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Sample records for metabolic syndrome features

  1. Overlapping Clinical Features Between NAFLD and Metabolic Syndrome in Children

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    Anna Alisi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a cluster of pathological liver conditions of emerging importance in overweight and obese children. NAFLD is associated with central obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidaemia, which are considered to be the main features of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Prevention of the adverse outcomes of NAFLD, as well as the risk of MetS, depends on the identification of genetic background and environmental factors that modulate susceptibility to these diseases. However, several lines of evidence highlight the strong correlation and co-currency of these two chronic diseases, both in children and in adults. In the present review, we provide an overview of the current clinical proofs on the link between NAFLD and MetS in children, with particular focus on all the possible overlapping features that connect them at paediatric age.

  2. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  3. Hypertension Is a Key Feature of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects Aging with HIV

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    Martin-Iguacel, Raquel; Negredo, Eugènia; Peck, Robert

    2016-01-01

    to predispose to these metabolic complications and to the excess risk of CVD observed in the HIV population. The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a clustering of RF for CVD that includes abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Hypertension is a prevalent feature of the MS in HIV...

  4. Cardio-Metabolic Features of Type 2 Diabetes Subjects Discordant in the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Sa Rah Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study is to investigate the cardio-metabolic parameters and surrogate markers of insulin resistance in a discordant group of type 2 diabetes (T2DM subjects who satisfy the Adults Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria, but not the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria, for metabolic syndrome (MetS.MethodsWe assessed the prevalence of MetS in T2DM subjects (n=167 who were selected from subjects registered at the diabetes center of Dong-A University Medical Center. We used the ATP III criteria and the IDF criteria for the diagnosis of MetS and sorted the subjects into 2 MetS groups: one group diagnosed per ATP III criteria (MetSa and one diagnosed per IDF criteria (MetSi. We then compared the clinical characteristics, metabolic parameters (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and uric acid values and co-morbidities (prevalence of microalbuminuria, fatty liver, and cardiovascular disease between the MetSa, MetSi, and discordant MetS groups.ResultsThe prevalence of MetS in the MetSa group (73.6% was higher than in the MetSi group (62.2%. The MetS prevalence in the discordant group was 11.4%. The discordant group showed no significant differences in clinical characteristics (except waist circumference and body mass index, metabolic parameters, or prevalence of co-morbidities, as compared with subjects with MetS by both criteria.ConclusionIn this study, cardio-metabolic features of the subjects diagnosed with MetS using ATP III criteria, but not IDF criteria, are not significantly different from those of subjects diagnosed with MetS using both criteria.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome in Children: Clinical Picture, Features of Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism

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    O.S. Bobrykovych

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study included 225 children aged from 14 to 18 years with various manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in neighborhoods, different by iodine provision. The physical development (height, weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumferences has been examined. Biochemical investigations are focused on the study of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in children. It is found that children who live in mountains have more severe obesity. In parallel with the increase of the degree of obesity, disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism aggravate in children with sings of metabolic syndrome.

  6. The value of anthropometric indices for identifying women with features of metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMI is a widely used anthropometric measure for identifying CVD and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Two new anthropometric indices are A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and Body Roundness Index (BRI) that may provide better correlations to features of MetS. Methods: Subject data were obtained from 91 over...

  7. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  8. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Volek, Jeff S; Feinman, Richard D

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) represents a constellation of markers that indicates a predisposition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other pathologic states. The definition and treatment are a matter of current debate and there is not general agreement on a precise definition or, to some extent, whether the designation provides more information than the individual components. We consider here five indicators that are central to most definitions and we provide evidence from the lit...

  9. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic Syndrome (MetS represents a constellation of markers that indicates a predisposition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other pathologic states. The definition and treatment are a matter of current debate and there is not general agreement on a precise definition or, to some extent, whether the designation provides more information than the individual components. We consider here five indicators that are central to most definitions and we provide evidence from the literature that these are precisely the symptoms that respond to reduction in dietary carbohydrate (CHO. Carbohydrate restriction is one of several strategies for reducing body mass but even in the absence of weight loss or in comparison with low fat alternatives, CHO restriction is effective at ameliorating high fasting glucose and insulin, high plasma triglycerides (TAG, low HDL and high blood pressure. In addition, low fat, high CHO diets have long been known to raise TAG, lower HDL and, in the absence of weight loss, may worsen glycemic control. Thus, whereas there are numerous strategies for weight loss, a patient with high BMI and high TAG is likely to benefit most from a regimen that reduces CHO intake. Reviewing the literature, benefits of CHO restriction are seen in normal or overweight individuals, in normal patients who meet the criteria for MetS or in patients with frank diabetes. Moreover, in low fat studies that ameliorate LDL and total cholesterol, controls may do better on the symptoms of MetS. On this basis, we feel that MetS is a meaningful, useful phenomenon and may, in fact, be operationally defined as the set of markers that responds to CHO restriction. Insofar as this is an accurate characterization it is likely the result of the effect of dietary CHO on insulin metabolism. Glucose is the major insulin secretagogue and insulin resistance has been tied to the hyperinsulinemic state or the effect of such a state on lipid metabolism. The

  10. Night eating syndrome in class II-III obesity: metabolic and psychopathological features.

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    Calugi, S; Dalle Grave, R; Marchesini, G

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the relationship of metabolic disorders and psychological features with the night eating syndrome (NES) in individuals with moderate-to-severe obesity. Cross-sectional observation. A total of 266 consecutive participants with class II-III obesity, entering an inpatient weight loss program. Participants who reported consuming either a large amount of their caloric intake after the evening meal (roughly self-assessed as > or =25% of daily calories) or the presence of nocturnal feeding at the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ) (N=49) were interviewed by the Night Eating Syndrome History and Inventory (NESHI). Assessment also included the clinical/biochemical parameters of the metabolic syndrome and several questionnaires of psychopathology. NES was diagnosed by NESHI criteria (evening hyperphagia (> or =25% of daily food intake after the evening meal) and/or waking at night to eat at least three times a week) in the last 3 months. Twenty-seven participants (10.1%) met NESHI criteria. Differences were not observed between participants with and without NES as to age, body mass index (BMI), prevalence of metabolic syndrome, Binge Eating Scale and Body Shape Questionnaire. NES participants had significantly higher scores of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life (IWQOL). Among NES cases, the BDI score was indicative of moderate depression in 18.5% of cases and of severe depression in 44.4%. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, identified the BDI score as the only variable significantly associated with the diagnosis of NES. Diagnosing NES does not help identify obese individuals with specific medical complications, but indicates more severe psychological distress and depression.

  11. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  12. Effects of dietary polyphenols on metabolic syndrome features in humans: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, M J; Riva, C; Vinet, A

    2016-07-01

    Dietary polyphenols constitute a large family of bioactive substances potential beneficial effect on metabolic syndrome (MetS). This review summarizes the results of clinical studies on patients with MetS involving the chronic supplementation of a polyphenol-rich diet, foods, extracts or with single phenolics on the features of MetS (obesity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure and glycaemia) and associated complications (oxidative stress and inflammation). Polyphenols were shown to be efficient, especially at higher doses, and there were no specific foods or extracts able to alleviate all the features of MetS. Green tea, however, significantly reduced body mass index and waist circumference and improved lipid metabolism. Cocoa supplementation reduced blood pressure and blood glucose. Soy isoflavones, citrus products, hesperidin and quercetin improved lipid metabolism, whereas cinnamon reduced blood glucose. In numerous clinical studies, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects were not significant after polyphenol supplementation in patients with MetS. However, some trials pointed towards an improvement of endothelial function in patients supplemented with cocoa, anthocyanin-rich berries, hesperidin or resveratrol. Therefore, diets rich in polyphenols, such as the Mediterranean diet, which promote the consumption of diverse polyphenol-rich products could be an effective nutritional strategy to improve the health of patients with MetS. © 2016 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity. © 2016 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  13. Meglumine exerts protective effects against features of metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes.

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    Arturo Bravo-Nuevo

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes complications pose a growing medical challenge worldwide, accentuating the need of safe and effective strategies for their clinical management. Here we present preclinical evidence that the sorbitol derivative meglumine (N-methyl-D-glucamine can safely protect against several features of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, as well as elicit enhancement in muscle stamina. Meglumine is a compound routinely used as an approved excipient to improve drug absorption that has not been ascribed any direct biological effects in vivo. Normal mice (SV129 administered 18 mM meglumine orally for six weeks did not display any gastrointestinal or other observable adverse effects, but had a marked effect on enhancing muscle stamina and at longer times in limiting weight gain. In the established KK.Cg-Ay/J model of non-insulin dependent diabetes, oral administration of meglumine significantly improved glycemic control and significantly lowered levels of plasma and liver triglycerides. Compared to untreated control animals, meglumine reduced apparent diabetic nephropathy. Sorbitol can improve blood glucose uptake by liver and muscle in a manner associated with upregulation of the AMPK-related enzyme SNARK, but with undesirable gastrointestinal side effects not seen with meglumine. In murine myoblasts, we found that meglumine increased steady-state SNARK levels in a dose-dependent manner more potently than sorbitol. Taken together, these findings provide support for the clinical evaluation of meglumine as a low-cost, safe supplement offering the potential to improve muscle function, limit metabolic syndrome and reduce diabetic complications.

  14. [CONNECTIVE TISSUE METABOLIC FEATURES IN CLIMACTERIC SYNDROME'S PATIENTS WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF MENOPAUSE].

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    Gryshchenko, O; Vasylieva, I; Gryshchuk, K

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was investigation of the connective tissue metabolic features among women with menopausal syndrome (MS) and MS, in which the arthropathic syndrome is leading and comparative analysis of the connective tissue indicators exchange during menopause caused in a surgical and natural way. We examined 70 women in total, menopause duration they accounted for 1,95±1,1 years, it came both as natural, and as a result of a surgery. The main group included 40 women with MS with leading arthropathic syndrome. The patients' modified menopausal index was calculated (MMI), the functional condition of the joints was assessed on a scale-questionnaire with the calculation of the clinical-functional index of WOMAC; the quantitative content and qualitative composition of glycosaminoglycans in the serum, the urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and uronic acids were determined. To determine the degree of deviation from the control (standard) indicators was used non-parametric Mann-Whitney criterion and factor analysis (main components method). It was revealed that all patients have an increased content of glycosaminoglycans and glycoprotein in the blood, which corresponds to the general age-related rearrangement of connective tissue metabolism, but the patients of the main group have more expressed indictors, which corresponds to more severe dystrophic changes and the severity of clinical symptoms. Redistribution of the fractional composition of glycosaminoglycans towards the increase of chondroitin-6 sulfate in patients of the main group indicates the presence of pre-emptive destruction of cartilage. The arthropathic syndrome availability also confirms the significant reduction CI-6s / CI-4s ratio and an increased content of chondroitin sulfates. Patients with a natural type of menopause showed more pronounced changes in connective tissue metabolites, in contrast to patients with surgical menopause еhat indicates a longer and more invasive pathologic course of

  15. GENDER FEATURES OF INTERACTION HORMONAL ACTIVITY ADIPOSE TISSUE AND PROINFLAMMATORY STATUS IN HYPERTENSION WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

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    I. D. Bespalova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: research gender features of relationship of hormonal activity of adipose tissue and proinflammatory status with essential hypertension (EH in combination with metabolic syndrome (MS.Material and methods. Were examined 46 patients with essential hypertension stage (BP < 180/110 mm Hg. in conjunction with the metabolic syndrome. Along with a complete clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination adopted in specialized cardiological clinic, were defined concentrations in serum leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin and the level of markers of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein, neopterin and fibrinogen, was assessed the level of spontaneous production of cytokines and active oxygen species and the expression level of CD4, CD8 and CD36 – blood mononuclear leukocytes markers.Results and conclusions. It was established that the hormonal status of adipose tissue have women with EH combined with MS are characterized by higher levels of leptin and adiponectin in blood serum than in men.It was established not only a significant role adipokin imbalance in mechanisms of MS and systemic inflammation in these patients category, but also were studied gender characteristics. While for men in the development of the above pathological manifestations hipoadiponektinemia has the most meaning, and for women – hyperleptinemia.

  16. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  17. Endocrino-metabolic features in women with polycystic ovary syndrome during pregnancy.

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    Paradisi, G; Fulghesu, A M; Ferrazzani, S; Moretti, S; Proto, C; Soranna, L; Caruso, A; Lanzone, A

    1998-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of metabolic adaptation of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during pregnancy, the endocrino-metabolic features of a group of PCOS patients with or without gestational diabetes were studied longitudinally during the three trimesters of gestation. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, 100 g) and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp were performed throughout the study. Plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose were determined by radioimmunoassay and glucose oxidase technique, respectively. Five of 13 PCOS patients developed gestational diabetes (GD) at the third trimester (PCOS-GD), while the other eight patients did not develop any alteration of glucose metabolism (PCOS-nGD). Both fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations did not change significantly during pregnancy and no difference was seen between the two groups. On the contrary PCOS-GD group early exhibited higher values of area under the curve (AUC) for glucose and insulin response to OGTT with respect to those found in PCOS-nGD group. This difference was already significant in the first gestational trimester. Moreover insulin sensitivity value (M) was significantly lower in the first trimester of gestation in PCOS-GD as compared with that found in PCOS-nGD group. However, as gestation proceeded, M value decreased in PCOS-nDG group and the difference from PCOS patients developing gestational diabetes was not sustained into the second and third trimesters. Both groups had similar body mass index values and AUC insulin increase from first to third trimester of gestation. It is concluded that early alteration of insulin sensitivity and secretion constitute specific risk factors in PCOS patients for the development of abnormalities of glucose tolerance.

  18. Metabolic and Reproductive Features before and during Puberty in Daughters of Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Codner, Ethel; Pérez, Virginia; Echiburú, Bárbara; Maliqueo, Manuel; Ladrón de Guevara, Amanda; Preisler, Jessica; Crisosto, Nicolás; Sánchez, Fernando; Cassorla, Fernando; Bhasin, Shalender

    2009-01-01

    Context: A significant proportion of the first-degree female relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may be at risk for developing PCOS. However, it is not known at which stage of pubertal development the hormonal and metabolic abnormalities ensue in PCOS.

  19. Detection of metabolic syndrome features among childhood cancer survivors: A target to prevent disease

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    Adriana Aparecida Siviero-Miachon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Aparecida Siviero-Miachon1, Angela Maria Spinola-Castro1, Gil Guerra-Junior21Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Sao Paulo – UNIFESP/EPM, Brazil; 2Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, State University of Campinas – FCM/UNICAMP, BrazilAbstract: Along with the growing epidemic of obesity, the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity, and mortality are increasing markedly. Several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension, and dyslipidemia commonly cluster together as a condition currently known as metabolic syndrome. Thus far, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction are the primary events of the metabolic syndrome. Several groups have recommended clinical criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in adults. Nonetheless, in what concerns children and adolescents, there are no unified definitions, and modified adult criteria have been suggested by many authors, despite major problems. Some pediatric disease states are at risk for premature cardiovascular disease, with clinical coronary events occurring very early in adult life. Survivors of specific pediatric cancer groups, particularly acute lymphocytic leukemia, central nervous system tumors, sarcomas, lymphomas, testicular cancer, and following bone marrow transplantation, may develop metabolic syndrome traits due to: hormonal deficiencies (growth hormone deficiency, thyroid dysfunction, and gonadal failure, drug or radiotherapy damage, endothelial impairment, physical inactivity, adipose tissue dysfunction, and/or drug-induced magnesium deficiency. In conclusion, some primary and secondary prevention remarks are proposed in order to reduce premature cardiovascular disease risk in this particular group of patients.Keywords: metabolic syndrome X, cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, obesity, growth hormone

  20. RESISTANT HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    O. M. Drapkina; J. S. Sibgatullina

    2016-01-01

    Clinical case of resistant hypertension in a patient with metabolic syndrome is presented. Features of hypertension in metabolic syndrome and features of metabolic syndrome in women of pre- and postmenopausal age are also considered. Understanding the features of metabolic syndrome in women, as well as features of hypertension and metabolic syndrome will improve the results of treatment in patients with resistant hypertension.

  1. Effects of Human C-Reactive Protein on Pathogenesis of Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kajiya, T.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 731-737 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA ČR GAP303/10/0505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:EC(XE) HEALTH-F4-2010-241504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : C-reactive protein * metabolic syndrome * transgenic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.207, year: 2011

  2. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P

  3. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P protein and HDL cholesterol (R = 0.13, P protein...

  4. Variations of the interleukin-6 promoter are associated with features of the metabolic syndrome in Caucasian Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Y H; Rose, C S; Urhammer, S A

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) is an essential regulator of the acute phase response associated with insulin-resistant states including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Three polymorphisms at positions -597, -572, and -174 of the IL6 promoter have been reported to influence IL6 transcription. The ....... The aim of this study was to investigate whether the IL6 promoter polymorphisms were associated with features of the WHO-defined metabolic syndrome and related quantitative traits in 7,553 Caucasian Danes....

  5. Effects of a diet rich in arabinoxylan and resistant starch compared with a diet rich in refined carbohydrates on postprandial metabolism and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schioldan, Anne Grethe; Gregersen, Søren; Hald, Stine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Low intake of dietary fibre is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. Dyslipidaemia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Knowledge of the impact of dietary fibres on postprandial lipaemia is, however, sparse. This study aimed in subjects with metabolic...... syndrome to assess the impact on postprandial lipaemia and features of the metabolic syndrome of a healthy carbohydrate diet (HCD) rich in cereal fibre, arabinoxylan and resistant starch compared to a refined-carbohydrate western-style diet (WSD). Methods: Nineteen subjects completed the randomised...... lipid content were measured. Results: We found no diet effects on postprandial lipaemia. However, there was a significant diet × statin interaction on total cholesterol (P = 0.02) and LDL cholesterol (P = 0.002). HCD decreased total cholesterol (−0.72 mmol/l, 95% CI (−1.29; −0.14) P = 0.03) and LDL...

  6. Metabolic and Reproductive Features before and during Puberty in Daughters of Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Codner, Ethel; Pérez, Virginia; Echiburú, Bárbara; Maliqueo, Manuel; Ladrón de Guevara, Amanda; Preisler, Jessica; Crisosto, Nicolás; Sánchez, Fernando; Cassorla, Fernando; Bhasin, Shalender

    2009-01-01

    Context: A significant proportion of the first-degree female relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may be at risk for developing PCOS. However, it is not known at which stage of pubertal development the hormonal and metabolic abnormalities ensue in PCOS. Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the reproductive and metabolic profiles of daughters of women with PCOS (PCOSd) during the peripubertal period, a stage during which the gonadal axis is activated and PCOS may become clinically manifest. Design: Ninety-nine PCOSd [30 prepubertal and 69 pubertal (Tanner II-V)] and 84 daughters of control women (Cd) (20 prepubertal and 64 pubertal) were studied. An oral glucose tolerance test, a GnRH agonist test (leuprolide acetate, 10 μg/kg sc), and a transabdominal ultrasound were performed. Gonadotropins, sex steroids, SHBG, glucose, insulin, and lipids were determined. Results: Both groups had similar chronological ages and body mass index sd scores according to Tanner stage distribution. Ovarian volume and 2-h insulin were significantly higher in PCOSd compared to Cd at all Tanner stages. In Tanner stages IV and V, basal testosterone and poststimulated LH, testosterone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations were significantly higher in PCOSd compared to Cd. Conclusions: Hyperinsulinemia and an increased ovarian volume are present in PCOSd before the onset of puberty and persist during pubertal development. The biochemical abnormalities of PCOS appear during late puberty. Considering the early onset and the nature of the alterations, PCOSd constitute a high-risk group for metabolic and reproductive derangements. PMID:19223518

  7. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease concurrent with metabolic syndrome: Pathophysiological and clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Ovsyannikov, E S; Labzhania, N B

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) still remains a serious public health problem, which is a common cause of disability and death in the able-bodied population. Furthermore, the number of patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) is steadily increasing worldwide. Recently, there is also an increase in the number of patients with COPD concurrent with MS, which is a mutually confounding risk factor for concomitant cardiovascular disease and adversely affects prognosis in these patients. Systemic subclinical inflammation is a common link between COPD and the components of MS. Systemic inflammation in patients with comorbidity is complemented by an inflammatory process in the abdominal visceral adipose tissue that serves as a source of proinflammatory adipokines (leptin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α). Patients with COPD in the presence of MS components have in general higher ventilation needs, more obvious clinical manifestations of bronchopulmonary diseases, and more frequent COPD exacerbations and frequently require higher doses of inhaled glucocorticosteroids. As compared with normal-weight patients with COPD, obese patients with this condition have more limited physical activity and much more exercise intolerance. There are currently no practical recommendations for the management of patients with comorbidity; patients with COPD concurrent with MS need an individual therapeutic approach. It is important to elaborate a package of preventive measures to improve quality of life in patients, to reduce the incidence of systemic complications, and to achieve symptomatic improvements. Thus, to develop and implement practical guidelines for physicians and patients are an urgent issue.

  8. Pathophysiological, genetic and gene expression features of a novel rodent model of the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Wallis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex etiology and pathogenesis of pathophysiological components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome have been demonstrated in humans and animal models.We have generated extensive physiological, genetic and genome-wide gene expression profiles in a congenic strain of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat containing a large region (110 cM, 170 Mb of rat chromosome 1 (RNO1, which covers diabetes and obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL, introgressed onto the genetic background of the normoglycaemic Brown Norway (BN strain. This novel disease model, which by the length of the congenic region closely mirrors the situation of a chromosome substitution strain, exhibits a wide range of abnormalities directly relevant to components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications, including hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and altered pancreatic and renal histological structures. Gene transcription data in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue indicate that a disproportionately high number (43-83% of genes differentially expressed between congenic and BN rats map to the GK genomic interval targeted in the congenic strain, which represents less than 5% of the total length of the rat genome. Genotype analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in strains genetically related to the GK highlights clusters of conserved and strain-specific variants in RNO1 that can assist the identification of naturally occurring variants isolated in diabetic and hypertensive strains when different phenotype selection procedures were applied.Our results emphasize the importance of rat congenic models for defining the impact of genetic variants in well-characterised QTL regions on in vivo pathophysiological features and cis-/trans- regulation of gene expression. The congenic strain reported here provides a novel and sustainable model for

  9. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Endocrine and metabolic features of female children with Prader-Willi syndrome: an analysis of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mo-Ling; Li, Juan; Ding, Yu; Chen, Yao; Chang, Guo-Ying; Wang, Xiu-Min; Wang, Jian; Shen, Yi-Ping

    2017-05-01

    This article reports the clinical features and endocrine and metabolic features of 4 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). All the patients were female and aged 6-12 years at diagnosis. All of them had clinical manifestations of obesity, unusual facies, developmental retardation, and intellectual disability. Genetic detection showed that 2 patients had paternal deletion of the 15q11.2-q13 region, one patient had maternal autodiploid in the 15q11.2-q13 region, and one patient had no abnormality in the 15q11.2-q13 region. All patients had varying degrees of endocrine and metabolic disorders: 2 patients had short stature, among whom one had delayed appearance of secondary sex characteristics and the other one had type 2 diabetes; one patient had insulin resistance and no mammary gland development; one patient had a body height of P 3 -P 10 and precocious puberty. Patients with PWS have various endocrine disorders, so long-term endocrine follow-up and management is very important.

  11. Effects of short- and long-term Mediterranean-based dietary treatment on plasma LC-QTOF/MS metabolic profiling of subjects with metabolic syndrome features: The Metabolic Syndrome Reduction in Navarra (RESMENA) randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Martinez, José Alfredo; de la Iglesia, Rocio; Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Poutanen, Kaisa; Hanhineva, Kati; Zulet, Maria de los Ángeles

    2015-04-01

    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Metabolomics approach may contribute to identify beneficial associations of metabolic changes affected by Mediterranean diet-based interventions with inflammatory and oxidative-stress markers related to the etiology and development of the MetS. Liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight-MS metabolic profiling was applied to plasma from a 6-month randomized intervention with two sequential periods, a 2-month nutritional-learning intervention period, and a 4-month self-control period, with two energy-restricted diets; the RESMENA diet (based on the Mediterranean dietary pattern) and the Control diet (based on the American Heart Association guidelines), in 72 subjects with a high BMI and at least two features of MetS. The major contributing biomarkers of each sequential period were lipids, mainly phospholipids and lysophospholipids. Dependency network analysis showed a different pattern of associations between metabolic changes and clinical variables after 2 and 6 month of intervention, with a highly interconnected network during the nutritional-learning intervention period of the study. The 2-month RESMENA diet produced significant changes in the plasma metabolic profile of subjects with MetS features. However, at the end of the 6-month study, most of the associations between metabolic and clinical variables disappeared; suggesting that adherence to healthy dietary habits had declined during the self-control period. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  13. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Excessive fructose intake induces the features of metabolic syndrome in healthy adult men: role of uric acid in the hypertensive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pozo, S E; Schold, J; Nakagawa, T; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J; Lillo, J López

    2010-03-01

    Excessive fructose intake causes metabolic syndrome in animals and can be partially prevented by lowering the uric acid level. We tested the hypothesis that fructose might induce features of metabolic syndrome in adult men and whether this is protected by allopurinol. A randomized, controlled trial of 74 adult men who were administered 200 g fructose daily for 2 weeks with or without allopurinol. Primary measures included changes in ambulatory blood pressure (BP), fasting lipids, glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, body mass index and criteria for metabolic syndrome. The ingestion of fructose resulted in an increase in ambulatory BP (7+/-2 and 5+/-2 mm Hg for systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP), Pmetabolic syndrome increased by 25-33% depending on the criteria. Allopurinol lowered the serum uric acid level (Pmetabolic syndrome (0-2%, P=0.009). High doses of fructose raise the BP and cause the features of metabolic syndrome. Lowering the uric acid level prevents the increase in mean arterial blood pressure. Excessive intake of fructose may have a role in the current epidemics of obesity and diabetes.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  16. A healthy Nordic diet alters the plasma lipidomic profile in adults with features of metabolic syndrome in a multicenter randomized dietary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lankinen, Maria; Schwab, Ursula S; Kolehmainen, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: Men and women (n = 200) with features of metabolic syndrome [mean age: 55 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.6] were randomly assigned to either a healthy Nordic (n = 104) or a control (n = 96) diet for 18 or 24 wk at 6 centers. Of the participants, 156 completed the study with plasma lipidomic...

  17. Role of standardized grape polyphenol preparation as a novel treatment to improve synaptic plasticity through attenuation of features of metabolic syndrome in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Cheuk; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Gong, Bing; Song, Brian J; Janle, Elsa M; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Cooper, Bruce; Varghese, Merina; Cheng, Alice; Freire, Daniel; Bilski, Amanda; Roman, Jessica; Nguyen, Tuyen; Ho, Lap; Talcott, Stephen T; Simon, James E; Wu, Qingli; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome has become an epidemic and poses tremendous burden on the health system. People with metabolic syndrome are more likely to experience cognitive decline. As obesity and sedentary lifestyles become more common, the development of early prevention strategies is critical. In this study, we explore the potential beneficial effects of a combinatory polyphenol preparation composed of grape seed extract, Concord purple grape juice extract, and resveratrol, referred to as standardized grape polyphenol preparation (SGP), on peripheral as well as brain dysfunction induced by metabolic syndrome. We found dietary fat content had minimal effect on absorption of metabolites of major polyphenols derived from SGP. Using a diet-induced animal model of metabolic syndrome (DIM), we found that brain functional connectivity and synaptic plasticity are compromised in the DIM mice. Treatment with SGP not only prevented peripheral metabolic abnormality but also improved brain synaptic plasticity. Our study demonstrated that SGP, comprised of multiple bioavailable and bioactive components targeting a wide range of metabolic syndrome related pathological features, provides greater global protection against peripheral and central nervous system dysfunctions and can be potentially developed as a novel prevention/treatment for improving brain connectivity and synaptic plasticity important for learning and memory. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  19. Dietary nitrite reverses features of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome induced by high-fat diet and ovariectomy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Kazuo; Ehara, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Hiroshige; Nakano, Genya; Sonoda, Kunihiro; Ito, Junta; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Menopausal women are at greater risk of developing metabolic syndrome with reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Hormone replacement therapy increases eNOS activity and normalizes some characteristics of metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) supplementation should have a therapeutic effect on this syndrome. We examined the effect of dietary nitrite in a mouse model with postmenopausal metabolic syndrome induced by ovariectomy (OVX) and a high fat diet (HF). C57BL/6 female mice were divided into five groups, sham+normal fat diet (NF), sham+ HF, OVX+HF with or without sodium nitrite (50 mg and 150 mg/l) in the drinking water. Daily food intake and weekly body weight were monitored for 18 wk. OVX and HF significantly reduced plasma levels of nitrate/nitrite (NOx), and mice developed obesity with visceral hypertrophic adipocytes and increased transcriptional levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in visceral fat tissues. The proinflammatory state in the adipocytes provoked severe hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance in OVX+HF group compared with sham+NF group. However, dietary nitrite significantly suppressed adipocyte hypertrophy and transcriptions of proinflammatory cytokines in visceral fat in a dose-dependent manner. The improvement of visceral inflammatory state consequently reversed the hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance observed in OVX+HF mice. These results suggest that an endogenous NO defect might underlie postmenopausal metabolic syndrome and that dietary nitrite provides an alternative source of NO, subsequently compensating for metabolic impairments of this syndrome. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Healthy Nordic diet downregulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue in individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Ulven, Stine M; Paananen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, a healthy Nordic diet (ND) has been shown to have beneficial health effects close to those of Mediterranean diets. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore whether the ND has an impact on gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and whether changes...... in gene expression are associated with clinical and biochemical effects. DESIGN: Obese adults with features of the metabolic syndrome underwent an 18- to 24-wk randomized intervention study comparing the ND with the control diet (CD) (the SYSDIET study, carried out within Nordic Centre of Excellence...... sites for the nuclear transcription factor κB. CONCLUSION: A healthy Nordic diet reduces inflammatory gene expression in SAT compared with a control diet independently of body weight change in individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT...

  1. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Albornoz López, Raúl; Pérez Rodrigo, Iciar

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activ...

  2. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and met...

  3. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  4. Healthy Nordic diet downregulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue in individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Ulven, Stine M; Paananen, Jussi; de Mello, Vanessa; Schwab, Ursula; Carlberg, Carsten; Myhrstad, Mari; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Dungner, Elisabeth; Sjölin, Eva; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Cloetens, Lieselotte; Landin-Olsson, Mona; Akesson, Björn; Rosqvist, Fredrik; Hukkanen, Janne; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Dragsted, Lars O; Savolainen, Markku J; Brader, Lea; Hermansen, Kjeld; Risérus, Ulf; Thorsdottir, Inga; Poutanen, Kaisa S; Uusitupa, Matti; Arner, Peter; Dahlman, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a healthy Nordic diet (ND) has been shown to have beneficial health effects close to those of Mediterranean diets. The objective was to explore whether the ND has an impact on gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and whether changes in gene expression are associated with clinical and biochemical effects. Obese adults with features of the metabolic syndrome underwent an 18- to 24-wk randomized intervention study comparing the ND with the control diet (CD) (the SYSDIET study, carried out within Nordic Centre of Excellence of the Systems Biology in Controlled Dietary Interventions and Cohort Studies). The present study included participants from 3 Nordic SYSDIET centers [Kuopio (n = 20), Lund (n = 18), and Oulu (n = 18)] with a maximum weight change of ±4 kg, highly sensitive C-reactive protein concentration diet reduces inflammatory gene expression in SAT compared with a control diet independently of body weight change in individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  6. Ultrasound features of polycystic ovaries relate to degree of reproductive and metabolic disturbance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Jacob P; Vanden Brink, Heidi; Brooks, Eric D; Pierson, Roger A; Chizen, Donna R; Lujan, Marla E

    2015-03-01

    To reexamine associations between polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) and degree of symptomatology in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) using a well-defined PCOS population, newer ultrasound technology, and reliable offline assessments of sonographic parameters. Cross-sectional observational study. Academic hospital and clinical research unit. Forty-nine women with PCOS as defined by hyperandrogenism and oligoamenorrhea. None. Number of follicles per follicle size category, antral follicle count (AFC), ovarian volume (OV), follicle distribution pattern, stromal area, ovarian area, stromal to ovarian area ratio (S/A) and stromal echogenicity index (SI), total (TT), androstenedione, LH, FSH, cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1C, menstrual cycle length, hirsutism score, body mass index (BMI), waist:hip ratio, and blood pressure. AFC, but not OV, was positively associated with TT (ρ = .610), androstenedione (ρ = .490), and LH:FSH (ρ = .402). SI was positively associated with androgen markers and LH:FSH, while S/A was negatively associated with these variables. Follicles ≤4 mm were negatively associated with various metabolic markers, whereas larger follicles (5-8 mm) showed positive associations. Stromal markers were not associated with cardiometabolic measures. LH:FSH best predicted follicles ≤4 mm, and BMI predicted 5- to 9-mm follicles. Dominant follicles ≥10 mm were best predicted by age. AFC, and not OV, reflected the severity of reproductive dysfunction in PCOS. Associations among different sized follicles were consistent with recruitable sized follicles, which reflects the severity of metabolic dysfunction in PCOS. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Microbiota and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Yüksel; Batman, Adnan

    2017-04-01

    The role of gut bacteria in the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases has been a focus of attention in the last 10 years. Prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases continues to increase, in spite of technological developments and treatment alternatives. Microbial dysbiosis, described as the decrease of useful bacteria and the increase of harmful bacteria, has been associated with diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome. In microbial dysbiosis, increase of harmful metabolites and changes to composition of bile acids occur via carbohydrate and protein fermentation. As a result, insulin resistance pathways are activated, which initiate the processes of obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Healthy diet recommendations, including prebiotic and probiotic foods and the use of probiotic agents, look promising for future treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  8. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with shared pathophysiology who are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. By considering the central features of the metabolic syndrome and how they are related, we may better understand the underlying pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis. A comprehensive definition for the metabolic syndrome and its key features would facilitate research into its causes and hopefully lead to new insights into pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment approaches.

  9. Abdominal aortic calcification quantified by the Morphological Atherosclerotic Calcification Distribution (MACD index is associated with features of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barascuk Natasha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC predict cardiovascular mortality. A new scoring model for AAC, the Morphological Atherosclerotic Calcification Distribution (MACD index may contribute with additional information to the commonly used Aortic Calcification Severity (AC24 score, when predicting death from cardiovascular disease (CVD. In this study we investigated associations of MACD and AC24 with traditional metabolic-syndrome associated risk factors at baseline and after 8.3 years follow-up, to identify biological parameters that may account for the differential performance of these indices. Methods Three hundred and eight healthy women aged 48 to 76 years, were followed for 8.3 ± 0.3 years. AAC was quantified using lumbar radiographs. Baseline data included age, weight, blood pressure, blood lipids, and glucose levels. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to test for relationships. Results At baseline and across all patients, MACD correlated with blood glucose (r2 = 0.1, P Conclusion Patterns of calcification identified by the MACD, but not the AC24 index, appear to contain useful biological information perhaps explaining part of the improved identification of risk of cardiovascular death of the MACD index. Correlations of MACD but not the AC24 with glucose levels at baseline suggest that hyperglycemia may contribute to unique patterns of calcification indicated by the MACD.

  10. Polymorphism in the MHC2TA gene is associated with features of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Lindholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, a -168A-->G polymorphism in the MHC class II transactivator gene (MHC2TA was shown to be associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial infarction (MI. AIM: To confirm the association between the MHC2TA -168A-->G polymorphism and MI and to study its putative role for microalbuminuria, the metabolic syndrome (MetS and cardiovascular mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using an allelic discrimination method we genotyped 11,064 individuals from three study populations: 1 4,432 individuals from the Botnia type 2 diabetes (T2D study, 2 1,222 patients with MI and 2,345 control subjects participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study and comprising an MI case-control sample, and 3 3,065 T2D patients from the Local Swedish Diabetes registry. RESULTS: No association between the -168A-->G polymorphism in MHC2TA and MI was observed. However, in the Botnia cohort the AG/GG genotypes were associated with cardiovascular mortality after MI (1.78 [1.09-2.92], p = 0.02. In addition, the AG/GG genotypes were more common in subjects with MetS (40.1% vs. 36.9%, p = 0.03 and in non-diabetic subjects with microalbuminuria (45.4% vs. 36.5%, p = 0.003 compared to control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: A polymorphism in MHC2TA was associated with cardiovascular mortality and predictors of cardiovascular mortality, microalbuminuria and MetS.

  11. Testosterone and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men are closely Linked. Epidemiological studies have shown that Low testosterone Levels are associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an adverse Lipid profile in men. Conversely in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have a high prevalence of hypogonadism. Metabolic syndrome and Low testosterone status are both independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Observational and experimental data ...

  12. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  13. The metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetSy) is increasingly common in Australia. It is associated with the rise in obesity and lifestyle risk behaviours. It is also controversial - its value in predicting cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk and in guiding therapy has been challenged. This article aims to provide advice on the diagnosis of the MetSy and the principles for its prevention and management in the context of primary care, taking into consideration aetiological factors and the complexity of managing its constituent risk factors. Diagnosis of the MetSy is useful in focusing attention on central adiposity and insulin resistance as risk factors both for the syndrome, and cardiovascular and diabetes morbidity and mortality. Its assessment requires measurement of waist circumference - a simple but seldom performed procedure in general practice. The most essential components for the prevention and management of the MetSy are measures to change diet and physical activity in order to achieve and sustain weight loss.

  14. Androgenic Hormones In Relation To Parameters of the Metabolic Syndrome in male patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M. A.; Soliman, S. E.; Semna, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    Back ground and aim of the work :The numerous deleterious effects of metabolic syndrome are being investigated throughout the medical community. Hypo-androgenomes in men is associated with features of the metabolic syndrome, even it may predict the metabolic syndrome, but the association with the metabolic syndrome it self using an accepted definition has not been described. A group 40 men defined as metabolic syndrome were assessed to investigate the relationship between androgenic hormones and parameters of the metabolic syndrome. (Author)

  15. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; pacute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; pacute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  18. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Apr 13,2017 What are the symptoms ... Syndrome? This content was last reviewed August 2016. Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  20. [Nutrition and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matía Martín, Pilar; Lecumberri Pascual, Edurne; Calle Pascual, Alfonso L

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient evidence exists in relation to the association in clinical practice between disorders in the metabolism of glucose, lipoproteins, insulin action, arterial hypertension and centrally-distributed obesity. This association is named Metabolic Syndrome. Despite the existence thereof had been questioned by the ADA and EASD, it is a useful tool affording the possibility of identifying individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome and/or its individual components are associated with a high incidence rate of cardiovascular disease. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are underlying risk factors along this syndrome's pathway to disease, changes in living habits therefore being a first-line intervention in the prevention and treatment of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, aterogenic dyslipemia and arterial hypertension. Weight loss and exercise are the keys to the overall plan, one of the most important non-pharmacological cardiovascular risk reduction strategies however still being diet. Epidemiological studies have found a high intake of simple sugars, of foods having a glycemic index and of diets with a high glycemic load to be associated to insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol figures. Los saturated fat intake in favor of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids has been implied in a reduction of the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipemia, although the debate is ongoing. Unrefined grain fiber in the diet has been beneficial in reducing the risk of diabetes. Among the diet patterns, the Mediterranean diet has been related to a lower incidence of diabetes and a reduction in the risk of death. Studies for intervention in the prevention of type II diabetes have suggested low-fat diets (reducing saturated and trans-fats), with a high degree of fiber and low glycemic index. Clinical trials have shown diets with small amounts of carbohydrates, low glycemic

  1. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalli, M.A.; Aamir, M.; Mustafa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  4. The metabolic syndrome in HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe W; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a term used to describe the clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including elevated triglyceride (TG), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), hypertension, hyperglycemia/ insulin resistance and intra-abdominal obesity. This paper...

  5. Equine metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  6. Revisiting the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gerard T; Gan, Seng Khee; Watts, Gerald F

    2006-10-16

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) refers to the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors - including abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and elevated blood pressure - that are thought to be linked to insulin resistance. MS is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. MS is common, affecting a quarter to a third of adults, and its prevalence is rising, in parallel with increasing obesity and population ageing. Operational definitions of MS have been proposed by the World Health Organization and the National Cholesterol Education Program. Recently, the International Diabetes Federation proposed a global definition that emphasised the importance of central adiposity. In cardiovascular risk assessment, MS encapsulates the contribution of non-traditional risk factors and provides a clinically useful framework for early identification of people at increased long-term risk. It should be used in conjunction with standard algorithms based on conventional risk factors, which better predict short-term risk. Management of MS should emphasise lifestyle interventions (eg, physical activity, healthy diet and weight reduction) to reduce long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those at increased short-term risk should also have individual risk factors treated according to established guidelines.

  7. Effects of raw red onion consumption on metabolic features in overweight or obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Mamaghani, Mehranghiz; Saghafi-Asl, Maryam; Pirouzpanah, Saeed; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of raw red onion consumption on metabolic features in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, the patients (n=54) were randomly allocated to the intervention group as 'high-onion' (raw red onions: 2 × 40-50 g/day if overweight and 2 × 50-60 g/day if obese) or to the control group as 'low-onion' (raw red onions: 2 × 10-15 g/day) along with limited liliaceous vegetables for 8 weeks. Body mass index, dietary record, and metabolic parameters (fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lipoprotein (a)) were evaluated in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle at baseline and after 8 weeks. Hormonal variables (progesterone, prolactin, and 17-OH progesterone) were also measured at baseline. Onion significantly decreased the levels of total cholesterol within each group; however, these changes were stronger in the high-onion group (weighted mean differences [WMD]: -5.60 [95% confidence interval [CI]: -9.16, -2.03]; P=0.003) than in the low-onion group (WMD: -6.42 [95%CI: -11.97, -0.87]; P=0.025). Similarly, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly (WMD: -5.13 [95%CI: -9.46, -0.81); P=0.022) in the high-onion group, and (WMD: -2.90 [95%CI -5.57, -0.21]; P=0.035) in the low-onion group after treatment. The levels of fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) did not differ significantly after 8-week onion treatment. Adjustment for confounders did not make any significant changes in any of the parameters in post-treatment levels. Raw red onion consumption appears to be effective as a cholesterol-lowering food agent in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. However, further investigation is warranted. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarla, Sara; Struglia, Manuela; Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Necozione, Stefano; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the relationship among serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome. Anthropometric parameters, serum uric acid and metabolic parameters were evaluated in 139 subjects. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in subjects with than without metabolic syndrome (p metabolic syndrome components (p for trend uric acid significantly correlated with various anthropometric and serum metabolic parameters. Serum uric acid levels were higher in individuals with rather than without metabolic syndrome and raised gradually as the number of metabolic syndrome components increased. The relationship between serum uric acid levels and various metabolic parameters suggests that uric acid might be considered as a component of metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia is a common finding in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies indicated that hyperuricemia may be also a predictor of metabolic syndrome development.

  10. Metabolic Syndrome in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Escasany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in female nurses in the Hospital Juan A. Fernandez (HJAF, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to determine whether work, rest, diet, and health, are predictive of it.Materials and methods: For the first objective, a descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was conducted, and for the second, a multivariate cross-sectional observational multivariate analysis was made comparing independent samples. A total of 192 nurses were studied between October 2008 and March 2009. They completed a questionnaire that include indicators that could be predictors of MS. Anthropometric measurements, including blood pressure were taken, was well as a blood sample to analyze fasting glucose, HDL-C and plasma triglycerides.Results: It was found that 35% and 41% of nurses were overweight and obese, respectively. A total of 92% had centro-abdominal obesity. The prevalence of MS found was 33.3% (95%CI, 26.7 to 40.5. Those who had this disease were between 53±9 years. Statistically significant differences were found in the bivariate analysis between MS and the variables, age, length of service, time worked during night shift, and academic studies.Conclusions: The prevalence of MS was 64/192 in HJAF nurses (33.3% I 95%CI, 26.7-40.5. There were no statistically significant differences with the indicators of, age, “time worked during night shift”, and “studies”. These results suggest that age is the most important variable in predicting the onset of MS in the population of nurses.

  11. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  12. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Cunningham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS. Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  13. Neuroinflammatory basis of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-10-05

    Inflammatory reaction is a fundamental defense mechanism against threat towards normal integrity and physiology. On the other hand, chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis, have been causally linked to chronic, low-grade inflammation in various metabolic tissues. Recent cross-disciplinary research has led to identification of hypothalamic inflammatory changes that are triggered by overnutrition, orchestrated by hypothalamic immune system, and sustained through metabolic syndrome-associated pathophysiology. While continuing research is actively trying to underpin the identity and mechanisms of these inflammatory stimuli and actions involved in metabolic syndrome disorders and related diseases, proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ), the downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and some related molecules in the hypothalamus were discovered to be pathogenically significant. This article is to summarize recent progresses in the field of neuroendocrine research addressing the central integrative role of neuroinflammation in metabolic syndrome components ranging from obesity, glucose intolerance to cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  14. [Metabolic syndrome after kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbálková, Marta; Svojanovský, Jan; Trnavský, Karel; Kuman, Milan; Jarkovský, Jiří; Karpíšek, Michal; Souček, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Higher risk of the metabolic syndrome and its components in patients after kidney transplantation is caused by immunosuppressive therapy. THE AIM OF OUR STUDY was to evaluate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in kidney transplant recipients and to analyse their influence on allograft function and albuminuria. In the study we monitored 69 patients after cadaveric kidney transplantation. The prevalence of the meta-bolic syndrome was 61.3 % 3 years after kidney transplantation. The prevalence of new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was 27 % and that of abdominal obesity 59.7 % of patients. The age of kidney transplant recipients with the metabolic syndrome was higher than of these without it, but not statistically significant. The age of kidney transplant recipients with new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was significantly higher, 54.0 (35.0; 69.0) years, than in patients without it, 45.5 (27.0; 60.0) years, OR (95% IS) 1.116 (1.031; 1.207), p = 0.006.The number of components of the metabolic syndrome was negatively correlated with the graft function (rs -0,275, p = 0,031). In patients with impaired renal function with estimated glomerular filtration (using MDRD equation) metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridaemia was significantly higher. Chronic allograft dysfunction was predicted by donor age, delayed allograft function, rejection, low level of HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia was the only significant predictor of allograft dysfunction independently of the presence of delayed allograft function, rejection episodes and donor age. The metabolic syndrome, elevation of apolipoprotein B and nonHDL-cholesterol and increased systolic blood pressure were associated with albuminuria. Higher levels of apolipoprotein B and total cholesterol were independent predictors of increased albumin-creatinine ratio. Obesity

  15. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  16. Clinical biomarkers in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Silva, Veronica; Singer, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A biomarker can be defined as a measurable variable that may be used as an indicator of a given biological state or condition. Biomarkers have been used in health and disease for diagnostic purposes, as tools to assess effectiveness of nutritional or drug intervention, or as risk markers to predict the development of certain diseases. In nutrition studies, selecting appropriate biomarkers is important to assess compliance, or incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism, and in the diagnosis and prognosis of nutrition-related diseases. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that occur simultaneously in the same individual, and it is associated with systemic alterations that may involve several organs and tissues. Given its close association with obesity and the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide, identifying obese individuals at risk for metabolic syndrome is a major clinical priority. Biomarkers for metabolic syndrome are therefore potential important tools to maximize the effectiveness of treatment in subjects who would likely benefit the most. Choice of biomarkers may be challenging due to the complexity of the syndrome, and this article will mainly focus on nutrition biomarkers related to the diagnosis and prognosis of the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Incident Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Earl S.; Li, Chaoyang; Sattar, Naveed

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?Our objective was to perform a quantitative review of prospective studies examining the association between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Using the title terms ?diabetes? and ?metabolic syndrome? in PubMed, we searched for articles published since 1998. RESULTS?Based on the results from 16 cohorts, we performed a meta-analysis of estimates of relative risk (RR) and incident diabetes. The random-effects summary RRs were 5.17 (95% CI 3.99?6....

  18. Pharmacological treatment and therapeutic perspectives of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder based on insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is diagnosed by a co-occurrence of three out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressures, elevated glucose, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome is that it increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased globally, particularly in the last decade, to the point of being regarded as an epidemic. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the USA is estimated to be 34% of adult population. Moreover, increasing rate of metabolic syndrome in developing countries is dramatic. One can speculate that metabolic syndrome is going to induce huge impact on our lives. The metabolic syndrome cannot be treated with a single agent, since it is a multifaceted health problem. A healthy lifestyle including weight reduction is likely most effective in controlling metabolic syndrome. However, it is difficult to initiate and maintain healthy lifestyles, and in particular, with the recidivism of obesity in most patients who lose weight. Next, pharmacological agents that deal with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia can be used singly or in combination: anti-obesity drugs, thiazolidinediones, metformin, statins, fibrates, renin-angiotensin system blockers, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists, sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors, and some antiplatelet agents such as cilostazol. These drugs have not only their own pharmacologic targets on individual components of metabolic syndrome but some other properties may prove beneficial, i.e. anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. This review will describe pathophysiologic features of metabolic syndrome and pharmacologic agents for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, which are currently available.

  19. Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Poor glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome and their relative incidence among recently diagnosed diabetic patients in Tamale ...

  20. Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among Recently Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. ... West African Journal of Medicine ... BACKGROUND: Poor glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  1. Cortisol: the villain in Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Paredes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This article reviews the state of the art regarding the association between glucocorticoid actions and both obesity and insulin resistance, two main features of the metabolic syndrome. Methods A methodological assessment of the literature on PubMed and SciELO databases was conducted by using the following terms: stress, metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoids, obesity, insulin resistance, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Results Chronic stress, mainly through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, promotes the accumulation of visceral fat. Reciprocally, obesity promotes a systemic low-grade inflammation state, mediated by increased adipokine secretion, which can chronically stimulate and disturb stress system. This vicious cycle, probably initiated by visceral adipose tissue dysfunction, might be the trigger for the development of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Given the strong evidences linking glucocorticoid release, obesity and type 2 diabetes, better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this connection might be useful for prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Metabolic aspects of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bonsignore

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is often associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS and could contribute to cardiovascular risk in OSAS. Sleep loss and intermittent hypoxia could contribute to the pathogenesis of the metabolic alterations associated with obesity, a common feature of OSAS. The biology of the adipocyte is being increasingly studied, and it has been found that hypoxia negatively affects adipocyte function. In November 2007, the European Respiratory Society and two EU COST Actions (Cardiovascular risk in OSAS (B26 and Adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome (BM0602, held a Research Seminar in Düsseldorf, Germany, to discuss the following: 1 the effects of hypoxia on glucose metabolism and adipocyte function; 2 the role of inflammatory activation in OSAS and obesity; 3 the alarming rates of obesity and OSAS in children; 4 the harmful effects of the metabolic syndrome in OSAS; 5 the effects of OSAS treatment on metabolic variables; and 6 the relationship between daytime sleepiness and hormonal and inflammatory responses. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, the role of the endocannabinoid system and novel pharmacological approaches to treat insulin resistance were also discussed. As obesity and hypoxia could be the basic links between OSAS and adipocyte dysfunction, further research is needed to translate these new data into clinical practice.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in HIV infected adults in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska-Płońska, Magdalena; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Rogalski, Paweł; Łucejko, Mariusz; Flisiak, Robert

    2018-01-19

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is usually diagnosed based on presence of abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein levels (HDL). Whether HIV is associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than general population remains unclear. Aim of the study was to determine the incidence of metabolic syndrome in the population of HIV infected adults and its association with clinical, virological and biochemical features. Two hundred and seventy HIV infected Caucasian adult patients were enrolled in the study and evaluated based on clinical records in years 2013-2015. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 60 out of 270 (22%) patients, 47 (24%) males and 13 (17%) females, mostly (72%) aged above 40 years. Percentage of patients with diagnosed metabolic syndrome in specific age groups in comparison to general Polish population for females aged metabolic syndrome in MS population were found as follows: BMI > 30 kg/m2 in 29%, waist circumference exceeding 94cm in men and 80cm in woman - 87.5%, TG ≥ 150 mg/dL - 82%, HDL 100 mg/dL - 42%. In the stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, age (OR: 1.052, 95% CI: 1.018 - 1.088, p=0.003) and nadir CD4 metabolic syndrome in HIV infected population is higher than in general Polish population. Age and low nadir CD4 were found to be associated with metabolic syndrome.

  4. Green coffee polyphenols do not attenuate features of the metabolic syndrome and improve endothelial function in mice fed a high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Kwok Cheong, J D; Croft, K D; Henry, P D; Matthews, V; Hodgson, J M; Ward, N C

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of the major polyphenol in coffee, chlorogenic acid (CGA), on obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, systemic oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of the metabolic syndrome. Thirty C57BL6 mice were randomly divided into (n=10/group) (i) normal diet (ND), (ii) high fat diet (HFD), or (iii) high fat diet supplemented with 0.5% w/w green coffee bean extract (GCE) rich in chlorogenic acid (HFD+GCE). The high fat diet consisted of 28% fat and all animals were maintained on their diets for 12 weeks. The mice fed a HFD and HFD+GCE displayed symptoms of the metabolic syndrome compared to their normal fed counterparts, although no endothelial dysfunction was detected in the abdominal aortas after 12 weeks. GCE did not attenuate HFD-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or systemic oxidative stress. Furthermore, GCE did not protect against ex vivo oxidant (hypochlorous acid)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contributory role of adenosine deaminase in metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an enzyme of purine metabolism commonly associated with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and believed to modulate bioactivity of insulin. Its contributory role in patients with metabolic syndrome (having features such as obesity, insulin resistance, fasting hyperglycaemia, lipid ...

  6. Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retondario, Anabelle; Fernandes, Ricardo; Rockenbach, Gabriele; Alves, Mariane de Almeida; Bricarello, Liliana Paula; Trindade, Erasmo Benicio Santos de Moraes; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de

    2018-03-02

    Metabolic syndrome is a multi-causal disease. Its treatment includes lifestyle changes with a focus on weight loss. This systematic review assessed the association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. Data were collected mainly from four databases: PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane), Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Keywords related to metabolic syndrome, selenium, as well as metabolic syndrome features were searched. This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. A systematic review protocol was registered at PROSPERO (n. 42016046321). Two reviewers independently screened 2957 abstracts. Six studies were included to perform data extraction with standardized spreadsheets. The risk of bias was assessed by using specific tools according to the design of the relevant studies. An assessment was carried out based on the appropriateness of the study reports accordingly to STROBE and the CONSORT-based checklist for each study design. Three studies found no association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome; two of them found an inverse association; and one study found a direct association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. One study also showed an inverse association between Selenium intake and the prevalence of high waist circumference, high diastolic blood pressure, and hyperglycaemia in women. Overall, based on the argumentation and results of this study, it is possible to conclude that Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome are not clearly associated in adults and elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Canuto; Marcos Pascoal Pattussi; Jamile Block Araldi Macagnan; Ruth Liane Henn; Maria Teresa Anselmo Olinto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic ...

  9. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers.METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (...

  10. Increasing Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Soo; Shin, Hayley; Song, Jung Han; Kwak, Soo Heon; Kang, Seon Mee; Won Yoon, Ji; Choi, Sung Hee; Cho, Sung Il; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Jang, Hak Chul; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The number of people with metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide, and changes in socioenvironmental factors contribute to this increase. Therefore, investigation of changes in metabolic syndrome and its components in South Korea, where rapid socioenvironmental changes have occurred in recent years, would be foundational in setting up an effective strategy for reducing this increasing trend. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We compared the prevalence and pattern of metabolic syndrome ...

  11. MicroRNAs related to androgen metabolism and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Udesen, Pernille Bækgaard; Wissing, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a frequent endocrine disorder in women. PCOS is associated with altered features of androgen metabolism, increased insulin resistance and impaired fertility. Furthermore, PCOS, being a syndrome diagnosis, is heterogeneous and characterized by polycystic ovaries...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Non‑systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nascimento

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between mental illness and metabolic disturbances has been recognized since the beginning of the last century. The debate concerning medical morbidity in schizophrenia intensified during the last twenty years, especially after the introduction of atypical antipsychotics. Aims: To highlight some features of the metabolic syndrome in this population, specifically epidemiological data, underlying mechanisms and antipsychotic therapy. Methods: Non‑systematic review of literature. Results and Conclusions: Despite the different criteria used for the definition of metabolic syndrome, it is clear today that the schizophrenic population has the highest rate of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in this population demonstrates a geographical distribution similar to the general population. Although it hasn’t been recognized for years, schizophrenic patients’ vulnerability to develop metabolic disturbances isn’t entirely related to antipsychotic therapy. Actually, it results from an interaction of multiple factors, including hereditary, genetic, biochemical and environmental ones (which include antipsychotic therapy. Moreover, they are not exclusively explained by weight gain. Metabolic disturbances are one of the main concerns related to general psychopharmacology. The differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics in terms of metabolic syndrome are not completely established. However, clozapine and olanzapine are recognized to have the worst metabolic profile, amongst all atypical antipsychotics.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Non‑systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nascimento

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The link between mental illness and metabolic disturbances has been recognized since the beginning of the last century. The debate concerning medical morbidity in schizophrenia intensified during the last twenty years, especially after the introduction of atypical antipsychotics. Aims: To highlight some features of the metabolic syndrome in this population, specifically epidemiological data, underlying mechanisms and antipsychotic therapy. Methods: Non‑systematic review of literature. Results and Conclusions: Despite the different criteria used for the definition of metabolic syndrome, it is clear today that the schizophrenic population has the highest rate of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in this population demonstrates a geographical distribution similar to the general population. Although it hasn’t been recognized for years, schizophrenic patients’ vulnerability to develop metabolic disturbances isn’t entirely related to antipsychotic therapy. Actually, it results from an interaction of multiple factors, including hereditary, genetic, biochemical and environmental ones (which include antipsychotic therapy. Moreover, they are not exclusively explained by weight gain. Metabolic disturbances are one of the main concerns related to general psychopharmacology. The differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics in terms of metabolic syndrome are not completely established. However, clozapine and olanzapine are recognized to have the worst metabolic profile, amongst all atypical antipsychotics.

  14. Metabolic syndrome--neurotrophic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, M; Aloe, L

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers of the metabolic syndrome assume that many mechanisms are involved in its complex pathophysiology such as an increased sympathetic activity, disorders of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, the action of chronic subclinical infections, proinflammatory cytokines, and the effect of adipocytokines or psychoemotional stress. An increasing body of scientific research in this field confirms the role of the neurotrophins and mastocytes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune diseases. Recently it has been proved that neurotrophins and mastocytes have metabotrophic effects and take part in the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the early stage of the metabolic syndrome we established a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of the nerve growth factor. In the generalized stage the plasma levels of the neutrophines were statistically decreased in comparison to those in the healthy controls. We consider that the neurotrophin deficit is likely to play a significant pathogenic role in the development of the metabolic anthropometric and vascular manifestations of the generalized stage of MetSyn. We suggest a hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome based on the neuro-immuno-endocrine interactions. The specific pathogenic pathways of MetSyn development include: (1) increased tissue and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1(IL-1), Interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) and tumor necrosis factor - alpha (TNF-alpha) caused by inflammatory and/or emotional distress; (2) increased plasma levels of neurotrophin - nerve growth factor (NGF) caused by the high IL-1, IL-6 and TNFalpha levels; (3) high plasma levels of NGF which enhance activation of: the autonomous nerve system--vegetodystonia (disbalance of neurotransmitters); Neuropeptide Y (NPY)--enhanced feeding, obesity and increased leptin plasma levels; hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis--increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and

  15. SIRT1 and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mac-Marcjanek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Both obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two major components of metabolic syndrome, become healthepidemics in the world. Over the past decade, advances in understanding the role of some regulators participatingin lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis have been made.Of them, SIRT1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast Sir2 protein has been identified. SIRT1 is a nuclearNAD+-dependent deacetylase that targets many transcriptional modulators, including PPAR-α and -γ (peroxisomeproliferator-activated receptors α and γ, PGC-1α (PPAR-γ coactivator-1α, FOXO (forkhead box O proteins,and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, thereby this enzyme mediates a wide range of physiological processes like apoptosis,fat metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and neurodegeneration.In this article, we discuss how SIRT1 regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin secretion indifferent metabolic organs/tissue, including liver, muscle, pancreas, and fat. Additionally, the role of this enzymein reduction of inflammatory signalling is highlighted.

  16. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-19

    Mar 19, 2013 ... 2005; 112: e297 and Circulation. 2005; 112: e298). Circulation. 2005; 112: 2735Б52. 19. Al-Lawati JA, Mohammed AJ, Al-Hinai HQ, Jousilahti P. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Omani adults. Diabetes Care. 2003; 26: 1781Б5. 20. Al-Qahtani DA, Imtiaz ML. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

  17. Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    Background: The metabolic syndrome refers to a clustering of risk factors including
    abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia,
    and hypertension and it is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus type

  18. The metabolic syndrome - background and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Zwieten, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MBS) is characterised by a clustering of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. This syndrome is now widely recognised as a distinct pathological entity, and it is receiving a great deal of attention in the medical literature but also in the lay press.

  19. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat

  20. [Epidemiological significance of the metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, D; Azeem, K; Dumbrovská, L; Vlčková, J; Horák, V; Kollárová, H

    From an epidemiological point of view, the metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors causally, rather than coincidentally, related to insulin resistance. The metabolic syndrome is a condition with relatively high prevalence rates in both the Czech Republic and in other developed countries. There is a clear trend of increasing prevalence in both sexes depending on age. In the Czech Republic, the syndrome is less common in females (25.5%) than in males (37.6%). Epidemiological studies found white (Europoid race) males to be at higher risk due to abdominal obesity. The definition of the metabolic syndrome has evolved over time and helps to identify individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, hence the use of the term cardiometabolic syndrome. Early detection of metabolic syndrome symptoms including insulin resistance should be performed mainly by general practitioners as part of regular check-ups.

  1. Diacylglycerol oil for the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Excess adiposity has been shown to play a crucial role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. The elevated fasting and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoprotein levels is the central lipid abnormality observed in the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies have indicated that diacylglycerol (DAG is effective for fasting and postprandial hyperlipidemia and preventing excess adiposity by increasing postprandial energy expenditure. We will here discuss the mechanisms of DAG-mediated improvements in hyperlipidemia and in postprandial energy expenditure, and effects of DAG oil on lipid/glucose metabolism and on body fat. Further, the therapeutic application of DAG for the metabolic syndrome will be considered.

  2. Increased Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataş, Hatice; Gönül, Müzeyyen

    2017-05-05

    Inflammatory and immune processes can be triggered in vitiligo due to a decreased number of melanocytes and their anti-inflammatory effects. Because of the systemic nature of vitiligo, metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance and lipid profile disturbances as well as skin involvement may be observed in vitiligo. To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and vitiligo. Case-control study. The demographic, clinical and laboratory features in the subjects were compared according to presence of vitiligo and metabolic syndrome [patients (n=63) vs. gender-age matched controls (n=65) and metabolic syndrome positive (n=38) vs. negative (n=90)]. A logistic regression analysis was also used. We identified metabolic syndrome in 24 (38.1%) subjects with vitiligo and 14 (21.5%) subjects without vitiligo (p=0.04). Active vitiligo, segmental vitiligo, an increased duration of vitiligo and an increased percentage in the affected body surface area were determined to be independent predictors of metabolic syndrome [activity of vitiligo: p=0.012, OR (95% CI)=64.4 (2.5-1672); type of vitiligo: p=0.007, OR (95% CI)=215.1 (4.3-10725.8); duration of vitiligo: p=0.03, OR (95% CI)=1.4 (1.1-2.0); percentage of affected body surface area: p=0.07, OR (95% CI)=1.2 (0.98-1.5)]. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome is increased in patients with vitiligo. The poor clinical features of vitiligo, such as active, extended and segmental vitiligo with an increased duration of time, are independent predictors for developing metabolic syndrome.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status), socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift), and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration) of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2). The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2), followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64), workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93) and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24). On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73). CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status, socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift, and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2. The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2, followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64, workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93 and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73. CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  5. Roentgenologic features of the Meckel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaenen, U.; Herva, R.

    1983-09-21

    The Meckel syndrome is an autosomal recessive lethal malformation syndrome. The main features are multicystic dysplastic kidneys, microcephaly with occipital encephalocele and polydactyly. This paper describes 6 new cases, with special reference to skeletal findings in postmortem total body radiographs Microcephaly with an occipital bone defect and encephalocele or hydrocephaly (1/6), short upper extremities, bell-shaped thorax with abdominal distension and postaxial polydactyly in the hands and feet were constant findings in these cases.

  6. Roentgenologic features of the Meckel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaenen, U.; Herva, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Meckel syndrome is an autosomal recessive lethal malformation syndrome. The main features are multicystic dysplastic kidneys, microcephaly with occipital encephalocele and polydactyly. This paper describes 6 new cases, with special reference to skeletal findings in postmortem total body radiographs Microcephaly with an occipital bone defect and encephalocele or hydrocephaly [1/6], short upper extremities, bell-shaped thorax with abdominal distension and postaxial polydactyly in the hands and feet were constant findings in these cases. (orig.)

  7. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. Areas Covered This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Expert Opinion Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics. PMID:26488852

  8. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in South Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Asia is home to one of the largest population of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The prevalence of MetS in South Asians varies according to region, extent of urbanization, lifestyle patterns, and socioeconomic/cultural factors. Recent data show that about one-third of the urban population in large cities in India has the MetS. All classical risk factors comprising the MetS are prevalent in Asian Indians residing in India. The higher risk in this ethnic population necessitated a lowering of the cut-off values of the risk factors to identify and intervene for the MetS to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are underway in MetS to assess the efficacy in preventing the diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this ethnic population.

  10. CLINICAL AND IMAGING FEATURES OF OTHELLO'S SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Geda, Yonas E.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to document the clinical and imaging features of Othello's syndrome (delusional jealousy). Methods The study design was a retrospective case series of 105 patients with Othello's syndrome that were identified by using the Electronic Medical Record system of Mayo Clinic. Results The average age at onset of Othello's syndrome was 68 (25–94) years with 61.9% of patients being male. Othello's syndrome was most commonly associated with a neurological disorder (73/105) compared with psychiatric disorders (32/105). Of the patients with a neurological disorder, 76.7% had a neurodegenerative disorder. Seven of eight patients with a structural lesion associated with Othello's syndrome had right frontal lobe pathology. Voxel-based morphometry showed greater grey matter loss predominantly in the dorsolateral frontal lobes in the neurodegenerative patients with Othello's compared to matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders without Othello's syndrome. Treatment success was notable for patients with dopamine agonist induced Othello's syndrome in which all six patients had improvement in symptoms following decrease in medication. Conclusions This study demonstrates that Othello's syndrome occurs most frequently with neurological disorders. This delusion appears to be associated with dysfunction of the frontal lobes, especially right frontal lobe. PMID:21518145

  11. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Job Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Moradi, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    The occupation of the people can influence the development of metabolic syndrome. To determine the association between metabolic syndrome and its determinants with the job rank in workers of a large car factory in Iran. 3989 male workers at a large car manufacturing company were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric data of the participants, including age, height, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured. Blood samples were taken to measure lipid profile and blood glucose level. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in each participant based on ATPIII 2001 criteria. The workers were categorized based on their job rank into 3 groups of (1) office workers, (2) workers with physical exertion, and (3) workers with chemical exposure. The study characteristics, particularly the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its determinants were compared among the study groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study was 7.7% (95% CI 6.9 to 8.5). HDL levels were significantly lower in those who had chemical exposure (p=0.045). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in those who had mechanical exertion (p=0.026). The frequency of metabolic syndrome in the office workers, workers with physical exertion, and workers with chemical exposure was 7.3%, 7.9%, and 7.8%, respectively (p=0.836). Seemingly, there is no association between metabolic syndrome and job rank.

  12. Psychosocial risk factors for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Lund, Rikke; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Metabolic deregulations and development of metabolic syndrome may be an important pathway underlying the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We aim to estimate the effect of a comprehensive range of psychosocial factors on the risk of developing metabolic...... syndrome in men and women. Methods: The study population consisted of 3621 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline and reexamined after 10 years. The data was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, income.......11) to be risk factors for developing the metabolic syndrome in women, while vital exhaustion (OR 2.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 4.59) and intake of sleep medications (OR 2.54, 95% CI 0.92 to 5.96) may play a more important role in men. Conclusions: Experiencing major life events in work and adult life and...

  13. Facial and Ocular Features of Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Leoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is the most common inherited disorder of connective tissue affecting multiple organ systems. Identification of the facial, ocular and skeletal features should prompt referral for aortic imaging since sudden death by aortic dissection and rupture remains a major cause of death in patients with unrecognized Marfan syndrome. Echocardiography is recommended as the initial imaging test, and once a dilated aortic root is identified magnetic resonance or computed tomography should be done to assess the entire aorta. Prophylactic aortic root replacement is safe and has been demonstrated to improve life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Medical therapy for Marfan syndrome includes the use of beta blockers in older children and adults with an enlarged aorta. Addition of angiotensin receptor antagonists has been shown to slow the progression of aortic root dilation compared to beta blockers alone. Lifelong and regular follow up in a center for specialized care is important for patients with Marfan syndrome. We present a case of a patient with clinical features of Marfan syndrome and discuss possible therapeutic interventions for her dilated aorta.

  14. Dermatologic features of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin-Moreau, Morgane; Colin, Estelle; Nguyen, Sylvie; Andrieux, Joris; de Leersnyder, Hélène; Bonneau, Dominique; Martin, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive facial and skeletal features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities, including self-injurious behaviors. We aimed to investigate whether cutaneous features are common in SMS. We performed a complete skin examination in 20 young SMS patients. Skin features secondary to self-injurious behavior, such as bites, abrasions, dystrophic scars, limited spots of hyperkeratosis, anomalies of the nails, and whitlows, were found in the majority of patients. Acral pachydermia and fissured plantar keratoderma were common. Xerosis was constant and associated with extensive keratosis pilaris in the majority of patients. Dermatofibromas were frequent in older patients. The hair was dense and shiny, with an unusual hairline. Eyelash trichomegaly and heavy brows were common, as well as folliculitis on the back. The skin features of SMS have rarely been reported in the literature. Some of these are the consequence of neurobehavioral features, but some cutaneous features and abnormalities of appendages have not been reported in other related syndromes. Skin manifestations of SMS are varied, sometimes induced by self-injurious behavior and sometimes more specific. It remains to be determined whether the combination of the two kinds of signs could contribute to early diagnosis of the syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Components of the metabolic syndrome: clustering and genetic variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povel, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol levels and hypertension frequently co-occur within individuals. The cluster of these features is referred to as the metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim

  16. KUDESAN EFFICACY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Kolesnikova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic abnormalities in metabolic syndrome affect the functioning of practically all organs and systems, and most seriously — cardio-vascular system. Cardio-vascular abnormalities in metabolic syndrome manifest as arterial hypertension, Riley-Day syndrome and endothelial dysfunction that can lead to decrease of adaptive and reserve capabilities. Co-enzyme Q10 possesses cardioprotective,  stress-protective and anti-ischaemic activity. Clinical study performed on 40 children aged 10 to 17 years with constitutive obesity, complicated metabolic syndrome, has proven validity of co-enzyme Q10 treatment in patients with metabolic syndrome. The use of co-enzyme Q10 15 mg/day during 30 days has lead to improvement of psycho-emotional condition, decrease in anxiety complaints, sleep improvement, decrease in asthenic syndrome symptoms, improvement in electrophysiological heart indices Key words: metabolic syndrome, co-enzyme Q10. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 102–106.

  17. Dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome among type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is raising worldwide; however, the role of diet in the origin of metabolic syndrome is not understood well. This study identifies major dietary patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with and without metabolic syndrome; and its association with metabolic syndrome ...

  18. Relationships among personality traits, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome scores: The Kakegawa cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohseto, Hisashi; Ishikuro, Mami; Kikuya, Masahiro; Obara, Taku; Igarashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Satomi; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Shigihara, Michiko; Yamanaka, Chizuru; Miyashita, Masako; Mizuno, Satoshi; Nagai, Masato; Matsubara, Hiroko; Sato, Yuki; Metoki, Hirohito; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Kuriyama, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome and the presence of metabolic syndrome components are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association between personality traits and metabolic syndrome remains controversial, and few studies have been conducted in East Asian populations. We measured personality traits using the Japanese version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (Revised Short Form) and five metabolic syndrome components-elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose-in 1322 participants aged 51.1±12.7years old from Kakegawa city, Japan. Metabolic syndrome score (MS score) was defined as the number of metabolic syndrome components present, and metabolic syndrome as having the MS score of 3 or higher. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome components and multiple regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and MS scores adjusted for age, sex, education, income, smoking status, alcohol use, and family history of CVD and diabetes mellitus. We also examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome presence by multiple logistic regression analyses. "Extraversion" scores were higher in those with metabolic syndrome components (elevated waist circumference: P=0.001; elevated triglycerides: P=0.01; elevated blood pressure: P=0.004; elevated fasting glucose: P=0.002). "Extraversion" was associated with the MS score (coefficient=0.12, P=0.0003). No personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Higher "extraversion" scores were related to higher MS scores, but no personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The association of breast arterial calcification and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyma Yildiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship between metabolic syndrome and breast arterial calcification detected via mammography in a cohort of postmenopausal subjects. METHODS: Among 837 patients referred to our radiology department for mammographic screening, 310 postmenopausal females (105 patients with and 205 patients without breast arterial calcification aged 40 to 73 (mean 55.9±8.4 years were included in this study. The groups were compared with respect to clinical characteristics and metabolic syndrome criteria. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the factors related to breast arterial calcification. RESULTS: Age, postmenopausal duration and the frequencies of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and metabolic syndrome were significantly higher in the subjects with breast arterial calcification than in those without (p<0.05. Multivariate analysis indicated that age (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6, p = 0.001 and metabolic syndrome (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.5−10.4, p = 0.005 were independent predictors of breast arterial calcification detected via mammography. The independent predictors among the features of metabolic syndrome were low levels of high-density lipoproteins (OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 1.0−64.0, p = 0.047 and high blood pressure (OR = 8.7, 95% CI = 1.5−49.7, p = 0.014. CONCLUSIONS: The likelihood of mammographic detection of breast arterial calcification increases with age and in the presence of hypertension or metabolic syndrome. For patients undergoing screening mammography who present with breast arterial calcification, the possibility of metabolic syndrome should be considered. These patients should be informed of their cardiovascular risk factors and counseled on appropriate lifestyle changes.

  20. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with sh...

  1. The association between the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score and pulmonary function in non-smoking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun; Gi, Mi Young; Cha, Ju Ae; Yoo, Chan Uk; Park, Sang Muk

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the association of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score with the predicted forced vital capacity and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) values in Korean non-smoking adults. We analysed data obtained from 6684 adults during the 2013-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. After adjustment for related variables, metabolic syndrome ( p metabolic syndrome score ( p metabolic syndrome score with metabolic syndrome score 0 as a reference group showed no significance for metabolic syndrome score 1 [1.061 (95% confidence interval, 0.755-1.490)] and metabolic syndrome score 2 [1.247 (95% confidence interval, 0.890-1.747)], but showed significant for metabolic syndrome score 3 [1.433 (95% confidence interval, 1.010-2.033)] and metabolic syndrome score ⩾ 4 [1.760 (95% confidence interval, 1.216-2.550)]. In addition, the odds ratio of restrictive pulmonary disease of the metabolic syndrome [1.360 (95% confidence interval, 1.118-1.655)] was significantly higher than those of non-metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were inversely associated with the predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values in Korean non-smoking adults. In addition, metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were positively associated with the restrictive pulmonary disease.

  2. Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Laboratory Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Victoria; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric overweight and obesity is an emerging public health priority as rates have rapidly increased worldwide. Obesity is often clustered with other metabolic abnormalities including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This cluster of risk factors, termed the metabolic syndrome, has traditionally been reported in adults. However, with the increased prevalence of pediatric obesity, the metabolic syndrome is now evident in children and adolescents. This complex cluster of risk factors is the result of the pathological interplay between several organs including adipose tissue, muscle, liver, and intestine with a common antecedent - insulin resistance. The association of the metabolic syndrome with several systemic alterations that involve numerous organs and tissues adds to the complexity and challenge of diagnosing the metabolic syndrome and identifying useful clinical indicators of the disease. The complex physiology of growing and developing children and adolescents further adds to the difficulties in standardizing laboratory assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis for the diverse pediatric population. However, establishing a consensus definition is critical to identifying and managing children and adolescents at high risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. As a result, the examination of novel metabolic syndrome biomarkers which can detect these metabolic abnormalities early with high specificity and sensitivity in the pediatric population has been of interest. Understanding this complex cluster of risk factors in the pediatric population is critical to ensure that this is not the first generation where children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This review will discuss the pathophysiology, consensus definitions and laboratory assessment of pediatric metabolic syndrome as well as potential novel biomarkers.

  3. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. ... They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: ...

  4. Association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptom profiles-Sex-specific?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Smits, Johanna E M P; Schoevers, Robert A; van den Brink, Rob H S; Holewijn, Suzanne; Franke, Barbara; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The association between depression and metabolic syndrome is becoming more obvious. Waist circumference (WC) might be the most important metabolic syndrome (MetS) feature in relation to late-life depression, with a possible mediating role for adiponectin. Methods: Cross-sectional

  5. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  6. Popliteal pterygium syndrome: Orofacial and general features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Bahetwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the case of a 13-year-old Indian boy with popliteal pterygium syndrome. The popliteal pterygium syndrome is an extremely rare hereditary disorder thought to occur with an incidence of approximately 1 in 300000 live births. It is a congenital malformation syndrome affecting the face, limbs, and genitalia with highly characteristic features, including popliteal webbing, cleft palate (with or without cleft lip, lower lip pits, syndactyly, and genital and nail anomalies. This patient was referred to our department because of complaints of pain in the mouth and poor oral health. The orofacial findings included cleft lip, cleft palate, lower lip pits, a few missing teeth, and severely decayed teeth. In this syndrome, the orodental problems are overshadowed by the major syndromic manifestations but nevertheless need appropriate management. These patients have special dental needs and early diagnosis of the affected children is therefore important in order to initiate preventive dental care and carry out appropriate dental treatment at the optimal time.

  7. CORRELATION OF NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AND FEATURES OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MORBIDLY OBESE PATIENTS IN THE PREOPERATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Fernando de; Setúbal, Sergio; Martinho, José Manoel; Ferraz, Loraine; Gaudêncio, Andressa

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic and chronic disease that can bring other comorbidities to the patient. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is present in up to 90% of these patients and can progress to hepatitis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship of this liver disease and obesity is already well known; however, it is possible that some parameters of the comorbidities are more related than others in the pathophysiology of the disease. Was analyzed the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the comorbidities of metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese patients. Was involved ultrasonography and laboratory assessment of obese patients before bariatric surgery. NAFLD was assessed using the same sonography parameters for all patients. Based on the results, the patients were divided into groups with and without NAFLD. Comparisons between them involved clinical and laboratory variables such as fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment - insulin resistance), glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyl transferase, C-reactive protein, albumin and ferritin. Patients who reported alcohol abuse (defined as the consumption of >14 drinks per week) or who had hepatitis were excluded. Eighty-two patients (74 women and 8 men) were studied, of whom 53 (64.6%) had NAFLD and 29 (35.4%) did not. The levels of glycated hemoglobin (p=0.05) and LDL cholesterol (p=0.01) were significantly altered in patients with NAFLD. However, weight, body mass index and excess weight did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.835, p=0.488 and p=0.727, respectively). Altered LDL cholesterol and glycated hemoglobin levels were related to the presence of NAFLD. A obesidade é doença epidêmica e crônica que pode trazer outras comorbidades ao paciente. A doença hepática gordurosa não alcoólica está presente em até 90% desses pacientes e pode evoluir para

  8. Gout and Metabolic Syndrome: a Tangled Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottam, Gabrielle E; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-08-26

    The complexity of gout continues to unravel with each new investigation. Gout sits at the intersection of multiple intrinsically complex processes, and its prevalence, impact on healthcare costs, and association with important co-morbidities make it increasingly relevant. The association between gout and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, renal disease, and obesity suggest that either gout, or its necessary precursor hyperuricemia, may play an important role in the manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we analyze the complex interconnections between gout and metabolic syndrome, by reviewing gout's physiologic and epidemiologic relationships with its major co-morbidities. Increasing evidence supports gout's association with metabolic syndrome. More specifically, both human studies and animal models suggest that hyperuricemia may play a role in promoting inflammation, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, adipogenesis and lipogenesis, insulin and glucose dysregulation, and liver disease. Fructose ingestion is associated with increased rates of hypertension, weight gain, impaired glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia and is a key driver of urate biosynthesis. AMP kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of processes that tend to mitigate against the metabolic syndrome. Within hepatocytes, leukocytes, and other cells, a fructose/urate metabolic loop drives key inhibitors of AMPK, including AMP deaminase and fructokinase, that may tilt the balance toward metabolic syndrome progression. Preliminary evidence suggests that agents that block the intracellular synthesis of urate may restore AMPK activity and help maintain metabolic homeostasis. Gout is both an inflammatory and a metabolic disease. With further investigation of urate's role, the possibility of proper gout management additionally mitigating metabolic syndrome is an evolving and important question.

  9. Radiological features of late-onset lymphoedema in Noonan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jou-Kou; Li, Yiu-Wah

    2003-01-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with diverse manifestations. Lymphatic abnormalities occur in less than 20% of patients. We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with swollen lower limbs and dysmorphic features characteristic of Noonan's syndrome. The radiological features of this unusual case of late-onset lymphoedema in association with Noonan's syndrome are presented. (orig.)

  10. Toxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2006-01-01

    (HAART) may encounter the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), which attenuates patient compliance to this treatment. HALS is characterised by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review depicts the metabolic abnormalities associated...... with HAART by describing the key cell and organ systems that are involved, emphasising the role of insulin resistance. An opinion on the remedies available to treat the metabolic abnormalities and phenotype of HALS is provided....

  11. Long-term AICAR administration reduces metabolic disturbances and lowers blood pressure in rats displaying features of the insulin resistance syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Esben Selmer; Jessen, Niels; Pold, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    clamp conditions. To investigate whether chronic AICAR administration, in addition to the beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity, is capable of improving other phenotypes associated with the insulin resistance syndrome, obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats (n = 6) exhibiting insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia......The insulin resistance syndrome is characterized by several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Chronic chemical activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by the adenosine analog 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta -D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) has been shown to augment insulin action......-treated animals exhibited a tendency toward decreased intra-abdominal fat content. Furthermore, AICAR administration normalized the oral glucose tolerance test and decreased fasting concentrations of glucose and insulin close to the level of the lean animals. Finally, in line with previous findings, AICAR...

  12. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  14. Holter registers and metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Aguilar-Molina, A. M.; Zamora-Justo, J. A.; Gutiérrez-Calleja, R. A.; Virgilio-González, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    There is a relationship between the state of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndrome (MS). A way to diagnose the heart state of a person is to monitor the electrical activity of the heart using a 24 hours Holter monitor. Scanned ECG signal can be analyzed beat-by-beat by algorithms that separate normal of abnormal heartbeats. If the percentage of abnormal heartbeats is too high it could be argued that the patient has heart problems. We have algorithms that can not only identify the abnormal heartbeats, but they can also classify them, so we classified and counted abnormal heartbeats in patients with MS and subjects without MS. Most of our patients have large waist circumference, high triglycerides and high levels of LDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol although some of them have high blood pressure. We enrolled adult patients with MS free of diabetes in a four month lifestyle intervention program including diet and physical aerobic exercise, and compared with healthy controls. We made an initial registration with a Holter, and 24 hours ECG signal is analyzed to identify and classify the different types of heartbeats. The patients then begin with diet or exercise (at least half an hour daily). Periodically Holter records were taken up and we describe the evolution in time of the number and type of abnormal heartbeats. Results show that the percentage of abnormal heartbeats decreases over time, in some cases the decline is very significant, and almost a reduction to half or less of abnormal heartbeats after several months since the patients changed their eating or physical activity habits.

  15. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome: The link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranabir Salam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS or "Syndrome X" which is a constellation of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and increased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglyceride (TG levels. It is one of the main threats for public health in the 21st century with its associated risk of cardiovascular disease. This condition affects a major chunk of mankind. International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated that around 20-25% of the adult population of the world has MetS. Several definitions have been put forward by different expert bodies leading to confusion. To overcome this, joint new statement of many expert group have been issued. Serum testosterone (T has been shown to be associated with MetS. Several studies have shown a higher prevalence of MetS in subjects with low testosterone. There are also several studies showing a significant difference in serum T between those with MetS and those without. Serum T has also been shown to be associated with components of MetS and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT improves various metabolic and anthropometric parameters in MetS. Patients with androgen deprivation for treatment of various cancers have also been reported to have higher prevalence of MetS. But the evidence of association is not sufficient evidence for the causation of MetS by low testosterone and long-term studies are needed to confirm whether T deficiency is the cause or is a feature of MetS.

  16. a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Maria Banaś

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Material and methods. The study group comprised 325 children and adolescents (177♀, 148♂ aged 7, 13 and 16 years. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference were made, along with the determination of blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid levels. Overweight states and obesity were assessed according to the IOTF criteria. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were evaluated using growth charts appropriate for the age, gender and height of the children of Lodz. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the NCEP/AT P III criteria. Results . Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 6.5% of the subjects. In children aged 13 and 16 years – 7.6% (p > 0.05 vs. 7 years, aged 7 years – 3.9% (p > 0.05 vs. 13, 16 years, boys (8.8%; p > 0.05, girls (4.5%; p > 0.05. Among children with excessive body weight, metabolic syndrome was observed in every fourth child (25.4%, more often in those with obesity (44.1% than with abdominal obesity (32% and those who were overweight (19.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. metabolic syndrome. The number of components of metabolic syndrome elevated with increasing body weight (p < 0.001. Abdominal obesity was observed in 17.5% of the subjects. Children with abdominal obesity had higher levels of triglycerides (p < 0.05 and lower HDL cholesterol (p 110 mg/dl in 85 (26.1% and excessive body weight in 71 subjects (21.8%. Conclusions . The presence of metabolic syndrome correlated with overweight state, obesity and abdominal obesity

  17. Nutritional intervention in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingjing; Zhu, Wenhua; Dai, Honglei; Chen, Zhouwen; Chen, Leiqian; Fang, Lizheng

    2007-01-01

    Through an interventional study in the metabolic syndrome, evaluate the feasibility of the standard nutritional intervention. Select metabolic syndrome patients from people who received a health check in our hospital and randomly allocate them into four groups. The standard interventional group received both the nutritional intervention and health education; the simple interventional group only received the nutritional intervention; the simple health educational group only received health education; the control group did not receive any intervention measure. Examine the related index of the metabolic syndrome of each group before and half a year after the intervention: waistline, blood pressure, triglyceride, fasting plasma glucose etc. K-W test and Chi-square test, Bonferroni correction was used in our study. The index of the metabolic syndrome was significantly different for each of the four groups before and after intervention (pnutritional interventional group and for, the simple health education group was significantly different, but there was no difference for the other indices (p>0.05) between the standard nutritional interventional group and simple nutritional interventional group, except that the waistline difference (pnutritional intervention is an effective strategy for patients with the metabolic syndrome.

  18. Long-term AICAR administration reduces metabolic disturbances and lowers blood pressure in rats displaying features of the insulin resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Esben S; Jessen, Niels; Pold, Rasmus; Ledet, Thomas; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Pedersen, Steen B; Pedersen, Oluf; Schmitz, Ole; Lund, Sten

    2002-07-01

    The insulin resistance syndrome is characterized by several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Chronic chemical activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by the adenosine analog 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta -D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) has been shown to augment insulin action, upregulate mitochondrial enzymes in skeletal muscles, and decrease the content of intra-abdominal fat. Furthermore, acute AICAR exposure has been found to reduce sterol and fatty acid synthesis in rat hepatocytes incubated in vitro as well as suppress endogenous glucose production in rats under euglycemic clamp conditions. To investigate whether chronic AICAR administration, in addition to the beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity, is capable of improving other phenotypes associated with the insulin resistance syndrome, obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats (n = 6) exhibiting insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension were subcutaneously injected with AICAR (0.5 mg/g body wt) daily for 7 weeks. Obese control rats were either pair-fed (PF) (n = 6) or ad libitum-fed (AL) (n = 6). Lean Zucker rats (fa/-) (n = 8) served as a reference group. AICAR administration significantly reduced plasma triglyceride levels (P < 0.01 for AICAR vs. AL, and P = 0.05 for AICAR vs. PF) and free fatty acids (P < 0.01 for AICAR vs. AL, and P < 0.05 for AICAR vs. PF) and increased HDL cholesterol levels (P < 0.01 for AICAR vs. AL and PF). AICAR treatment also lowered systolic blood pressure by 14.6 +/- 4.3 mmHg (P < 0.05), and AICAR-treated animals exhibited a tendency toward decreased intra-abdominal fat content. Furthermore, AICAR administration normalized the oral glucose tolerance test and decreased fasting concentrations of glucose and insulin close to the level of the lean animals. Finally, in line with previous findings, AICAR treatment was also found to enhance GLUT4 protein expression and to increase maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport in primarily white fast-twitch muscles. Our

  19. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  20. Rodent Models for Metabolic Syndrome Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Panchal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodents are widely used to mimic human diseases to improve understanding of the causes and progression of disease symptoms and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension, together known as the metabolic syndrome, are causing increasing morbidity and mortality. To control these diseases, research in rodent models that closely mimic the changes in humans is essential. This review will examine the adequacy of the many rodent models of metabolic syndrome to mimic the causes and progression of the disease in humans. The primary criterion will be whether a rodent model initiates all of the signs, especially obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dysfunction of the heart, blood vessels, liver and kidney, primarily by diet since these are the diet-induced signs in humans with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that the model that comes closest to fulfilling this criterion is the high carbohydrate, high fat-fed male rodent.

  1. Ghrelin in Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pulkkinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of related risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and liver disease. Obesity, which has become a global public health problem, is one of the major risk factors for development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Obesity is a complex disease, caused by the interplay between environmental and genetic factors. Ghrelin is one of the circulating peptides, which stimulates appetite and regulates energy balance, and thus is one of the candidate genes for obesity and T2DM. During the last years both basic research and genetic association studies have revealed association between the ghrelin gene and obesity, metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes

  2. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folić Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents is serious problem of modern society. In order to prevent development of possible complications (cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 later in life, early recognition of children at risk for developing metabolic syndrome is of great importance. Previous differences in criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents have been significantly decreased by new criteria issued by the International Diabetes Federation. From the aspect of prevention, key elements are proper nutrition and regular physical activity. In a view of treatment recommendations, initial steps should be regulation of energy balance in the diet and increase in physical activity; the drug treatment is reserved for patients with high risk of complications. .

  3. Cardiorespiratory fitness and the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedell-Neergaard, Anne-Sophie; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Petersen, Gitte Lindved

    2018-01-01

    -fitness was inversely associated with an overall metabolic syndrome score, as well as triglycerides, glycated haemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and directly associated with high-density lipoprotein. Single inflammatory biomarkers and a combined inflammatory score partly explained......OBJECTIVE: Individuals with metabolic syndrome have increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to test the hypothesis that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CR-fitness), counteracts accumulation of visceral fat, decreases inflammation and lowers risk factors...... of the metabolic syndrome. METHOD: The study sample included 1,293 Danes (age 49-52 years) who from 2009 to 2011 participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank, including a questionnaire, physical tests, and blood samples. Multiple linear regression models were performed with CR-fitness as exposure...

  4. Coexistence of Metabolic Syndrome and Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhan Çelik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is one of the chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Crohn's disease, in which the inflammation is responsible for the pathogenesis. Recently, some studies reported the importance of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and an association of chronic inflammatory systemic diseases with atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine coexistence of psoriasis vulgaris with various severity and metabolic syndrome.Material and Method: One hundred psoriasis vulgaris patients and one hundred sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI was used for evaluating the disease severity in psoriasis patients. A PASI score below 7 was accepted as mild, between 7-12 as moderate, and above 12 as severe. We evaluated metabolic syndrome in both patient and control groups by using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III metabolic syndrome criteria. SPSS 10.0 for Windows was used in analyzing data. For comparison, the student’s-t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test were used. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Metabolic syndrome, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, high waist circumference and lower high-density lipoprotein levels were more common in patients with psoriasis than in controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference in these parameters between these two groups (p>0.05. We found that the mean value of triglyceride levels was statistically higher in the psoriasis group (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant difference was observed between patients with mild, moderate, severe psoriasis and controls for the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, the mean value of triglyceride levels in psoriasis patients was higher and the mean value

  5. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Ellervik, Christina; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE An association between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis, has been suggested.Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a more localized chronic inflammation of the skin, has been speculated to have a similar association......,predominantly female, and more often smokers compared with the non-HS group.EXPOSURE Hidradenitis suppurativa.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Metabolic syndrome and its components of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity.RESULTS When compared with the non-HS group, the odds ratios (ORs...

  6. Incidence and Major Metabolic Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study involved 300 (92 males and 208 females) type 2 diabetic patients and was conducted at the Tamale Teaching/Regional Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Programme, Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) criteria. The incidence of the ...

  7. [Obesity and metabolic syndrome in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Villarreal, Velia Margarita; Rizo-Baeza, María M; Cortés Castell, Ernesto

    2009-03-01

    In spite of the lack of a uniform definition for metabolic syndrome in pediatry, recent studies have shown that it develops during childhood and is highly prevalent among children and adolescents who suffer from obesity. In light of the current epidemic of obesity in this age category in western countries, and specifically in Mexico, it becomes essential to know the means to prevent, detect and treat this syndrome. Nurses play an important role in promoting childhood health with regards to metabolic syndrome. To put into practice the strategies which resolve underlying problems related with this syndrome is a priority for the well-being of this age group. These strategies should include the application and management of public policies; the collaboration by health services, social services and schools; but, furthermore, the prevention and the management of this syndrome require a family commitment, while the changes in living habits benefit the entire family. This review article proposes to introduce prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies which nursing personnel can carry out while dealing with metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

  8. The pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask Larsen, Julie; Dima, Lorena; Correll, Christoph U; Manu, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome includes a constellation of several well-established risk factors, which need to be aggressively treated in order to prevent overt type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While recent guidelines for the treatment of individual components of the metabolic syndrome focus on cardiovascular benefits as resulted from clinical trials, specific recent recommendations on the pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome are lacking. The objective of present paper was to review the therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome and its components, the available evidence related to their cardiovascular benefits, and to evaluate the extent to which they should influence the guidelines for clinical practice. Areas covered: A Medline literature search was performed to identify clinical trials and meta-analyses related to the therapy of dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, glucose metabolism and obesity published in the past decade. Expert commentary: Our recommendation for first-line pharmacological are statins for dyslipidemia, renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibitors for arterial hypertension, metformin or sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors or glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) for glucose intolerance, and the GLP-1RA liraglutide for achieving body weight and waist circumference reduction.

  9. Endotoxemia of metabolic syndrome: a pivotal mediator of meta-inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, Ishwarlal; Rajamani, Uthra

    2014-11-01

    Endotoxemia, which is now emerging as a feature of metabolic syndrome, is believed to contribute to the chronic low-grade inflammatory status and insulin resistance of the syndrome. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), or endotoxins, bind to LPS-binding protein and activate pattern recognition receptors, classically Toll-like receptor-4, mediating inflammation. Increased gut permeability and changes in composition and diversity of gut microbiome have been proposed as possible mechanisms to explain increased circulating endotoxins in metabolic syndrome. Endotoxins are also believed to be delivered into the circulation by chylomicrons. Weight loss and probiotic and prebiotic therapeutic strategies can reduce endotoxemia, inflammation, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  10. Fat-soluble micronutrients and metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. MetS prevalence has been associated with diet inadequacy. Conversely, the cumulative incidence of MetS has been inversely associated with a Mediterranean-style diet that includes many different health-beneficial nutrients. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet could reduce or at least stabilize metabolic risk factors. Recent findings Low serum level...

  11. Sedentary activity associated with metabolic syndrome independent of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bankoski, Andrea; Harris, Tamara B; McClain, James J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults.......This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults....

  12. Pre-morbid intelligence, the metabolic syndrome and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G D; Gale, C R; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between pre-morbid intelligence quotient (IQ) and the metabolic syndrome, and assessed the role of the metabolic syndrome as a mediating factor in the association of IQ with total and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality....

  13. Metabolic Syndrome after Kidney Transplantation - Are You at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of serious complications that may result from having metabolic syndrome. Treatment recommendations mirror those mentioned above for prevention of ... achieve these goals, as well as others for treatment of metabolic syndrome. If these strategies are not sufficient, your physician ...

  14. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  15. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed t...

  16. Metabolic syndrome and the genesis of uric acid stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Naim M

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid stones are significantly more common among nephrolithiasis patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity, and/or the metabolic syndrome. The principal metabolic feature responsible for this association is an overly acidic urine, which leads to the precipitation of sparingly soluble uric acid crystals in urine and subsequent development of stones. The unduly acidic urine in uric acid stone formers is caused by a combination of excessive dietary intake of animal proteins and a defect in renal ammoniagenesis and/or excretion that leads to impaired buffering and amplifies the acidic urine caused by an increased acid excretion. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polycystic ovary syndrome: A component of metabolic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1935, Stein and Leventhal first described the polycystic ovary (PCO as a frequent cause of irregular ovulation in women seeking treatment for subfertility. Although the initial management was surgical with wedge resection of ovary, the availability of radioimmunoassay and increased clinical use of ultrasound made it clear that many women had the ultrasound characteristics of PCO with or without the biochemical or clinical features of PCOS and therefore that PCO were not associated with a single syndrome. The association between increased insulin resistance and PCOS is a consistent finding in all ethnic groups. Obesity is a common factor in the majority of women with PCOS. It is postulated that a woman may be genetically predisposed to developing PCOS but it is only the interaction of environmental factors (obesity with the genetic factors that results in the characteristic metabolic and menstrual disturbances. Weight loss, altered diet and exercise have been shown to be effective in the management of PCOS. Importance of early recognition, proper intervention, long-term monitoring and health implications needs more concern.

  18. Metabolic syndrome in Tunisian bipolar I patients | Ezzaher | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender, age, illness episode and treatment were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, while patients under lithium had higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than those under valproic acid, carbamazepine or antipsychotics. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significant higher levels of HOMA-IR and ...

  19. Metabolic syndrome in urban city of North-Western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... elevated (49.8%). Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is common in residents of North- Western Nigeria, commoner in the females than males. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome should be detected in normal individuals for implementing effective preventive measures. Key words: Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, obesity ...

  20. Background and treatment of metabolic syndrome: a therapeutic challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, Pieter A.; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a clustering of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. This syndrome is now widely recognized as a distinct pathologic entity. It is receiving a great deal of attention in the medical literature and also in the lay press. People with metabolic syndrome have

  1. Hypertension in Metabolic Syndrome: Vascular Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizábal, Yolanda; Llorens, Silvia; Nava, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and cardiovascular symptoms: insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipemia. Hypertension and vascular disorders are central to this syndrome. After a brief historical review, we discuss the role of sympathetic tone. Subsequently, we examine the link between endothelial dysfunction and IR. NO is involved in the insulin-elicited capillary vasodilatation. The insulin-signaling pathways causing NO release are different to the classical. There is a vasodilatory pathway with activation of NO synthase through Akt, and a vasoconstrictor pathway that involves the release of endothelin-1 via MAPK. IR is associated with an imbalance between both pathways in favour of the vasoconstrictor one. We also consider the link between hypertension and IR: the insulin hypothesis of hypertension. Next we discuss the importance of perivascular adipose tissue and the role of adipokines that possess vasoactive properties. Finally, animal models used in the study of vascular function of metabolic syndrome are reviewed. In particular, the Zucker fatty rat and the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat (SHROB). This one suffers macro- and microvascular malfunction due to a failure in the NO system and an abnormally high release of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, all this alleviated with glitazones used for metabolic syndrome therapy. PMID:23573411

  2. Metabolic syndrome among Ghanaian patients presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a general risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Western populations. This study assessed the relationship between MetS and its compo-nents in Ghanaian patients presenting with CKD. The study population comprised of 146 non-dialysed individuals with CKD with ...

  3. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee V. Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall’s plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

  4. THE METABOLIC SYNDROME AMONG PATIENTS WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of occurrence of the Metabolic Syndrome among patients presenting with cardiovascular disease at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Methods: This was a case-control study of 100 con-secutive cardiovascular disease patients and 100 age- and sex- matched controls who ...

  5. Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and microalbuminuria, and more recently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and atherosclerosis. Although the concept of the MetS is subject to debate due to lack of a unifying underlying mechanism, the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome phenotype is rapidly increasing worldwide. Moreover, it is increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents of obese mothers. Evidence from both epidemiological and experimental animal studies now demonstrates that MetS onset is increasingly likely following exposure to suboptimal nutrition during critical periods of development, as observed in maternal obesity. Thus, the developmental priming of the MetS provides a common origin for this multifactorial disorder. Consequently, the mechanisms leading to this developmental priming have recently been the subject of intensive investigation. This review discusses recent data regarding the epigenetic modifications resulting from nutrition during early development that mediate persistent changes in the expression of key metabolic genes and contribute toward an adult metabolic syndrome phenotype. In addition, this review considers the role of the endogenous molecular circadian clock system, which has the potential to act at the interface between nutrient sensing and epigenetic processing. A continued and greater understanding of these mechanisms will eventually aid in the identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, and help develop therapeutic interventions, in accordance with current global government strategy.

  6. Cortisol in hair and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Alexander, N.; Bornstein, S.R.; Gao, W.; Miller, R.; Stark, S.; Bosch, J.A.; Fischer, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Although exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids is known to contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), the importance of physiological variation in basal cortisol secretion is less clear. This issue can be addressed by using hair cortisol analysis,

  7. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Urolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yee V.; Cook, Paul; Somani, Bhaskar K.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures. PMID:25873954

  8. Metabolic Syndrome among Undergraduate Students Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Laboratory Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, 2Department of Community Medicine - College of Medicine, ... undergraduate students in three Sudanese universities. Methods: A total of 384 first-year ... Keywords: Metabolic syndrome, Obesity, Hypertension, Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Anthropometric. Tropical ...

  9. Metabolic Syndrome X and Colon Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Svačina, Š.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana; Visokai, V.; Lipská, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, suppl. 1 (2003), s. 86 ISSN 0307-0565. [European Congress on Obesity /12./. 29.05.2003-01.06.2003, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : metabolic syndrome X * colon cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  10. Metabolic complications in the small intestine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Rafael; Orozco, Reynaldo

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic complications in the syndrome of small intestine is presented in a patient of masculine sex, 27 years old, who consulted for a square of inflammation gingival, migraine, fever, anorexia and adinamia for three days, followed by maculopapular-eritematose eruption for 8 days, coincident with the ampicillin ingestion, and later on severe abdominal pain and diarrhea

  11. Hypertension in Metabolic Syndrome: Vascular Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Mendizábal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and cardiovascular symptoms: insulin resistance (IR, obesity, dyslipemia. Hypertension and vascular disorders are central to this syndrome. After a brief historical review, we discuss the role of sympathetic tone. Subsequently, we examine the link between endothelial dysfunction and IR. NO is involved in the insulin-elicited capillary vasodilatation. The insulin-signaling pathways causing NO release are different to the classical. There is a vasodilatory pathway with activation of NO synthase through Akt, and a vasoconstrictor pathway that involves the release of endothelin-1 via MAPK. IR is associated with an imbalance between both pathways in favour of the vasoconstrictor one. We also consider the link between hypertension and IR: the insulin hypothesis of hypertension. Next we discuss the importance of perivascular adipose tissue and the role of adipokines that possess vasoactive properties. Finally, animal models used in the study of vascular function of metabolic syndrome are reviewed. In particular, the Zucker fatty rat and the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat (SHROB. This one suffers macro- and microvascular malfunction due to a failure in the NO system and an abnormally high release of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, all this alleviated with glitazones used for metabolic syndrome therapy.

  12. Clinical Features of Chinese of Chinese Patients with Fuchs' Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peizeng Yang,; Haoli Jin,; Bing Li,; Xuan Chen,; Kijlstra, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome. Design: Retrospective noncomparative case series. Participants: One hundred eighteen eyes of 104 consecutive patients with Fuchs' syndrome initially examined between January 1999 and March 2005. Methods: The

  13. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with depression in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttajit S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirijit Suttajit, Sutrak PilakantaDepartment of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandPurpose: To identify the point prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia and to evaluate the association between depressive symptoms and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia.Patients and methods: Metabolic syndrome was assessed based on an updated definition derived from the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III and the International Diabetes Federation criteria. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17 was used to measure depressive symptoms in 80 patients with schizophrenia. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression for the association between each depressive symptom and metabolic syndrome.Results: The point prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome according to the modified NCEP-ATP III and International Diabetes Federation criteria were 37% and 35%, respectively. The risk of having metabolic syndrome significantly increased in those who were widowed or separated, or had longer duration of illness. Central obesity was the metabolic feature with the highest odds ratios for metabolic syndrome at 19.3. Three out of 17 items of HDRS subscales were found to be significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, including depressed mood, middle insomnia, and retardation with the odds ratios of 3.0, 3.4, and 3.6, respectively.Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia was higher than the overall rate but was slightly lower than in the general population in the USA. Central obesity, measured by waist circumference, was found to be highly correlated with metabolic syndrome. Depressed mood, middle insomnia, and retardation were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Waist circumference and screening

  14. Metabolic syndrome: the danger signal in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mathieu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Mathieu1, Philippe Pibarot2, Jean-Pierre Després31Department of Surgery, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, Canada; 3Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by infiltration of blood vessels by lipids and leukocytes. There is a growing body of evidence that among risk factors that promote atherosclerosis, the metabolic syndrome is a powerful and prevalent predictor of cardiovascular events. The systemic inflammatory process associated with the metabolic syndrome has numerous deleterious effects that promote plaque activation, which is responsible for clinical events. Interactions between the innate immune system with lipidderived products seem to play a major role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in relation with the metabolic syndrome. The multiple links among adipose tissue, the vascular wall, and the immune system are the topics of this review, which examines the roles of oxidized low density lipoprotein, inflammatory cytokines, and adipokines in triggering and perpetuating a danger signal response that promotes the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, therapeutic options that specifically target the metabolic syndrome components are reviewed in light of recent developments. Keywords: atherosclerosis, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, innate immune system, danger signal theory

  15. Historical perspectives of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Eiji

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance syndrome is a constellation of obesity-related metabolic derangements predisposing to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In 1998, WHO defined the first criteria of MetS. Three years later, the user-friendly National Cholesterol Education Program criteria of MetS were proposed. Different criteria were issued by the International Diabetes Federation in 2005, making abdominal obesity a necessary component. Several international societies, including The International Diabetes Federation, jointly adopted the revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria as harmonizing criteria of MetS in 2009. WHO warned the next year that MetS has limited practical utility as a management tool. Adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be a fundamental mechanism of metabolic derangements, associated with ectopic lipid deposit and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and the liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The metabolic syndrome among Danish seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a cluster of risk factors related to insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is a strong risk factor for chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and is related to nutritional factors, sleep patterns, work-related stress, fatigue, and physical......-for-duty examination by seamen’s doctors at baseline, 141 seafarers (mean age 41.3 years) were tracked and re-examined after 2 years. At baseline all participants received general advice regarding lifestyle issues. Seafarers with MS were additionally given specific advice regarding treatment. The seafarers provided...... questionnaire information about their workplace on board, about treatment of hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, and about previously diagnosed type 2-diabetes. In order to define MS, we collected data about waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose. Results: Out...

  17. A Comprehensive Review on Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is defined by a constellation of interconnected physiological, biochemical, clinical, and metabolic factors that directly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and all cause mortality. Insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, genetic susceptibility, elevated blood pressure, hypercoagulable state, and chronic stress are the several factors which constitute the syndrome. Chronic inflammation is known to be associated with visceral obesity and insulin resistance which is characterized by production of abnormal adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, leptin, and adiponectin. The interaction between components of the clinical phenotype of the syndrome with its biological phenotype (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, etc. contributes to the development of a proinflammatory state and further a chronic, subclinical vascular inflammation which modulates and results in atherosclerotic processes. Lifestyle modification remains the initial intervention of choice for such population. Modern lifestyle modification therapy combines specific recommendations on diet and exercise with behavioural strategies. Pharmacological treatment should be considered for those whose risk factors are not adequately reduced with lifestyle changes. This review provides summary of literature related to the syndrome’s definition, epidemiology, underlying pathogenesis, and treatment approaches of each of the risk factors comprising metabolic syndrome.

  18. Sleep symptoms predict the development of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Wendy M; Buysse, Daniel J; Matthews, Karen A; Kip, Kevin E; Strollo, Patrick J; Hall, Martica; Drumheller, Oliver; Reis, Steven E

    2010-12-01

    Sleep complaints are highly prevalent and associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. This is the first prospective study to report the association between commonly reported sleep symptoms and the development of the metabolic syndrome, a key CVD risk factor. Participants were from the community-based Heart Strategies Concentrating on Risk Evaluation study. The sample was comprised of 812 participants (36% African American; 67% female) who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline, had completed a baseline sleep questionnaire, and had metabolic syndrome evaluated 3 years after baseline. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured cross-sectionally using a portable monitor in a subset of 290 participants. Logistic regression examined the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and its components according to individual sleep symptoms and insomnia syndrome. Specific symptoms of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep [DFA] and "unrefreshing" sleep), but not a syndromal definition of insomnia, were significant predictors of the development of metabolic syndrome. Loud snoring more than doubled the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and also predicted specific metabolic abnormalities (hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). With further adjustment for AHI or the number of metabolic abnormalities at baseline, loud snoring remained a significant predictor of metabolic syndrome, whereas DFA and unrefreshing sleep were reduced to marginal significance. Difficulty falling asleep, unrefreshing sleep, and, particularly, loud snoring, predicted the development of metabolic syndrome in community adults. Evaluating sleep symptoms can help identify individuals at risk for developing metabolic syndrome.

  19. [Nutrition, metabolic syndrome and morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano Gil, M; Silvestre Teruel, V; Aguirregoicoa García, E; Criado Gómez, L; Duque López, Y; García-Blanch, G

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and specifically morbid obesity (MO), is a chronic disease with serious health consequences related to the associated comorbidities and constitutes a leading risk factor for the metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the present study we analyze the abnormalities related to MO in the plasmatic levels of nutrients (both macro and micronutrients). We retrospectively evaluated data of 497 patients, 369 women and 128 men diagnosed of MO. The average age of the patients was 40.07 (rank: 16-62). Previous to the study anthropometric measures, blood pressure (BP) and plasma levels of insulin and macronutrients and micronutrients were measured. The higher body mass index (BMI) in women and the waist circumference (WC) in both sexes demonstrates the existence of visceral obesity. Hypertensive disease (HD) was found in 18.6% of men and 33.5% of women. 55.1% of the men and 42.3% of the women had three or more criteria defining the risk of developing MetS. We found hyperglycemia, insulinemia and dyslipemia. We did not find protein malnutrition, but there were elevated values of reactive C-protein. Biochemical indicators of macro and micronutrients were not altered. The high incidence of patients with HD, carriers of three or more criteria that defines the metabolic syndrome (SM), suggests that a very significant part of our patients suffered the metabolic syndrome (MS). The term metabolic syndrome defines the group of factors of metabolic risk of CVD, which is confirmed by the elevated levels of reactive C-protein. We did not find abnormalities in the plasmatic levels of biochemical markers of nutrients.

  20. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  1. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  2. Loose anagen hair syndrome associated with colobomas and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Brandrup, Flemming; Clemmensen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    Loose anagen hair syndrome is an uncommon congenital disorder. It may occur in association with other syndromes and dysmorphic features. We report a girl who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for this syndrome as proposed by Tosti (Arch Dermatol 2002, 138: 521-522). She also had several other...

  3. Loose anagen hair syndrome associated with colobomas and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Brandrup, Flemming; Clemmensen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    Loose anagen hair syndrome is an uncommon congenital disorder. It may occur in association with other syndromes and dysmorphic features. We report a girl who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for this syndrome as proposed by Tosti (Arch Dermatol 2002, 138: 521-522). She also had several other ano...

  4. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  5. A Nutritional Approach to the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Lerman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor diet and sedentary lifestyle contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS; addressing both is crucial for its management. A diet featuring the Mediterranean dietary pattern or low glycemic load has been shown to prevent and ameliorate MetS. Plant compounds, including soy protein and phytosterols, have been associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Recently, phytochemicals from hops and acacia were identified as lipogenic, antiinflammatory compounds that reduced serum insulin and glucose levels in animals. A 12-week, randomized lifestyle intervention study in overweight and obese women with LDL ≥3.37 mmol/L (130 mg/dL compared a Mediterranean-style, low-glycemic-load diet and soy/phytosterol-based medical food to an AHA low-fat diet. The modified Mediterranean diet with medical food was superior in reducing markers of MetS and CVD risk. A subsequent,randomized 12-week study in men and women with MetS and LDL ≥3.37 mmol/L (130 mg/dL showed that supplementation with soy/phytosterol-based medical food plus phytochemicalsenhanced the benefits of a Mediterranean-style low-glycemic-load diet and aerobic exercise. At the completion of the study, 43% of participants receiving medical food and phytochemicalsexhibited net resolution of MetS compared with only 22% of those on diet and exercise alone. A subanalysis of participants at high risk (MetS + LDL ≥4.14 mmol/L [160 mg/dL] indicated minimal benefit from lifestyle change alone but marked benefits with the addition of medical food and phytochemicals. Case studies illustrate long-term benefits of this supplemented lifestyle change program. In conclusion, institution of a phytochemical-enhanced lifestyle intervention promises to be a clinically useful approach in MetS management.

  6. Fructokinase, Fructans, Intestinal Permeability, and Metabolic Syndrome: An Equine Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard J; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Otabachian-Smith, Silvia; Ishimoto, Takuji; Cicerchi, Christina; Cheeke, Peter R.; MacIntosh, Bridgett; Hess, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Fructose is a simple sugar present in honey and fruit, but can also exist as a polymer (fructans) in pasture grasses. Mammals are unable to metabolize fructans, but certain gram positive bacteria contain fructanases and can convert fructans to fructose in the gut. Recent studies suggest that fructose generated from bacteria, or directly obtained from the diet, can induce both increased intestinal permeability and features of metabolic syndrome, especially the development of insulin resistance. The development of insulin resistance is driven in part by the metabolism of fructose by fructokinase C in the liver, which results in oxidative stress in the hepatocyte. Similarly, the metabolism of fructose in the small bowel by intestinal fructokinase may lead to increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. While speculative, these observations raise the possibility that the mechanism by which fructans induce laminitis could involve intestinal and hepatic fructokinase. Further studies are indicated to determine the role of fructanases, fructose and fructokinase in equine metabolic syndrome and laminitis. PMID:23439477

  7. Equine metabolic syndrome: Etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trailović Dragiša R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS is a term adopted in 2002 in aim to define the complex pathology involving obesity, insulin resistance and laminitis in horses and ponies. The EMS was terminologically derived upon similar condition in humans. The metabolic disturbance in equines is developed sequentially to the primary chronic overfeeding, i.e. intake of surplus food to individual needs combined with insufficient activity of animal. The syndrome has been reported more frequently in ponies than in other breeds although genetic background of EMS has not been confirmed. The characteristic symptoms include regional collection of adipose tissue under the skin often distributed regionally i.e. in crest (neck from pool to withers, behind the shoulders, at the dock of the tail and in prepuce in males or in the udder in mares; as well as impaired locomotion and/or lameness in all four limbs and cycling disturbance in mares.

  8. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Oh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, a person with a body mass index (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a person with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 is classified as severely obese. Central obesity is defined as a waist circumference ≥90 cm for Korean men and ≥85 cm for Korean women. Recent epidemiologic data show that the prevalence of severe obesity and metabolic syndrome is steadily increasing. These epidemics increased morbidity and mortality of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, and other cancers in Korea. Decreased physical activity, increased fat and alcohol consumption, heavy smoking, and stress/depressed mood are the primary modifiable life-style risk factors for Koreans. Recently, public health interventions to encourage life-style changes have shown promising results in reducing the prevalence of severe obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  10. Metabolic syndrome in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Ana-Mari; Mătăsaru, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MS) in children and adolescents. Investigation conducted in the interval October 2010 - June 2011 in 3103 school children aged 7-18 years. After body weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure were measured, 262 school children were found to be obese, of which 120 agreed to testing for defining the metabolic syndrome: triglycerides (TG), cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, blood glucose, insulinemia, OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test), SGOT, SGPT, urea, creatinine, and ESR. Using IDF 2009 modified criteria, the prevalence of MS in the study series was 55.8%. The most common criteria for defining MS were: TG > or = 95th percentile, BP > or = 95th percentile, and blood glucose > or = 100mg/dl. Applying IDF 2009 criteria, 55.8% of the obese subjects presented 3-5 criteria, thus meeting the diagnostic criteria for MS in children.

  11. AMPK, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Neil B; Carling, David; Prentki, Marc; Cacicedo, José M

    2013-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, as are central adiposity, dyslipidemia, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers. Regular exercise and calorie restriction have long been known to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease the prevalence of these disorders. The subsequent identification of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its activation by exercise and fuel deprivation have led to studies of the effects of AMPK on both IR and metabolic syndrome-related diseases. In this review, we evaluate this body of literature, with special emphasis on the hypothesis that dysregulation of AMPK is both a pathogenic factor for these disorders in humans and a target for their prevention and therapy.

  12. Prevalence of Hypertension within the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Grünfeldová, H.; Peleška, Jan; Hanuš, P.; Marušiaková, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30 (2007), s. 371-372 ISSN 1420-4096. [Central European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. 11.10.2007-13.10.2007, Kraków] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  13. Presence of metabolic syndrome in football linemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Jackie L; Calland, Doug; Hanks, Fiona; Johnston, Bruce; Pester, Benjamin; Sweeney, Robert; Thorne, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of symptoms associated with abdominal obesity that demonstrates a high risk for cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. To evaluate football linemen in National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III schools for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria as well as to document other related biomarkers. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Three university locations on the first full day of football camp in early morning. Of 76 football linemen, 70 were able to provide blood samples. Height, mass, blood pressure, upper-body skinfolds, and waist circumference were measured at various stations. Two small venous samples of blood were collected and analyzed in a hospital laboratory for fasting insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and glycosylated hemoglobin. The last station was a verbal family history for cardiovascular disease and diabetes; also, athletes filled out a nutrition attitudes questionnaire. Of the 70 athletes, 34 were identified as having metabolic syndrome according to measures of blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. The mean total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio for the group was 4.95, with 32 participants displaying values higher than 5.0. Twelve volunteers had total cholesterol levels greater than 200 mmol/L, 15 had high levels of C-reactive protein, and 9 had slightly elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin. Although athletes might be assumed to be protected from risks of cardiovascular disease, we found a high incidence of metabolic syndrome and other associated adverse biomarkers for heart disease in collegiate football linemen. Early screening, awareness, and intervention may have favorable effects on the overall health outcomes of football linemen.

  14. AMPK, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ruderman, Neil B.; Carling, David; Prentki, Marc; Cacicedo, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, as are central adiposity, dyslipidemia, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers. Regular exercise and calorie restriction have long been known to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease the prevalence of these disorders. The subsequent identification of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its activation by exercise and fuel depr...

  15. The Global Epidemic of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklayen, Mohammad G

    2018-02-26

    Metabolic syndrome, variously known also as syndrome X, insulin resistance, etc., is defined by WHO as a pathologic condition characterized by abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Though there is some variation in the definition by other health care organization, the differences are minor. With the successful conquest of communicable infectious diseases in most of the world, this new non-communicable disease (NCD) has become the major health hazard of modern world. Though it started in the Western world, with the spread of the Western lifestyle across the globe, it has become now a truly global problem. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is often more in the urban population of some developing countries than in its Western counterparts. The two basic forces spreading this malady are the increase in consumption of high calorie-low fiber fast food and the decrease in physical activity due to mechanized transportations and sedentary form of leisure time activities. The syndrome feeds into the spread of the diseases like type 2 diabetes, coronary diseases, stroke, and other disabilities. The total cost of the malady including the cost of health care and loss of potential economic activity is in trillions. The present trend is not sustainable unless a magic cure is found (unlikely) or concerted global/governmental/societal efforts are made to change the lifestyle that is promoting it. There are certainly some elements in the causation of the metabolic syndrome that cannot be changed but many are amenable for corrections and curtailments. For example, better urban planning to encourage active lifestyle, subsidizing consumption of whole grains and possible taxing high calorie snacks, restricting media advertisement of unhealthy food, etc. Revitalizing old fashion healthier lifestyle, promoting old-fashioned foods using healthy herbs rather than oil and sugar, and educating people about choosing healthy/wholesome food over junks

  16. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    It was studied the 131 I-labelled albumin metabolism in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations [pt

  17. Berry Fruit Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Vendrame

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which often includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, as well as a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-thrombotic environment. This leads to a dramatically increased risk of developing type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death both in the United States and worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that berry fruit consumption has a significant potential in the prevention and treatment of most risk factors associated with Metabolic Syndrome and its cardiovascular complications in the human population. This is likely due to the presence of polyphenols with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, such as anthocyanins and/or phenolic acids. The present review summarizes the findings of recent dietary interventions with berry fruits on human subjects with or at risk of Metabolic Syndrome. It also discusses the potential role of berries as part of a dietary strategy which could greatly reduce the need for pharmacotherapy, associated with potentially deleterious side effects and constituting a considerable financial burden.

  18. Nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita de Carvalho, Cláudia; Dias Mendonça, Dayana; Haas Piovesan, Carla; Edler Macagnan, Fabrício; Pandolfo Feoli, Ana Maria

    2014-11-16

    The nutritional approach in the treatment of metabolic syndrome is a fundamental factor. It is important to raise awareness to patients about the benefits of following the treatments when you want to promote changes in lifestyle. The aim of this study was to assess nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome according to the dietary recommendations prescribed. Quasi-experimental research with 72 subjects with metabolic syndrome, held in southern Brazil. A nutritional orientation was conducted, related or not with physical exercise for three months. A 24-hour recall and two-day food record, were the reference method of dietary intake assessment. Nutritional adequacy was determined by the energy and nutrient intakes as defined by the Brazilian Food Guide Pyramid groups. Volunteers reached on average 80% of the energy consumption recommended. Protein and lipid intake was higher, and carbohydrate consumption was lower than recommended levels. There was a low intake of cereals, vegetables, dairy product and beans (pnutritional adequacy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic syndrome: definition and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Hari; Ryan, Debra A; Celzo, Ma Florence; Stapleton, Dwight

    2012-01-01

    The collection of impaired glucose metabolism, central obesity, elevated blood pressure, and dyslipidemia is identified as metabolic syndrome (MetS). It is estimated that approximately 25% of the world's population has MetS. In the United States, MetS is more common in men and Hispanics, and its incidence increases with age. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The underlying risk factors include insulin resistance and abdominal obesity. Confusion about MetS exists in part due to the lack of a consensus definition and treatment protocol. Treatment of MetS begins with therapeutic lifestyle changes and then pharmacologic treatment of the syndrome's individual components. Effective interventions include diet modification, exercise, and use of pharmacologic agents to treat risk factors. Weight loss and increasing physical activity significantly improve all aspects of MetS. A diet that includes more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, monounsaturated fats, and low-fat dairy products will benefit most patients with MetS. Physicians can be most effective in advising patients by customizing specific lifestyle recommendations after assessing patients for the presence of risk factors.

  20. Radiologic features of preteus syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition that is characterized by a wide range of malformations with overgrowth of various tissues. The author reports the case of a Proteus syndrome in a 14-year-old girl who had the unique features of this syndrome including megaspondylodysplasia with resultant scoliosis, leg discrepancy, macrodactyly, clinodactyly, hyperostosis in external auditory meatus, asymmetric megalencephaly, splenomegaly, cystic lung changes, asymmetric soft tissue fat infiltrations and a long, asymmetric face, with descriptions of the radiological features.

  1. [Plasma testosterone, obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Gaëtan; Eas, Florence; Kuhn, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    The frequency of diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome rises concurrently with that of body mass index (BMI). In adult men, plasma testosterone level changes evolve inversely to that of BMI. Plasma total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and free testosterone are significantly lower in adult men with a clinical and biological pattern of metabolic syndrome (MetS) than in those without such a pattern. After adjustment for confounding factors, diabetes type 2 (DT2) remains associated with a significant decrease of plasma testosterone level. The androgenic blockade, used as a treatment for disseminated prostate cancer, induces a metabolic pattern similar to MetS. In men older than 65 years, a decrease of plasma testosterone level is associated with an increased risk of stroke or of death linked to a cardiovascular event. After exclusion of contraindications, the substitution with androgens of a demonstrated hypogonadism in a obese patient, notably when obesity is associated with a pattern of MetS and/or a DT2, could have some metabolic and cardiovascular advantages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    A number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, and elevated blood pressure are collectively known as metabolic syndrome (MS). Since mitochondrial activity is modulated by the availability of energy in cells, the disruption of key regulators of metabolism in MS not only affects the activity of mitochondria but also their dynamics and turnover. Therefore, a link of MS with mitochondrial dysfunction has been suspected since long. As a chronobiotic/cytoprotective agent, melatonin has a special place in prevention and treatment of MS. Melatonin levels are reduced in diseases associated with insulin resistance like MS. Melatonin improves sleep efficiency and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, partly for its role as a metabolic regulator and mitochondrial protector. We discuss in the present review the several cytoprotective melatonin actions that attenuate inflammatory responses in MS. The clinical data that support the potential therapeutical value of melatonin in human MS are reviewed.

  3. Combination of Captopril and Allopurinol Retards Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal, Carlos A.; Reungjui, Sirirat; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Mu, Wei; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Both ACE inhibitors and allopurinol have been shown to partially prevent metabolic syndrome induced by fructose. We tested the hypothesis that combined therapy might be more effective at blocking the metabolic syndrome induced with fructose. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high fructose diet with or without allopurinol, captopril, or the combination for 20 weeks. A control group received a normal diet. All groups were pair-fed to assure equivalent caloric intake. Results Despite reduced energy intake, the fructose-fed rats developed features of metabolic syndrome including elevated blood pressure, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperuricemia and hyperinsulinemia. While both allopurinol and captopril alone tended to reduce features of the metabolic syndrome, the combined therapy was synergistic, with significant reduction in blood pressure, less accumulation of abdominal fat, an improvement in the dyslipidemia and a complete prevention of insulin resistance. Conclusion A high fructose diet can induce metabolic syndrome even in the setting of caloric restriction. Captopril and allopurinol synergistically reduce features of the metabolic syndrome, especially hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Combination allopurinol and ACE inhibitor therapy might provide a superior means to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19696478

  4. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among employees in Northeast China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X; Yang, Fang; Bots, Michiel L.; Guo, Wei Ying; Zhao, Bing; Hoes, Arno W.; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of metabolic abnormalities and has been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among employees in Northeast China. Methods:

  5. Thyroid function in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: metabolic syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are two common disorders encountered in the metabolic clinic. Recently, there has been increased interest in the association between the two disorders because of the similarities between symptoms of hypothyroidism and components of the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among college football linemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Kerry; Blackburn, David; Arnold, Bart; Arnason, Terra

    2011-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Canadian amateur football players. University football players from Saskatchewan were invited to participate in this study. Each subject underwent screening for blood pressure using a BpTRU monitor, and serum cholesterol and fasting blood glucose using a Cholestech LDX analyzer. Waist circumference was recorded and body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS were compared between linemen and non-linemen using independent sample t-tests for continuous data and chi-square for dichotomous variables. Out of 39 players who consented to participate, 14% of linemen (3/21) and no non-linemen satisfied metabolic syndrome criteria. Compared to non-linemen, linemen had a higher waist circumference (108.0 vs. 82.9 cm; p<0.001), higher total body fat composition (26.4% vs. 11.2%; p<0.001), lower mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.93, vs. 1.12 mmol/L; p=0.021) and higher fasting blood glucose (5.22 vs. 4.77 mmol/L; p<0.001). Despite their young age and participation in an elite-level athletic program, many collegiate-level football linemen had features of metabolic syndrome. Although our study focused on a single team, we suspect these trends may be consistent across the country. 2011.

  7. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and decreased excretion of uric acid causing endothelial dysfunction in kidney leads to renal disease and cardiovascular disorders. This review focus on the role of uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome and onthe possible pathophysiology. PMID:26064845

  8. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    syndrome after liver transplantation. METHODS: The databases Medline and Scopus were searched for observational studies evaluating prevalence and risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. Meta-analyses were performed based on odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable analyses...

  9. Diagnostic features of polycystic ovary syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-02-17

    Feb 17, 2006 ... Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the commonest endocrinopathies in women.1 It was first described by Stein and Leventhal2 in 1935, as the association of infertility, obesity, hirsutism and bilateral enlarged polycystic ovaries. As a syndrome, PCOS has had an interesting history, with much ...

  10. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  11. Early Onset Childhood Obesity and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-09

    This podcast features Lorena Pacheco, a doctoral student at the University of California San Diego and one of the winners of PCD’s 2017 Student Research Paper Contest. Lorena answers questions about her winning research, which focuses on the relationship between early onset obesity as a risk factor for increased metabolic syndrome in Chilean children.  Created: 10/9/2017 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/9/2017.

  12. Accessing Autonomic Function Can Early Screen Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Mian; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend metabolic syndrome components (p for trend metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61–0.64) for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. Conclusions and Significance In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome. PMID:22916265

  13. Accessing autonomic function can early screen metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001. Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001. Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0-24, participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50-100 had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.64 for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome.

  14. Metabolic syndrome among rural Indian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Anamitra; Das, Kausik; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Rai, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    To prevent an increasing level of mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease among the rural Indian population, a management strategy of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) should be devised. This study aims to estimate the burden of MetS and its associated risk factors. Data from the Birbhum Population Project covering 9886 individuals (4810 male and 5076 female population) aged ≥18 years were used. The burden of metabolic syndrome, as defined by the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel, was determined. Bivariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses were used to attain the study objective. Over 10.7% of the males and 20.3% of the females were diagnosed with MetS. Irrespective of sex, older individuals, being overweight/obese (body mass index of ≥23 kg/m 2 ) had higher probability of developing MetS, whereas being underweight is deemed a protective factor against MetS. Low physical activity among women appeared to be a risk factor for MetS. The prevalence of MetS is concerning even in rural India. Any intervention designed to address the issue could emphasize on weight loss, and physical activity, focusing on women and people at an advanced stage of life. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Connexins, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Romain; Allagnat, Florent; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Diabetes and the related metabolic syndrome are multi system disorders that result from improper interactions between various cell types. Even though the underlying mechanism remains to be fully understood, it is most likely that both the long and the short distance range cell interactions, which normally ensure the physiologic functioning of the pancreas, and its relationships with the insulin-targeted organs, are altered. This review focuses on the short-range type of interactions that depend on the contact between adjacent cells and, specifically, on the interactions that are dependent on connexins. The widespread distribution of these membrane proteins, their multiple modes of action, and their interactions with conditions/molecules associated to both the pathogenesis and the treatment of the 2 main forms of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, make connexins an essential part of the chain of events that leads to metabolic diseases. Here, we review the present state of knowledge about the molecular and cell biology of the connexin genes and proteins, their general mechanisms of action, the roles specific connexin species play in the endocrine pancreas and the major insulin-targeted organs, under physiological and patho-physiological conditions.

  16. Metabolic Syndrome: Genetic Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziki, Maen D. Abou; Mani, Arya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of inter-related and heritable metabolic traits, which collectively impart unsurpassed risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Considerable work has been done to understand the underlying disease mechanisms by elucidating its genetic etiology. Recent findings Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been widely utilized albeit with modest success in identifying variants that are associated with more than two metabolic traits. Another limitation of this approach is the inherent small effect of the common variants, a major barrier for dissecting their cognate pathways. Modest advances in this venue have been also made by genetic studies of kindreds at the extreme ends of quantitative distributions. These efforts have led to the discovery of a number of disease genes with large effects that underlie the association of diverse traits of this syndrome. Summary Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in identification of genetic risk factors associated with the various traits of MetS. The heterogeneity and multifactorial heritability of MetS, however, has been a challenge towards understanding the factors underlying the association of these traits. Genetic investigations of outlier kindreds or homogenous populations with high prevalence for the disease can potentially improve our knowledge of the disease pathophysiology. PMID:26825138

  17. Membrane lipid alterations in the metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, Javier S

    2017-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of pathological conditions, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and low HDL levels that is of great concern worldwide, as individuals with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance, the key feature of the metabolic syndrome, might be at the same time cause and consequence of impaired lipid composition in plasma membranes of insulin-sensitive tissues like liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Diet intervention has been proposed as a powerful tool to prevent the development of the metabolic syndrome, since healthy diets have been shown to have a protective role against the components of the metabolic syndrome. Particularly, dietary fatty acids are capable of modulating the deleterious effects of these conditions, among other mechanisms, by modifications of the lipid composition of the membranes in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, there is still scarce data based of high-level evidence on the effects of dietary oils on the effects of the metabolic syndrome and its components. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of dietary oils on improving alterations of the components of the metabolic syndrome. It also examines their influence in the modulation of plasma membrane lipid composition and in the functionality of membrane proteins involved in insulin activity, like the insulin receptor, GLUT-4, CD36/FAT and ABCA-1, and their effect in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol, and, in turn, the key features of the metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of heart rate as neuroadrenergic marker in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarti Trevano, Fosca; Seravalle, Gino; Macchiarulo, Mario; Villa, Paolo; Valena, Carlo; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a pronounced sympathetic overactivity as documented by the marked increase in muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (MSNA) as well as in plasma norepinephrine values reported in this condition. Whether and to what extent heart rate (HR) reflects the abovementioned adrenergic alterations in metabolic syndrome remains largely undefined. It is also undefined the validity of the abovementioned adrenergic markers in reflecting the main features of the metabolic syndrome. In 65 metabolic syndrome patients, aged 56.5 ± 1.3 years (mean ± SEM), we measured over a 30-min resting period blood pressure, HR (ECG), venous plasma norepinephrine (HPLC) and MSNA (microneurography). We also evaluated anthropometric and metabolic variables including HOMA index, correlating them with the adrenergic markers. The same measurements were also made in 48 age-matched healthy controls. HR was significantly greater in the metabolic syndrome patients than in controls (74.6 ± 1.5 versus 67.5 ± 1.5 bpm, P reliability of HR (and of plasma norepinephrine) as sympathetic marker appears to be limited, however, this variable being unable to reflect, at variance from MSNA, the main metabolic and anthropometric abnormalities characterizing the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (pmetabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (pmetabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic syndrome induced by anticancer treatment in childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Won Chueh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of childhood cancer survivors is increasing as survival rates improve. However, complications after treatment have not received much attention, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome comprises central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, and cancer survivors have higher risks of cardiovascular events compared with the general population. The mechanism by which cancer treatment induces metabolic syndrome is unclear. However, its pathophysiology can be categorized based on the cancer treatment type administered. Brain surgery or radiotherapy may induce metabolic syndrome by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which may induce pituitary hormone deficiencies. Local therapy administered to particular endocrine organs directly damages the organs and causes hormone deficiencies, which induce obesity and dyslipidemia leading to metabolic syndrome. Chemotherapeutic agents interfere with cell generation and growth, damage the vascular endothelial cells, and increase the cardiovascular risk. Moreover, chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress, which also induces metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity caused by cancer treatment or the cancer itself, dietary restrictions, and the frequent use of antibiotics may also be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Since childhood cancer survivors with metabolic syndrome have higher risks of cardiovascular events at an earlier age, early interventions should be considered. The optimal timing of interventions and drug use has not been established, but lifestyle modifications and exercise interventions that begin during cancer treatment might be beneficial and tailored education and interventions that account for individual patients' circumstances are needed. This review evaluates the recent literature that describes metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors, with a focus on its pathophysiology.

  1. The metabolic syndrome using the National Cholesterol Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The metabolic syndrome using the National Cholesterol Education Program and International Diabetes Federation definitions among urbanised black South Africans with established coronary artery disease.

  2. Metabolic syndrome induced by anticancer treatment in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Hee Won; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2017-06-01

    The number of childhood cancer survivors is increasing as survival rates improve. However, complications after treatment have not received much attention, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome comprises central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, and cancer survivors have higher risks of cardiovascular events compared with the general population. The mechanism by which cancer treatment induces metabolic syndrome is unclear. However, its pathophysiology can be categorized based on the cancer treatment type administered. Brain surgery or radiotherapy may induce metabolic syndrome by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which may induce pituitary hormone deficiencies. Local therapy administered to particular endocrine organs directly damages the organs and causes hormone deficiencies, which induce obesity and dyslipidemia leading to metabolic syndrome. Chemotherapeutic agents interfere with cell generation and growth, damage the vascular endothelial cells, and increase the cardiovascular risk. Moreover, chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress, which also induces metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity caused by cancer treatment or the cancer itself, dietary restrictions, and the frequent use of antibiotics may also be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Since childhood cancer survivors with metabolic syndrome have higher risks of cardiovascular events at an earlier age, early interventions should be considered. The optimal timing of interventions and drug use has not been established, but lifestyle modifications and exercise interventions that begin during cancer treatment might be beneficial and tailored education and interventions that account for individual patients' circumstances are needed. This review evaluates the recent literature that describes metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors, with a focus on its pathophysiology.

  3. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  4. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DM), there is a multiple set of risk factors that commonly appear together forming what is now known as the 'Metabolic Syndrome' (MS). This 'clustering' of metabolic abnormalities that occur in the same individual appear to confer substantial ...

  5. Neurobiology of the metabolic syndrome : An allostatic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Gertjan; Buwalda, Bauke

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of more or less related metabolic and cardiovascular derangements including visceral obesity, insulin resistance, blood and tissue dislipidemia, high blood pressure and it is often associated with neuroendocrine and immunological dysregulations. The aetiology of

  6. Metabolic Syndrome: Systems Thinking in Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommermuth, Ron; Ewing, Kristine

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. MetS is associated with approximately 4-fold increase in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and a 2-fold increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease complications. MetS is a progressive, proinflammatory, prothrombotic condition that manifests itself along a broad spectrum of disease. It is associated with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, gout, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Intervening in and reversing the pathologic process become more difficult as the disease progresses, highlighting the needs for increased individual and community surveillance and primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Shaheen; Gondal, Ghulam Murtaza; Bano, Uzma

    2008-08-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Diabetes Clinic, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January to August 2006. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes , type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at 'r' and 'p' creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Aggressive Prostate Cancer at Initial Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Simona; Tenaglia, Raffaele L

    2017-07-01

    Links between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy are emerging. The aim of the research was to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome and aggressive prostate malignancy, at initial diagnosis, without the influence of hormonal treatment. Retrospective analysis of 133 patients with prostate tumor diagnosis between 2007 and 2009 was conducted. Patients with prostate cancer were subdivided in 2 groups according to Gleason score: Gleason score≥7 as high-grade prostate tumor (Group 1) and Metabolic syndrome was defined according to International Diabetes Federation and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with aggressive prostate cancer (OR 1.87, pmetabolic syndrome were more likely to present with more aggressive prostate carcinoma vs. patients without metabolic syndrome. Further research should elucidate these relations in larger samples to confirm these associations and to stabilize future prevention and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. High prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients: impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe H.Westring; Friis-Møller, Nina; Bruyand, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study and discusses the impact of different methodological approaches on estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome over time.......This study describes the characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study and discusses the impact of different methodological approaches on estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome over time....

  10. Savant Syndrome: Clinical and Neuropsychological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Savant syndrome defines the people who have severe developmental and mental disabilities but also have extraordinary mental skills which are missing in many people. Although general mental capacity is under average mental level, savant has excessive knowledge about one or more domains. It is accepted that as many as one in 10 persons with autistic disorder have such remarkable abilities in varying degrees, although savant syndrome occurs in other developmental disabilities or in other types of central nervous system injury or disease as well. Males outnumber females by an approximate 6 : 1 ratio in savant syndrome. Savant skills are limited to five general categories. These are music, art, calender calculating, mathematics and mechanical or spatial skills. Savant skills can also be divided into three as savants who have splinter skills, talented savants and prodigious savants. A remarkable memory welds to the special abilities determined in savant syndrome. Savant syndrome can be congenital or it can be acquired. Most often savant skills emerge in childhood, superimposed on some underlying developmental disability present at birth. However, acquired savant skills can also appear, when none were previously present, in neurotypical individuals following brain injury or disease later in infancy, childhood or adult life. Savant skills don’t depend on only rote memory. It is approved that an enhanced or spared ability to represent and manipulate highly organised domain-specific information. Various theoretic models were defined to explain the neuropsychological profile in savant syndrome. Interest in savants has a long history, stretching back to the early 18th century; nevertheless, the savant syndrome remains as much a mystery now as it did when it was first described. Given that many questions about the existence and nature of savant talent remain unanswered, it seems likely that research efforts will continue unabated.

  11. Double trisomy (48,XXX,+18) with features of Roberts syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descartes, M.; Longshore, J.W.; Crawford, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We report an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18, who also displayed features of Roberts syndrome. All previously published cases with similar double trisomy have presented with features of trisomy 18 syndrome. The chromosome analysis done at birth revealed the double trisomy; parental chromosomes were normal. The proband presented with microbrachycephaly, unilateral cleft lip and palate, choanal atresia, midfacial capillary hemanioma, thin nares, shallow orbits, malformed ears, sparse hair, hypomelia of the upper limbs, rocker-bottom feet, auricular septal defect and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Characteristic features of Roberts syndrome included hypomelia, midfacial defects, and severe growth deficiency. Among the many different features reported in the literature for patients with trisomy 18 syndrome, the most consistent were growth deficiency, clenched fingers and congenital heart defects (e.g. VSD, ASD, PDA). Although some of our patient`s features such as cleft lip and cleft palate, low-set malformed ears, ASD, defects of the corpus callosum, choanal atresia, radial aplasia could also be seen in trisomy 18 syndrome (in 10-50% of the cases), her phenotype was more typical of Roberts syndrome because of symmetrical hypomelia and midfacial defects. Our patient`s chromosomes did not show premature separation of centromeric heterochromatin, a feature reported to occur in approximately one-half of individuals with Roberts syndrome. Sporadic aneuploidy involving different chromosomes has been found in lymphocyte cultures from some Roberts syndrome patients and is considered by some authors as a mitotic mutant. This aneuploidy is most likely to be chromosome gain. The simultaneous occurrence of trisomy X and 18 is extremely rare with only 11 cases having been reported in the literature. Our patient is unique since she has the double trisomy in addition to the characteristic features of Roberts syndrome.

  12. Perinatal clinical and imaging features of CLOVES syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seville (Spain); Fajardo, Manuel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Seville (Spain); Chaudry, Gulraiz; Alomari, Ahmad I. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We report a neonate with antenatal imaging features suggestive of CLOVES syndrome. Postnatal clinical and imaging findings confirmed the diagnosis, with the constellation of truncal overgrowth, cutaneous capillary malformation, lymphatic and musculoskeletal anomalies. The clinical, radiological and histopathological findings noted in this particular phenotype help differentiate it from other overgrowth syndromes with complex vascular anomalies. (orig.)

  13. Clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Peizeng; Fang, Wang; Jin, Haoli; Li, Bing; Chen, Xuan; Kijlstra, Aize

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome. Retrospective noncomparative case series. One hundred eighteen eyes of 104 consecutive patients with Fuchs' syndrome initially examined between January 1999 and March 2005. The history and clinical findings of all

  14. Sonographic features of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 14 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chan, Gavin Shueng Wai; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2005-06-01

    Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare inherited disorder. Previous reports suggest that the diagnosis may be based on prenatal sonographic demonstration of severe limb flexion, absence of fetal motion, and a large cystic hygroma in the second and third trimesters. We present the sonographic features and postmortem features of a fetus with lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 13 weeks of gestation, which shows that the condition can possibly be diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  15. Relation between Hormonal Disorders and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Primary Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade plenty of the researches dedicated to the problem of hypothyroidism were published, that radically changed views to the value of thyroid pathology on the whole. Neurohumoral changes are considered as a nosotropic factor of hypothyroidism development in persons with metabolic syndrome (MS. Aim of the research is to study the features of hormonal disorders and their correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and methods. The study involved 80 patients with primary hypothyroidism: 61 had metabolic syndrome and 19 did not have metabolic syndrome. Results. Statistically significant increased levels of leptin, insulin, cortisol, C-peptide were revealed in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome while the most marked changes were found in patients with multiple metabolic abnormalities. Conclusions. The interrelations between hyperleptinemia and fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin levels, thyroid-stimulating hormone, index HOMA were determined indicating the modulating role of chronic hyperglycemia, hormonal disorders and insulin resistance in the expression and realization of the biological action of leptin in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome.

  16. The effect of statin alone or in combination with ezetimibe on postprandial lipoprotein composition in obese metabolic syndrome patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajer, Gideon R.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; van Vark-van der Zee, Leonie C.; Visseren, Frank L. J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Fasting and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia are essential features of metabolic syndrome. Statins decrease fasting lipid levels but fail to reduce fat load induced hypertriglyceridemia. We established whether ezetimibe combined with simvastatin differently influences post fat load

  17. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN GRANITE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilakshmi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS has significantly increased over the last few decades and has become a main health challenge worldwide. Prevalence of MS is quickly rising in developing countries due to changing lifestyle. It was considered worthwhile to study MS and its components in granite workers since granite factories are situated in and around Khammam area. Moreover, no studies of MS in granite workers have been reported in literature. OBJECTIVES: Aim of our study is to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in granite workers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 210 male workers in the age group of 20 - 50 working in granite industries located in and around the Khammam town of Telangana State are selected for the present study. Blood pressures (BP, waist circumference (WC were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected for the estimation of glucose and lipids. RESULTS: 69 subjects out of 210 were identified as having MS based on updated National cholesterol education programme - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP - ATP III guidelines. CONCLUSION: MS should be identified and remedial measures may be suggested, so that the risk of hypertension, cardiovascular risk, diabetes and the resultant morbidity is minimized and can be delayed

  18. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Whitehead

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome.

  19. Stressful life events and incident metabolic syndrome : The Hoorn study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutters, F.; Pilz, S.; Koopman, A.D.; Rauh, S.P.; Pouwer, F.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Elders, P.J.; Nijpels, G.; Dekker, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Stressful life events are associated with the metabolic syndrome in cross-sectional studies, but prospective studies addressing this issue are rare and limited. We therefore evaluated whether the number of stressful life events is associated with incident metabolic syndrome. We assessed the

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using weight and weight indices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using weight and weight indices in an apparently healthy Nigerian ... ABSTRACT. Background: Notions about the metabolic syndrome (MS) emphasized the importance of obesity. This may ..... from The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination. Survey. Archives of Internal Medicine ...

  1. Oxidative stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome in Sokoto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-20

    Aug 20, 2015 ... and HOMA‑IR. The HDL‑C was found to be lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome but not statistically significant (P = 0.48). Antioxidant levels. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidant levels of the research participants are shown in Table 3. The subjects with metabolic syndrome had significantly ...

  2. Effect of Spirulina platensis powder on metabolic syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. platensis inhibits also hemolysis of erythrocytes induced by AAPH. In conclusion, S. platensis powder prevent metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose and fat diet. These results justify the use of the plant in the treatment of diabetes in Benin. Keywords: Spirulina platensis, metabolic syndrome, fructose, diabetes, ...

  3. Consequences of metabolic syndrome on postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban; Fuks, David; Chopinet, Sophie; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Costi, Renato; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Smadja, Claude; Gayet, Brice

    2017-05-07

    To analyze immediate postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy regarding metabolic syndrome. In two academic centers, postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy from 2002 to 2014 were prospectively recorded. Patients presenting with metabolic syndrome [defined as at least three criteria among overweight (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m²), diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia] were compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. Among 270 consecutive patients, 29 (11%) presented with metabolic syndrome. In univariable analysis, patients with metabolic syndrome were significantly older (69.4 years vs 62.5 years, P = 0.003) and presented more frequently with soft pancreas (72% vs 22%, P = 0.0001). In-hospital morbidity (83% vs 71%) and mortality (7% vs 6%) did not differ in the two groups so as pancreatic fistula rate (45% vs 30%, P = 0.079) and severity of pancreatic fistula ( P = 0.257). In multivariable analysis, soft pancreas texture ( P = 0.001), pancreatic duct diameter 30 kg/m² ( P = 0.041) were identified as independent risk factors of pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy, but not metabolic syndrome. In spite of logical reasoning and appropriate methodology, present series suggests that metabolic syndrome does not jeopardize postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Therefore, definition of metabolic syndrome seems to be inappropriate and fatty pancreas needs to be assessed with an international consensual histopathological classification.

  4. Microalbuminuria and the metabolic syndrome in obese type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standard criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome were used. Microalbuminuria was determined using 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (mg/g). Result: Group A (obese diabetics with the metabolic syndrome) had mean ALB: CR ratio of 48±3 mg/g. The difference between the mean ALB: CR ratio of Group A (48±3 ...

  5. An association between diet, metabolic syndrome and lower urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diet is a key factor in the aetiology of many diseases, including metabolic syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders. Metabolic syndrome is a growing and increasingly expensive health problem in both the developed and the developing world, with an associated rise in morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, lower ...

  6. Increased brain fatty acid uptake in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti

    2010-01-01

    To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it.......To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it....

  7. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that is responsible for most of the excess cardiovascular morbidity amongst persons with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The metabolic syndrome increases the risk for coronary heart disease and stroke by three-fold with a marked increase in cardiovascular ...

  8. Metabolic syndrome and obesity among workers at Kanye Seventh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Metabolic syndrome and obesity are risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or cardiovascular disease, especially stroke. There is evidence worldwide of the high prevalence of these pathologies in health care providers. Objectives. To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome, overweight, ...

  9. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but

  10. Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients. ... Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) criteria and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. ... Results: By using the NCEP-ATP III criteria 26 out of 91 patients (28.6%) had the metabolic syndrome. MS was ...

  11. Joubert syndrome with orofacial digital features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Bhardwaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome (JS is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g., pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia, and nystagmus, renal cysts, and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnea and hyperpnea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. Since the clinical findings of JS are quite heterogeneous, determination of radiological findings is essential.

  12. Joubert Syndrome with Orofacial Digital Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Parveen; Sharma, Minoo; Ahluwalia, Karan

    2018-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g., pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia, and nystagmus), renal cysts, and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnea and hyperpnea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. Since the clinical findings of JS are quite heterogeneous, determination of radiological findings is essential.

  13. Fat-soluble micronutrients and metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. MetS prevalence has been associated with diet inadequacy. Conversely, the cumulative incidence of MetS has been inversely associated with a Mediterranean-style diet that includes many different health-beneficial nutrients. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet could reduce or at least stabilize metabolic risk factors. Recent findings Low serum level of fat-soluble micronutrients, such as carotenoids, vitamin (vit) A, D and E, has been linked to MetS. Fat-soluble micronutrients could contribute to prevent MetS thanks to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (vit E, carotenoids) or to their central role as hormone regulators (vit D) and/or lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis sensors (vit D and E). Summary This review summarizes recent epidemiological studies linking fat-soluble micronutrients to MetS and highlights new evidence on their mechanisms of actions. PMID:28858890

  14. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors...... metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait...... and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664...

  15. Omega-3, Metabolic Syndrome, and Schizophrenia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Narjes Roudbaraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature, schizophrenia is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome. This mental disorder has such manifestations as visceral obesity, impaired lipid metabolism, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. The prevalence rate of schizophrenia varies in different countries. There is a body of evidence about the higher incidence of cardiovascular events in the schizophrenic patients with metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the prevention or treatment of this condition in sthese patients is a matter of fundamental importance. Fish oils, commonly used by people, contain omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3 has been demonstrated to be effective in the patients with metabolic syndrome.

  16. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Rousset-Jablonski, C.; Alifano, M.; Mansuet-Lupo, A.; Buy, J.-N.; Revel, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is considered to be rare, but is the most frequent form of extra-abdominopelvic endometriosis. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome affects women of reproductive age. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical findings, which can include catamenial pneumothorax and haemothorax, non-catamenial endometriosis-related pneumothorax, catamenial haemoptysis, lung nodules, and isolated catamenial chest pain. Symptoms are typically cyclical and recurrent, with a right-sided predominance. Computed tomography (CT) is the first-line imaging method, but is poorly specific; therefore, its main role is to rule out other pulmonary diseases. However, in women with a typical clinical history, some key CT findings may help to confirm this often under-diagnosed syndrome. MRI can also assist with the diagnosis, by showing signal changes typical of haemorrhage within diaphragmatic or pleural lesions

  17. Symposium introduction: metabolic syndrome and the onset of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin-Rong; Blackburn, George L; Walker, W Allan

    2007-09-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders are among the most pressing of today's health care concerns. Recent evidence from epidemiologic and basic research studies, as well as translational, clinical, and intervention studies, supports the emerging hypothesis that metabolic syndrome may be an important etiologic factor for the onset of cancer. On March 15-16, 2006, The Harvard Medical School Division of Nutrition hosted the symposium "Metabolic Syndrome and the Onset of Cancer" as a platform to systematically evaluate the evidence in support of this hypothesis. This symposium, which gathered leaders in the fields of metabolism, nutrition, and cancer, will stimulate further research investigating the etiologic role of metabolic syndrome in cancer. Furthermore, it will help to guide the development of effective cancer prevention strategies via nutritional and lifestyle modifications to alleviate metabolic syndrome.

  18. Plant-derived therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Brittany L; Raskin, Ilya; Cefalu, William T; Ribnicky, David M

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome is defined as a set of coexisting metabolic disorders that increase an individual's likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Medicinal plants, some of which have been used for thousands of years, serve as an excellent source of bioactive compounds for the treatment of metabolic syndrome because they contain a wide range of phytochemicals with diverse metabolic effects. In order for botanicals to be effectively used against metabolic syndrome, however, botanical preparations must be characterized and standardized through the identification of their active compounds and respective modes of action, followed by validation in controlled clinical trials with clearly defined endpoints. This review assesses examples of commonly known and partially characterized botanicals to describe specific considerations for the phytochemical, preclinical and clinical characterization of botanicals associated with metabolic syndrome.

  19. Immunologic features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Orange, Jordan; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Krantz, Ian; Deardorff, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a genetic syndrome with multisystem abnormalities. Infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The goals of our study were to identify the frequency and types of infections in CdLS and to determine if underlying immunodeficiency contributes to the clinical spectrum of this syndrome. We assessed infectious histories in 45 patients with CdLS and evaluated conventional immunologic screening tests in 27 patients. Among these 27 subjects, additional phenotypic enumeration of T-cell subsets, expression of activation markers in T cells, and production of cytokines in response to T-cell stimulants were studied in 12 CdLS subjects compared with 12 normal case control subjects. Recurrent infections were reported at high frequency in CdLS patients and included chronic ear infections (53%), chronic viral respiratory infections (46%), pneumonia (42%), sinus infections (33%), oral candidiasis (13%), sepsis (6%), and bacterial skin infections (4%). Full immune evaluation in 27 subjects led to identification of 9 cases of antibody deficiency syndrome in patients with severe forms of CdLS. Subjects with CdLS had decreased percentages of T regulatory cells and T follicular helper cells compared with normal control subjects (P < .05). This study identified for the first time a high frequency of antibody deficiency in CdLS subjects, indicating a critical need for screening and management of immunodeficiency in CdLS patients with a history of well-documented severe or recurrent infections. Furthermore, our results indicate that impaired T-cell populations may be associated with antibody deficiency in CdLS.

  20. High prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients : impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, Signe W; Friis-Møller, Nina; Bruyand, Mathias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Rickenbach, Martin; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Phillips, Andrew; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Caroline; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study describes the characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study and discusses the impact of different methodological approaches on estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome over time.

  1. High prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients: impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, S.W.; Friis-Moller, N.; Bruyand, M.; D'Arminio-Monforte, A.; Rickenbach, M.; Reiss, P.; El-Sadr, W.; Phillips, A.; Lundgren, J.; Sabin, C.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study describes the characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study and discusses the impact of different methodological approaches on estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome over time.

  2. High prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients: impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe H.Westring; Friis-Møller, Nina; Bruyand, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study and discusses the impact of different methodological approaches on estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome over time....

  3. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Nagaraj, Usha D; Pearl, Phillip L

    2015-07-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms "Cornelia," "Brachmann" and "de Lange." The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present.

  4. MANAGEMENT OF THE ORAL-FEATURES OF SJOGREN SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SGRAVENMADE, EJ; VISSINK, A

    In this paper the basis of the oral features of Sjogren's syndrome is described and guidelines for proper management of these features are given. The most pronounced oral symptoms are a dry sensation in the mouth and difficulties with swallowing and speech. Furthermore, these patients do not sleep

  5. Self-Injurious Behavior in Rett Syndrome: Interactions between Features of Rett Syndrome and Operant Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In this case study, interactions were examined between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning as determinants of self-injurious behavior (SIB). Analysis suggested different functions for two forms of SIB: automatic reinforcement by sensory stimulation and escape from social interactions. Features of Rett syndrome tended to maximize the…

  6. Understanding cachexia as a cancer metabolism syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, P E

    2016-02-22

    Metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumors to foster cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis, but as well at a systemic level affecting the whole organism, eventually leading to cancer cachexia. Indeed, as cancer cells rely on external sources of nitrogen and carbon skeleton to grow, systemic metabolic deregulation promoting tissue wasting and metabolites mobilization ultimately supports tumor growth. Cachectic patients experience a wide range of symptoms affecting several organ functions such as muscle, liver, brain, immune system and heart, collectively decreasing patients' quality of life and worsening their prognosis. Moreover, cachexia is estimated to be the direct cause of at least 20% of cancer deaths. The main aspect of cachexia syndrome is the unstoppable skeletal muscle and fat storage wasting, even with an adequate caloric intake, resulting in nutrient mobilization - both directly as lipid and amino acids and indirectly as glucose derived from the exploitation of liver gluconeogenesis - that reaches the tumor through the bloodstream. From a metabolic standpoint, cachectic host develops a wide range of dysfunctions, from increased insulin and IGF-1 resistance to induction of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and fat tissue browning resulting in an increased energy expenditure and heat generation, even at rest. For a long time, cachexia has been merely considered an epiphenomenon of end-stage tumors. However, in specific tumor types, such as pancreatic cancers, it is now clear that patients present markers of tissue wasting at a stage in which tumor is not yet clinically detectable, and that host amino acid supply is required for tumor growth. Indeed, tumor cells actively promote tissue wasting by secreting specific factors such as parathyroid hormone-related protein and micro RNAs. Understanding the molecular and metabolic mediators of cachexia will not only advance therapeutic approaches against cancer, but also improve patients' quality of life.

  7. Serum adipocytokine profile and metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marilda Guimarães; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo de; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the frequency of metabolic syndrome in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and its possible association with clinical and laboratory dermatomyositis-related features and serum adipocytokines. This cross-sectional study included 35 dermatomyositis patients and 48 healthy controls. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. Patient age was comparable in the dermatomyositis and control groups, and the median disease duration was 1.0 year. An increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome was detected in the dermatomyositis group (34.3% vs. 6.3%; p=0.001). In addition, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were noted in contrast to lower leptin levels. In dermatomyositis patients, adipocytokine levels were correlated with the levels of total cholesterol, low-density cholesterol, triglycerides and muscle enzymes. A comparison of dermatomyositis patients with (n=12) and without (n=23) syndrome metabolic revealed that adipocytokine levels were also correlated with age, and that dermatomyositis patients with metabolic syndrome tended to have more disease activity despite similar adipocytokine levels. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in young adult female dermatomyositis patients and is related to age and disease activity. Moreover, increased serum adiponectin and resistin levels were detected in dermatomyositis patients, but lower serum leptin levels were observed.

  8. The use of various diet supplements in metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Sicińska; Edyta Pytel; Aneta Maćczak; Maria Koter-Michalak

    2015-01-01

    Civilization development is associated with immense progress in science and significant improvement of human living conditions but simultaneously it contributes to many health problems including metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a set of mutually associated factors including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, lipids disorders and hypertension, which is the main cause of development of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The first line of defense against metabolic s...

  9. Facial acanthosis nigricans: A morphological marker of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Panda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acanthosis nigricans (AN is a frequently encountered entity. Facial AN (FAN is a subset of AN which is being increasingly recognized. Recently, reports hypothesizing the association of FAN with features of metabolic syndrome have been published. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the clinicodemographic profile of patients with FAN, and to assess the correlation of hypertension, increased waist–hip ratio (WHR, increased body mass index (BMI, type 2 diabetes mellitus, deranged lipid profile, serum insulin, and impaired oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT (parameters of metabolic syndrome in these patients, as well as to determine the most significant predictor (highest relative risk of development of FAN. Methods: A multicentric case–control study was conducted (123 cases in each group over a period of 2 years. Data were obtained on the basis of history, examination, and relevant laboratory investigations. Statistical analysis was done using Statistica version 6 (StatSoft Inc., 2001, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA, SPSS statistics version 17 (SPSS Inc., 2008, Illinois, Chicago, USA, and GraphPad Prism version 5 (GraphPad Software Inc., 2007, San Diego, California, USA. Results: Mean age of the patients with FAN was 38.83 ± 8.62 years. Mean age of onset of the disease was 30.93 ± 8.18 years. The most common site of face involved was the forehead and temporal region. The most common pigmentation was brown-black. Male sex, positive OGTT, increased WHR, and increased BMI were most significantly related to FAN. Smoking was found to have a protective effect against the development of FAN. Conclusion: Here, we document a significant association between male patients with positive OGTT, increased WHR, and BMI and FAN. Thus, we propose that FAN could be considered a morphological marker of metabolic syndrome.

  10. Association of Bone Mineral Density with the Metabolic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeong Han [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kam, Shin [Dept. of Preventtive MedicinE, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and the metabolic syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1204 adults(males: 364 females: 840) in a general hospital health promotion center. They were grouped into the normal and lower BMD group according to bone loss(osteopenia, osteoporosis), as determined by duel energy X-ray absorptiometery (DEXA). We analyzed the association between BMD and metabolic syndrome by multiple logistic regression analysis. After adjustment for age, weight, alcohol intake, smoking, regular exercise, regular intake of meals, and menopausal status, odds ratios for the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome by gender were calculated for lower BMD. After adjustment for the effect of potential covariates, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was associated with bone loss in men (p<0.001). If the odds ratio of normal group is 1.00, then that of the lower BMD group is 3.07 (95% CI=1.83-5.16). The prevalence of metabolic alterations fitting the criteria of metabolic syndrome was significantly decreased in High BMI, Low HDL in men and in High BMI in women (p<0.05). This study shows that BMD was associated with metabolic syndrome. Further studies needed to obtain evidence concerning the association between BMD and metabolic syndrome.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets in the medical school biochemistry curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Richard D; Makowske, Mary

    2003-09-01

    One of Robert Atkins contributions was to define a diet strategy in terms of an underlying metabolic principle ("the science behind Atkins"). The essential feature is that, by reducing insulin fluxes, lipids are funnelled away from storage and oxidized. Ketosis can be used as an indicator of lipolysis. A metabolic advantage is also proposed: controlled carbohydrates leads to greater weight loss per calorie than other diets. Although the Atkins diet and its scientific rationale are intended for a popular audience, the overall features are consistent with current metabolic ideas. We have used the Atkins controlled-carbohydrate diet as a focal point for teaching nutrition and metabolism in the first-year medical school curriculum. By presenting metabolism in the context of the current epidemic of obesity and of metabolic syndrome and related disorders, we provide direct application of the study of metabolic pathways, a subject not traditionally considered by medical students to be highly relevant to medical practice. We present here a summary of the metabolic basis of the Atkins diet as we teach it to medical students. We also discuss a proposed mechanism for metabolic advantage that is consistent with current ideas and that further brings out ideas in metabolism for students. The topics that are developed include the role of insulin and glucagon in lipolysis, control of lipoprotein lipase, the glucose-glycogen-gluconeogenesis interrelations, carbohydrate-protein interactions and ketosis. In essence, the approach is to expand the traditional feed-fast (post-absorptive) cycles to include the effect of low-carbohydrate meals: the disease states studied are generalized from traditional study of diabetes to include obesity and metabolic syndrome. The ideal diet for weight loss and treatment of metabolic syndrome, if it exists, remains to be determined, but presenting metabolism in the context of questions raised by the Atkins regimen prepares future physicians for

  12. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Nagaraj, Usha D. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Pearl, Phillip L. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms ''Cornelia'', ''Brachmann'' and ''de Lange.'' The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present. (orig.)

  13. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Nagaraj, Usha D.; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms ''Cornelia'', ''Brachmann'' and ''de Lange.'' The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present. (orig.)

  14. Clinicopathologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Features of Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Landa, Victoria; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Alegre, Victor; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Requena, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare histopathologic variant of Sweet syndrome. The nature of the histiocytoid infiltrate has generated considerable controversy in the literature. The main goal of this study was to conduct a comprehensive overview of the immunohistochemical phenotype of the infiltrate in histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We also analyze whether this variant of Sweet syndrome is more frequently associated with hematologic malignancies than classic Sweet syndrome. This is a retrospective case series study of the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 33 patients with a clinicopathologic diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was conducted in the dermatology departments of 5 university hospitals and a private laboratory of dermatopathology. The clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and follow-up features of 33 patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome were analyzed. In some cases, cytogenetic studies of the dermal infiltrate were also performed. We compare our findings with those of the literature. The dermal infiltrate from the 33 study patients (20 female; median age, 49 years; age range, 5-93 years; and 13 male; median age, 42 years; age range, 4-76 years) was mainly composed of myeloperoxidase-positive immature myelomonocytic cells with histiocytoid morphology. No cytogenetic anomalies were found in the infiltrate except in 1 case in which neoplastic cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia were intermingled with the cells of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. Authentic histiocytes were also found in most cases, with a mature immunoprofile, but they appeared to be a minor component of the infiltrate. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was not more frequently related with hematologic malignancies than classic neutrophilic Sweet syndrome. The dermal infiltrate of cutaneous lesions of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is composed mostly of immature cells of myeloid lineage. This infiltrate should not be interpreted as leukemia cutis.

  15. Longitudinal measurement invariance of the metabolic syndrome: is the assessment of the metabolic syndrome stable over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Wright, Bruce R; Burns, G Leonard; Parks, Craig D; Strand, Paul S

    2011-02-01

    Without verification of longitudinal measurement invariance, researchers cannot be certain whether observed change in the metabolic syndrome reflects true change or changes in assessment or structure of the construct over time. This research tested longitudinal measurement invariance of a 1-factor model of the metabolic syndrome during the course of 6 years. Tests of longitudinal measurement invariance (configural, metric, and scalar) were conducted on 604 men and women who participated in the Spokane Heart Study from 1996 to 2006. Metabolic syndrome indicators included body mass index, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose. Sequential configural and metric invariance models demonstrated adequate model fit, but the scalar invariance model led to a decrement in fit. Therefore, the theoretical framework of the syndrome and the relationships between the syndrome construct and the indicators appear to be equivalent over time. However, observed values of the metabolic syndrome indicators may differ across time when there is a constant level of the syndrome. Because longitudinal invariance was not fully demonstrated, interpretation of change in the metabolic syndrome over time may be misleading because change may be partly attributable to measurement properties of the indicators. However, a cross-sectional 1-factor model of the metabolic syndrome is supported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietary strategies to reduce metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Catherine J; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by central obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension, high fasting glucose, chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress. This condition has become an increasing problem in our society where about 34 % of adults are diagnosed with MetS. In parallel with the adult situation, a significant number of children present lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance, which can be used as markers of MetS in the pediatric population. Changes in lifestyle including healthy dietary regimens and increased physical activity should be the first lines of therapy to decrease MetS. In this article, we present the most recent information on successful dietary modifications that can reduce the parameters associated with MetS. Successful dietary strategies include energy restriction and weight loss, manipulation of dietary macronutrients--either through restriction of carbohydrates, fat, or enrichment in beneficial fatty acids, incorporation of functional foods and bioactive nutrients, and adherence to dietary and lifestyle patterns such the Mediterranean diet and diet/exercise regimens. Together, the recent findings presented in this review serve as evidence to support the therapeutic treatment of MetS through diet.

  17. Laminitis and the equine metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip J; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; LaCarrubba, Alison; Ganjam, V K Seshu; Messer, Nat T

    2010-08-01

    Although much has been written about laminitis in the context of its association with inflammatory processes, recognition is growing that most cases of laminitis examined by veterinarians in private practice are those associated with pasture grazing, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). The term 'endocrinopathic laminitis' has been adopted to classify the instances of laminitis in which the origin seems to be more strongly associated with an underlying endocrinopathy, such as either IR or the influence of corticosteroids. Results of a recent study suggest that obesity and IR represent the most common metabolic and endocrinopathic predispositions for laminitis in horses. IR also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of laminitis that develops when some horses or ponies are allowed to graze pastures at certain times of the year. The term equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) has been proposed as a label for horses whose clinical examination results (including both physical examination and laboratory testing) suggest heightened risk for developing laminitis as a result of underlying IR. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutrigenetics, metabolic syndrome risk and personalized nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Phillips, Catherine M; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of metabolic risk factors reflecting overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle and its increasing prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions. The importance of MetS lies in its close association with the risk of cardiometabolic disease. In this scenario, the principal goals of pharmacological therapy for these patients are to achieve and maintain an optimal cardiometabolic control, including lipids, blood glucose and blood pressure; in order to prevent and treat potential complications. Moreover nutrition has commonly been accepted as a cornerstone of treatment for MetS, with the expectation that an appropriate intake of energy and nutrients will improve its control. However the question arises as to whether dietary therapy may require a more personalised approach. In this regard improvements in genetic analysis have enhanced our understanding of the role of genetics in this dietrelated condition. In this review we will present recent data highlighting the importance of gene-nutrient interactions in the context of MetS risk.

  19. Gemigliptin ameliorates Western-diet-induced metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Hee; Leem, Jaechan; Park, Sungmi; Lee, Chong-Kee; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the pleiotropic actions of DPP-4 inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to examine whether gemigliptin, a recently developed DPP-4 inhibitor, could ameliorate features of metabolic syndrome. Mice were fed a Western diet (WD) for 12 weeks and were subsequently divided into 2 groups: mice fed a WD diet alone or mice fed a WD diet supplemented with gemigliptin for an additional 4 weeks. Gemigliptin treatment attenuated WD-induced body mass gain, hypercholesterolemia, adipocyte hypertrophy, and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue, which were accompanied by an increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 in subcutaneous fat. These events contributed to improved insulin sensitivity, as assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test. Furthermore, gemigliptin reduced WD-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation via inhibition of de novo lipogenesis and activation of fatty acid oxidation, which was accompanied by AMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Gemigliptin ameliorated WD-induced hepatic inflammation and fibrosis through suppression of oxidative stress. These results suggest that DPP-4 inhibitors may represent promising therapeutic agents for metabolic syndrome beyond their current role as antihyperglycemic agents.

  20. [Metabolic syndrome in workers of a second level hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiew-Quirós, Alvaro; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Hernández-Herrera, Ricardo Jorge; Gallardo-Vela, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    People with metabolic syndrome (20-25 % of the world population) are three times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke and twice as likely to die from this cause. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in workers of a second level hospital. This was a cross-sectional study with 160 healthcare workers in Monterrey, México. Sociodemographic, anthropometric and biochemical data were obtained to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were carried out in order to assess the relationship between metabolic syndrome and sociodemographic and occupational variables. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among workers was 38.1 %. Nurses were more affected with 32.8 %. Overweight and obesity were prevalent in 78 %. In the logistic regression there was a significant association between metabolic syndrome and not having partner (OR 3.98, 95 % CI [1.54-10.25]) and obesity (OR 4.69, 95 % CI [1.73-12.73]). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity is alarming. Appropriate and prompt actions must be taken in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  1. Hyperleptinemia, Adiposity, and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Older Adults

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    Suruchi Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Abdominal adiposity and serum leptin increase with age as does risk of metabolic syndrome. This study investigates the prospective association between leptin and metabolic syndrome risk in relation to adiposity and cytokines. Methods. The Health, Aging, and Body Composition study is a prospective cohort of older adults aged 70 to 79 years. Baseline measurements included leptin, cytokines, BMI, total percent fat, and visceral and subcutaneous fat. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between leptin and metabolic syndrome (defined per NCEP ATP III incidence after 6 years of follow-up among 1,120 men and women. Results. Leptin predicted metabolic syndrome in men (P for trend = 0.0002 and women (P for trend = 0.0001. In women, risk of metabolic syndrome increased with higher levels of leptin (compared with quintile 1, quintile 2 RR = 3.29, CI = 1.36, 7.95; quintile 3 RR = 3.25, CI = 1.33, 7.93; quintile 4 RR = 5.21, CI = 2.16, 12.56; and quintile 5 RR = 7.97, CI = 3.30, 19.24 after adjusting for potential confounders. Leptin remained independently associated with metabolic syndrome risk after additional adjustment for adiposity, cytokines, and CRP. Among men, this association was no longer significant after controlling for adiposity. Conclusion. Among older women, elevated concentrations of leptin may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome independent of adiposity and cytokines.

  2. Definition of the metabolic syndrome: current proposals and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisin, Efrain; Alpert, Martin A

    2005-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome includes a clustering of metabolic derangements that cause affected subjects to have an increased risk for developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and, according to recent epidemiologic studies, chronic kidney disease. The present review discusses four definitions of metabolic syndrome published by different national and international committees. In an effort to bridge the differences existent in those classifications, a unified definition that recognizes the increased biologic activity of the upper visceral fatty tissue and the strong association of abdominal obesity as a leading part of metabolic syndrome is proposed herein. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is reserved for pre-diabetic patients who share the risk of becoming diabetic or developing cardiovascular or chronic kidney disease.

  3. Pathogenesis of the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Monogenic Disorders

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    Rinki Murphy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying rare human metabolic disorders that result from a single-gene defect has not only enabled improved diagnostic and clinical management of such patients, but also has resulted in key biological insights into the pathophysiology of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are linked to obesity and driven by excess caloric intake and reduced physical activity. However, key events in the causation of the metabolic syndrome are difficult to disentangle from compensatory effects and epiphenomena. This review provides an overview of three types of human monogenic disorders that result in (1 severe, non-syndromic obesity, (2 pancreatic beta cell forms of early-onset diabetes, and (3 severe insulin resistance. In these patients with single-gene defects causing their exaggerated metabolic disorder, the primary defect is known. The lessons they provide for current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the common metabolic syndrome are highlighted.

  4. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Microalbuminuria in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Ok; Bak, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jin-Young; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of Korean adults to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria as a marker for early-stage chronic kidney disease. A total of 8,497 adults (3,625 men and 4,872 women) who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2011 and 2012 were included. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to recommendation from a joint interim statement of international organizations published in 2009. Microalbuminuria was defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g. The association between metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria was evaluated using logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates while considering sampling weights and the complex survey design. The prevalence of microalbuminuriain subjects with metabolic syndrome was 11% for men and 14.4% for women, whereas the prevalence in subjects without metabolic syndrome was 3.1% for men and 6.7% for women. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with an increased risk of microalbuminuriain both women (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 2.01 to 3.88) and men (odds ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.27). All components of the metabolic syndrome were associated with a significantly increased risk of microalbuminuria with the strongest association for high blood pressure. The risk of microalbuminuria increased in a dose-dependent manner (P-value for trend metabolic syndrome components observed for both sexes. These findings suggest that metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease from an early stage.

  5. Dietary intake, eating habits, and metabolic syndrome in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Aesun; Lim, Sun-Young; Sung, Joohon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Kim, Jeongseon

    2009-04-01

    Dietary factors contribute to the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, a disorder associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and some cancers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the intake frequencies of certain food groups, eating habits, and the risk of metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study of Korean men. Study participants were recruited from the National Cancer Center in South Korea. A total of 7,081 men aged 30 years and older were recruited between August 2002 and May 2007. Metabolic syndrome was defined as having three or more of the following conditions: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, high triglyceride level, and high fasting blood glucose level. The association of metabolic syndrome and sociodemographic characteristics, food intake frequencies, and eating habits assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, was examined. The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome for men aged 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59, and 60+ years was 18.2%, 19.8%, 21.9%, and 20.5%, respectively. The study participants with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (27.6% vs 21.6%, Peat quickly (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.12 for fast vs slow) and to overeat frequently (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.85 to 3.05 for more than 4 times a week vs less than once a week). The results suggest that high intake of seaweed and oily foods as well as eating habits such as eating faster and frequent overeating, are associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome. In contrast, high fruit intake may be associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome. The importance of dietary habits in metabolic syndrome development needs to be pursued in further studies.

  6. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Shahpoor Maddah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of obesity and other metabolic conditions with osteoarthritis is under debate; however, a strong link between metabolic disturbances is suggested to contribute to increased incidences and progression of osteoarthritis. We examined the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with the incidence of knee osteoarthritis in Iranian population. A community-based study was conducted on a total of 625 Iranian volunteers with the complaint of knee pain. Weight-bearing and anteroposterior plain radiographs of both knees were taken on the day of admission. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the modified Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome were 22.5% in males and 11.6% in females (P=0.002. The prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis was 20.0% in males and 43.8% of females (P<0.001. In both genders, osteoarthritis group had higher serum levels of triglyceride and systolic blood pressure in comparison with non-osteoarthritis group. Women with osteoarthritis had higher Body Mass Index (BMI, however, this association was not observed in men. In females, the presence of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritis group at 2.187 fold the risk in the non-osteoarthritis group. But, the presence of osteoarthritis was not associated with metabolic syndrome in males. Metabolic syndrome mainly through high BMI is associated with knee osteoarthritis in the Iranian women, but neither metabolic syndrome nor any related components are associated with knee osteoarthritis in men.

  7. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Portugal: the PORMETS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Luís; Severo, Milton; Barros, Henrique; Santos, Ana Cristina

    2017-06-08

    The PORMETS study was designed to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its determinants in the overall and administrative regions of the Portuguese mainland. A cross-sectional study of a representative sample of non-institutionalized Portuguese adults selected from primary health care centres lists including 1695 men and 2309 women was conducted from February 2007 to July 2009. A structured questionnaire was administered, collecting information on personal medical history and socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics. Anthropometrics, blood pressure, and venous blood samples were obtained. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to three operational definitions. The prevalence ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated using binomial generalized linear regression, with the log link function. The prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome in this sample of Portuguese adults were 36.5%, 49.6%, and 43.1%, using the Adult Treatment Panel III, International Diabetes Federation and Joint Interim Statement definitions, respectively. The most prevalent feature of metabolic syndrome in this sample was high blood pressure (64.3%) and the lowest was high fasting glucose (24.9%). After adjustment for age and gender, significant differences were observed for the 18 districts of the Portugal mainland. Additionally, metabolic syndrome was significantly more frequent in non-urban areas than in urban ones (p = 0.001). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in women (p˂0.001) and older participants (p˂0.001), as well as in those who reported being housewives (p = 0.010), retired (p = 0.046) or unemployed (p = 0.024). This study showed that metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the Portuguese adult population. Regional differences in the prevalence of this syndrome were observed, and this condition was more common in non-urban areas and less favoured socio-economic categories.

  8. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Portugal: the PORMETS study

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    Luís Raposo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PORMETS study was designed to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its determinants in the overall and administrative regions of the Portuguese mainland. Methods A cross-sectional study of a representative sample of non-institutionalized Portuguese adults selected from primary health care centres lists including 1695 men and 2309 women was conducted from February 2007 to July 2009. A structured questionnaire was administered, collecting information on personal medical history and socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics. Anthropometrics, blood pressure, and venous blood samples were obtained. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to three operational definitions. The prevalence ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated using binomial generalized linear regression, with the log link function. Results The prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome in this sample of Portuguese adults were 36.5%, 49.6%, and 43.1%, using the Adult Treatment Panel III, International Diabetes Federation and Joint Interim Statement definitions, respectively. The most prevalent feature of metabolic syndrome in this sample was high blood pressure (64.3% and the lowest was high fasting glucose (24.9%. After adjustment for age and gender, significant differences were observed for the 18 districts of the Portugal mainland. Additionally, metabolic syndrome was significantly more frequent in non-urban areas than in urban ones (p = 0.001. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in women (p˂0.001 and older participants (p˂0.001, as well as in those who reported being housewives (p = 0.010, retired (p = 0.046 or unemployed (p = 0.024. Conclusions This study showed that metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the Portuguese adult population. Regional differences in the prevalence of this syndrome were observed, and this condition was more common in non-urban areas and less

  9. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Features of Autoinflammatory Syndromes in Children

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    Е. I. Alexeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to study the prevalence and clinical features of autoinflammatory syndromes among patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods: A prospective nonrandomized study was conducted. All its members have been studied for mutations in TNFRSF1A and NLRP3 genes by the sequencing method. Results: 90 children (27 boys, 63 girls aged from 1 to 17 (average age 8.2 years, with a guide diagnosis: «Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis», were examined. As a result, 10 (14% patients showed mutations in TNFRSF1A gene, leading to the development of TRAPS-syndrome (8 had the most common mutation of R92Q; 3 — not previously described mutations in NLRP3 gene. 2 patients had the diagnosis of CINCA/NOMID Syndrome, 1 — Muckle–Wells Syndrome. In three cases, mutations leading to the development of TRAPS-syndromethe were identified in the first line of descent. Classical examples of autoinflammatory syndromes such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS, and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS. The data about their pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment is presented. Conclusion: It is shown that early detection and adequate treatment of patients with autoinflammatory syndromes, characterized by severe disease and serious prognosis, is difficult due to lack of awareness of pediatricians and unavailability of genetic diagnosis of these syndromes. The necessity of the development of a universal model of the diagnostic algorithm for identification of autoinflammatory syndromes using next-generation sequencing technologies is grounded. 

  10. [Clinical analysis of metabolic syndrome in vertiginous diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Sawai, Yachiyo; Shirota, Shiho; Shimizu, Naoki; Murai, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To explore the relationship between metabolic syndrome and vertigo, we measured waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides and blood pressure in 333 subjects aged 20-79 years with vertigo. We found overall metabolic syndrome prevalence defined by Japanese diagnostic criteria to be 13.2%, similar to that in other national surveys by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The 6-fold higher prevalence in men over women exceeded that of other reports, however. The highest frequency was in vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) disorders, suggesting that conditions such as VBI in men with vertigo could involve metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for vertigo incidence.

  11. The metabolic syndrome in black hypertensive women - Waist circumference more strongly related than body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheeder, P; Stolk, RP; Veenhouwer, JF; Grobbee, DE

    Objective. To examine the association between measures of. obesity and features of the metabolic syndrome in treated. black female hypertensive subjects. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. An urban primary health care centre in Mamelodi, Pretoria. Subjects. Women with hypertension and without

  12. Increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with acne inversa.

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    Robert Sabat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acne inversa (AI; also designated as Hidradenitis suppurativa is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease, localized in the axillary, inguinal and perianal skin areas that causes painful, fistulating sinuses with malodorous purulence and scars. Several chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with the metabolic syndrome and its consequences including arteriosclerosis, coronary heart disease, myocardial infraction, and stroke. So far, the association of AI with systemic metabolic alterations is largely unexplored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A hospital-based case-control study in 80 AI patients and 100 age- and sex-matched control participants was carried out. The prevalence of central obesity (odds ratio 5.88, hypertriglyceridemia (odds ratio 2.24, hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia (odds ratio 4.56, and hyperglycemia (odds ratio 4.09 in AI patients was significantly higher than in controls. Furthermore, the metabolic syndrome, previously defined as the presence of at least three of the five alterations listed above, was more common in those patients compared to controls (40.0% versus 13.0%; odds ratio 4.46, 95% confidence interval 2.02 to 9.96; P<0.001. AI patients with metabolic syndrome also had more pronounced metabolic alterations than controls with metabolic syndrome. Interestingly, there was no correlation between the severity or duration of the disease and the levels of respective parameters or the number of criteria defining the metabolic syndrome. Rather, the metabolic syndrome was observed in a disproportionately high percentage of young AI patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time that AI patients have a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and all of its criteria. It further suggests that the inflammation present in AI patients does not have a major impact on the development of metabolic alterations. Instead, evidence is given for a role of metabolic alterations in the development of AI. We recommend

  13. Structural changes in the liver in metabolic syndrome

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    D. V. Vasendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientifically proven close relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with development of metabolic syndrome and its individual components involves the conclusion that the target organ in metabolic symptom, even regardless of the severity of obesity, the liver occupies a dominant position, as the body undergoes the first characteristic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease changes, involving violation of metabolism in the body. Dislipoproteinemia plays an important role in the formation of metabolic syndrome in obesity and other obesity-associated diseases. Altered liver function are the root cause of violations of processes of lipid metabolism and, consequently, abnormal functioning of the liver may be a separate, additional and independent risk factor for development of dyslipidemia and obesity as the main component of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Metabolic syndrome: a multifaceted risk factor for kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Fernando; Serra, Adelaide

    2014-10-01

    Kidney stones and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are common conditions in industrialized countries. There is growing evidence of associations between kidney stone disease and MetS or some of its components. The link between uric acid stones and MetS is well understood, but the link with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones, the most common kidney stone composition, is more complex, and MetS is frequently overlooked as a risk factor for calcium nephrolithiasis. The physiopathological mechanisms of kidney stone disease in MetS are reviewed in this article. Uric acid stones are a consequence of the excessively acidic urine that results from insulin resistance. The pathophysiology of CaOx stones may include: increased excretion of lithogenesis promoters and decreased excretion of inhibitors; increased risk of Randall's plaque development; and inflammatory damage to renal epithelia by oxidative stress, as a consequence of the insulin-resistant milieu that characterizes MetS. The last mechanism contributes to the adhesion of CaOx crystals to subepithelial calcium deposits working as anchor sites where stones can grow. The predominant MetS features could determine the chemical composition of the stones in each patient. Kidney stones may be a renal manifestation of MetS and features of this syndrome should be looked for in patients with idiopathic nephrolithiasis.

  15. Cardiovascular Risk Stratification in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome Without Diabetes or Cardiovascular Disease: Usefulness of Metabolic Syndrome Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Walter; Epstein, Teo; Huerín, Melina; Lobo, Lorenzo Martín; Molinero, Graciela; Angel, Adriana; Masson, Gerardo; Millán, Diana; De Francesca, Salvador; Vitagliano, Laura; Cafferata, Alberto; Losada, Pablo

    2017-09-01

    The estimated cardiovascular risk determined by the different risk scores, could be heterogeneous in patients with metabolic syndrome without diabetes or vascular disease. This risk stratification could be improved by detecting subclinical carotid atheromatosis. To estimate the cardiovascular risk measured by different scores in patients with metabolic syndrome and analyze its association with the presence of carotid plaque. Non-diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III definition) without cardiovascular disease were enrolled. The Framingham score, the Reynolds score, the new score proposed by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator were calculated. Prevalence of carotid plaque was determined by ultrasound examination. A Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis was performed. A total of 238 patients were enrolled. Most patients were stratified as "low risk" by Framingham score (64%) and Reynolds score (70.1%). Using the 2013 ACC/AHA score, 45.3% of the population had a risk ≥7.5%. A significant correlation was found between classic scores but the agreement (concordance) was moderate. The correlation between classical scores and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator was poor. Overall, the prevalence of carotid plaque was 28.2%. The continuous metabolic syndrome score used in our study showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque (area under the curve 0.752). In this population, the calculated cardiovascular risk was heterogenic. The prevalence of carotid plaque was high. The Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque.

  16. [Myelodysplastic syndromes: pathophysiology, clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becha, Mohamed; Braham Jmili, Néjia

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hemopathies very common in geriatric practice. They are characterized by qualitative morphological abnormalities of one or more myeloid lineages responsible for an ineffective hematopoiesis, and therefore cytopenias of central origin contrasting with a usually rich bone marrow wealth. The MDS are asymptomatic in half of the cases and their discovery is a result of systematic blood analysis or tests to explore another disease. The evolution is marked by worsening cytopenias, and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia transformation with poor prognosis because frequently chemoresistant. The diagnosis of MDS is pronounced after a clinico-biological confrontation to discuss the differential diagnosis taking into account all clinical and cytological data, results of conventional cytogenetics and evolution after vitamin therapy. Knowledge more depth on MDS refine MDS classification criteria by developing successive classifications (FAB 1982, WHO 2001 and 2008) which aim the identification of MDS groups with clinical, biological and common prognostic. The treatment of MDS is essentially symptomatic. The development of new targeted therapeutic strategies enables high hopes in a context where treatment options are a difficult choice, because the advanced age of most patients. Finally, detailed knowledge of risk factors and prognostic scores are very useful to make the best treatment decisions.

  17. Pain syndrome features in Parkinson's disease

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    Bril Е.М.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain in Parkinson disease take the special place among all of disease symptoms due to it pathogenetics and clinical diversity. In spite of the plurality of resent studies, the majority of clinical practioners and neurologists didn't pay attention to significant decline of the quality of life in patients with Parkinson disease and pain disorders. This article was created with aim to summarize all important results of studies, focused on pain pathogenesis and clinical features on different stages of disease.

  18. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Roger S; Danilewitz, Marlon; Liauw, Samantha S; Kemp, David E; Nguyen, Ha T T; Kahn, Linda S; Kucyi, Aaron; Soczynska, Joanna K; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Lachowski, Angela; Kim, Byungsu; Nathanson, Jay; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad; Taylor, Valerie H

    2010-11-01

    The ubiquity and hazards posed by abnormal body composition and metabolic parameters in the bipolar population are a priority research and clinical issue. Herein, we summarize and synthesize international studies describing the rate of US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III [ATP III])- and International Diabetes Federation (IDF)-defined metabolic syndrome and its criterion components in individuals with bipolar disorder. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 2005 and July 2009 with the following search terms: metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder, mania and manic-depression. Articles selected for review were based on adequacy of sample size, the use of standardized experimental procedures, validated assessment measures, and overall manuscript quality. The rate of metabolic syndrome in individuals with bipolar disorder is increased relative to the general population. Disparate estimates are reported ranging from comparability to approximately twofold greater than the general population. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome amongst bipolar individuals is now documented in twelve countries from Europe, Australia, Asia, North and South America. The co-occurrence of metabolic syndrome in the bipolar population is associated with a more complex illness presentation, less favourable response to treatment, and adverse course and outcome. The association between metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder is mediated/moderated by both iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic factors. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome in bipolar populations is due to the clustering of traditional (and emerging) risk factors as well as iatrogenic and health systems factors. Extant data support recommendations for prioritizing, surveillance, prevention, diagnosis and management of metabolic syndrome as routine care

  19. Turner′s syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

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    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  20. Cyclic vomiting syndrome masking a fatal metabolic disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne

    2013-05-01

    Disorders of fatty acid oxidation are rare but can be fatal. Hypoglycaemia with acidosis is a cardinal feature. Cases may present during early childhood or can be delayed into adolescence or beyond. We present a case of multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), an extremely rare disorder of fatty acid oxidation. Our 20-year-old patient presented with cardiovascular collapse, raised anion gap metabolic acidosis and non-ketotic hypoglycaemia. She subsequently developed multi-organ failure and sadly died. She had a previous diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) for more than 10 years, warranting frequent hospital admissions. The association between CVS and MADD has been made before though the exact relationship is unclear. All patients with persistent severe CVS should have metabolic investigations to exclude disorders of fatty acid oxidation. In case of non-ketotic hypoglycaemia with acidosis, the patient should be urgently referred to a specialist in metabolic diseases. All practitioners should be aware of these rare disorders as a cause of unexplained acidosis.

  1. [Types of dislipidemia in children with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromnats'ka, N M

    2014-01-01

    To study dyslipidemia types in children with metabolic syndrome. From 1520 children of total population 155 children aged from 9 to 18 years were selected, who formed 2 groups: 1 group--85 children with metabolic syndrome, 2 group--54 children with normal body mass. Anthropometry, blood pressure measurement, estimation of total cholesterol, low density cholesterol, very low density cholesterol, high density cholesterol, tryglicerides in blood were done. The total cholesterol level was 1,1 times higher (p = 0.001), low density cholesterol 1,4 times higher (p = 0.001), very low density cholesterol 1,1 times higher (p= 0.015), tryglicerides 1,1 times higher (p = 0.020) in children with metabolic syndrome than in children of control group. In children with metabolic syndrome sensitively more often IIa, IV dislipidemia types and isolated hypercholesterolemia and less often IIb, III dislipidemia types and high density cholesterol isolated decrease were diagnosed. So children with metabolic syndrome were characterized by atherogenic types of dislipidemias which determine early atherosclerosis development. Children with metabolic syndrome must be examined on the lipid metabolism violation with the aim of its prevention and correction.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Cannon, Christopher P; Braunwald, Eugene; Goodrich, Erica L; Im, KyungAh; Lukas, Mary Ann; O'Donoghue, Michelle L

    2018-01-01

    Background The incremental prognostic value of assessing the metabolic syndrome has been disputed. Little is known regarding its prognostic value in patients after an acute coronary syndrome. Design and methods The presence of metabolic syndrome (2005 International Diabetes Federation) was assessed at baseline in SOLID-TIMI 52, a trial of patients within 30 days of acute coronary syndrome (median follow-up 2.5 years). The primary endpoint was major coronary events (coronary heart disease death, myocardial infarction or urgent coronary revascularization). Results At baseline, 61.6% ( n = 7537) of patients met the definition of metabolic syndrome, 34.7% (n = 4247) had diabetes and 29.3% had both ( n = 3584). The presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of major coronary events (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 1.29, p definition, only diabetes (adjHR 1.48, p metabolic syndrome was numerically but not significantly associated with the risk of major coronary events (adjHR 1.13, p = 0.06). Conversely, diabetes was a strong independent predictor of major coronary events in the absence of metabolic syndrome (adjHR 1.57, p metabolic syndrome identified patients at highest risk of adverse outcomes but the incremental value of metabolic syndrome was not significant relative to diabetes alone (adjHR 1.07, p = 0.54). Conclusions After acute coronary syndrome, diabetes is a strong and independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome provides only marginal incremental value once the presence or absence of diabetes is established.

  3. Dietary methyl-consuming compounds and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Da; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2011-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Although systemic oxidative stress and aberrant methylation status are known to have important roles in the development of metabolic syndrome, how they occur remains unclear. The metabolism of methyl-consuming compounds generates reactive oxygen species and consumes labile methyl groups; therefore, a chronic increase in the levels of methyl-consuming compounds in the body can induce not only oxidative stress and subsequent tissue injury, but also methyl-group pool depletion and subsequent aberrant methylation status. In the past few decades, the intake amount of methyl-consuming compounds has substantially increased primarily due to pollution, food additives, niacin fortification and high meat consumption. Thus, increased methyl consumers might have a causal role in the development and prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases. Moreover, factors that decrease the elimination/metabolism of methyl-consuming compounds and other xenobiotics (for example, sweat gland inactivity and decreased liver function) or increase the generation of endogenous methyl-consuming compounds (for example, mental stress-induced increase in catecholamine release) may accelerate the progression of metabolic syndrome. Based on current nutrition knowledge and the available evidence from epidemiological, ecological, clinical and laboratory studies on metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, this review outlines the relationship between methyl supply-consumption imbalance and metabolic syndrome, and proposes a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis and prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases.

  4. Leptin Level in Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Dreval, PhD, ScD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the dynamics of leptin in the various types of disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism could reveal its role in the pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the Fasting Leptin Level (FLL and effect of acute hyperinsulinemia during the Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT on the leptin levels in women with Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IRS. Materials and Methods: In total, 59 obese women (54.0 [48.5-60.0] yrs; BMI – 33.2 [29.0-37.2] kg/m² with IRS (12 – obesity (NGT, 18 - ITG and 30 - T2DM were observed. The IVGTT test was done only in women with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and T2DM. The leptin level was investigated during fasting conditions and again 120 min post glucose loading. Then the Hepatic glucose production Index (H-index was calculated using the IVGTT data. Results: The FLL in women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT was almost two times greater than in women with IGT and T2DM. A negative relationship was found to exist between FLL and HbA1c in T2DM (r=0.3, p8%. The leptin level significantly decreased at 120 min of IVGTT in both the IGT and T2DM groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: The FLL depended upon the degree of glucose metabolism impairment; postprandial leptin response to the glucose load was lower in the IGT group than in the T2DM subjects.

  5. Enterovirus related metabolic myopathy: a postviral fatigue syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, R; Soteriou, B; Zhang, H; Archard, L

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To detect and characterise enterovirus RNA in skeletal muscle from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and to compare efficiency of muscle energy metabolism in enterovirus positive and negative CFS patients.

  6. Vascular risk factors and adipocyte dysfunction in metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajer, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    The cluster of vascular risk factors closely associated with obesity, consists of fasting and postprandial dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, also known as metabolic syndrome, is associated with an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition, adipose tissue in

  7. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents - criteria for diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Marcio C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a greater concern about the presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. It is evident that each component of the syndrome must be identified as early as possible in order to prevent definitive lesions. The question is how to do this and which cut-offs must be adopted for this diagnosis. For a matter of convenience, the definition chosen as the most appropriate is the one proposed by the IDF, with cut-offs fixed for pressure, lipids and glycemia, and abdominal circumference points assessed by percentile. Although on the one hand this definition could fail to include some children in the diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome, on the other hand, it would be of easier acceptance as it does not use multiple tables to assess several anthropometric and metabolic criteria. PMID:19840386

  8. Frank-ter Haar syndrome with unusual clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Munis; Saatci, Cetin; Tasdemir, Sener; Akcakus, Mustafa; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Frank-ter Haar syndrome first recognized by Frank et al. [Y. Frank, M. Ziprkowski, A. Romano, R. Stein, M.B. Katznelson, B. Cohen, R.M. Goodman, Megalocornea associated with multiple skeletal anomalies: a new genetic syndrome?, J. Genet. Hum. 21 (1973) 67-72.] and subsequently confirmed by ter Haar et al. [B. Ter Haar, B. Hamel, J. Hendriks, J. de Jager, Melnick-Needles syndrome: indication for an autosomal recessive form, Am. J. Med. Genet. 13 (1982) 469-477.]. The main clinical features of the syndrome are brachycephaly, wide fontanels, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, macro cornea with or without glaucoma, full cheeks, small chin, bowing of the long bones, and flexion deformity of the fingers [S.M. Maas, H. Kayserili, J. Lam, M.Y. Apak, R.C. Hennekam, Further delineation of Frank-ter Haar syndrome, Am. J. Med. Genet. 131 (2004) 127-133.]. We report a child with Frank-ter Haar syndrome presenting unusual clinical features. Hypopigmented areas in hair, bilateral adducted thumb, bilateral contractures in elbows and pelvic limb, atrial septal defect have not been described previously in the literature. Our patient also had double-outlet right ventricle.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and its components among university students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, Samuel Mungai; Kimani, Samuel Thuo; Munyoki, Gilbert

    2017-11-28

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of interrelated disorders which occur together causing an increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The university population is an understudied group despite the increase in the frequency of related disorders and metabolic risk factors e.g. obesity and diabetes, majorly due to the assumption that they are in their most active phase of life therefore healthy. This study looked at metabolic syndrome, the sedentary lifestyles and dietary habits present among university students attending Mount Kenya University, main campus. Stratified sampling was used to select participants. Self-administered questionnaires were issued to participants after a signed consent had been obtained following which clinical assessments and biochemical measures were performed. They included blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, anthropometric measurements; height, weight, BMI and waist circumference. Pearson's chi-square tests and non-parametric independent t-test were used to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per gender, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI and prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI category. The study established that 1.9% of the participants met the criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to HJSS criteria. Among the elements, there was statistical difference in gender BMI and waist circumference. 11.8% of subjects had two metabolic syndrome components while 3.1% had three components while none of the subjects had all six components. Elevated triglycerides was the most prevalent defining component for metabolic syndrome. There is a statistically significant relationship between sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits as risk factors to metabolic syndrome. Young adults in university have begun developing metabolic syndrome and the risk of developing the syndrome continues to increase with the

  10. Components of the metabolic syndrome, but not the metabolic syndrome per se, are associated with aortic distensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentolouris, Nicholas; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Liatis, Stavros; Moyssakis, Ioannis; Perrea, Despoina; Soldatos, Rigas-Philippos; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2007-12-01

    Reduction in aortic distensibility occurs early in the atherosclerosis process and carries a poor prognosis. Metabolic syndrome is common and it is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and aortic distensibility. A total of 135 subjects without diabetes were studied. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the NCEP-ATP-III criteria. Aortic distensibility was assessed non-invasively by ultrasonography. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for the components of the metabolic syndrome, and, additionally, for body mass index, pulse pressure, presence of coronary artery disease, use of statins and use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers, demonstrated an independent association between aortic distensibility and age (pmetabolic syndrome status. Moreover, there was a suggestive association with albumin-to-creatinine ratio (p=0.06). Metabolic syndrome per se is not associated with reduction in aortic distensibility. From the components of the metabolic syndrome, only blood pressure is a strong predictor of aortic distensibility. In addition, ageing and higher values of albumin-to-creatinine ratio are also associated with low aortic distensibility.

  11. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia. We evaluated 103 patients less than 40 years of age, from a low-income population, and without history of cardiovascular disease, in all of them the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. In all patients, fasting serum uric acid levels were measured; hyperuricaemia was defined as serum uric acid values 6.5 mg/dl in men and 5.1 mg/dl in women. Statistical analysis was performed with odds ratio. 83 of our patients (80.5%) suffered metabolic syndrome, the odds ratio for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with hyperuricaemia was 5.1 (p=0.002, I.C 1.8- 14.5). When patients were evaluated by gender a significantly association between hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was found in women (odds ratio 3.6, p=0.048, C.I. 1.0-12.9), and men (odds ratio 10.2, p= 0.015, IC 1.5-13.2). When uric acid was correlated with the components of metabolic syndrome, we only found a positive correlation with waist circumference (r=0.483). Our results showed a significant association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults in Mexico. DR is associated with estimated risk of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia as a component of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Bespalova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The level of uric acid in the blood serum of 103 patients with coronary heart disease was researched in clinical conditions. The interrelation with the components of the metabolic syndrome in patients on the background of individually selected pathogenetic therapy was studied. It was shown that the abdominal obesity has the highest correlation with the level of uric acid in a cluster of metabolic syndrome components.

  13. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence and risk factors in Korean gout patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Song, Gwan Gyu; Ji, Jong Dae; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Young Ho; Choi, Sung Jae

    2016-10-12

    We performed this study to investigate associations between metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and gout. We reviewed the medical records of 151 patients with gout at the Department of Rheumatology in Korea University Ansan Hospital. The following measures were examined: waist circumference, blood pressure, alcohol consumption, and levels of triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting serum glucose, serum uric acid (SUA), creatinine, insulin, and C-peptide. We assessed metabolic syndrome by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and renal function by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation; patients were classified according to World Health Organization Asia-Pacific obesity criteria. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in gout patients (50.8%) was higher than in non-gout patients. The mean SUA level was significantly higher in gout patients with metabolic syndrome (9.13 ± 3.15 mg/dL) than in gout patients without metabolic syndrome (8.14 ± 2.07 mg/dL). The mean SUA level was also significantly higher in patients with gout and CKD (9.55 ± 2.86 mg/dL) than in patients with gout but no CKD (7.74 ± 2.27 mg/dL). In gout patients, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with waist circumference (r = 0.409, p = 0.001). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with gout was 50.8%, which is higher than the prevalence in the general Korean population. Hyperuricemia in gout patients was correlated with metabolic syndrome and CKD. Insulin resistance may provide clues to better understand the relationship between metabolic syndrome, CKD, and gout.

  14. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Microalbuminuria in Korean Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Ok; Bak, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jin-Young; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of Korean adults to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria as a marker for early-stage chronic kidney disease. Methods A total of 8,497 adults (3,625 men and 4,872 women) who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2011 and 2012 were included. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to recommendation from a joint interim statement of international orga...

  15. Metabolic syndrome 2 years after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Lizbeth; Ortiz, Cristian J; Espinosa, Omar; Sepúlveda, Elisa M; Piña, Tatiana; Joo, Paul; Zerrweck, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The latest diabetes consensus identified obesity as key component of the metabolic syndrome. The role of bariatric surgery over such syndrome has been less explored with a lack of long term studies, and especially among Mexicans. Retrospective study including patients with metabolic syndrome submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass at a single institution with complete data after 24 months. The objective was to analyze the improvement of the syndrome and each component. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters were analyzed at 12 and 24 months. Secondarily weight loss and other parameters were also analyzed. Finally, an analysis of syndrome improvement related to weight loss was performed. Sixty-three patients were included. The 2 most common components associated with obesity were reduced HDL and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes. There was a significant improvement of metabolic syndrome and its components, as well as for the rest of the analyzed data, from the first check point and throughout follow-up. Prevalence of such syndrome was 6.3% at 12 and 24 months. Hypertension and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes were the components with the greatest and fastest improvement; HDL levels and obesity were the least improved. There was a direct relationship between percentage of excess weight loss or percentage of excess BMI loss, and syndrome's improvement. Patients with metabolic syndrome improved after gastric bypass, with results lasting after 2 years; other metabolic parameters important for cardiovascular risk were also positively affected. There was a relationship between the amount of weight loss and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rare features associated with Mobius syndrome: Report of two cases

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    Rumela Ghosh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobius syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with the preliminary diagnostic criteria of congenital facial and abducent nerve palsy. Involvement of other cranial nerves, too, is common. Prevalence rate of this syndrome is approximately 1 in 100,000 neonates. It is of unknown etiology with sporadic occurrence. However, data regarding the occurrence rate in India is limited. Features such as orofacial malformations, limb defects, and musculoskeletal, behavioral, and cognitive abnormalities might be associated. A thorough evaluation to identify the condition and establishing an adequate treatment plan is of utmost important in this condition. We are reporting clinical and radiographic features of Mobius syndrome in two cases along with unusual findings of limb and neck deformity.

  17. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  18. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: treatment, clinical features and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the treatment, epidemiology and clinical features of the adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Fatigue is a common complaint among adolescents, with a reported incidence of up to 20% in girls. This fatigue however is not chronic, does not debilitate and has an identifiable

  19. Operculum syndrome: unusual feature of herpes simplex encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, J. C.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis in adults and young patients carries a high mortality and morbidity. Its presentation may be nonspecific, sometimes hampering early diagnosis. Two young children are reported with herpes simplex encephalitis in whom the operculum syndrome was an outstanding feature. This

  20. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, H.Y.; Van Zanten, B.G.A.; De Ru, S.A.; Boon, M.; Mancini, G.M.S.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Poll-The, B.; Lindhout, D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS), one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: University Children's Hospital. Patients: Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures: Audiological

  1. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, Hester Y.; Van Zanten, Bert G. A.; De Ru, Sander A.; Boon, Maartje; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Lindhout, Dick

    Objective To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS). one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss Design: Retrospective case series. Setting University Children's Hospital Patients Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures Audiological data.

  2. Is hearing loss a feature of Joubert syndrome, a ciliopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, Hester Y.; van Zanten, Bert G. A.; de Ru, Sander A.; Boon, Maartje; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Lindhout, Dick

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess if hearing loss is a feature of Joubert syndrome (JBS). one of the ciliopathies and therefore possibly associated with hearing loss Design: Retrospective case series. Setting University Children's Hospital Patients Dutch patients with JBS. Main outcome measures Audiological data.

  3. Emerging health problems among women: Inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome has been documented worldwide. However, few studies have investigated the risk of inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome specifically in women. Hormone balance plays a crucial role in regulating metabolism and helps to maintain optimal health. It is likely that the sex difference in obesity may be due to the variation in hormone concentration throughout a woman's life, which predisposes them to weight gain. This paper reviews previous literature and discusses factors that influence the risk of adiposity-related health consequences among women for three critical biological transitions throughout a woman's life: puberty, menopause, and pregnancy. To improve quality of life and metabolic health for women, interventions are needed to target women at different transition stages and provide tailored health education programs. Interventions should raise awareness of physical inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, and promote healthy behavioral change in women.

  4. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction in Nascent Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Bremer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS confers an increased risk for both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Moreover, studies on adipose tissue biology in nascent MetS uncomplicated by T2DM and/or CVD are scanty. Recently, we demonstrated that adipose tissue dysregulation and aberrant adipokine secretion contribute towards the syndrome’s low-grade chronic proinflammatory state and insulin resistance. Specifically, we have made the novel observation that subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT in subjects with nascent MetS has increased macrophage recruitment with cardinal crown-like structures. We have also shown that subjects with nascent MetS have increased the levels of SAT-secreted adipokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, leptin, RBP-4, CRP, SAA, PAI-1, MCP-1, and chemerin and plasma adipokines (IL-1, IL-6, leptin, RBP-4, CRP, SAA, and chemerin, as well as decreased levels of plasma adiponectin and both plasma and SAT omentin-1. The majority of these abnormalities persisted following correction for increased adiposity. Our data, as well as data from other investigators, thus, highlight the importance of subcutaneous adipose tissue dysfunction in subjects with MetS and its contribution to the proinflammatory state and insulin resistance. This adipokine profile may contribute to increased insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, promoting the increased risk of T2DM and CVD.

  5. [Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Vilela, María Elena; Quílez Pina, Raquel María; Bonafonte Marteles, José Luis; Morlanes Navarro, Teresa; Calvo Gracia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) according to the definitions of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in hospitalized elderly patients. This descriptive and prospective study (February-March 2011) included 200 consecutive patients hospitalized in a Geriatric Department. Sociodemographic, clinical and biochemical data was collected. The prevalence of MS was 65% (NCEP-ATP III) and 67.5% (IDF) and was greater in women (NCEP-ATP III=72.8%, IDF=73.6%) than in men (NCEP-ATP III=50.7%; IDF=56.3%). The mean age of patients diagnosed with MS by both diagnostic criteria were similar: 84.7 years. MS was not associated with an increased prevalence of CVD. MS is highly prevalent in elderly hospitalized patients, being higher in women, with both diagnostic criteria (NCEP- ATP III and IDF). In our population the MS was not associated with an increased prevalence of CVD. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Menopause and Metabolic Syndrome in Tunisian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Ben Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of menopausal status on the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS in Tunisian women. Methods. We analyzed a total of 2680 women aged between 35 and 70 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric indices, fasting glucose, and lipid profile were measured. The MetS was assessed by the modified NCEP-ATPIII definition. Results. The mean values of waist circumference, blood pressure, plasma lipids, and fasting glucose were significantly higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women, a difference that was no longer present when adjusting for age. Except for hypertriglyceridaemia, the frequency of central obesity, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol was significantly higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. After adjusting for age, the significance persisted only for hyperglycemia. The overall prevalence of MetS was 35.9%, higher in postmenopausal (45.7% versus 25.6% than in premenopausal women. A binary logistic regression analysis showed that menopause was independently associated with MetS (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.10–1.82 after adjusting for age, residence area, marital status, family history of cardiovascular disease, education level, and occupation. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that the MetS is highly prevalent in this group of women. Menopause can be a predictor of MetS independent of age in Tunisian women.

  7. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  8. Associations between resident perceptions of the local residential environment and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Katherine; Paquet, Catherine; Howard, Natasha; Coffee, Neil; Hugo, Graeme; Taylor, Anne; Adams, Robert; Daniel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A substantial body of research has arisen concerning the relationships between objective residential area features, particularly area-level socioeconomic status and cardiometabolic outcomes. Little research has explored residents' perceptions of such features and how these might relate to cardiometabolic outcomes. Perceptions of environments are influenced by individual and societal factors, and may not correspond to objective reality. Understanding relations between environmental perceptions and health is important for the development of environment interventions. This study evaluated associations between perceptions of local built and social environmental attributes and metabolic syndrome, and tested whether walking behaviour mediated these associations. Individual-level data were drawn from a population-based biomedical cohort study of adults in Adelaide, South Australia (North West Adelaide Health Study). Participants' local-area perceptions were analysed in cross-sectional associations with metabolic syndrome using multilevel regression models (n = 1, 324). A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure evaluated whether walking mediated these associations. Metabolic syndrome was negatively associated with greater local land-use mix, positive aesthetics, and greater infrastructure for walking, and was positively associated with greater perceived crime and barriers to walking. Walking partially mediated associations between metabolic syndrome and perceived environmental features. Initiatives targeting residents' perceptions of local areas may enhance the utility of environmental interventions to improve population health.

  9. [Clinical and pathological features of Alport syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun-Hua; Huang, Song-Ming; Wu, Hong-Mei; Bao, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ying; Han, Yuan; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Zhen

    2010-03-01

    To study the clinical and pathological features of Alport syndrome in children. The clinical and histopathological data of 10 hospitalized children with Alport syndrome from February 2007 to February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 7 males and 3 females, with the age ranging from 2 years to 6 years and 7 months (mean 3 years and 2 months). Five of 10 cases had positive family history. X-linked dominant inheritance Alport syndrome was diagnosed in 8 cases, and autosomal recessive inheritance Alport syndrome in 2 cases. Recurrent gross hematuria was found in 5 cases, hematuria and proteinuria in 3 cases, massive proteinuria in 1 case, and nephritic syndrome in 1 case. Under the light microscope, 8 cases presented with mesangial proliferation glomerulonephritis, and 2 cases with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Immunofluorescence assay showed that all cases had IgM deposition in glomerulus. Only 1 case showed typical glomerular basement membrane (GBM) pathological changes. All cases showed abnormal alpha-chain distribution in renal collagen IV. The children with Alport syndrome have diverse clinical manifestations. Characteristic histopathological presentations could not be found under a light microscope, mesangial proliferation glomerulonephritis is the dominant pathological change, and IgM deposition in glomerulus is common. The GBM pathological change in children is not common. Immunofluorescence assay of alpha-chain in collagen IV is needed for the diagnosis of Alport syndrome.

  10. Effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Eom, Jin-Sup; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Brain volume progressively decreases with an increase in atrophy, and the brain becomes more susceptible to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Metabolic syndrome has also been associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline. This study was part of a longitudinal study conducted on Koreans aged 60 years or older. We analyzed a final sample of 596 Korean participants with complete baseline and 2-year follow-up data. The cognitive function of the subjects was assessed using the Korean version of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Head circumference was measured from the glabella to the occipital protuberance using a measuring tape. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the NCEP-ATP III standards. Central obesity was assessed on the basis of waist-circumference values, in accordance with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region report on Asians. We used a longitudinal factorial design in which the MMSE score was the dependent variable, and head circumference and metabolic syndrome were considered as factors. After adjusting the results for age, gender, education, height, weight, baseline MMSE, and number of follow-up years, we observed that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome were independently associated with rapid cognitive decline. All these findings suggest that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome have additive effects on cognitive decline. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Occupation-Related Differences in the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chaparro, Miguel-Angel; Calvo-Bonacho, Eva; González-Quintela, Arturo; Fernández-Labandera, Carlos; Cabrera, Martha; Sáinz, Juan-Carlos; Fernández-Meseguer, Ana; Banegas, José R.; Ruilope, Luis-Miguel; Valdivielso, Pedro; Román-García, Javier

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Spanish working population and determine how the prevalence varies according to occupation and sex. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a cross-sectional study of 259,014 workers (mean age 36.4 years, range [16–74]; 72.9% male) who underwent a routine medical checkup. The Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) definition for metabolic syndrome was used. RESULTS—The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 11.6% (95% CI 11.5–11.7) in male subjects and 4.1% (4.0–4.2) in female subjects and increased with age. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varied in the different categories of occupational activity depending on the sex considered. Among female subjects, the age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in blue-collar than in white-collar workers, but this difference was not evident among male workers. CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies in the different categories of occupational activity in the Spanish working population. This variation also depends on sex. PMID:18753667

  12. Metabolic syndrome in asthmatic patients of hazara division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Kazim, S.M.; Gillani, S.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common disease and most asthmatics are obese. Both asthma and obesity are showing parallel trends in their increasing prevalence. Obesity is also the main component of metabolic syndrome and several studies have shown metabolic syndrome to be associated with bronchial asthma. The present study was, therefore, designed to determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome among patients with chronic asthma in our setup. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Department of Medicine, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from May to November, 2014. One hundred and fifty-four asthmatic patients were enrolled in this study. Samples for blood glucose, triglycerides and HDL Cholesterol were taken after an overnight fast. Sitting blood pressure was measured with mercury sphygmomanometer after 10 minutes of rest. Waist circumference was measured at the level of the midpoint between the high point of the iliac crest and the last rib. Results: Out of 154 patients, 80 were males and 74 were females. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 46 (29.87 percent) patients. When metabolic syndrome was stratified according to age, sex and duration of asthma, the results were found to be insignificant (p-0.89, 0.30 and 0.85). Conclusion: This study showed that metabolic syndrome was present in almost one third of study population. (author)

  13. Relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: which clinical arguments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome are growing epidemics associated with an increased risk for many types of cancer. In the liver, inflammatory and angiogenic changes due to insulin resistance and fatty liver disease are associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Regardless of underlying liver disease, cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) although are cases of HCC arising without cirrhosis raise the possibility of a direct carcinogenesis secondary to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Moreover, metabolic syndrome and its different features may also increase the risk of HCC in the setting of chronic liver diseases of other causes such as viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Taking into account all these data, it is necessary to better determine the risk of developing HCC in patients with metabolic syndrome to improve the screening guidelines and develop prophylactic treatments in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome among Type-2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of three out of five conditions that are due to hyperinsulinemia: abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and/or low HDL), elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. The syndrome is highly prevalent in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus ...

  15. Inborn errors of metabolism in children referred with Reye's Syndrome: a changing pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, P.C.; Valle, D.; Brusilow, S.W.

    1988-12-02

    Genetic disorders were identified infrequently among children presenting Reye's syndrome in the past. During a two-year period, the authors evaluated four consecutive patients referred for intensive care of Reye's syndrome. A standard investigation for inborn errors of metabolism revealed that two patients had enzymatic defects of fatty acid oxidation, and the other two had partial deficiencies of ornithine transcarbamoylase. None had experienced a previous episode of Reye's syndrome, and three of the four had been entirely healthy in the past. Their experience suggests that as the incidence of Reye's syndrome has decreased, patients with its clinical features are not more likely to have manageable inborn errors of metabolism (eg, disorders of ureagenesis, ketogenesis, and branched-chain amino acids).

  16. Metabolic syndrome: frequency and gender differences at an out-patient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, F.; Qureshi, R.; Borhany, T.; Hamza, H.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome among patients attending an out-patient clinic of a teaching hospital and to compare the clinical features regarding metabolic syndrome among males and females. All adults, above 25 years, attending the clinics for an executive check-up and giving informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured questionnaire administered to those eligible to participate. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to ATP-III guidelines. There were 250 participants in this study. Mean age of study participants was 48.94 (SD10.62) years, while approximately two-thirds, 157 (62.8%), were male. Metabolic syndrome (those who had 3 or more risk factors) was present in 35.2% of adults. Fasting blood sugar level was raised in 36.4% of study participants while significant number of participants (78.8%) had a Body Mass Index (BMI) Z 25 (p = 0.02). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was significantly high in this study with preponderance of males and prevalence similar to that observed in developed countries. Majority of patients had obesity and high fasting blood sugar levels. Males demonstrated higher levels of triglycerides and low levels of High-density lipoprotein (HDL) compared to females while blood pressure reading was observed to be the same in both males and females. (author)

  17. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin, S.; Gondal, G.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  18. What do we know about metabolic syndrome in adolescents with PCOS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cırık, Derya Akdağ; Dilbaz, Berna

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy of reproductive-aged women that manifests itself with a variety of features. For this reason, three different diagnostic criteria have been introduced. For adults, the National Institutes of Health Conference (NIH) criteria, which consists of hyperandrogenism and oligo-anovulation, is the most widely used. Symptoms of PCOS usually start with puberty and may overlap with normal pubertal development. Hormonal fluctuations during this period make the diagnosis of PCOS more difficult. Until now, there is no validated diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents. Although menstrual disorders and cosmetic problems are the most common complaints of adolescents with PCOS, patients should also be evaluated for the potential risk for insulin resistance, obesity, subclinical atherosclerosis, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is the most prominent predictor of metabolic syndrome. As the incidence of obesity is increasing both in childhood and adolescence, governments will be faced with a social and economic burden in the future. Adolescents with PCOS are more obese than normal adolescents and have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. It is suggested that abdominal adiposity increases the risk of metabolic syndrome by inducing various cytokine secretions. Although there is no consensus on metabolic syndrome criteria in the adolescent period, International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria may be used for children older than 10 years. Various clinical and metabolic markers are investigated for the prediction of metabolic syndrome in the literature. Waist circumference, serum triglycerides and androgens are the suspected predictors of metabolic syndrome. The prevention of abdominal adiposity and the early diagnosis of PCOS in adolescence should be the main target for the prevention of metabolic syndrome. Clinicians should investigate adolescents with PCOS for metabolic and

  19. What do we know about metabolic syndrome in adolescents with PCOS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cırık, Derya Akdağ; Dilbaz, Berna

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy of reproductive-aged women that manifests itself with a variety of features. For this reason, three different diagnostic criteria have been introduced. For adults, the National Institutes of Health Conference (NIH) criteria, which consists of hyperandrogenism and oligo-anovulation, is the most widely used. Symptoms of PCOS usually start with puberty and may overlap with normal pubertal development. Hormonal fluctuations during this period make the diagnosis of PCOS more difficult. Until now, there is no validated diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents. Although menstrual disorders and cosmetic problems are the most common complaints of adolescents with PCOS, patients should also be evaluated for the potential risk for insulin resistance, obesity, subclinical atherosclerosis, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Obesity is the most prominent predictor of metabolic syndrome. As the incidence of obesity is increasing both in childhood and adolescence, governments will be faced with a social and economic burden in the future. Adolescents with PCOS are more obese than normal adolescents and have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. It is suggested that abdominal adiposity increases the risk of metabolic syndrome by inducing various cytokine secretions. Although there is no consensus on metabolic syndrome criteria in the adolescent period, International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria may be used for children older than 10 years. Various clinical and metabolic markers are investigated for the prediction of metabolic syndrome in the literature. Waist circumference, serum triglycerides and androgens are the suspected predictors of metabolic syndrome. The prevention of abdominal adiposity and the early diagnosis of PCOS in adolescence should be the main target for the prevention of metabolic syndrome. Clinicians should investigate adolescents with PCOS for metabolic and

  20. Descriptive epidemiology of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbuba, Sharmin; Mohsin, Fauzia; Rahat, Farhana; Nahar, Jebun; Begum, Tahmina; Nahar, Nazmun

    2018-01-04

    The study was done to assess the magnitude of problems of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescents. It was a cross-sectional study done from January 2013 to June 2014 in paediatric endocrine outpatient department in BIRDEM General Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total 172 adolescents having exogenous obesity aged 10-18 years were included. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) were defined as per WHO criteria.The adolescents having Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥95th centile were classified as obese.Waist circumference was measured at the level midway between the lower rib margin & the iliac crest, at the level of umbilicus with the person breathing out gently in centimeter. Hip circumference was measured at the maximum width over the buttocks at the level of the greater trochanters in centimeter. Among 172 obese adolescents, metabolic syndrome was found in 66 patients (38.4%). The commonest metabolic abnormality among those having metabolic syndrome was low HDL level (77.3%) followed by high triglyceride level(71.2%). Glucose intolerance (IFG and/or IGT) was found in 16.7%, Type 2 DM in 10.6%, systolic hypertension in 10.7% and diastolic hypertension in 12.1%. Triglyceride (p = 0.042) and Cholesterol level (p = 0.016) were significantly higher and HDL-cholesterol level (p = 0.000) was significantly lower among obese adolescents having metabolic syndrome. Less physical activity (p = 0.04) was significantly related to the development of metabolic syndrome. On logistic regression analysis male sex, family history of obesity and low HDL-cholesterol correlated to metabolic syndrome. The High rate of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescents is alarming. Copyright © 2018 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents with phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane C. Kanufre

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that patients with PKU and excess weight are potentially vulnerable to the development of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct clinical and laboratory monitoring, aiming to prevent metabolic changes, as well as excessive weight gain and its consequences, particularly cardiovascular risk.

  2. Prevalence of lipodystrophy and metabolic syndrome among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Checklists were used for reviewing charts about clinical manifestations of metabolic abnormalities and immunologic profile of patients. Data was cleaned, entered in and analyzed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. Results: Metabolic syndrome was detected in 21.1% and HIV-lipodystrophy was detected 12.1% of ...

  3. Association of pre-eclampsia with metabolic syndrome and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preeclampsia has been linked to increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. The best approach for the prevention of CVD after preeclampsia is yet unclear. Studies assessing CVD risk post preeclampsia have included metabolic risk factors that define the metabolic syndrome (MS). This review quantifies the ...

  4. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among apparently healthy adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of multiple metabolic abnormalities that increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a resultant severe economic implication.This study assessed the burden of MetS in a Nigerian rural community setting. Method: This was a cross-sectional, community ...

  5. Contributory role of adenosine deaminase in metabolic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Several metabolic pathways have been reported to be deregulated in the metabolic syndrome especially the immune system (Nieman et al, 1999). Lymphocyte numbers and proliferation responses were reported to be altered in obese subjects and genetically obese animals (Tanaka et al, 1998). Cytokine balance was also ...

  6. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents - criteria for diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, there has been a greater concern about the presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. It is evident that each component of the syndrome must be identified as early as possible in order to prevent definitive lesions. The question is how to do this and which cut-offs must be adopted for this diagnosis. For a matter of convenience, the d...

  7. Seizures as an Atypical Feature of Beal’s Syndrome

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    Nazreen B. K. Jaman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital contractural arachnodactyly, commonly known as Beal’s syndrome, is an extremely rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-2 (FBN2 gene located on chromosome 5q23. It is an autosomal dominant inherited connective tissue disorder characterised by a Marfan-like body habitus, contractures, abnormally shaped ears and kyphoscoliosis. We report a seven-year-old Omani male who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2014 with seizures. He was noted to have certain distinctive facial features and musculoskeletal manifestations; he was subsequently diagnosed with Beal’s syndrome. Sequencing of the FBN2 gene revealed that the patient had a novel mutation which was also present in his mother; however, she had only a few facial features indicative of Beal’s syndrome and no systemic involvement apart from a history of childhood seizures. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of Beal’s syndrome with seizure symptoms as a potential feature.

  8. Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome: New insights on craniofacial and dental features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadh, Wael; Kiukkonen, Anu; Nieminen, Pekka; Arte, Sirpa; Hurmerinta, Kirsti; Rice, David P

    2017-04-01

    Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome is a rare condition characterized by bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), eyelid abnormalities, and oligodontia. Despite orofacial clefting and oligodontia being central features of the condition, detailed reports of dental and craniofacial characteristics are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze the dental and craniofacial features in a group of patients with BCD syndrome (three of which were related). Cephalometric radiographic analyses were performed on BCD syndrome patients (all radiographs taken at age 8 years) and compared to 40 randomly selected age-matched controls (20 non-syndromic BCLP, 20 non-cleft). Also, we assessed clinical records, photographs, dental study casts, and dental radiographs to determine the extent and pattern of tooth agenesis, dental morphology and malocclusion. BCD syndrome patients showed a very severe skeletal III malocclusion (maxillary-mandibular sagittal discrepancy) and reduced anterior lower face measurement compared to non-syndromic BCLP and non-cleft controls (P = 0.001, P = 0.027). All patients exhibited oligodontia (mean number of missing permanent teeth 13.7, range 7-17). All patients exhibited missing upper central and lateral incisor, upper canine and premolar teeth. Variations in dental morphology included taurodontism, conical-shaped teeth, and notching of the incisal edges. All patients had a short and narrow maxilla which translated into anterior and posterior cross bites. We conclude that, in our BCD syndrome group, the craniofacial skeletal defects are more severe than patients with BCLP. The pattern of tooth agenesis is unusual as it included teeth that are normally highly resistant to agenesis, namely upper central incisor and canine teeth. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia-Vine, M. M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B.; Bustos, A.; Cabello, J.

    2001-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a type of sepsis caused by anaerobes that is secondary to a pharyngotonsillar infection complicated by suppurative thrombophlebitis of ipsilateral jugular vein and septic emboli. Imaging studies are valuable tools for confirming the diagnosis. Chest x-ray reveals poorly defined cavitated, peripheral, nodular lesions. computed tomography (CT) is useful in confirming the pulmonary lesions, which are suggestive of septic emboli. Doppler ultrasound of the neck plays and indispensable role in demonstrating the internal jugular vein thrombosis. We report the case of patient who presented the characteristic clinical and radiological features of Lemierre's syndrome. (Author) 17 refs

  10. The role of interleukin-18 in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seljeflot Ingebjørg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metabolic syndrome is thought to be associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation, and a growing body of evidence suggests that interleukin-18 (IL-18 might be closely related to the metabolic syndrome and its consequences. Circulating levels of IL-18 have been reported to be elevated in subjects with the metabolic syndrome, to be closely associated with the components of the syndrome, to predict cardiovascular events and mortality in populations with the metabolic syndrome and to precede the development of type 2 diabetes. IL-18 is found in the unstable atherosclerotic plaque, in adipose tissue and in muscle tissue, and is subject to several regulatory steps including cleavage by caspase-1, inactivation by IL-18 binding protein and the influence of other cytokines in modulating its interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of IL-18 in the metabolic syndrome, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular risk and the potential effect of life style interventions.

  11. Epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome in urban West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasthi Narayan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metabolic syndrome is one of the emerging health problems of the world. Its prevalence is high in urban areas. Though pathogenesis is complex, but the interaction of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, dietary, and genetic factors are known as contributing factors. Community-based studies were very few to find out the prevalence or predictors of the syndrome. Objectives: To ascertain the prevalence and epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: A total of 690 study subjects were chosen by 30 clusters random sampling method from 43 wards of Durgapur city. Data were analyzed in SPSS version 20 software and binary logistic regression was done to find out statistical significance of the predictors. Results: Among 32.75% of the study population was diagnosed as metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition with a modification for Asia Pacific cut-off of waist circumference. Odds were more among females (2.43, upper social class (14.89, sedentary lifestyle (17.00, and positive family history. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high in urban areas of Durgapur. Increased age, female gender, higher social status, sedentary lifestyle, positive family history, and higher education were the statistically significant predictors of metabolic syndrome.

  12. Epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome in urban West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sasthi Narayan; Roy, Sunetra Kaviraj; Rahaman, Md Abdur

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is one of the emerging health problems of the world. Its prevalence is high in urban areas. Though pathogenesis is complex, but the interaction of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, dietary, and genetic factors are known as contributing factors. Community-based studies were very few to find out the prevalence or predictors of the syndrome. To ascertain the prevalence and epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome. A total of 690 study subjects were chosen by 30 clusters random sampling method from 43 wards of Durgapur city. Data were analyzed in SPSS version 20 software and binary logistic regression was done to find out statistical significance of the predictors. Among 32.75% of the study population was diagnosed as metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition with a modification for Asia Pacific cut-off of waist circumference. Odds were more among females (2.43), upper social class (14.89), sedentary lifestyle (17.00), and positive family history. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high in urban areas of Durgapur. Increased age, female gender, higher social status, sedentary lifestyle, positive family history, and higher education were the statistically significant predictors of metabolic syndrome.

  13. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome.

  14. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hideto; Fueki, Noboru; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Sakuragawa, Norio; Iio, Masaaki (National Central Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on six patients with the Rett syndrome and the results were compared with the concurrent clinical status of the patients. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) was low in five patients, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was low in four patients; both had a tendency to decline with advancing age. Although the cause is unknown, it is suggested that impaired oxidative metabolism exists in the Rett syndrome. An analysis of the distribution among brain regions showed that the ratios of values for the frontal cortex to those for the temporal cortex for both the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO{sub 2} were lower than those for the controls, which may indicate the loss of of hyperfrontality in the Rett syndrome. Distribution of brain metabolism may be immature in the Rett syndrome. (author).

  15. Cardiovascular Changes in Animal Models of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre M. Lehnen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a group of risk factors that directly contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance seems to have a fundamental role in the genesis of this syndrome. Over the past years to the present day, basic and translational research has used small animal models to explore the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and to develop novel therapies that might slow the progression of this prevalent condition. In this paper we discuss the animal models used for the study of metabolic syndrome, with particular focus on cardiovascular changes, since they are the main cause of death associated with the condition in humans.

  16. Correlation of uric acid levels and parameters of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibičková, Ľ; Langová, K; Vaverková, H; Kubíčková, V; Karásek, D

    2017-07-18

    Hyperuricemia has been described as associated with the risk of development metabolic syndrome; however the relationship between the uric acid level and particular parameters of metabolic syndrome remained unclear. We performed a cross-sectional study on a cohort of 833 dyslipidemic patients and correlated their levels of uric acid with parameters of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, C-reactive protein, anthropometric parameters. We also defined patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype and compered their uric acid levels with those without this phenotype. We found that levels of uric acid are associated with parameters of metabolic syndrome. Specifically, dyslipidemia characteristic for metabolic syndrome (low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides) correlates better with uric acid levels than parameters of insulin resistance. Also waist circumference correlates better with uric acid levels than body mass index. Patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype had higher levels of uric acid when compared with patients without this phenotype. Serum uric acid levels are even in low levels linearly correlated with parameters of metabolic syndrome (better with typical lipid characteristics than with parameters of insulin resistance) and could be associated with higher cardiovascular risk.

  17. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among elderly Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, María Araceli; Yáñez-Velasco, Lucía; Carnevale, Alessandra; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Bernal, Demetrio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rojas, Rosalba; Villa, Antonio; Tur, Josep A

    2017-11-01

    One of the most prevalent chronic diseases among elderly population is the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MetS and associated factors among Mexican elderly people. Cross-sectional survey carried out in Mexico (2007). A random sample (n=516) of the elderly population (≥65years; 277 female, 239 male) was interviewed. Anthropometric and analytical measurements, and a general questionnaire incorporating questions related to socio-demographic and life-style factors were used. MetS definition AHA/NHLBI/IDF was applied. The prevalence of MetS in the elderly (≥65years) was of 72.9% (75.7% men; 70.4% women). Participants with values above MetS cut-off points were 92.4% (hypertension), 77.8% (hypertriglyceridemia), 77.1% (low HDL-cholesterol), 71.1% (hyperglycaemia), and 65.4% (central obesity). People with MetS showed higher values of anthropometric and biochemical variables than those without MetS, except for the height, cholesterol and creatinine. Mid-high education level (9-12 years), no smokers and former smokers, and Central-Western inhabitants of Mexico were associated with MetS components. BMI status was the main determinant of MetS prevalence and MetS components. The reported prevalence of MetS among the elderly Mexican population was higher than those previously obtained in the geographical area, showing a major public health problem in Mexican elders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iúri Amorim de Santana

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer among men in Brazil. Recently, several studies have hypothesized a relationship between PCa and metabolic syndrome (MS. The aim here was to identify an association between MS and PCa. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, Fundação de Beneficência Hospital de Cirurgia (FBHC and Universidade Federal de Sergipe. METHODS: Laboratory and anthropometric parameters were compared between PCa patients (n = 16 and controls (n = 16. RESULTS: The PCa patients showed significantly greater frequency of MS than did the controls (p = 0.034. Serum glucose was higher and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was lower than in the controls, although without significant differences. There were significant differences in blood pressure (p = 0.029 and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.004. Pearson linear correlation showed a positive association between waist-to-hip ratio and prostate specific antigen (r = 0.584 and p = 0.028. Comparing subgroups with and without MS among the PCa patients, significant differences (p < 0.05 in weight, height, body mass index, hip circumference and lean body mass were observed, thus showing higher central obesity in those with MS. The serum glucose values were also higher in MS patients (p = 0.006, thus demonstrating that insulin resistance has a role in MS physiopathology. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that MS may exert an influence on the development of PCa. However, it would be necessary to expand the investigation field with larger sample sizes and cohorts studied, to test the hypothesis generated in this study.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease

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    Anis Belarbia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul′s University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6% was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI. CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

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    Belarbia, Anis; Nouira, Safa; Sahtout, Wissal; Guedri, Yosra; Achour, Abdellatif

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul's University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia) over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6%) was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV) impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  1. Links between nutrition, drug abuse, and the metabolic syndrome.

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    Virmani, Ashraf; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed; Gaetani, Franco

    2006-08-01

    Nutritional deficiency in combination with drug abuse may increase risk of developing the metabolic syndrome by augmenting cell damage, excitotoxicity, reducing energy production, and lowering the antioxidant potential of the cells. We have reviewed here the following points: effects of drugs of abuse on nutrition and brain metabolism; effects of nutrition on actions of the drugs of abuse; drug abuse and probability of developing metabolic syndrome; role of genetic vulnerability in nutrition/drug abuse and brain damage; and the role of neuroprotective supplements in drug abuse. Nutrition education is an essential component of substance abuse treatment programs and can enhance substance abuse treatment outcomes. The strategies available, in particular the nutritional approach to protect the drug abusers from the metabolic syndrome and other diseases are discussed.

  2. Uncoupling proteins, dietary fat and the metabolic syndrome

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    Warden Craig H

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been intense interest in defining the functions of UCP2 and UCP3 during the nine years since the cloning of these UCP1 homologues. Current data suggest that both UCP2 and UCP3 proteins share some features with UCP1, such as the ability to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential, but they also have distinctly different physiological roles. Human genetic studies consistently demonstrate the effect of UCP2 alleles on type-2 diabetes. Less clear is whether UCP2 alleles influence body weight or body mass index (BMI with many studies showing a positive effect while others do not. There is strong evidence that both UCP2 and UCP3 protect against mitochondrial oxidative damage by reducing the production of reactive oxygen species. The evidence that UCP2 protein is a negative regulator of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells is also strong: increased UCP2 decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion ultimately leading to β-cell dysfunction. UCP2 is also neuroprotective, reducing oxidative stress in neurons. UCP3 may also transport fatty acids out of mitochondria thereby protecting the mitochondria from fatty acid anions or peroxides. Current data suggest that UCP2 plays a role in the metabolic syndrome through down-regulation of insulin secretion and development of type-2 diabetes. However, UCP2 may protect against atherosclerosis through reduction of oxidative stress and both UCP2 and UCP3 may protect against obesity. Thus, these UCP1 homologues may both contribute to and protect from the markers of the metabolic syndrome.

  3. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

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    Thang S Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a special constellation of reversible major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main, diagnostic, components are reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose, all of which are related to weight gain, specifically intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation and a large waist circumference. Using internationally adopted arbitrary cut-off values for waist circumference, having metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease, but offers an effective treatment approach through weight management. Metabolic syndrome now affects 30–40% of people by age 65, driven mainly by adult weight gain, and by a genetic or epigenetic predisposition to intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation related to poor intra-uterine growth. Metabolic syndrome is also promoted by a lack of subcutaneous adipose tissue, low skeletal muscle mass and anti-retroviral drugs. Reducing weight by 5–10%, by diet and exercise, with or without, anti-obesity drugs, substantially lowers all metabolic syndrome components, and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking should be corrected as a priority. Anti-diabetic agents which improve insulin resistance and reduce blood pressure, lipids and weight should be preferred for diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery offers an alternative treatment for those with BMI ≥ 40 or 35–40 kg/m 2 with other significant co-morbidity. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is expected to rise along with the global obesity epidemic: greater emphasis should be given to effective early weight-management to reduce risk in pre-symptomatic individuals with large waists.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

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    Amanda Oliva Gobato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI, body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR index for values above 3.16. The analysis of ROC curves was used to assess the BMI and the abdominal circumference, aiming to identify the subjects with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The cutoff point corresponded to the percentage above the reference value used to diagnose obesity. Results: The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 45.5% of the patients and insulin resistance, in 29.1%. Insulin resistance showed association with HDL-cholesterol (p=0.032 and with metabolic syndrome (p=0.006. All body composition indicators were correlated with insulin resistance (p<0.01. In relation to the cutoff point evaluation, the values of 23.5 and 36.3% above the BMI reference point allowed the identification of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The best cutoff point for abdominal circumference to identify insulin resistance was 40%. Conclusions: All body composition indicators, HDL-cholesterol and metabolic syndrome showed correlation with insulin resistance. The BMI was the most effective anthropometric indicator to identify insulin resistance.

  5. Effect of metformin on exercise capacity in metabolic syndrome.

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    Paul, Abi Albon; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Thabah, Molly Mary; George, Melvin; Chandrasekaran, Indumathi; Gunaseelan, Vikneswaran; Selvarajan, Sandhiya

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors with increased predilection towards occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Currently physical exercise and management with metformin are the prevailing treatment modalities for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome have been found to have reduced exercise capacity over a period of time. Likewise metformin has been shown to decrease exercise capacity among healthy volunteers. Hence this study aims to evaluate the effect of metformin on the exercise capacity of patients with metabolic syndrome. Prospective study with 6 weeks follow up. Newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome and to be started on Table Metformin 500mg twice a day were recruited for the study after obtaining written informed consent. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (CPET) was done at baseline before the subjects were started on metformin and after 6 weeks of treatment using cardiopulmonary exercise testing apparatus (ZAN600). Fifteen treatment naïve patients with metabolic syndrome completed six weeks of therapy with metformin. In these patients oxygen uptake [VO2] showed statistically significant decrease from 1.10±0.44 at baseline to 0.9±0.39 (l/min) after six weeks of treatment with metformin [mean difference of -0.20 (-0.31 to -0.09); P=0.001]. Similarly oxygen uptake/kg body weight [VO2/Kg] showed a significant decrease from 14.10±4.73 to 11.44±3.81 (mlkg -1 min -1 ) at the end of six weeks of treatment [mean difference of -2.66 (-4.06 to -1.26); P=0.001]. Six weeks of treatment with metformin significantly decreases exercise capacity in newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

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    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  7. Comparative evaluation of the influence of diabetic retinopathy progression factors on indices of lipid metabolism in metabolic syndrome

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    L.Yu. Pуlуpenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The search and study of new risk factors for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DRP and their modifying influence on the components of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM remain relevant. The purpose was to conduct a comparative evaluation of the impact of certain DRP development factors on indices of lipid metabolism in metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The research was carried out in 64 patients (95 eyes with T2DM, metabolic syndrome and DRP (males and females, average age 61.55 ± 2.37 years, average duration of diabetes 11.23 ± 2.11 years, average level of HbA1c 9.89 ± 0.78 %, average body mass index 34.55 ± 3.75 kg/m2, who were divided into 3 groups depending on the stage of DRP. Results. Results had showed that the following factors have modifying influence on the level of total cholesterol in the blood of patients with T2DM and DRP: age of patients (under 60 years, duration of diabetes (less than 10 years, decompensation of carbohydrates metabolism — for the 3rd stage of DRP, features of therapy for T2DM (oral hypoglycemic drugs — for the 2nd stage of DRP; on the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: younger age of patients, decompensation of diabetes — for the 3rd stage of DRP, features of hypoglycemic therapy (insulin therapy, shorter duration of diabetes — for the 2nd stage of DRP; on the level of triglycerides: age of patients (under 60 years, duration of diabetes (less than 10 years and insulin therapy — for the 1st and 3rd stages of DRP. Conclusions. It is concluded that features of hypoglycemic therapy can be a new modifying factor for the risk of DRP progression.

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome is positively related to metabolic syndrome: a population-based cross-sectional study.

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    Yinting Guo

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome is a common gastrointestinal disorder that may affect dietary pattern, food digestion, and nutrient absorption. The nutrition-related factors are closely related to metabolic syndrome, implying that irritable bowel syndrome may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, few epidemiological studies are available which are related to this potential link. The purpose of this study is to determine whether irritable bowel syndrome is related to metabolic syndrome among middle-aged people. We designed a cross-sectional study of 1,096 subjects to evaluate the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome and its components. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was based on the Japanese version of the Rome III Questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American Heart Association scientific statements of 2009. Dietary consumption was assessed via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Principal-components analysis was used to derive 3 major dietary patterns: "Japanese", "sweets-fruits", and "Izakaya (Japanese Pub "from 39 food groups. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome were 19.4% and 14.6%, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the dietary pattern factor score tertiles and irritable bowel syndrome. After adjustment for potential confounders (including dietary pattern, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides for subjects with irritable bowel syndrome as compared with non-irritable bowel syndrome are 2.01(1.13-3.55 and 1.50(1.03-2.18, respectively. Irritable bowel syndrome is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and it components. This study is the first to show that irritable bowel syndrome was significantly related to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides among an adult population. The findings suggest that

  9. Intranasal Insulin Restores Metabolic Parameters and Insulin Sensitivity in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Derkach, K V; Ivantsov, A O; Chistyakova, O V; Sukhov, I B; Buzanakov, D M; Kulikova, A A; Shpakov, A O

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effect of 10-week treatment with intranasal insulin (0.5 IU/day) on glucose tolerance, glucose utilization, lipid metabolism, functions of pancreatic β cells, and insulin system in the liver of rats with cafeteria diet-induced metabolic syndrome. The therapy reduced body weight and blood levels of insulin, triglycerides, and atherogenic cholesterol that are typically increased in metabolic syndrome, normalized glucose tolerance and its utilization, and increased activity of insulin signaling system in the liver, thus reducing insulin resistance. The therapy did not affect the number of pancreatic islets and β cells. The study demonstrates prospects of using intranasal insulin for correction of metabolic parameters and reduction of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  10. Multimodal Ultrawide-Field Imaging Features in Waardenburg Syndrome.

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    Choudhry, Netan; Rao, Rajesh C

    2015-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman was referred for bilateral irregular fundus pigmentation. Dilated fundus examination revealed irregular hypopigmentation posterior to the equator in both eyes, confirmed by fundus autofluorescence. A thickened choroid was seen on enhanced-depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI SD-OCT). Systemic evaluation revealed sensorineural deafness, telecanthus, and a white forelock. Further investigation revealed a first-degree relative with Waardenburg syndrome. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by a group of features including telecanthus, a broad nasal root, synophrys of the eyebrows, piedbaldism, heterochromia irides, and deafness. Choroidal hypopigmentation is a unique feature that can be visualized with ultrawide-field fundus autofluorescence. The choroid may also be thickened and its thickness measured with EDI SD-OCT. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Application of alternative anthropometric measurements to predict metabolic syndrome

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    Gul Sagun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The association between rarely used anthropometric measurements (e.g., mid-upper arm, forearm, and calf circumference and metabolic syndrome has not been proven. The aim of this study was to assess whether mid-upper arm, forearm, calf, and waist circumferences, as well as waist/height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio, were associated with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: We enrolled 387 subjects (340 women, 47 men who were admitted to the obesity outpatient department of Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital between September 2010 and December 2010. The following measurements were recorded: waist circumference, hip circumference, waist/height ratio, waist-to-hip ratio, mid-upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, calf circumference, and body composition. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure plasma glucose, lipids, uric acid, insulin, and HbA1c. RESULTS: The odds ratios for visceral fat (measured via bioelectric impedance, hip circumference, forearm circumference, and waist circumference/hip circumference were 2.19 (95% CI, 1.30-3.71, 1.89 (95% CI, 1.07-3.35, 2.47 (95% CI, 1.24-4.95, and 2.11(95% CI, 1.26-3.53, respectively. The bioelectric impedance-measured body fat percentage correlated with waist circumference only in subjects without metabolic syndrome; the body fat percentage was negatively correlated with waist circumference/hip circumference in the metabolic syndrome group. All measurements except for forearm circumference were equally well correlated with the bioelectric impedance-measured body fat percentages in both groups. Hip circumference was moderately correlated with bioelectric impedance-measured visceral fat in subjects without metabolic syndrome. Muscle mass (measured via bioelectric impedance was weakly correlated with waist and forearm circumference in subjects with metabolic syndrome and with calf circumference in subjects without metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Waist

  12. Obesity-driven gut microbiota inflammatory pathways to metabolic syndrome

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    Luiz Henrique Agra eCavalcante-Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signalling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome.

  13. [Cardiovascular risk parameters, metabolic syndrome and alcohol consumption by workers].

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    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; López González, Ángel Arturo; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, María Victoria; Capdevila-García, Luisa; Terradillos-García, María Jesús; Aguilar-Jiménez, Encarna

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of alcohol consumption is high in the general population and generates specific problems at the workplace. To establish benchmarks between levels of alcohol consumption and cardiovascular risk variables and metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional study of 7,644 workers of Spanish companies (2,828 females and 4,816 males). Alcohol consumption and its relation to cardiovascular risk was assessed using Framingham calibrated for the Spanish population (REGICOR) and SCORE, and metabolic syndrome was assessed using modified ATPIII and IDF criteria and Castelli and atherogenic index and triglycerides/HDL ratio. A multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression and odds ratios were estimated. Statistically significant differences were seen in the mean values of the different parameters studied in prevalence of metabolic syndrome, for both sexes and with modified ATPIII, IDF and REGICOR and SCORE. The sex, age, alcohol, and smoking variables were associated to cardiovascular risk parameters and metabolic syndrome. Physical exercise and stress are only associated to with some of them. The alcohol consumption affects all cardiovascular risk parameters and metabolic syndrome, being more negative the result in high level drinkers. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome and its lipid complications

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    T Binesh Marvasti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity epidemic has been spread all over the world in the past few decades and has caused a major public health concern due to its increasing global prevalence. Obese individuals are at higher risks of developing dyslipidemic characteristics resulting in increased triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol content and reduced HDL-cholesterol levels. This disorder has profound implications as afflicted individuals have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of development of hypertension, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Today, this phenotype is designated as metabolic syndrome. According to the criteria set by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, for a patient to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, the person must have central obesity plus any two of the following conditions: raised TG, reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised blood pressure, and increased fasting plasma glucose. Current National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III guidelines for the treatment of patients with the metabolic syndrome encourage therapies that lower LDL cholesterol and TG and raise HDL-cholesterol. Primary intervention often involves treatment with statins to improve the lipid profiles of these patients. However, recent studies suggest the potential of newly identified drugs including thiazolidinediones, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors that seem to be promising in reducing the level of progression of metabolic syndrome related disorders. This review discusses the current pharmacological treatments of the metabolic syndrome with the above mentioned drugs.

  15. Salivary uric acid as a noninvasive biomarker of metabolic syndrome

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    Soukup Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated serum uric acid is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Because a linear relationship exists between serum and salivary uric acid (SUA concentration, saliva testing may be a useful noninvasive approach for monitoring cardiometabolic risk. The goal of this pilot study was to determine if SUA is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate correlations between SUA and individual cardiometabolic risk factors. Findings Volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 without conditions known to affect serum uric acid levels were recruited. Height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured and a full lipid panel along with fasting blood glucose was obtained. Saliva samples were collected and uric acid levels were determined. 78 volunteers, 35% of whom had metabolic syndrome, completed the study. SUA was significantly elevated in patients with metabolic syndrome (p=.002. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the 4th quartile for SUA was 67% compared to 25% in quartiles1-3 combined. Significant correlations were seen between SUA and systolic blood pressure (r=.440, p=.000, diastolic blood pressure ( r=.304, p=.007, waist circumference (r=.332, p=.003, BMI ( r=.269, p=.018, fasting blood glucose ( r=.341, p=.002, triglycerides (r=.410, p=.000, HDL ( r=.237, p=.036 and the number of cardiometabolic risk factors present (r=0.257, p=.023. Conclusions These results suggest that SUA may be a useful biomarker for noninvasive monitoring of cardiometabolic risk. Larger studies are needed to validate this approach.

  16. Salivary uric acid as a noninvasive biomarker of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Maria; Biesiada, Izabela; Henderson, Aaron; Idowu, Benmichael; Rodeback, Derek; Ridpath, Lance; Bridges, Edward G; Nazar, Andrea M; Bridges, Kristie Grove

    2012-04-19

    Elevated serum uric acid is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Because a linear relationship exists between serum and salivary uric acid (SUA) concentration, saliva testing may be a useful noninvasive approach for monitoring cardiometabolic risk. The goal of this pilot study was to determine if SUA is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate correlations between SUA and individual cardiometabolic risk factors. Volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 without conditions known to affect serum uric acid levels were recruited. Height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured and a full lipid panel along with fasting blood glucose was obtained. Saliva samples were collected and uric acid levels were determined. 78 volunteers, 35% of whom had metabolic syndrome, completed the study. SUA was significantly elevated in patients with metabolic syndrome (p=.002). The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the 4th quartile for SUA was 67% compared to 25% in quartiles1-3 combined. Significant correlations were seen between SUA and systolic blood pressure (r=.440, p=.000), diastolic blood pressure ( r=.304, p=.007), waist circumference (r=.332, p=.003), BMI ( r=.269, p=.018), fasting blood glucose ( r=.341, p=.002), triglycerides (r=.410, p=.000), HDL ( r=.237, p=.036) and the number of cardiometabolic risk factors present (r=0.257, p=.023). These results suggest that SUA may be a useful biomarker for noninvasive monitoring of cardiometabolic risk. Larger studies are needed to validate this approach.

  17. Assessing validity of serum cystatin C for predicting metabolic syndrome.

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    Asefy, Zahra; Mirinejad, MirMoosa; Amirrasooli, Hooshang; Tagikhani, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Serum concentration of cystatin C a marker of glomerular filtration has been associated with Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate cystatin C as a marker of diabetic kidney disease in normoalbuminuric diabetic patients without Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). The study population consisted of 65 subjects with metabolic syndrome and 32 subjects free of metabolic syndrome (control group). HDL-C, LDL-C, blood urea, triglycerides, glucose, HbA1c, serum cystatin C and serum creatinine were measured in both groups. GFR was calculated in both groups using Cockrofta Gault equation. Metabolic syndrome presented higher cystatin C levels than normal samples (0.98 8 0.26 1.24 8 0.24 p metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with elevated cystatin C levels. Diabetic patients also presented a slightly greater creatinine (1.11 8 0.09 1.04 0.15 p metabolic syndrome and may identify a certain degree of renal dysfunction even when serum creatinine does not exceed normal level.

  18. How coffee affects metabolic syndrome and its components.

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    Baspinar, B; Eskici, G; Ozcelik, A O

    2017-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome, with its increasing prevalence, is becoming a major public health problem throughout the world. Many risk factors including nutrition play a role in the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Of the most-consumed beverages in the world, coffee contains more than 1000 components such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. It has been proven in many studies that coffee consumption has a positive effect on chronic diseases. In this review, starting from the beneficial effects of coffee on health, the relationship between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome and its components has been investigated. There are few studies investigating the relationship between coffee and metabolic syndrome, and the existing ones put forward different findings. The factors leading to the differences are thought to stem from coffee variety, the physiological effects of coffee elements, and the nutritional ingredients (such as milk and sugar) added to coffee. It is reported that consumption of coffee in adults up to three cups a day reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  19. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Iran: A 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshad, Sina; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Etemad, Koorosh; Meysamie, Alipasha; Afarideh, Mohsen; Khajeh, Elias; Asgari, Fereshteh; Mousavizadeh, Mostafa; Rafei, Ali; Neishaboury, Mohamadreza; Ghajar, Alireza; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its individual components among the Iranian adult population in 2011 and to investigate changes between 2007 and 2011. Data from two rounds of the Surveillance of Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases national surveys conducted in 2007 and 2011 were pooled. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. In 2007, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among adults aged 25-64 years was 35.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.27-37.63), which decreased to 32.96 (95% CI 30.73-35.18) in 2011 (P = 0.0108). Despite this overall decline, the prevalence of central obesity (P = 0.1383), raised triglycerides (P = 0.3058), and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P = 0.5595) remained constant. There was a trend towards a decline in the proportion of individuals with increased blood pressure (P = 0.0978), and the proportion of adults with increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased (P metabolic syndrome has decreased slightly in Iran, although prevalence of increased FPG has increased significantly. One-third of the Iranian adult population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. [The use of various diet supplements in metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicińska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Maćczak, Aneta; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-01-09

    Civilization development is associated with immense progress in science and significant improvement of human living conditions but simultaneously it contributes to many health problems including metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a set of mutually associated factors including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, lipids disorders and hypertension, which is the main cause of development of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The first line of defense against metabolic syndrome is a change of life style including body mass reduction, application of a low-calorie diet and performance of physical activity. In spite of the simplicity of therapy, long-term success of the above treatment among patients is observed seldom because it is very difficult to obey rigorous rules. Nowadays, it is considered that diet supplements including antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids and mineral elements are helpful in metabolic syndrome treatment due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is considered that a health balanced diet enriched with various diet supplements may be the best strategy in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  1. The use of various diet supplements in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Sicińska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Civilization development is associated with immense progress in science and significant improvement of human living conditions but simultaneously it contributes to many health problems including metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a set of mutually associated factors including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, lipids disorders and hypertension, which is the main cause of development of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The first line of defense against metabolic syndrome is a change of life style including body mass reduction, application of a low-calorie diet and performance of physical activity. In spite of the simplicity of therapy, long-term success of the above treatment among patients is observed seldom because it is very difficult to obey rigorous rules. Nowadays, it is considered that diet supplements including antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids and mineral elements are helpful in metabolic syndrome treatment due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is considered that a health balanced diet enriched with various diet supplements may be the best strategy in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  2. The metabolic vascular syndrome - guide to an individualized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Markolf; Pistrosch, Frank; Bornstein, Stefan R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2016-03-01

    In ancient Greek medicine the concept of a distinct syndrome (going together) was used to label 'a group of signs and symptoms' that occur together and 'characterize a particular abnormality and condition'. The (dys)metabolic syndrome is a common cluster of five pre-morbid metabolic-vascular risk factors or diseases associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, fatty liver disease and risk of cancer. The risk for major complications such as cardiovascular diseases, NASH and some cancers develops along a continuum of risk factors into clinical diseases. Therefore we still include hyperglycemia, visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension as diagnostic traits in the definition according to the term 'deadly quartet'. From the beginning elevated blood pressure and hyperglycemia were core traits of the metabolic syndrome associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus metabolic and vascular abnormalities are in extricable linked. Therefore it seems reasonable to extend the term to metabolic-vascular syndrome (MVS) to signal the clinical relevance and related risk of multimorbidity. This has important implications for integrated diagnostics and therapeutic approach. According to the definition of a syndrome the rapid global rise in the prevalence of all traits and comorbidities of the MVS is mainly caused by rapid changes in life-style and sociocultural transition resp. with over- and malnutrition, low physical activity and social stress as a common soil.

  3. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome

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    Zhou Shi-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body’s total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body’s antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body’s total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin’s antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn and metabolic syndrome are also discussed.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, S.; Naveed, T.; Shakoor, T.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Cross-sectional, descriptive study. A total of 100 subjects with ischemic heart disease, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Demographic data (age and gender) and the 5 component conditions of the metabolic syndrome were noted. Subjects were physically assessed for the abdominal obesity, based on waist circumference. Fasting blood samples for glucose and lipid profile in first 24 hours after acute coronary insult were drawn and tested in central laboratory. Variables were processed for descriptive statistics. In this study population, 68% were male and 32% were female with mean age of 52 +-13.6 years in men and 56 +- 12.5 years in women. Frequency of metabolic syndrome was 32% in men and 28% in women. It increased with age. The highest rate of metabolic syndrome was in men diagnosed as STEMI (odds ratio: 3.39, 95% CI=1.36-8.41). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was high among the patients with IHD. It supports the potential for preventive efforts in persons with high-risk of IHD. (author)

  5. The use of various diet supplements in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Sicińska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Civilization development is associated with immense progress in science and significant improvement of human living conditions but simultaneously it contributes to many health problems including metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a set of mutually associated factors including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, lipids disorders and hypertension, which is the main cause of development of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The first line of defense against metabolic syndrome is a change of life style including body mass reduction, application of a low-calorie diet and performance of physical activity. In spite of the simplicity of therapy, long-term success of the above treatment among patients is observed seldom because it is very difficult to obey rigorous rules. Nowadays, it is considered that diet supplements including antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids and mineral elements are helpful in metabolic syndrome treatment due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is considered that a health balanced diet enriched with various diet supplements may be the best strategy in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  6. A practical "ABCDE" approach to the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Michael J; Bansal, Sandeep; Rouf, Rosanne; Golden, Sherita H; Blumenthal, Roger S; Defilippis, Andrew P

    2008-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus that are due to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. This increasingly important proinflammatory condition remains both underrecognized and undertreated. To aid physicians in their approach to the metabolic syndrome, we assessed and synthesized the literature on cardiovascular risk assessment and early intervention for risk reduction. We performed a comprehensive search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database for peer-reviewed clinical studies published from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2007, augmented by consultation with content experts. We used the search terms metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, waist circumference, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, prediabetes, diabetes, treatment, prevention, aspirin, hypertension, cholesterol, atherogenic dyslipidemia, lifestyle therapy, diet, and exercise. Criteria used for study review were controlled study design, English language, relevance to clinicians, and validity based on experimental design and appropriateness of conclusions. Although growing evidence supports early intervention in patients with the metabolic syndrome, many physicians do not recognize the risk associated with this condition and fail to initiate early treatment. A comprehensive management plan can be assembled through an "ABCDE" approach: "A" for assessment of cardiovascular risk and aspirin therapy, "B" for blood pressure control, "C" for cholesterol management, "D" for diabetes prevention and diet therapy, and "E" for exercise therapy. This ABCDE approach provides a practical and systematic framework for encouraging metabolic syndrome recognition and for implementing a comprehensive, evidence-based management plan for the reduction of cardiovascular risk.

  7. Justice at Work and Metabolic Syndrome: the Whitehall II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, David; Tabák, Ádám G.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Shipley, Martin J.; De Vogli, Roberto; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence shows that high levels of justice are beneficial for employee health, although biological mechanisms underlying this association are yet to be clarified. We aim to test whether high justice at work protects against metabolic syndrome. Methods A prospective cohort study of 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II study) including 6123 male and female British civil servants aged 35 to 55 years without prevalent CHD at baseline (1985-1990). Perceived justice at work was determined by means of questionnaire on two occasions between 1985 and 1990. Follow-up for metabolic syndrome and its components occurring from 1990 through 2004 was based on clinical assessments on three occasions over more than 18 years. Results Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, ethnicity and employment grade showed that men who experienced a high level of justice at work had a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome than employees with a low level of justice (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.89). There was little evidence of an association between organizational justice and metabolic syndrome or its components in women (hazard ratio 0.88; 95%CI: 0.67-1.17). Conclusions Our prospective findings provide evidence of an association between high levels of justice at work and the development of metabolic syndrome in men. PMID:19819861

  8. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ahmad, T.; Hussain, S.J.; Javed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity and Ischaemic Heart Disease have become a problem of public health magnitude with substantial economic burden both in the developed as well as the developing countries. Obesity is quite frequent in Type 2 diabetics and also plays a central role in causing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Metabolic Syndrome significantly increases the incidence of cardiovascular complications. This study was done to determine the frequency of MetS in our Type 2 diabetic patients as most of the components of MetS can be modified and identifying/managing these at an early stage might be of considerable help in reducing cardiovascular complications. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in Medical B and Medical A wards of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Nov, 08 to April, 09. Type 2 Diabetic patients aged above 40 years who gave informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome was estimated according to the IDF consensus worldwide definition of the MetS. Results: Of the 100 patients enrolled in this study 56 were females and 44 were males with a mean age of 59.9 years. Out of these 100 participants seventy six (76%) were diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Of the 56 females, forty eight (85.71%) were having metabolic syndrome while twenty eight (63.63%) of the 44 male participants were having the syndrome. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: Frequency of MetS was found to be significantly high in this study with female preponderance. All the components, except Hypertension were more frequent in females. Diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome need more aggressive approach in management so as to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular complications. (author)

  9. [The metabolic syndrome: effects of a pronounced weight loss induced by bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Julia; Hanusch-Enserer, Ursula; Prager, Rudolf; Patsch, Josef R; Ebenbichler, Christoph

    2005-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising worldwide dramatically, affecting up to 50 percent of the population. The epidemic of obesity leads to a marked increase in the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors characterized by visceral obesity, insulin resistance, low HDL-Cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, and a subclinical proinflammatory state. In the last years, the NCEP and the WHO highlighted and defined the key features of the metabolic syndrome to facilitate the clinical diagnosis and preventive interventions. The conservative therapy of obesity and the metabolic syndrome by life style intervention and pharmacological interventions leads only to moderate weight loss with inconstant long-term success. Intervention by bariatric surgery can serve as a model for the metabolic effects of permanent weight loss. In several studies the pronounced weight loss induced a reduction of almost all components of the metabolic syndrome, including glucose and lipid status and is followed by an improvement in the quality of life. Recent research suggested a decrease in mortality rate in addition to cost effectiveness of bariatric surgery.

  10. Beta-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

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    Pérez-Fuentes

    2010-08-01

    subjects in the control group (n = 254 was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190. Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR, and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05 of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D. This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D.Conclusion: The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases.Keywords: insulin sensitivity, insulin resistance, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, b-cell function

  11. Association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Mi; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Cho, Hye Min; Oh, Sun Min; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il

    2012-05-01

    Serum uric acid levels have been reported to be associated with a variety of cardiovascular conditions. However, the direct association between uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome remains controversial. Thus, we evaluated the association of serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome in a community-based cohort study in Korea. We performed cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of 889 males and 1491 females (aged 38 to 87) who participated in baseline examinations of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study: Kanghwa study. Blood samples were collected after at least an 8 hour fast. Uric acid quartiles were defined as follows: Metabolic syndrome was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Criteria with adjusted waist circumference cutoffs (90 cm for males; 80 cm for females). The association between serum uric acid quartiles and metabolic syndrome was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. The odds ratio for having metabolic syndrome in the highest versus lowest quartiles of serum uric acid levels was 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 4.46) in males and 2.14 (95% CI, 1.50 to 3.05) in females after adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index, total cholesterol, HbA1c, albumin, γ-glutamyltransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and log C-reactive protein. The number of metabolic abnormalities also increased gradually with increasing serum uric acid levels (adjusted p for trend uric acid levels are positively associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in Korean males and females.

  12. Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features and lipodystrophy (MDPL) syndrome in the context of inherited lipodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinier, Frederic; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Hanna, David; Smith, Josh D; Valentini, Maria; Zara, Ilenia; Berutti, Riccardo; Sanna, Serena; Oppo, Manuela; Cusano, Roberto; Satta, Rosanna; Montesu, Maria Antonietta; Jones, Chris; Cerimele, Decio; Nickerson, Deborah A; Angius, Andrea; Cucca, Francesco; Cottoni, Francesca; Crisponi, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Lipodystrophies are a large heterogeneous group of genetic or acquired disorders characterized by generalized or partial fat loss, usually associated with metabolic complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. Many efforts have been made in the last years in identifying the genetic etiologies of several lipodystrophy forms, although some remain to be elucidated. We report here the clinical description of a woman with a rare severe lipodystrophic and progeroid syndrome associated with hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes whose genetic bases have been clarified through whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis. This article reports the 5th MDPL (Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome) patient with the same de novo p.S605del mutation in POLD1. We provided further genetic evidence that this is a disease-causing mutation along with a plausible molecular mechanism responsible for this recurring event. Moreover we overviewed the current classification of the inherited forms of lipodystrophy, along with their underlying molecular basis. Progress in the identification of lipodystrophy genes will help in better understanding the role of the pathways involved in the complex physiology of fat. This will lead to new targets towards develop innovative therapeutic strategies for treating the disorder and its metabolic complications, as well as more common forms of adipose tissue redistribution as observed in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasonographic evaluation of liver volume and the metabolic syndrome in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, F; Giannetti, M; Mazzeo, S; Fierabracci, P; Scartabelli, G; Marsili, A; Valeriano, R; Pucci, A; Anselmino, M; Zampa, V; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A

    2007-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common finding in obese subjects, and increasing evidence has been provided suggesting that it represents the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the extent of liver enlargement is related to the severity of the metabolic syndrome in obese women. The relationship between ultrasound- measured hepatic left lobe volume (HLLV) and various features of the metabolic syndrome was evaluated in 85 obese women. The mean+/-SD value of HLLV in obese women was 431+/-214 ml (range 46-1019 ml) while it was 187+/-31 ml (range 143-258 ml) in lean subjects. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, ultrasound-measured intra-abdominal fat was the only anthropometric measure independently associated with HLLV. A strong positive association was found between HLLV and serum liver enzymes, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, uric acid, C reactive protein, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while a negative correlation was observed between HLLV and HDL cholesterol. The values of HLLV corresponding to the cut-off values of various risk factors for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome were calculated, yielding a mean value of 465 ml. In conclusion, ultrasound measurement of HLLV represents a simple, reliable and low-cost tool for the evaluation of liver involvement in the metabolic syndrome. The strong association between liver enlargement and various cardiovascular risk factors associated with insulin resistance supports the role of liver steatosis as an important link among the many facets of the metabolic syndrome in human obesity.

  14. WATER AND SALT METABOLISM IN THE GERIATRIC SYNDROMES

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    Carlos G. Musso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Geriatrics has already described four syndromes of its own: confusional syndrome, incontinence (fecal and/or urinary, and gait disorders and immobility syndrome, naming them geriatric giants. This name reflects their prevalence and great importance in the elderly. Ageing process induces many changes in renal physiology such as a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (senile hyponatremia, and water and sodium reabsorbtion capability. Besides, there are particular water and salt metabolism alteration characteristics of the geriatric syndromes, such as dehydration and hypernatremia in psychiatric disturbances as well as hyponatremia in patients suffering from immobility syndrome. The geriatric giants and nephrogeriatric physiology changes, are a good example of feed-back between geriatric syndromes, clinical entities characteristics in the elderly that predispose and potentiate each other, leading to catastrophic clinical events.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease

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    Vaia D. Raikou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Methods: 149 patients (77 males/72 females were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results: The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x2 = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x2 = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6–17.8 higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2–8.8 higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1–11.3. Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x2 = 11.8, p = 0.003, x2 = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x2 = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively, and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x2 = 5.7, p = 0.06. A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x2 = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x2 = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively was found. Conclusion: The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  16. The insulin-like growth factor I system: physiological and pathophysiological implication in cardiovascular diseases associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Anversa, Piero

    2015-02-15

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. A number of theories have been speculated for the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome including impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, interrupted neurohormonal regulation and compromised intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Recent evidence has revealed that adults with severe growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) deficiency such as Laron syndrome display increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular diseases. IGF-1 signaling may regulate contractility, metabolism, hypertrophy, apoptosis, autophagy, stem cell regeneration and senescence in the heart to maintain cardiac homeostasis. An inverse relationship between plasma IGF-1 levels and prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as associated cardiovascular complications has been identified, suggesting the clinical promises of IGF-1 analogues or IGF-1 receptor activation in the management of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms between IGF-1 and metabolic syndrome are still poorly understood. This mini-review will discuss the role of IGF-1 signaling cascade in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in particular the susceptibility to overnutrition and sedentary life style-induced obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and other features of metabolic syndrome. Special attention will be dedicated in IGF-1-associated changes in cardiac responses in various metabolic syndrome components such as insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The potential risk of IGF-1 and IGF-1R stimulation such as tumorigenesis is discussed. Therapeutic promises of IGF-1 and IGF-1 analogues including mecasermin, mecasermin rinfabate and PEGylated IGF-1 will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ERICA: prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Schaan, Beatriz; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício T L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS We evaluated 37,504 adolescents who were participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, school-based, national study. The adolescents, aged from 12 to 17 years, lived in cities with populations greater than 100,000 inhabitants. The sample was stratified and clustered into schools and classes. The criteria set out by the International Diabetes Federation were used to define metabolic syndrome. Prevalences of metabolic syndrome were estimated according to sex, age group, school type and nutritional status. RESULTS Of the 37,504 adolescents who were evaluated: 50.2% were female; 54.3% were aged from 15 to 17 years, and 73.3% were from public schools. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 2.6% (95%CI 2.3-2.9), slightly higher in males and in those aged from 15 to 17 years in most macro-regions. The prevalence was the highest in residents from the South macro-region, in the younger female adolescents and in the older male adolescents. The prevalence was higher in public schools (2.8% [95%CI 2.4-3.2]), when compared with private schools (1.9% [95%CI 1.4-2.4]) and higher in obese adolescents when compared with nonobese ones. The most common combinations of components, referring to 3/4 of combinations, were: enlarged waist circumference (WC), low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) and high blood pressure; followed by enlarged WC, low HDL-c and high triglycerides; and enlarged WC, low HDL-c, high triglycerides and blood pressure. Low HDL was the second most frequent component, but the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome (26.8%) was observed in the presence of high triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS ERICA is the first Brazilian nation-wide study to present the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and describe the role of its components. Despite the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome being low, the high prevalences of some

  18. Insulin Signaling, Resistance, and the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Mouse Models to Disease Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaodong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major underlying mechanism for the “metabolic syndrome”, which is also known as insulin resistance syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is increasing at an alarming rate, becoming a major public and clinical problem worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is represented by a group of interrelated disorders, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. It is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and increased morbidity and mortality. Animal studies demonstrate that insulin and its signaling cascade normally control cell growth, metabolism and survival through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphotidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), of which activation of PI-3K-associated with insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 (IRS1, 2) and subsequent Akt→Foxo1 phosphorylation cascade has a central role in control of nutrient homeostasis and organ survival. Inactivation of Akt and activation of Foxo1, through suppression IRS1 and IRS2 in different organs following hyperinsulinemia, metabolic inflammation, and over nutrition may provide the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome in humans. Targeting the IRS→Akt→Foxo1 signaling cascade will likely provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. This review discusses the basis of insulin signaling, insulin resistance in different mouse models, and how a deficiency of insulin signaling components in different organs contributes to the feature of the metabolic syndrome. Emphasis will be placed on the role of IRS1, IRS2, and associated signaling pathways that couple to Akt and the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxo1. PMID:24281010

  19. A newborn with overlapping features of AEC and EEC syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celik, T.H.; Buyukcam, A.; Simsek-Kiper, P.O.; Utine, G.E.; Ersoy-Evans, S.; Korkmaz, A.; Yntema, H.G.; Bodugroglu, K.; Yurdakok, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting (EEC) syndrome is the prototype of several p63 conditions, which include ankyloblepharon, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting (AEC) syndrome, limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS), ADULT syndrome, and others. All these disorders include

  20. Predicting metabolic syndrome using decision tree and support vector machine methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Alavijeh, Farzaneh; Jalili, Saeed; Sadeghi, Masoumeh

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome which underlies the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes is considered as a group of metabolic abnormalities including central obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Recently, artificial intelligence based health-care systems are highly regarded because of its success in diagnosis, prediction, and choice of treatment. This study employs machine learning technics for predict the metabolic syndrome. This study aims to employ decision tree and support vector machine (SVM) to predict the 7-year incidence of metabolic syndrome. This research is a practical one in which data from 2107 participants of Isfahan Cohort Study has been utilized. The subjects without metabolic syndrome according to the ATPIII criteria were selected. The features that have been used in this data set include: gender, age, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, hip circumference, physical activity, smoking, hypertension, antihypertensive medication use, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, fasting blood sugar, 2-hour blood glucose, triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on ATPIII criteria and two methods of decision tree and SVM were selected to predict the metabolic syndrome. The criteria of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were used for validation. SVM and decision tree methods were examined according to the criteria of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 0.774 (0.758), 0.74 (0.72) and 0.757 (0.739) in SVM (decision tree) method. The results show that SVM method sensitivity, specificity and accuracy is more efficient than decision tree. The results of decision tree method show that the TG is the most important feature in predicting metabolic syndrome. According

  1. Equine metabolic syndrome in Colombian creole horse: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Castillo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The equine metabolic syndrome is a condition that can be recognized because of obesity, insulin resistance and laminitis. Genetic factors could play a role in the occurrence of this syndrome. Certain breeds such as ponies (including the South American creole horses have a lower sensibility to insulin and a higher prevalence of hyperinsulinemia. The environment and management conditions, such as overfeeding and lack of exercise are factors that bring a propensity for obesity. The adipose tissue works as an endocrine organ producing hormones (adipokines or adipocytokines that affect the horse´s metabolism. The objective of this report is to describe the first case report of a Colombian creole mare with a metabolic syndrome, diagnosed by means of the combined test of glucose-insulin and clinical signs. Early diagnosis of this entity and an adequate treatment are useful for improving the life and the zootechnical conditions of the patient.

  2. [Obesity or overweight and metabolic syndrome in Mexico City teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Yamamoto-Kimura, Liria; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Caracas-Portilla, Nacú A; Posadas-Romero, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    aim: To know the metabolic syndrome and its components prevalence in Mexico City adolescents sample. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 772 men and 1078 women, 12 to 16 years old, from 8 randomly selected public junior high schools in Mexico City. Anthropometric variables, lipids, lipoproteins, Apo AI and B, glucose and insulin were determined. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 12.5%, 11.15% in men and 13.5% en women (p ns). The most frequently metabolic syndrome component found in México City adolescents was low HDL-C levels (38%), followed by hypertriglyceridemia (25.5%), hypertension (19.2%), central obesity (11.8%) and elevated fasting glucose (1.7). Except by the hypertriglyceridemia, higher in woman than in men, 28.2% vs. 21.6%, p obesity in Mexico City adolescents, increases the risk of premature development of coronary atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus in this population.

  3. A new course in the clinical pathways for metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Shoko; Wada, Yumi; Nakamura, Rie

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is consisted with multiple risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension based on visceral fat accumulation, for the development of arteriosclerosis. We present, here, a clinical pathway for education of patients with metabolic syndrome. The program contains an adequate explanation of the high risk for arteriosclerosis to the patients, the measurement of visceral fat content by computed tomography, and several clinical examinations for the evaluation of arteriosclerotic lesions. We have presented this program on the ward of diabetes center in our hospital for patients diagnosed as having metabolic syndrome. Because the focus of education is to clarify understanding of the harmful effects of visceral fat and the benefits of its reduction, it might be a valuable tool to motivate and empower the patient and improve the patient's lifestyle. (author)

  4. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among an urban population in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduka, Lydia U; Kombe, Yeri; Kenya, Eucharia; Kuria, Elizabeth; Bore, John K; Bukania, Zipporah N; Mwangi, Moses

    2012-04-01

    Developing countries are undergoing an epidemiologic transition accompanied by increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) linked to urbanization and lifestyle modifications. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of CVD risk factors whose extent in Kenya remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and factors associated with its occurrence among an urban population in Kenya. This was a household cross-sectional survey comprising 539 adults (aged ≥18 years) living in Nairobi, drawn from 30 clusters across five socioeconomic classes. Measurements included waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triacylglycerides (TAGs), fasting glucose, and blood pressure. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 34.6% and was higher in women than in men (40.2 vs. 29%; P Kenya. The Kenyan government needs to create awareness, develop prevention strategies, and strengthen the health care system to accommodate screening and management of CVDs.

  5. [Is the metabolic syndrome a new childhood disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, M; Mullis, P E; Flück, C E

    2006-03-29

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents have become a major public health problem in recent years throughout the world. The medical consequences of obesity may manifest as an increase in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents putting them at increased risk for future cardiovascular diseases. Obesity can cause insulin resistance and might disturb glucose homeostasis eventually leading to type 2 diabetes in susceptible patients. Insulin resistance is also involved in the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in obese children characteristically presenting as hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol. Even elevated blood pressure might be present in obese kids. Here we present a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with the metabolic syndrome. The diagnostic criteria of the metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents are discussed. Thoughts about pathophysiology and therapeutic options are offered.

  6. Personality as a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommersteeg, Paula M C; Pouwer, Francois

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Personality can be defined as a stable set of behavioral characteristics of a person. In this review we systematically reviewed whether different personality...... characteristics are associated with the risk of having or developing the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Systematic review. RESULTS: In total 18 studies were included. Thirteen cross-sectional analyses, and ten longitudinal analyses were grouped according to personality constructs: hostility, anger, and Type...... A behavior, temperament, neuroticism, and Type D personality. Conflicting evidence was reported on persons with high hostility, neuroticism, or Type D personality scores to be associated with an increased metabolic syndrome prevalence and development. All significant findings do point in the same direction...

  7. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  8. Fecal microbiota transplantation in metabolic syndrome: History, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, P F; Frissen, M N; de Clercq, N C; Nieuwdorp, M

    2017-05-04

    The history of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) dates back even to ancient China. Recently, scientific studies have been looking into FMT as a promising treatment of various diseases, while in the process teaching us about the interaction between the human host and its resident microbial communities. Current research focuses mainly on Clostridium difficile infections, however interest is rising in other areas such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the metabolic syndrome. With regard to the latter, the intestinal microbiota might be causally related to the progression of insulin resistance and diabetes. FMT in metabolic syndrome has proven to be an intriguing method to study the role of the gut microbiota and open the way to new therapies by dissecting in whom insulin resistance is driven by microbiota. In this article we review the history of FMT, the present evidence on its role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and its efficacy, limitations and future prospects.

  9. Self-injurious behavior in Rett syndrome: interactions between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C; Murphy, G; Crayton, L; Corbett, J

    1993-03-01

    Operant and biological theories of the cause of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in people with a mental handicap are often viewed as mutually exclusive. In this single case study, interactions between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning as determinants of SIB are examined. Functional analysis by analog methodology indicated different functions for two forms of SIB shown by the subject: automatic reinforcement by sensory stimulation and escape from social interactions. It is suggested that features of Rett syndrome established conditions under which operant conditioning of self-injurious responding was maximized. The implications of this interaction between features of syndromes and operant conditioning for the conceptualization of the cause of SIB are discussed and it is proposed that the notion of a unitary cause of SIB is inappropriate. It is more productive to consider operant conditioning as the process that maintains responding against a background of predisposing and mediating factors which may be biologically determined.

  10. Comparison of metabolic syndrome with growing epidemic syndrome Z in terms of risk factors and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, Meral; Davutoğlu, Vedat; Aydın, Neriman; Filiz, Ayten

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare metabolic syndrome with syndrome Z growing epidemic in terms of risk factors, demographic variables, and gender differences in our large cohort at southeastern area in Turkey. Data of patients admitted to sleep clinic in University of Gaziantep from January 2006 to January 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. ATP III and JNC 7 were used for defining metabolic syndrome and hypertension. Data of 761 patients were evaluated. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in patients with syndrome Z than in patients without metabolic syndrome. Age, waist/neck circumferences, BMI, triglyceride, glucose, and Epworth sleepiness scale score were detected higher, whereas the minimum oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome was more common in sleep apneic subjects than in controls (58 versus 30 %). Female sleep apneics showed higher rate of metabolic syndrome than those of males (74 versus 52 %). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and left ventricular hypertrophy were detected higher in males with syndrome Z than in males without metabolic syndrome. Snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were detected higher in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Systemic/pulmonary hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Complaints of headache and systemic/pulmonary hypertension were more common among females than males with syndrome Z. Female syndrome Z patients had lower minimum oxygen saturation than male patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome in sleep apneic patients is more prevalent than in controls. All metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly different among obstructive sleep apneic patients with respect to gender with more severe

  11. Serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Wen; Chang, Tsui-Yen; Chen, Jong-Dar

    2010-06-01

    A positive association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome has been reported, but little information is available about the association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults. We performed a cross-sectional study of 2085 men and 1557 women. All of the participants underwent a health screening during the period from January 2005 to December 2005 at a health center of the Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The results showed that hyperuricemia was significantly associated with increased risk for hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and high blood pressure in men and women. The risk of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the fourth quartile than in the first quartile of uric acid level in men (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.14) and women (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.39-3.93). In addition, uric acid level was inversely associated with hyperglycemia in men. The ORs of hyperglycemia for the second, third, and fourth quartile of uric acid were 0.69 (95% CI, 0.46-1.03), 0.55 (95% CI, 0.37-0.83), and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.29-0.69), respectively, compared with the lowest quartile of uric acid. The results demonstrate that there is a positive association between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and an inverse association between uric acid and fasting plasma glucose in Taiwanese adults. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and nutrition in a Granada's tropical coast population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, S; Samaniego-Sánchez, C; Romero, A; Quesada-Granados, J J; López-García de la Serrana, H

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is described as an association of health problems that a given person may simultaneously or successively develop, and it is considered a serious condition because it is related to a significantly increased risk of suffering diabetes, coronary disease and brain damage. Nutrition, along with other factors such as physical activity and genetic inheritance, has an influence on preventing MS. The aim of this research is to demonstrate important aspects concerning the diagnosis, the prevalence, and the prevention of metabolic syndrome among the population of the tropical coast of Granada. 119 individuals from the tropical coast of Granada were studied to collect personal data such as their body mass index, body fat percentage, glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and food intake (through nutritional survey). As a result of this research, a metabolic syndrome prevalence of 20,2% was obtained, 58,3% of which was related to women. The results obtained show significant statistical differences between individuals having metabolic syndrome and the control group. Particularly, these differences can be noted in parameters such as the BMI or the % of body fat. Nevertheless, there are no significant differences between the two groups concerning parameters related to nutrition such as % of fat, carbohydrates, proteins and kcal/day. As a conclusion from the research, we can state that the metabolic syndrome prevalence among the population of the tropical coast of Granada is similar to the figure obtained for the population in the US and in other areas of Spain. In addition, this research shows that metabolic syndrome is more frequent among individuals whose BMI and % of body fat is higher than 30. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary energy density and the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaillzadeh, A; Azadbakht, L

    2011-05-01

    In a comparison of women worldwide, Iranian women were found to have the highest prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, specific characteristics of diet in Middle-Eastern countries might provide additional information on the diet-disease relations. This study was performed to assess the association between dietary energy density and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women. Usual dietary intakes were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 486 Iranian adult women by the use of a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary energy density was calculated as each individual's reported daily energy intake (kcal/d) into total weight of foods (excluding beverages) consumed (g/d). Anthropometric measures, fasting plasma glucose, serum lipid profiles and blood pressure were evaluated. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Mean dietary energy density was 1.77 ± 0.35 kcal/g. Individuals in the top tertile of dietary energy density had 80% (odds ratio: 1.80; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 3.15) greater odds of having the metabolic syndrome. Even after further adjustment for body mass index, this association remained significant. Higher dietary energy density was also significantly associated with greater odds of having abdominal adiposity (4.23; 2.51, 7.18), high-serum triacylglycerol concentrations (3.55; 2.31, 5.93) and low-serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.80; 1.13, 2.84). No overall significant associations were found between higher dietary energy density and risk of having elevated blood pressure or abnormal glucose homeostasis. Higher dietary energy density was significantly associated with a greater risk of the metabolic syndrome and most of its components. Further studies are required to focus on lowering dietary energy density as a probable strategy for preventing metabolic syndrome.

  14. [Association between metabolic syndrome and its components with presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jiarui; Wang, Ningning; Yang, Xiaoshan

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of metabolic syndrome and its components on presbycusis. Total of 165 cases and 202 controls were continuously collected in Harbin Ninth Hospital from June 2013 to August 2014, these subjects were investigated and received anthropometry and received biochemical test in hospital laboratory. Statistics analysis was adopted by χ2 test, t test and logistic regression model. Only triglyceride abnormal proportion of case group was higher than that of control group among components of metabolic syndrome, and it were associated with age-related hearing loss whether before adjustment or not after adjustment, OR (95% CI) were 1.69 (1.09-2.63) and 1.96 (1.08-3.54) respectively, and others were not associated with presbycusis. In addition, among all of the various combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss before adjustment and after adjustment, OR were 5.31 (95% CI 1.63-17.27), 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-6.85) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.04-4.18) respectively. Further more, the metabolic syndrome was not statistically associated with presbycusis, OR were 1.27 (95% CI 0.83-1.94) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.54-1.57) respectively before adjustment and after adjustment. In addition, stratified by age, the metabolic syndrome was still not statistically associated with presbycusis in each stratification, OR were 0.89 (95% CI 0.44-1.82) and 1.49 (95% CI 0.67-3.30) respectively. The triglyceride was associated with presbycusis. Among all of combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss.

  15. High-fat diet induces significant metabolic disorders in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hao; Jia, Xiao; Yu, Qiuxiao; Zhang, Chenglu; Qiao, Jie; Guan, Youfei; Kang, Jihong

    2014-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female endocrinopathy associated with both reproductive and metabolic disorders. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is currently used to induce a PCOS mouse model. High-fat diet (HFD) has been shown to cause obesity and infertility in female mice. The possible effect of an HFD on the phenotype of DHEA-induced PCOS mice is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate both reproductive and metabolic features of DHEA-induced PCOS mice fed a normal chow or a 60% HFD. Prepubertal C57BL/6 mice (age 25 days) on the normal chow or an HFD were injected (s.c.) daily with the vehicle sesame oil or DHEA for 20 consecutive days. At the end of the experiment, both reproductive and metabolic characteristics were assessed. Our data show that an HFD did not affect the reproductive phenotype of DHEA-treated mice. The treatment of HFD, however, caused significant metabolic alterations in DHEA-treated mice, including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and pronounced liver steatosis. These findings suggest that HFD induces distinct metabolic features in DHEA-induced PCOS mice. The combined DHEA and HFD treatment may thus serve as a means of studying the mechanisms involved in metabolic derangements of this syndrome, particularly in the high prevalence of hepatic steatosis in women with PCOS. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  16. Severity of periodontitis and metabolic syndrome: is there an association?

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes-Filho, Isaac Suzart; Mercês, Magno Conceição; Soares, Johelle de Santana Passos; Cruz, Simone Seixas da; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Costa, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a major factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Causal factors for MetS are not well defined or yet unidentified. Preliminary investigations suggest that infections and inflammation may be involved in the etiology of this syndrome. This study aims to estimate the association between the severity of periodontitis (exposure) and MetS (outcome). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 419 participants recruited from the Di...

  17. Epigenomics, gestational programming and risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M; Jellyman, J K; Ross, M G

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are emerging as mediators linking early environmental exposures during pregnancy with programmed changes in gene expression that alter offspring growth and development. There is irrefutable evidence from human and animal studies that nutrient and environmental agent exposures (for example, endocrine disruptors) during pregnancy may affect fetal/newborn development resulting in offspring obesity and obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities (metabolic syndrome). This concept of 'gestational programming' is associated with alterations to the epigenome (nongenomic) rather than changes in the DNA sequence (genomic). Epigenetic alterations induced by suboptimal maternal nutrition/endocrine factors include DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and/or regulatory feedback by microRNAs, all of which have the ability to modulate gene expression and promote the metabolic syndrome phenotype. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific transcriptome patterns and phenotypes not only in the exposed individual, but also in subsequent progeny. Notably, the transmission of gestational programming effects to subsequent generations occurs in the absence of continued adverse environmental exposures, thus propagating the cycle of obesity and metabolic syndrome. This phenomenon may be attributed to an extrinsic process resulting from the maternal phenotype and the associated nutrient alterations occurring within each pregnancy. In addition, epigenetic inheritance may occur through somatic cells or through the germ line involving both maternal and paternal lineages. Since epigenetic gene modifications may be reversible, understanding how epigenetic mechanisms contribute to transgenerational transmission of obesity and metabolic dysfunction is crucial for the development of novel early detection and prevention strategies for programmed metabolic syndrome. In this review we discuss the evidence in human and animal studies for the role of

  18. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available John J Chen,1,2,* Lucas J Wendel,1,3,* Emily S Birkholz,1 John G Vallone,4 Anne L Coleman,5,6 Fei Yu,7 Vinit B Mahajan1,3,8 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, 7Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: A retrospective case–control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups.Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001 (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76–10.49; P=0.0004. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates

  19. Toxigenic and metabolic causes of ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Martina M; Hajja, Waddah; Al-Khatib, Sofian; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Sreedhar, Dharmashree; Li, Rebecca Na; Wong-McKinstry, Edna; Carlson, Richard W

    2012-10-01

    Ketoacidotic syndromes are frequently encountered in acute care medicine. This article focuses on ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes associated with intoxications, alcohol abuse, starvation, and certain dietary supplements as well as inborn errors of metabolism. Although all of these various processes are characterized by the accumulation of ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis, there are differences in the mechanisms, clinical presentations, and principles of therapy for these heterogeneous disorders. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for these disorders are presented, as well as guidance regarding identification and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in college students: Differences by gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Araceli Álvarez Gasca

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in college students as well as differences between men and women are analyzed. 970 students (67.4% women, 32.6% men were randomly selected and assessed on lifestyle (EV, central obesity, and metabolic syndrome(SM. Results showed 4.63% with SM and 36.65% with obesity, women predominated. Predominant EV was good and better in men than women, highest frequency of SM was in bad EV. Relationship between gender, obesity, and SM was significant for the studied population. Differences were found between men and women.

  1. Endocrine and metabolic aspects of the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutzios, Georgios; Livadas, Sarantis; Marinakis, Evangelos; Opie, Nicole; Economou, Frangiskos; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2011-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness), is a neurodegenerative disease with autosomal recessive inheritance with incomplete penetrance. DIDMOAD is a very rare disease with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 770,000 and it is believed to occur in 1 of 150 patients with juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Additionally, WS may also present with different endocrine and metabolic abnormalities such as anterior and posterior pituitary gland dysfunction. This mini-review summarizes the variable presentation of WS and the need of screening for other metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, coexisting in this rare syndrome.

  2. On the surgical treatment of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y I Sedletsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present he results of surgical treatment of 136 patients with metabolic syndrome at long-term period of evaluation (up to 15 years. All patients had jejunoileal bypass surgery in modification prof. Y.I. Sedletsky. We show the effect of surgery on overweight, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. We've traced above changes depending on the period elapsed since the time of the operation. The results prove the efficiency and stability of effects of jejunoileal bypass surgery on components of the metabolic syndrome. Evaluation of the complications rate of this method is also presented in the article.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in non-obese Taiwanese: new definition of metabolically obese, normal-weight individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-huang

    2009-11-05

    Not only the obese, but also the non-obese adults have the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the upper normal weight. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome and its individual components in non-obese adult Taiwanese (body mass index (BMI) metabolic syndrome, defined by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (2005), were analyzed in the BMI category according to 2.0 unit increments, in individuals seeking a health examination. The higher the BMI categories, the more prevalent the metabolic syndrome was in women and in men (P metabolic syndrome in women were 1.3 (95%CI: 0.5 - 3.2) with BMI 21.0 - 22.9 kg/m(2), 3.0 (1.3 - 7.1) with BMI 23.0 - 24.9 kg/m(2), and 8.6 (3.6 - 20.8) for women with BMI 25.0 - 26.9 kg/m(2), after controlling for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, betel nut chewing, blood routine, biochemical data, hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus. The corresponding odds ratios in men were 1.6 (0.6 - 4.2), 3.7 (1.6 - 8.8), and 9.9 (4.2 - 23.2). Individuals in the upper normal weight and slightly overweight BMI range have relatively high prevalence and increased risk of having metabolic syndrome. Therefore, physicians should screen metabolic syndrome in not only obese but also non-obese individuals for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Features of Turner syndrome among a group of Cameroonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonkam, Ambroise; Veigne, Sandra W; Abass, Ali; Ngo Um, Suzanne; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Mbanya, Jean-Claude; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-06-01

    To describe the features of Turner syndrome among a group of Cameroonian patients. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with amenorrhea and/or short stature who attended the genetic unit of Yaoundé Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatric Hospital (Yaoundé, Cameroon) for a specialist consultation between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008. Sociodemographic, clinical, and cytogenetic data were collected. Turner syndrome was confirmed among 11 of the 14 participants (seven had monosomy of the X chromosome; four had mosaicism involving a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome). The mean age at diagnosis was 18.4±2.8years. The reasons for consultation were delayed puberty (n=10) and short stature (n=1). Nine patients had a short neck, nine had a forearm carrying-angle deformity, eight had a low hairline, and two had a webbed neck. Abdominal ultrasonography identified a horseshoe kidney in two patients and a rudimentary uterus in nine patients. None of the patients displayed cardiac abnormalities. Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism was reported among five patients. Eight patients did not receive hormonal treatment owing to advanced bone age or economic reasons. Late diagnosis and variable phenotypic expression were key features of Cameroonian patients with Turner syndrome. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of metabolic syndrome in patients with osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Salim, B.; Khalil, Z.; Nasim, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine association of osteoarthritis (OA) with metabolic syndrome in a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Patients were randomly interviewed in the Female Rheumatology department and a total of 240 patients with single rheumatologic disease and age >35 years were selected. Informed consent was taken and patients were interviewed using a self-made questionnaire to evaluate their medical history, physical and laboratory examination. SPSS version 17 was used to analyze the data. Results: Out of 240 subjects, 81 patients had OA and another 81 patients were randomly selected from the age and gender matched control (non-OA) group. The mean age of patients in OA and non-OA group was 56.68 ± 09.76 and 53.57 ± 11.01 years, respectively. In OA group, 48.1% and in non-OA group 22.2% of patients were falling in category of being obese/morbidly obese. According to AHA criteria for Metabolic Syndrome, percentage of OA patients labeled to have metabolic syndrome was 58.8% as compared to 19.5% in non-OA group. Conclusion: There was a strong association of metabolic syndrome with OA and would surely make a foreground for future studies to be conducted on developing preventive strategies and ultimately reducing the morbidities and mortalities associated with Metabolic Osteoarthritis. (author)

  6. Metabolic syndrome markers in wistar rats of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi Ana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent decades, metabolic syndrome has become a public health problem throughout the world. Longitudinal studies in humans have several limitations due to the invasive nature of certain analyses and the size and randomness of the study populations. Thus, animal models that are able to mimic human physiological responses could aid in investigating metabolic disease. Thus, the present study was designed to analyze metabolic syndrome markers in albino Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus of different ages. The following parameters were assessed at two (young, four ( adult, six (adult, and twelve (mature months of age: glucose tolerance (glucose tolerance test; insulin sensitivity (insulin tolerance test; fasting serum glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL cholestero, and LDL cholesterol concentrations; glucose uptake in isolated soleus muscle; and total lipid concentration in subcutaneous, mesenteric, and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. We found that aging triggered signs of metabolic syndrome in Wistar rats. For example, mature rats showed a significant increase in body weight that was associated. In addition, mature rats showed an increase in the serum concentration of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol, which is characteristic of dyslipidemia. There was also an increase in serum glucose compared with the younger groups of animals. Therefore, aging Wistar rats appear to be an interesting model to study the changes related to metabolic syndrome.

  7. An animal model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome: Nile grass rat

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Kousuke; Melhorn, Mark I.; Zandi, Souska; Frimmel, Sonja; Tayyari, Faryan; Hisatomi, Toshio; Almulki, Lama; Pronczuk, Andrzej; Hayes, K. C.; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a prevalent and complex disease, characterized by the variable coexistence of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinaemia, and hypertension. The alarming rise in the prevalence of metabolic disorders makes it imperative to innovate preventive or therapeutic measures for MetS and its complications. However, the elucidation of the pathogenesis of MetS has been hampered by the lack of realistic models. For example, the existing animal models of MetS, i.e., genetically e...

  8. Epigenetics and a new look on metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jaroslav; Vaněčková, Ivana; Mikulášková, Barbora; Behuliak, Michal; Maletínská, L.; Zicha, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 611-620 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25396A; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * epigenetics * transgenerational inheritance * gene-environmental interactions * obesity * hypertension Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  9. Epigenetics and a new look on metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jaroslav; Vaněčková, I.; Mikulášková, Barbora; Behuliak, M.; Maletínská, Lenka; Zicha, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 611-620 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08679S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * epigenetics * transgenerational inheritance * gene-environmental interactions * obesity * hypertension Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/64/64_611.pdf

  10. Townes-Brocks syndrome with overlapping features of hemifacial microsomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadavalli Guruprasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS is an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple malformations and variable expression. Major findings include external ear anomalies, hearing loss, limb deformity, imperforate anus, and renal malformations. Intelligence is usually normal, although mild moderate mental retardation has been reported. It can be difficult to differentiate clinically between hemifacial microsomia (HFM and Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS. The distinction is important because TBS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, whereas HFM is sporadic. We report a classical case of TBS with overlapping features of hemifacial microsomia in an 11 year old boy who presented with unilateral anotia with hearing defect, renal agenesis and imperforate anus by birth.

  11. Clinical Features of Miller-Fisher Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Ono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is recognized as a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS. MFS is a rare disorder that is characterized by the acute onset of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia/hyporeflexia. MFS has a higher incidence in Asia, where the incidence is estimated to be 18%–26% of GBS compared with 3%–5% in the West. The differential diagnosis of MFS includes Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE which is characterized by a clinical triad (nystagmus and ophthalmoplegia, mental status changes, and ataxia, myasthenia gravis, and brainstem stroke. The association between MFS and pregnancy has not been reported previously. Here, we describe the clinical features of a pregnant woman in early pregnancy with MFS. This case highlights the fact that it is necessary to establish an accurate diagnosis based on the details from the patient’s history on appropriate complementary testing in a pregnant patient with MFS.

  12. The Association between Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet and Metabolic Syndrome in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ghasemifard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Epidemiologic data linking adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH diet and metabolic syndrome in Iranian population is sparse. We aimed to evaluate the association between adherence to the DASH dietary pattern and risk of metabolic syndrome in a group of Isfahani female nurses. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 420 female nurses aged >30 years selected by a multistage cluster random sampling method. Usual dietary in-takes were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were drawn to measure metabolic profiles and blood pressure was recorded. Additional co-variate information was obtained using questionnaires. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III. The DASH score was constructed based on high intake of fruits, vegeta-bles, whole grains, lean meat,and low-fat dairy. The data was analyzed by SPSS18 software and one-way ANOVA, Chi-square and ANCOVA statistical tests. Results: After controlling for confounders, individuals in the highest tertile of the DASH diet score had 81% lower risk of metabolic syndrome than those in the lowest category (OR: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.07-0.96. In addition, participants in the highest tertile of adherence to DASH diet had 62, 72, 78 and 86% lower odds for enlarged waist circumference, hyper-triglyceridemia, low HDL-c levels and high blood pressure than those in the lowest tertile, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that adherence to the DASH eating plan reduced the risk of metabolic syndrome and all of its features, except hyperglycemia. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:112-121

  13. Selenium, Vanadium, and Chromium as Micronutrients to Improve Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Sunil K; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Brown, Lindsay

    2017-03-01

    Trace metals play an important role in the proper functioning of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Some of the trace metals are thus essential for maintaining homeostasis, while deficiency of these trace metals can cause disorders with metabolic and physiological imbalances. This article concentrates on three trace metals (selenium, vanadium, and chromium) that may play crucial roles in controlling blood glucose concentrations possibly through their insulin-mimetic effects. For these trace metals, the level of evidence available for their health effects as supplements is weak. Thus, their potential is not fully exploited for the target of metabolic syndrome, a constellation that increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing throughout the world, a simpler option of interventions with food supplemented with well-studied trace metals could serve as an answer to this problem. The oxidation state and coordination chemistry play crucial roles in defining the responses to these trace metals, so further research is warranted to understand fully their metabolic and cardiovascular effects in human metabolic syndrome.

  14. The Definition and Prevalence of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Increase in prevalence of obesity has become a worldwide major health problem in adults, as well as among children and adolescents. Furthermore, total adiposity and truncal subcutaneous fat accumulation during adolescence are positively and independently associated with atherosclerosis at adult ages. Centrally accumulation of body fat is associated with insulin resistance, whereas distribution of body fat in a peripheral pattern is metabolically less important. Obesity is associated with a large decrease in life expectancy. The effect of extreme obesity on mortality is greater among younger than older adults. In this respect, obesity is also associated with increased risk of several cancer types. However, up to 30% of obese patients are metabolically healthy with insulin sensitivity similar to healthy normal weight individuals, lower visceral fat content, and lower intima media thickness of the carotid artery than the majority of metabolically "unhealthy" obese patients.Abdominal obesity is the most frequently observed component of metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome; clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension, is a major public health challenge. The average prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 31%, and is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of all-cause mortality.

  15. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  16. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n=61, 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  17. Metabolic syndrome: what is it and what are the implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D I; Hall, W L; Williams, C M

    2005-08-01

    Obesity and overweight are linked with a cluster of metabolic and vascular disorders that have been termed the metabolic syndrome. Although there is not yet a universally-accepted set of diagnostic criteria, most expert groups agree that the syndrome is characterised by impaired insulin sensitivity and hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia (elevated blood triacyglycerols with depressed HDL-cholesterol), abdominal obesity and hypertension. Based on existing published criteria estimates suggest that the syndrome affects a substantial percentage of the middle-aged and elderly populations of most European countries (10-20%) and confers increased risk of type 2 diabetes (2-8.8-fold) and CVD (1.5-6-fold), as well as having a marked effect on morbidity. Although the pathophysiology is incompletely understood, insulin resistance and abdominal obesity are central to subsequent abnormalities in circulating glucose and lipoproteins, and vascular function that lead to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and CVD. The link between metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD, as well as inability to reverse the present rising rates of obesity, will lead to economically-unsustainable costs of health care in the next 10-20 years. Preventative strategies for metabolic syndrome are required to slow rates of progression and to reduce dependence on costly medical management. A notable development is recent evidence that shows that diet and exercise are more effective than drug treatment in preventing the development of type-2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. The LIPGENE project will investigate dietary fat quality as a strategy for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and identify food chain approaches that can support consumer attempts to alter their dietary patterns.

  18. Inherited lipodystrophies and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monajemi, Houshang; Stroes, Erik; Hegele, Robert A.; Fliers, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Lipodystrophies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by an abnormal subcutaneous fat distribution, the extent of which can vary from localized, to partial, to generalized lipoatrophy. Whereas partial and generalized lipodystrophies are each associated with metabolic

  19. Diet-induced metabolic syndrome model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Homayounfar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of the metabolic risk factors. In general, a person who has the metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who does not have the metabolic syndrome. High-calorie-diet rodent models have contributed significantly to the analysis of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, but their phenotype varies distinctly between different studies and maybe is not very similar to a model of the metabolic syndrome in humans. We sought to create a model in this study close to the disease in humans.   Materials & Methods: Twenty male, Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the high-calorie diet group with 416 calories per 100 grams (researcher made or the control diet group for 12 weeks. Weight changes, lipid profile, glucose, insulin levels, and QUICKI index (an indicator of insulin sensitivity were measured. Weight changes were compared using the repeated measures and the independent t-test, and serum factors were compared using the independent t-test.   Results: There was a significant change in weight, glucose, insulin, and lipid profile except for HDL at the end of the study. The QUICKI index (0.34 ± 0.02 vs. 0.40 ± 0.01; p value <0.0001 suggested that insulin resistance had been created in the high-calorie diet group.   Conclusion: The present study demonstrates the ability to make diet-induced metabolic syndrome domestically.

  20. Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome. The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24–62 years) was first standardized to a North America...

  1. The search for putative unifying genetic factors for components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, M; Lyssenko, V; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of factors contributing to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes but unifying mechanisms have not been identified. Our aim was to study whether common variations in 17 genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes or components...... of the metabolic syndrome and variants in nine genes with inconsistent association with at least two components of the metabolic syndrome would also predict future development of components of the metabolic syndrome, individually or in combination....

  2. METABOLIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS: diagnostic issues, comorbidity and side effects of antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Kozumplik, Oliver; Uzun, Suzana; Jakovljević, Miro

    2010-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in people with schizophrenia. Metabolic syndrome can contribute to significant morbidity and premature mortality and should be accounted for in the treatment of mental disorders. Along with results of numerous investigations regarding metabolic syndrome, different issues have occurred. The aim of this article is to review literature regarding diagnostic and treatment of metabolic syndrome and po...

  3. BIPOLAR DISORDER AND METABOLIC SYNDROME: COMORBIDITY OR SIDE EFFECTS OF TREATMENT OF BIPOLAR DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Babić, Dragan; Maslov, Boris; Nikolić, Katica; Martinac, Marko; Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is evidence that people with mental disorders are more likely to suffer from metabolic syndrome. In the last decades there has been an increase in interest for researching metabolic syndrome in psychiatric patients and plenty of evidence about their association. However, investigations on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with bipolar disorder are still surprisingly rare. The aim of this paper is to analyze comorbidity of bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome...

  4. Influence of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome groups on quality of life in women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Wen; Chen, I-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; zhōng yī) syndrome groups are based on the symptoms of human diseases and guide the use of Chinese herbs. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TCM syndrome groups on biochemical characteristics and quality of life (QOL) in women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Among the 1080 registered female patients screened at our outpatient clinic, a total of 322 women aged between 18 and 65 years and meeting the requirements of MS were enrolled. All the patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire on metabolic TCM syndrome groups and a questionnaire on the QOL, the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Short Form-12 (SF-12). Data of biochemical characteristics were collected at the same time. The present study showed MS women in TCM syndrome groups had significantly lower physical and mental component scores in SF-12 compared with those not in TCM syndrome groups. We also found MS patients in TCM syndrome groups, except Kidney Deficiency syndrome, showed higher body mass indexes, waist circumference, and hip circumference. However, there was almost no difference in most biochemical characteristics between TCM syndrome groups. The MS patients diagnosed as belonging to TCM syndrome groups had poor QOL.

  5. Monotherapy of experimental metabolic syndrome: I. Efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezek Štefan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma cholesterol, especially low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, is one of the major risk factors for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats (hHTG were developed as a new inbred model for the study of relationships between blood pressure and metabolic abnormalities. The aim of this work was to determine the cholesterol-lowering and antioxidant effects of the novel pyridoindol derivative SMe1EC2, compared to the cholesterol-lowering drug atorvastatin, in rats fed either standard or high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (HFC; 1% cholesterol and 7.5% lard fat. Male hHTG rats fed HFC (HTG+HFC were administered with SMe1EC2 or atorvastatin (both 50 mg/kg/day p.o. for 4 weeks. Physiological status of animals was monitored by the measurement of preprandial glucose levels and blood pressure. Lipid profile was characterized by the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC, HDL-, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides (TRG. The concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was evaluated in the kidney, liver and serum. Further, the assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6 in the serum was completed. Feeding the animals with HFC diet resulted in increased serum levels of TC, LDL and TRG. SMe1EC2 ameliorated serum levels of LDL in hHTG rats, both on standard and HFC diet. These effects were comparable with those of the standard hypolipidemicum atorvastatin. SMe1EC2 lowered blood pressure, tissue TBARS concentrations and serum IL-1 levels of HTG+HFC rats. Beneficial effects together with very good toxicity profile predestinate SMe1EC2 to be promising agent for further surveys related to metabolic syndrome features.

  6. Pulmonary embolism as the primary presenting feature of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Periwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old previously healthy male presented with subacute onset of shortness of breath and chest pain. He was diagnosed with bilateral extensive pulmonary embolism (PE. In the absence of any predisposing factors, an extensive workup for unprovoked thrombophilia was done. During the course of his illness, the patient developed anasarca and was diagnosed to be suffering from nephrotic syndrome (NS, secondary to membranous glomerulopathy. Although, thrombotic complications are commonly associated with NS, it is unusual for PE to be the primary presenting feature in these patients.

  7. Effect of metabolic syndrome on mitsugumin 53 expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Ma

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia that increases the individual's likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases. Patients inflicted with metabolic disorders also suffer from tissue repair defect. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53 is a protein essential to cellular membrane repair. It facilitates the nucleation of intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane disruption to create repair patches, contributing to the regenerative capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues upon injury. Since individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome possess tissue regeneration deficiency and MG53 plays a crucial role in restoring membrane integrity, we studied MG53 activity in mice models exhibiting metabolic disorders induced by a 6 month high-fat diet (HFD feeding. Western blotting showed that MG53 expression is not altered within the skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice with metabolic syndrome. Rather, we found that MG53 levels in blood circulation were actually reduced. This data directly contradicts findings presented by Song et. al that indict MG53 as a causative factor for metabolic syndrome (Nature 494, 375-379. The diminished MG53 serum level observed may contribute to the inadequate tissue repair aptitude exhibited by diabetic patients. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses reveal that skeletal muscle fibers of mice with metabolic disorders experience localization of subcellular MG53 around mitochondria. This clustering may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress resulting from HFD feeding and may implicate MG53 as a guardian to protect damaged mitochondria. Therapeutic approaches that elevate MG53 expression in serum circulation may be a novel method to treat the degenerative tissue repair function of diabetic patients.

  8. An update on the assessment and management of metabolic syndrome, a growing medical emergency in paediatric populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Chiara; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Carnovale, Carla; Galli, Erica; Nannini, Pilar; Cervia, Davide; Perrotta, Cristiana

    2017-05-01

    In the last decades the increasing rate of obesity in children and adolescents worldwide has led to the onset in paediatric age of metabolic syndrome, a disease commonly associated to adulthood. Central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, and hypertension are typical features of metabolic syndrome that seem to hesitate often in type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and many other clinical conditions. Thus preventing and curing metabolic syndrome in paediatric patients is becoming an urgent need for public health. While diagnostic criteria and therapy of metabolic syndrome in adults are very well defined, there is no consensus on the definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents as well as on healing approaches. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advances on the pathogenesis and clinical outcomes of paediatric metabolic syndrome. We then detail the therapeutic strategies (i.e. dietary regimens, physical exercise, nutraceuticals, and medications) employed to manage the disease. Finally, we analyse the safety profile of the drugs used in children and adolescents by performing a retrospective review of paediatric adverse reactions reported in the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System database. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and risk of restenosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterjukema, J; Monraats, PS; Zwinderman, AH; De Maat, MPM; Kastelein, JJP; Doevendans, PAF; De Winter, RJ; Tio, RA; Frants, RR; Van der Laarse, A; Van der Wall, EE; Jukema, JW

    OBJECTIVE - Patients with metabolic syndrome have increased risk of cardiovascular events. The number of patients With Metabolic syndrome is rapidly increasing, and these patients Often need revascularization. However, only limited data are available on the effect of metabolic syndrome on restenosis

  10. The metabolic syndrome in adults prenatally exposed to the Dutch famine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Susanne R.; Painter, Rebecca C.; Holleman, Frits; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Roseboom, Tessa J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have shown that the metabolic syndrome may originate in utero. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether exposure to prenatal famine is associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. DESIGN: We assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome

  11. A Clinical Pharmacist's Role in Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Rural Pediatric Ambulatory Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Sandra; Kohler, Lisa A.; Souffrant, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population is increasing. Barriers, including the lack of consensus of a definition for metabolic syndrome and time constraints for the pediatrician, may limit the identification and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the role…

  12. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome components in young adults: A pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Nolan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn represents a clustering of different metabolic abnormalities. MetSyn prevalence is present in approximately 25% of all adults with increased prevalence in advanced ages. The presence of one component of MetSyn increases the risk of developing MetSyn later in life and likely represents a high lifetime burden of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore we pooled data from multiple studies to establish the prevalence of MetSyn and MetSyn component prevalence across a broad range of ethnicities. PubMed, SCOPUS and Medline databases were searched to find papers presenting MetSyn and MetSyn component data for 18–30 year olds who were apparently healthy, free of disease, and MetSyn was assessed using either the harmonized, National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII, American Heart Association/National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (AHA/NHBLI, or International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of MetSyn. After reviewing returned articles, 26,609 participants' data from 34 studies were included in the analysis and the data were pooled. MetSyn was present in 4.8–7% of young adults. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as low high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol was the most prevalent MetSyn component (26.9–41.2%, followed by elevated blood pressure (16.6–26.6%, abdominal obesity (6.8–23.6%, atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as raised triglycerides (8.6–15.6%, and raised fasting glucose (2.8–15.4%. These findings highlight that MetSyn is prevalent in young adults. Establishing the reason why low HDL is the most prevalent component may represent an important step in promoting primary prevention of MetSyn and reducing the incidence of subsequent clinical disease.

  13. Serum Adiponectin and Ghrelin, Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. Decreases in circulating adiponectin and ghrelin have been associated with MetS. Our primary aim was to evaluate the relationship of MetS with adiponectin and ghrelin for Cuban Americans with ...

  14. Metabolic syndrome among garage workers in the automobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes but little is known about its prevalence among the active healthy population whose occupational activity is mainly manual and energy based. The aim of this study therefore, was to determine the prevalence of MetS and its components ...

  15. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Individual Criteria in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jill; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is present in young adults and because coronary heart disease (CHD) is likely, screening to determine MetS prevalence and its criteria is critical. Objective: To determine MetS prevalence and most prevalent criteria in a sample of first-year college students. Participants: First-year college students between 18 and 24…

  16. Metabolic syndrome and Cancer: Do they share common molecular pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniou E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors including obesity, has emerged as a global health plague. A lot of epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that the metabolic syndrome is linked not only to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 but also to cancer development and progression. In this review the potential mechanisms tying the metabolic syndrome with cancer are presented. The role of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, the activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway, and the induction of cytotoxic products are highlighted. Subsequent effects leading to oxidative stress, release of lipokines with signaling properties by adipocytes, development of a sustained systemic inflammation, production of inflammatory cytokines, and establishment of a tumorigenic environment are also discussed. The importance of the metabolic syndrome and obesity coupled with the deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms has trigger intensive clinical research with an aim to prevent the risk of cancer and improve outcomes. Moreover, the need for lifestyle changes with increased physical activity and improved dietary quality has been emerged as urgent health priority.

  17. Association between Cigarette Smoking and Metabolic Syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome as defined by using the modified NCEP/ATP III criteria [modified the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)/Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria] and cigarette smoking in Thai subjects. Methods: This study was carried out among 254 ...

  18. Leclercia adecarboxylata bacteraemia in an immunocompromised patient with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Porto, Antonio; Casas Ciria, Javier; Roman Enri, Manuela; Garcia Collado, Sergio; Bachiller Luque, M Rosario; Eiros, Jose Maria

    2014-06-01

    Leclercia adecarboxylata is being increasingly diagnosed as a causative agent of infection due to the availability of rapid molecular diagnostic techniques Few cases of bacteraemia in subjects with underlying medical conditions have been reported. We report a case of L. adecarboxylata bacteraemia in an immunocompromised patient with metabolic syndrome.

  19. Altered carbon dioxide metabolism and creatine abnormalities in rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbach, Nicky S J; Smeets, Eric E J; Bierau, Jörgen; Keularts, Irene M L W; Plasqui, Guy; Julu, Peter O O; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt; Bakker, Jaap A.; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their good appetite, many females with Rett syndrome (RTT) meet the criteria for moderate to severe malnutrition. Although feeding difficulties may play a part in this, other constitutional factors such as altered metabolic processes are suspected. Irregular breathing is a common clinical

  20. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-30

    Sep 30, 2016 ... Table 1: The International Diabetes Federation. Consensus Definition for Metabolic Syndrome. Adapted from Zimmet et al. Components/criteria Age 10-16 years. Age > 16 years. Abdominal Obesity. WC ≥ 90th percentile or adult cut‑off if lower. WC ≥ 94cm in males. WC ≥ 80cm in females. Hypertension.

  1. Association of pre-eclampsia with metabolic syndrome and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-25

    Nov 25, 2015 ... Background and Objectives: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women globally. Preeclampsia has been ... of preeclampsia. Key words: Cardiovascular disease risk, metabolic syndrome, preeclampsia .... underlying mechanism responsible for the transition from preeclampsia to ...

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Psychiatric Patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study seeks to find the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), its indi-vidual components and oxidative stress in psychiatric patients on antipsychotic medication com-pared to newly diagnosed patients attending ... Keywords: Diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress, mental illness

  3. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Czepielewski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Summarize data on metabolic syndrome (MS in bipolar disorder (BD. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the Medline, Embase and PsycInfo databases, using the keywords "metabolic syndrome", "insulin resistance" and "metabolic X syndrome" and cross-referencing them with "bipolar disorder" or "mania". The following types of publications were candidates for review: (i clinical trials, (ii studies involving patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or (iii data about metabolic syndrome. A 5-point quality scale was used to assess the methodological weight of the studies. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles were selected. None of studies reached the maximum quality score of 5 points. The prevalence of MS was significantly higher in BD individuals when compared to a control group. The analysis of MS subcomponents showed that abdominal obesity was heterogeneous. Individuals with BD had significantly higher rates of hypertriglyceridemia than healthy controls. When compared to the general population, there were no significant differences in the prevalence of low HDL-c in individuals with BD. Data on hypertension were also inconclusive. Rates of hyperglycemia were significantly greater in patients with BD compared to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: The overall results point to the presence of an association between BD and MS, as well as between their subcomponents.

  4. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The coloured population has the second-highest prevalence of diabetes in South Africa. However, the data were based on a study conducted almost 20 years ago in a peri-urban coloured population of the Western Cape. We aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in an ...

  5. Association between Cigarette Smoking and Metabolic Syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Cigarette Smoking and Metabolic Syndrome in Thais. ... International Journal of Health Research ... Results: The anthropometric variables, biochemical parameters, blood pressures and resting heart rate were not significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers, except for white blood cell count ...

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using NCEP-ATPIII and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome using ınternational dietetics federation (IDF) versus National cholesterol education program; adult treatment panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) definitions in Turkish adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 1531 (male 758 and female 773) Turkish adults, aged ...

  7. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Chinese adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Zhai, F.; Kok, F.J.; Piao, J.; Zhang, J.; Ma, G.

    2008-01-01

    Since national figures on the occurrence of metabolic syndrome among Chinese adolescents are lacking, this study aims to estimate its prevalence and distribution among Chinese youngsters. The 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey is a nationally representative cross-sectional study.

  8. High risk of metabolic syndrome among black South African women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) globally. The prevalence of MetS is higher in black women compared to black men from South Africa. Aim: To compare the prevalence of MetS between black South African men and women with SMI ...

  9. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), is rapidly increasing in developing countries. However, the epidemiology of MetS is not well reported in the pediatric and young adult population. We determined the prevalence of MetS and its components among overweight and obese Nigerian adolescents and ...

  10. Obesity, body composition and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille Fog; Nilas, Lisbeth; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the impact of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and obesity on glucose and lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in women with PCOS. METHODS: In 35 women with PCOS (17 lean, lean PCOS and 18 obese, obese PCOS) and 25 control women (9 lean, lean controls and 16 obese...

  11. Symptom Dimensions of Depression and Anxiety and the Metabolic Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppino, Floriana S.; Dortland, Arianne K. B. van Reedt; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Bouvy, Paul F.; Giltay, Erik J.; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: To investigate the association between depression and anxiety symptoms and the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), using a dimensional approach. The association between depression and anxiety, on the one hand, and the MetSyn as a cluster or its individual components, on the other hand, is

  12. Circulating Haptoglobin and Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minović, Isidor; Eisenga, Michele F.; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Berg, van den Else; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; Frenay, Anne-Roos S.; Goor, van Harry; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Levy, Andy P.; Ajm Gaillard, Carlo; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Eggersdorfer, Manfred L.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Kema, Ido P.; Bakker, Stephan L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that has recently been linked to components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aimed to evaluate Hp as marker of MetS, and to assess its association with long-term outcome in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We measured plasma Hp in a prospective

  13. Longitudinal Associations Between Metabolic Syndrome Components and Telomere Shortening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revesz, D.; Milaneschi, Y.; Verhoeven, J.E.; Lin, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Deterioration of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with short telomere length (TL). Large-scale longitudinal studies with repeated measures of MetS and TL are lacking. Objectives: We examined whether baseline MetS components predict TL over time, and whether deteriorations in

  14. Metabolic syndrome in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Type 2 diabetes is becoming epidemic and several studies have shown that diabetes is associated with increased co.morbidities and impaired functional health in the general adult population. Type 2 diabetes is one of the co.morbidities associated with metabolic syndrome that carries with it ...

  15. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  16. Relation between usual daily walking time and metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are several studies about the positive relation between physical inactivity or low cardio respiratory fitness with development of metabolic syndrome (MS). In contrast, physical activity had favourable effects on all components of MS but the quantity and the frequency of physical activity necessary to produce ...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahi, Gita; LeBlanc, Paul J.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.; O'Leary, Debra; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have higher rates of obesity compared to children with typical motor development, and, as a result may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of MetS and its components among children with and without DCD. This…

  18. Division IAA Football Players and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovich, Wendy E. S.; Babcock, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body composition and blood pressure (BP), two markers for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), were correlated in college football players. Height, weight, BMI, systolic (SBP) and Diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and body composition (three measures) were assessed in a Division IAA football team (N = 55). Data…

  19. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among active sportsmen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among active sportsmen/sportswomen and sedentary workers in the Kumasi Metropolis using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), World Health Organization (WHO), and International Diabetes ...

  20. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its component traits among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and all-cause mortality. This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of MetS and its component traits among students in a Nigerian university in whom there are limited data.

  1. Overview of the Metabolic Syndrome; An Emerging Pandemic of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occur together have become known as the metabolic syndrome. Over the years various diagnostic criteria have been proposed by different organizations and most recently efforts have been made to unify the diagnostic criteria. This article ...

  2. Undiagnosed metabolic syndrome and other adverse effects amo