offer practical advice to increase radiation therapists knowledge and skills in the use of reflective workplace diaries.

  9. Workplace diaries promoting reflective practice in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Naomi [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: naomi.chapman@newcastle.edu.au; Dempsey, Shane E. [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: shane.e.dempsey@newcastle.edu.au; Warren-Forward, Helen M. [Medical Radiation Science, Faculty of Health Science, Box 16 Hunter Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: helen.warren-forward@newcastle.edu.au

    2009-05-15

    Competency standards usually describe that radiation therapists are expected to display characteristics of reflective practice. Many radiation therapists may be unequipped to undertake reflective practice or produce evidence of reflective practice due to limited understanding of the process. There are many models to guide practitioners in their reflective journeys, however, the literature describing reflective practice can appear confusing. This paper will discuss the role of reflective practice, provide a definition for reflective practice and define concepts central to reflective journaling or workplace diaries. The paper will offer practical advice to increase radiation therapists knowledge and skills in the use of reflective workplace diaries.

  10. [Efficacy of complex therapy with metformin and ramipril combination for patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaĭdashev, I P; Savchenko, L H; Kaĭdasheva, E I; Kutsenko, N L; Kutsenko, L O; Solokhina, I L; Mamontova, T V

    2010-01-01

    We have studied efficiency of a complex therapy with metformin and ramipril combination (1000 mg and 5 mg per day) respectively in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). The group of patients with MS which answered the basic criteria IDF (2005) was determined. Carbohydrate and Lipidic metabolism were studied. Patients were characterized with raised weight index (WI), arterial hypertension, increased concentration of triglycerides in blood serum, of glucose, of HbAlc level and S-peptide, and also high level of endotelin (1-38) and CD32+CD40+circulating particles of endothelium. Three months treatment lead to decrease in WI, arterial pressure, triglycerides concentration, HbAlc, glucose, except CD32+CD40+. Six months treatment lead to more expressed positive dynamics. Thus, metformin and ramipril combination in patients with MS leads to decrease in insulin resistancy, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism normalization, to restoration of endothelium functions that is possible to consider as prophylaxis of the development of type 2 diabetes melitus and its cardiovascular complications.

  11. Effects Of Music Therapy On Clinical And Biochemical Parameters Of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Music therapy is a new approach being used for the management of metabolic abnormalities and stress related illness.Objective: To study the effect of Music therapy on various clinical and biochemical parameters of Metabolic Syndrome.Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out on 100 patients of metabolic syndrome selected randomly. These patients were divided into two equal groups after age, sex adjustment. In control group (group I 50 patients underwent the conventional treatment. 50 patients in study group were treated with supervised music protocol along with conventional treatment. The Body Mass Index, ;Waist-Hip ratio, Blood pressure, Fasting blood sugar were monitored weekly while HbA1c and lipid profile were determined at the baseline and after three months of exposure to music therapy. Statistical analysis was performed by employing student t- test.Results: In the study group there was a significant decrease in BMI (27.18±5.02 to 25.44±3.49 kg/m2, p<0.05, waist hip ratio (0.95±0.05 to 0.93±0.05 cm, p<0.05, Fasting blood sugar (196.00±47.80mg/ dl to152.00±16.19mg/dl , p<0.001, HbA1c (8.41±1.31% to 7.08±0.78 % p<0.001, Systolic Blood Pressure (151.00±12.10 to 136±9.04 mmHg p<0.001, Diastolic Blood Pressure (94±4.80 to 86.44±3.16 mmHg, p<0.01, Mean serum cholesterol (257.80±18.92 to 229.12±17.82mg/dl, p<0.001 and triglycerides (180.86±14.04 to 136.50±8.92mg/dl, p<0.001, LDL (167.97±14.40 to 140.20±15.41mg/dl, p<0.001, and VLDL (33.60±2.88 to 28.04±3.08mg/dl, p<0.001 and increase in HDL (33.32±3.38 to 39.71±3.41mg/dl, p<0.001, when compared with those of control group not receiving the music therapy along with the conventional treatment.Conclusion: The promising outcomes of Music therapy showed that it may be considered as a useful adjunct to conventional treatment in management of the metabolic syndrome. This study advocates music therapy to establish it from a general well being concepts to a

  12. Fractionation of Palliative Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases in Ontario: Do Practice Guidelines Guide Practice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, Allison [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kong, Weidong [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward [Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a provincial practice guideline on the fractionation of palliative radiation therapy for bone metastases (PRT.B) in Ontario. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study used electronic treatment records linked to Ontario's population-based cancer registry. Hierarchical multivariable regression analysis was used to evaluate temporal trends in the use of single fractions (SFs), controlling for patient-related factors associated with the use of SFs. Results: From 1984 to 2012, 43.9% of 161,835 courses of PRT.B were administered as SFs. The percentage of SF courses was greater for older patients (age <50 years, 39.8% vs age >80 years, 52.5%), those with a shorter life expectancy (survival >12 months, 36.9% vs < 1 month, 53.6%), and those who lived farther from a radiation therapy center (<10 km, 42.1% vs > 50 km, 47.3%). The percentage of SFs to spinal fields was lower than that to other skeletal sites (31.5% vs 57.1%). The percentage of SFs varied among the cancer centers (range, 26.0%-67.8%). These differences were all highly significant in the multivariable analysis (P<.0001). In 2004, Cancer Care Ontario released a practice guideline endorsing the use of SFs for uncomplicated bone metastases. The rate of use of SFs increased from 42.3% in the pre-guideline period (1999-2003) to 52.6% in the immediate post-guideline period (2004-2007). However, it subsequently decreased again to 44.0% (2009-2012). These temporal trends were significant after controlling for patient-related factors in the multivariable analysis (P<.0001). Large intercenter variations in the use of SFs persisted after publication of the guideline. Conclusions: The publication of an Ontario practice guideline endorsing the use of SF PRT.B was associated with only a transient increase in the use of SFs in Ontario and did little to reduce intercenter variations in fractionation.

  13. Using Poetic Documents: An Exploration of Poststructuralist Ideas and Poetic Practices in Narrative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speedy, Jane

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the use of poetic documents in narrative therapy practice. It considers the ways in which feminist and poststructuralist ideas inform these practices and speculates about the extent to which a "poetic-mindedness" might sustain the practice of double- (or multiple-) listening. The author illustrates these explorations…

  14. Protein metabolism in Turner syndrome and the impact of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Riis, Anne Lene; Møller, Niels; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2007-09-01

    Studies have documented an altered body composition in Turner syndrome (TS). Body fat is increased and muscle mass is decreased. Ovarian failure necessitates substitution with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and HRT induces favourable changes in body composition. It is unknown how HRT affects protein metabolism. To test whether alterations in body composition before and after HRT in TS are a result of altered protein metabolism. We performed a randomized crossover study with active treatment (HRT in TS and oral contraceptives in controls) or no treatment. We studied eight women (age 29.7 +/- 5.6 (mean +/- SD) years) with TS, verified by karyotype, and eight age-matched controls (age 27.3 +/- 4.9 years). All subjects underwent a 3-h study in the postabsorptive state. Protein dynamics of the whole body and of the forearm muscles were measured by an amino acid tracer dilution technique using [(15)N]phenylalanine and [(2)H(4)]tyrosine. Substrate metabolism was examined by indirect calorimetry. Energy expenditure was comparable among TS and controls, and did not change during active treatment. Whole-body phenylalanine and tyrosine fluxes were similar in the untreated situations, and did not change during active treatment. Amino acid degradation and protein synthesis were similar in all situations. Muscle protein breakdown was similar among groups, and was not affected by treatment. Muscle protein synthesis rate and forearm blood flow did not differ among groups or due to treatment. Protein metabolism in TS is comparable to controls, and is not affected by HRT.

  15. Ketone-Based Metabolic Therapy: Is Increased NAD+ a Primary Mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Elamin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet’s (KD anticonvulsant effects have been well-documented for nearly a century, including in randomized controlled trials. Some patients become seizure-free and some remain so after diet cessation. Many recent studies have explored its expanded therapeutic potential in diverse neurological disorders, yet no mechanism(s of action have been established. The diet’s high fat, low carbohydrate composition reduces glucose utilization and promotes the production of ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are a more efficient energy source than glucose and improve mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Cellular energy production depends on the metabolic coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, a marker for mitochondrial and cellular health. Furthermore, NAD activates downstream signaling pathways (such as the sirtuin enzymes associated with major benefits such as longevity and reduced inflammation; thus, increasing NAD is a coveted therapeutic endpoint. Based on differential NAD+ utilization during glucose- vs. ketone body-based acetyl-CoA generation for entry into the tricarboxylic cycle, we propose that a KD will increase the NAD+/NADH ratio. When rats were fed ad libitum KD, significant increases in hippocampal NAD+/NADH ratio and blood ketone bodies were detected already at 2 days and remained elevated at 3 weeks, indicating an early and persistent metabolic shift. Based on diverse published literature and these initial data we suggest that increased NAD during ketolytic metabolism may be a primary mechanism behind the beneficial effects of this metabolic therapy in a variety of brain disorders and in promoting health and longevity.

  16. [Effect of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on metabolic parameters in patients with craniopharyngioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J F; Wang, X; Xiong, S Y; Zheng, J J; Yu, B Q; Nie, M; Wu, X Y; Qi, S T

    2017-11-14

    Objective: To investigate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on metabolic parameters in patients with craniopharyngioma surgeries. Methods: Totallys 30 patients with craniopharyngioma were included in this retrospective study. They were divided into growth hormone (GH) group and control group according to whether they received rhGH therapy or not. The following parameters, including body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumstance, transaminase, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were compared after rhGH therapy for 4-6 months. Results: In GH group, patients were 18-46 (30.0±8.8) years old. The duration after craniopharyngioma surgery was (12.9±5.4) years. Before rhGH therapy, they had got sufficient thyroid and glucocorticoid hormone replacement. After rhGH therapy, the body weight decreased from (92.3±20.1) to (87.6 ±14.6) kg ( P =0.190), with a reduction of BMI from (30.1±5.9) to (28.2±3.7) kg/m(2) ( P =0.120). The waist circumference decreased from (104.4±9.4) cm to (98.8±10.6) cm ( P =0.002). Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) decreased from (52±34) to (28±19) U/L ( P =0.029), with a reduction of aspartate transaminase (AST) from (46±21) to (33±18) U/L ( P =0.035) and γ-glutamyl transpeptadase (GGT) from (59±42) to (29±15) U/L ( P =0.02). hsCRP decreased from (5.3±4.9) to (2.3±2.8) mg/L ( P =0.006) and triglyceride (TG) decreased from (1.8±0.7) to (1.5±0.6) mmol/L ( P =0.028). Fasting blood glucose, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and free fat acid (FFA) were not significantly changed(all P >0.05). In the control group, the above mentioned parameters did not changed significantly during 4-6 months of observational period(all P >0.05). Conclusion: rhGH therapy improves metabolic parameters in patients after craniopharyngioma surgery by decreasing body weight, waist circumstance and fat deposit in liver, as well as

  17. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  18. THE USE OF MULTI-COMPONENT THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Nedogoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS is a cluster of hormonal and metabolic abnormalities arising from insulin resistance. It is associated with high risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. To reduce this risk, correction of the key pathophysiological factor of MS is recommended, namely, abdominal obesity. However, conventional non-medical treatment approaches (lifestyle changes and diet, as well as medical therapy with metformin frequently do not provide significant and consistent reduction in body weight. With all this, the use of sibutramine, a centrally active anti-obesity agent, looks promising. Being a selective inhibitor of re-uptake of neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine, this agent promotes decreased appetite and weight loss in combination with diet and exercise.Aim: To compare efficacy of lifestyle intervention only to that of lifestyle intervention plus metformin monotherapy or lifestyle intervention plus combination therapy with sibutramine and metformin with regard to anthropometric and metabolic parameters in MS patients. Materials and methods: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, comparative study in 3 parallel groups. Sixty patients (mean age 45.4 ± 7.5 years with MS (according to IDF 2005 criteria were enrolled and randomized into 3 groups at 1:1:1 ratio. For 24 weeks, patients in the group 1 (n = 20 were on metformin monotherapy, those in the group 2 (n = 20 on combined therapy with sibutramine and metformin and patients from the group 3 (control group, n = 20 were given recommendations on lifestyle change only. The groups were matched for baseline clinical characteristics and demographics. All patients were instructed on diet, physical activity, and lifestyle changes. Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were assessed at baseline, weeks 4, 12 and 24. Results: The group on combination therapy with sibutramine/metformin showed the highest mean percentage of decrease in body mass, body mass

  19. Spectrum of Art Therapy Practice: Systematic Literature Review of "Art Therapy," 1983-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.; Mann, Sarah M.; Martinez, Johanna C.; Roach, Ann B.; Wallace, Nina M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine art therapists' fit in the continuum of health delivery services defined by behavioral health. All publications in "Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art" Therapy Association from 1983 (Volume 1) to 2014 (Volume 31) were systematically reviewed to understand how art therapy has been…

  20. Horticultural Therapy – Theoretical Postulates and Practical Use

    OpenAIRE

    Darija Kuharić; Mirela Grgić; Ljubica Ranogajec

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture can serve different purposes. Health care providers and social welfare workers in the USA, Canada and the EU have recently taken interest in therapeutic values of horticulture. Horticultural therapy is a professionally conducted type of patient treatment where positive values of human interaction with plants and gardens are used to improve one’s cognitive, psychological, social and physical functions. Since horticultural therapy can be applied in various health care an...

  1. The national occupational therapy practice analysis: findings and implications for competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, W; Cada, E

    1998-10-01

    This article reports some of the findings from a national study of occupational therapy practice conducted by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) as part of its fiduciary responsibility to ensure that its entry-level certification examination is formulated on the basis of current practice. The NBCOT developed a survey with input from approximately 200 occupational therapy leaders and then used it to solicit information about current practice from 4,000 occupational therapists and 3,000 occupational therapy assistants. The sample included geographical location, experience level, and practice area distributions. Approximately 50% of the sample responded to the survey. Data indicate similarities and differences in occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant practice (e.g., occupational therapists spend more time conducting evaluations, planning interventions, and supervising, whereas occupational therapy assistants spend more time providing interventions), an increased emphasis on population-based services (e.g., serving a business or industry rather than an individual worker), and an emphasis on occupation as a core knowledge base for practice. From a continuing competency perspective, the data can be useful to the profession; we can plan continuing education to address topics that practitioners have indicated are critical to their practice. The findings will be useful for revising the entry-level certification examination and may guide thinking about the parameters of continuing competence because the responses represent a cross-section of the profession.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in chronic hepatitis C infection: does it still matter in the era of directly acting antiviral therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim TR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available TR Lim Centre for Liver Research and NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Liver Disease, University of Birmingham and Liver and Hepatobiliary Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, UK Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Given the pandemic spread of HCV infection and metabolic syndrome, the burden of their interaction is a major public health issue. The presence of metabolic syndrome accelerates the progression of liver disease in patients with HCV infection. New drug development in HCV has seen an unprecedented rise in the last year, which resulted in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. This review describes the underlying mechanisms and clinical effects of metabolic syndrome in HCV infection, as well as their importance in the era of new directly acting antiviral therapy. Keywords: HCV, genotype 3, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, directly acting antiviral agents

  3. Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from practice educators in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy and physiotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.; Hills, C.; MacDonald-Wicks, L.; Johnston, C.; James, D.; Surjan, Y.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of students. Practice educator characteristics may positively or negatively affect student learning in practice settings. This study aimed to identify characteristics of the ideal practice educator that lead to successful practical experiences as perceived by current practice educators working in the Australian context of diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods: All practice educators (n = 1063) on the University of Newcastle Practice Educator Database were invited to participate in this prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study via online link or paper format. Results: There was a 52% response rate. The five most valued characteristics were feedback skills, non-judgemental, professionalism, clarity and listening skills. The five least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, respect for students' autonomy, well-prepared, availability and being a role model. Comparisons between disciplines, genders, ages, years in practice and levels of supervisory experience indicated some statistically significant differences, though actual differences were small. Discussion: Overall there was a high degree of agreement within and between disciplines on the characteristics of the ideal practice educator. The top five skills could be classed as generic skills and not specific clinical and practice skills, thus formal training and certification schemes may enhance practice educator competence. - Highlights: • The most important characteristics were feedback skills and non-judgmental. • The least important characteristics were scholarly activity and respects student autonomy. • Female educators valued all characteristics except scholarly activities as being more important. • Older participants valued availability, and

  4. Facing suffering and death: alternative therapy as post-secular religious practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kalvig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of religious practice being ‘post-secular’ raises questions concerning secularisation, sacralisation and the various meanings of the prefix ‘post’. This paper investigates a kind of practice that is ever increasing in late modern, Western societies and elsewhere; namely, the practice of alternative therapy and the conceptualisations and world-views pertaining to it. The focus is on the themes of suffering and death in relation to alternative spirituality and therapy. Some answers are given to the following questions: is alternative therapy a kind of post-secular religious practice? If so, what kinds of answers or consolations does alternative therapy offer in the face of suffering and death? How do possible ‘alternative theodicies’ relate to holism as a paradigmatic principle? To what extent does, for example, ‘reincarnationism’ seem to function as explanatory model regarding suffering, evil and death?

  5. Model of iodine metabolism in a T3-thyrotoxic patient undergoing I-131 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, S.; Price, R.; Brill, A.B.; Dobyns, B.M.; Berman, M.

    Data on radioactivity in the thyroid, urine, serum, butanol-extractable iodine (BEI) and chromatographic fractionations of BEI, obtained during four I-131 therapeutic treatments of a T 3 -thyrotoxic patient, have been analyzed and simulated with the help of a 7-compartment model. Good fits to most of the data can be obtained with both the dose-independent and dose-dependent models. A model with 3 or 4 compartments, which provides adequate fits to iodine kinetic data in most euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients is not satisfactory in the case of this patient. Thus, to represent iodine metabolism during T 3 -thyrotoxicosis therapy, we find that it is necessary to provide for separate biochemical pathways for the BEI components as well as the butanol-insoluble compounds released by the thyroid gland

  6. Metabolic control after years of completing a clinical trial on sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Giménez, Marga; Orois, Aida; Conget, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy has been shown to be effective and safe for improving metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in a number of trials. Our objective was to assess glycemic control in a group of T1DM patients on insulin pump or SAP therapy after years of participating in the SWITCH (Sensing With Insulin pump Therapy To Control HbA1c) trial and their return to routine medical monitoring. A retrospective, observational study of 20 patients who participated in the SWITCH trial at our hospital from 2008 to 2010. HbA1c values were compared at the start, during (at the end of the periods with/without SAP use - Sensor On/Sensor Off period respectively - of the cross-over design), and 3 years after study completion. HbA1c values of patients who continued SAP therapy (n=6) or only used insulin pump (n=14) were also compared. Twenty patients with T1DM (44.4±9.3 years, 60% women, baseline HbA1c level 8.43±0.55%) were enrolled into the SWITCH study). Three years after study completion, HbA1c level was 7.79±0.77 in patients on pump alone, with no significant change from the value at the end of the Off period of the study (7.85±0.57%; p=0.961). As compared to the end of the On period, HbA1c worsened less in patients who remained on SAP than in those on pump alone (0.18±0.42 vs. 0.55±0.71%; p=0.171), despite the fact that levels were similar at study start (8.41±0.60 vs. 8.47±0.45; p=0.831) and at the end of the On period (7.24±0.48 vs. 7.38±0.61; p=0.566). Frequency of CGM use in patients who continued SAP therapy was high (61.2% of the time in the last 3 months). Our study suggests that the additional benefit of SAP therapy achieved in a clinical trial may persist in the long term in routine clinical care of patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon dioxide therapy in the treatment of cellulite: an audit of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Georgia S K

    2010-04-01

    The clinical practice of using carbon dioxide therapy for localized adiposities was audited over a 4-year period. Patients receiving physical, dietary, or drug concurrent therapy were excluded from the audit. Original measurements in terms of mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) were compared with those obtained after five sessions. This series included 101 women who underwent abdominal therapy. Significant reduction (p carboxytherapy is safe and effective.

  8. [Metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fani, Filippo; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Castellano, Giuseppe; Cremaschi, Elena; Greco, Paolo; Parenti, Elisabetta; Morabito, Santo; Sabatino, Alice; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is frequently observed in clinical practice, especially among critically ill patients and/or in the course of renal failure. Complex mechanisms are involved, in most cases identifiable by medical history, pathophysiology-based diagnostic reasoning and measure of some key acid-base parameters that are easily available or calculable. On this basis the bedside differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis should be started from the identification of the two main subtypes of metabolic acidosis: the high anion gap metabolic acidosis and the normal anion gap (or hyperchloremic) metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis, especially in its acute forms with elevated anion gap such as is the case of lactic acidosis, diabetic and acute intoxications, may significantly affect metabolic body homeostasis and patients hemodynamic status, setting the stage for true medical emergencies. The therapeutic approach should be first aimed at early correction of concurrent clinical problems (e.g. fluids and hemodynamic optimization in case of shock, mechanical ventilation in case of concomitant respiratory failure, hemodialysis for acute intoxications etc.), in parallel to the formulation of a diagnosis. In case of severe acidosis, the administration of alkalizing agents should be carefully evaluated, taking into account the risk of side effects, as well as the potential need of renal replacement therapy.

  9. Social Action in Practice: Shifting the Ethnocentric Lens in Cross-Cultural Art Therapy Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of globalization and changing demographics, an intercultural perspective that is self-reflexively aware of ethnocentric bias is increasingly important for art therapists. This article draws from cross-cultural art therapy in the international service realm to consider the nature of art therapy as a distinctly cultural practice.…

  10. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  11. AAMFT Master Series Tapes: An Analysis of the Inclusion of Feminist Principles into Family Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Shelley A.; MacPhee, David; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis of 23 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Master Series tapes was used to determine how well feminist behaviors have been incorporated into ideal family therapy practice. Feminist behaviors were infrequent, being evident in fewer than 3% of time blocks in event sampling and 10 of 39 feminist behaviors of the…

  12. Horticultural Therapy – Theoretical Postulates and Practical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Kuharić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture can serve different purposes. Health care providers and social welfare workers in the USA, Canada and the EU have recently taken interest in therapeutic values of horticulture. Horticultural therapy is a professionally conducted type of patient treatment where positive values of human interaction with plants and gardens are used to improve one’s cognitive, psychological, social and physical functions. Since horticultural therapy can be applied in various health care and social welfare programmes, horticultural therapists should be educated in the Republic of Croatia as well.

  13. The Reciprocal Relationship Between Art and Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fortuna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan Burwash, Ph.D., OTR/L, an occupational therapy professor and artist based in Washington State, provided the cover art for the Winter 2017 issue of the Open Journal of Occupational Therapy (OJOT. The featured piece contains Professor Burwash’s signature fauxpals, lampwork glass beads made from molten glass and pure silver foil. Art creates balance between traditional medicine and personal medicine, those meaningful activities that give life purpose. Professor Burwash’s personal medicine is making beautiful things that can be given away.

  14. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Good laboratory practices for biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    Biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening are essential laboratory services for the screening, detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism or inherited metabolic disorders. Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized on the basis of the level of testing complexity as either waived (i.e., from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived testing (which includes tests of moderate and high complexity). Laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing are required by CLIA regulations to meet the general quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the personnel requirements for high-complexity testing. Laboratories that perform public health newborn screening are subject to the same CLIA regulations and applicable state requirements. As the number of inherited metabolic diseases that are included in state-based newborn screening programs continues to increase, ensuring the quality of performance and delivery of testing services remains a continuous challenge not only for public health laboratories and other newborn screening facilities but also for biochemical genetic testing laboratories. To help ensure the quality of laboratory testing, CDC collaborated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Institutes of Health to develop guidelines for laboratories to meet CLIA requirements and apply additional quality assurance measures for these areas of genetic testing. This report provides recommendations for good laboratory practices that were developed based on recommendations from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, with additional input from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society; the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; and representatives of newborn

  16. Evidence based practice and techniques in aquatic therapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic therapy (AT) is a holistic method of treatment that involves activity or passive activity to produce healthcare outcomes. The push for holistic treatment in rehabilitation is emphasized by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2009). The WHO suggested that healthcare organizations should turn their attention from ...

  17. Exchanging knowledge within a community of practice: toward an epistemology of practice in Occupational Therapy paediatric hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Galheigo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research proposed the creation of a community of practice (CoP with the objective of: (i analysing the feasibility of a CoP as a means of generating knowledge among occupational therapists and (ii investigating the practice of occupational therapy with hospitalized children and adolescents. This article privileges the results of one of the predominantly discussed themes - the use of assessments and strategies of evaluation in Occupational Therapy in the hospital context. Method: A participatory action research study was undertaken with nine occupational therapists in face-to-face meetings combined with virtual tasks on an on-line platform. A hermeneutic and dialectical method was used to interpret the results. Results: The CoP produced practical knowledge about the use of assessments with hospitalized children and adolescents and demonstrated to be a strategy of knowledge development through dialogue and collaborative reflection on practice. Conclusion: Research on the implementation of communities of practice offers a promising approach to the production of knowledge in occupational therapy. The generated knowledge is representative of occupational therapists’ experiences and demonstrates an example of an epistemology of practice.

  18. Effect of alternative pathway therapy on branched chain amino acid metabolism in urea cycle disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Fernando; Carter, Susan; O'Brien, William E; Lee, Brendan

    2004-04-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism caused by the loss of enzymatic activities that mediate the transfer of nitrogen from ammonia to urea. These disorders often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. A combination of sodium phenylbutyrate and sodium phenylacetate/benzoate is used in the clinical management of children with urea cycle defects as a glutamine trap, diverting nitrogen from urea synthesis to alternatives routes of excretion. We have observed that patients treated with these compounds have selective branched chain amino acid (BCAA) deficiency despite adequate dietary protein intake. However, the direct effect of alternative therapy on the steady state levels of plasma branched chain amino acids has not been well characterized. We have measured steady state plasma branched chain and other essential non-branched chain amino acids in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females and treated null activity urea cycle disorder patients in the fed steady state during the course of stable isotope studies. Steady-state leucine levels were noted to be significantly lower in treated urea cycle disorder patients when compared to either untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects (Purea cycle disorder patients. These findings suggest that better titration of protein restriction could be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in patients with UCDs who are on alternative route therapy.

  19. Astrocyte Senescence and Metabolic Changes in Response to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART survival rates among patients infected by HIV have increased. However, even though survival has increased HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND still persist, suggesting that HAART-drugs may play a role in the neurocognitive impairment observed in HIV-infected patients. Given previous data demonstrating that astrocyte senescence plays a role in neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we examined the role of HAART on markers of senescence in primary cultures of human astrocytes (HAs. Our results indicate HAART treatment induces cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment is also associated with the induction of reactive oxygen species and upregulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These changes in mitochondria correlate with increased glycolysis in HAART drug treated astrocytes. Taken together these results indicate that HAART drugs induce the senescence program in HAs, which is associated with oxidative and metabolic changes that could play a role in the development of HAND.

  20. Effect of glucocorticoid therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Sihai; Wei Zhenggan; Huang Ming'an; Yao Jianguo; Li Hongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of glucocorticoids therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation. Methods: Plasma glucose and insulin levels in COPD patients after intravenous administration of 10 mg dexamethasone daily for 5 days were determined oral with glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT). Results: 1) The levels of basal plasma glucose and insulin were significantly higher in severe hypoxemic group than those in moderate hypoxemic group (p 2 (r = -0.5242, p < 0.05). 2) The levels of plasma glucose in intermediate and severe hypoxemic groups were remarkable higher (p < 0.05) than those in mild group. The two peak times of glucose curve were observed at one and two hour after oral glucose load. 3) After the administration of glucocorticoids, at half an hour and one hour plasma glucose levels were significantly higher than those before, the peak time of glucose levels appeared earlier and the insulin release levels were higher than they were before therapy (p < 0.05). Conclusion: COPD patients with acute exacerbation complicated with hypoxemia had problems of impaired glucose tolerance. The administration of glucocorticoids made the impairment worse

  1. Occupational therapy practice in emergency care: Occupational therapists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Lisa; Holmqvist, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    Emergency care takes place in a complex work environment that is characterized by critically ill patients, short hospital stays, and a wide variety of different healthcare professionals. Studies of occupational therapists' (OTs) experiences of working within emergency care have shown that they often experience difficulties in explaining the essence of occupational therapy and have to justify their approaches. Much effort has been made in Sweden to help OTs dispel the notion that occupational therapy is difficult to explain, and the aim of this study was to describe how Swedish OTs perceive their work in emergency care. A qualitative descriptive approach was taken, and 14 interviews were conducted with OTs working in emergency care. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The overall theme that emerged was "Feeling established through deliberate occupation-based work". The underlying categories showed different strategies used by the OTs to provide occupational therapy in an emergency care context. Deliberate strategies were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of occupational therapy and its approaches to patients and other health care professionals, and this resulted in the OTs feeling both established and needed. Unlike the OTs in previous studies, the Swedish OTs experienced no difficulties in explaining occupational therapy and could make convincing arguments for their interventions. Parallel to their clinical work, the OTs worked with on-going development to find ways to improve their approaches. In summary, these Swedish OTs seem to have been provided with a professional language and the knowledge required to establish themselves in an emergency care setting.

  2. The role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampage, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Much of the development of family therapy as a discipline was an outcome of the clinical, training, and theory-building activities conducted at family institutes around the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, these institutes were the crucibles in which the concepts and practices of family therapy flourished. The author, a leader at one of the largest family institutes in the United States, discusses the role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy, as well as the challenges of doing so. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  3. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  4. Play and play occupation: a survey of paediatric occupational therapy practice in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Moore

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Play occupation has been identified as an essential part of children’s lives, and it subsequently features in paediatric occupational therapy. However, few studies address the current place of play and play occupation in occupational therapy practice. This study aims to address this gap in knowledge by exploring paediatric occupational therapists’ perspectives on the place of play and play occupation in occupational therapy practice in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional online survey was conducted to gather data about the current use of play in the occupational therapy for children under 12 years. Convenience sampling and snowball recruitment techniques were used to recruit paediatric occupational therapists. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. Findings - In total, 65 therapists responded to the survey (estimated response rate, 32%. Results are organised into four sections: demographics and practice context, play assessment practices, use of play in practice and perceived barriers to play-centred practice. Respondents reported that they valued play as a childhood occupation. However, the survey findings identified that the primary focus was on play as a means to an end. Lack of education on play (research, theory and interventions and pressures in the workplace have been identified as barriers to play-centred practice. Research limitations/implications - Findings indicate that there is a mismatch between therapists valuing play as an occupation and how play is used in occupational therapy practice. Unless clarifications are made about play occupation as being different to skills acquisition in childhood, play occupation will continue to get overlooked as an authentic concern of occupation-centred practice. Thus, play as occupation deserves further attention from educators, researchers and practitioners as a means of strengthening occupation-centred practice, in

  5. Current electroconvulsive therapy practice and research in the geriatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Nancy; Prudic, Joan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is utilized worldwide for various severe and treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Research studies have shown that ECT is the most effective and rapid treatment available for elderly patients with depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis. For patients who suffer from intractable catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, ECT can be life saving. For elderly patients who cannot tolerate or respond poorly to medications and who are at a high risk for drug-induced toxicity or toxic drug interactions, ECT is the safest treatment option. Organic causes are frequently associated with late-life onset of neuropsychiatric conditions, such as parkinsonism, dementia and stroke. ECT has proven to be efficacious even when these conditions are present. During the next decade, research studies should focus on the use of ECT as a synergistic therapy, to enhance other biological and psychological treatments, and prevent symptom relapse and recurrence. PMID:24778709

  6. Functional constipation in infants: Diagnosis and therapy in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kamalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As of now, constipation in children, especially in babies during the first years of life, is a common complaint during a visit to a pediatrician and a gastroenterologist. Despite the fact that the current guidelines for the management of this patient group have been elaborated, there has been no consensus of opinion among parents and specialists regarding the therapy and prevention of constipation in children so far. The article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of functional constipation in children. The authors give their own observations and experience with the rectal suppositories Glycelax® pediatric in the therapy of proctogenic and mixed constipation in infants.

  7. Creative Problem Solving and Social Cooperation of Effective Physical Therapy Practice: A Pioneer Study and Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Action research (AR has an important role to play in educating physical therapists. Increasing efforts should be encouraged to instigate AR programs in physical therapy practice and clinical education. Such programs commonly require considerable effort and understanding by clinical instructors, and require adoption of new educational methods. AR programs can lead physical therapists and clinicians to be more questioning and reflective in evaluating practical questions regarding patient therapy and education. The purpose of this article is to educate the readers on the importance of AR and to provide a few relevant references on that topic. A specific study is described in this paper in which physical therapy clinical instructors participated in a structured workshop designed to demonstrate the values of AR and how such values can be incorporated in teaching their students. AR can lead to improved therapist-patient interaction and help solve specific practical problems arising during therapy sessions.

  8. An Exploration of the Role of Occupation in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl DiSanti

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of occupation in school-based occupational therapy practice. The research questions were (1) How do school-based occupational therapists describe the role of occupation during intervention? (2) Which theories of occupation do school-based occupational therapists associate with their own practice?…

  9. "What Are All These Dogs Doing at School?" Using Therapy Dogs to Promote Children's Reading Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses how registered therapy dogs can motivate and support children as they practice reading aloud in the company of the dog and with the support of the dog's handler. It also offers practical advice to educators, librarians, administrators, and community members seeking to implement such a program in their communities.

  10. Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2007-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients' practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes according…

  11. Examining the Purdue Pegboard Test for Occupational Therapy Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Debra Lindstrom-Hazel; Nicole VanderVlies Veenstra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occupational therapy ethics require that therapists use current assessment tools that provide useful comparison data. When an assessment only has normative data that is more than 40 years old, it cannot be considered current. The purpose of this study was to examine the past and current use of the Purdue Pegboard Test by occupational therapists and other professionals and to determine if it is beneficial to conduct a large normative study on the Purdue Pegboard Assembl...

  12. Ilaj bil hijamah (cupping therapy) in the Unani system of medicine: anecdotal practice to evidence based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Zaidi, S M; Jameel, S S; Jafri, Kehkashan; Khan, Shariq A; Ahmad, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    Cupping (Hijamah) therapy is very well documented as a result of several thousand years of clinical experiences in Unani medicine. In this procedure, suction is created by various means either with or without bloodletting. Though this therapy is being widely practiced across the globe for treating many chronic and intractable ailments but many reports reveal its unscientific and improper practices which results in many complications. Therefore to develop standard operative procedures and to propose protocols of cupping therapy in various diseases is the need of hour. A thorough literature review of relevant journals and textbooks was performed to gather the maximum available data on cupping therapy. This paper seeks to introduce the general concepts of cupping therapy in Unani medicine and other traditional systems of medicine, shortcomings and limitations of the currently published studies and suggest ways to improve these technical/methodological flaws. In addition, the authors have also attempted to provide the cupping related materials, hypotheses, observations which will provide the researchers the base for evaluating their usefulness in future clinical trials.

  13. [Distressful journey for the metabolic syndrome to its position in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, J

    2010-07-01

    MS is a major atherogenic syndrome in our population. The concept of MS has had a very positive effect on our knowledge of the most serious civilization diseases, the genotypic constellation of MS, although monogenic defects explain only a very small part of pathological defects. It is certain, however, that a crucial role played is by interactions between genetic factors and risk factors of external environment. Undoubtedly, insulin resistance, central obesity and impaired metabolism of adipose tissue play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS, and there are other pathogenetic theories. The author discusses briefly the history of MS and presents the best-known definitions starting with the 90s ofthe last century, ADA and EASD reservations towards MS, as well as the new harmonized definition from 2009. This modified definition ofMS has been adopted in practice in the Czech Republic due to the Czech Institute ofmetabolic syndrome. The author discusses in greater detail the WHO expert report from 2010, which indicates some limitations of diagnostic criteria for MS. Despite all the objections the expert report provides reasons to support the use of the term metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome is considered to be a recognized concept that focuses attention on the importance of comprehensive, multifactorial health problems. Finally, the author mentions sub-problems related to MS, which will have to be resolved in collaboration with diabetologists.

  14. Organizational Dimensions of Innovative Practice: A Qualitative Investigation of the Processes Supporting Innovation Adoption in Outpatient Physical Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabus, Carla; Spake, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    The ability to innovate and adapt practice is a requirement of the progressive healthcare provider. Innovative practice by rehabilitation providers has largely been approached as personal professional development; this study extends that perspective by examining innovation uptake from the organizational level. The varied professions can be expected to have distinct qualities of innovation adoption that reflect professional norms, values, and expectations. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the organizational processes of innovation uptake in outpatient physical therapy practice. Through nomination, two outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. Eighteen physical therapists, three owners, and a manager participated in the study. The two clinics served as case studies within a grounded theory approach. Data were collected through observation, unstructured questioning, work flow analysis, focus group sessions, and artifact analysis. Data were analyzed and coded among the investigators. A theoretical model of the innovation adoption process in outpatient physical therapy practice was developed. Elements of the model included (1) change grounded in relationship-centered care, (2) clinic readiness to accept change, and (3) clinic adaptability and resilience. A social paradigm of innovation adoption informed through this research complements the concentration on personal professional development.

  15. The impact of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students on practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen

    2012-04-01

    Many occupational therapy students can be classified as 'Generation Y', a group whose characteristics are perceived as being confident, optimistic and 'techno-savvy'. This study aimed to explore practice educator perceptions of 'Generation Y' students. A questionnaire survey was sent to all practice educators affiliated with the university. The survey contained fixed choice questions on demographics and educators' knowledge of the term 'Generation Y', followed by open-ended questions on practice educator perceptions of occupational therapy 'Generation Y' students and the educational strategies used in practice education. Anonymous responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, attribute coding and content analysis. Most educators considered that there was, in fact, a 'Generation Y student', describing them as confident with technology, over confident in their skill level and easily bored. Practice educators raised concerns regarding students' casual communication, poor professional behaviour, shallow professional reasoning and difficulty when receiving negative feedback. Overall, the results of this study suggest that 'Generation Y' students are having both a negative and a positive impact on practice education in occupational therapy. For educators, management of the overconfident student and professional reasoning development should be addressed in university practice education workshops. For students, the need for clarification of placement expectations on professional behaviour and communication was indicated. Students may also require 'listening to feedback' skill development prior to practice education. Universities and practice educators should consider the development of technological resources for practice education, including simulation, to meet the needs of the, now recognised 'Generation Y' student. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  16. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board

  17. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); Yielder, Jill [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  18. [Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Theoretical background and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeck, Nikolett; Schlosser, Károly Kornél; Szondy, Máté; Szabó-Bartha, Anett

    The Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is one of the modern, so-called third-wave behavioural therapies. Among them the most successful is ACT, both in the number of therapists and respective scientific research. ACT's theoretical and philosophical background is described explicitly and its therapeutic interventions were developed according to this philosophy. Its psychopathological model is based on the idea that mainly the person's regulatory efforts of their own thoughts and feelings lead to psychological problems. That is, the source of human suffering and various psychological problems is the so called psychological inflexibility: control attempts of private events instead of living a life based on personal values and long-term goals. Therefore, clinical work in ACT focuses on the acceptance and defusion of the unwanted inner experiences and on the development of a meaningful life. The present article aims to provide a comprehensive description of ACT in Hungarian: its theoretical background, clinical techniques, and efficacy. At the end of the article, the state of ACT in Hungary will also be briefly discussed.

  19. [Telemonitoring of swallowing function: technologies in speech therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Angela; Lavermicocca, Valentina; Notarnicola, Marilina; De Francesco, Luca; Dellomonaco, Anna Rita

    2018-02-01

    The process of medical-healthcare technological revolution represents an advantage for the patient and for the care provider, in terms of costs and distances reduction. The telehomecare approach could be useful for monitoring the swallowing disorder in neurodegenerative diseases, preventing complications. In this study the applicability of telemedicine techniques for the monitoring of swallowing function, in patients affected by Huntington's disease (HD), was evaluated through the acquisition and analysis of the sound of swallowing. Two patients with HD were outpatient screened for dysphagia through the Bedside Swallowing Assessment Scale (BSAS) sensitized with pulse oximetry and cervical auscultation. Subsequently, the swallowing functionality was telemonitored for three months with Skype. The swallowing sounds were acquired with a detection microphone attached to the lateral edge of the trachea during fluid intake. The sounds were instantly processed and graphically represented through the Praat software. The analysis of the acoustic signal acquired remotely has made it possible to identify the situations that required immediate speech therapy intervention, suggesting to the patients further modifications of food consistencies, and saving frequent moving to the hospital even in the absence of critical situations. Remote assistance applied to speech therapy could represent a benefit for patients and their carers and a more efficient use of medical and health resources.

  20. Effects of simultaneous and optimized sequential cardiac resynchronization therapy on myocardial oxidative metabolism and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Stuart D; Chareonthaitawee, Panithaya; Burnes, John E; Hill, Michael R S; Kemp, Brad J; Khandheria, Bijoy K; Hayes, David L; Gibbons, Raymond J

    2008-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and function. Recent data suggest the energy cost of such improvement is favorable. The effects of sequential CRT on myocardial oxidative metabolism (MVO(2)) and efficiency have not been previously assessed. Eight patients with NYHA class III heart failure were studied 196 +/- 180 days after CRT implant. Dynamic [(11)C]acetate positron emission tomography (PET) and echocardiography were performed after 1 hour of: 1) AAI pacing, 2) simultaneous CRT, and 3) sequential CRT. MVO(2) was calculated using the monoexponential clearance rate of [(11)C]acetate (k(mono)). Myocardial efficiency was expressed in terms of the work metabolic index (WMI). P values represent overall significance from repeated measures analysis. Global LV and right ventricular (RV) MVO(2) were not significantly different between pacing modes, but the septal/lateral MVO(2) ratio differed significantly with the change in pacing mode (AAI pacing = 0.696 +/- 0.094 min(-1), simultaneous CRT = 0.975 +/- 0.143 min(-1), and sequential CRT = 0.938 +/- 0.189 min(-1); overall P = 0.001). Stroke volume index (SVI) (AAI pacing = 26.7 +/- 10.4 mL/m(2), simultaneous CRT = 30.6 +/- 11.2 mL/m(2), sequential CRT = 33.5 +/- 12.2 mL/m(2); overall P simultaneous CRT = 4.29 +/- 1.72 mmHg*mL/m(2)*10(6), sequential CRT = 4.79 +/- 1.92 mmHg*mL/m(2)*10(6); overall P = 0.002) also differed between pacing modes. Compared with simultaneous CRT, additional changes in septal/lateral MVO(2), SVI, and WMI with sequential CRT were not statistically significant on post hoc analysis. In this small selected population, CRT increases LV SVI without increasing MVO(2), resulting in improved myocardial efficiency. Additional improvements in LV work, oxidative metabolism, and efficiency from simultaneous to sequential CRT were not significant.

  1. The modulation of corticosteroid metabolism by hydrocortisone therapy in patients with hypopituitarism increases tissue glucocorticoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Mark; Behan, Lucy Ann; Hannon, Mark J; Alonso, Aurora Aragon; Thompson, Christopher J; Murray, Robert D; Crabtree, Nicola; Hughes, Beverly A; Arlt, Wiebke; Agha, Amar; Toogood, Andrew A; Stewart, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased morbidity and mortality. There is ongoing debate about the optimum glucocorticoid (GC) replacement therapy. To assess the effect of GC replacement in hypopituitarism on corticosteroid metabolism and its impact on body composition. We assessed the urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile (using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) and body composition (clinical parameters and full body DXA) of 53 patients (19 female, median age 46 years) with hypopituitarism (33 ACTH-deficient/20 ACTH-replete) (study A). The corticosteroid metabolite profile of ten patients with ACTH deficiency was then assessed prospectively in a cross over study using three hydrocortisone (HC) dosing regimens (20/10 mg, 10/10 mg and 10/5 mg) (study B) each for 6 weeks. 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity was assessed by urinary THF+5α-THF/THE. Endocrine Centres within University Teaching Hospitals in the UK and Ireland. Urinary corticosteroid metabolite profile and body composition assessment. In study A, when patients were divided into three groups - patients not receiving HC and patients receiving HC≤20 mg/day or HC>20 mg/day - patients in the group receiving the highest daily dose of HC had significantly higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) than the ACTH replete group. They also had significantly elevated THF+5α-THF/THE (P=0.0002) and total cortisol metabolites (P=0.015). In study B, patients on the highest HC dose had significantly elevated total cortisol metabolites and all patients on HC had elevated THF+5α-THF/THE ratios when compared to controls. In ACTH-deficient patients daily HC doses of >20 mg/day have increased WHR, THF+5α-THF/THE ratios and total cortisol metabolites. GC metabolism and induction of 11β-HSD1 may play a pivitol role in the development of the metabolically adverse hypopituitary phenotype. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. Language and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Practice Paper-Literature Review and Case Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the impact of language on cognitive behavioural therapy. Language is emotive and studies carried out in the linguistic field have shown second language is less emotive when describing events occuring in the first language. This paper has been written based on the experiences of a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT service providing therapy to patients from a diverse cultural and ethnic population. Patients whose first language is not English often receive therapy in their second language. Global migration is a common phenomenon and mainly occurs for economic reasons or threat of violence. This paper has been drawn from the results of a literature review on first and second languages and therapy. Despite being an area that is extremely relevant to therapy, there is an apparent lack of literature in relation to cognitive behavioural therapy for depression and other disorders. CBT is one of the recommended therapies by National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Findings from the linguistic field highlight the potential short comings providing therapy in a patient’s second language. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance that therapists working in this field have an understanding of how first and second languages function and the role they play in maintaining patients’ psychological problems. This practice paper discusses measures that can be used in cognitive behavioural therapy to deal with this using a case example.

  3. A grounded-theory investigation of patient education in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindflesch, Aaron B

    2009-04-01

    Patient education is a critical component of physical therapy and is used frequently in practice. Research describing the practice of patient education in physical therapy is scarce, however. Qualitative research methods can be used to describe the practice of patient education in physical therapy and to identify supportive theory. This study describes the practice of patient education grounded in data obtained from nine physical therapists in three settings: outpatient, acute care, and inpatient rehabilitation. From the data common themes are reported. From the themes, supportive theory can be identified. Results show four primary themes regarding patient education in physical therapy. First, the physical therapists in this study were not able to easily differentiate patient education from primary interventions. Second, the purpose of patient education was to empower patients toward self-management and prevention. Third, therapists used a patient-centered approach to decide upon content. Finally, each therapist used function or demonstration to assess the outcome of patient education interventions. The results of this study can be used to inform current practitioners, for future research and to identify theoretical underpinnings to support the practice of patient education in physical therapy.

  4. Original Research: Metabolic alterations from early life thyroxine replacement therapy in male Ames dwarf mice are transient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Justin; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal M; McFadden, Sam; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are exceptionally long-lived due to a Prop1 loss of function mutation resulting in deficiency of growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Deficiency in thyroid-stimulating hormone and growth hormone leads to greatly reduced levels of circulating thyroid hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1, as well as a reduction in insulin secretion. Early life growth hormone replacement therapy in Ames dwarf mice significantly shortens their longevity, while early life thyroxine (T4) replacement therapy does not. Possible mechanisms by which early life growth hormone replacement therapy shortens longevity include deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, which are long lasting. A mechanism explaining why early life T4 replacement therapy does not shorten longevity remains elusive. Here, we look for a possible explanation as to why early life T4 replacement therapy does not impact longevity of Ames dwarf mice. We found that early life T4 replacement therapy increased body weight and advanced the age of sexual maturation. We also find that early life T4 replacement therapy does not impact glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity, and any deleterious effects on oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient and heat production are transient. Lastly, we find that early life T4 replacement therapy has long-lasting effects on bone mineral density and bone mineral content. We suggest that the transient effects on energy metabolism and lack of effects on glucose homeostasis are the reasons why there is no shortening of longevity after early life T4 replacement therapy in Ames dwarf mice. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  5. Therapies for inborn errors of metabolism: what has the orphan drug act delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talele, Sonali S; Xu, Kui; Pariser, Anne R; Braun, M Miles; Farag-El-Massah, Sheiren; Phillips, M Ian; Thompson, Barry H; Coté, Timothy R

    2010-07-01

    The 1983 US Orphan Drug Act established a process through which promising therapies are designated as orphan products and, later, with satisfactory safety and efficacy data, receive marketing approval and fiscal incentives. We examined accomplishments in drug development for inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs). Food and Drug Administration data were used to identify orphan product designations and approvals for IEMs, and the trends for the past 26 years were summarized. Individual clinical development times (CDTs) from filing investigational new drug application to marketing approval were determined. We examined 1956 orphan product designations from 1983 through 2008 and found 93 (4.8%) for IEMs. Of those, 24 (25.8%) received marketing approval. This proportion of approval was significantly (P = .036) higher than that for non-IEM orphan products (17%). Among the IEM products, disorders of complex molecules received the most designations and approvals (61 and 11, respectively). Among the subgroups, lysosomal storage diseases received the most designations and approvals (43 and 9, respectively), whereas mitochondrial diseases (other than fatty acid oxidation disorders) received 7 designations with no approvals. We then examined the CDTs for the approved IEM products and found a median of 6.4 years (range: 2.6-25.1 years). Biological products had significantly shorter CDTs than drugs (mean: 4.6 vs 11.0 years; P = .003). For 26 years, the Orphan Drug Act has generated new therapies for IEMs. Why some IEMs have motivated successful drug development and others have not remains enigmatic; yet the needs of IEM patients without treatment are a certainty.

  6. Tumor metabolism, the ketogenic diet and β-hydroxybutyrate: novel approaches to adjuvant brain tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Woolf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD. The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  7. Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with posttraumatic cognitive impairment after memantine therapy. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Wook; Shin, Ji-Cheol; An, Young-Sil

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with posttraumatic cognitive impairment after memantine therapy. We performed serial F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography studies before and after memantine therapy (20 mg per day) on 17 patients with posttraumatic cognitive impairment using statistical parametric mapping analysis. In addition, covariance analysis was performed to identify regions, where changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism correlated significantly with increased Mini-Mental Status Examination scores. Statistical parametric mapping analysis demonstrated that, compared with baseline, significantly increased cerebral glucose metabolism occurred in both inferior, middle and superior frontal gyri, both angular gyri, both precuneus, the right middle cingulum, the left inferior parietal lobule, the left fusiform gyrus, the left precentral gyrus, the left paracentral lobule, and the left lingual gyrus after memantine therapy (P uncorrected uncorrected corrected <0.0001). Our findings indicate that the prefrontal and the parietal association cortices may be the relevant structures for the pharmacological response to memantine therapy in patients with posttraumatic cognitive impairment. (author)

  8. Investigating the experiences in a school-based occupational therapy program to inform community-based paediatric occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens, Lezahn; Joosten, Annette

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative approach with teachers is required when providing community-based occupational therapy to educationally at risk children. Collaborators share common goals and interact and support each other but challenges arise in providing collaborative occupational therapy in settings outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to capture experiences of teachers and occupational therapists working within a school-based occupational therapy program to determine if their experiences could inform collaborative practice. In this pilot study, participant responses to questionnaires (n = 32) about their experiences formed the basis for focus groups and individual interviews. Two focus group were conducted, one with teachers (n = 11) and one with occupational therapy participants (n = 6). Individual interviews were conducted with the supervising occupational therapist, school principal and two leading teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data from closed questions, and thematic analysis using a constant comparison approach was used to analyse open ended questions, focus groups and interviews. Three main themes emerged: (i) the need for occupational therapists to spend time in the school, to explain their role, build relationships, understand classroom routines and the teacher role; (ii) occupational therapists need to not see themselves as the expert but develop equal partnerships to set collaborative goals and (iii) occupational therapists advocating for all parties to be informed throughout the occupational therapy process. The pilot study findings identified teacher and therapist experiences within the school setting that could inform improved collaborative practice with teachers and community-based occupational therapists and these findings warrant further investigation. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. Neutron therapy planning: Principles and practice in Edinburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Williams, J.R.; Redpath, A.T.; Arnott, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of treatment planning using beams of fast neutron irradiation are the same as that involved in X-ray therapy. The optimum treatment technique to be employed and the standard of dose distribution depend on the penetration of the beam, the sophistication of the treatment head and certain clinical constraints. These inter-related factors are briefly discussed. The Edinburgh Cyclotron produces d(15)+Be neutrons and compared to megavoltage X-rays it is necessary to use a greater number of fields, respect greater restraints on planning and, when wedge filters are used, accept relatively higher doses in 'hot spots'. With careful and detailed planning satisfactory dose distributions can be achieved. The procedures followed in clinical planning, field selection and dose computation are described. (orig.)

  10. Examining the Purdue Pegboard Test for Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Lindstrom-Hazel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational therapy ethics require that therapists use current assessment tools that provide useful comparison data. When an assessment only has normative data that is more than 40 years old, it cannot be considered current. The purpose of this study was to examine the past and current use of the Purdue Pegboard Test by occupational therapists and other professionals and to determine if it is beneficial to conduct a large normative study on the Purdue Pegboard Assembly Task (PPAT in order to bring the test up to date. Method: This was a psychometric study of inter-rater reliability and a small normative study of the PPAT with 150 healthy working adults from MI. Descriptive statistics were used for normative means, standard deviations, and standard errors of measurement. Results: Inter-rater reliability was measured using the intra-class correlation coefficient for the mean of all student-rating teams of seven occupational therapy students. The result of the psychometric study determined the ICC was above .99. During the normative study, 150 participants performed the PPAT for three trials. Norms for gender and ages 18-49 and 50-62 are presented. Conclusion: The result of the inter-rater reliability test determined that OT students can be reliable raters for the PPAT. The normative study collected current norms for healthy working adults in MI, but validity testing and a larger normative study is needed to bring the psychometrics of the PPAT up to date to be generalized for current use by occupational therapists.

  11. [Metabolic therapy with iodine 131 in patients with chronic renal failure. Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rodríguez Barbero, Inmaculada; Espadas-Maeso, María José; Muñoz-Morales, Ana; Flores-Gómez, Pilar; Serrano-Carretero, María Belén; Castedo-Sal, Juan José; Sánchez Rey-Castro, Elena; Zamorano-Córdoba, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    62 year-old male with CKD stage 5 in dialysis program since 2012 who underwent surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. Subsequently, the patient was admitted to the Unit of Metabolic Therapy at his reference hospital, where he is administered 80 millicuries of iodine-131 as a treatment associated with the surgery, unable to have his conventional dialysis, nursing interventions required in various stages of implementation of the continuous extrarenal clearance techniques (TCDE) were performed. The following care values were addressed targeted to patients undergoing treatment with I(131): specific equipment, personal protective measures and major diagnoses and nursing interventions. TCDE, despite being attributed to very critical patients, they can be extrapolated to other patients in a given time. TCDE allowed these patients to undergo dialysis in a safe environment for staff, ensuring proper disposal of contaminated liquids. TCDE were an effective treatment for the removal of I131, a single ssesion being necessary to normalize the levels of radioactivity. Coordination between services allewed ensure proper and effective treatment for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Paraoxonase responses to exercise and niacin therapy in men with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James Kyle; Plaisance, Eric P; Mahurin, A Jack; Mestek, Michael L; Moncada-Jimenez, Jose; Grandjean, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to characterize changes in paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and concentration after single aerobic exercise sessions conducted before and after 6 weeks of niacin therapy in men with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Twelve men with MetS expended 500 kcal by walking at 65% of VO2max before and after a 6-week regimen of niacin. Niacin doses were titrated by 500 mg/week from 500 to 1500 mg/day and maintained at 1500 mg/day for the last 4 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected before and 24 hours after each exercise session and analyzed for PON1 activity, PON1 concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), apolipoprotein A1, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oLDL), lipoprotein particle sizes and concentrations. PON1 activity, PON1 concentration, MPO, and oLDL were unaltered following the independent effects of exercise and niacin (P > 0.05 for all). High-density lipoprotein particle size decreased by 3% (P = 0.040) and concentrations of small very low-density lipoprotein increased (P = 0.016) following exercise. PON1 activity increased 6.1% (P = 0.037) and PON1 concentrations increased 11.3% (P = 0.015) with the combination of exercise and niacin. Exercise and niacin works synergistically to increase PON1 activity and concentration with little or no changes in lipoproteins or markers of lipid oxidation.

  13. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. Sánchez-Rodríguez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT on oxidative stress (OS in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW and MetS women (MSW were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%, their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05 and OS was also reduced (44%, this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%. In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women.

  14. Do they practice what we teach? Follow-up evaluation of a Schema Therapy training programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Deborah; Moghaddam, Nima; Beckley, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated a three-day Schema Therapy training programme for trainee clinical psychologists. The training used an experiential model of learning, which was intended to encourage the transfer of knowledge and techniques from the learning environment into clinical practice. Using a mixed-methods approach, the training programme was evaluated in terms of: (1) self-reported changes in knowledge, confidence and willingness to use Schema Therapy-informed techniques; (2) whether the tra...

  15. Practice comparisons between accelerated resolution therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing and cognitive processing therapy with case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Diego F; Waits, Wendi; Calvio, Lisseth; Byrne, Mary

    2016-12-01

    Recent outcomes for Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy indicate that as many as 60-72% of patients retain their PTSD diagnosis after treatment with CPT or PE. One emerging therapy with the potential to augment existing trauma focused therapies is Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART). ART is currently being used along with evidence based approaches at Fort Belvoir Community Hospital and by report has been both positive for clients as well as less taxing on professionals trained in ART. The following is an in-practice theoretical comparison of CPT, EMDR and ART with case examples from Fort Belvoir Community Hospital. While all three approaches share common elements and interventions, ART distinguishes itself through emphasis on the rescripting of traumatic events and the brevity of the intervention. While these case reports are not part of a formal study, they suggest that ART has the potential to augment and enhance the current delivery methods of mental health care in military environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Palliative radiation therapy practice for advanced esophageal carcinoma in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V; Gaye, P M; Wahab, S A; Ndlovu, N; Ngoma, T; Vanderpuye, V; Sowuhami, A; Dawotola, D A; Kigula-Mugambe, J; Jeremic, B

    2010-04-01

    While numerous surveys of pattern of practices of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in advanced esophageal cancers have been published in developed countries, there is no such survey in African countries. During and after a regional training course by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in palliative cancer care, a questionnaire was distributed to African RT centers to gather information about infrastructure and human resources available, and the pattern of practice of palliative RT for esophageal cancers. Twenty-four of the 35 centers (60%) completed the questionnaire. Twenty out of 23 (87%) centers treat patients with esophageal cancer presenting with dysphagia using external beam RT (16 centers external beam RT alone and 4 centers also use brachytherapy as a boost). Twelve (60%) centers prescribe RT doses of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 centers 20 Gy in 5 fractions. Eighteen centers (78%) have low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and 9 (39%) centers have high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. One center only used HDR brachytherapy alone to a dose of 16 Gy in 2 fractions over 8 days. RT remains a major component of treatment of patients with esophageal cancers in African countries. Still, there is a great variety among centers in both indications for RT and its characteristics for a treatment indication.

  17. Review of electroconvulsive therapy practice from a tertiary Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Preeti; Gogi, Prabhu Kiran Vishwanath; Srinath, Shoba; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Girimaji, Satish; Seshadri, Shekhar; Sagar, John Vijay

    2014-12-01

    The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in children and adolescents is a controversial issue. This study was done to examine the pattern and practice as well as the outcome of electroconvulsive therapy administered to children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary care centre. A 10 year retrospective chart review of all children and adolescents (up to 16 years of age) admitted in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) who had received at least 1 session of ECT was done. Information regarding diagnosis, reasons for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy, details regarding the procedure and outcome variables was collected from the records. Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale rating of the severity of illness and improvement seen were done by 2 trained psychiatrists independently. 22 children and adolescents received electroconvulsive therapy over 10 years. There were an equal number of boys and girls. All received modified ECT. Most patients who received electroconvulsive therapy were severely ill. Catatonic symptoms 54.5% (12) were the most common reason for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy. It was efficacious in 77.3% (17) of the patients. Electroconvulsive therapy was relatively safe, and most experienced no acute side effects. 68.2% (15) who were on follow up and did not experience any long term side effects due to the electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy has a place in the acute management of severe childhood psychiatric disorders. Further long term prospective studies are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of intensive vs conventional insulin therapy on perioperative nutritional substrates metabolism in patients undergoing gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Cheng Liu; Yan-Bing Zhou; Dong Chen; Zhao-Jian Niu; Yang Yu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of intensive vs conventional insulin therapy on perioperative nutritional substrates metabolism in patients undergoing radical distal gastrectomy.METHODS:Within 24 h of intensive care unit management,patients with gastric cancer were enrolled after written informed consent and randomized to the intensive insulin therapy (IIT) group to keep glucose levels from 4.4 to 6.1 mmol/L or the conventional insulin therapy (CIT) group to keep levels less than 10 mmol/L.Resting energy expenditure (REE),respiratory quotient (RQ),resting energy expenditure per kilogram (REE/kg),and the lipid oxidation rate were monitored by the indirect calorimeter of calcium citrate malate nutrition metabolism investigation system.The changes in body composition were analyzed by multi-frequency bioimpedance analysis.Blood fasting glucose and insulin concentration were measured for assessment of Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.RESULTS:Sixty patients were enrolled.Compared with preoperative baseline,postoperative REE increased by over 22.15% and 11.07%; REE/kg rose up to 27.22 ± 1.33 kcal/kg and 24.72 ± 1.43 kcal/kg; RQ decreased to 0.759 ± 0.034 and 0.791 ± 0.037; the lipid oxidation ratio was up to 78.25% ± 17.74% and 67.13% ± 12.76% supported by parenteral nutrition solutions from 37.56% ± 11.64% at the baseline; the level of Ln-HOMA-IR went up dramatically (P < 0.05,respectively) on postoperative days 1 and 3 in the IIT group.Meanwhile the concentration of total protein,albumin and triglyceride declined significantly on postoperative days 1 and 3 compared with pre-operative levels (P < 0.05,respectively).Compared with the CIT group,IIT reduced the REE/kg level (27.22 ± 1.33 kcal/kg vs 29.97 ± 1.47 kcal/kg,P =0.008; 24.72 ± 1.43 kcal/kg vs 25.66 ± 1.63 kcal/kg,P =0.013); and decreased the Ln-HOMA-IR score (P =0.019,0.028) on postoperative days 1 and 3; IIT decreased the level of CRP on postoperative days 1 and 3 (P

  19. Target volume delineation and treatment planning for particle therapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Leeman, Jonathan E; Cahlon, Oren; Sine, Kevin; Jiang, Guoliang; Lu, Jiade J; Both, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to treat patients appropriately and confidently by means of particle therapy. The orientation and purpose are entirely practical, in that the focus is on the physics essentials of delivery and treatment planning , illustration of the clinical target volume (CTV) and associated treatment planning for each major malignancy when using particle therapy, proton therapy in particular. Disease-specific chapters provide guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection and delineation and identify aspects that require the exercise of caution during treatment planning. The treatment planning techniques unique to proton therapy for each disease site are clearly described, covering beam orientation, matching/patching field techniques, robustness planning, robustness plan evaluation, etc. The published data on the use of particle therapy for a given disease site are also concisely reported. In addition to fully meeting the needs of radiation oncologists, this "kn...

  20. A Study on Education of Music Therapist and Music Therapy Practices in the United States in the 1960s : At the center of NAMT's publications and music therapy practices then

    OpenAIRE

    安宅, 智子

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a historical perspective of the education of music therapists in the United States in the 1960s-1970s and addresses the innovative aspects of music therapy advocated by the National Association of Music Therapy (NAMT). First, relevant articles published in The Journal of Music Therapy are examined to clarify NAMT's concept of music therapist education. Secondly, practical examples proposed in the books Music in Therapy (MT) and Therapy in Music for Handicapped Children (TM...

  1. Capturing presence moments: the art of mindful practice in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Denise

    2009-06-01

    This paper explores theoretical and practical views of mindfulness and phenomena of presence moments. The potential for altering life and enabling change through lived experience of mindful presence moments has relevance for occupational therapy practice. To suggest ways for occupational therapists to become mindfully present during practice. Based on theoretical perspectives drawn from the fields of psychology, philosophy, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, and education, a four-fold approach will be outlined for occupational therapists to practice mindfully and experience presence moments. This approach emphasizes key concepts of awareness, non-judgment, reflection, curiosity, and commitment to practice. A clinical scenario is used to illustrate the approach. The ideas raised in this paper need to be incorporated into daily practice by occupational therapists so that a culture of mindful practice can be cultivated. Suggestions are provided throughout the paper for an agenda of potential research studies to address aspects of mindfulness and presence moments more fully.

  2. Integrating Quality and Safety Competencies to Improve Outcomes: Application in Infusion Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Gwen; Nickel, Barbara

    Despite intense scrutiny and process improvement initiatives, patient harm continues to occur in health care with alarming frequency. The Quality and Safety Education for Nursing (QSEN) project provides a roadmap to transform nursing by integrating 6 competencies: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. As front-line caregivers, nurses encounter inherent risks in their daily work. Infusion therapy is high risk with multiple potential risks for patient harm. This study examines individual and system application of the QSEN competencies and the Infusion Nurses Society's 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice in the improvement of patient outcomes.

  3. EFFECTS OF SHORT TERM PRACTICE OF BHASTRIKA PRANAYAMA ON METABOLIC FITNESS (METF AND BONE INTEGRITY (BI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Bal Baljinder

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was conducted with the objective to determine the short term practice of bhastrika pranayama on Metabolic Fitness and Bone Integrity. Material: 30 university level females between the age group of 21-26 years were selected. The subjects were randomly matched and assigned into two groups: Group-A: Experimental (n 1=15; Group-B: Control (n 2=15. The subjects from Group-A: Experimental were provided to a 4-weeks bhastrika pranayama. Statistical Analysis: Student t test for paired samples was utilized to compare the means of the pre-test and the post-test. Results & Conclusions: Based on the analysis of the results obtained, we conclude that the significant differences were found in Metabolic Fitness (i.e., Maximal Oxygen Consumption (V O2max and blood pressure of University Level Girls. Insignificant between-group differences were noted in Blood Lipid, Blood Sugar and Bone Integrity of University Level Girls.

  4. Regulation of Brain Glucose Metabolic Patterns by Protein Phosphorlyation and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    Tymoczko et al. 2002). Both cardiac muscle and brain contain the necessary enzymes to metabolize either glucose or ketone bodies . The enzymes... metabolic phenotype of astrocytes and neurons in vitro; and to determine whether antipsychotic drug administration affects glucose metabolites in...Cortical Astrocytes and Neurons 20 Abstract 21 v Introduction ~ 22 Results 24 Enriched Astrocyte and Neuronal Cultures Display Unique Metabolic

  5. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric...... turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity......./min/ 1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results: Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum...

  6. Reviving Lonidamine and 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine to Be Used in Combination for Metabolic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Cervantes-Madrid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal metabolism is another cancer hallmark. The two most characterized altered metabolic pathways are high rates of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, which are natural targets for cancer therapy. Currently, a number of newer compounds to block glycolysis and glutaminolysis are being developed; nevertheless, lonidamine and 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON are two old drugs well characterized as inhibitors of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, respectively, whose clinical development was abandoned years ago when the importance of cancer metabolism was not fully appreciated and clinical trial methodology was less developed. In this review, a PubMed search using the words lonidamine and 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON was undertaken to analyse existing information on the preclinical and clinical studies of these drugs for cancer treatment. Data show that they exhibit antitumor effects; besides there is also the suggestion that they are synergistic. We conclude that lonidamine and DON are safe and potentially effective drugs that need to be reevaluated in combination as metabolic therapy of cancer.

  7. Reviving Lonidamine and 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine to Be Used in Combination for Metabolic Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Madrid, Diana; Romero, Yair; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal metabolism is another cancer hallmark. The two most characterized altered metabolic pathways are high rates of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, which are natural targets for cancer therapy. Currently, a number of newer compounds to block glycolysis and glutaminolysis are being developed; nevertheless, lonidamine and 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) are two old drugs well characterized as inhibitors of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, respectively, whose clinical development was abandoned years ago when the importance of cancer metabolism was not fully appreciated and clinical trial methodology was less developed. In this review, a PubMed search using the words lonidamine and 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) was undertaken to analyse existing information on the preclinical and clinical studies of these drugs for cancer treatment. Data show that they exhibit antitumor effects; besides there is also the suggestion that they are synergistic. We conclude that lonidamine and DON are safe and potentially effective drugs that need to be reevaluated in combination as metabolic therapy of cancer. PMID:26425550

  8. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, A; Oliveira, M J; Cysneiros, A; Martinho, C; Reis, R P; Penque, D; Pinto, P; Bárbara, C

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles) are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP). In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71%) were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI) and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild-moderate (pprofile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (pprofiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as complementary tool of diagnosis/treatment response in OSAS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. NEW METABOLIC INDEX USE POTENTIALITIES IN EVALUATION OF INSULIN RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roytberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics of insulin resistance (IR is one of the methods of primary prevention of cardio-vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The HOMA-IR index and ratio of plasma triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are the most frequently used indices in clinical and epidemiological scientific research. Prognostic value and efficacy of these tests as a screening method are not high. What method of IR detection should be used in clinical practice and how to interpret received values of the indices is still a matter of dispute.Aim. To evaluate informative value, sensitivity and specificity of a new metabolic index (MI for IR estimation in comparison with the calculated HOMA-IR index.Material and methods. A total of 845 patients (298 men, 547 women were enrolled into the further study after an outpatient regular medical check-up of 2,615 persons. Mean age of the patients was 45.77±12.18 years, body mass index – 28.95±1.44 kg/m2. To evaluate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism blood chemistry parameters were assessed. IR was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR and an oblique calculated index based on lipid metabolism parameters. In accordance with the developed screening method of IR detection (invention patent № 2493566 MI considering carbohydrate and lipid changes was proposed.Results. Calculation of MI and its threshold level was performed by analysis of a characteristic curve. Graphical dependence between sensitivity and specificity of the proposed index was demonstrated: sensitivity of the test was 75.7%, specificity – 89.1%. Probability of IR at MI value >7.0 was 63.5% (positive predictive value, probability of IR absence at the index value ≤7.0 was 93.6% (negative predictive value. The general accuracy of the test, which is characterized by the area under the characteristic curve, was 0.881 with 95%-confidence interval within 0.854-0.905.Conclusion. The importance of negative

  10. NEW METABOLIC INDEX USE POTENTIALITIES IN EVALUATION OF INSULIN RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roytberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics of insulin resistance (IR is one of the methods of primary prevention of cardio-vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The HOMA-IR index and ratio of plasma triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are the most frequently used indices in clinical and epidemiological scientific research. Prognostic value and efficacy of these tests as a screening method are not high. What method of IR detection should be used in clinical practice and how to interpret received values of the indices is still a matter of dispute.Aim. To evaluate informative value, sensitivity and specificity of a new metabolic index (MI for IR estimation in comparison with the calculated HOMA-IR index.Material and methods. A total of 845 patients (298 men, 547 women were enrolled into the further study after an outpatient regular medical check-up of 2,615 persons. Mean age of the patients was 45.77±12.18 years, body mass index – 28.95±1.44 kg/m2. To evaluate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism blood chemistry parameters were assessed. IR was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR and an oblique calculated index based on lipid metabolism parameters. In accordance with the developed screening method of IR detection (invention patent № 2493566 MI considering carbohydrate and lipid changes was proposed.Results. Calculation of MI and its threshold level was performed by analysis of a characteristic curve. Graphical dependence between sensitivity and specificity of the proposed index was demonstrated: sensitivity of the test was 75.7%, specificity – 89.1%. Probability of IR at MI value >7.0 was 63.5% (positive predictive value, probability of IR absence at the index value ≤7.0 was 93.6% (negative predictive value. The general accuracy of the test, which is characterized by the area under the characteristic curve, was 0.881 with 95%-confidence interval within 0.854-0.905.Conclusion. The importance of negative

  11. ALARA and paediatric imaging in radiation therapy: A survey of Canadian paediatric imaging practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgerson, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is little discussion in the literature regarding paediatric imaging dose reduction with respect to conventional imaging carried out in radiotherapy departments. This is in contrast to diagnostic radiography where dose optimization when imaging children is a very current topic. For this reason Canadian radiotherapy clinics were surveyed to look at paediatric imaging practice, knowledge and perspectives with respect to imaging dose reduction. Method: As this was an exploratory study, a questionnaire was developed and sent to radiation therapy clinics across Canada, via email, to assess knowledge of paediatric imaging and dose reduction initiatives. The questionnaire focus was CT simulation and treatment verification imaging of children. Results: Practice and knowledge of paediatric imaging varied across Canada. Forty percent of clinics reported using paediatric specific protocols for CT simulation and 20% of clinics reported using paediatric specific protocols for treatment verification imaging. There was variation in imaging practices among the clinics that reported treating the most children. The survey results show that while some measures are being taken to reduce paediatric imaging dose in radiation therapy, 46.7% of the respondents felt more could be done. Conclusion: The survey demonstrates interest in dose reduction in radiation therapy imaging as well as differences in current practice and knowledge across Canada. Paediatric imaging dose reduction would appear to be an area of practice that would benefit from more study and development of standards of practice

  12. Re-imagining occupational therapy clients as communities: Presenting the community-centred practice framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Nerida; Kenny, Amanda; Dickson-Swift, Virginia

    2018-01-09

    Occupational therapists' are increasingly working with communities and providing services at the community level. There is, however, a lack of conceptual frameworks to guide this work. The aim of this article is to present a new conceptual framework for community-centered practice in occupational therapy. The conceptual framework was developed from qualitative multi-case research on exemplars of community participation. The first was, a network of Canadian food security programs, and the second, a rural Australian community banking initiative. Key themes were identified from across the case studies, and cross-case findings interpreted using occupational therapy and occupational science knowledge, and relevant social theory. The outcome is a four-stage, occupation-focused, community-centered practice framework. The Community-Centred Practice Framework can be used by occupational therapists to understand and apply a community-centered practice approach. The four stages are: (1) Community Identity, (2) Community Occupations, (3) Community Resources and Barriers, and (4) Participation Enablement. Further research is needed to trial and critically evaluate the framework, to assess its usefulness as a robust, occupation-focused, frame of reference to guide community-centered practice in occupational therapy. The proposed framework should assist occupational therapists to conceptualize community-centered practice, and to utilize and apply theory.

  13. The promising anticancer drug 3-bromopyruvate is metabolized through glutathione conjugation which affects chemoresistance and clinical practice: An evidence-based view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Zolaly, Mohammed; Almaramhy, Hamdi H; Ayat, Mongi; Donki, Jagadish G

    2017-03-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is a promising effective anticancer drug against many different tumors in children and adults. 3BP exhibited strong anticancer effects in both preclinical and human studies e.g. energy depletion, oxidative stress, anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastatic effects, targeting cancer stem cells and antagonizing the Warburg effect. There is no report about 3BP metabolism to guide researchers and oncologists to improve clinical practice and prevent drug resistance. In this article, we provide evidences that 3BP is metabolized through glutathione (GSH) conjugation as a novel report where 3BP was confirmed to be attached to GSH followed by permanent loss of pharmacological effects in a picture similar to cisplatin. Both cisplatin and 3BP are alkylating agents. Reported decrease in endogenous cellular GSH content upon 3BP treatment was confirmed to be due to the formation of 3BP-GSH complex i.e. GSH consumption for conjugation with 3BP. Cancer cells having high endogenous GSH exhibit resistance to 3BP while 3BP sensitive cells acquire resistance upon adding exogenous GSH. Being a thiol blocker, 3BP may attack thiol groups in tissues and serum proteins e.g. albumin and GSH. That may decrease 3BP-induced anticancer effects and the functions of those proteins. We proved here that 3BP metabolism is different from metabolism of hydroxypyruvate that results from metabolism of D-serine using D-amino acid oxidase. Clinically, 3BP administration should be monitored during albumin infusion and protein therapy where GSH should be added to emergency medications. GSH exerts many physiological effects and is safe for human administration both orally and intravenously. Based on that, reported GSH-induced inhibition of 3BP effects makes 3BP effects reversible, easily monitored and easily controlled. This confers a superiority of 3BP over many anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Between practice, policy and politics: Music therapy and the Dementia Strategy, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Neta; Farrant, Camilla L; Pavlicevic, Mercédès

    2017-04-01

    Does current music therapy practice address the goals encapsulated in the UK Department of Health document, Living well with dementia: a national dementia strategy (the Dementia Strategy) published in 2009? A survey elicited the views of clients, family members, music therapists, care home staff and care home managers, about this question by focusing on the relationship between music therapy and the 17 objectives outlined in the Dementia Strategy. The results showed that the objectives that are related to direct activity of the music therapists (such as care and understanding of the condition) were seen as most fulfilled by music therapy, while those regarding practicalities (such as living within the community) were seen as least fulfilled. Although the responses from the four groups of participants were similar, differences for some questions suggest that people's direct experience of music therapy influences their views. This study suggests that many aspects of the Dementia Strategy are already seen as being achieved. The findings suggest that developments of both music therapy practices and government strategies on dementia care may benefit from being mutually informed.

  15. Participation and occupation in occupational therapy models of practice: A discussion of possibilities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Nyman, Anneli

    2017-11-01

    Occupation has been the focus in occupational therapy practice to greater or lesser degrees from a historical viewpoint. This evokes a need to discuss whether concepts that are added to our field will enhance or blur our focus on occupation. To explore how the concept of participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is related to the concept of occupation by reviewing and comparing its use in three models of practice within occupational therapy. The aim was also to generate discussion on possibilities and challenges concerning the relationship of participation and occupation. The models reviewed were The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), the Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E) and the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM). The concept of participation was related to occupation in different ways in these models. Based on the review some challenges and considerations for occupational therapy were generated. Relating the concept of participation from the ICF to the concept of occupation in models of practice can be challenging. At the same time, relating the concepts can be a resource to develop occupational therapy and the understanding of occupational issues in society.

  16. Optimization of 64Cu production for Radio-metabolic therapy and for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groppi, F.; Bonardi, M.; Birattari, C.; Gini, L.; Guariglia, S.; Mainardi, C.; Menapace, E.

    2002-01-01

    The 6 4C u is a very interesting radioisotope for nuclear biomedical applications, due to its physical characteristics: a) it decay β+ and β- with maximum energy equal to 653 keV and 578 keV respectively, that correspond to maximum range of β+ in soft tissue ∼ 2.7 mm and average range ∼ 1 mm. In this way it is possible to give a local dose in the region of interest and to have a high resolution in the PET images; b) it has an half life of 12.7 h, that is suitable for medical applications, reducing the exposure of personnel and of the patients and the problem of waste discharge; c) besides the gamma of annihilation (36%), it has only one γ emission at 1345.84 keV (0.473%) with low intensity: this reduces the dose to healthy tissue and to medical personnel. For these reasons 6 4C u can be considered a dual purpose radionuclide: it can be used both to localise and measure the tumour mass through the PET tomography and for the metabolic therapy of the tumour itself. Cu(2.) forms a class of stable classical complexes and chelates with ditio carbamates (DTC), like ethylmethyl-DTC and tiosemicarbazonates, like pyruvaldehyde-bis-(N 4 -methyl semicarbazone (PTSM) and acetyl-bis-(N 4 -methyl semicarbazone) (ATSM), and finally with aza macrocyclic chelants (cyclens, cyclams, sarcofands), like DOTA, DOTP and SarAr). The behaviour of some of them has been already investigated in both cell cultures, rats and humans since the end of the 90-ties

  17. Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy versus conventional best practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demoly, Pascal; Louis, Renaud; Søes-Petersen, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy (Symbicort SMART) reduces asthma exacerbations and symptoms versus fixed-dose regimens plus short-acting beta(2)-agonists (SABA) in double-blind trials. Information is lacking regarding its effectiveness versus conventional best practice (CBP...

  18. Mandatory Personal Therapy: Does the Evidence Justify the Practice? In Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Surabhi

    2013-01-01

    The article addresses the question of whether the practice of mandatory personal therapy, followed by several training organisations, is justified by existing research and evidence. In doing so, it discusses some implications of this training requirement from an ethical and ideological standpoint, raising questions of import for training…

  19. MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Bowen, Joanne; Barasch, Andrei; Elting, Linda; Epstein, Joel; Keefe, Dorothy M.; McGuire, Deborah B.; Migliorati, Cesar; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Peterson, Douglas E.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Brennan, Michael; Gibson, Rachel; Fulton, Janet; Hewson, Ian; Jensen, Siri B.; Logan, Richard; Öhrn, Kerstin E. O.; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Saunders, Deborah; von Bültzingslöwen, Inger; Yarom, Noam

    2014-01-01

    Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this systematic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) Clinical Practice Guidelines for mucositis.

  20. MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Bowen, Joanne; Barasch, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this systematic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) Clinical Practice Guidelines ...

  1. MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalla, R.V.; Bowen, J.; Barasch, A.; Elting, L.; Epstein, J.; Keefe, D.M.; McGuire, D.B.; Migliorati, C.; Nicolatou-Galitis, O.; Peterson, D.E.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Sonis, S.T.; Elad, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this systematic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) Clinical Practice Guidelines for

  2. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2017-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G.M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    2018-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G. M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  5. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

  6. Sylvia Docker lecture: the practice, research, policy nexus in contemporary occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Natasha A

    2014-04-01

    In this era of evidence-based practice, Australian occupational therapists largely accept scientific perspectives of the quality of evidence and 'what makes a strong study'. Yet unequal power relationships are usual between funders who set the research agenda, researchers and people who are the subjects of research. Emerging policy now mandates partnerships with consumers in any health and research projects about them. Are we person-centred in our research practices? What difference would increased consumer direction make to our research methods, scope and outcomes? This lecture describes some of the benefits and challenges of collaborative or inclusive research partnerships with consumers and outlines where this may take occupational therapy in future. The disability community's calls for inclusive research will be contrasted with mainstream research approaches and with occupational therapy's commitment to person-centredness. An example of inclusive research undertaken by the author and colleagues with disabilities which posed the question: 'What difference does assistive technology make to life for people living with impairment?' will be presented. Collaborative research is best conceptualised as a mutually productive journey, with many factors influencing how fully inclusive research principles can be realised. The possibilities and complexities of conducting research which has inclusive credentials are outlined. Inclusive research principles provide a means to enact person-centredness in research as well as practice. Following these principles challenges occupational therapy practitioners and researchers to address nexus issues: that is, intersections between and beyond research, policy and practice. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  7. Recommendations for physical and occupational therapy practice from the perspective of clients undergoing therapy for breast cancer-related impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Jill B; Giuliano, Susan; Meehan, Caitlin; Sander, Beth; Wootten, Rachel; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Evidence points to the efficacy of physical and occupational therapy intervention for the management of impairments and functional limitations related to the treatment of breast cancer. However, few studies give voice to the women participating in the physical rehabilitation programs intended to ameliorate their deficits. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore the experience of physical rehabilitation as well as to identify recommendations for physical and occupational therapy practice from the perspective of the client undergoing therapy for breast cancer-related impairments. A phenomenological design was chosen and included a purposive sample of women (n = 10) undergoing physical rehabilitation for impairments related to breast cancer treatment. Data included semistructured interviews and artifact examination. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted at a setting of the participants' choice. Data collection continued until saturation was reached. Data analysis was cyclical and ongoing and involved all six researchers in analyzing and triangulating all pieces of data. Member checks and a peer review were conducted to confirm relevance and validity. Five themes emerged: 1) challenges with obtaining referrals, 2) challenges with patient education, 3) improvements in functional impairments, 4) emotional support, and 5) benefits of a specialized clinic environment. Consideration of the five themes led to four recommendations for physical and occupational therapist practice from the perspective of the client: 1) advocate for presurgical therapy consultations, 2) be competent in the management of all impairments and functional limitations associated with breast cancer treatment, 3) be aware of the emotional support the therapist has the capacity to provide or not provide, and 4) as much as possible, create an inviting, nonclinical environment.

  8. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Nickel, K; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  9. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  10. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Feliciano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP. Material and methods: In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71% were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild–moderate (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively. Glycemic profile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively, and in glycemia and LDL cholesterol in severe group only (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively. Results: This study demonstrated an association between glucose metabolism parameters and triglycerides with OSAS severity underlying the complexity of the process leading to cardiovascular/metabolic complications in this disorder. Moreover, homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Conclusion: Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as

  11. Occupational therapy students' technological skills: Are 'generation Y' ready for 21st century practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. 'Generation Y' are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students' skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) 'Generation Y' participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Overall, the results suggested that this group of 'Generation Y' students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  12. Factors influencing the use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedge, Frances M; Braswell-Christy, Jennifer; Brown, Cynthia J; Foley, Kathleen T; Graham, Cecilia; Shaw, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice is central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions, providing accountability and addressing quality of physical therapy programs. There is limited discussion on barriers and facilitators to using outcome measures in physical therapy practice. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence a physical therapist when deciding to use outcome measures in clinical practice. Participants were 21 physical therapists, seven each from skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A grounded theory approach was used for interview and data collection. Common themes were determined from the data and a theory developed to explain the rationale behind physical therapists' decisions to use or not use outcome measures in clinical practice. Three overlapping themes related to (1) concepts of time, (2) knowledge, and (3) facility culture were indentified as factors influencing the use of outcome measures. A fourth encompassing theme, professionalism, identified the value placed on the use of outcome measures in practice. Data revealed that therapists require more information on the outcome measures available, and this information needs to be easily accessible within the workplace. Therapists value information generated by using outcome measures in the clinical setting, but need information on what measures are available and psychometric properties. Information must be easily accessible and measures easy to use. Newer graduates and recent learners have a foundation in the use of outcome measures, but more needs to be done in the clinic and through continuing education to promote increased use and understanding.

  13. Toward a chronobiological characterization of obesity and metabolic syndrome in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbalán-Tutau, M D; Gómez-Abellán, P; Madrid, J A; Canteras, M; Ordovás, J M; Garaulet, M

    2015-06-01

    To test several circadian rhythm variables in a female population to identify the best tool to assess chronodisruption in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) to define a score to be used for chronodisruption characterization in clinical practice. Anthropometric measurements and markers of circadian rhythms, such as sleep and feeding diary, Horne-Ostberg questionnaire, melatonin and cortisol measurements, and wrist temperature measurements, were determined. MetS variables were also analyzed. Study was conducted in 70 women. Data were subjected to factor analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used as predictors of chronodisruption risk, and a score was calculated to classify the subjects of risk. Factor analysis showed that the first-factor grouped variables were related to the skin temperature measurement. Second factor consisted of variables related to salivary cortisol levels and obesity-related measurements. Third factor included variables related to sleep-wake cycle. Fourth factor referred to peripheral temperature variables and included the classification of subjects according to the Horne-Ostberg questionnaire. To obtain a final punctuation we performed the weighted mean of the first four factors. The final range was from 27 to 57, mean value of 42. Punctuation was defined as the "chronodisruption score." Women displaying higher chronodisruption scores had higher MetS risk. The study demonstrates that wrist temperature recordings, together with two questions of sleep onset and offset, and one morning salivary cortisol determination could be enough to characterize the chronobiology of obesity and MetS, a new chronodisruption score was developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Restorative Yoga and Metabolic Risk Factors: The Practicing Restorative Yoga vs. Stretching for the Metabolic Syndrome (PRYSMS) randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Alka M.; Araneta, Maria Rosario G.; Pawlowsky, Sarah B.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Grady, Deborah; Vittinghoff, Eric; Schembri, Michael; Chang, Ann; Carrion-Petersen, Mary Lou; Coggins, Traci; Tanori, Daniah; Armas, Jean M.; Cole, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Intensive lifestyle change prevents type 2 diabetes but is difficult to sustain. Preliminary evidence suggests that yoga may improve metabolic factors. We tested a restorative yoga intervention vs. active stretching for metabolic outcomes. Methods In 2009–2012, we conducted a 48-week randomized trial comparing restorative yoga vs. stretching among underactive adults with the metabolic syndrome at the Universities of California, San Francisco and San Diego. We provided lifestyle counseling and a tapering series of 90-minute group classes in the 24-week intervention period and 24-week maintenance period. Fasting and 2-hour glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, insulin, systolic blood pressure, visceral fat, and quality of life were assessed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Results 180 participants were randomized and 135 (75%) completed the trial. At 12 months, fasting glucose decreased more in the yoga group than in the stretching group (−0.35 mmol/L vs. −0.03 mmol/L; p=0.002); there were no other significant differences between groups. At 6 months favorable changes within the yoga group included reductions in fasting glucose, insulin, and HbA1c and an increase in HDL-cholesterol that were not sustained at 1 year except changes in fasting glucose. The stretching group had a significant reduction in triglycerides at 6 months which was not sustained at 1 year but had improved quality of life at both time-points. Conclusions Restorative yoga was marginally better than stretching for improving fasting glucose but not other metabolic factors. PMID:24418351

  15. Survey of Usual Practice: Dysphagia Therapy in Head & Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisciunas, Gintas P.; Sokoloff, William; Stepas, Katherine; Langmore, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    There is no standardized dysphagia therapy for head and neck cancer patients and scant evidence to support any particular protocol, leaving institutions and individual speech language pathologists (SLPs) to determine their own protocols based on “typical” practices or anecdotal evidence. To gain an understanding of current usual practices, a national internet-based survey was developed and disseminated to SLPs who treat HNC patients. From a random sample of 4,000 ASHA SID 13 members, 1,931 fit the inclusion criteria, and 759 complete responses were recorded for a 39.3% response rate. Results were analyzed by institution type as well as by individual clinical experience. While some interesting trends emerged from the data, a lack of uniformity and consensus regarding best practices was apparent. This is undoubtedly due to a paucity of research adequately addressing the efficacy of any one therapy for dysphagia in the HNC population. PMID:22456699

  16. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Indelicato, D [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Boop, F [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  17. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T; Indelicato, D; Boop, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  18. Learning More about Those Who Play in Session: The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project (Phase I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simone F.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mullen, Jodi Ann; Ray, Dee; Baggerly, Jennifer; White, JoAnna; Kaplan, David

    2007-01-01

    Through a joint research committee sponsored by the Association for Play Therapy (APT) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project conducted the first phase of investigation. Findings offered a snapshot of mental health providers of play therapy, regarding the nature of who they are and…

  19. Non-Toxic Metabolic Management of Metastatic Cancer in VM Mice: Novel Combination of Ketogenic Diet, Ketone Supplementation, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poff

    Full Text Available The Warburg effect and tumor hypoxia underlie a unique cancer metabolic phenotype characterized by glucose dependency and aerobic fermentation. We previously showed that two non-toxic metabolic therapies - the ketogenic diet with concurrent hyperbaric oxygen (KD+HBOT and dietary ketone supplementation - could increase survival time in the VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that combining these therapies could provide an even greater therapeutic benefit in this model. Mice receiving the combination therapy demonstrated a marked reduction in tumor growth rate and metastatic spread, and lived twice as long as control animals. To further understand the effects of these metabolic therapies, we characterized the effects of high glucose (control, low glucose (LG, ketone supplementation (βHB, hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT, or combination therapy (LG+βHB+HBOT on VM-M3 cells. Individually and combined, these metabolic therapies significantly decreased VM-M3 cell proliferation and viability. HBOT, alone or in combination with LG and βHB, increased ROS production in VM-M3 cells. This study strongly supports further investigation into this metabolic therapy as a potential non-toxic treatment for late-stage metastatic cancers.

  20. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Ari

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG, the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD, would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A. ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD, KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001 and 4.2% (p = 0.006, respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which

  1. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M; Held, Heather E; Landon, Carol S; Goldhagen, Craig R; Mavromates, Nicholas; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong

  2. Metabolic Effects of Two Different Doses of Venlafaxine Therapy on Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamária Imre

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Venlafaxine is an antidepressant, categorized as a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI with suspected metabolic side effects. The aim of our study was to assess these metabolic effects in rats, using two different doses of venlafaxine.

  3. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Lost in translation? Moving contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M

    2014-10-01

    In the treatment of addictions, the gap between the availability of evidence-based therapies and their limited implementation in practice has not yet been bridged. Two empirically validated behavioral therapies, contingency management (CM) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), exemplify this challenge. Both have a relatively strong level of empirical support but each has weak and uneven adoption in clinical practice. This review highlights examples of how barriers to their implementation in practice have been addressed systematically, using the Stage Model of Behavioral Therapies Development as an organizing framework. For CM, barriers such as cost and ideology have been addressed through the development of lower-cost and other adaptations to make it more community friendly. For CBT, barriers such as relative complexity, lack of trained providers, and need for supervision have been addressed via conversion to standardized computer-assisted versions that can serve as clinician extenders. Although these and other modifications have rendered both interventions more disseminable, diffusion of innovation remains a complex, often unpredictable process. The existing specialty addiction-treatment system may require significant reforms to fully implement CBT and CM, particularly greater focus on definable treatment goals and performance-based outcomes. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Facilitating behavioral learning and habit change in voice therapy--theoretic premises and practical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwarsson, Jenny

    2015-12-01

    A typical goal of voice therapy is a behavioral change in the patient's everyday speech. The SLP's plan for voice therapy should therefore optimally include strategies for automatization. The aim of the present study was to identify and describe factors that promote behavioral learning and habit change in voice behavior and have the potential to affect patient compliance and thus therapy outcome. Research literature from the areas of motor and behavioral learning, habit formation, and habit change was consulted. Also, specific elements from personal experience of clinical voice therapy are described and discussed from a learning theory perspective. Nine factors that seem to be relevant to facilitate behavioral learning and habit change in voice therapy are presented, together with related practical strategies and theoretical underpinnings. These are: 1) Cue-altering; 2) Attention exercises; 3) Repetition; 4) Cognitive activation; 5) Negative practice; 6) Inhibition through interruption; 7) Decomposing complex behavior; 8) The 'each time-every time' principle; and 9) Successive implementation of automaticity.

  6. The Scope of Practice of Occupational Therapy in U.S. Criminal Justice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jaime P; Moreton, Emily M; Sitterly, Audra M

    2016-09-01

    In the past 40 years, prison populations in the U.S. have nearly quadrupled while funding for rehabilitation, education and other programmes has been cut. Despite accounting for a small fraction of the world's population more than 20% of the worlds incarcerated population is in the U.S. and the rate of recidivism remains alarmingly high. Occupational therapists have the capability to play a significant role in addressing the needs of persons within the criminal justice system. However, the profession has been slow to delineate of the role occupational therapy within criminal justice settings. This study sought to provide a descriptive analysis of current occupational therapy roles and practices within the U.S. criminal justice system. Using survey research methods, the researchers collected data from respondents (N = 45; Response Rate + 51.7%) to establish a baseline of the scope of practices employed by occupational therapists working in the U.S. criminal justice system. U.S. practitioners work within institutional and community based criminal justice settings. Primary practice models, assessments and group interventions were catalogued. Respondents strongly valued the creation of networking to build the professions' presence within criminal justice settings. Occupational therapy in the criminal justice system remains an emerging practice arena. Understanding the current scope of practice in the U.S. and creating a mechanism for collaboration may help increase the depth, breadth and overall growth of the profession's role in these settings. The sampling method does not guarantee a representative sample of the population and is limited to practice within the United States. Survey design may not have allowed for respondents to fully describe their practice experiences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Adiponectin gene therapy ameliorates high-fat, high-sucrose diet-induced metabolic perturbations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, A D; Sung, M M; Boisvenue, J J; Barr, A J; Dyck, J R B

    2012-09-10

    Adiponectin is an adipokine secreted primarily from adipose tissue that can influence circulating plasma glucose and lipid levels through multiple mechanisms involving a variety of organs. In humans, reduced plasma adiponectin levels induced by obesity are associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, suggesting that low adiponectin levels may contribute the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether gene therapy designed to elevate circulating adiponectin levels is a viable strategy for ameliorating insulin resistance in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer of mouse adiponectin plasmid DNA into gastrocnemius muscle resulted in elevated serum levels of globular and high-molecular weight adiponectin compared with control mice treated with empty plasmid. In comparison to HFHS-fed mice receiving empty plasmid, mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy displayed significantly decreased weight gain following 13 weeks of HFHS diet associated with reduced fat accumulation, and exhibited increased oxygen consumption and locomotor activity as measured by indirect calorimetry, suggesting increased energy expenditure in these mice. Consistent with improved whole-body metabolism, mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy also had lower blood glucose and insulin levels, improved glucose tolerance and reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis compared with control mice. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis of livers from mice receiving adiponectin gene therapy showed an increase in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins. Based on these data, we conclude that adiponectin gene therapy ameliorates the metabolic abnormalities caused by feeding mice a HFHS diet and may be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve obesity-mediated impairments in insulin sensitivity.

  8. Serum vitamin D and the metabolic syndrome among osteoporotic postmenopausal female patients of a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, Nada; Shroukh, Wejdan; Hijjawi, Razan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome are two common health issues worldwide. The association between these two health problems is subject to debate. This study aims to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome in a sample of osteoporotic postmenopausal women attending a family practice clinic in Amman-Jordan. This was an observational cross sectional study. It was carried out in the family practice clinic in Jordan University Hospital. The study included all postmenopausal osteoporotic women attending the clinic between June 2011 and May 2012, yielding a total of 326 subjects. The association between metabolic syndrome and serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Waist circumference, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting blood sugar were significantly higher among postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome, but HDL cholesterol was significantly lower (pmetabolic syndrome among all study participants was 42.9%. Triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among women deficiency or insufficiency (pmetabolic syndrome, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was 50.7%. Findings of the current study suggest a lack of relationship between serum vitamin D and metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between serum vitamin D levels and both serum triglycerides and LDL levels.

  9. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  10. Energy metabolism during activity-promoting video games practice in subjects with spinal cord injury: evidences for health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffurini, P; Bissolotti, L; Calza, S; Calabretto, C; Orizio, C; Gobbo, M

    2013-02-01

    Activity promoting video game (APVG) practice significantly affects energy metabolism through energy expenditure (EE) increase and has been recently included in strategies for health promotion. It is not known if the APVG practice provides similar outcomes in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI). Aim of the study was to evaluate cardio-pulmonary and metabolic adaptations during APVG practice and to find whether EE increase above resting condition could suggest the inclusion of this exercise in a more general strategy for health promotion and body weight control in subjects with SCI. Repeated measures study. Rehabilitation Institute. Ten male subjects with SCI (lesion levels from C7 to L1) age 26 to 55 years. We recorded pulmonary ventilation (VE), oxygen consumption (VO2) for EE esteem and heart rate (HR) at rest and while playing virtual bowling, tennis and boxing games using a portable metabolimeter equipped with ECG electrodes. The standard metabolic equivalent of task (METs) was calculated offline. The metabolic and functional parameters were referred to the 10th minute of each activity. Metabolic and functional parameters increased significantly from rest to bowling, tennis and boxing. METs exceeded in average 3 during boxing. One hour of APVG can increase daily EE by about 6% (bowling), 10% (tennis) and 15% (boxing). These considerable results suggest that physical exertion during APVG practice in subjects with SCI could contribute to health promotion as well as caloric balance control, especially when boxing is considered. This can be safely achieved at home with regular activity. These findings substantiate the potential for novel exercise modalities to counteract deconditioning due to inactivity in subjects with SCI by promoting physical activity through implementation of APVG exercise programs.

  11. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Blanchard Valley Health Systems, Findlay, Ohio (United States); Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar. Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona (Spain); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [AP-HP Hopital Henri-Mondor, Universite Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France); Maranzano, Ernesto [' S. Maria' Hospital, Terni (Italy); Liu, Rico [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Kam-Hung [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Lea-Choung [National University Cancer Institute (Singapore); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT){sub 3} receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  12. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying; Lutz, Stephen; Baardwijk, Angela van; Linden, Yvette van der; Holt, Tanya; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Maranzano, Ernesto; Liu, Rico; Wong, Kam-Hung; Wong, Lea-Choung; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Corn, Benjamin W.; De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT) 3 receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  13. Ethical Tensions Related to Systemic Constraints: Occupational Alienation in Occupational Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, Evelyne; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; McCorquodale, Lisa; Phelan, Shanon

    2016-09-03

    Ethical tensions arise daily in health care practice and are frequently related to health care system structures or policies. Collective case study methodology was adopted to examine ethical tensions reported by occupational therapists practicing in different settings in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Inductive analysis involving multiple layers of coding was conducted. This article focuses on tensions related to systemic constraints. Participants reported ethical tensions related to balancing client priorities with those of health care services. Four themes related to systemic constraints were identified including imposed practices, ineffective processes, resource limitations, and lack of services. Therapists' aims could be seen to align with an "ethic of care" and were seen to be in tension in light of systemic constraints. The findings raise issues related to occupational justice, particularly related to occupational alienation in occupational therapy practice, and open conversations related to neoliberalist health care agendas. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine; Terapia metabolica mediante radiofarmacos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  15. Transitioning From Occupational Therapy Student To Practicing Occupational Therapist: First Year of Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Randy P; Antanavage, Meredith E

    2017-04-01

    This research examined the transition from occupational therapy student to practicing occupational therapist over the course of one's first year of professional employment, as recalled by a sample of occupational therapists. Surveys were mailed to 500 occupational therapists randomly selected from membership in the American Occupational Therapy Association resulting in 202 returned surveys. Median year of graduation was 1998, ranging from 1967 to 2014. In general, respondents indicated the transition was positive. Having a mentor was related to high job satisfaction and good clinical fit, while supervising an occupational therapy assistant and low self-confidence were viewed as negative impact factors. Recent graduates presented with lower ratings of a positive transition and higher ratings of likelihood of experiencing burnout and initial job stress than earlier graduates. Recommendations for improving the transition experience are presented.

  16. A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Leighton J

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the effect that cross-gender sex steroid therapy has on metabolic and hormonal parameters. There is an emphasis on those changes that result in significant clinical effects such as the positive effects of the development of secondary sexual characteristics and negative effects such as haemostatic effects and thromboembolism in transwomen or dyslipidaemia in transmen. There is also a description of the current hormonal regimens used at the largest UK gender identity clinic. The overall safety of these treatments in the context of long-term outcome data is reviewed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Assessment of right ventricular oxidative metabolism by PET in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuti, Juhani; Naum, Alexandru; Stolen, Kira Q.; Kalliokoski, Riikka [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Sundell, Jan [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland); Engblom, Erik; Koistinen, Juhani; Airaksinen, K.E. Juhani [University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland); Ylitalo, Antti [Satakunta Central Hospital, Department of Medicine, Pori (Finland); Nekolla, Stephan G. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Munich (Germany); Bax, K.E. Jeroen J. [Leiden University, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) performance is known to have prognostic value in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) has been found to enhance left ventricular (LV) energetics and metabolic reserve in patients with heart failure. The interplay between the LV and RV may play an important role in CRT response. The purpose of the study was to investigate RV oxidative metabolism, metabolic reserve and the effects of CRT in patients with CHF and left bundle brach block. In addition, the role of the RV in the response to CRT was evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who had undergone implantation of a biventricular pacemaker 8{+-}5 months earlier were studied under two conditions: CRT ON and after CRT had been switched OFF for 24 h. Oxidative metabolism was measured using [{sup 11}C]acetate positron emission tomography (K{sub mono}). The measurements were performed at rest and during dobutamine-induced stress (5 {mu}g/kg per minute). LV performance and interventricular mechanical delay (interventricular asynchrony) were measured using echocardiography. CRT had no effect on RV K{sub mono} at rest (ON: 0.052{+-}0.014, OFF: 0.047{+-}0.018, NS). Dobutamine-induced stress increased RV K{sub mono} significantly under both conditions but oxidative metabolism was more enhanced when CRT was ON (0.076{+-}0.026 vs 0.065{+-}0.027, p=0.003). CRT shortened interventricular delay significantly (45{+-}33 vs 19{+-}35 ms, p=0.05). In five patients the response to CRT was striking (32% increase in mean LV stroke volume, range 18-36%), while in the other five patients no response was observed (mean change +2%, range -6% to +4%). RV K{sub mono} and LV stroke volume response to CRT correlated inversely (r=-0.66, p=0.034). None of the other measured parameters, including all LV parameters and electromechanical parameters, were associated with the response to CRT. In responders, RV K{sub mono} with CRT OFF was significantly lower

  18. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    with the disfiguring body-alterations known as HALS. More recently, however, regimens containing nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have attracted attention. Reviewing switch studies regarding metabolic parameters and body shape changes, certain trends emerge. Switching from PI, the metabolic...... complications such as dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance seem to be partly reversible, whereas the morphologic alterations appear to be unchanged. In studies in which NRTI's are switched, dyslipidaemia appears unaffected, but a modest improvement in peripheral lipoatrophy has been reported. However...

  19. Role for Occupational Therapy in Community Mental Health: Using Policy to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Lisa; Burson, Kathrine A; Januszewski, Celeste; Pitts, Deborah B; Preissner, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists must be aware of professional and policy trends. More importantly, occupational therapists must be involved in efforts to influence policy both for the profession and for the people they serve (Bonder, 1987). Using the state of Illinois as an example, this article reviews the policies and initiatives that impact service decisions for persons with psychiatric disabilities as well as the rationale for including occupational therapy in community mental health service provision. Despite challenges in building a workforce of occupational therapists in the mental health system, this article makes the argument that the current climate of emerging policy and litigation combined with the supporting evidence provides the impetus to strengthen mental health as a primary area of practice. Implications for scholarship of practice related to occupational therapy services in community mental health programs for individuals with psychiatric disability are discussed.

  20. Practical Fluid Therapy and Treatment Modalities for Field Conditions for Horses and Foals with Gastrointestinal Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, C Langdon

    2018-04-01

    With advances in technology and owner education, field management in equine veterinary medicine continues to evolve. Equine gastrointestinal disease is one of the most common types of emergencies evaluated by equine practitioners, and many of these patients can be effectively managed in the field. Although the equine veterinarian must make numerous decisions, fluid therapy, pain management, and antimicrobial use are 3 of the major choices that must be addressed when initiating field treatment of equine gastrointestinal disease. This article addresses the practical use of these 3 treatment categories that are essential to field practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Process research on Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples: linking theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Paul S; Johnson, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this article is on the link among theory, process, and outcome in the practice of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples. We describe the EFT model of change and the EFT perspective on adult love as the reflection of underlying attachment processes. We outline the manner in which theory and research inform EFT interventions. This leads into a detailed review of the literature on the processes of change in EFT. We highlight the client responses and therapist operations that have emerged from process research and their relation to treatment outcomes. We discuss the implications of this body of research for clinical practice and training. © FPI, Inc.

  2. The down syndrome behavioral phenotype: implications for practice and research in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunhauer, Lisa A; Fidler, Deborah J

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Down syndrome (DS) is the most common chromosomal cause of intellectual disability. The genetic causes of DS are associated with characteristic outcomes, such as relative strengths in visual-spatial skills and relative challenges in motor planning. This profile of outcomes, called the DS behavioral phenotype, may be a critical tool for intervention planning and research in this population. In this article, aspects of the DS behavioral phenotype potentially relevant to occupational therapy practice are reviewed. Implications and challenges for etiology-informed research and practice are discussed.

  3. Factors related to coping strategies during Japanese physical therapy students' clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Daisuke; Echigo, Ayumi

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify social skills and support that are related to the coping strategies Janpanese physical therapy students use during their clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Third-year students who were finished with their clinical practice participated. Self-administered questionnaires were used, including the daily life skill scale, social support scale, and tri-axial coping scale. Spearman's partial correlation coefficients were calculated between social skills, support of daily living, and coping strategies used during the clinical practice, while controlling for gender. [Results] A total of 56 completed questionnaires (median of age: 21 years; 27 males). Social skills during personal situations-knowledge summarization, self-esteem, and positive thinking-were significantly, positively correlated with planning and affirmative interpreting strategies to approach stressors regarding clinical practice, and negatively related to giving up strategies to avoid stressors. Intimacy, leadership, and empathy (social skills during interpersonal situations) were significantly, positively correlated with the following responses to approach stressors: catharsis, information gathering, and affirmative interpreting. Moreover, emotional/companionship social support was significantly, positively correlated with all avoidant coping strategies. [Conclusion] Japanese physical therapy students who had low personal and interpersonal social skills and excess emotional/companionship support in daily life tend to select avoidance, not approach, coping strategies during clinical practice.

  4. Influence of thyroid metabolism on radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Einfluss der Stoffwechsellage auf die Radioiodtherapie beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Weckesser, M.; Boy, C.; Schmidt, D.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik]|[Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin

    1997-12-01

    Radioiodine therapy is one of two definitive methods of treatment in Graves` disease beside near-total thyreoidectomy. Simple strategies like optimization of thyroid metabolism help to improve efficacy in radioiodine therapy thus lowering applied radioiodine doses, radiation exposure to the patient and to the environment and avoiding multiple vain therapeutic efforts. These strategies are likely to reduce costs at the same time. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Radioiodtherapie ist eine der beiden definitiven Therapiemethoden bei Morbus Basedow neben der nahezu totalen Thyreoidektomie. Ziel ist es, mit einfachen Methoden wie der optimalen Einstellung der Stoffwechsellage die Effizienz der Radioiodtherapie zu optimieren im Hinblick auf eine Reduktion der einzusetzenden Aktivitaet, der Gesamtstrahlenexposition fuer Patient und Umwelt und durch Vermeidung mehrfacher, vergeblicher therapeutischer Ansaetze. Diese Optimierung traegt auch zur Reduktion der Gesamtkrankheitskosten bei. (orig.)

  5. Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Brief Behavioral Activation Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Balán, Iván C.; Lejuez, C. W.; Hoffer, Marcela; Blanco, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral Activation and specifically the Brief Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depression (BATD) has a strong record of empirical support but its focus on practical out of session activation-based assignments can lead to poor levels of adherence if efforts to enhance motivation are not prioritized. Towards this end, this manuscript describes the assimilative integration of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and BATD to improve clinical outcomes by integrating MI's focus on building and mainta...

  6. An investigation into the relevance of gamelan music to the practice of music therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Loth, Helen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the use of Indonesian gamelan with participants who have special needs or with special populations, and considers what the playing of gamelan music has to offer music therapy practice. The gamelan is an ensemble of instruments on which the traditional music of Indonesia is played, consisting of mainly tuned and un-tuned percussion instruments tuned to four, five or seven tone scales. Gamelan are being increasingly used for music activities with participants who have sp...

  7. [Rational antibiotic therapy in the dental office: Practical guidelines for decision-making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y

    2016-04-01

    Although most dental and periodontal diseases are caused by bacteria, the usual therapy is mechanical/surgical rather than antimicrobial medications. However, sometimes antibiotic administration may be necessary in addition to or as an alternative to the surgical/mechanical treatment. Many studies have shown that the misuse of antibiotics by dentists may be mostly attributed to unnecessity or inefficient regimen, and could contribute to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The article presents practical guidelines to the administration of antibiotics in the dental office.

  8. Plasma metabolic changes in Chinese HIV-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir based treatment: Implications for HIV precision therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolin; Wu, Tong; Jiang, Yongjun; Zhang, Zining; Han, Xiaoxu; Geng, Wenqing; Ding, Haibo; Kang, Jing; Wang, Qi; Shang, Hong

    2018-05-16

    The goal of this study is to profile the metabolic changes in the plasma of HIV patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) relative to their treatment-naïve phase, aimed to identify precision therapy for HIV for improving prognosis and predicting dyslipidemia caused by LPV/r. 38 longitudinal plasma samples were collected from 19 HIV-infected patients both before and after antiretroviral therapy, and 18 samples from healthy individuals were used as controls. Untargeted metabolomics profiling of these plasma samples was performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 331 compounds of known identity were detected among these metabolites, a 67-metabolite signature mainly mapping to tryptophan, histidine, acyl carnitine, ketone bodies and fatty acid metabolism distinguished HIV patients from healthy controls. The levels of 19 out of the 67 altered metabolites including histidine, kynurenine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), recovered after LPV/r-based antiretroviral therapy, and histidine was positively correlated with the presence of CD4 + T lymphocytes. Furthermore, using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, we discovered that butyrylcarnitine in combination with myristic acid from plasma in treatment-naïve patients could predict dyslipidemia caused by LPV/r with 87% accuracy. Metabolites alterations in treatment-naïve HIV patients may indicate an inflammatory, oxidative state and mitochondrial dysfunction that is permissive for disease progression. Histidine may provide a specific protective function for HIV patients. Besides, elevated fatty acids levels including butyrylcarnitine and myristic acid after infection may indicate patients at risk of suffering from dyslipidemia after LPV/r-based HAART. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Kristie; Wright, Caroline; Osborne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  10. Long-term interdisciplinary therapy decreases symptoms of binge eating disorder and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Paula Bresciani; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Poli, Vanessa Schoenardie; Sanches, Ricardo Badan; Silva, Stephan Garcia Andrade; Fidalgo, João Pedro Novo; Nascimento, Maythe Amaral; de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Caranti, Danielle Arisa

    2017-04-01

    Obesity-associated comorbidities greatly impact the quality and expectancy of life. Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most prevalent eating disorder and it is an important risk factor for obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). For these reasons, we aimed to assess the effect of an interdisciplinary therapy on the symptoms of BED and the prevalence of MetS in obese adults. It was hypothesized that the interdisciplinary therapy would decrease symptoms of BED and markers of MetS. Twenty-four volunteers (BMI 34.80±3.17 kg/m 2 ; 41.21±6.28 years old) completed a 32-week intervention. Biochemical characteristics, body composition, the degree of symptoms of binge eating, and macronutrients, and sodium consumption pre- and post-treatment were determined. The prevalence of MetS dropped from 75% to 45.8%, post-therapy. Among the markers of MetS, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased significantly, whereas high-density lipoprotein levels increased. Fasting plasma glucose, diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides did not change. Based on binge-eating scale (BES) scores, before therapy, 33.3% of volunteers were classified as moderate bingers, and after therapy all volunteers were classified as having no BED symptoms. No difference in the prevalence of MetS between individuals classified as normal or moderate bingers was observed, but we found a positive post-therapy correlation between the BES score and body fat, gynoid fat and trunk fat. Sodium, fat, and carbohydrate consumption decreased. Protein intake did not change. In conclusion, the interdisciplinary approach was efficient in reducing symptoms of BED and MetS prevalence in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention practices in patients with candidacy for anticoagulation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, I.; Ahmad, S.; Hayat, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke secondary to Atrial Fibrillation is usually due to thrombi formed in the left atrium and left atrial appendage embolizing to cause ischemic stroke. Therefore, in patients with Atrial Fibrillation, antithrombotic therapy is recommended to prevent stroke. Vitamin K antagonist therapy is most widely used antithrombotic therapy for patients with valvular and non valvular AF. Aspirin is recommended only in low risk patients. This study was conducted to determine the stroke prevention practices in local patients with atrial fibrillation who were candidates for anticoagulation therapy. Method: This was descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Cardiovascular Department Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar and Cardiology Department Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar. Sampling technique was non probability consecutive. Patients visiting OPD of respective hospitals with EKG evidence of AF and having CHADES VASC score 2 or more or having mitral stenosis and AF were included in the study. Patients with additional indications for anticoagulation were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 205 patients with atrial fibrillation were studied. Mean age was 60.7±14.7 years. Male were 55.6 percentage (n=114) while 44.4 percentage (n=91) were female. Of these 149 (72.7 percentage) were candidates for anticoagulation based on CHA2DS2 VASc score of 2 and more or mitral stenosis with AF. Only 27.5 percentage (n=41) patients were adequately treated with anticoagulant therapy using VKA or novel oral anticoagulant drugs. Majority of them were getting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Conclusion: Most patients with AF and high risk characteristics for thromboembolism are not receiving proper stroke prevention therapies. (author)

  12. Still Subversive after All These Years: The Relevance of Feminist Therapy in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura S.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, based on my Carolyn Wood Sherif Memorial Award Address, I address questions of the viability of feminist practice in the current zeitgeist. Using the framework of responding to questions raised by doctoral students about feminist therapy, I address how feminist practice aligns with the evidence-based practice movement,…

  13. A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines' Recommendations on Levothyroxine Therapy Alone versus Combination Therapy (LT4 plus LT3) for Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Eyal; Farahani, Pendar

    2015-12-04

    Patients with hypothyroidism are increasingly enquiring about the benefit of using combination therapy of levothyroxine (LT4) and liothyronine (LT3) as a potential treatment for hypothyroidism. Combination therapy, however, remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to systematically review available hypothyroidism treatment recommendations from clinical practice guidelines from around the world to identify the consensus regarding combination therapy. Clinical practice guidelines were obtained from searches of PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE, using several combinations of MeSH terms. The search was limited to clinical guidelines in English-language publications, published between January 1, 1990 and May 1, 2015. A quantitative approach was utilized for data synthesis. Thirteen guidelines were identified, including three regarding pregnancy, two regarding pediatric populations and eight regarding adult populations. There were six guidelines from North America, four guidelines from Europe and three guidelines from South America. Twelve of the guidelines were published after 2010. Nine guidelines addressed combination therapy of LT4 plus LT3, and all nine concluded that LT4 therapy alone is the standard of care, with insufficient evidence to recommend widespread combination therapy. Only the 2012 ETA Guidelines and the 2015 BTA Guidelines concluded that combination therapy could be used, although only in certain circumstances and as an experimental treatment. This systematic review illustrates that clinical practice guidelines worldwide do not recommend and do not support routine use of combination LT4 and LT3 therapy to treat hypothyroidism.

  14. Prediction of work metabolism from heart rate measurements in forest work: some practical methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubeau, Denise; Auger, Isabelle; Leone, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Individual heart rate (HR) to workload relationships were determined using 93 submaximal step-tests administered to 26 healthy participants attending physical activities in a university training centre (laboratory study) and 41 experienced forest workers (field study). Predicted maximum aerobic capacity (MAC) was compared to measured MAC from a maximal treadmill test (laboratory study) to test the effect of two age-predicted maximum HR Equations (220-age and 207-0.7 × age) and two clothing insulation levels (0.4 and 0.91 clo) during the step-test. Work metabolism (WM) estimated from forest work HR was compared against concurrent work V̇O2 measurements while taking into account the HR thermal component. Results show that MAC and WM can be accurately predicted from work HR measurements and simple regression models developed in this study (1% group mean prediction bias and up to 25% expected prediction bias for a single individual). Clothing insulation had no impact on predicted MAC nor age-predicted maximum HR equations. Practitioner summary: This study sheds light on four practical methodological issues faced by practitioners regarding the use of HR methodology to assess WM in actual work environments. More specifically, the effect of wearing work clothes and the use of two different maximum HR prediction equations on the ability of a submaximal step-test to assess MAC are examined, as well as the accuracy of using an individual's step-test HR to workload relationship to predict WM from HR data collected during actual work in the presence of thermal stress.

  15. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse – theoretical, practical and analytical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Roger Speakman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterisation of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequalae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyser, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers per analyser. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use ANCOVA with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  16. Grapes (Vitis vinifera) as a Potential Candidate for the Therapy of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaberi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Hosein

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with several disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia as well as cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Plant-derived polyphenols, compounds found in numerous plant species, play an important role as potential treatments for components of metabolic syndrome. Studies have provided evidence for protective effects of various polyphenol-rich foods against metabolic syndrome. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, nuts, and berries are rich in polyphenolic compounds. Grapes (Vitis vinifera), especially grape seeds, stand out as rich sources of polyphenol potent antioxidants and have been reported helpful for inhibiting the risk factors involved in the metabolic syndrome such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. There are also many studies about gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anti-obesity effects of grape polyphenolic compounds especially proanthocyanidins in the literature. The present study investigates the protective effects of grape seeds in metabolic syndrome. The results of this study show that grape polyphenols have significant effects on the level of blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, as well as beneficial activities in liver and heart with various mechanisms. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of grape polyphenols is discussed. More detailed mechanistic investigations and phytochemical studies for finding the exact bioactive component(s) and molecular signaling pathways are suggested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Metabolic therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy in a dish: investigating mechanisms of ketogenic diet using electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Kawamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1 direct application of ketone bodies, (2 mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and (3 reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including ATP-sensitive potassium channels, vesicular glutamate transporter, pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy.

  18. Gene therapy for the circumvention of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) caused by single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the result of point mutations in nuclear (and mitochondrial) DNA. Such localised damage to DNA (and its replicative mechanisms) may not be excised fully by the DNA repair mechanism in the genome: and therefore can become inheritable; subsequently to manifest later as an inborn error of metabolism (IEM). Causes of mutagenic damage to the DNA can include background radiation (such as emitted by radon gas), and by reactive oxygen species (ROS): and also by mutagenic chemicals that occur naturally (inter alia in the diet). Other causes of DNA damage are variable environmental hazards such as solar-derived short wave ultraviolet light A. Gene therapy involves the placement of missing genes into particular tissues by the harnessing of suitable vectors (originally these were animal viruses such as SV40). For example, gene therapy in the rat for diabetes has succeeded by liver-production of insulin (using genes obtained from pancreatic Islets of Langerhans cells). Many inborn errors of metabolism could be treated in this way: examples may include 100 haemoglobinopathies (such as sickle cell anaemia), phenylketonuria; and other diseases caused by lack of tissue-production of a particular enzyme (in its catalytically-active conformation).

  19. Beyond anorexia -cachexia. Nutrition and modulation of cancer patients' metabolism: supplementary, complementary or alternative anti-neoplastic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Seelaender, Marilia; Sanchez-Lara, Karla; Gioulbasanis, Ioannis; Molfino, Alessio; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo

    2011-09-01

    Anorexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in cancer patients and influence their clinical outcome. The better understanding of the mechanisms underlying behavioral changes and altered metabolism yielded to the development of specialized nutritional support, which enhances utilization of provided calories and proteins by counteracting some of the metabolic derangements occurring during tumor growth. Inflammation appears to be a key factor determining the cancer-associated biochemical abnormalities eventually leading to anorexia and cachexia. Interestingly, inflammation is also involved in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis by impairing immune surveillance, among other mechanisms. Therefore, nutritional interventions aiming at modulating inflammation to restore nutritional status may also result in improved response to pharmacological anti-cancer therapies. Recent clinical data show that supplementation with nutrients targeting inflammation and immune system increases response rate and survival in cancer patients. This suggests that nutrition therapy should be considered as an important adjuvant strategy in the multidimensional approach to cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic Therapy for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in a Dish: Investigating Mechanisms of Ketogenic Diet using Electrophysiological Recordings in Hippocampal Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masahito Jr.; Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1) direct application of ketone bodies; (2) mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique; and (3) reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT), pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy. PMID:27847463

  1. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Methods Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Results Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). Conclusion After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:26636578

  2. Carnitine therapy for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease: evidence and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johri, A M; Heyland, D K; Hétu, M-F; Crawford, B; Spence, J D

    2014-08-01

    As the incidence of metabolic syndrome increases, there is also a growing interest in finding safe and inexpensive treatments to help lower associated risk factors. L-carntine, a natural dietary supplement with the potential to ameliorate atherosclerosis, has been the subject of recent investigation and controversy. A majority of studies have shown benefit of L-C supplementation in the metabolic syndrome or cardiovascular risk factors. However, recent work has suggested that dietary L-C may accelerate atherosclerosis via gut microbiota metabolites, complicating the role of L-C supplementation in health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/P-selectin interactions as a novel therapy for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Madhukar S; Miranda-Nieves, David; Chen, Jiaxuan; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2017-05-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome continue to pose an important public health challenge worldwide as they significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of this process has identified that chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role. In this regard, given that both animal models and human studies have demonstrated that the interaction of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) with P-selectin is not only critical for normal immune response but also is upregulated in the setting of metabolic syndrome, PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions provide a novel target for preventing and treating resultant disease. Current approaches of interfering with PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions include targeted antibodies, recombinant immunoglobulins that competitively bind P-selectin, and synthetic molecular therapies. Experimental models as well as clinical trials assessing the role of these modalities in a variety of diseases have continued to contribute to the understanding of PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions and have demonstrated the difficulty in creating clinically relevant therapeutics. Most recently, however, computational simulations have further enhanced our understanding of the structural features of PSGL-1 and related glycomimetics, which are responsible for high-affinity selectin interactions. Leveraging these insights for the design of next generation agents has thus led to development of a promising synthetic method for generating PSGL-1 glycosulfopeptide mimetics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6-18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10-60 ml/min/1.73 m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity.

  5. Long-term effect of yogic practices on diurnal metabolic rates of healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaya M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The metabolic rate is an indicator of autonomic activity. Reduced sympathetic arousal probably resulting in hypometabolic states has been reported in several yogic studies. Aim: The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of yoga training on diurnal metabolic rates in yoga practitioners at two different times of the day (at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.. Methods and Material: Eighty eight healthy volunteers were selected and their metabolic rates assessed at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. using an indirect calorimeter at a yoga school in Bangalore, India. Results and conclusions: The results show that the average metabolic rate of the yoga group was 12% lower than that of the non-yoga group ( P < 0.001 measured at 9 p.m. and 16% lower at 6 a.m. ( P < 0.001. The 9 p.m. metabolic rates of the yoga group were almost equal to their predicted basal metabolic rates (BMRs whereas the metabolic rate was significantly higher than the predicted BMR for the non-yoga group. The 6 a.m. metabolic rate was comparable to their predicted BMR in the non-yoga group whereas it was much lower in the yoga group ( P < 0.001. The lower metabolic rates in the yoga group at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. may be due to coping strategies for day-to-day stress, decreased sympathetic nervous system activity and probably, a stable autonomic nervous system response (to different stressors achieved due to training in yoga.

  6. Long-term effect of yogic practices on diurnal metabolic rates of healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaya M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The metabolic rate is an indicator of autonomic activity. Reduced sympathetic arousal probably resulting in hypometabolic states has been reported in several yogic studies. Aim : The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of yoga training on diurnal metabolic rates in yoga practitioners at two different times of the day (at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.. Materials and Methods : Eighty eight healthy volunteers were selected and their metabolic rates assessed at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. using an indirect calorimeter at a yoga school in Bangalore, India. Results and conclusions: The results show that the average metabolic rate of the yoga group was 12% lower than that of the non-yoga group ( P < 0.001 measured at 9 p.m. and 16% lower at 6 a.m. ( P < 0.001. The 9 p.m. metabolic rates of the yoga group were almost equal to their predicted basal metabolic rates (BMRs whereas the metabolic rate was significantly higher than the predicted BMR for the non-yoga group. The 6 a.m. metabolic rate was comparable to their predicted BMR in the non-yoga group whereas it was much lower in the yoga group ( P < 0.001. The lower metabolic rates in the yoga group at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. may be due to coping strategies for day-to-day stress, decreased sympathetic nervous system activity and probably, a stable autonomic nervous system response (to different stressors achieved due to training in yoga.

  7. Occupational therapy students' contribution to occasions of service during practice placements in health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Stephens, Elizabeth; Clark, Michele; Ash, Susan; Graves, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Currently in the Australian higher education sector, the productivity benefits of occupational therapy clinical education placements are a contested issue. This article will report results of a study that developed a methodology for documenting time use during placements and investigated the productivity changes associated with occupational therapy clinical education placements in Queensland, Australia. Supervisors' and students' time use during placements and how this changed for supervisors compared to pre- and post-placement is also presented. Using a cohort survey design, participants were students from two Queensland universities, and their supervisors employed by Queensland Health. Time use was recorded in 30 minute blocks according to particular categories. There was a significant increase in supervisors' time spent in patient care activities (F = 94.011(2,12.37 df) , P increasing between pre- and during placement (P = 0.028). There was a significant decrease in supervisors' time spent in placement activities (F = 5.133(2,19.18 df) , P = 0.016) from during to post-placement. Students spent more time than supervisors in patient care activities while on placement. A novel method for reporting productivity and time-use changes during clinical education programs for occupational therapy has been applied. Supervisors spent considerable time in assessing and managing students and their clinical education role should be seen as core business in standard occupational therapy practice. This paper will contribute to future assessments of the economic impact of student placements for allied health disciplines. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  9. Sick leave and disability pension before and after initiation of antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neovius, M; Simard, J F; Klareskog, L; Askling, J

    2011-08-01

    To investigate sick leave and disability pension in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to the initiation of biological and non-biological antirheumatic therapies in clinical practice. Patients aged 19-60 years initiating non-biological mono (n=2796) or combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy (n=973), or biological agents (n=4787) were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register between 1999 and 2007. Sick leave and disability pension data (1995-2010) were retrieved from national registers. During the year before the start of mono DMARD, combination DMARD and biological treatment, 10%, 12% and 43% of patients received disability pension benefits, respectively. The corresponding combined annual sick leave and disability pension days were 78 (54+25), 132 (105+27) and 190 (79+111). Irrespective of treatment type, initiators were characterised by a history of increasing sick leave and disability pension. Treatment start was associated with a break in this trajectory: sick leave decreased while disability pension increased, resulting in a net stabilisation of total days. Higher levels of days on sick leave and disability pension at treatment start were observed in patients initiating biologics in 1999 (236 days/year) compared with 2007 (150 days/year; ppension increased rapidly before the initiation of antirheumatic therapy, which was associated with a halt but not a reversal of this development. Work ability is a metric of importance for clinical practice, signalling large remaining needs in the RA population, and the need for intervention earlier in the disease process.

  10. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice.

  11. Magneto-laser-ultrasonic therapy. Scientific materials used in practice. V.4(1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samosyuk, I.Z.; Chukhraev, N.V.; Myasnikov, V.G.; Samosyuk, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Contemporary data about the use of magnetotherapy, ultrasound and magnetolaser therapy in resonance energy ranges are presented in this book. Practical methodics of simultaneous and combined use of these physical factors in different branches of clinical medicine (neurology, cardiology, gastroenterology and others) are described. General idea of biological rhythms is given and it is considered as a background of living systems development. Biorhythms are used for determination of 'biological resonance', the optimum correlation between vibrations of the organism and external ones. In such a way the best results of treatment are achieved. Modern principles of the sensitive zone choice, bases of biorhythmic and resonance phenomena are presented. Practical uses of them became more and more important in physiotherapy and acupuncture. Human biological rhythms are taken into consideration during bioresonance treatment. Features of each treatment method are described. Reactions of different organism systems (nervous, hearth and vessel, bone, respiratory systems, internal secretion) on magnetic field influence, obtained treatment effects of magnetotherapy and possible mistakes in treatment are discussed. Special advices on the use of ultrasound therapy and magnetotherapy are given. The most part of magneto-laser-ultrasound therapy uses refers to the new generation of series 'MIT' and 'MIT-11' apparat which combine all three treatment factors

  12. Urine metabonomic profiling of a female adolescent with PIT-1 mutation before and during growth hormone therapy: insights into the metabolic effects of growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Rahman, Shaffinaz; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Lichanska, Agnieszka M; Huynh, Tony; Leong, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone with important roles in growth and metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the metabolism of a human subject with severe GH deficiency (GHD) due to a PIT-1 gene mutation and the metabolic effects of GH therapy using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics. NMR-based metabonomics is a platform that allows the metabolic profile of biological fluids such as urine to be recorded, and any alterations in the profile modulated by GH can potentially be detected. Urine samples were collected from a female subject with severe GHD before, during and after GH therapy, and from healthy age- and sex-matched controls and analysed with NMR-based metabonomics. The samples were collected at a hospital and the study was performed at a research facility. We studied a 17 year old female adolescent with severe GHD secondary to PIT-1 gene mutation who had reached final adult height and who had ceased GH therapy for over 3 years. The subject was subsequently followed for 5 years with and without GH therapy. Twelve healthy age-matched female subjects acted as control subjects. The GH-deficient subject re-commenced GH therapy at a dose of 1 mg/day to normalise serum IGF-1 levels. Urine metabolic profiles were recorded using NMR spectroscopy and analysed with multivariate statistics to distinguish the profiles at different time points and identify significant metabolites affected by GH therapy. NMR-based metabonomics revealed that the metabolic profile of the GH-deficient subject altered with GH therapy and that her profile was different from healthy controls before, and during withdrawal of GH therapy. This study illustrates the potential use of NMR-based metabonomics for monitoring the effects of GH therapy on metabolism by profiling the urine of GH-deficient subjects. Further controlled studies in larger numbers of GH-deficient subjects are required to determine the clinical benefits of NMR-based metabonomics in

  13. Towards inclusive occupational therapy: Introducing the CORE approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Robert B

    2017-12-01

    Occupation is a human right and a social determinant of health. It is also taken for granted. Having access to, and participating in, occupation, is intricately linked to positive health and wellbeing. Despite theory and evidence to support the link between occupation, health and wellbeing, occupational therapists can struggle with applying an occupation focus in practice and knowing how to use occupational frameworks to enable occupation. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Capabilities, Opportunities, Resources and Environments (CORE) approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice. It provides occupational therapists with a means of operationalising occupational enablement and facilitating social inclusion. The CORE approach is introduced by linking its main ideas to Economist and Nobel Prize Laureate Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, as well as findings from the author's doctoral research into entrenched disadvantage and social inclusion. Practical questions guided by the CORE approach's acronym are given to explore how the approach can be utilised alongside other occupational models and frameworks to encourage strategies for effective enablement through occupation for social inclusion. As experts in enabling occupation, occupational therapists can use the CORE approach to design occupation-focused interventions and promote inclusive occupational therapy. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  14. International experts' practice in the antibiotic therapy of infective endocarditis is not following the guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot-Dupont, H; Casalta, J P; Gouriet, F; Hubert, S; Salaun, E; Habib, G; Fernandez-Gerlinger, M P; Mainardi, J L; Tattevin, P; Revest, M; Lucht, F; Botelho-Nevers, E; Gagneux-Brunon, A; Snygg-Martin, U; Chan, K L; Bishara, J; Vilacosta, I; Olmos, C; San Román, J A; López, J; Tornos, P; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Durante-Mangoni, E; Utili, R; Paul, M; Baddour, L M; DeSimone, D C; Sohail, M R; Steckelberg, J M; Wilson, W R; Raoult, D

    2017-10-01

    The management of infective endocarditis (IE) may differ from international guidelines, even in reference centres. This is probably because most recommendations are not based on hard evidence, so the consensus obtained for the guidelines does not represent actual practices. For this reason, we aimed to evaluate this question in the particular field of antibiotic therapy. Thirteen international centres specialized in the management of IE were selected, according to their reputation, clinical results, original research publications and quotations. They were asked to detail their actual practice in terms of IE antibiotic treatment in various bacteriological and clinical situations. They were also asked to declare their IE-related in-hospital mortality for the year 2015. The global compliance with guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy was 58%, revealing the differences between theoretical 'consensus', local recommendations and actual practice. Some conflicts of interest were also probably expressed. The adherence to guidelines was 100% when the protocol was simple, and decreased with the seriousness of the situation (Staphylococus spp. 54%-62%) or in blood-culture-negative endocarditis (0%-15%) that requires adaptation to clinical and epidemiological data. Worldwide experts in IE management, although the majority of them were involved and co-signed the guidelines, do not follow international consensus guidelines on the particular point of the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of practice and of technical modifications on acute morbidity after prostate curie-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fur, E.; Malhaire, J.P.; Pradier, O.; Valeri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a cohort of 150 patients treated by curie-therapy for a prostate cancer, the authors report the analysis of the influence of some technical modifications (use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of a second period, and of a high frequency echographic probe during a third period) on the urinary toxicity. This toxicity has been assessed by using the urinary retention rate, and the difference between the maximum and initial International Prostate Symptom Score (IPPS). Rectal morbidity has been scaled according to a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. It appears that the occurrence of urinary retention after prostate radiotherapy decreases with practice and use of the automatic stepper. It seems that there is no impact on urinary morbidity (urinary retention excluded) nor on rectal morbidity. Short communication

  16. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Radiation Therapy: Radiobiological Principles and Current Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia, though by itself generally non-curative for cancer, can significantly increase the efficacy of radiation therapy, as demonstrated by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical results. Its limited use in the clinic is mainly due to various practical implementation difficulties, the most important being how to adequately heat the tumor, especially deep-seated ones. In this work, we first review the effects of hyperthermia on tissue, the limitations of radiation therapy and the radiobiological rationale for combining the two treatment modalities. Subsequently, we review the theory and evidence for magnetic hyperthermia that is based on magnetic nanoparticles, its advantages compared with other methods of hyperthermia, and how it can be used to overcome the problems associated with traditional techniques of hyperthermia.

  17. Intergenerational service learning: to promote active aging, and occupational therapy gerontology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Beverly P; Wong, Stephanie Dapice; Dechello, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Americans are living longer, and the meaning of age has changed, particularly for Boomers and seniors. These demographic changes have economic and social ramifications with implications for health care, including rehabilitation services, and health science education. Service learning is an experiential learning pedagogy that integrates traditional higher education with structured active learning experiences. This article reports on one intergenerational service learning program spanning 3 years. It was designed to facilitate community dialogue on fall prevention and active aging, and to provide intergenerational educational community-based experiences in occupational therapy professional education. The program additionally sought to promote students' understanding of aging and issues related to aging in place, students' professional development and civic engagement, and to encourage students to consider pursuing a career in occupational therapy gerontology practice.

  18. Local ablation therapy with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for hepatocellular carcinoma: a practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A successful program for local ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC requires extensive imaging support for diagnosis and localization of HCC, imaging guidance for the ablation procedures, and post-treatment monitoring. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS has several advantages over computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI, including real-time imaging capability, sensitive detection of arterial-phase hypervascularity and washout, no renal excretion, no ionizing radiation, repeatability, excellent patient compliance, and relatively low cost. CEUS is useful for image guidance for isoechoic lesions. While contrast-enhanced CT/MRI is the standard method for the diagnosis of HCC and post-ablation monitoring, CEUS is useful when CT/MRI findings are indeterminate or CT/MRI is contraindicated. This article provides a practical review of the role of CEUS in imaging algorithms for pre- and post-ablation therapy for HCC.

  19. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Weight loss as the cornerstone in the therapy of metabolic syndrome in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the last decade, the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MS and obesity is being actively discussed. An early detection of fat metabolism violations and treatment of healthy adolescents is an important component of primary prevention of metabolic syndrome. The aim of the study was to examine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of obesity in adolescents and to estimate the effectiveness of primary prevention of metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The medical forms 026/o Medical record of a child (for pre-school and general educational institutions of 656 adolescents aged 16–18 years, who study at HSEI of Ukraine Bukovinian State Medical University colleges within 2014–2016 years were analyzed. According to the result of the analysis, a study group was formed of 50 teenagers with overweight and obesity. The violation of fat metabolism was verified using percentile tables: BMI within 85–95 percentile was estimated as overweight, above 95 percentile — as obesity. In addition, there were analyzed of 67 medical records of inpatients adolescents who were treated for obesity in the Department of Endocrinology of the Chernivtsi Regional Children’s Hospital in the period from 2006 to 2016. There analyze such laboratory parameters as the levels of cholesterol, thyroid hormones, blood glucose fasting test and glucose tolerance test, levels of elastase-1 in feces, and the results of additional research tool. There was formed a clinical group of 20 adolescent parents who underwent a range of measures, including a complete exclusion of easily digestible refined carbohydrates from daily meals, a certain amount of physical activity, correction of day regimen. Results. The analysis of medical records of 656 teenagers data showed a violation of physical development in 50 (7.6 % patients, including excess body weight in 28 (56 %, obesity in 22 (44 % persons. Half of examined patients with

  1. Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT): Tool for the Purposeful Practice of Clinical Reasoning in Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah E; Painter, Elizabeth E; Morgan, Brandon C; Kaus, Anna L; Petersen, Evan J; Allen, Christopher S; Deyle, Gail D; Jensen, Gail M

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential to physical therapist practice. Solid clinical reasoning processes may lead to greater understanding of the patient condition, early diagnostic hypothesis development, and well-tolerated examination and intervention strategies, as well as mitigate the risk of diagnostic error. However, the complex and often subconscious nature of clinical reasoning can impede the development of this skill. Protracted tools have been published to help guide self-reflection on clinical reasoning but might not be feasible in typical clinical settings. This case illustrates how the Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT) tool can be used to guide the clinical reasoning process and prompt a physical therapist to search the literature to answer a clinical question and facilitate formal mentorship sessions in postprofessional physical therapist training programs. The SCRIPT tool enabled the mentee to generate appropriate hypotheses, plan the examination, query the literature to answer a clinical question, establish a physical therapist diagnosis, and design an effective treatment plan. The SCRIPT tool also facilitated the mentee's clinical reasoning and provided the mentor insight into the mentee's clinical reasoning. The reliability and validity of the SCRIPT tool have not been formally studied. Clinical mentorship is a cornerstone of postprofessional training programs and intended to develop advanced clinical reasoning skills. However, clinical reasoning is often subconscious and, therefore, a challenging skill to develop. The use of a tool such as the SCRIPT may facilitate developing clinical reasoning skills by providing a systematic approach to data gathering and making clinical judgments to bring clinical reasoning to the conscious level, facilitate self-reflection, and make a mentored physical therapist's thought processes explicit to his or her clinical mentor. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  2. Work participation of patients with musculoskeletal disorders: is this addressed in physical therapy practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Wiebke; Hutting, Nathan; Engels, Josephine A; Bart Staal, J; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Heerkens, Yvonne F

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the main complaints for visiting a physical therapist (PT) in primary health care; they have a negative effect on an individual's quality of life and result in a major cost to society. Qualitative research has shown that physical therapists (PTs) treating patients with these disorders experience barriers in the integration of occupational factors within their practice, and also revealed a lack of cooperation between PTs and (other) occupational healthcare providers. The aim of this study is to quantitatively investigate how generalist PTs in the Netherlands, who treat patients with musculoskeletal disorders, currently integrate occupational factors within their practice, and to identify their opinions and needs with regard to enhancing the integration of the patient's work within physical therapy practice. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among generalist PTs who treat working-age (18-67 years) patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Generalist PTs were contacted for participation via digital news-mails and asked to fill out an online survey which was developed based on the results of a recent qualitative study. The survey consisted of: i) demographics of the participants, ii) questions on how generalist PTs currently integrate occupational factors within their practice, and iii) asked their opinion about the integration of occupational factors within physical therapy. The PTs were also asked about their needs with regard to the integration of occupational factors and with regard to cooperation with other (occupational) health professionals. All answers (using Likert scales) are presented as the number and percentage of the respondents reporting those specific answers, whereas all other answers are presented as means and standard deviations. Of the 142 respondents, 64% indicated that occupational factors should be addressed to a greater extent within physical therapy. To have the possibility to bill for a workplace assessment

  3. Neuropsychiatric and metabolic aspects of dopaminergic therapy: perspectives from an endocrinologist and a psychiatrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasoulia-Kaspar, Anastasia P; Popp, Kathrin H; Stalla, Gunter Karl

    2018-01-01

    The dopaminergic treatment represents the primary treatment in prolactinomas, which are the most common pituitary adenomas and account for about 40% of all pituitary tumours with an annual incidence of six to ten cases per million population. The dopaminergic treatment includes ergot and non-ergot derivatives with high affinity for the dopamine receptors D1 or/and D2. Through the activation of the dopaminergic pathway on pituitary lactotrophs, the dopamine agonists inhibit the prolactin synthesis and secretion, therefore normalizing the prolactin levels and restoring eugonadism, but they also lead to tumour shrinkage. Treatment with dopamine agonists has been associated – apart from the common side effects such as gastrointestinal symptoms, dizziness and hypotension – with neuropsychiatric side effects such as impulse control disorders (e.g. pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, hypersexuality and binge eating) and also with behavioral changes from low mood, irritability and verbal aggressiveness up to psychotic and manic symptoms and paranoid delusions not only in patients with prolactinomas but also in patients with Parkinson’s disease and restless leg syndrome. They usually have de novo onset after initiation of the dopaminergic treatment and have been mainly reported in patients with Parkinson’s disease, who are being treated with higher doses of dopamine agonists. Moreover, dopamine and prolactin seem to play an essential role in the metabolic pathway. Patients with hyperprolactinemia tend to have increased body weight and an altered metabolic profile with hyperinsulinemia and increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in comparison to healthy individuals and patients with non-functioning pituitary adenomas. Treatment with dopamine agonists in these patients in short-term studies seems to lead to weight loss and amelioration of the metabolic changes. Together these observations provide evidence that dopamine and prolactin have a crucial role both

  4. Natural molecules for the therapy of hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, V; Musacchio, M C; Bulfoni, A; Morgante, G; De Leo, V

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy of women of reproductive age and a complex endocrine condition, due to its heterogeneity and uncertainty about its etiology. However, PCOS is also associated with other metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes. There are few medications that are approved for the most common symptoms of PCOS, leading to the off-label use of medications that were approved for other indications. One of the most common medications being used off label for PCOS is metformin. Research of other effective therapeutic options has included the utility of inositol. A systematic literature search of PubMed was performed using the following combination of terms: 'PCOS', 'hyperandrogenism' 'inositol', 'natural molecules'. Only papers published between 2000 and 2016 were included in our analysis. The present review analyzes all aspects of the choice of natural molecules in the treatment of hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders in PCOS women. The rationale underlying the use of inositols as a therapeutic application in PCOS derives from their activities as insulin mimetic agents and their salutary effects on metabolism and hyperandrogenism without side effects. In this review will discuss the role of a number of natural associations between inositol and different substances in the treatment of hyperandrogenic symptoms in PCOS women.

  5. Metabolic therapy of thyroid by {sup 131}I and radiation protection; Therapie metabolique thyroidienne par {sup 131}I et radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, I.; Caussin, J.; Smeesters, P.; Wambersie, A.; Beckers, C. [Centre de Medecine Nucleaire, Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    The recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 60) to be applied in the European Union from the year 2000 imply a limit of the annual dose of 1 mSv for public as well as the compliance with the dose constraints. In order to verify the possibility of observing these new standards without losing the very favourable cost-profit of the {sup 131}I therapy in thyroiditis, 73 members of patient families treated by radioiodine were surveyed by direct dosimetry. A number of 22 patients afflicted with thyroid cancer received doses of 3700 to 7400 MBq and 18 hyperthyroid patients received 200 to 600 MBq. Dosemeters mounted around the neck were carried for 2-3 weeks by 35 spouses and 38 children 4 months to 25 years old. The residual thyroid radioactivity and the T{sub 1/2} of {sup 131}I were measured by gamma chambers in every patients. In the group of patients with thyroid cancers the effective T{sub 1/2} is 2.2 days. The doses measured in families are lower than 1 mSv in any spouses and lower than 0.3 mSv in all the children except one. In hyperthyroid patients the effective T{sub 1/2} is 6.2 days. The average dose received is 1.04 mSv (0.05-5.2) for spouses and 0.13 mSv (0.04-3.1) for children. These direct dosimetry data are reliable and allow to propose reasonable and efficient restrictions which will not compromise neither the efficiency of treatment or the environment safety

  6. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell Connections by Tunneling Nanotubes: Effects of Mitochondrial Trafficking on Target Cell Metabolism, Homeostasis, and Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communications play a major role in tissue homeostasis and responses to external cues. Novel structures for this communication have recently been described. These tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) consist of thin-extended membrane protrusions that connect cells together. TNTs allow the cell-to-cell transfer of various cellular components, including proteins, RNAs, viruses, and organelles, such as mitochondria. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are both naturally present and recruited to many different tissues where their interaction with resident cells via secreted factors has been largely documented. Their immunosuppressive and repairing capacities constitute the basis for many current clinical trials. MSCs recruited to the tumor microenvironment also play an important role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. MSCs are now the focus of intense scrutiny due to their capacity to form TNTs and transfer mitochondria to target cells, either in normal physiological or in pathological conditions, leading to changes in cell energy metabolism and functions, as described in this review. PMID:28659978

  8. Cell Connections by Tunneling Nanotubes: Effects of Mitochondrial Trafficking on Target Cell Metabolism, Homeostasis, and Response to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Luce Vignais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communications play a major role in tissue homeostasis and responses to external cues. Novel structures for this communication have recently been described. These tunneling nanotubes (TNTs consist of thin-extended membrane protrusions that connect cells together. TNTs allow the cell-to-cell transfer of various cellular components, including proteins, RNAs, viruses, and organelles, such as mitochondria. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are both naturally present and recruited to many different tissues where their interaction with resident cells via secreted factors has been largely documented. Their immunosuppressive and repairing capacities constitute the basis for many current clinical trials. MSCs recruited to the tumor microenvironment also play an important role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. MSCs are now the focus of intense scrutiny due to their capacity to form TNTs and transfer mitochondria to target cells, either in normal physiological or in pathological conditions, leading to changes in cell energy metabolism and functions, as described in this review.

  9. Model of iodine metabolism in a T3-thyrotoxic patient undergoing I-131 therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, S.; Price, R.; Brill, A. B.; Dobyns, B. M.; Berman, M.

    1975-06-01

    Data on radioactivity in the thyroid, urine, serum, butanol-extractable iodine (BEI) and chromatographic fractionations of BEI, obtained during four I-131 therapeutic treatments of a T3-thyrotoxic patient, have been analyzed and simulated with the help of a 7-compartment model. Good fits to most of the data can be obtained with both the dose-independent and dose-dependent models. A model with 3 or 4 compartments, which provides adequate fits to iodine kinetic data in most euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients is not satisfactory in the case of this patient. Thus, to represent iodine metabolism during T3-thyrotoxicosis therapy, we find that it is necessary to provide for separate biochemical pathways for the BEI components as well as the butanol-insoluble compounds released by the thyroid gland. (auth)

  10. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop…

  11. A Controlled Trial of CPAP Therapy on Metabolic Control in Individuals with Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Tanya G.; Wang, Xuelei; Rueschman, Michael; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Aylor, Joan; Babineau, Denise C.; Mehra, Reena; Redline, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To address whether treatment of sleep apnea improves glucose tolerance. Design: Randomized, double-blind crossover study. Setting: Sleep clinic referrals. Patients: 50 subjects with moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI > 15) and impaired glucose tolerance. Interventions: Subjects were randomized to 8 weeks of CPAP or sham CPAP, followed by the alternate therapy after a one-month washout. After each treatment, subjects underwent 2-hour OGTT, polysomnography, actigraphy, and measurements of indices of glucose control. Measurements and Results: The primary outcome was normalization of the mean 2-h OGTT; a secondary outcome was improvement in the Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI (0,120). Subjects were 42% men, mean age of 54 (10), BMI of 39 (8), and AHI of 44 (27). Baseline fasting glucose was 104 (12), and mean 2-h OGTT was 110 (57) mg/dL. Seven subjects normalized their mean 2-h OGTT after CPAP but not after sham CPAP, while 5 subjects normalized after sham CPAP but not after CPAP. Overall, there was no improvement in ISI (0,120) between CPAP and sham CPAP (3.6%; 95% CI: [-2.2%, 9.7%]; P = 0.22). However, in those subjects with baseline AHI ≥ 30 (n = 25), there was a 13.3% (95% CI: [5.2%, 22.1%]; P CPAP compared to sham CPAP. Conclusions: This study did not show that IGT normalizes after CPAP in subjects with moderate sleep apnea and obesity. However, insulin sensitivity improved in those with AHI ≥ 30, suggesting beneficial metabolic effects of CPAP in severe sleep apnea. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01385995. Citation: Weinstock TG; Wang X; Rueschman M; Ismail-Beigi F; Aylor J; Babineau DC; Mehra R; Redline S. A controlled trial of CPAP therapy on metabolic control in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and sleep apnea. SLEEP 2012;35(5):617-625. PMID:22547887

  12. Molecular genetics of experimental hypertension and the metabolic syndrome: from gene pathways to new therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2007), s. 941-952 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8545; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0390; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/06/0028 Grant - others:The Howard Hughes Institute(US) HHMI55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : SHR * CD36 * metabolic syndrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.194, year: 2007

  13. Comparison of two Medication Therapy Management Practice Models on Return on Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, Nicholas P; Berenbrok, Lucas A; Ferreri, Stefanie P

    2017-06-01

    To compare the return on investment (ROI) of an integrated practice model versus a "hub and spoke" practice model of pharmacist provided medication therapy management (MTM). A cohort retrospective analysis of MTM claims billed in 76 pharmacies in North Carolina in the 2010 hub and spoke practice model and the 2012 "integrated" practice model were analyzed to calculate the ROI. In 2010, 4089 patients received an MTM resulting in 8757 claims in the hub and spoke model. In 2012, 4896 patients received an MTM resulting in 13 730 claims in the integrated model. In 2010, US$165 897.26 was invested in pharmacist salary and $173 498.00 was received in reimbursement, resulting in an ROI of +US$7600.74 (+4.6%). In 2012, US$280 890.09 was invested in pharmacist salary and US$302 963 was received in reimbursement, resulting in an ROI of +US$22 072.91 or (+7.9%). The integrated model of MTM showed an increase in number of claims submitted and in number of patients receiving MTM services, ultimately resulting in a higher ROI. While a higher ROI was evident in the integrated model, both models resulted in positive ROI (1:12-1:21), highlighting that MTM programs can be cost effective with different strategies of execution.

  14. Occupational therapy practice community: process evaluation by the participants and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Galheigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a participatory action research with occupational therapists in a community of practice which purpose was to discuss the care production provided by occupational therapy to hospitalized children and adolescents. The participants were nine occupational therapists from hospitals of the city of São Paulo. Ten face-to-face meetings were conducted and a Web-mediated environment was created for conducting virtual activities. The face meetings were recorded and tapped. This article aims to present the evaluation made by the participants and researchers about the process experienced in the community. Through content analysis, seventeen reporting units were identified and grouped into four main themes: the dialogic process; theoretical and practical implications; reflective process; participatory process and its barriers. The process evaluation showed that dialogue during the meetings contributed to a sense of belonging, integration, and awareness/group cohesion and made possible discussing and reflecting on topics relevant to the practice of occupational therapist. Direct communication proved to be the main form of exchange among the professionals in the group. The participants working conditions, the computers and virtual environments access issues, the surplus work generated by meetings and the displacement in urban centers were complicating factors for the participant’s greater adhesion. Evaluation showed that this strategy favored the construction of shared knowledge, and its implementation can foster reflection, research development and knowledge production, as well as contribute to the occupational therapist professional practice improvement.

  15. Songs composed for use in music therapy: a survey of original songwriting practices of music therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer D

    2006-01-01

    While researchers have documented the efficacy of clinical songwriting in music therapy, limited research has been conducted on songs composed by music therapists that address clinical goals. The purpose of this research was to examine the original songwriting practices of music therapists. Professional music therapists (N = 1,364) received a 14-question survey via email asking each to identify client populations and clinical goals addressed by original songs, their length of time in clinical practice, and specifics about their acquisition of songwriting skills. The data collected from 302 completed surveys revealed that respondents who used original songs were most likely to work with children and adolescents in schools or the developmental disability field and wrote songs in order to individualize treatment. Music therapists working with persons over 65 years of age in long term care or assisted living programs were the least likely to use original songs in clinical practice, opting for interventions utilizing the client's familiar music. Most music therapists found songwriting generally easy, but only 37% indicated that they acquired this skill during their undergraduate degree. Additional research on the clinical efficacy of original songs and therapist's compositional processes is needed to identify best practices models for strategic songwriting.

  16. Learning together for effective collaboration in school-based occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Michelle A; Shulha, Lyn M

    2012-12-01

    School-based occupational therapy (SBOT) practice takes place within a complex system that includes service recipients, service providers, and program decision makers across health and education sectors. Despite the promotion of collaborative consultation at a policy level, there is little practical guidance about how to coordinate multi-agency service and interprofessional collaboration among these stakeholders. This paper reports on a process used to engage program administrators in an examination of SBOT collaborative consultation practice in one region of Ontario to provide an evidence-informed foundation for decision making about implementation of these services. Within an appreciative inquiry framework (Cooperrider, Whitney, & Stavros, 2008), Developmental Work Research methods (Engeström, 2000) were used to facilitate shared learning for improved SBOT collaborative consultation. Program administrators participated alongside program providers and service recipients in a series of facilitated workshops to develop principles that will guide future planning and decision making about the delivery of SBOT services. Facilitated discussion among stakeholders led to the articulation of 12 principles for effective collaborative practice. Program administrators used their shared understanding to propose a new model for delivering SBOT services. Horizontal and vertical learning across agency and professional boundaries led to the development of powerful solutions for program improvement.

  17. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroscientific and neuroanthropological perspectives in music therapy research and practice with patients with disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Julia; Heine, Astrid M; Steinhoff, Nikolaus; Weiss, Konrad; Tucek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A growing understanding of music therapy with patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) has developed from observing behavioral changes and using these to gain new ways of experiencing this research environment and setting. Neuroscience provides further insight into the effects of music therapy; however, various studies with similar protocols show different results. The neuroanthropological approach is informed by anthropological and philosophical frameworks. It puts emphasis on a research with and not just on human beings concerning the subject/object question within a research process. It examines relational aspects and outcomes in the context of working in an interdisciplinary team. This allows a broader view of music therapy in a reflective process and leads to a careful interpretation of behavioral reactions and imaging results. This article discusses the importance of the neuroanthropological perspective on our way of obtaining knowledge and its influence on therapeutic practice. It is important to consider how knowledge is generated as it influences the results. Data from two cases will be presented to illustrate the neuroanthropological approach by comparing quantitative PET data with qualitative results of video analyses.

  19. Neuroscientific and neuroanthropological perspectives in music therapy research and practice with patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eVogl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing understanding of music therapy with patients with disorders of consciousness has developed from observing behavioral changes and using these to gain new ways of experiencing this research environment and setting. Neuroscience provides further insight into the effects of music therapy; however, various studies with similar protocols show different results.The neuroanthropological approach is informed by anthropological and philosophical frameworks. It puts emphasis on a research with and not just on human beings concerning the subject/object question within a research process. It examines relational aspects and outcomes in the context of working in an interdisciplinary team. This allows a broader view of music therapy in a reflective process and leads to a careful interpretation of behavioral reactions and imaging results.This article discusses the importance of the neuroanthropological perspective on our way of obtaining knowledge and its influence on therapeutic practice. It is important to consider how knowledge is generated as it influences the results. Data from two cases will be presented to illustrate the neuroanthropological approach by comparing quantitative PET data with qualitative results of video analyses.

  20. Neuroscientific and neuroanthropological perspectives in music therapy research and practice with patients with disorders of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Julia; Heine, Astrid M.; Steinhoff, Nikolaus; Weiss, Konrad; Tucek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A growing understanding of music therapy with patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) has developed from observing behavioral changes and using these to gain new ways of experiencing this research environment and setting. Neuroscience provides further insight into the effects of music therapy; however, various studies with similar protocols show different results. The neuroanthropological approach is informed by anthropological and philosophical frameworks. It puts emphasis on a research with and not just on human beings concerning the subject/object question within a research process. It examines relational aspects and outcomes in the context of working in an interdisciplinary team. This allows a broader view of music therapy in a reflective process and leads to a careful interpretation of behavioral reactions and imaging results. This article discusses the importance of the neuroanthropological perspective on our way of obtaining knowledge and its influence on therapeutic practice. It is important to consider how knowledge is generated as it influences the results. Data from two cases will be presented to illustrate the neuroanthropological approach by comparing quantitative PET data with qualitative results of video analyses. PMID:26300720

  1. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism or heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Albertine E; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Vlasveld, L Thom; van Barneveld, Teus; Terink, Rieneke; Dors, Natasja; Brons, Paul P T; Knoers, Nine V A M; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2014-06-19

    During recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited microcytic anemias has gained from the identification of several genes and proteins involved in systemic and cellular iron metabolism and heme syntheses. Numerous case reports illustrate that the implementation of these novel molecular discoveries in clinical practice has increased our understanding of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. Integration of these insights into daily clinical practice will reduce delays in establishing a proper diagnosis, invasive and/or costly diagnostic tests, and unnecessary or even detrimental treatments. To assist the clinician, we developed evidence-based multidisciplinary guidelines on the management of rare microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism and heme synthesis. These genetic disorders may present at all ages, and therefore these guidelines are relevant for pediatricians as well as clinicians who treat adults. This article summarizes these clinical practice guidelines and includes background on pathogenesis, conclusions, and recommendations and a diagnostic flowchart to facilitate using these guidelines in the clinical setting. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Increasing the occupational therapy mental health workforce through innovative practice education: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Thomas, Yvonne; Holley, Sue; Springfield, Elizabeth; Edwards, Ann; Broadbridge, Jacqui; Greber, Craig; McBryde, Cathy; Banks, Rebecca; Hawkins, Rachel

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a pilot trial of two innovative placement models in the area of mental health, namely role emerging and collaborative supervision. The Queensland Occupational Therapy Fieldwork Collaborative conducted this trial in response to workforce shortages in mental health. Six occupational therapy students and eight practice educators were surveyed pre- and post-placements regarding implementation of these innovative models. Students participating in these placements reported that they were highly likely to work in mental health upon graduation, and practice educators were positive about undertaking innovative placements in future. An overview of the placement sites, trials, outcomes and limitations of this pilot trial is provided. Though limited by its small sample size, this pilot trial has demonstrated the potential of innovative placement models to provide valuable student learning experiences in mental health. The profession needs to develop expertise in the use of innovative placement models if students are to be adequately prepared to work with the mental health issues of the Australian community now and in the future.

  3. Guidelines on radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Doerr, U.; Dietlein, M.; Schlemmer, H.; Grimm, J.; Zajic, T.; Nestle, U.; Ladner, S.; Sepehr-Rezai, S.; Rosenbaum, S.; Puskas, C.; Fostitsch, P.; Heinecke, A.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: For the examination of the impact on clinical practice of the guidelines for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), treatment data from the ongoing multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS) were analyzed. Patients, methods: patients were randomized to adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) or no RTx in addition to standard therapy in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/x MO/x (UICC, 5 th ed. 1997). All patients were to receive the same treatment regimen consisting of thyroidectomy, ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT), and a diagnostic 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) 3-4 months after RIT. Results: Of 339 eligible patients enrolled between January 2000 and March 2004, 273 could be analyzed. Guideline recommendations by the German Society for Nuclear Medicine from 1999 and 1992 were complied with within 28% and 82% with regard to the interval between surgery and RIT (4 vs. 4-6 weeks), in 33% and 84% with regard to 131 I activity for RIT (1-3 vs. 1-4 GBq; ±10%), and in 16% and 60% with regard to 131 I activity for WBS (100-300 vs. 100-400 MBq; ±10%). Conclusions: the 1999 guideline revision appears to have had little impact on clinical practice. Further follow-up will reveal if guideline compliance had an effect on outcomes. (orig.)

  4. A Survey of the Practice of Electroconvulsive Therapy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson-Martin, Janine J; Milligan, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in South Africa. A 36-item questionnaire was sent to all hospitals that practiced ECT in a 12-month period between 2011 and 2012. Forty-two institutions had an ECT machine on site, but 13 institutions reported nonuse. Electroconvulsive therapy services were available in only 6 of the 9 provinces. Questionnaires were sent to the 29 active sites. Twenty-four units (82.8%) responded, and of these, 20 institutions (68.9%) responded to question on the number of patients treated with ECT. Pre-ECT procedures commonly involved informed consent, a physical examination, and basic blood investigations. Bilateral, unilateral, and bifrontal electrode placements were used, whereas dose titration methods and seizure monitoring were used by most respondents. The number of persons treated with ECT per 10,000 persons per year was 0.22, whereas the number of ECT procedures performed per 10,000 persons per year was 1.19. The most common indication for ECT was depression, with most patients being between the ages of 18 and 59 years. The characteristics and rate of ECT utilization in South Africa have been determined and generally emulated international guidelines and trends. However, accessibility to services and aspects such as training and accreditation could be improved.

  5. Evaluating the Quality of Website Information of Private-Practice Clinics Offering Cell Therapies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Hidenori; Nakayama, Takeo; Hatta, Taichi; Takahashi, Naomi; Fujita, Misao

    2016-05-24

    Although the safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies are yet to be proven, recent studies show that such therapies are being advertised with some questionable marketing techniques to effect positive portrayal of the therapies on the webpages of private-practice clinics to sell their therapies worldwide. In such context, those clinics communicate directly with consumers (patients and their family members) via the clinics' websites. Meanwhile, the Health Science Council at the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MHLW) in Japan has pointed out noncompliance of some local clinics with the provisions concerning medical advertising in the Medical Care Act in the past. However, locally little is known about the current status of those clinics including the quality of their webpage information disseminated. To evaluate the quality of website information of private-practice clinics offering cell therapies in Japan. Twenty-four websites with 77 treatments from the Google search were identified for evaluation. The following three exploratory analyses were performed: first in order to ascertain web-based portrayal of private-practice clinics offering cell therapies, a descriptive analysis was conducted using a coding frame; second we evaluated the quality of the target website information from the viewpoint of the level of consideration taken for patients and their family members, using 10 quality criteria ("the Minimum Standard") from the e-Health Code of Ethics 2.0; third we counted and coded expressions that matched set categories for "name-dropping" and "personalized medicine" in the information posted on these websites. Analysis on the treatments (N=77) revealed 126 indications (multiple response): the top three indications were "cancer," "skin-rejuvenation/antiaging/anti-skin aging," and "breast augmentation/buttock augmentation." As for the portrayal of treatment risks and benefits, 78% (60/77) of treatments were mentioned with "benefits," whereas 77% (59

  6. [Low-grade systemic inflammation and the development of metabolic diseases: from the molecular evidence to the clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pedroza, José Israel; González-Tapia, Luis Alonso; del Olmo-Gil, Esteban; Castellanos-Rodríguez, Diana; Escobedo, Galileo; González-Chávez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is characterised by high circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and increased macrophage infiltration in peripheral tissues. Most importantly, this inflammatory state does not involve damage or loss of function of the infiltrated tissue, which is a distinctive feature of the low-grade systemic inflammation. The term "meta-inflammation" has also been used to refer to the low-grade systemic inflammation due to its strong relationship with the development of cardio-metabolic diseases in obesity. A review is presented on the recent clinical and experimental evidence concerning the role of adipose tissue inflammation as a key mediator of low-grade systemic inflammation. Furthermore, the main molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory polarization of macrophages with the ability to infiltrate both the adipose tissue and the vascular endothelium via activation of toll-like receptors by metabolic damage-associated molecular patterns, such as advanced glycation-end products and oxidized lipoproteins, is discussed. Finally, a review is made of the pathogenic mechanisms through which the low-grade systemic inflammation contributes to develop insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, atherogenesis, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension in obese individuals. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of low-grade systemic inflammation in promoting cardio-metabolic diseases is necessary, in order to further design novel anti-inflammatory therapies that take into consideration clinical data, as well as the circulating levels of cytokines, immune cells, and metabolic damage-associated molecular patterns in each patient. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Darvish-Damavandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acidemia (PA is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC. This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA, derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  8. BEYOND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN DIABETES MELLITUS: EFFECTS OF INCRETIN-BASED THERAPY ON BONE METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA eCECCARELLI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM and osteoporosis (OP are common disorders with a significant health burden, and an increase in fracture risk has been described both in type 1 (T1DM and in type 2 (T2DM diabetes. The pathogenic mechanisms of impaired skeletal strength in diabetes remain to be clarified in details and they are only in part reflected by a variation in bone mineral density (BMD. In T2DM, the occurrence of low bone turnover together with a decreased osteoblast activity and compromised bone quality has been shown. Of note, some antidiabetic drugs (e.g. tiazolidinediones, insulin may deeply affect bone metabolism. In addition, the recently introduced class of incretin-based drugs (i.e. GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors is expected to exert potentially beneficial effects on bone health, possibly due to a bone anabolic activity of GLP-1, that can be either direct or indirect through the involvement of thyroid C cells.Here we will review the established as well as the putative effects of incretin hormones and of incretin-based drugs on bone metabolism, both in preclinical models and in man, taking into account that such therapeutic strategy may be effective not only to achieve a good glycemic control, but also to improve bone health in diabetic patients.

  9. Low level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced ATP generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). LLL illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome C leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas those treated with LLL or pyruvate alone, or sham light displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by a combination of LLL and pyruvate, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue due to secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissues like injured brain. Keywords:

  10. Association of adiponectin/leptin ratio with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism parameters in HIV-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiliscan, Catalin; Arama, Victoria; Mihailescu, Raluca; Munteanu, Daniela; Iacob, Diana Gabriela; Popescu, Cristina; Catana, Remulus; Negru, Anca; Lobodan, Alina; Arama, Stefan Sorin

    2018-02-16

    Adiponectin and leptin are adipose tissue hormones that regulate important lipid and glucose metabolic pathways. Our objective was to evaluate the interplay of these hormones described by the adiponectin/leptin ratio (ALR) in correlation to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism parameters in nondiabetic HIV-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy (ART). We enrolled consecutive nondiabetic patients with confirmed HIV infection, undergoing stable ART regimens for at least six months. Blood samples were collected and tested for immunological and virological parameters, adiponectin and leptin, fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose, fasting triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. ALR was computed for each patient. Resistance to insulin was assessed by calculating the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). We enrolled 87 HIV-infected persons, with a mean age of 31.7 years (range: 18-65), including 47 men (mean age = 32.8 years) and 40 women (mean age = 30.5 years). The median value of ALR was 6.8 (interquartile range - IQR = 17.1). In male patients, ALR was inversely associated with the serum level of triglycerides (R = 0.285, p = 0.05), total cholesterol (R = 0.326, p = 0.02), and LDL cholesterol (R = 0.298, p = 0.04). Also for the male cohort, an increase in ALR seemed to improve insulin sensitivity (R = 0.323, p = 0.02) and serum HDL cholesterol (R = 0.597, p = 0.01). None of these correlations were observed in HIV-infected women. Adiponectin and leptin seem to play important but different gender-specific roles in the pathogenesis of lipid and glucose metabolism of HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy. ALR, adiponectin/leptin ratio; BMI, body mass index; LDL, low-density lipoprotein; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; QUICKI, Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index.

  11. Music Therapy Practice Status and Trends Worldwide: An International Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Petra; Tague, Daniel B

    2017-11-01

    The field of music therapy is growing worldwide. While there is a wealth of country-specific information available, only a few have databased workforce censuses. Currently, little to no descriptive data exists about the global development of the profession. The purpose of this study was to obtain descriptive data about current demographics, practice status, and clinical trends to inform worldwide advocacy efforts, training needs, and the sustainable development of the field. Music therapists (N = 2,495) who were professional members of organizations affiliated with the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT) served as a sample for this international cross-sectional survey study. A 30-item online questionnaire was designed, pilot tested by key partners, and translated into seven languages. Researchers and key partners distributed the online survey through e-mail invitations and social media announcements. Professional music therapists worldwide are well-educated, mature professionals with adequate work experience, who are confident in providing high-quality services primarily in mental health, school, and geriatric settings. Due to ongoing challenges related to recognition and government regulation of the field as an evidence-based and well-funded healthcare profession, most individuals work part-time music therapy jobs and feel underpaid. Yet, many music therapists have a positive outlook on the field's future. Continued research and advocacy efforts, as well as collaborations with lobbyists, business consultants, and credentialing/licensure experts to develop progressive strategies, will be crucial for global development and sustainability of the field. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Utility of adenosine PET (perfusion/metabolic) imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction following thrombolytic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.C.; Esterbrooks, D.M.; Shiue, C.; Mohiuddin, S.; Hilleman, D.; Frick, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the diagnostic role of adenosine (AI) proton emission tomography (PET) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and thrombolytic therapy using adenosine as a coronary vasodilator. The authors performed rest/stress myocardial perfusion and metabolic image studies (using N-13 NH 3 and F-18 FDG) in 14 patients within 1 week after thrombolytic therapy for an AMI. AI (140 μg/kg/min for 6 minutes) used a pharmacologic stressor resulted only in transient and well-tolerated side effects. Sensitivities and specificities of the rest/stress perfusion imaging and coronary angiographic results (performed within 1 week) are as follows: LAD, 87.5% and 83.3%; LCX, 100% and 100%; RCA, 100% and 83.3%; and overall, 94.4% and 91.3%. Resting NH 3 /FDG mismatch (hypoperfused viable myocardium) was seen in 2/14 patients in infarct-related (IR) and 3/14 patients in non-IR stenoses

  13. Standardized 15N tracer method for the determination of parameters of the whole-body protein metabolism in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghans, P.; Jung, K.; Matkowitz, R.

    1984-01-01

    A standardized 15 N tracer method is described for the assessment of nitrogen and protein metabolism in healthy and pathological changed organisms. The method represents an isotope technical procedure for the application in clinical research and practice. The clinical preparation of the patient/proband by means of a standardized nutritional regime, the tracer administration (single dose) and the sampling (urine, blood), the 15 N tracer technique (sample chemistry, emissionsspectrometric isotope analysis) and the mathematical evaluation of 15 N tracer data are described. (author)

  14. Metabolic risks at birth of neonates exposed in utero to HIV-antiretroviral therapy relative to unexposed neonates: an NMR metabolomics study of cord blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moutloatse, Gontse P.; Bunders, Madeleine J.; van Reenen, Mari; Mason, Shayne; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Engelke, Udo F. H.; Wevers, Ron A.; Reinecke, Carools J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected pregnant women is highly effective in preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of the virus, but deleterious metabolic and mitochondrial observations in infants born to HIV-infected women treated with ART during pregnancy are

  15. Enriching practice of dialectic behaviour therapy with the dynamic maturational model of attachment and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for a clinician is integration of the wisdom available in the wide range of therapeutic paradigms available. I have found the principles guiding dialectic behaviour therapy (DBT; see Miller, Rathus, & Linehan, 2007, for applying DBT to adolescents) extremely useful in my practice running a general adolescent unit; similarly, the understanding of the different information processing and learning principles associated with each of the Type A and C attachment strategies, as understood in dynamic maturational model (DMM), has guided me through the dark corners of treatment. Specifically, how does DMM inform practice of DBT? As a 'DBTer' might say, 'Where is the wisdom in both points of view?' Nevertheless, DMM is not primarily about treatment. It concerns how different ways of adapting to developmental contingencies bias perceptual propensities, and hence the information available for reflective brain function. Recognition of these twists to knowing what is going on can then be used to inform a variety of therapeutic approaches. The purpose of this article is to look for the signposts in DBT and DMM which together help navigate the comprehensive approach necessary in complicated therapy. In the process, hopefully some more general principles for addressing discomfited adolescents arise for informing future practice. Although many steer shy of using personality disorder diagnoses for adolescents, clinicians are nevertheless addressing, directly or indirectly, the personality development of all adolescents in treatment, regardless of their classical axis I diagnoses, including both those with developing emotional instability and a group of avoidant over-controlled adolescents, which in Norway is growing in prominence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Microbiological changes after periodontal therapy in diabetic patients with inadequate metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Maciel Silva-Boghossian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment (SRP on the composition of the subgingival microbiota of chronic periodontitis (CP in individuals with type 2 diabetes (DM2 with inadequate metabolic control and in systemically healthy (SH individuals. Forty individuals (20 DM2 and 20 SH with CP underwent full-mouth periodontal examination. Subgingival plaque was sampled from 4 deep sites of each individual and tested for mean prevalence and counts of 45 bacterial taxa by the checkerboard method. Clinical and microbiological assessments were performed before and 3 months after SRP. At baseline, those in the DM2 group presented a significantly higher percentage of sites with visible plaque and bleeding on probing compared with those in the SH group (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group presented significantly higher levels of C. rectus and P. gingivalis, and lower prevalence of P. micra and S. anginosus, compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. At the 3-month visit, both groups showed a significant improvement in all clinical parameters (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group showed significantly higher prevalence and/or levels of A. gerencseriae, A. naeslundii I, A. oris, A. odontolyticus, C. sputigena, F. periodonticum, and G. morbillorum compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. However, those in the DM2 group showed a significant reduction in the levels of P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (p ≤ 0.001 over time. Those in the SRP group showed improved periodontal status and reduced levels of putative periodontal pathogens at 3 months’ evaluation compared with those in the DM2 group with inadequate metabolic control.

  17. Early changes in parameters of bone and mineral metabolism during therapy for hyper- and hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncu, T; Aksoy, N; Arikan, E; Ugur, B; Tasan, E; Hatemi, H

    2001-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormones on various organs and metabolic systems have been the focus of intensive research. In this study we investigated the mechanisms of the changes in some parameters of bone and mineral metabolism before and during treatment of hyper- and hypothyroidism. Our study groups were as follows; 1) Untreated hyperthyroid patients (n= 38), 2) Hyperthyroid patients treated for three months (n=21), 3) Untreated hypothyroid patients (n=27), 4) Hypothyroid patients treated for three months (n= 20), and 5) Euthyroid control subjects (age, weight, sex and menopausal status matched) (n = 47). As expected, the mean serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and urinary Ca/creatinine and deoxypyridinoline (D-Pyr)/creatinine levels were higher in group-1 than in the control group. Serum PTH level was lower in group-1 than in group-5. However, after treatment for three months (group-2) we found that the serum and urinary levels of these parameters (except ALP) were not different than in the control group. Group-3 and group-4 did not show any differences in these parameters compared with group-5. Covariance analysis showed that urinary D-Pyr excretion had a positive, independent relationship to the serum free T3 level and age (P hyperthyroid patients, and with the treatment, particularly, in the period of first three months the bone resorption markers decrease rapidly. If the treatment is maintained the decrease slows, becoming more gradual. However, bone formation markers like ALP remain high in hyperthyroid patients during the treatment. In the light of this data, it is possible to conclude that osteoblastic activity lasts longer in hyperthyroidism. On the other hand, we demonstrated that these bone formation and resorption markers do not seem to be different in hypothyroid patients, even during the treatment, compared to the euthyroid controls.

  18. Dose-Dependent Effects of Radiation Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow, Metabolism, and Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Carol A.; Zhou Sumin; Raynor, Renee; Tisch, Andrea; Light, Kim; Shafman, Timothy; Wong, Terence; Kirkpatrick, John; Turkington, Timothy; Hollis, Donna; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study was performed to formally relate dose-dependent radiologically defined changes in normal brain induced by radiotherapy (RT) to neurocognitive dysfunction in subjects with primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Adult patients receiving three-dimensional RT for central nervous system (CNS) tumors were enrolled. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and neuropsychological testing were performed before RT and 3 weeks and 6 months after treatment. Analyses were performed for correlations between changes in 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET (metabolism), 15 O-PET (relative blood flow), regional radiation dose, follow-up time, and neuropsychological test scores. Results: Eleven subjects were enrolled and 6 completed follow-up studies. The PET data showed reduced FDG uptake, with average decreases of 2-6% in regions of the brain receiving greater than 40 Gy at 3 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The 15 O-H 2 O PET showed increases (<10%) at 3 weeks in relative regional blood flow in brain receiving greater than 30 Gy, but less at the 6-month follow-up studies. There were significant correlations between decreases in FDG uptake and increased scores from the Symptom Checklist-90-R, with an average increase in T score of 2 (p < 0.0001). The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test showed a significant correlation of decreased FDG uptake with increased errors and perseveration in test performance, with an average decrease in T score of 11 (p = 0.037). Conclusions: A dose-dependent response of CNS tissue was detected using FDG PET in this small number of patients. Decreases in CNS metabolism correlated with decreased performance on neuropsychological tests for problem solving, cognitive flexibility, and global measures of psychopathology. Additional research is needed to verify and define these findings

  19. Effects of psychological therapies in randomized trials and practice-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Michael; Stiles, William B; Connell, Janice; Twigg, Elspeth; Leach, Chris; Lucock, Mike; Mellor-Clark, John; Bower, Peter; King, Michael; Shapiro, David A; Hardy, Gillian E; Greenberg, Leslie; Angus, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Randomized trials of the effects of psychological therapies seek internal validity via homogeneous samples and standardized treatment protocols. In contrast, practice-based studies aim for clinical realism and external validity via heterogeneous samples of clients treated under routine practice conditions. We compared indices of treatment effects in these two types of studies. Using published transformation formulas, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores from five randomized trials of depression (N = 477 clients) were transformed into Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores and compared with CORE-OM data collected in four practice-based studies (N = 4,196 clients). Conversely, the practice-based studies' CORE-OM scores were transformed into BDI scores and compared with randomized trial data. Randomized trials showed a modest advantage over practice-based studies in amount of pre-post improvement. This difference was compressed or exaggerated depending on the direction of the transformation but averaged about 12%. There was a similarly sized advantage to randomized trials in rates of reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI). The largest difference was yielded by comparisons of effect sizes which suggested an advantage more than twice as large, reflecting narrower pre-treatment distributions in the randomized trials. Outcomes of completed treatments for depression in randomized trials appeared to be modestly greater than those in routine care settings. The size of the difference may be distorted depending on the method for calculating degree of change. Transforming BDI scores into CORE-OM scores and vice versa may be a preferable alternative to effect sizes for comparisons of studies using these measures.

  20. Fieldwork practice for learning: Lessons from occupational therapy students and their supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshini Naidoo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fieldwork practice forms a vital part of occupational therapy (OT education and contributes significantly to competent practice and students’ clinical reasoning. Students’ learning is positively or negatively influenced by their fieldwork experience. Objective. To explore the views and experiences of final-year OT students, site-based clinicians and university-based academic supervisors to identify strategies that influenced students’ learning during fieldwork practice. Methods. This descriptive qualitative study used a purposeful sampling technique. Data collection strategies included focus group discussions with clinical and academic supervisors and semistructured interviews with final-year students. Each set of data was analysed according to the research questions. The researcher analysed the data into themes, which were corroborated by a supervisor. Data source and analyst triangulation ensured trustworthiness of the study. Results. Two themes, i.e. difficulties experienced by students during fieldwork and supervision strategies that they found beneficial for learning, are described. Guidance and mentoring from experienced therapists helped students to link observations from assessments and intervention plans. Observations of treatment sessions, peer learning and practice in the skills laboratories were beneficial for learning, competence and confidence. Guided questions from supervisors to enhance reflexive practice and peer learning strengthened the students’ confidence and ability to give feedback to their peers. The students also benefited from sessions that allowed them the freedom and space to work autonomously. Conclusion. This study provides insight into the difficulties that students experienced when engaging with fieldwork and offers some strategies that have been found to advance their learning.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  2. Therapy by electromagnetic wave of millimeter energy range (EFH-therapy, MRT, IWT). Scientific and practical materials on the use of physical factors in clinical and health resort practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samosyuk, I.Z.; Fisenko, L.I.; Kolesnik, K.Eh.; Chukhraev, N.V.; Shimkov, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    Problems of extremely high frequency (EHF) therapy, microwave resonance therapy (MRT) and information-wave therapy (IWT) are considered. Possibilities of electromagnetic waves in millimeter energy range use in clinical and health resort practice are systematized. Recommendations on their use in treatment of different diseases are given. The main principles of selection of zones for meridian correction with the help of electromagnetic waves in millimeter energy range are exposed. The results of EFH-therapy clinical use indicate the possibility of its application practically in all cases, since positive results were obtained in most cases. The recommendations are prepared with account of possibilities and parameters of the apparatus ''MIT-1'' for reflexotherapy which was designed and produced by the Medical Innovative Centre in Kiev

  3. Staff training and outreach support for Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and its implementation in practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streater, Amy; Spector, Aimee; Hoare, Zoe; Aguirre, Elisa; Russell, Ian; Orrell, Martin

    2017-12-01

    There is evidence that Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy are effective in mild to moderate dementia. There is, however, little evidence available for its implementation in practice and the impact of outreach support on the sustainability of the programme. Two hundred and forty-one staff members were randomised from 63 dementia care settings between outreach support including an online forum, email, and telephone support, compared to usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control group. The primary outcome was average number of attendees to the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programmes. There was no difference in average number of attendees between the intervention and usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control groups for the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (p = 0.82) or the maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme (p = 0.97). Outreach support does not affect the average number of people with dementia attending the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy or maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme. Irrespective of outreach support, the programmes remain widely implemented and yield perceived benefits for people with dementia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The practical management of bleedings during treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: the emergency reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding represents the most feared complication of the new oral anticoagulants, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, as well as all the antithrombotic therapies. During the acute phase of bleeding in patients taking anticoagulants, restoration of an effective hemostasis represents the cornerstone of practical management. While vitamin K antagonists are effectively and promptly reversed by specific antidotes such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs, fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K, it is still not clear how to manage the urgent reversal of DOACs during life-threatening or major bleedings due to the lack of specific antidotes. However, in vitro and ex vivo studies have suggested some potential strategies to reverse DOACs in clinical practice, other than general support measures that are always recommended. Activated charcoal could be used in subjects with DOAC-related bleedings presenting to the emergency department within two hours of the last oral intake. Non-activated or activated PCCs (FEIBA and recombinant activated Factor VII (raFVII seem to be the optimal strategy for urgent reversal of dabigatran, while non-activated PCCs seem to have efficacy in reversing rivaroxaban. Due to its low plasma protein binding, dabigatran could be also dialyzed in urgent cases. Clinically relevant non-major bleedings and minor bleedings should be treated with general and local measures, respectively, and, when necessary, with dose delay or drug withdrawal. In this article, the Authors describe the practical approach to bleedings occurring during DOACs treatment.

  5. Perceptions and practices regarding women's vaginal health following radiation therapy: A survey of radiation oncologists practicing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachnic, Lisa A; Bruner, Deborah W; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Russo, Gregory A

    Vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized complication of pelvic and vaginal radiation therapy (RT). A 26-item survey assessing the signs/symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and impact of VS on women's sexual health was distributed to radiation oncologists. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Chi-square tests examined differences in categorical responses. A total of 233 (10.5%) participants completed the entire survey. Twelve percent, 21%, and 68% report treating gynecologic (GYN) tumors only, non-GYN pelvic tumors only, or both, respectively. Regarding risk factors, 78% believed that VS can be caused by pelvic RT alone, 91% by vaginal brachytherapy alone, and 98% by combined pelvic RT and vaginal brachytherapy. Approximately one-half of respondents felt that being postmenopausal and having a hysterectomy before radiation therapy were risk factors for VS, whereas the other half felt that these were not risk factors. All respondents agreed that VS is a clinical diagnosis. Respondents indicated that VS symptoms include dyspareunia, vaginal pain, dryness, and/or bleeding (100%, 90%, 85%, and 72%, respectively); 65% indicated all 4. The most commonly recommended treatment for VS is vaginal dilator use. Radiation oncologists who treat GYN-only versus non-GYN cancers were more likely to perform a vaginal examination, to distribute written instructions regarding vaginal dilator use (P = .002), to have vaginal bleeding reported after RT (P = .001), and to refer patients to a sexual counselor (P = .007). Most providers (73%) expressed willingness to participate in prospective research on the diagnosis and treatment of VS. This is the first large-scale survey of radiation oncologists' perceptions and practices regarding VS. There is agreement among providers regarding the signs/symptoms of VS and strategies for its prevention/treatment using vaginal dilators. Further prospective and observational research is needed. This survey shows a willingness on

  6. Radioiodine 131 therapy in hyperthyroidism evaluation of French nuclear medicine practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.; Boin, C.; Desruet, M.; Roux, J.; Wolf, M.; Fagret, D.; Allenet, B.; Foroni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim Radioiodine 131 I (RAI) is currently used routinely in the treatment of hyperthyroidism including Graves disease (GD), toxic multi-nodular goitre (TMNG) and toxic solitary nodule (TSN). It has proved to be safe, efficient and relatively inexpensive therapy. But after more than 60 years, many protocols are coexisting and no consensus exists on the most appropriate way to prescribe RAI dose: fixed dose regime or calculated doses based on gland size or turnover of RAI. This is the first nationwide French survey assessing the current practices about radioiodine treatment in thyrotoxicosis. Methods: we sent a questionnaire to French nuclear medicine hospital units and cancer treatment centres (n=69) about their practices in 2012. Questions were asked about RAI treatment: objectives, way to prescribe the therapeutic dose and its factors, radioisotope use to explore thyroid function and method of gland size measurement. Results: we received 40 responses. Euthyroidism was a successful treatment outcome for 33% of French respondents whereas hypothyroidism was the aim for 26%. Antithyroid drugs were stopped 7 days on average (range 3-21 days) before therapy. 68% of physicians used ultrasound for thyroid volume measurement. Calculated doses were used by 40% of clinicians (Marinelli's formula: 80%). Factors influencing prescription were thyroid uptake (100%) based on radiotracer iodine-131 (33%) or iodine-123 (67%), thyroid volume (93%) and disease (80%). Fixed activities represented 60% of the prescribed doses (72,5% for TMNG and TSN). The administered dose was chosen between 1 to 3 levels of standard doses, according to the patient characteristics. Factors influencing this choice were disease, with respectively a median of 370 MBq (range:185-740), 555 MBq (185-740), 555 MBq (296-925) for GD, TSN and TMNG, thyroid volume (59%) and thyroid uptake (52%) with the radiotracer iodine-123 (30%) or technetium-99m (70%). Even physicians

  7. Music therapy services for individuals with autism spectrum disorder: a survey of clinical practices and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Petra; Rivera, Nicole R; Chandler, Alie; Humpal, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the definitions, diagnoses, prevalence rates, theories about the causes, evidence-based treatment options, and practice guidelines pertaining to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have undergone numerous changes. While several recent studies evaluate the effects of music therapy interventions for individuals with ASD, no current review reflects the latest music therapy practices and trends. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the status of music therapy practices for serving clients with ASD, the implementation of national ASD standards and guidelines, the awareness of recent developments, and training needs of music therapists. Professional members of the American Music Therapy Association who are working with individuals with ASD served as the sample for this national cross-sectional survey study (N = 328). A 45-item online questionnaire was designed and distributed through email and social media. Participants accessed the online survey through SurveyMonkey®. Findings suggest music therapy practices and services for individuals with ASD have shifted and now reflect a slightly higher percentage of caseload, a broader age range of clients, and a trend to serve clients in home and community settings. Most therapeutic processes align with recommended practices for ASD and incorporate several of the recognized evidence-based practices. Less understood or recognized are inclusion practices and latest developments in the field of ASD. Music therapists have a solid understanding of providing services for individuals with ASD, but would benefit from advanced online training and improved information dissemination to stay current with the rapidly changing aspects pertinent to this population. © 2013 by the American Music Therapy Association.

  8. Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Spine Metastases: A Critical Review to Guide Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Kristin J., E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Fisher, Charles [Department of Surgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for metastatic spinal tumors is increasingly being performed in clinical practice. Whereas the fundamentals of SBRT practice for intact spinal metastases are established, there are as yet no comprehensive practice guidelines for the postoperative indications. In particular, there are unique considerations for patient selection and treatment planning specific to postoperative spine SBRT that are critical for safe and effective management. The purpose of this critical review is to discuss the rationale for treatment, describe those factors affecting surgical decision making, introduce modern surgical trends, and summarize treatment outcomes for both conventional postoperative external beam radiation therapy and postoperative spine SBRT. Lastly, an in-depth practical discussion with respect to treatment planning and delivery considerations is provided to help guide optimal practice.

  9. Metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients practicing combat sports: at least two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenek-Klupa, Teresa; Matejko, Bartlomiej; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that physical activity should be an integral part of the management of diabetes. It remains controversial, however, whether combat sports, often preferred by young individuals type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), may be performed without high risk of metabolic decompensation. The aim of this observational study was to summarize a two-year follow-up period of five young male patients with T1DM practicing combat sports under the care of a physical-activity oriented specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Of the five patients, three mixed martial arts and two kick-boxing competitors were included in the study. To control glucose in each patient, an individual approach was used that took into consideration the type of training, the sequence of the exercises, and the relative proportion of different forms of exercise. During the follow-up, glycemic control was improved and maintained in all individuals. Neither an episode of hospitalization-requiring diabetic ketoacidosis nor severe hypoglycemia occurred in these patients during the follow-up. In conclusion, an individual approach for T1DM patients practicing combat sports may result in achieving and maintaining satisfactory glycemic control without increased risk of metabolic decompensation.

  10. [Disorders of lipid and glucose metabolism. Long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, N; Goebel, F D

    2002-04-09

    In addition to readily controllable short-term side effects, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) also has long-term side effects: lipodystrophy syndrome, hyperlipoproteinemia, insulin resistance, elevated glucose tolerance sometimes leading to diabetes mellitus and lactic acidosis. The pathogenesis remains uncertain although various hypotheses have been advanced. A number of approaches for the treatment of lipodystrophy are available, the effects of which, however, have not been confirmed by study results. Hyperlipoproteinemia probably means an increased cardiovascular risk, but a final pronouncement on this is not yet possible. Fibrates and statins are currently applied for treatment, but interactions with HAART medicaments have to be considered. HAART-induced diabetes mellitus presents clinically as type 2 diabetes, and is treated accordingly.

  11. Social participation: redesign of education, research, and practice in occupational therapy*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškur, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    There is growing attention to participation and social participation in literature and policy reports. Occupational therapists strongly believe that creating coherence between the person's occupations and environment will facilitate participation of each individual. Nowadays, societal developments such as "health literacy and self-management", "Web 2.0 social media", "empowering communities", and "Nothing About Us Without Us" increase opportunities for people to interact on different levels of social participation. Social participation can be used as an outcome, though it can also be seen as a means to change society and to develop solutions for barriers experienced by people with chronic diseases or disabilities. Societal developments will have an impact on social participation in terms of supporting each other and contributing to society. Additionally, these changes will have a major influence on the way we educate, conduct research, and deliver occupational therapy practice.

  12. Determining Need for School-Based Physical Therapy Under IDEA: Commonalities Across Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialu, Carlo; Doyle, Maura

    2017-10-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) includes physical therapy (PT) as a related service that may be provided to help students with disabilities benefit from their education. However, the IDEA does not provide specific guidance for the provision of school-based PT, resulting in variations in practice across the United States. The authors examined 22 state and local education agency guidelines available online to find commonalities related to the determination of a student's need for PT. Seven commonalities found: educational benefit, team decision, need for PT expertise, establishment of Individualized Education Program (IEP) goal before determining need for PT, distinction between medical and educational PT, the student's disability adversely affects education, and the student's potential for improvement. These commonalities are discussed in relation to current PT and special education literature. This article suggests applying these commonalities as procedural requirements and questions for discussion during an IEP team meeting.

  13. Practice and research in Australian massage therapy: a national workforce survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan L.; Barnett, Rebecca; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background Massage is the largest complementary medicine profession in Australia, in terms of public utilisation, practitioner distribution, and number of practitioners, and is being increasingly integrated into the Australian health care system. However, despite the increasing importance of massage therapists in Australian health care delivery, or the increased practice and education obligations this may entail, there has been little exploration of practice, research, and education characteristics of the Australian massage therapist workforce. Purpose To identify practice, research, and education characteristics among the Australian massage therapist workforce. Settings The Australian massage therapy profession. Participants 301 randomly selected members of the Association of Massage Therapists (Australia). Research Design A 15-item, cross-sectional telephone survey. Main Outcomes Measures Massage therapists’ demographic information, practice characteristics, and education and research characteristics. Results Most respondents (73.8%) worked 20 hours per week or less practising massage, nearly half of all respondents (46.8%) treated fewer than 10 massage clients per week, and over three-quarters (81.7%) of respondents were self-employed. Massage therapy was the sole source of income for just over half (55.0%) of the study respondents. Only 5.7% of respondents earned over the average wage ($50,000) through their massage activities. Nearly half of all respondents (43.3%) reported regularly exceeding their continuing professional education (CPE) quota mandated by their professional association. However, 21.1% reported struggling to achieve their CPE quota each year. Over one-third of respondents (35.6%) were not interested in acquiring further CPE points beyond minimum requirements. Respondents were significantly more likely to have an active approach to research if they had higher income (p = .015). Multivariate analysis showed factors associated with access to

  14. A Finnish national code of practice for reference dosimetry of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.; Sipilae, P.; Jaervinen, H.; Parkkinen, R.; Jokelainen, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A national Code of Practice (CoP) for reference dosimetry of radiation therapy in Finland will be established during 2002 and will be implemented from the beginning of 2003. The CoP will cover dosimetry of the conventional radiotherapy modalities used in Finland i.e. external radiotherapy with megavoltage photon and electron beams, external radiotherapy with low energy kilovoltage X-ray beams and brachytherapy. The formalisms for external radiation beam dosimetry are those of TRS 389. For brachytherapy the formalism will follow the general guidelines of TECDOC-1274. The CoP will be prepared by the SSDL of STUK in close co-operation with the Finnish radiotherapy physicists. For external beam radiotherapy, the main objective of the national Code of Practice for radiation therapy dosimetry is to maintain the achieved good level of consistency of the dosimetry procedures in external beam radiotherapy as the 'absorbed dose to water' based approach of TRS 389 is implemented in Finland. In the CoP the dosimetry the procedures are described for the whole dosimetry chain starting from the calibration of the ionisation chambers at the SSDL of STUK and ending to the calibration of the beam monitor ionisation chamber of a linear accelerator. For brachytherapy dosimetry the aim is to fix the national practice for reference air kerma rate calibrations both for radioactive sources and for well-type ionisation chambers. Although the dosimetry procedures are described independently of the SSDL service, CoP makes use of the special features of the calibration service offered by the SSDL of STUK. For ionisation chambers used for photon dosimetry the calibration factors for the user measurement chain are given not only for the actual reference beam quality ( 60 Co) but also for a set of user beam qualities. Furthermore, SSDL of STUK offers calibration services for plane parallel ionisation chambers in an electron beam of a user linac. For brachytherapy SSDL of STUK has

  15. Bone strength and management of postmenopausal fracture risk with antiresorptive therapies: considerations for women’s health practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung AM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Cheung,1–3 Heather Frame,4 Michael Ho,5 Erin S Mackinnon,6 Jacques P Brown7 1Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Centre of Excellence in Skeletal Health Assessment, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network (UHN, 3Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 4Assiniboine Clinic, Winnipeg, MB, 5University Health Network, Toronto, 6Amgen Canada, Inc, Mississauga, ON, 7Rheumatology Division, CHU de Québec Research Centre, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada Abstract: Bone strength – and, hence, fracture risk – reflects the structural and material properties of the skeleton, which changes with bone turnover during aging and following effective pharmacotherapy. A variety of powerful new techniques (quantitative computed tomography, as well as peripheral quantitative computed tomography and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography provide precise images of bone structure and can be used to model the response of specific bones to different types of mechanical load. This review explores the various components of bone strength and the clinical significance of measures, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, and modern imaging data, with regard to fracture risk in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, before and after initiating antiresorptive therapy. These imaging and related techniques offer an ever-clearer picture of the changes in bone structure and bone mineral metabolism during normal aging and in osteoporosis, as well as in response to treatment. However, because the newer techniques are not yet available in routine practice, validated tools for absolute fracture risk assessment remain essential for clinical decision making. These tools, which are tailored to patient risk data in individual countries, are based on bone mineral density and other readily available clinical data. In addition, bone turnover marker measurements can be useful in

  16. The legal aspects of expedited partner therapy practice: do state laws and policies really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ryan; Leichliter, Jami S; Stenger, Mark R; Loosier, Penny S; Slive, Lauren

    2013-08-01

    Expedited partner therapy (EPT) is a potential partner treatment strategy. Significant efforts have been devoted to policies intended to facilitate its practice. However, few studies have attempted to evaluate these policies. We used data on interviewed gonorrhea cases from 12 sites in the STD Surveillance Network in 2010 (n = 3404). Patients reported whether they had received EPT. We coded state laws relevant to EPT for gonorrhea using Westlaw legal research database and the general legal status of EPT in STD Surveillance Network sites from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Web site in 2010. We also coded policy statements by medical and other boards. We used χ tests to compare receipt of EPT by legal/policy variables, patient characteristics, and provider type. Variables significant at P < 0.10 in bivariate analyses were included in a logistic regression model. Overall, 9.5% of 2564 interviewed patients with gonorrhea reported receiving EPT for their partners. Receipt of EPT was significantly higher where laws and policies authorizing EPT existed. Where EPT laws for gonorrhea existed and EPT was permissible, 13.3% of patients reported receiving EPT as compared with 5.4% where there were no EPT laws and EPT was permissible, and 1.0% where there were no EPT laws and EPT was potentially allowable (P < 0.01). Expedited partner therapy was higher where professional boards had policy statements supporting EPT (P < 0.01). Receipt of EPT did not differ by most patient characteristics or provider type. Policy-related findings were similar in adjusted analyses. Expedited partner therapy laws and policies were associated with higher reports of receipt of EPT among interviewed gonorrhea cases.

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2018-03-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of published systematic reviews.During the intake, the patient is screened for serious pathologies and corresponding patterns. Patients with cervical radiculopathy can be included or excluded through corresponding signs and symptoms and possibly diagnostic tests (Spurling test, traction/distraction test, and Upper Limb Tension Test). History taking is done to gather information about patients' limitations, course of pain, and prognostic factors (eg, coping style) and answers to health-related questions.In case of a normal recovery (treatment profile A), management should be hands-off, and patients should receive advice from the physical therapist and possibly some simple exercises to supplement "acting as usual."In case of a delayed/deviant recovery (treatment profile B), the physical therapist is advised to use, in addition to the recommendations for treatment profile A, forms of mobilization and/or manipulation in combination with exercise therapy. Other interventions may also be considered. The physical therapist is advised not to use dry needling, low-level laser, electrotherapy, ultrasound, traction, and/or a cervical collar.In case of a delayed/deviant recovery with clear and/or dominant psychosocial prognostic factors (treatment profile C), these factors should first be addressed by the physical therapist, when possible, or the patient should be referred to a specialist, when necessary.In case of neck pain grade III (treatment profile D), the therapy resembles that for profile B, but the use of a cervical collar for pain reduction may be considered. The advice is to use it sparingly: only for a short period per day and only for a few weeks.

  18. Therapeutic Change in Group Therapy For Interpersonal Trauma: A Relational Framework for Research and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliara, Zoë; Karatzias, Thanos; Gullone, Angela; Ferguson, Sandra; Cosgrove, Katie; Burke Draucker, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of therapeutic change processes in group therapy for complex interpersonal trauma has been limited. The present study aimed at addressing this gap by developing a framework of therapeutic change in this field from a survivor and therapist perspective. This is a qualitative study, which utilized semistructured individual interviews. Transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to identify recurrent themes. A final sample of n = 16 patients and n = 5 facilitators completed the interview. Main change processes identified by survivors were as follows: self versus others, trust versus threat, confrontation versus avoidance, and "patching up" versus true healing. Therapeutic processes identified by therapist facilitators included managing group dynamics, unpredictability and uncertainty, and process versus content. The proposed framework explains therapeutic change in group therapy in relational terms, that is, therapeutic dissonance, the dynamic interaction of self and experience as well as building empathic trusting relations. The importance of managing dissonance to aid personally meaningful recovery was highlighted. These findings have implications for the usefulness of relational and person-centered approaches to clinical practice in the area of interpersonal and complex trauma, especially in the early identification, prevention, and management of dropouts.

  19. Measurement of anatomy contouring in EPI review: a practical method for use in radiation therapy departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halkett, Georgia; Williams, Marie

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment verification can be performed using hard copy portal films or digital Electronic Portal Images (EPI) of the treatment field, acquired at the time of treatment. This paper describes a practical method of assessing the accuracy of reference anatomy outlining, for treatment sites involving the pelvis, breast and lumbar spine. Seven original bone anatomy outlines contoured onto verification images of five patients, were printed on transparency sheets and reference points were marked at equal distances along the anatomy curves. Two sample anatomy contour sets were created by two independent radiation therapists who outlined visible bone anatomy on the same seven digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and hard copy outlines were obtained. Three independent observers with differing levels of experience, assessed the discrepancies between the original anatomy contours and the sample sets on two occasions one week apart, by measuring the distances between the original and sample set contours (absolute values in mm). The degree of agreement between the same assessor on two occasions (intra-rater reliability) and between assessors (inter-rater reliability) was analysed using parametric analysis for levels of relationship and significant differences. This simple method of reference anatomy outline measurement was shown to be highly reliable within assessors and between assessors (r > 0.87 and rz > 0.75 for both intra- and inter-rater comparisons). This measurement process may be a suitable method, for undertaking quality assurance activities in image verification within radiation therapy departments. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients naive to antiretroviral therapy or receiving a first-line treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, Leonardo; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Magistrelli, Eleonora; Rossi, Nicolo'; Rosselli Del Turco, Elena; Bussini, Linda; Borderi, Marco; Viale, Pierluigi

    2017-05-01

    The combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has dramatically improved the life expectancy of patients with HIV infection, but may lead to several long-term metabolic abnormalities. However, data about the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected people vary considerably across different observational studies. The prevalence of MS among HIV-infected patients was evaluated by a cross-sectional study conducted among subjects naive to cART or receiving the first antiretroviral regimen and referring to our Clinics from January 2015 to December 2015. The diagnosis of MS was made based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. The study recruited 586 patients: 98 naive to cART and 488 under the first antiretroviral treatment. The prevalence of MS, according to NCEP-ATP III criteria, was significantly higher among treated patients than among naive ones (20.9% vs. 7.1%; p = 0.014). The most frequently reported components of MS among treated patients were high triglycerides (44.3%), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (41.1%), and hypertension (19.7%). On multivariate analysis, long duration of HIV infection, low nadir of CD4 lymphocytes, high body mass index, current use of one protease inhibitor, and long duration of cART were significantly associated with a higher risk of MS, while current use of one integrase inhibitor was significantly associated with a lower risk of MS. The non-negligible prevalence of MS among HIV-infected patients under cART requires a careful and periodic monitoring of its components, with particular attention to dyslipidemia and hypertension.

  1. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF DIABETES MELLITUS: CORRECTION OF EARLY DISORDERS OF GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mamedov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Early glucose metabolism disorders (GMD are of interest in development of effective approaches to prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Data of international clinical trials shows that early GMD are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The possibilities of GMD prevention and early treatment are discussed. Antihyperglycemic medications classification, their mode of action and efficacy are presented from evidence-based medicine point of view. This data confirms that successful DM primary prevention at early stage of GMD reduces the risk of cardiovascular complications.

  2. Long-Term Improvement of Neurological Signs and Metabolic Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Krabbe's Disease after Global Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michael S; Issa, Yazan; Jakubauskas, Benas; Stoskute, Monika; Elackattu, Vince; Marshall, Jeffrey N; Bogue, Wil; Nguyen, Duc; Hauck, Zane; Rue, Emily; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Zaric, Violeta; Bosland, Maarten; van Breemen, Richard B; Givogri, Maria I; Gray, Steven J; Crocker, Stephen J; Bongarzone, Ernesto R

    2018-03-07

    We report a global adeno-associated virus (AAV)9-based gene therapy protocol to deliver therapeutic galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme that is deficient in Krabbe's disease. When globally administered via intrathecal, intracranial, and intravenous injections to newborn mice affected with GALC deficiency (twitcher mice), this approach largely surpassed prior published benchmarks of survival and metabolic correction, showing long-term protection of demyelination, neuroinflammation, and motor function. Bone marrow transplantation, performed in this protocol without immunosuppressive preconditioning, added minimal benefits to the AAV9 gene therapy. Contrasting with other proposed pre-clinical therapies, these results demonstrate that achieving nearly complete correction of GALC's metabolic deficiencies across the entire nervous system via gene therapy can have a significant improvement to behavioral deficits, pathophysiological changes, and survival. These results are an important consideration for determining the safest and most effective manner for adapting gene therapy to treat this leukodystrophy in the clinic. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Aesthetic Turn in Mental Health: Reflections on an Explorative Study into Practices in the Arts Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Samaritter

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper will draw on materials from arts therapies literature and comments from experts’ panels to discuss some specific characteristics of the arts therapies and to investigate the role of aesthetic engagement for resilience and mental well-being. The arts increasingly find their way as interventions in mental health domains. However, explorations into the specific mechanisms that underpin the therapeutic effect of arts-based activities are still scarce. Qualitative data were collected from a thematic literature review and expert comments on meaningful working procedures in arts therapies. Analysis of multiple data sources revealed core themes and core procedures that occur across arts therapy modalities. This paper presents a practice informed model of arts-based methods in mental health that may serve as a conceptual frame of reference for arts therapists and as study material on the applicability of arts therapy interventions for specific mental health settings.

  4. Metabolic transit of radiocaesium in domestic animals - practical application in an accidental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Vincent-Naulleau, S.

    2001-01-01

    When a serious nuclear accident occurs, the radioisotopes of caesium are very worrying to public health. Because of their long environmental persistence, their diffusion and their solubility in natural environments, they are present in many foodstuffs. Numerous studies were undertaken during the atmospheric nuclear tests, but since the accident of Tchernobyl land Goiania, this research has been pursued anew. By using the experimental data,, this report takes stock of the knowledge on the metabolic transit of radiocaesium in domestic animals. The transfer of this radionuclide in the major foodstuffs of animal origin (milk, meat, eggs) is important and depends on the metabolism of the animal species, and in one species, the age, the physiologic state and the diet. Nevertheless, it is possible to restrict the radioactive contamination by adding to all animal feed, some additives. The methods for in vivo determination of the radioactive measurements in cattle, in laboratory or in real conditions, are discussed too. Finally, all these results are used to consider the short-, middle- and long-term management of an accidental situation. (authors)

  5. Combination therapy with lercanidipine and enalapril reduced central blood pressure augmentation in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Cartoni, Giulia; Stea, Francesco; Magagna, Armando; Virdis, Agostino; Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Claudio; Taddei, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) augmentation are independent predictors of cardiovascular events. In a randomized, open, parallel group study we compared the effect on these parameters of combination therapy with an ACE-inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker or thiazide diuretic in 76 hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome uncontrolled by ACE-inhibitor monotherapy. After 4weeks run-in with enalapril (ENA, 20mg), patients were randomized to a combination therapy with lercanidipine (LER, 10-20mg) or hydrochlorothiazide (HCT, 12.5-25mg) for 24weeks. Aortic stiffness (carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV), central BP values and augmentation (augmentation index, AIx) were measured by applanation tonometry. The two groups showed similar office and central BP after run-in. Office (ENA/LER: from 149.1±4.9/94.5±1.5 to 131.7±8.1/82.2±5.3; ENA/HCT: from 150.3±4.7/94.7±2.1 to 133.1±7.1/82.8±5.3mmHg) and central BP (ENA/LER 127.4±17.1/85.2±12.1 to 120.5±13.5/80.0±9.5mmHg; ENA/HCT 121.6±13.4/79.3±9.5mmHg) were similarly reduced after 24weeks. PWV was comparable after run-in and not differently reduced by the two treatments (ENA/LER from 8.6±1.5 to 8.1±1.3m/s, pmetabolic syndrome not controlled by ENA alone. These results indicate a positive effect of the combination of ENA/LER on central BP augmentation, suggesting a potential additive role for cardiovascular protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Case report of exercise and statin-fibrate combination therapy-caused myopathy in a patient with metabolic syndrome: contradictions between the two main therapeutic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, Andrea; Kalabay, László; Nemcsik, János

    2013-02-06

    Lifestyle modifications including exercise are beneficial and fundamentally part of the therapy of metabolic syndrome, although in most of the cases medical interventions are also required to reach the target values in the laboratory parameters. Statin and fibrate combination therapy is considered to be safe and effective in dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. However, increased physical activity can enhance the statin and fibrate-associated myopathy. Myositis and the rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis are causing a conflict between exercise and statin-fibrate therapy, which is yet to be resolved. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man with metabolic syndrome who had the side-effect of exercise and drug-associated myositis. The patient had only transient moderate complaints and rhabdomyolysis could be avoided with the one-month creatine kinase control, a test which is not recommended routinely by the new guidelines. We would like to turn the spotlight on the possible complications of statin-fibrate therapy and exercise, when strict follow-up is recommended. In this condition high number of patients can be affected and the responsibility of general practitioners is accentuated.

  7. Pacemaker diagnostics in atrial fibrillation: limited usefulness for therapy initiation in a pacemaker practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlapati, Neeraja; Fisher, John D

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to determine the practical value of pacemaker diagnostics for atrial fibrillation (AF) in an unselected general pacemaker practice, specifically workflow and initiation of anticoagulation or antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy. We prospectively followed consecutive pacemaker interrogations over a period of 1 year to identify patients with AF (burden from 1% to 99%). We contacted referring physicians with AF details, and then determined whether the information resulted in therapeutic changes. Of the 1,100 pacemakers interrogated, 728 were dual chamber (DDDs) with AF diagnostic capability. AF was recorded in 73 (10%) but seven had limited information, leaving 66 patients; of these, 42 (63%) patients were already anticoagulated and in five (7%) patients, anticoagulation had been stopped because of complications. Initial diagnosis of AF was made by the pacemaker in 17 patients (26% of 66; 2% of 728); four (6% of 66) patients were newly initiated on anticoagulation. Of the 66 patients, 17 patients were already on AADs; 49 (74%) had satisfactory rate control or had other issues; only two (3% of 66; 0.3% of 728) received new AADs. Of 728 patients with DDD pacemakers, only 17 were newly discovered to have AF, and six (0.8%) had changes in medications based on the pacemaker data. Adding pacemaker-derived data to existing clinical information had little therapeutic impact, due to a combination of cumbersome workflow, and because AF was usually known to practitioners. Developments in automated monitoring systems may provide more accessible and therapeutically useful information. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Use of Simulation Learning Experiences in Physical Therapy Entry-to-Practice Curricula: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Heather; Herold, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To review the literature on simulation-based learning experiences and to examine their potential to have a positive impact on physiotherapy (PT) learners' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in entry-to-practice curricula. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in the MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase Classic+Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science databases, using keywords such as physical therapy, simulation, education, and students. Results: A total of 820 abstracts were screened, and 23 articles were included in the systematic review. While there were few randomized controlled trials with validated outcome measures, some discoveries about simulation can positively affect the design of the PT entry-to-practice curricula. Using simulators to provide specific output feedback can help students learn specific skills. Computer simulations can also augment students' learning experience. Human simulation experiences in managing the acute patient in the ICU are well received by students, positively influence their confidence, and decrease their anxiety. There is evidence that simulated learning environments can replace a portion of a full-time 4-week clinical rotation without impairing learning. Conclusions: Simulation-based learning activities are being effectively incorporated into PT curricula. More rigorously designed experimental studies that include a cost–benefit analysis are necessary to help curriculum developers make informed choices in curriculum design. PMID:25931672

  9. Future directions for ICT in aphasia therapy for older adults: enhancing current practices through interdisciplinary perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kötteritzsch, Anna; Gerling, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Growing numbers of older adults requiring aphasia therapy create challenges for the health care system. Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to provide computer-mediated, self-administered aphasia therapy that complements conventional therapy. We explore overlaps in ICT for older adults and aphasia therapy applications with the goal of integrating innovative ICT in aphasia therapy. Based on a case study, we explain how results of different disciplines developing IC...

  10. Cross-sectional study to examine evidence-based practice skills and behaviors of physical therapy graduates: is there a knowledge-to-practice gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Patricia J; Norton, Amy V; Darrah, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Curricula changes in physical therapist education programs in Canada emphasize evidence-based practice skills, including literature retrieval and evaluation. Do graduates use these skills in practice? The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of research information in the clinical decision making of therapists with different years of experience and evidence-based practice preparation. Perceptions about evidence-based practice were explored qualitatively. A cross-sectional study with 4 graduating cohorts was conducted. Eighty physical therapists representing 4 different graduating cohorts participated in interviews focused on 2 clinical scenarios. Participants had varying years of clinical experience (range=1-15 years) and academic knowledge of evidence-based practice skills. Therapists discussed the effectiveness of interventions related to the scenarios and identified the sources of information used to reach decisions. Participants also answered general questions related to evidence-based practice knowledge. Recent graduates demonstrated better knowledge of evidence-based practice skills compared with therapists with 6 to 15 years of clinical experience. However, all groups used clinical experience most frequently as their source of information for clinical decisions. Research evidence was infrequently included in decision making. This study used a convenience sample of therapists who agreed to volunteer for the study. The results suggest a knowledge-to-practice gap; graduates are not using the new skills to inform their practice. Tailoring academic evidence-based activities more to the time constraints of clinical practice may help students to be more successful in applying evidence in practice. Academic programs need to do more to create and nurture environments in both academic and clinical settings to ensure students practice using evidence-based practice skills across settings. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  11. The Challenge of Cultural Competency in the Multicultural 21st Century: A Conceptual Model to Guide Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Darawsheh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available bstract Background: Occupational therapists increasingly encounter clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and need to meet their professional obligation of delivering culturally competent practice. Yet the process of cultural competency is poorly understood in occupational therapy practice. There is a need for a clear understanding of the meaning and process of cultural competency as it is enacted in practice with a wide range of individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds. Aim: To investigate the process, stages, characteristics, and requirements of cultural competency as practiced by experienced occupational therapists. Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 community occupational therapists experienced in delivering occupational therapy services in clients’ homes in a culturally diverse area in London, England. Findings: Interview data were analyzed and ordered into the format of a conceptual process model where cultural competency formed the core concept. The model of cultural competency that emerged from this study comprised six stages: cultural awareness, cultural preparedness, a cultural picture of the person, cultural responsiveness, cultural readiness, and cultural competence. Conclusion: Cultural competency is a complex process that needs to be based on underpinning occupational theory and actualized at the level of practice. Further research is needed to test out the model and illuminate the process of cultural competency in different areas of occupational therapy practice.

  12. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  13. Adherence of physical therapy with clinical practice guidelines for the rehabilitation of stroke in an active inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M S, Ajimsha; Kooven, Smithesh; Al-Mudahka, Noora

    2018-03-09

    Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners and patients to make decisions about appropriate health care. Clinical practice guideline adherence analysis is the best way to fine tune the best practices in a health care industry with international benchmarks. To assess the physical therapist's adherence to structured stroke clinical practice guidelines in an active inpatient rehabilitation center in Qatar. Department of Physical therapy in the stroke rehabilitation tertiary referral hospital in Qatar. A retrospective chart audit was performed on the clinical records of 216 stroke patients discharged from the active inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit with a diagnosis of stroke in 2016. The audit check list was structured to record the adherence of the assessment, goal settings and the management domains as per the "Physical Therapy After Acute Stroke" (PAAS) guideline. Of the 216 case files identified during the initial search, 127 files were ultimately included in the audit. Overall adherence to the clinical practice guideline was 71%, a comparable rate with the studies analyzing the same in various international health care facilities. Domains which were shared by interdisciplinary teams than managed by physical therapy alone and treatments utilizing sophisticated technology had lower adherence with the guideline. A detailed strength and weakness breakdown were then conducted. This audit provides an initial picture of the current adherence of physical therapy assessment and management with the stroke physical therapy guideline at a tertiary rehabilitation hospital in the state of Qatar. An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the physical therapy care to a highest possible standard of practice. Implications for Rehabilitation  • An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the rehabilitation care to the highest possible standard

  14. Therapy by electromagnetic wave of millimeter energy range (EFH-therapy, MRT, IWT). Scientific and practical materials on the use of physical factors in clinical and health resort practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samosyuk, I.Z.; Chukhraev, N.V.; Shimkov, G.E.; Bitson, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    EHF-therapy method is a principally new method of treatment which is based on the peculiarities in perception by human organism the magnetic radiation of millimeter energy range. Practical use of this method has shown its high therapeutic efficiency at influencing on acupuncture points. This monography is completely devoted to description of EHF-therapy effects on acupuncture points with account of the Chinese reflexotherapy. Apparats of 'MIT' and 'Eleknronika-EHF' series do not provoke any damages in biological structures and refer to the safe class. The proposed scientific and practical materials on the use of physical factors in clinical and health resort practice are edited in addition to the previous monograph under the same title. These materials are of use for physicians of different specializations and listeners of medical advanced courses

  15. Snipping, Gluing, Writing: The Properties of Collage as an Arts-Based Research Practice in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Gioia; Scotti, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an artistic inquiry conducted by two art therapists using a dialogic method of collage and letter writing over a period of 4 weeks. The goal of the project was to broaden understanding of arts-based research and to discover the properties of collage as a research practice in art therapy. A thematic analysis of the visual and…

  16. Developing the Therapeutic Potential of Embodied Cognition and Metaphors in Nature-Based Therapy: Lessons from Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazon, Sus S.; Schilhab, Theresa S. S.; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper theoretically examines the interplay between cognition and bodily involvement in relation to nature-based therapy and proposes implications for practice. With support from theory within embodied cognition and neuroscientific studies, it is argued that explicit learning is actively supported by bodily involvement with the environment.…

  17. Selecting relevant and feasible measurement instruments for the revised Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, Nicoline; Veerbeek, Janne; Schiemanck, Sven; van der Wees, Philip; Nollet, Frans; Kwakkel, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To select relevant and feasible instruments for the revision of the Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients with stroke. Methods: In this implementation study a comprehensive proposal for ICF categories and matching instruments was developed, based on reliability

  18. Selecting relevant and feasible measurement instruments for the revised Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, N.; Veerbeek, J.; Schiemanck, S.; Wees, P.J. van der; Nollet, F.; Kwakkel, G.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To select relevant and feasible instruments for the revision of the Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients with stroke. METHODS: In this implementation study a comprehensive proposal for ICF categories and matching instruments was developed, based on reliability

  19. Preparing Occupational Therapy Students to Address Mental Health Promotion, Prevention, and Intervention in School-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Cindy DeRuiter; Bilics, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Directors of entry-level occupational therapy (OT) programs were surveyed regarding how their programs prepare students to become mental health practitioners in schools. Analysis of quantitative data included descriptive statistics to examine participants' ratings of their program's ability to prepare students for mental health practice. We found…

  20. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students : are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Dijk; B. Spek; M Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness

  1. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students: are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use

  2. Adventure-Based Experiential Therapy with Inpatients in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: An Approach to Practicability and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Florian; Rüth, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the use of adventure-based experiential therapy (AET) with child and adolescent psychiatry inpatients. AET environments, indications, practicality, therapeutic effects and research are outlined and clinical findings are reported. Activities such as rock-climbing, exploring a creek and caving are discussed and the limitations…

  3. Review of Occupational Therapy Intervention Research in the Practice Area of Children and Youth 2009–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Roxanna M.; Huang, Yu Yun; Lim, Yoonjeong

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. We conducted a systematic review examining the extent to which pediatric intervention research recently published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy reflects occupational therapy’s holistic occupation-based tenets. METHOD. We surveyed 10 systematic reviews and analyzed 38 single effectiveness studies for intervention approach, type, level of environmental targeting, level of occupational task and participation practice, and measures used. RESULTS. Of the 38 single effectiveness studies, 12 (32%) explicitly incorporated both environmental targets of intervention and practice of complex or in vivo occupational tasks, with steady increases during the 2009–2013 time frame. CONCLUSION. In the area of children and youth, occupational therapy is making steady gains in reflecting and demonstrating the effectiveness of the profession’s holistic, occupation-based tenets. Occupational therapy researchers must be mindful to ensure that despite the reductionist nature of intervention research, interventions reflect the profession’s holistic understanding of the interplay between the child, environment, and occupations. PMID:24581415

  4. Guidelines for information about therapy experiments: a proposal on best practice for recording experimental data on cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Beltrán, Alejandra N; Yong, May Y; Dancey, Gairin; Begent, Richard

    2012-01-06

    Biology, biomedicine and healthcare have become data-driven enterprises, where scientists and clinicians need to generate, access, validate, interpret and integrate different kinds of experimental and patient-related data. Thus, recording and reporting of data in a systematic and unambiguous fashion is crucial to allow aggregation and re-use of data. This paper reviews the benefits of existing biomedical data standards and focuses on key elements to record experiments for therapy development. Specifically, we describe the experiments performed in molecular, cellular, animal and clinical models. We also provide an example set of elements for a therapy tested in a phase I clinical trial. We introduce the Guidelines for Information About Therapy Experiments (GIATE), a minimum information checklist creating a consistent framework to transparently report the purpose, methods and results of the therapeutic experiments. A discussion on the scope, design and structure of the guidelines is presented, together with a description of the intended audience. We also present complementary resources such as a classification scheme, and two alternative ways of creating GIATE information: an electronic lab notebook and a simple spreadsheet-based format. Finally, we use GIATE to record the details of the phase I clinical trial of CHT-25 for patients with refractory lymphomas. The benefits of using GIATE for this experiment are discussed. While data standards are being developed to facilitate data sharing and integration in various aspects of experimental medicine, such as genomics and clinical data, no previous work focused on therapy development. We propose a checklist for therapy experiments and demonstrate its use in the 131Iodine labeled CHT-25 chimeric antibody cancer therapy. As future work, we will expand the set of GIATE tools to continue to encourage its use by cancer researchers, and we will engineer an ontology to annotate GIATE elements and facilitate unambiguous

  5. Guidelines for information about therapy experiments: a proposal on best practice for recording experimental data on cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Beltrán Alejandra N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biology, biomedicine and healthcare have become data-driven enterprises, where scientists and clinicians need to generate, access, validate, interpret and integrate different kinds of experimental and patient-related data. Thus, recording and reporting of data in a systematic and unambiguous fashion is crucial to allow aggregation and re-use of data. This paper reviews the benefits of existing biomedical data standards and focuses on key elements to record experiments for therapy development. Specifically, we describe the experiments performed in molecular, cellular, animal and clinical models. We also provide an example set of elements for a therapy tested in a phase I clinical trial. Findings We introduce the Guidelines for Information About Therapy Experiments (GIATE, a minimum information checklist creating a consistent framework to transparently report the purpose, methods and results of the therapeutic experiments. A discussion on the scope, design and structure of the guidelines is presented, together with a description of the intended audience. We also present complementary resources such as a classification scheme, and two alternative ways of creating GIATE information: an electronic lab notebook and a simple spreadsheet-based format. Finally, we use GIATE to record the details of the phase I clinical trial of CHT-25 for patients with refractory lymphomas. The benefits of using GIATE for this experiment are discussed. Conclusions While data standards are being developed to facilitate data sharing and integration in various aspects of experimental medicine, such as genomics and clinical data, no previous work focused on therapy development. We propose a checklist for therapy experiments and demonstrate its use in the 131Iodine labeled CHT-25 chimeric antibody cancer therapy. As future work, we will expand the set of GIATE tools to continue to encourage its use by cancer researchers, and we will engineer an ontology to

  6. Pharmacogenetics and Metabolism from Science to Implementation in Clinical Practice: The Example of Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Re, Marzia; Restante, Giuliana; Di Paolo, Antonello; Crucitta, Stefania; Rofi, Eleonora; Danesi, Romano

    2017-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines are widely used in the treatment of solid tumors and remain the backbone of many combination chemotherapy regimens. Despite their clinical benefit, they are associated with frequent gastrointestinal and hematological toxicities, which often lead to treatment discontinuation. Fluoropyrimidines undergo complex anabolic and catabolic biotransformation. Enzymes involved in this pathway include dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), which breaks down 5-FU and its prodrugs. Candidate gene approaches have demonstrated associations between 5-FU treatment outcomes and germline polymorphisms in DPD. The aim of this review is to report and discuss the latest results on fluoropyrimidine pharmacogenetics. Literature from PubMed databases and bibliography from retrieved publications have been analyzed according to terms such DPD, DPYD, fluoropyrimdines, polymorphisms, toxicity, pharmacogenetics. To date, many sequence variations have been identified within DPYD gene, although the majority of these have no functional consequences on enzymatic activity. Nowadays, there is a general agreement on the clinical significance of the importance of DPD deficiency in patients who suffer from severe, life-threatening drug toxicity although preemptive testing is not applied to all patients. Considering the published literature, clinicians are strongly encouraged to consider testing for DPD poor metabolizer variants as a rational pre-treatment screening for patients candidate to a fluoropyrimidine-based regimens, in order to prevent toxicities and personalise treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Different effects of paliperidone and risperidone therapy on blood lipid and Hcy metabolism as well as endocrine hormones in patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Bei-Fang Fan; Ze-Hui Li; Shuo Yang; Cai-Hong Gao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore the different effects of paliperidone and risperidone therapy on blood lipid and Hcy metabolism as well as endocrine hormones in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 118 patients with schizophrenia who were treated in the hospital between December 2014 and February 2017 were collected as the research subjects and divided into control group and study group by random number table, each group with 59 cases. Control group received risperidone thera...

  8. Mitochondrial genomics and antiretroviral therapy-associated metabolic complications in HIV-infected Black South Africans: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinxadi, Phumla Z; Dave, Joel A; Samuels, David C; Heckmann, Jeannine M; Maartens, Gary; Levitt, Naomi S; Wester, C William; Haas, David W; Hulgan, Todd

    2013-07-01

    Studies suggest that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART)-related metabolic complications and distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP), but there have been few studies in persons of African descent. We explored such associations in South African adults. Clinical and laboratory data and DNA specimens from a cross-sectional study were used. Sequencing and Phylotree determined African mtDNA subhaplogroups. Wilcoxon and regression analyses determined associations between mtDNA subhaplogroups and ART-related complications. The 171 participants represented six major haplogroups: L0 (n=78), L1 (n=3), L2 (n=30), L3 (n=53), L4 (n=1), and L5 (n=6). Analyses were restricted to 161 participants representing L0, L2, and L3: 78% were female; the median age was 36 years. All had been exposed to thymidine analogues, 42% were on lopinavir/ritonavir (lopinavir/r), and 58% were on either efavirenz or nevirapine. Median (IQR) ART duration was 22 (14-36) months. Median fasting triglycerides were 1.60 (1.13-1.75) and 1.04 (0.83-1.45) mmol/liter among L3e1 (n=22) and other subhaplogroups, respectively (p=0.003). Subhaplogroup L3e1 [adjusted OR (aOR) 3.16 (95% CI: 1.11-8.96); p=0.03] and exposure to lopinavir/r [aOR 2.98 (95% CI: 1.02-8.96); p=0.05] were independently associated with hypertriglyceridemia, after adjusting for age, sex, and ART duration. There were no significant associations between mtDNA haplogroups and cholesterol, dysglycemia, hyperlactatemia, or lipoatrophy, or DSP. Subhaplogroup L3e1 and lopinavir/r exposure were independently associated with hypertriglyceridemia in black South Africans on ART. This is the first report to link an African mtDNA variant with hypertriglyceridemia. If replicated, these findings may provide new insights into host factors affecting metabolic complications.

  9. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice: a study by the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D; Horowitz, Allan J; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G

    2012-05-01

    The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for teeth with irreversible pulpitis, necrotic pulp or periapical

  10. [DYNAMIC OF CLINICAL, LABORATORY AND SONOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER SUCCESSFUL LITHOLITIC THERAPY AT PATIENTS WITH GALLSTONE DISEASE IN ASSOCIATION WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaus, O V; Akhmedov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of study was to determine the leading clinical, immunological and sonographic pararneters, reflecting the efficiency of Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at the rate of 10 mg per 1 kg of body weight in the treatment of gallstone disease in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). An assessment of clinical, biochemical immunological and sonographic parameters in 54 patients with gallstone disease associated with the metabolic syndrome before and after the six-month treatment UDCA were made. In accordance with our results the significant predictors, reflecting successful litholitic therapy at patients with gallstone disease in association with metabolic syndrome are decrease the serum concentration of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (P = 0.003), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (P = 0.001), increase the serum concentration of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (P = 0.02), decrease the left liver lobe thickness (P = 0,003) and the thickness of gallbladder wall (P = 0.0002). The results of our study have shown that the therapy with ursodesoxycholic acid of patients with metabolic syndrome leads to decrease of factors of gallstone progression (elevated levels of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and increased thickness of the left lobe liver and gallbladder wall).

  11. Energy metabolism disorders in rare and common diseases. Toward bioenergetic modulation therapy and the training of a new generation of European scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2015-06-01

    Energy metabolism alterations are found in a large number of rare and common diseases of genetic or environmental origin. The number of patients that could benefit from bioenergetic modulation therapy (BIOMET) is therefore very important and includes individuals with pathologies as diverse as mitochondrial diseases, acute coronary syndrome, chronic kidney disease, asthma or even cancer. Although, the alteration of energy metabolism is disease specific and sometimes patient specific, the strategies for BIOMET could be common and target a series of bioenergetic regulatory mechanisms discussed in this article. An excellent training of scientists in the field of energy metabolism, related human diseases and drug discovery is also crucial to form a young generation of MDs, PHDs and Pharma or CRO-group leaders who will discover novel personalized bioenergetic medicines, through pharmacology, genetics, nutrition or adapted exercise training. The Mitochondrial European Educational Training (MEET) consortium was created to pursue this goal, and we dedicated here a special issue of Organelle in Focus (OiF) to highlight their objectives. A total of 10 OiFs articles constitute this Directed Issue on Mitochondrial Medicine. As part of this editorial article, we asked timely questions to the PR. Jan W. Smeitink, professor of Mitochondrial Medicine and CEO of Khondrion, a mitochondrial medicine company. He shared with us his objectives and strategies for the study of mitochondrial diseases and the identification of future treatments. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Severe metabolic or mixed acidemia on intensive care unit admission: incidence, prognosis and administration of buffer therapy. A prospective, multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Boris; Rimmele, Thomas; Le Goff, Charlotte; Chanques, Gérald; Corne, Philippe; Jonquet, Olivier; Muller, Laurent; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Guervilly, Christophe; Papazian, Laurent; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Jaber, Samir

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sought describe the incidence and outcomes of severe metabolic or mixed acidemia in critically ill patients as well as the use of sodium bicarbonate therapy to treat these illnesses. We conducted a prospective, observational, multiple-center study. Consecutive patients who presented with severe acidemia, defined herein as plasma pH below 7.20, were screened. The incidence, sodium bicarbonate prescription and outcomes of either metabolic or mixed severe acidemia were analyzed. Among 2, 550 critically ill patients, 200 (8%) presented with severe acidemia, and 155 (6% of the total admissions) met the inclusion criteria. Almost all patients needed mechanical ventilation and vasopressors during their ICU stay, and 20% of them required renal replacement therapy within the first 24 hours of their ICU stay. Severe metabolic or mixed acidemia was associated with a mortality rate of 57% in the ICU. Delay of acidemia recovery as opposed to initial pH value was associated with increased mortality in the ICU. The type of acidemia did not influence the decision to administer sodium bicarbonate. The incidence of severe metabolic or mixed acidemia in critically ill patients was 6% in the present study, and it was associated with a 57% mortality rate in the ICU. In contradistinction with the initial acid-base parameters, the rapidity of acidemia recovery was an independent risk factor for mortality. Sodium bicarbonate prescription was very heterogeneous between ICUs. Further studies assessing specific treatments may be of interest in this population.

  13. Severe metabolic or mixed acidemia on intensive care unit admission: incidence, prognosis and administration of buffer therapy. a prospective, multiple-center study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we sought describe the incidence and outcomes of severe metabolic or mixed acidemia in critically ill patients as well as the use of sodium bicarbonate therapy to treat these illnesses. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational, multiple-center study. Consecutive patients who presented with severe acidemia, defined herein as plasma pH below 7.20, were screened. The incidence, sodium bicarbonate prescription and outcomes of either metabolic or mixed severe acidemia were analyzed. Results Among 2, 550 critically ill patients, 200 (8%) presented with severe acidemia, and 155 (6% of the total admissions) met the inclusion criteria. Almost all patients needed mechanical ventilation and vasopressors during their ICU stay, and 20% of them required renal replacement therapy within the first 24 hours of their ICU stay. Severe metabolic or mixed acidemia was associated with a mortality rate of 57% in the ICU. Delay of acidemia recovery as opposed to initial pH value was associated with increased mortality in the ICU. The type of acidemia did not influence the decision to administer sodium bicarbonate. Conclusions The incidence of severe metabolic or mixed acidemia in critically ill patients was 6% in the present study, and it was associated with a 57% mortality rate in the ICU. In contradistinction with the initial acid-base parameters, the rapidity of acidemia recovery was an independent risk factor for mortality. Sodium bicarbonate prescription was very heterogeneous between ICUs. Further studies assessing specific treatments may be of interest in this population. PMID:21995879

  14. AMTA Monograph Series. Effective Clinical Practice in Music Therapy: Music Therapy for Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Barbara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Whether new to the profession or an experienced clinician, this text provides a wealth of state-of-the-art information for undergraduates, graduates and professionals. This volume covers the wide range of mental disorder diagnoses and addresses specific populations such as forensic and drug and alcohol rehabilitation. How music therapy is used…

  15. Structured hypocaloric diet is more effective than behavioral therapy in reducing metabolic syndrome in Mexican postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Muñoz-Manrique, Cinthya; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Mier-Cabrera, Jennifer; Aguilera-Pérez, Jesús Rafael

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of a lifestyle intervention using a behavioral therapy (BT) approach with the effects of a cardioprotective structured hypocaloric diet on metabolic syndrome in Mexican postmenopausal women. This study is a randomized clinical trial (2006-2009) of Mexican postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III criteria) who were recruited from the Postmenopause Clinic of the National Institute of Perinatology in Mexico City. Women were assigned to one of two groups--group 1 (structured hypocaloric diet; n = 63): energy restriction (-300 to -500 kcal/d) emphasizing cardioprotective dietary changes; and group 2 (BT; n = 55): goal setting, problem-solving, and stimulus control to achieve cardioprotective dietary and lifestyle recommendations. Metabolic syndrome prevalence, as well as weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and fasting biochemical markers (glucose and lipid profile), were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, and 6 months after the intervention. Metabolic syndrome risk (relative risk and absolute risk reduction), mean differences between groups, and logistic regression were evaluated using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software, version 17.0. A total of 118 women were studied (mean [SD] age, 53.81 [6.43] y). No baseline differences were observed between groups. At the end of the study, a higher reduction in metabolic syndrome prevalence was observed in group 1 (-38.1%) compared with group 2 (-12.7%; relative risk, 0.237; 95% CI, 0.092-0.608; P = 0.003). The effect was maintained even when adjusted by age, hormone therapy and antihypertensive drug use. A cardioprotective structured hypocaloric diet is more effective than the BT approach in reducing metabolic syndrome after 6 months of intervention. Both strategies have positive effects on different individual cardiovascular risk factors.

  16. Negative Impact of Testosterone Deficiency and 5α-Reductase Inhibitors Therapy on Metabolic and Sexual Function in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2017-01-01

    Androgens are steroid hormones with pleotropic and diverse biochemical and physiological functions, and androgen deficiency exerts a negative impact on human health. Testosterone (T) either directly or via its transformation into the more potent metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) or via aromatization into estradiol (E 2 ) modulates important biochemical signaling pathways of human physiology and plays a critical role in the growth and/or maintenance of functions in a host of tissues and organs. T and 5α-DHT play an important role in regulating physiology of the muscle, adipose tissue, liver, bone, and central nervous system, as well as reproductive and sexual functions. Thus, androgen deficiency (also referred to as hypogonadism) is a well-recognized medical condition and if remained untreated will have a negative impact on human health and quality of life.In this chapter, we have summarized the negative impact of T deficiency (TD) on a host of physiological functions including reduced lean body mass (LBM), increased fat mass (FM), increased insulin resistance (IR), metabolic syndrome (MetS) and adiposity, reduced bone mineral density (BMD), anemia, sexual dysfunction, and reduced quality of life and increased mortality. In addition, we discuss another critical aspect of unrecognized form of androgen deficiency resulting from inhibition of 5α-reductases with drugs, such as finasteride and dutasteride, to block transformation of T into 5α-DHT in the course of treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and male pattern hair loss, also known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA). The negative impact of drugs that inhibit transformation of T to 5α-DHT by 5α-reductases on metabolic function is manifested in fat accumulation in the liver, which may predispose to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Also, inhibition of 5α-DHT formation increases glucose synthesis and reduces glucose disposal potentially contributing to hyperglycemia, IR, and

  17. CRRTnet: a prospective, multi-national, observational study of continuous renal replacement therapy practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Michael; Bagshaw, Sean M; House, Andrew A; Juncos, Luis A; Piazza, Robin; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-07-06

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is the recommended modality of dialysis for critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability. Yet there remains significant variability in how CRRT is prescribed and delivered, and limited evidence-basis to guide practice. This is a prospective, multi-center observational study of patients undergoing CRRT. Initial enrollment phase will occur at 4 academic medical centers in North America over 5 years, with a target enrollment of 2000 patients. All adult patients (18-89 years of age) receiving CRRT will be eligible for inclusion; patients who undergo CRRT for less than 24 h will be excluded from analysis. Data collection will include patient characteristics at baseline and at time of CRRT initiation; details of CRRT prescription and delivery, including machine-generated treatment data; and patient outcomes. The goal of this study is to establish a large comprehensive registry of critically ill adults receiving CRRT. Specific aims include describing variations in CRRT prescription and delivery across quality domains; validating quality measures for CRRT care by correlating processes and outcomes; and establishing a large registry for use in quality improvement and benchmarking efforts. For initial analyses, some particular areas of interest are anticoagulation protocols; approach to fluid overload; CRRT-related workload; and patient safety. Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov 1/10/2014: NCT02034448.

  18. Insulin pump therapy in children with diabetes mellitus: practice of Krasnoyarsk Krai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Evgen'evna Taranushenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To summarize practical experience of insulin pump therapy (IPT in child population of Krasnoyarsk and to assess its efficacy for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in paediatrics. Materials and Methods. We performed a comparative analysis of clinical and laboratory data from 48 children with T1DM prior to and after 6-12 months of IPT. Results. IPT yielded fourfold decrease in complaints of hyperglycemia and labile glycemia without concurrent increase in reports of severe hypoglycemia.  We observed a trend for lowering of mean HbA1c levels, where 65% of patients showed positive dynamics in comparison with the period of multiple daily injection regimen. Interestingly, after 6-12 months of IPT, insulin requirement dropped in most patients. Conclusion. Our data support clinical efficiency and safety of IPT, as well as superiority of this treatment over multiple daily injection regimen. We conclude that IPT is a treatment of choice for children with T1DM.

  19. Cutaneous epidermoid carcinoma (spinocellular carcinoma): clinical practice recommendations for diagnosis and therapy. Full report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Ludovic; Bonerandi, Jean-Jacques; Brugneaux, Julie; Beauvillain, Claude; Chassagne, Jean-Francois; Clavere, Pierre; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Grossin, Maggy; Sei, Jean-Francois; Caquant, Ludovic; Chaussade, Veronique; Desouches, Christophe; Garnier, Francois; Jourdain, Alain; Lemonnier, Jean-Yves; Maillard, Herve; Ortonne, Nicolas; Rio, Emmanuel; Simon, Etienne

    2009-01-01

    This guide aims at providing practitioners taking into care patients presenting a cutaneous cancer with recommendations based on scientific evidences or expert agreements. More precisely, the objectives are to clarify the terminology used to describe the different forms of cutaneous epidermoid carcinoma (CEC) and of their precursors (actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease), to propose a prognosis classification of CECs adapted to the previously identified prognosis factors, to optimise the diagnosis and therapy of actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease according to recent publications, and to recall the principles of a primary prevention of CECs and of their precursors, and of screening of high risk individuals. Thus, the different parts of this report address the following issues: anatomic-clinical forms and epidemiology of CECs and of their precursors, prognosis factors of CECs, means of treatment of CECs and of their precursors (medical, physical, surgical, radiation-based, and chemical treatments). Radiotherapy notably comprises external radiotherapy and interstitial brachytherapy. Indications for radiotherapy are discussed with respect to existing guides and to the clinical situation. The authors address the care of CECs and of their precursors (prevention, screening and clinical diagnosis, care of invasive CECs, keratoacanthoma treatment). They finally discuss quality criteria aimed at practice improvement, and perspectives regarding the evolution of this guide and studies to be performed

  20. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace.

  1. Comparison of physical therapy anatomy performance and anxiety scores in timed and untimed practical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sarah M; Evans, Cathy; Agur, Anne M R

    2015-01-01

    Students in health care professional programs face many stressful tests that determine successful completion of their program. Test anxiety during these high stakes examinations can affect working memory and lead to poor outcomes. Methods of decreasing test anxiety include lengthening the time available to complete examinations or evaluating students using untimed examinations. There is currently no consensus in the literature regarding whether untimed examinations provide a benefit to test performance in clinical anatomy. This study aimed to determine the impact of timed versus untimed practical tests on Master of Physical Therapy student anatomy performance and test anxiety. Test anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Differences in performance, anxiety scores, and time taken were compared using paired sample Student's t-tests. Eighty-one of the 84 students completed the study and provided feedback. Students performed significantly higher on the untimed test (P = 0.005), with a significant reduction in test anxiety (P anxiety. If the intended goal of evaluating health care professional students is to determine fundamental competencies, these factors should be considered when designing future curricula. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Practical Guidance on Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) for Neuroendocrine Tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT) using 90 Y-DOTATOC was first administered in 1996 in Basel, Switzerland, to a 40 year old patient with a gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET). The objective was to stabilize the progression of the tumour, which had proven refractory to conventional chemotherapy. The excellent subjective and objective responses after several treatment cycles prompted exhaustive pre-clinical and clinical research to explore the therapeutic potential of PRRNT for the treatment of NETs. Since then, PRRNT using 90 Y- or 177 Lu-DOTATOC has acquired wide acceptance and is now used in many medical centres in Europe and other parts of the world. NET is a unique subclass of cancer in which a good percentage of affected patients may experience disease control following several cycles of PRRNT, with improvement of symptoms and quality of life in the majority of cases. This book is a practical reference for specialists in clinical oncology and nuclear medicine embarking on deploying and executing a comprehensive programme for treating patients with NETs. It is part of a larger endeavour of the IAEA to enable medical centres in Member States to introduce therapeutic applications of unsealed radioisotopes in clinical routine practice. This publication provides comprehensive, multidisciplinary guidance on the use of PRRNT in order to enhance the effective, safe and standardized implementation of best practice for treating patients with NETs and gastroenteropancreatic cancers, with due regard to the recent international classifications of NETs. It provides comprehensive protocols for employing either 90 Y or 177 Lu tagged somatostatin receptor targeting peptides, as well as clinically assessed protocols for renal protection. It is a comprehensive compilation of clinically based evidence with input from experienced and renowned medical professionals in this field. The various sections cover clinical presentations, patient eligibility

  3. Practical Guidance on Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) for Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT) using {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC was first administered in 1996 in Basel, Switzerland, to a 40 year old patient with a gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET). The objective was to stabilize the progression of the tumour, which had proven refractory to conventional chemotherapy. The excellent subjective and objective responses after several treatment cycles prompted exhaustive pre-clinical and clinical research to explore the therapeutic potential of PRRNT for the treatment of NETs. Since then, PRRNT using {sup 90}Y- or {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC has acquired wide acceptance and is now used in many medical centres in Europe and other parts of the world. NET is a unique subclass of cancer in which a good percentage of affected patients may experience disease control following several cycles of PRRNT, with improvement of symptoms and quality of life in the majority of cases. This book is a practical reference for specialists in clinical oncology and nuclear medicine embarking on deploying and executing a comprehensive programme for treating patients with NETs. It is part of a larger endeavour of the IAEA to enable medical centres in Member States to introduce therapeutic applications of unsealed radioisotopes in clinical routine practice. This publication provides comprehensive, multidisciplinary guidance on the use of PRRNT in order to enhance the effective, safe and standardized implementation of best practice for treating patients with NETs and gastroenteropancreatic cancers, with due regard to the recent international classifications of NETs. It provides comprehensive protocols for employing either {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu tagged somatostatin receptor targeting peptides, as well as clinically assessed protocols for renal protection. It is a comprehensive compilation of clinically based evidence with input from experienced and renowned medical professionals in this field. The various sections cover clinical presentations

  4. Integrating Research, Theory-Building, Training, and Practice in CBT Group Therapy for Children and Adolescents with anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael

    This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents. The res......This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents....... The resulting Youth CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus is organized around a short-term, 10-session, evidence-based, manualized, family-based, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group program, called "Cool Kids" for children and "Chilled Adolescents" for adolescents, and derived from Ronald Rapee's work in Australia....... A distinctive aspect of the work of the Youth CBT Therapy Program is their incorporation of a case-study perspective into a series of group designs, including:(a) a randomized treatment vs. waitlist-control efficacy study (n=120); (b) an open, naturalistic effectiveness study of the program in two mental health...

  5. Forming insights: assessment of the occupational therapy practice in a cultural context from experience with indigenous people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Daniela Corrêa de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a reflection process on the issue of occupational therapy and culture through analysis of practical experiences of a extension project. It aimed to increase knowledge and reflections of occupational therapy and its technical actions in cultural contexts from the perspective of ethnicity issues. It is a documental and qualitative research was aiming to report the experience of students and an occupational therapist, obtained through their written reports between 2012 and 2014. Data were analyzed using the categorizations proposed by Bardin. The categories of analysis found are related to technical activities in occupational therapy, namely: cultural and ethnic action. The results showed that, in the experiences with the Guarani community, there are already significant and consolidated actions of occupational therapy in cultural contexts. The technical actions already performed confirm the relevance of the occupational therapist role in the cultural context and in the ethnicity context. These practices are, in turn, relevant for the production of knowledge, the theoretical and methodological scope and professional training in social and cultural contexts of occupational therapy. It is emphasized that technical procedures coherent with the ethnicity issues in a joint relationship, articulated by cultural mediation, can strengthen human doings and identity claims.

  6. Understanding the molecular target therapy and it's approved synchronous use with radiation therapy in current Indian oncology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Puneet; Dohhen, Umesh Kumar; Romana; Srivastava, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    The molecular targeted drugs (MTD) are of two types; large and small. The large molecular targeted drugs (LMTD) cannot cross the cancer cell membrane whereas those that cross the cancer cell membrane are nicknamed small molecular target drugs (SMTD). India has availability of almost all MTD originals approved by USA Food and Drug administration. However a few LMTD like inj vectibix, inj Zevalin, Inj Bexar etc.; and SMTD like cap Tipifarnib approved for AML, are not available in India currently although approved and available in USA. The MTD may he used alone as singlet; along with chemotherapy as doublet or triplet; or along with radiation and chemotherapy combo (nicknamed chemo-radiation-bio therapy). The molecular target therapy approved by USA and/or European FDA and currently available in India and used along with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy, indication wise are; Brain Tumor Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTD) and Inj bevacizumab (LMTD) in Glioblasoma Multiforme; for Carcinoma Head and neck Inj Cetuximab and Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTT), Tab Geftinib (SMTD). (author)

  7. Type II diabetes and its therapy in clinical practice - results from the standardised non-interventional registry SIRTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallwitz, B; Kusterer, K; Hildemann, S; Fresenius, K

    2014-12-01

    Modern antidiabetic therapies should achieve low HbA1c values and avoid hypoglycaemic complications. The registry SIRTA included 1522 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from 306 German medical practices. Patients had an HbA1c > 6.5% under the maximum tolerated metformin dose. If required, they received combination therapy with other antidiabetics according to the guideline of the German Diabetes Society [Deutsche Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG)] or usual medical practice. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The target criteria included the achievement of HbA1c target values and the emergence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. Most patients (64.0%) were planned to achieve an HbA1c target < 6.5%, the standard target recommended by the 2009 DDG guideline valid throughout the registry. Primarily to reduce the individual risk for hypoglycaemia, 32.4% of patients had a less strict HbA1c-target of 6.5-7.0%. These targets were achieved by 31.3% and 44.3% of patients, respectively. Combination therapies increased from 45% to 56% over the 6 months registry. Four patients had severe hypoglycaemias (0.26%). The registry confirms results from other epidemiologic studies on the therapy of T2DM in everyday practice. The treatment strategies applied effectively reduced blood glucose and avoided severe hypoglycaemias. An early therapy of insufficiently controlled patients with T2DM is important, as lower baseline values facilitated achieving HbA1c targets. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice across Curricula-An Overview of a Professional Development Course for Occupational Therapy Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Marta M; DeAngelis, Tina M

    2017-01-01

    A professional development course for occupational therapy educators about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) was developed and piloted. The course was developed to promote increased awareness of resources and methods for teaching EBP that are applicable across entry-level curricula. Participants included full-time faculty (n = 7) from one entry-level occupational therapy program in the New York City area. The results of the pilot informed refinement of the course in preparation for delivery to a wider audience of educators. This paper provides a description of the course, results of the pilot, and implications for future delivery of the course.

  9. SHORT REPORT Technological dreams: The implications of new technologies for occupational therapy education and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, BARBARA

    2001-01-01

    Computer technologies will change both occupational therapy education and practice. Technological optimists suggest that there will be positive benefits for distance learning and supervision, universal equal access to information and expertise, and positive cross-cultural exchange. However, technologies have inevitable and unexpected costs. In this report I explore the potential for future problems with professional induction, educational reductionism, cultural imperialism and deprofessionalization through a review of the literature. I suggest that early recognition of the costs as well as the benefits of computer-based education will be important to the development of international occupational therapy.

  10. Physical therapy in the 21st century (Part II): evidence-based practice within the context of evidence-informed practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Part II of this two-part introduction to this Special Issue on physical therapy practice in the 21st century outlines a health-focused strategy for physical therapists to lead in the assault on lifestyle conditions, global health care priorities, described in Part I. Consistent with contemporary definitions of physical therapy, its practice, professional education, and research, physical therapy needs to reflect 21st-century health priorities and be aligned with global and regional public health strategies. A proposed focus on health emphasizes clinical competencies, including assessments of health, lifestyle health behaviors, and lifestyle risk factors; and the prescription of interventions to promote health and well-being in every client or patient. Such an approach is aimed to increase the threshold for chronic conditions over the life cycle and reduce their rate of progression, thereby preventing, delaying, or minimizing the severity of illness and disability. The 21st-century physical therapist needs to be able to practice such competencies within the context of a culturally diverse society to effect positive health behavior change. The physical therapist is uniquely positioned to lead in health promotion and prevention of the lifestyle conditions, address many of their causes, as well as manage these conditions. Physical therapists need to impact health globally through public and social health policy as well as one-on-one care. This role is consistent with contemporary definitions of physical therapy as the quintessential noninvasive health care practitioner, and the established efficacy and often superiority of lifestyle and lifestyle change on health outcomes compared with invasive interventions, namely, drugs and surgery. A concerted commitment by physical therapists to health and well-being and reduced health risk is consistent with minimizing the substantial social and economic burdens of lifestyle conditions globally.

  11. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  12. Dietary therapy in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and/or left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bibra, Helene; Ströhle, Alexander; St John Sutton, Martin; Worm, Nicolai

    2017-05-01

    Heart failure is an ongoing epidemic of left ventricular (LV) dilatation and/or dysfunction due to the increasing prevalence of predisposing risk factors such as age, physical inactivity, (abdominal) obesity, and type-2-diabetes. Approximately half of these patients have diastolic heart failure (HFpEF). The prognosis of HFpEF is comparable to that of systolic heart failure, but without any known effective treatment. A biomathematically corrected diagnostic approach is presented that quantifies diastolic dysfunction via the predominant age dependency of LV diastolic function and unmasks (metabolic) risk factors, that are independent of age and, therefore, potential targets for therapy. Patients with HFpEF have reduced cardiac energy reserve that is frequently caused by insulin resistance. Consequently, HFpEF and/or LV diastolic dysfunction may be regarded as a cardiac manifestation of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Accordingly, a causal therapy for metabolically induced dysfunction aims at normalizing insulin sensitivity by improving postprandial glucose and lipid metabolism. The respective treatments include 1) weight loss induced by dietary energy restriction that is often not sustained long-term and 2) independent of weight loss, focus on carbohydrate modification in exchange for an increase in protein and fat, ideally combined with an aerobic exercise program. Hence, beneficial effects of different macronutrient compositions in the dietary therapy of the underlying MetS are discussed together with the most recently available publications and meta-analyses. Modulation/restriction of carbohydrate intake normalizes postprandial hyperglycemic and insulinemic peaks and has been shown to improve all manifestations of the MetS and also to reduce cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of antihypertensive therapy on cerebral perfusion in patients with metabolic syndrome: relationship with cognitive function and 24-h arterial blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, Nataliya Y; Chernov, Vladimir I; Efimova, Irina Y; Lishmanov, Yuri B

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the regional cerebral blood flow, cognitive function, and parameters of 24-h arterial blood pressure monitoring in patients with metabolic syndrome before and after combination antihypertensive therapy. The study involved 54 patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) investigated by brain single-photon emission computed tomography, 24-h blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), and comprehensive neuropsychological testing before and after 24 weeks of combination antihypertensive therapy. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly poorer regional cerebral blood flow compared with control group: by 7% (P = 0.003) in right anterior parietal cortex, by 6% (P = 0.028) in left anterior parietal cortex, by 8% (P = 0.007) in right superior frontal lobe, and by 10% (P = 0.00002) and 7% (P = 0.006) in right and left temporal brain regions, correspondingly. The results of neuropsychological testing showed 11% decrease in mentation (P = 0.002), and 19% (P = 0.011) and 20% (P = 0.009) decrease in immediate verbal and visual memory in patients with MetS as compared with control group. Relationships between the indices of ABPM, cerebral perfusion, and cognitive function were found. Data showed an improvement of regional cerebral blood flow, ABPM parameters, and indicators of cognitive functions after 6 months of antihypertensive therapy in patients with MetS. The study showed the presence of diffuse disturbances in cerebral perfusion is associated with cognitive disorders in patients with metabolic syndrome. Combination antihypertensive treatment exerts beneficial effects on the 24-h blood pressure profile, increases cerebral blood flow, and improves cognitive function in patients with MetS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mapping the scope of occupational therapy practice in palliative care: A European Association for Palliative Care cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Gail; Morgan, Deidre

    2018-05-01

    Occupational therapists play an integral role in the care of people with life-limiting illnesses. However, little is known about the scope of occupational therapy service provision in palliative care across Europe and factors influencing service delivery. This study aimed to map the scope of occupational therapy palliative care interventions across Europe and to explore occupational therapists' perceptions of opportunities and challenges when delivering and developing palliative care services. A 49-item online cross-sectional survey comprised of fixed and free text responses was securely hosted via the European Association for Palliative Care website. Survey design, content and recruitment processes were reviewed and formally approved by the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyse data. Setting/respondents: Respondents were European occupational therapists whose caseload included palliative care recipients (full-time or part-time). In total, 237 valid responses were analysed. Findings demonstrated a consistency in occupational therapy practice in palliative care between European countries. Clinician time was prioritised towards indirect patient care, with limited involvement in service development, leadership and research. A need for undergraduate and postgraduate education was identified. Organisational expectations and understanding of the scope of the occupational therapy role constrain the delivery of services to support patients and carers. Further development of occupational therapy in palliative care, particularly capacity building in leadership and research activities, is warranted. There is a need for continuing education and awareness raising of the role of occupational therapy in palliative care.

  15. Effect of periodontal therapy on metabolic control and an inflammatory mediator in type 2 diabetic subjects: a report on 17 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carlos; Pérez, Clara; Sabogal, Diego

    2012-04-01

    A reciprocal relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis has been described, whereby chronic periodontal infection could affect diabetic metabolic control. Therefore, periodontal therapy could influence metabolic control or systemic inflammation leading to diabetic complications. This case report series presents the effect of therapy on periodontal indices, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. Seventeen diabetic patients diagnosed with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis received periodontal therapy. All patients received a hygienic phase of treatment and were re-examined 3 months later. At re-examination, subjects judged to need periodontal surgery were treated and re-examined after a further 3 months. A complete clinical examination and measurements of HbA1c and hs-CRP were evaluated. Periodontal treatment led to a significant improvement in periodontal indices; only five patients required periodontal surgery. The percentage of bleeding on probing was reduced by nearly 40%; percentage of pockets > or = 5 mm was less than half baseline values; mean pocket depth reduction was 1.21 mm (0.58) and attachment level gain was 0.74 mm (0.69). Nevertheless, no changes were present for HbA1c; a reduction in hs-CRP of 1.37 mg/L (2.67) was present. Periodontal therapy in this case series group produced a significant improvement in the clinical condition, butdid not affect metabolic control. It led to a decrease in hs-CRP.

  16. The Practice of Electroconvulsive Therapy in US Correctional Facilities: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Sandarsh; McCall, W Vaughn; Iltis, Ana S; Rosenquist, Peter B; Hogan, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    There are little data regarding the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in correctional settings in the United States. A survey was conducted to study the current practice of ECT in US prisons. We hypothesize that ECT is underutilized in the correctional setting. We also review the ethical aspects of using ECT for the treatment of mental illness in the prison population. A 12-question survey via a Survey Monkey link was emailed to chiefs of psychiatry, or the equivalent, of each state's department of corrections. We examined the frequency of Likert-type responses, tabulated individual comments for qualitative review, and grouped for comparison. Email contacts for chiefs of psychiatry, or the equivalent, for the department of corrections in 45 states (90%) were obtained and a survey link was sent. Thirty-one (68.9%) of 45 responded to the survey. Respondent estimates of the number of inmates with mental illness in 31 prison systems varied from less than 500 to more than 4500. Of these 31, 12 (38.7%) had more than 4500 inmates with mental illness. Four systems reported the use of ECT within the last 5 years. Of those, one reported use in the last 1 to 6 months, and 3 reported use in the last 2 to 5 years. Of these 4 prison systems, all felt that they had up to 10 patients who would benefit if ECT continued to be offered or became available in the future. None of these systems provided ECT within the prison. The inmates were referred to a local state psychiatric facility, a university hospital, or other institutions. The reasons for not using ECT as reported by the respondents are grouped under subheadings of stigma, ethical concerns, logistical concerns, and others. Considering the high prevalence of mental illness in prisons, one might expect a high prevalence of ECT responsive mental illness and, hence, provision of ECT to some prisoners with mental illness. However, our survey suggests that the use of ECT in prisons in the United States is low. Stigma

  17. A conceptual framework for international service-learning course planning: promoting a foundation for ethical practice in the physical therapy and occupational therapy professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Jill Black; Pechak, Celia

    2011-01-01

    As physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) educational programs endeavor to foster core values of social responsibility, justice, and altruism in an increasingly global community, the incorporation of local and international service-learning (ISL) into the curriculum is growing. Much of the research has focused on the measurement of student learning, with little written about the impact on the host community. Proponents of global health initiatives are calling for consideration of all stakeholders to ensure ethical practice. This paper explores the current literature related to PT and OT ISL and builds a conceptual framework for ISL course planning. The essential phases in the framework include: 1) pre-experience planning/preparation stage, 2) field immersion experience stage, and 3) postexperience stage. The essential elements are: 1) cultural competency training, 2) communication and coordination with community, 3) comprehensive assessment, and 4) strategic planning. The authors suggest this framework as a practical tool to structure ISL courses with an explicit emphasis on ethical concerns. Additionally, they seek to foster more dialogue and action related to the promotion of ethical practices in ISL in PT and OT education programs.

  18. Empirically Based Psychosocial Therapies for Schizophrenia: The Disconnection between Science and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn D. Shean

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirically validated psychosocial therapies for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia were described in the report of the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT, 2009. The PORT team identified eight psychosocial treatments: assertive community treatment, supported employment, cognitive behavioral therapy, family-based services, token economy, skills training, psychosocial interventions for alcohol and substance use disorders, and psychosocial interventions for weight management. PORT listings of empirically validated psychosocial therapies provide a useful template for the design of effective recovery-oriented mental health care systems. Unfortunately, surveys indicate that PORT listings have not been implemented in clinical settings. Obstacles to the implementation of PORT psychosocial therapy listings and suggestions for changes needed to foster implementation are discussed. Limitations of PORT therapy listings that are based on therapy outcome efficacy studies are discussed, and cross-cultural and course and outcome studies of correlates of recovery are summarized.

  19. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Foley, Kathleen A. [Strategic Consulting, Thomson Reuters Healthcare, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoffman-Censits, Jean [Department of Medical Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pizzi, Laura T. [School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gomella, Leonard G. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  20. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  1. Accommodating practical constraints for intensity modulated radiation therapy by means of compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    The thesis deals with the practical implementation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) generated by means of patient specific metal compensators. An elaborate comparison between several compensator-machining techniques, with respect to their suitability for production within a hospital workshop, is presented. The limitations associated with the selected compensator manufacturing technique are identified and implemented as constraints in an existing inverse treatment-planning algorithm. In order to obtain the profile of a compensator, which produces a desired intensity distribution, inverse modeling of the radiation attenuation within the compensator is required. Two novel and independent approaches, based on deconvolution and system identification, are proposed to accomplish this. To compare the approach with the 'rival' state of the art beam modulation technique, a theoretical and experimental examination of the modulated fields generated by manufactured compensators and multileaf collimators is presented. This comparison focused on the achievable resolution of the intensity modulated beams in lateral and longitudinal directions. To take into account the characteristics of a clinical environment the suitability of the most common commercially available treatment couch systems for IMRT treatments is studied. An original rule based advisory system is developed to alert the operator of any potential collision of the beam with the movable supporting structures of the treatment couch. The system is capable of finding alternative positions for the supporting frames and, if necessary, can suggest alternative beam directions. Finally, a head and neck phantom is designed for gel dosimetry to assess IMRT treatment delivery techniques. The phantom is based on a simplistic but realistic design and contains the main anatomical features

  2. Integration of literacy into speech-language therapy: a descriptive analysis of treatment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Schwarz, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was: (a) to examine the extent to which speech-language therapy provided to children with language disorders in the schools targets code-based literacy skills (e.g., alphabet knowledge and phonological awareness) during business-as-usual treatment sessions, and (b) to determine whether literacy-focused therapy time was associated with factors specific to children and/or speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Participants were 151 kindergarten and first-grade children and 40 SLPs. Video-recorded therapy sessions were coded to determine the amount of time that addressed literacy. Assessments of children's literacy skills were administered as well as questionnaires regarding characteristics of SLPs (e.g., service delivery, professional development). Results showed that time spent addressing code-related literacy across therapy sessions was variable. Significant predictors included SLP years of experience, therapy location, and therapy session duration, such that children receiving services from SLPs with more years of experience, and/or who utilized the classroom for therapy, received more literacy-focused time. Additionally, children in longer therapy sessions received more therapy time on literacy skills. There is considerable variability in the extent to which children received literacy-focused time in therapy; however, SLP-level factors predict time spent in literacy more than child-level factors. Further research is needed to understand the nature of literacy-focused therapy in the public schools. Readers will be able to: (a) define code-based literacy skills, (b) discuss the role that speech-language pathologists have in fostering children's literacy development, and (c) identify key factors that may currently influence the inclusion of literacy targets in school-based speech-language therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in pancreatic cancer: from research to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Vishal; Arora, Ena; Masab, Muhammad; Gupta, Sorab

    2018-05-04

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is genetically engineered tumor antigen-specific anticancer immunotherapy, which after showing great success in hematological malignancies is currently being tried in advanced solid tumors like pancreatic cancer. Immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and dense fibrous stroma are some of the limitation in the success of this novel therapy. However, genetic modifications and combination therapy is the topic of the research to improve its efficacy. In this article, we summarize the current state of knowledge, limitations, and future prospects for CAR T cell therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  4. X-ray diagnostics, X-ray therapy, diagnostics and therapy with radioactive materials in free medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzer, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the documents of the Kassenaerztliche Vereinigung Niederbayerns in Straubing, the work of the established general practicioners in the fields of X-ray and nuclear medicine was investigated for the 1st quarter of 1971, and the X-ray diagnostic services rendered were evaluated according to age and sex. 2/3 of all doctors participating in a health insurance plan in Lower Bavaria are general practitioners; all other fields are represented less often than in Munich. The values for the whole Federal Republic are in between. Internal specialists, radiologists, and urologists together carry out 85.7% of the ten examinations which contribute most to the total gonadal dose. An application of the data on the 1st quarter to the annual value is only possible by allowing for an error of 13.1%. All in all, 6% more X-ray services are administered to men than to women. For both sexes, the genetically most important group of 15-34 resp. 15-39 years of age is highly represented, although young men receive X-ray diagnostics more frequently. X-ray therapy makes up only about 0.5% of all services. Nuclear medical diagnostics is employed to the same extent by radiologists and internal specialists, while therapy with radioactive substances is almost exclusively provided by radiologists. Relative to the population density, radioactive substances are more often used in Lower Bavaria than in West Berlin. (orig.) [de

  5. Client-centred therapy, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic growth: theoretical perspectives and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen

    2004-03-01

    In practice it is not unusual for client-centred therapists to work with people who have experienced traumatic events. However, client-centred therapy is not usually considered within texts on traumatic stress and questions have been raised over the appropriateness of client-centred therapy with trauma survivors. The present study shows how, although he was writing well before the introduction of the term 'post-traumatic stress disorder', Carl Rogers provided a theory of therapy and personality that contains an account of threat-related psychological processes largely consistent with contemporary trauma theory. Rogers' theory provides the conceptual underpinnings to the client-centred and experiential ways of working with traumatized people. Furthermore, Rogers' theory provides an understanding of post-traumatic growth processes, and encourages therapists to adopt a more positive psychological perspective to their understanding of how people adjust to traumatic events.

  6. A Quality Model to Select Patients in Cupping Therapy Clinics: A New Tool for Ensuring Safety in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushanab, Tamer; AlSanad, Saud

    2018-06-08

    Cupping therapy is a popular treatment in various countries and regions, including Saudi Arabia. Cupping therapy is regulated in Saudi Arabia by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), Ministry of Health. The authors recommend that this quality model for selecting patients in cupping clinics - first version (QMSPCC-1) - be used routinely as part of clinical practice and quality management in cupping clinics. The aim of the quality model is to ensure the safety of patients and to introduce and facilitate quality and auditing processes in cupping therapy clinics. Clinical evaluation of this tool is recommended. Continued development, re-evaluation and reassessment of this tool are important. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hijama therapy (wet cupping) - its potential use to complement British healthcare in practice, understanding, evidence and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Mohammed Imran

    2016-05-01

    Wet cupping was used in the nineteenth century for treatment of patients in the United Kingdom (UK) by a few experienced practitioners. Revival Hijama use by practitioners in the UK in recent years has been observed as well as interest from the public, with developments of specific certified training programmes, established businesses providing tailored Hijama therapy Clinical Waste disposal services, provisions of insurance cover, involvement of medical professionals and membership with the General Regulatory Council for Complementary Therapies (GRCCT). However, there has also been noted that there is not much in the way of guidance or regulation. Therefore, we would like to initiate some communication and understanding of Hijama (wet cupping) to benefit medical professionals, discussing recent research undertaken as a basis for potentially more in the future (evidence-based practice), in the likely event that a patient might request to be referred for this therapy during a consultation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Music Therapy for children with special needs - clinical practice and assessment in the light of developmental psychology and communicative musicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    continues with practices on basic improvisational techniques related to time, form and emotions: synchronization, turn-taking, theme-with-variations, matching/attunement, vitality forms, simple musical playing rules, etc. The techniques are connected to macro- and micro-regulation of arousal and emotions......). Turn-taking in music therapy with children with communication disorders. British Journal of Music Therapy, 18(2), 45-53. Malloch, S. & Trevarthen, C. (Eds) (2009). Communicative Musicality. Exploring the basis of human companionship. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Stern, D. N. (2010). Forms...... of Vitality. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Wigram, T. (2004). Improvisation. Methods and Techniques for Music Therapy Clinicians, Educators and Students. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers....

  9. Management of testosterone therapy in adolescents and young men with hypogonadism: are we following adult clinical practice guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Leena; Yu, Richard N; Bhasin, Shalender; Cohen, Laurie E

    2015-05-01

    Male hypogonadism is a common disorder that is associated with low bone density, poor muscle mass, anemia, and sexual dysfunction. The Endocrine Society recently published a Clinical Practice Guideline for testosterone therapy in androgen-deficient men. Because treatment is frequently initiated in adolescence, the goal of this quality improvement initiative was to assess whether pediatric endocrinologists at a large tertiary care center follow these guidelines and to identify opportunities for improvement. We performed a retrospective chart review at Boston Children's Hospital. Inclusion criteria were as follows: current age ≥16 years, diagnosis of hypogonadism, and testosterone replacement therapy. Data were collected about current age, age at treatment initiation, diagnoses, pre- and on-treatment testosterone levels, route of testosterone administration and dose, bone density, hematocrit levels, and adherence with therapy. Fifty-nine patients were included. Fourteen (24%) were prescribed lower testosterone doses than those recommended in the Clinical Practice Guideline. Seven (12%) had no pre-treatment testosterone levels, and 10 (17%) had no on-treatment levels. In 49 patients with on-treatment testosterone levels, 36 had at least one value that was lower than the adult reference range. Ten (28%) of the 36 men with low testosterone levels had no dose adjustments. Thirty-seven (63%) of the 59 patients had no dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, and 18 (31%) did not have hematocrit levels. Pediatric endocrinologists in this review did not consistently follow the Clinical Practice Guideline for testosterone therapy in hypogonadal adult males. Strategies that improve adherence to guidelines could help maximize the benefits of therapy and minimize treatment-associated risks.

  10. A qualitative study of intimate partner violence universal screening by family therapy interns: implications for practice, research, training, and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todahl, Jeffrey L; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented-and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening-is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy interns when implementing universal screening for IPV in an outpatient clinic setting. Twenty-two graduate students in a COAMFTE-accredited program were interviewed using qualitative research methods grounded in phenomenology. Three domains, 7 main themes, and 26 subthemes were identified. The three domains that emerged in this study include (a) therapist practice of universal screening, (b) client response to universal screening, and (c) therapist response to universal screening. Implications for practice, research, training, and supervision are discussed.

  11. Perspectives on Queer Music Therapy: A Qualitative Analysis of Music Therapists' Reactions to Radically Inclusive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Catherine E; Grzanka, Patrick R; Bain, Candice L

    2018-01-13

    The queer music therapy model was designed by Bain, Grzanka, and Crowe in 2016 as a novel therapeutic approach to affirm and empower LGBTQ+ identity through music. No data have been generated on how this model might actually be implemented, or the strengths and limitations of the model according to music therapy professionals. The purpose of this study was to build on Bain and colleagues' work by collecting music therapists' perspectives on queer music therapy and using these data to critically evaluate the model. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with twelve music therapists who identify as LGBTQ+ or have experience working with LGBTQ+ clients. Participants were prompted to discuss their music therapy backgrounds, experiences with LGBTQ+ clients, and reactions to the queer music therapy model. Interviews were analyzed using a critical discourse analysis approach. The qualitative findings revealed major strengths of the queer music therapy model and ways in which it could be improved by attending to: (a) the structural limitations of the music therapy discipline, including the demographic composition of the field and lack of critical perspectives in music therapy training; and (b) intersectional considerations of ageism and ableism within diverse LGBTQ+ populations. Queer music therapy has positive implications for future work with LGBTQ+ individuals, but it must more substantively integrate intersectionality theory to serve a diverse range of LGBTQ+ clients. Further, it must critically attend to the structural limitations of the music therapy discipline itself. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Music Therapy Association. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. The Impact of Library Tutorials on the Information Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Students in an Evidence-Based Practice Course: A Rubric Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, April J; Hoberecht, Toni; Peterson, Alyssa; Randall, Ken

    2018-01-01

    This study measures how online library instructional tutorials implemented into an evidence-based practice course have impacted the information literacy skills of occupational and physical therapy graduate students. Through a rubric assessment of final course papers, this study compares differences in students' search strategies and cited sources pre- and post-implementation of the tutorials. The population includes 180 randomly selected graduate students from before and after the library tutorials were introduced into the course curriculum. Results indicate a statistically significant increase in components of students' searching skills and ability to find higher levels of evidence after completing the library tutorials.

  13. The effectiveness of internet cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for social anxiety disorder in routine practice

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, A.D.; O'Moore, Kathleen; Mason, Elizabeth; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common, chronic and disabling mental disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment of SAD and internet CBT (iCBT) offers a cost-effective and convenient alternative to face to face approaches, with high fidelity and demonstrated efficacy. The aim of the current paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of an iCBT programme for SAD (The This Way Up Clinic Shyness Programme) when delivered in routine practice through two different p...

  14. The effectiveness of internet cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) for social anxiety disorder across two routine practice pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Alishia D.; O'Moore, Kathleen; Mason, Elizabeth; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common, chronic and disabling mental disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment of SAD and internet CBT (iCBT) offers a cost-effective and convenient alternative to face to face approaches, with high fidelity and demonstrated efficacy. The aim of the current paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of an iCBT programme for SAD (The This Way Up Clinic Shyness Programme) when delivered in routine practice through two different p...

  15. Telerehabilitation Store and Forward Applications: A Review of Applications and Privacy Considerations in Physical and Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Peterson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of store and forward applications commonly used in physical and occupational therapy practice is reviewed with respect to regulation, privacy, security, and clinical applications. A privacy and security checklist provides a clear reference of pertinent regulatory issues regarding these software applications. A case study format is used to highlight clinical applications of store and forward software features. Important considerations of successful implementation of store and forward applications are also identified and discussed.

  16. Telerehabilitation store and forward applications: a review of applications and privacy considerations in physical and occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    An overview of store and forward applications commonly used in physical and occupational therapy practice is reviewed with respect to regulation, privacy, security, and clinical applications. A privacy and security checklist provides a clear reference of pertinent regulatory issues regarding these software applications. A case study format is used to highlight clinical applications of store and forward software features. Important considerations of successful implementation of store and forward applications are also identified and discussed.

  17. Kahwà:tsire: Indigenous Families in a Family Therapy Practice with the Indigenous Worldview as the Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Derrick, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    This study creates new knowledge regarding the impact of European colonization on Indigenous (Aboriginal, First Nations, Inuit, Metis) families in Canada. It particularly focuses on the issues in families whose children were forcibly removed by the government to institutions called residential schools. Members of Indigenous families voluntarily attended a family therapy practice which utilized a family systems approach and was uniquely based in the Indigenous worldview. This worldview is spir...

  18. MO-A-BRB-01: Review of TG-262 Internal Survey of Practices in EMR for External Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechalakos, J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of converting to an electronic chart for radiation therapy can be daunting. It requires a dedicated committee to first research and choose appropriate software, to review the entire documentation policy and flow of the clinic, to convert this system to electronic form or if necessary, redesign the system to more easily conform to the electronic process. Those making the conversion and those who already use electronic charting would benefit from the shared experience of those who have been through the process in the past. Therefore TG262 was convened to provide guidance on electronic charting for external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. This course will present the results of an internal survey of task group members on EMR practices in External Beam Radiation Therapy as well as discuss important issues in EMR development and structure for both EBRT and brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: Be familiarized with common practices and pitfalls in development and maintenance of an electronic chart in Radiation Oncology Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in External Beam Radiation Therapy Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in Brachytherapy

  19. [Circumscribed and diffuse peritonitis: severe complications in bariatric and metabolic surgery; specifics related to their diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špička, P; Vaverka, P; Gryga, A; Malý, T

    Cases of localized and diffuse peritonitis are severe surgical conditions. Despite expanding possibilities for the diagnosis and therapy, patients with peritonitis, its diffuse form in particular, still suffer from high morbidity and mortality. The management of this condition, both in the healthy and especially seriously ill population, is not satisfactory. Recently, we have witnessed an increase in bariatric and metabolic surgery in response to an ever rising number of extremely obese patients worldwide. Bariatric patients belong to a group of seriously ill patients with a significant risk of post-operative complications due to an infection. Although their treatment is identical to that of the normal population, a great emphasis is put on early recognition of complications, and the decision on any potential surgical revision should be actively approached, often necessitating the absence of frequently lengthy paraclinical assessments. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 346 obese bariatric patients undergoing surgical treatment for morbid obesity between August 2011 and August 2015. A total of 6 patients experienced severe complications including two cases of diffuse peritonitis, two cases of localized peritonitis and two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding. One patient died after her discharge from hospital due to toxic shock caused by stomach perforation. We describe two case reports in greater detail to highlight the importance of early detection of complications and a timely surgical intervention. In principle, bariatric patients are a severely ill population where standard diagnostic procedures for post-operative complications often fail. Clinical findings and the surgeons experience are commonly the only diagnostic signs that trigger a surgical revision. In contrast, surgical treatment of post-operative complications in obese patients with peritonitis is virtually identical to that in patients with normal or slightly increased BMI. It involves thorough

  20. Occupational Therapy Contributions in Early Intervention: Implications for Personnel Preparation and Interprofessional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlenhaupt, Mary; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Schefkind, Sandra; Chandler, Barbara; Harvison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy provides a unique contribution in early intervention programs for families and their children from birth to 3 years old who are at risk for, or who have, identified disabilities. This article describes occupational therapy's distinct value and presents the profession's perspective on services to enhance families' caregiving…

  1. Experiential Learning in Occupational Therapy: Can It Enhance Readiness for Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht-Sabres, Lisa Jean

    2013-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the effectiveness of experiential learning opportunities near the end of the occupational therapy students' didactic education. A pretest/posttest design with a gain score approach was used to determine whether there was a significant improvement in the occupational therapy students' self-perception of their…

  2. Assessing the Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Technical Insights and Practical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, A.; Fournier, L.; Lassau, N.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Nathan, P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Powles, T.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: The introduction of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has resulted in new challenges for assessing response to therapy, and conventional response criteria using computed tomography (CT) are limited. It is widely recognised that targeted therapies may lead to

  3. Play Therapy in Elementary Schools: A Best Practice for Improving Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pedro J.; Ray, Dee C.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study of 1st graders who are academically at risk examined the effectiveness of child-centered play therapy (CCPT). The experimental group received biweekly, 30-minute play therapy sessions for 8 weeks. Findings indicated that these 1st graders participating in CCPT (n = 21) demonstrated a statistically significant increase on the Early…

  4. Reflective Process in Play Therapy: A Practical Model for Supervising Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Virginia B.; Folger, Wendy A.; Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Counselor educators and other supervisors, who work with graduate student counseling interns utilizing Play Therapy, should be educated, grounded, and trained in theory, supervision, and techniques specific to Play Therapy. Unfortunately, this is often not the case. Therefore, a three step model was created to assist those who do not have specific…

  5. Practical approach to the use of daylight photodynamic therapy with topical methyl aminolevulinate for actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, C A; Wulf, H C; Szeimies, R M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy has been shown to be an effective therapy for actinic keratoses (AKs) and a simple and tolerable treatment procedure in three randomized Scandinavian studies and two recent Phase III randomized controlled studies in Australia and Europe...

  6. Medical Music Therapy: A Model Program for Clinical Practice, Education, Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This monograph evolved from the unique, innovative partnership between the Florida State University Music Therapy Program and Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. Its purpose is to serve as a model for music therapy educators, students, clinicians, and the hospital administrators who might employ them. This book should prove a valuable resource for…

  7. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Practice and Innovation in Physical Therapy Using the IDEAL-Physio Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, David; Hamilton, David; Davies, Loretta; Cook, Jonathan; Hirst, Allison; McCulloch, Peter; Paez, Arsenio

    2018-02-01

    The IDEAL framework is an established method for initial and ongoing evaluations of innovation and practice for complex health care interventions. First derived for surgical sciences and embedded at a global level for evaluating surgery/surgical devices, the IDEAL framework is based on the principle that innovation and evaluation in clinical practice can, and should, evolve together in an ordered manner: from conception to development and then to validation by appropriate clinical studies and, finally, longer-term follow-up. This framework is highly suited to other complex, nonpharmacological interventions, such as physical therapist interventions. This perspective outlines the application of IDEAL to physical therapy in the new IDEAL-Physio framework. The IDEAL-Physio framework comprises 5 stages. In stage 1, the idea phase, formal data collection should begin. Stage 2a is the phase for iterative improvement and adjustment with thorough data recording. Stage 2b involves the onset of formal evaluation using systematically collected group or cohort data. Stage 3 is the phase for formal comparative assessment of treatment, usually involving randomized studies. Stage 4 involves long-term follow-up. The IDEAL-Physio framework is recommended as a method for guiding and evaluating both innovation and practice in physical therapy, with the overall goal of providing better evidence-based care. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  8. Implementation of a baby doll therapy protocol for people with dementia: Innovative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Barbara A; Gaspar, Phyllis M

    2015-09-01

    Dementia is exhibited by both emotional and physical states such as agitation. Chemical restraints, often used for agitated behaviors, are not always effective and produce untoward effects. Baby doll therapy is a nonpharmacologic therapy that can affect agitated behavior in dementia patients, yet a protocol for the therapy did not exist. An implementation protocol for doll therapy for those with dementia was developed and implemented with 16 residents in a dementia care center. Outcomes were measurements of the impact of the dolls on six areas of the resident's behavior and their reactions to the doll. Participants had an increase in level of happiness, activity/liveliness, interaction with staff and others, and ease of giving care. There was also a reduction in the level of anxiety. The increase in happiness was a statistically significant outcome. Baby doll therapy is an effective nonpharmacological approach for improving the well-being of patients with moderate to severe dementia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The use of cognitive behaviour therapy in the management of BPSD in dementia (Innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koder, Deborah

    2018-02-01

    Psychosocial approaches to the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia have received much support in the scientific literature. The following paper focuses on cognitive behaviour therapy as a valid framework in assessing and treating people with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. The importance of identifying symptoms of depression and anxiety is emphasized, as cognitive behaviour therapy has been shown to be an effective intervention for these conditions in older adults. Modifications of cognitive behaviour therapy for those with dementia are discussed based on available evidence, with emphasis on incorporating nursing home staff in treatment programs and focusing on behavioural elements of cognitive behaviour therapy such as activity scheduling. The paper concludes with suggestions regarding how to incorporate and promote the use of cognitive behaviour therapy in dementia care settings.

  10. An Occupational Therapy and Teaching Partnership: Applying a Scholarship of Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Brian; MacCobb, Siobhán

    2017-07-01

    Occupational therapists must generate knowledge and evidence that relates specifically to their practice context especially when there is a paucity of literature for emerging areas of practice. This paper describes the process of adopting a scholarship of practice approach with other professionals to generate evidence for practice in mainstream post primary school settings with students with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties (SEBD). Scholarship of practice and clinical reasoning are closely intertwined as therapists generate evidence on their practice to make informed decisions and judgments. In this paper, there are a number of important concepts needing to be highlighted for their meaning in this specific context.

  11. The impact of undergraduate occupational therapy students' interpersonal skills on their practice education performance: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mong-Lin; Brown, Ted; White, Carolynne; Marston, Celia; Thyer, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Interpersonal skills such as active listening, verbal communication and body language are essential competencies for occupational therapists, and students are expected to demonstrate these skills when completing practice placements. To investigate whether interpersonal skills are predictive of occupational therapy students' practice performance. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving third and fourth year occupational therapy undergraduate students (n = 70). Students' interpersonal skills were measured using the Interpersonal Communication Competence Scale (ICCS), Listening Styles Profile (LSP-R) and Active-Empathic Listening Scale (AELS). Students' practice performances at the mid-way and final points of their placements were measured using the Student Practice Evaluation Form-Revised (SPEF-R). The relationships between students' interpersonal skills and practice performance were examined using univariate and multi-variate regressions. Higher ICCS Interaction Management subscale scores predicted better SPEF-R Self-Management Skills at the mid-way point through practice placements (β = 1.93, SE = 0.76), and better Professional Behaviours (β = 1.28, SE = 0.64) and better Service Evaluation Skills (β = 2.84, SE = 0.95) at the final SPEF-R completion point. Higher ICCS Empathy subscale scores predicted lower SPEF-R Documentation scores at the mid-way point (β = -0.81, SE = 0.38), while higher ICCS Supportiveness subscale scores predicted lower mid-way SPEF-R Service Provision scores (β = -2.84, SE = 1.77). No ICCS subscale scores were predictive of the SPEF-R communication, co-worker communication and information gathering subscale scores. As well, LSP-R and AELS subscale scores were not predictive of the SPEF-R subscale scores. While predictive relationships were not found between occupational therapy students' communication, co-worker communication and information gathering skills, this preliminary evidence indicates that students

  12. Experiences of self-practice/self-reflection in cognitive behavioural therapy: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Corinne; Schröder, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Self-practice/self-reflection is a valuable training strategy which involves therapists applying therapeutic techniques to themselves, and reflecting on the process. To undertake a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies exploring therapists' experiences of self-practice/self-reflection in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). This would integrate, and interpret, the current literature in order to develop a new understanding, and contribute to the development of CBT training programmes. The meta-synthesis encompassed three distinct phases: undertaking a comprehensive and systematic literature search; critically appraising the papers; and synthesising the data using the meta-ethnographic method. The literature search identified 378 papers, ten met the criteria for inclusion. After critical appraisal, all were included in the synthesis. The synthesis identified 14 constructs, which fell into three broad categories: 'experience of self-practice/self-reflection'; 'outcomes of self-practice/self-reflection'; and 'implications for training'. This synthesis found that self-practice allows therapists to put themselves into their clients' shoes, experiencing the benefits that therapy can bring but also the problems that clients can run in to. This experience increases therapists' empathy for their clients, allowing them to draw on their own experiences in therapy. As a result, therapists tend to feel both more confident in themselves and more competent as a therapist. The self-practice/self-reflection process was facilitated by reflective writing and working with others, particularly peers. Self-practice/self-reflection is a valuable training strategy in CBT, which has a range of beneficial outcomes. It can also be used as a means of continuing personal and professional development. Self-practice of CBT techniques, and reflecting on the process, can be a useful training strategy and helpful for ongoing development Therapists could consider developing a 'self-case' study

  13. Use of medical expulsive therapy in children: An assessment of nationwide practice patterns and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Jonathan S.; Merguerian, Paul A.; Fu, Benjamin C.; Holt, Sarah K.; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Gore, John L.; Shnorhavorian, Margarett

    2018-01-01

    Summary Introduction Early data support the use of medical expulsive therapy (MET) in children. However, little is known regarding use or outcomes associated with MET outside of pediatric-specific practices. Using a national administrative dataset, we sought to characterize utilization patterns of MET as well as assess outcomes associated with MET exposure. Study design We interrogated the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database to identify children under the age of 18 presenting to the emergency department (ED) with any diagnosis of upper urinary tract calculi (UUTC, including renal and ureteral calculi). MET exposure was defined as having a prescription filled for a MET agent within 1 week of the ED encounter. Characteristics of children receiving MET were defined and outcomes compared between children with and without MET exposure. Results Of 1325 children included in the study, 13.2% received MET, including 15.4% of children with a diagnosis of “calculus of the ureter.” MET use increased significantly throughout the study period (p = 0.004), although only 30.4% of children considered potential MET candidates received MET in the final year of the study (2013). Among all patients, receipt of MET was associated with male gender, presence of comorbidity, provider-type (urologist), and year of diagnosis, although among those with a specific diagnosis of “calculus of the ureter,” only year of diagnosis remained a significant factor. Rates of unplanned physician visits and surgical interventions were similar between groups. Children receiving MET were more likely to receive follow-up imaging, although only 46% of children with ureteral calculi had appropriate follow-up imaging within 90 days, regardless of MET exposure. Odds ratios of factors and outcomes associated with MET exposure are shown in the Table. Discussion Although early data support safety and efficacy MET in children, nationwide use in children is low among potential candidates for

  14. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women stratified by hormone replacement therapy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of a high-sodium, high-protein diet on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women ( aged 49 - 60 y) stratified by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a crossover trial, 18 women (n = 8 HRT users (+HRT) and n = 10 nonusers (-HRT)) were...... randomly assigned to a diet high in protein ( 90 g/day) and sodium (180 mmol/day) ( calciuric diet) or a diet moderate in protein ( 70 g/day) and low in sodium ( 65 mmol/day) for 4 weeks followed by crossover to alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. The calciuric diet significantly (P...

  15. Selection of Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Focused Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denduluri, Neelima; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Telli, Melinda L; Eisen, Andrea; Graff, Stephanie L; Hassett, Michael J; Holloway, Jamie N; Hurria, Arti; King, Tari A; Lyman, Gary H; Partridge, Ann H; Somerfield, Mark R; Trudeau, Maureen E; Wolff, Antonio C; Giordano, Sharon H

    2018-05-22

    Purpose To update key recommendations of the ASCO guideline adaptation of the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on the selection of optimal adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for early breast cancer and adjuvant targeted therapy for breast cancer. Methods An Expert Panel conducted targeted systematic literature reviews guided by a signals approach to identify new, potentially practice-changing data that might translate to revised practice recommendations. Results The Expert Panel reviewed phase III trials that evaluated adjuvant capecitabine after completion of standard preoperative anthracycline- and taxane-based combination chemotherapy by patients with early-stage breast cancer HER2-negative breast cancer with residual invasive disease at surgery; the addition of 1 year of adjuvant pertuzumab to combination chemotherapy and trastuzumab for patients with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer; and the use of neratinib as extended adjuvant therapy for patients after combination chemotherapy and trastuzumab-based adjuvant therapy with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Recommendations Patients with early-stage HER2-negative breast cancer with pathologic, invasive residual disease at surgery following standard anthracycline- and taxane-based preoperative therapy may be offered up to six to eight cycles of adjuvant capecitabine. Clinicians may add 1 year of adjuvant pertuzumab to trastuzumab-based combination chemotherapy in patients with high-risk, early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Clinicians may use extended adjuvant therapy with neratinib to follow trastuzumab in patients with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Neratinib causes substantial diarrhea, and diarrhea prophylaxis must be used. Additional information can be found at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines .

  16. Aggression control therapy for violent forensic psychiatric patients: method and clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsveld, R.H.J.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hollin, C.R.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    Aggression control therapy is based on Goldstein, Gibbs, and Glick's aggression replacement training and was developed for violent forensic psychiatric in- and outpatients (adolescents and adults) with a (oppositional-defiant) conduct disorder or an antisocial personality disorder. First, the

  17. Breakthroughs in modern cancer therapy and elusive cardiotoxicity: Critical research-practice gaps, challenges, and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, P.-P. (Ping-Pin); Li, J. (Jin); J.M. Kros (Johan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTo date, five cancer treatment modalities have been defined. The three traditional modalities of cancer treatment are surgery, radiotherapy, and conventional chemotherapy, and the two modern modalities include molecularly targeted therapy (the fourth modality) and immunotherapy (the

  18. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this patient group that

  19. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and desc