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Sample records for metabolic syndrome components

  1. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. ... They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: ...

  2. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-19

    Mar 19, 2013 ... 2005; 112: e297 and Circulation. 2005; 112: e298). Circulation. 2005; 112: 2735Б52. 19. Al-Lawati JA, Mohammed AJ, Al-Hinai HQ, Jousilahti P. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Omani adults. Diabetes Care. 2003; 26: 1781Б5. 20. Al-Qahtani DA, Imtiaz ML. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

  3. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia as a component of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Bespalova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The level of uric acid in the blood serum of 103 patients with coronary heart disease was researched in clinical conditions. The interrelation with the components of the metabolic syndrome in patients on the background of individually selected pathogenetic therapy was studied. It was shown that the abdominal obesity has the highest correlation with the level of uric acid in a cluster of metabolic syndrome components.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and its components among university students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, Samuel Mungai; Kimani, Samuel Thuo; Munyoki, Gilbert

    2017-11-28

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of interrelated disorders which occur together causing an increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The university population is an understudied group despite the increase in the frequency of related disorders and metabolic risk factors e.g. obesity and diabetes, majorly due to the assumption that they are in their most active phase of life therefore healthy. This study looked at metabolic syndrome, the sedentary lifestyles and dietary habits present among university students attending Mount Kenya University, main campus. Stratified sampling was used to select participants. Self-administered questionnaires were issued to participants after a signed consent had been obtained following which clinical assessments and biochemical measures were performed. They included blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, anthropometric measurements; height, weight, BMI and waist circumference. Pearson's chi-square tests and non-parametric independent t-test were used to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per gender, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI and prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI category. The study established that 1.9% of the participants met the criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to HJSS criteria. Among the elements, there was statistical difference in gender BMI and waist circumference. 11.8% of subjects had two metabolic syndrome components while 3.1% had three components while none of the subjects had all six components. Elevated triglycerides was the most prevalent defining component for metabolic syndrome. There is a statistically significant relationship between sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits as risk factors to metabolic syndrome. Young adults in university have begun developing metabolic syndrome and the risk of developing the syndrome continues to increase with the

  5. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahpoor Maddah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of obesity and other metabolic conditions with osteoarthritis is under debate; however, a strong link between metabolic disturbances is suggested to contribute to increased incidences and progression of osteoarthritis. We examined the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with the incidence of knee osteoarthritis in Iranian population. A community-based study was conducted on a total of 625 Iranian volunteers with the complaint of knee pain. Weight-bearing and anteroposterior plain radiographs of both knees were taken on the day of admission. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the modified Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome were 22.5% in males and 11.6% in females (P=0.002. The prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis was 20.0% in males and 43.8% of females (P<0.001. In both genders, osteoarthritis group had higher serum levels of triglyceride and systolic blood pressure in comparison with non-osteoarthritis group. Women with osteoarthritis had higher Body Mass Index (BMI, however, this association was not observed in men. In females, the presence of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritis group at 2.187 fold the risk in the non-osteoarthritis group. But, the presence of osteoarthritis was not associated with metabolic syndrome in males. Metabolic syndrome mainly through high BMI is associated with knee osteoarthritis in the Iranian women, but neither metabolic syndrome nor any related components are associated with knee osteoarthritis in men.

  6. [Association between metabolic syndrome and its components with presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jiarui; Wang, Ningning; Yang, Xiaoshan

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of metabolic syndrome and its components on presbycusis. Total of 165 cases and 202 controls were continuously collected in Harbin Ninth Hospital from June 2013 to August 2014, these subjects were investigated and received anthropometry and received biochemical test in hospital laboratory. Statistics analysis was adopted by χ2 test, t test and logistic regression model. Only triglyceride abnormal proportion of case group was higher than that of control group among components of metabolic syndrome, and it were associated with age-related hearing loss whether before adjustment or not after adjustment, OR (95% CI) were 1.69 (1.09-2.63) and 1.96 (1.08-3.54) respectively, and others were not associated with presbycusis. In addition, among all of the various combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss before adjustment and after adjustment, OR were 5.31 (95% CI 1.63-17.27), 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-6.85) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.04-4.18) respectively. Further more, the metabolic syndrome was not statistically associated with presbycusis, OR were 1.27 (95% CI 0.83-1.94) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.54-1.57) respectively before adjustment and after adjustment. In addition, stratified by age, the metabolic syndrome was still not statistically associated with presbycusis in each stratification, OR were 0.89 (95% CI 0.44-1.82) and 1.49 (95% CI 0.67-3.30) respectively. The triglyceride was associated with presbycusis. Among all of combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss.

  7. How coffee affects metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baspinar, B; Eskici, G; Ozcelik, A O

    2017-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome, with its increasing prevalence, is becoming a major public health problem throughout the world. Many risk factors including nutrition play a role in the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Of the most-consumed beverages in the world, coffee contains more than 1000 components such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. It has been proven in many studies that coffee consumption has a positive effect on chronic diseases. In this review, starting from the beneficial effects of coffee on health, the relationship between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome and its components has been investigated. There are few studies investigating the relationship between coffee and metabolic syndrome, and the existing ones put forward different findings. The factors leading to the differences are thought to stem from coffee variety, the physiological effects of coffee elements, and the nutritional ingredients (such as milk and sugar) added to coffee. It is reported that consumption of coffee in adults up to three cups a day reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  8. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-30

    Sep 30, 2016 ... Table 1: The International Diabetes Federation. Consensus Definition for Metabolic Syndrome. Adapted from Zimmet et al. Components/criteria Age 10-16 years. Age > 16 years. Abdominal Obesity. WC ≥ 90th percentile or adult cut‑off if lower. WC ≥ 94cm in males. WC ≥ 80cm in females. Hypertension.

  9. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), is rapidly increasing in developing countries. However, the epidemiology of MetS is not well reported in the pediatric and young adult population. We determined the prevalence of MetS and its components among overweight and obese Nigerian adolescents and ...

  10. Longitudinal Associations Between Metabolic Syndrome Components and Telomere Shortening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revesz, D.; Milaneschi, Y.; Verhoeven, J.E.; Lin, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Deterioration of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with short telomere length (TL). Large-scale longitudinal studies with repeated measures of MetS and TL are lacking. Objectives: We examined whether baseline MetS components predict TL over time, and whether deteriorations in

  11. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its component traits among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and all-cause mortality. This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of MetS and its component traits among students in a Nigerian university in whom there are limited data.

  12. The search for putative unifying genetic factors for components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, M; Lyssenko, V; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of factors contributing to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes but unifying mechanisms have not been identified. Our aim was to study whether common variations in 17 genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes or components...... of the metabolic syndrome and variants in nine genes with inconsistent association with at least two components of the metabolic syndrome would also predict future development of components of the metabolic syndrome, individually or in combination....

  13. Polycystic ovary syndrome: A component of metabolic syndrome?

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    Vignesh J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1935, Stein and Leventhal first described the polycystic ovary (PCO as a frequent cause of irregular ovulation in women seeking treatment for subfertility. Although the initial management was surgical with wedge resection of ovary, the availability of radioimmunoassay and increased clinical use of ultrasound made it clear that many women had the ultrasound characteristics of PCO with or without the biochemical or clinical features of PCOS and therefore that PCO were not associated with a single syndrome. The association between increased insulin resistance and PCOS is a consistent finding in all ethnic groups. Obesity is a common factor in the majority of women with PCOS. It is postulated that a woman may be genetically predisposed to developing PCOS but it is only the interaction of environmental factors (obesity with the genetic factors that results in the characteristic metabolic and menstrual disturbances. Weight loss, altered diet and exercise have been shown to be effective in the management of PCOS. Importance of early recognition, proper intervention, long-term monitoring and health implications needs more concern.

  14. Rett syndrome: a neurological disorder with metabolic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Stephanie M.

    2018-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator. Despite remarkable scientific progress since its discovery, the mechanism by which MECP2 mutations cause RTT symptoms is largely unknown. Consequently, treatment options for patients are currently limited and centred on symptom relief. Thought to be an entirely neurological disorder, RTT research has focused on the role of MECP2 in the central nervous system. However, the variety of phenotypes identified in Mecp2 mutant mouse models and RTT patients implicate important roles for MeCP2 in peripheral systems. Here, we review the history of RTT, highlighting breakthroughs in the field that have led us to present day. We explore the current evidence supporting metabolic dysfunction as a component of RTT, presenting recent studies that have revealed perturbed lipid metabolism in the brain and peripheral tissues of mouse models and patients. Such findings may have an impact on the quality of life of RTT patients as both dietary and drug intervention can alter lipid metabolism. Ultimately, we conclude that a thorough knowledge of MeCP2's varied functional targets in the brain and body will be required to treat this complex syndrome. PMID:29445033

  15. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome components in young adults: A pooled analysis

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    Paul B. Nolan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn represents a clustering of different metabolic abnormalities. MetSyn prevalence is present in approximately 25% of all adults with increased prevalence in advanced ages. The presence of one component of MetSyn increases the risk of developing MetSyn later in life and likely represents a high lifetime burden of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore we pooled data from multiple studies to establish the prevalence of MetSyn and MetSyn component prevalence across a broad range of ethnicities. PubMed, SCOPUS and Medline databases were searched to find papers presenting MetSyn and MetSyn component data for 18–30 year olds who were apparently healthy, free of disease, and MetSyn was assessed using either the harmonized, National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII, American Heart Association/National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (AHA/NHBLI, or International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of MetSyn. After reviewing returned articles, 26,609 participants' data from 34 studies were included in the analysis and the data were pooled. MetSyn was present in 4.8–7% of young adults. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as low high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol was the most prevalent MetSyn component (26.9–41.2%, followed by elevated blood pressure (16.6–26.6%, abdominal obesity (6.8–23.6%, atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as raised triglycerides (8.6–15.6%, and raised fasting glucose (2.8–15.4%. These findings highlight that MetSyn is prevalent in young adults. Establishing the reason why low HDL is the most prevalent component may represent an important step in promoting primary prevention of MetSyn and reducing the incidence of subsequent clinical disease.

  16. Metabolic Syndrome and the Components of the Mediterranean Diet

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    Maria Luz Fernandez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities known to increase heart disease risk by two-fold and type 2 diabetes risk by five-fold. These disturbances include dyslipidemias, hypertension, hyperglycemia and central adiposity in addition to insulin resistance and low grade inflammation. The prevalence of MetS is about 34% in the United States with variations according to ethnicity and race. Lfestyle factors including smoking, lack of exercise, poor dietary habits as well as low socioeconomic status are associated with the development of MetS. Diet is considered one of the major contributors to MetS. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (high intake of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, olive oil, fish, low-fat dairy products, and moderate wine consumption has been associated with lower prevalence of MetS. Interventions utilizing this dietary approach have proven to be successful in reducing some of the associated metabolic abnormalities. In this review, evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies showing the benefits of the Mediterranean diet is presented. The effect of the specific components of the Mediterranean diet is also discussed.

  17. Components of the metabolic syndrome, but not the metabolic syndrome per se, are associated with aortic distensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentolouris, Nicholas; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Liatis, Stavros; Moyssakis, Ioannis; Perrea, Despoina; Soldatos, Rigas-Philippos; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2007-12-01

    Reduction in aortic distensibility occurs early in the atherosclerosis process and carries a poor prognosis. Metabolic syndrome is common and it is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and aortic distensibility. A total of 135 subjects without diabetes were studied. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the NCEP-ATP-III criteria. Aortic distensibility was assessed non-invasively by ultrasonography. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for the components of the metabolic syndrome, and, additionally, for body mass index, pulse pressure, presence of coronary artery disease, use of statins and use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers, demonstrated an independent association between aortic distensibility and age (pmetabolic syndrome status. Moreover, there was a suggestive association with albumin-to-creatinine ratio (p=0.06). Metabolic syndrome per se is not associated with reduction in aortic distensibility. From the components of the metabolic syndrome, only blood pressure is a strong predictor of aortic distensibility. In addition, ageing and higher values of albumin-to-creatinine ratio are also associated with low aortic distensibility.

  18. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its individual components in Brazilian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Roberto Wagner F; de Araújo, Márcio Flávio M; Marinho, Niciane Bandeira P; de Vasconcelos, Hérica Cristina A; Lima, Adman Câmara S; Pereira, Dayse Christina R; Almeida, Paulo César; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Damasceno, Marta Maria C

    2013-05-01

    To identify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its individual components in a population of college students at a public higher education institution in Fortaleza, Brazil. Scientific evidence has demonstrated the ascent of the metabolic syndrome in the young population. Cross-sectional study of 702 Brazilian college students between January-July 2011. Socio-demographic indicators, life habits and the components of the metabolic syndrome were assessed. anova statistical tests were used to associate gender with the metabolic syndrome components, and the chi-square test to associate the number of metabolic syndrome components with gender and body mass index. High fasting venous glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels were found in 12·3, 23·0, 9·7 and 5·9% of the sample, respectively. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome amounted to 1·7%. Nevertheless, 30·4% of students manifested at least one and 12·4% at least two individual components. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was higher in men (58·3%) and in people who were overweight (33·3%) and obese (41·7%). It is important to implement public health policies to reduce college students' vulnerability to the metabolic syndrome. Most college students who displayed ≥3 metabolic syndrome components were men and already indicated being overweight and/or obesity. It is important that nurses assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome in college students as a predictor of cardiovascular health. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatinamini, Sara; Ataie-Jafari, Asal; Qorbani, Mostafa; Nikoohemat, Shideh; Kelishadi, Roya; Asayesh, Hamid; Hosseini, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Serum uric acid levels is reported to be associated with a variety of cardiometabolic risk factors; however, its direct association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains controversial. Thus, we examined the association of serum uric acid concentrations with the MetS components. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. This case-control study comprised 101 non-smoking individuals (41 in the MetS group and 60 in the non-MetS group). Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, uric acid, and anthropometric measures were determined, and body composition was assessed by using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). After adjustment for confounding factors, serum uric acid was significantly higher in MetS group than non-MetS group (5.70 ± 1.62 vs 4.97 ± 1.30 mg/dL, respectively, P = 0.001). After controlling for age, sex and body mass index in partial correlation analysis, uric acid was positively correlated with triglycerides, and negatively with HDL-C. In multiple logistic regression analysis, every 1 mg/dl elevation in the serum uric acid level increased the risk of MetS approximately by 2-folds (OR: 2.11, 95 % CI: 1.30-3.41). This study showed that those individuals with MetS have higher uric acid levels; the association of uric acid and MetS components supports that it might be an additional components of MetS.

  20. Components of the metabolic syndrome: clustering and genetic variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povel, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol levels and hypertension frequently co-occur within individuals. The cluster of these features is referred to as the metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim

  1. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, S.; Javed, M. A.; Kasuri, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Study Design: Case-series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from January to June 2012. Methodology: Seventy-five (64 females and 11 males) patients with clinically diagnosed and electrodiagnostically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome were inducted. Their waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, fasting triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were recorded. Patients were categorized having metabolic syndrome according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, if any 3 were present out of hypertension, elevated fasting triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated fasting blood glucose, and elevated waist circumference. Result: Mean age of the patients was 42.04±9.31 years, mean waist circumference was 95.32±9.03 cm, mean systolic blood pressure was 134.13±13.72 mmHg, mean diastolic blood pressure was 89.13±8.83 mmHg, mean fasting blood glucose was 94.35±21.81 mg/dl, mean fasting triglycerides was 177.48±48.69 mg/dl, and mean high density lipoprotein cholesterol was 41.95±11.17 mg/dl. Metabolic syndrome was found in 54 (72 percentage) patients including 9 (16.7 percentage) males and 45 (83.3 percentage) females. Out of 75 patients, 54 (72 percentage) had elevated waist circumference, 52 (69.3 percentage) had elevated blood pressure, 19 (25.3 percentage) had elevated fasting blood glucose, 53 (70.6 percentage) had elevated fasting triglycerides and 54 (72 percentage) had reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Highest frequency of metabolic syndrome was found in age range of 40 - 49 years in both genders. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is frequently found in the patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  2. Metabolic syndrome and its components associated with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited information on the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic kidney disease (CKD in the Iranian population, a group that has a high prevalence of CKD and obesity. The aim of present study was to determine the relationship between MetS and CKD in West of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 800 subjects aged more than 35 years admitted from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled in the study. MetS was defined based on the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CKD was defined from the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative practice guidelines. Waist circumference and body mass index were calculated, as well, blood samples were taken and lipid profile, plasma glucose levels, and serum creatinine were measured. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: CKD was seen in 14.8% patients with MetS and 8.3% individuals without MetS. MetS was associated with an increased odds ratio (OR for a glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (OR: 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.99; P = 0.004. Individuals with 2, 3, 4, and 5 components of the MetS had an increased OR for CKD: 2.19 (95% CI: 0.95-3.62, 2.65 (95% CI: 1.03-4.71, 2.86 (95% CI: 1.08-5.53, and 5.03 (95% CI: 1.80-8.57, respectively, compared with individuals with none of the components. Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of CKD in patients with MetS compared with the subject without MetS. Our observations raised major clinical and public health concerns in Iran, where both the MetS and kidney diseases are becoming common.

  3. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome among People in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Shen, Chong; Chu, Min J; Gao, Yue X; Xu, Guang F; Huang, Jian P; Xu, Qiong Q; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent worldwide and its prevalence is related to physical activity, race, and lifestyle. Little data is available for people living in rural areas of China. In this study we examined associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components among people in rural China. The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6,997 male participants between 2007 and 2008. Data of socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle were collected. The associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 21.6%. It was significantly lower in men than in women. Low risks of metabolic syndrome were observed in those who did less sitting and engaged in more vigorous physical activity. The highest tertile of vigorous physical activity was associated with 15-40% decreased odds of metabolic syndrome and all of its components, except for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in men. Women with the highest tertile of moderate physical activity had 15-30% lower odds of central obesity, high glucose, and high triglycerides compared with those in the lowest tertile. Sitting time >42 hours per week had a 4%-12% attributable risk of metabolic syndrome, central obesity, and high triglycerides in both genders, and abnormal glucose and diastolic blood pressure in women. Sleeping for more than 8 hours per day was associated with risk of high serum glucose and lipids. Our data suggested that physical activity has a preventive effect against metabolic syndrome and all its abnormal components, and that longer sitting time and sleep duration are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome components, including central obesity and high triglycerides, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. This study could provide information for future investigation into these associations. Also, recommendations are developed to reduce

  4. Relationship between metabolic syndrome and its components with bone densitometry in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mahnaz; Farzam, Seyed Amir; Mamaghani, Zahra; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2017-11-01

    Prevention of osteoporosis and bone fracture and the relationship between metabolic syndrome and bone density are controversial issues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and its components with bone mineral density in post menopausal women referred for bone mineral density (BMD) test. A total of 143 postmenopausal women with at least one year of menopause experience participated in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric characteristics for all participants were collected. Also, biochemical parameters including fasting blood sugar, Cholesterol (HDL and LDL), triglyceride were measured. Association between the components of metabolic syndrome and bone densitometry were analyzed by statistical methods. In this study, 72% of participants did not have metabolic syndrome. Among them, 43.4% and 28.7% had osteoporosis and normal density, respectively. Of remaining participants with metabolic syndrome, 12.6% and 15.4% had osteoporosis and normal density, respectively. Among the metabolic syndrome components, waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, and waist to hip ratio were significantly associated with bone mass (Pmetabolic syndrome did not have significant differences than women without metabolic syndrome in terms of lumbar and femoral neck density (P>0.05). Results from this study showed that metabolic syndrome and its components did not induce bone mass loss. The discrepancies of the studies in this area call for more large scale studies in population so as to prevent women problems in this area. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Raw Crushed Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on Components of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Prema Ram; Jani, Rameshchandra D; Sharma, Megh Shyam

    2017-09-28

    Metabolic syndrome consists of a group of risk factors characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and prothrombotic and proinflammatory conditions. Raw garlic homogenate has been reported to reduce serum lipid levels in animal model; however, no precise studies have been performed to evaluate the effect of raw crushed garlic (Allium sativum L.) on components of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of raw crushed garlic on components of metabolic syndrome. A total of 40 metabolic syndrome patients were randomly selected from the diabetic center of SP Medical College, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. They underwent treatment with 100 mg/kg body weight raw crushed garlic 2 times a day with standard diet for 4 weeks; their anthropometric and serum biochemical variables were measured at both the beginning and the end of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS version 20, and Student's paired "t" test was used to compare variables before and after treatment with garlic preparation. Raw crushed garlic significantly reduced components of metabolic syndrome including waist circumference (p .05) of patients with metabolic syndrome after consumption of raw crushed garlic for 4 weeks. Raw crushed garlic has beneficial effects on components of metabolic syndrome; therefore, it can be used as an accompanying remedy for prevention and treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  6. Association of sleep quality components and wake time with metabolic syndrome: The Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Study (QMDS), Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohal, Mohammadali; Ghorbani, Azam; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Ziaee, Amir; Mohammadi, Zahrasadat

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of sleep quality and sleep quantity with metabolic syndrome in Qazvin, Iran. this cross sectional study was conducted in 1079 residents of Qazvin selected by multistage cluster random sampling method in 2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program third Adult treatment panel. Sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). A logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of sleep status and metabolic syndrome. Mean age was 40.08±10.33years. Of 1079, 578 (52.2%) were female, and 30.6% had metabolic syndrome. The total global PSQI score in the subjects with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than subjects without metabolic syndrome (6.30±3.20 vs. 5.83±2.76, P=0.013). In logistic regression analysis, sleep disturbances was associated with 1.388 fold increased risk of metabolic syndrome after adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index. Sleep disturbances component was a predictor of metabolic syndrome in the present study. More longitudinal studies are necessary to understand the association of sleep quality and its components with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and its components in a Brazilian sample of pemphigus patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambiel, Marcela Vendruscolo; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pemphigus foliaceus and pemphigus vulgaris are endemic in the northeastern region of São Paulo State, Brazil. They are treated mainly with systemic corticosteroids, which may provoke osteoporosis; atherosclerosis, higher blood pressure, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hyperlipidemia and abdominal obesity. These side effects of corticoids also constitute criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. OBJECTIVE The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and each component of metabolic syndrome in Pemphigus foliaceus and pemphigus vulgaris groups was compared with Brazilian casuistic samples. METHODS Data of 147 patients (pemphigus foliaceus 48.9% and pemphigus vulgaris 51.1%) were compiled from medical records regarding metabolic syndrome and its components, and included in the analysis. RESULTS There was no significant difference regarding the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in pemphigus groups compared with the Brazilian casuistic samples. The analysis of each component of metabolic syndrome showed a higher prevalence of: higher blood pressure in male subjects with pemphigus vulgaris, and in pemphigus foliaceus in both genders; diabetes mellitus in both genders for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus; obesity in females for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, and hypertriglyceridemia in both genders for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus groups that were statistically significant compared to the Brazilian reports. Furthermore, the study noted a higher incidence of cardiovascular events in both genders in pemphigus foliaceus and pemphigus vulgaris groups than in Brazilian casuistic samples. CONCLUSION The components of metabolic syndrome are more numerous in pemphigus when compared with Brazilian casuistic samples. Future studies are necessary to assure that metabolic syndrome may be associated with pemphigus per se, including a greater casuistic sample of patients who have not taken corticoids. PMID:25184914

  8. Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Dou Lin

    2006-11-01

    Conclusion: Serum UA level was elevated significantly as the number of metabolic components increased. Abnormal TG had the most influence on serum UA. A prospective study is warranted to determine if the prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia affects the development of metabolic syndrome.

  9. Interconnection between metabolic syndrome components in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Bayanova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our study is to deter­mine intercommunication between the indexes of insulin resistance, С-peptide, leptin, cortisol, thyroid hormones in obese patients. Materials and methods. The study involved 30 persons with the average body mass index (BMI 35.1 kg/м2. They were divided into three groups by this index depending on the obesity severity. Results. The indexes of insulin, С-peptide, HOMA index with the enhanced BMI had a tendency to the increase. Their average indexes were highest in patients with III stage obesity. An increased level of ТSH was determined for the 31 % patients of the first group, in 25 % patients of the second group and in 50 % patients of the third group. Free thyroxine (fТ4 level was highest in the patients of the second group, fТ4 indexes under 0.93 ng/dl were observed in 25 % patients of the first group and in 50 % patients of the third group. The cortisol level maximally rose in the patients of the second group and went down a little in the patients of the third group. The leptin indexes rose with the increase of BMI. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome develops on a background of the decline of thyroid function and increase of insulin secretion.

  10. BIDIRECTIONAL PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME COMPONENTS WITH DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, AND ANTIDEPRESSANT USE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiles, Sarah A; Révész, Dóra; Lamers, Femke; Giltay, Erik; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome components-waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose-are cross-sectionally associated with depression and anxiety with differing strength. Few studies examine the relationships over time or whether antidepressants have independent effects. Participants were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA; N = 2,776; 18-65 years; 66% female). At baseline, 2- and 6-year follow-up, participants completed diagnostic interviews, depression and anxiety symptom inventories, antidepressant use assessment, and measurements of the five metabolic syndrome components. Data were analyzed for the consistency of associations between psychopathology indicators and metabolic syndrome components across the three assessment waves, and whether psychopathology or antidepressant use at one assessment predicts metabolic dysregulation at the next and vice versa. Consistently across waves, psychopathology was associated with generally poorer values of metabolic syndrome components, particularly waist circumference and triglycerides. Stronger associations were observed for psychopathology symptom severity than diagnosis. Antidepressant use was independently associated with higher waist circumference, triglycerides and number of metabolic syndrome abnormalities, and lower HDL-C. Symptom severity and antidepressant use were associated with subsequently increased number of abnormalities, waist circumference, and glucose after 2 but not 4 years. Conversely, there was little evidence that metabolic syndrome components were associated with subsequent psychopathology outcomes. Symptom severity and antidepressant use were independently associated with metabolic dysregulation consistently over time and also had negative consequences for short-term metabolic health. This is of concern given the chronicity of depression and anxiety and prevalence of antidepressant treatment. © 2016 The

  11. Correlation of the leucocyte count with traditional and non-traditional components of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bai-Yu; Tian, Chun-Feng; Gao, Bu-Lang; Tong, Yu-Hong; Zhao, Xu-Hong; Zheng, Ying

    2016-11-01

    To investigate correlation of the white blood cell (WBC) and its subtype count with the traditional and non-traditional components of the metabolic syndrome. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 18,222 people were enrolled in this study. The height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were measured, and blood samples were tested for all subjects after an overnight fast. The count of WBC and its subtypes, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein, aminotransferases, fibrinogen, uric acid, and fasting blood glucose were all assessed. Metabolic syndrome was found in 2502 of 18,222 healthy Chinese people (16.41%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 22.61% for men significantly (P metabolic syndrome. With increase of the WBC count, BMI, systolic and diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, glutamyltranspetidase, blood urea nitrogen fibrinogen and uric acid all went up significantly (P creatinine remained relatively sTable After adjustment of age, sex, alcoholic drinking and education, the metabolic components of obesity, hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia rose significantly (P metabolic syndrome. Aminotransferases, fibrinogen and uric acid all significantly increase with increased WBC count in a dose-dependent manner. Increased counts of the total WBC and its subtypes are positively associated with presence of metabolic syndrome.

  12. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components based on a harmonious definition among adults in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Brini O

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Otmane El Brini,1 Omar Akhouayri,1 Allal Gamal,2 Abdelhalem Mesfioui,1 Bouchra Benazzouz1 1Laboratory of Genetic, Neuroendocrinology and Biotechnology, University Ibn Tofail, Faculty of Sciences, Kenitra, Morocco; 2Diagnostic center, Rabat, Morocco Purpose: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases that includes central obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors in a representative sample of Morocco adults using the 2009 joint interim statement definition. Patients and methods: We analyzed data of 820 patients aged 19 years and older. For metabolic syndrome diagnosis, we used the criteria of the recently published joint interim statement (2009. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 35.73% among all adults, 18.56% among men, and 40.12% among women. Prevalence increased with age, peaking among those aged 50–59 years. The most common abnormality highlights abdominal obesity (49.15%. Also, half of patients have one or two risk factors for developing this syndrome. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors is high among adults in Morocco, especially in women. The most prevalent component of metabolic syndrome in our population was abdominal obesity. Keywords: central obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance, triglyceride, cholesterol

  13. Association between the metabolic syndrome and its components with falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kuo-Chen; Pu, Shou-Jin; Lin, Chung-Hao; Chang, Hong-Jyun; Chen, Ying-Jen; Liu, Maw-Sen

    2012-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome and falls are both serious and common health problems in older adults. However, little is known about whether the metabolic syndrome contributes to falls. We investigated the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and its components with falls in community-dwelling older adults. We designed and conducted a cross-sectional study. A total of 1165 community-dwelling older adults who received a geriatric health examination, including interviewer-administered questionnaires and physical and biochemical examinations, were retrospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2010 and specifically asked about the history of falls in the preceding year. The mean age of the participants was 74.9 ± 6.7 years, and 54.3% were women. The overall prevalence of falls and metabolic syndrome were 17.9% and 27.3%, respectively. Compared with those who did not fall, the participants who fell had a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (45.7% versus 23.3%, Prisk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults (odds ratio=2.56, 95% confidence interval 1.86-3.51). Because falling is a multifactorial geriatric syndrome, many potential confounders, such as visual abnormalities, obesity, arthritis, and polypharmacy, were not considered in this study. The metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults and should be addressed with regard to prevention of falls.

  14. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components based on a harmonious definition among adults in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Brini, Otmane; Akhouayri, Omar; Gamal, Allal; Mesfioui, Abdelhalem; Benazzouz, Bouchra

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases that includes central obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance, high triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors in a representative sample of Morocco adults using the 2009 joint interim statement definition. We analyzed data of 820 patients aged 19 years and older. For metabolic syndrome diagnosis, we used the criteria of the recently published joint interim statement (2009). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 35.73% among all adults, 18.56% among men, and 40.12% among women. Prevalence increased with age, peaking among those aged 50-59 years. The most common abnormality highlights abdominal obesity (49.15%). Also, half of patients have one or two risk factors for developing this syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors is high among adults in Morocco, especially in women. The most prevalent component of metabolic syndrome in our population was abdominal obesity.

  15. Relation between Hormonal Disorders and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Primary Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade plenty of the researches dedicated to the problem of hypothyroidism were published, that radically changed views to the value of thyroid pathology on the whole. Neurohumoral changes are considered as a nosotropic factor of hypothyroidism development in persons with metabolic syndrome (MS. Aim of the research is to study the features of hormonal disorders and their correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and methods. The study involved 80 patients with primary hypothyroidism: 61 had metabolic syndrome and 19 did not have metabolic syndrome. Results. Statistically significant increased levels of leptin, insulin, cortisol, C-peptide were revealed in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome while the most marked changes were found in patients with multiple metabolic abnormalities. Conclusions. The interrelations between hyperleptinemia and fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin levels, thyroid-stimulating hormone, index HOMA were determined indicating the modulating role of chronic hyperglycemia, hormonal disorders and insulin resistance in the expression and realization of the biological action of leptin in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome.

  16. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  17. Snus use during the life-course and risk of the metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byhamre, Marja Lisa; Gustafsson, Per E; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Maria; Hammarström, Anne; Wennberg, Patrik

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between life-course exposure to snus and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in adulthood. Tobacco habits at baseline (age 16) and three follow-ups (ages 21, 30 and 43) were assessed among 880 participants in a population-based cohort in Northern Sweden. Presence of the metabolic syndrome at age 43 was ascertained using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Odds ratios and CIs for risk of the metabolic syndrome and its components by snus use at 16, 21, 30 and 43 years were calculated using logistic regression. Cumulative snus use was defined as number of life periods (1-4) with current snus use. At age 43, 164 participants (18.6%) were current snus users. We found no association between exclusive snus use at the ages of 16, 21, 30 and 43 years and the metabolic syndrome at age 43 years. Snus use (among non-smokers) was associated with raised triglycerides and high blood pressure in crude analysis, but not in multivariable models. There was no association between cumulative snus use and risk of the metabolic syndrome. Cumulative snus use was associated with central obesity, raised triglycerides and impaired fasting glucose/diabetes mellitus type 2 in crude analyses, but not after adjustments. The health consequences of snus exposure from adolescence to mid-adulthood do not seem to include increased risk of the metabolic syndrome or its components. The cardio-metabolic risk of dual exposure to snus and cigarettes may warrant further attention.

  18. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Individual Components Among Midwestern University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Najat; Brown, Carrie A; Snyder, Ericka; Cumper, Stephanie; Langolf, Andrea; Trayer, Chelsey; Green, Chelsea

    2017-08-01

    Michigan has the 17th highest adult obesity rate in the United States. Among college-aged adults between 18 and 25 years old, the rate of obesity was 11.6%. Obesity is a key precedent for the development of metabolic syndrome. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its individual components among a sample of students at Central Michigan University. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 462 students, aged 18-25 years, in Spring 2015 and Fall/Spring 2016 semesters. Students were recruited throughout the campus via flyers, in-class, and Blackboard announcements. Biochemical, anthropometric, and blood pressure measurements were taken for all students. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was estimated based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Multivariable analysis was used to assess the prevalence of metabolic risk components. To explore the association between metabolic risk factors and lifestyle behaviors, students filled out a validated online questionnaire related to their eating habits, physical activity, and sleep patterns. Metabolic syndrome was not prevalent in our sample. However, about one-third of the students had at least one metabolic abnormality, and 6.0% had two metabolic abnormalities. The most common metabolic abnormalities were low HDL-cholesterol levels (22.0%) and high waist circumference (12.6%), and elevated serum triglyceride (5.8%). Adjusting for other factors, excess adiposity and high visceral fat scores were associated with increased risk of metabolic risk factors, whereas healthy lifestyle practices such as daily breakfast consumption, eating three meals a day, being active, and not smoking were associated with lower risks for MetS. Given the adverse consequences of undiagnosed metabolic abnormalities, efforts to identify and manage MetS among asymptomatic college students, particularly women, is essential and warrants further

  19. The metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with prostate cancer on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Juan; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Alvarez-Ossorio, José L; Pesqueira, Daniel; Tabernero, Angel; Gómez Veiga, Francisco; Lorente, José A; Porras, Mariano; Lobato, Juan J; Ribal, María J; Planas, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy may promote the development of the metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer. We assessed the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome and its components during the first year of androgen deprivation therapy. This observational, multicenter, prospective study included 539 patients with prostate cancer scheduled to receive 3-month depot luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for more than 12 months. Waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profile, blood pressure and fasting glucose were evaluated at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. The metabolic syndrome was assessed according to NCEP ATP III criteria (2001) and 4 other definitions (WHO 1998, AACE 2003, AHA/NHLBI 2005 and IDF 2005). At 6 and 12 months after the initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, significant increases were observed in waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. No significant changes in blood pressure 130/85 or greater were detected. A nonsignificant increase of 3.9% in the prevalence of the full metabolic syndrome (ATP III) was observed (22.9% at baseline vs 25.5% and 26.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at baseline varied according to the definition used, ranging from 9.4% (WHO) to 50% (IDF). At 12 months significant increases in prevalence were observed with the WHO (4.1%) and AHA/NHLBI (8.1%) definitions. Androgen deprivation therapy produces significant early effects on waist circumference, body mass index, fasting glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. The prevalence of and increase in the metabolic syndrome depend on the defining criteria. Counseling patients on the prevention, early detection and treatment of specific metabolic alterations is recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microalbuminuria in relation to the metabolic syndrome and its components in a Chinese population

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Hu, Bang-Chuan; Fan, Wang-Xiang; Zou, Jun; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated the prevalence of microalbuminuria and its association with the metabolic syndrome and its components in a Chinese population. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a newly established residential area in the suburb of Shanghai. We measured anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids, and collected spot urine samples for the determination of albumin-creatinine ratio. We defined microalbuminuria as a urinary albumin-...

  1. BIDIRECTIONAL PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME COMPONENTS WITH DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, AND ANTIDEPRESSANT USE

    OpenAIRE

    Hiles, Sarah A.; R?v?sz, D?ra; Lamers, Femke; Giltay, Erik; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome components?waist circumference, high?density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL?C), triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose?are cross?sectionally associated with depression and anxiety with differing strength. Few studies examine the relationships over time or whether antidepressants have independent effects. Methods Participants were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA; N = 2,776; 18?65 years; 66% female). At baseline, 2? and...

  2. Comparison of the relative contributions of intra-abdominal and liver fat to components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotronen, Anna; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Sevastianova, Ksenia

    2011-01-01

    Abdominally obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome often have excess fat deposition both intra-abdominally (IA) and in the liver, but the relative contribution of these two deposits to variation in components of the metabolic syndrome remains unclear. We determined the mutually independent...... were correlated (r = 0.65, P density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, plasma glucose, insulin and liver enzyme concentrations, and hepatic...

  3. Relationship between thyroid stimulating hormone and various components of metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, S.; Hashim, R.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the relation between thyroid stimulating hormone and various components of metabolic syndrome. Study Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Pathology department, Army Medical College of National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) Islamabad and Military Hospital (MH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan; from January to March 2013. Material and Methods: Hundred adult inhabitants (30-60 years) of Rawalpindi participated in this study. Subjects who fulfilled the WHO criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS) were included and those who had any thyroid illness, or were using any thyroid medications were excluded from this study. For thyroid function tests (TFT's), serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total tri-iodothyronine (TT3), free throxine (FT4) were estimated. Insulin resistance (IR) was measured by Homeostasis Model Assessment for IR (HOMA-IR). Data was analyzed by SPSS-18. Results: Out of 50 subjects of control group, 26 (52%) were male and 24 (48%) were female. Basal metabolic rate (BMI), serum triglyceride (TG), HOMA-IR were higher and serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) was lower in MetS patients. There was no significant difference in serum TT3 and FT4 between MetS patients and control group, however, mean serum TSH levels were higher in MetS (2.622 + 0.924 vs 5.002 + 1.074 mIU/l, p<0.001). In correlation analysis, serum TSH was positively and significantly correlated with BMI (r=0.344, p=0.014) and HOMA-IR (r=0.419, p<0.002). Conclusion: These results suggest that serum TSH correlates with various components of metabolic syndrome patients. Analysis of serum TSH levels in metabolic syndrome patients may prove beneficial in preventing the various cardiometabolic complications in such patients. (author)

  4. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components of metabolic syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a regional cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jessica L; Kar, Sujata; Vanky, Eszter; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Piltonen, Terhi; Puurunen, Johanna; Tapanainen, Juha S; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes Rosa; Hayashida, Sylvia Asaka Yamashita; Soares, Jose Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Mellembakken, Jan Roar; Dokras, Anuja

    2017-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder and its presentation varies with race and ethnicity. Reproductive-age women with polycystic ovary syndrome are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome; however, it is not clear if prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of its components differs based on race and ethnicity. Moreover, the majority of these women do not undergo routine screening for metabolic syndrome. We sought to compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of its components in women with polycystic ovary syndrome in the United States with women in India, Brazil, Finland, and Norway. This is a cross-sectional study performed in 1089 women with polycystic ovary syndrome from 1999 through 2016 in 5 outpatient clinics in the United States, India, Brazil, Finland, and Norway. Polycystic ovary syndrome was defined by the Rotterdam criteria. Main outcome measures were: metabolic syndrome prevalence, blood pressure, body mass index, fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting triglycerides, and fasting glucose. Data from all sites were reevaluated for appropriate application of diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome, identification of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype, and complete metabolic workup. The US White women with polycystic ovary syndrome were used as the referent group. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between race and metabolic syndrome prevalence and its components and to adjust for potential confounders, including age and body mass index. The median age of the entire cohort was 28 years. Women from India had the highest mean Ferriman-Gallwey score for clinical hyperandrogenism (15.6 ± 6.5, P polycystic ovary syndrome, there are significant differences in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of its components based on race and ethnicity, which may reflect contributions from both racial and environmental factors. Our findings indicate the prevalence

  6. Relationship between metabolic syndrome components and oxidative stress in elderly community-dwelling Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Martínez-Cruz, Mauricio; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) components and oxidative stress (OxS) in elderly community-dwelling Mexicans. We carried out a comparative cross-sectional study on 113 elderly subjects (> or =60 years old); 50 of them did not have MetS and 63 did have MetS (based on Adult Treatment Panel III criteria). We measured total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and calculated the SOD/GPx ratio. High blood pressure (HBP) was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) > or =140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) > or =90 mm Hg. We found a statistically significant increase in the percentage of cases of severe OxS in elderly subjects with MetS in comparison to healthy elderly (17 vs. 8%, OR: 7.33, 95% CI: 1.38-42.39; p < 0.01). It was observed that subjects with 5 MetS components had a 10-fold higher risk of developing OxS than subjects with 1 component (OR: 11.00, 95% CI: 1.72-115.17; p < 0.01). A positive correlation between SBP and LPO (r = 0.202, p < 0.05), and a negative correlation of SBP and DBP with TAS activity (r = -0.232, p < 0.05; r = -0.211, p < 0.05) were also observed. Our findings suggest that MetS is linked to severe OxS, that the number of metabolic syndrome components is a significant risk factor in the development of OxS, and that HBP is the most important metabolic syndrome component linked to OxS in the elderly.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  8. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  9. The prevalence of microalbuminuria and its relationships with the components of metabolic syndrome in the general population of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, BaoDe; Yang, DaGan; Chen, Yu; Xu, WeiYi; Ye, Bo; Ni, ZhenYuan

    2010-05-02

    Few studies have examined the relationships between the prevalence of microalbuminuria and the metabolic risk factors in the general population of China. We performed a population based study to investigate the prevalence of microalbuminuria and its relationships with the components of the metabolic syndrome in Hangzhou, China. The subjects of this cross-sectional study were the individuals from 19 to 87 y. The metabolic syndrome was defined based on the criteria of the Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS). Microalbuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g. A total of 2985 subjects (average age of 44 y) were analyzed. Among them, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria was 12.6% and 8.8%, respectively. Microalbuminuria prevalence rate was significantly higher in the population >60 y than metabolic abnormalities was significantly higher than the control group, and the prevalence rate of MAU in the metabolic syndrome group reached up to 20.3%. There was a significantly positive correlation between the prevalence of microalbuminuria and the corresponding components of the metabolic syndrome (Pmetabolic syndrome. Early screening strategies for prevention and treatment of MAU are strongly suggested, especially in the population >60 y and the ones with metabolic abnormalities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome components in Mexican adults without type 2 diabetes or hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Jiménez-Corona, Aída; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J; Barquera, Simón; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To describe the number of Mexican adults with undiagnosed diabetes and arterial hypertension and their association with obesity. The study included a sub-sample of 6 613 subjects aged 20 years or more who participated in the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2006). Subjects with a previous diagnosis of diabetes or hypertension (n=1 861) were excluded. Prevalences and standard errors were estimated, taking into account the complex sample design. 6.4 million adults have obesity and undiagnosed impaired fasting glucose. Almost two million more have fasting glucose levels diagnostic for diabetes. As for arterial blood pressure, 5.4 million adults had prehypertension. Another 5.4 million adults had blood pressure levels suggestive of probable hypertension. A total of 21.4 million Mexican adults with obesity had at least one further component of the metabolic syndrome. A large proportion of adults with obesity-related metabolic comorbidities remains undiagnosed in Mexico.

  11. Gender Differences Time Trends for Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among Tehranian Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate the trend of metabolic syndrome and its components in Tehran children and adolescents during a median followup of 6.6 years. Methods. Data from 1999–2001 (phase I, 2002–2005 (phase II, and 2006–2008 (phase III of the Tehran, Lipid and Glucose Study were analyzed (=5439; age 6–18 years for the trend of metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components. General estimation equation (GEE models were used to analyze this correlated data. Results. The crude prevalence of MetS for boys at baseline was 13.2%, which increased to 16.4% in the third phase. In girls, the prevalence of Mets decreased from 11.8% at baseline to 6% during followup. The odd ratios (OR of obesity over the whole study period were raised in both sexes. The OR of abdominal obesity increased significantly in boys, but no change was observed in girls. No significant OR was observed in boys, while OR for MetS was shown to have a decreasing trend in girls during the followup. In the three time points, the ORs of MetS decreased significantly in girls but no significant difference was observed in boys. Conclusion. Inspite of increasing trend for obesity in both sexes, the trend of MetS decreased in girls and was relatively stable in boys, in Tehranian children, and adolescents.

  12. Longitudinal study of the diagnosis of components of the metabolic syndrome in individuals with binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, James I; Lalonde, Justine K; Coit, Caitlin E; Tsuang, Ming T; McElroy, Susan L; Crow, Scott J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Hudson, Margo S; Yanovski, Jack A; Rosenthal, Norman R; Pope, Harrison G

    2010-06-01

    Binge-eating disorder may represent a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. The objective was to assess longitudinally the relation between binge-eating disorder and components of the metabolic syndrome. At 2.5 and 5 y of follow-up, 134 individuals with binge-eating disorder and 134 individuals with no history of eating disorders, who were frequency-matched for age, sex, and baseline body mass index (BMI), were interviewed during the follow-up interval regarding new diagnoses of 3 metabolic syndrome components: hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. A comparison of individuals with and without a binge-eating disorder in analyses adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, and interval BMI change had hazard ratios (95% CIs) for reporting new diagnoses of metabolic syndrome components of 2.2 (1.2, 4.2; P = 0.023) for dyslipidemia, 1.5 (0.76, 2.9; P = 0.33) for hypertension, 1.6 (0.77, 3.9; P = 0.29) for type 2 diabetes, 1.7 (1.1, 2.6; P = 0.023) for any component, and 2.4 (1.1, 5.7; P = 0.038) for > or =2 components. Binge-eating disorder may confer a risk of components of the metabolic syndrome over and above the risk attributable to obesity alone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00777634.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Its Individual Components among Jordanian Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khateeb Mohammed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MeS and its individual components in Jordanian children and adolescents aged 7–18 years and determine the factors that are associated with clustering of metabolic abnormalities. MeS was defined using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF definition. The prevalence of MeS was estimated from 512 subjects who had complete information on all MeS components. The prevalence of MeS according to IDF criteria was 1.4% in subjects aged between 10 and 15.9 years and 3.6% in subjects aged between 16 and 18 years. When categorized according to body mass index (BMI, the prevalence of the MeS was 15.1% in obese subjects, compared to 0.3% in subjects with normal BMI, and 3.0% in overweight subjects. In conclusion, our results indicate that although the prevalence of MeS is low in Jordanian children and adolescents, a large proportion of them had one or two metabolic abnormalities.

  14. Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sang-Yhun; Lee, June-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is increasing evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mortality. However, previous research examining metabolic syndrome and mortality in older populations has produced mixed results. In addition, there is a clear need to identify and manage individual components of metabolic syndrome to decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this meta-analysis, we searched the MEDLINE databases using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. Based on 20 prospective cohort studies, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15–1.32; I2 = 55.9%] and CVD mortality (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11–1.39; I2 = 58.1%). The risk estimates of all-cause mortality for single components of metabolic syndrome were significant for higher values of waist circumference or body mass index (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88–1.00), higher values of blood glucose (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05–1.34), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02–1.21). In the elderly population, metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, increased blood glucose and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with increased mortality. However, older obese or overweight individuals may have a decreased mortality risk. Thus, the findings of the current meta-analysis raise questions about the utility of the definition of metabolic syndrome in predicting all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in the elderly population. PMID:29137039

  15. Insulin resistance and its association with the components of the metabolic syndrome among obese children and adolescents

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    Mass-Díaz Eliezer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance is the primary metabolic disorder associated with obesity; yet little is known about its role as a determinant of the metabolic syndrome in obese children. The aim of this study is to assess the association between the degree of insulin resistance and the different components of the metabolic syndrome among obese children and adolescents. Methods An analytical, cross-sectional and population-based study was performed in forty-four public primary schools in Campeche City, Mexico. A total of 466 obese children and adolescents between 11-13 years of age were recruited. Fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured; insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome were also evaluated. Results Out of the total population studied, 69% presented low values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, 49% suffered from abdominal obesity, 29% had hypertriglyceridemia, 8% presented high systolic and 13% high diastolic blood pressure, 4% showed impaired fasting glucose, 51% presented insulin resistance and 20% metabolic syndrome. In spite of being obese, 13% of the investigated population did not present any metabolic disorder. For each one of the components of the metabolic syndrome, when insulin resistance increased so did odds ratios as cardiometabolic risk factors. Conclusions Regardless of age and gender an increased degree of insulin resistance is associated with a higher prevalence of disorders in each of the components of the metabolic syndrome and with a heightened risk of suffering metabolic syndrome among obese children and adolescents.

  16. The metabolic syndrome identifies a heterogeneous group of metabolic component combinations in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Crystal Man Ying; Huxley, Rachel R; Woodward, Mark; Zimmet, Paul; Shaw, Jonathan; Cho, Nam H; Kim, Hyung Rae; Viali, Satu; Tominaga, Makoto; Vistisen, Dorte; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Colagiuri, Stephen

    2008-09-01

    To compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) by combinations of MetS components derived from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. Four studies with ethnically distinct populations from the Asia-Pacific region were selected from the DETECT-2 study database. The prevalences of combinations of MetS components using the modified ATPIII (modATPIII) and IDF MetS definitions were compared between sexes and across populations. A total of 22,952 participants from Australia, Japan, Korea and Samoa were included. The age-adjusted prevalence of modATPIII MetS varied from 9.4 to 35.8% in men and 10.3 to 57.2% in women; results for IDF were generally higher. Prevalences of the 16 possible MetS component combinations from the modATPIII definition that result in a diagnosis of MetS ranged from 0 to 12.7%. Of those with IDF-defined abdominal obesity, the prevalences of the 11 IDF-defined MetS component combinations ranged from 0.2 to 18.3%. The large variation in the prevalence of possible MetS component combinations to diagnose MetS may explain the different risk of cardiovascular outcomes associated with MetS in different populations, especially since particular combinations of MetS components are associated with different risk of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

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    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  18. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  19. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, and microvascular dysfunction: a principal component analysis approach

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    Panazzolo Diogo G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to evaluate the multivariate association between functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements. Methods Data from 189 female subjects (34.0±15.5 years, 30.5±7.1 kg/m2, who were non-smokers, non-regular drug users, without a history of diabetes and/or hypertension, were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA. PCA is a classical multivariate exploratory tool because it highlights common variation between variables allowing inferences about possible biological meaning of associations between them, without pre-establishing cause-effect relationships. In total, 15 variables were used for PCA: body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP, fasting plasma glucose, levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, triglycerides (TG, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP, and functional microvascular variables measured by nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy was used for direct visualization of nutritive capillaries, assessing functional capillary density, red blood cell velocity (RBCV at rest and peak after 1 min of arterial occlusion (RBCVmax, and the time taken to reach RBCVmax (TRBCVmax. Results A total of 35% of subjects had metabolic syndrome, 77% were overweight/obese, and 9.5% had impaired fasting glucose. PCA was able to recognize that functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements had a similar variation. The first five principal components explained most of the intrinsic variation of the data. For example, principal component 1 was associated with BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, insulin, TG, CRP, and TRBCVmax varying in the same way. Principal component 1 also showed a strong association among HDL-c, RBCV, and RBCVmax, but in the opposite way. Principal component 3 was

  20. Daily profile in two circadian markers "melatonin and cortisol" and associations with metabolic syndrome components.

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    Corbalán-Tutau, Dolores; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Nicolás, Francisco; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-01-17

    The aim of the present work was to investigate associations in circadian markers, melatonin (MT) and cortisol, with metabolic syndrome (MetS) parameters, and with leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin plasma values. The study was conducted in 70 women (mean age: 41±10years) that were classified without MetS (n=30) and with MetS (n=40). Blood collection, plasma separation and processing, and biochemical analyses for plasma lipids were performed. For measuring salivary melatonin, participants collected two samples. The first simple was obtained before lunch (at 14:00 p.m.) and the second sample was taken at night (3:00 a.m.). On a random working day, participants delivered repeated salivary cortisol samples. The first sample was obtained in the morning (09:00 a.m.), then before lunch at (14:00 p.m.), and finally just before bedtime (23:00 p.m.). Significant differences were found between the MT measurements taken at night in women without and with MetS. With respect to cortisol, significant differences were found in the different times cortisol levels toward a more flattened pattern among MetS women. Both parameters were positive correlated between them. Of note MT and cortisol night/morning ratios were associated with MetS score and metabolic syndrome components. The findings indicate that diminished daily amplitude in MT and cortisol circadian patterns was associated with metabolic disturbances in blood pressure, glucose and plasma lipids regulation, ghrelin and adipocyte-secreted hormones such as leptin and adiponectin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Associations between physical activity and sedentary time on components of metabolic syndrome among adults with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Jason R; Prasad, Vivek K; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Blair, Steven N; Sui, Xuemei; Burgess, Stephanie; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Recent data show that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are at a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which could possibly be explained by an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) due to the known toxicities associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between physical activity (PA) and components of MetSyn in a sample of PLWHA taking ART. A total of 31 males and 32 females living with HIV and currently taking ART were enrolled in a home-based PA intervention aimed to reduce risk factors for CVD. Clinical assessments included measures of resting blood pressure (BP), waist circumference, height, weight, PA levels via accelerometer, and a fasted blood draw. Components of MetSyn were divided into three clusters (1 = 0-1; 2 = 2; 3 = 3 or more). A one-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences between clusters. Multiple linear regressions were used to identify significant associations between moderate intensity PA (MPA) and sedentary time among components of MetSyn. MPA was significantly lower across MetSyn clusters (p < 0.001), whereas sedentary time was significantly higher (p = 0.01). A multiple linear regression showed MPA to be a significant predictor of waist circumference after controlling for age, race, gender, and sedentary time. Routine PA can be beneficial in helping PLWHA reduce waist circumference ultimately leading to metabolic improvements. This in turn would help PLWHA self-manage known components of MetSyn, thus reducing their risk of CVD and mortality.

  2. Associations between smoking, components of metabolic syndrome and lipoprotein particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Sandra N.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vonk, Judith M.; Boezen, H. Marike; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Feskens, Edith J.; van Beek, Andre P.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clustering of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors is known as metabolic syndrome (MetS). The risk of having MetS is strongly associated with increased adiposity and can be further modified by smoking behavior. Apolipoproteins (apo) associated with low-density

  3. Associations between smoking, components of metabolic syndrome and lipoprotein particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, S.N.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vonk, J.M.; Boezen, H.M.; Dullaart, R.P.F.; Muller Kobold, A.C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Beek, van A.P.; Klauw, van der M.M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clustering of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors is known as metabolic syndrome (MetS). The risk of having MetS is strongly associated with increased adiposity and can be further modified by smoking behavior. Apolipoproteins (apo) associated with low-density

  4. Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome Components and Periodontal Disease in a Japanese General Population: the Suita Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikui, Miki; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Ono, Takahiro; Kida, Momoyo; Kosaka, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    A positive association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and periodontal status has recently been noted. However, no study has evaluated the relationship by sex and in a general urban population using the uniform definition proposed in the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between MetS and periodontal status using the uniform definition in a general urban Japanese population. A total of 1,856 Japanese men and women (mean age: 66.4 years) were studied using data from the Suita study. Periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). MetS was defined using the 2009 Joint Interim Statement. The associations of the MetS and its components with periodontal disease were investigated using multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, drinking, and smoking. Among the components of the MetS, low HDL cholesterol level was significantly associated with periodontal disease in men and women [odds ratios (OR)=2.39 and 1.53; 95% confidence intervals=1.36-4.19 and 1.06-2.19]. Furthermore, the risk of periodontal disease showed 1.43-, 1.42-, and 1.89-fold increases in those with 2, 3, and ≥4 components, respectively, compared with those having no components (P trend <0.001). For the analysis by sex, the risk of periodontal disease was increased 2.27- and 1.76-fold in those with ≥4 components in men and women, respectively (both P trend =0.001). These findings suggest that MetS and lower HDL cholesterol are associated with periodontal disease. Subjects with two or more MetS components had a significantly higher prevalence of periodontal disease.

  5. Components of the metabolic syndrome differ between young and old adults in the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Andrew D; Sardi, Gabriel L; Reed, James F

    2012-08-01

    Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is high in the United States and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The authors examined whether the prevalence of the MetS and its components differs across age groups. Data were analyzed from 4 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys between the years 1999 and 2006. Prevalence of MetS as defined by the Third Report of the Adult Treatment Panel criteria and prevalence of associated cardiac risk factors were determined in 41,474 participants aged 18 years and older without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). All estimates were weighted. Prevalence of MetS among asymptomatic adults without CVD was 20.5% and remained stable for the total population during survey periods. Prevalence of MetS increased with age: 6.6% in young adults (age 18-29 years) and 34.6% in older adults (70 and older). Components of MetS differed between young and old adults. Young adults had lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, less glucose intolerance, and less hypertension. This study provides an estimate of MetS prevalence in asymptomatic adults in the United States during an 8-year period revealing that MetS affects a large number of Americans. Components of MetS differ between young and old adults and may have important implications in their clinical management. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Menopause: clustering of metabolic syndrome components and population changes in insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejsková, M; Alušík, S; Suchánek, M; Zecová, S; Pitha, J

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in women rises rapidly during the menopause, substantially increasing their cardiovascular risk and mortality. The aim of the study was to analyze menopausal changes in individual MS components and the parameter of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A random population sample of 909 women aged 45-54 years, resident in Prague 4, was examined in an epidemiological study. After excluding women with gynecological hormone therapy or surgical therapy, the two groups of women were compared: women of reproductive age (REPRO, n = 245) vs. naturally postmenopausal women (POSTm, n = 149). The incidence of MS rose significantly in menopause (REPRO/POSTm 22.9 ± 2.6%/38.3 ± 4.0%; p menopause (REPRO/POSTm: low HOMA-IR 13.8%/18.7%, not significant; high HOMA-IR 30.9%/57.3%, p menopause, there was an increase in the clustered incidence (accompanying MS) of each of the five MS components at the expense of isolated incidence (not accompanying MS). The acceleration of MS incidence at the onset of menopause may be accompanied by an increase in insulin resistance only in the population at highest risk. Reproductive women entering the menopause with an isolated MS component are at high risk for developing additional risk factors during menopause.

  7. Association of alcohol consumption and components of metabolic syndrome among people in rural China.

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    Xiao, Jing; Huang, Jian-Ping; Xu, Guang-Fei; Chen, De-Xi; Wu, Gui-Yun; Zhang, Min; Shen, Yi; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Accumulative evidence in the literature suggests alcohol consumption is a protective factor of the metabolic syndrome (MS). However, few studies investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and components of MS. We examined association of several types of alcoholic beverage with components of MS among people in rural China. In the Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study (NMSS), a cross-sectional study, a total of 20,502 participants, including 13,505 women and 6,997 men aged 18-74 years, were recruited between 2007 and 2008 in Nantong, China. Socio-economic status, dietary intake, physical exercise, alcoholic beverage consumption, and smoking status information were obtained, and triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprtein cholesterol (HDL-c), blood pressure (BP) and blood glucose level were examined for all participants. Logistic regression model and the restricted cubic spline approach were used to analyze the associations between alcoholic beverage consumption and MS components. The MS prevalence was 21.1% in the whole population, which was significantly low among drinkers (20.6%), compared with non-drinkers (23.6%) in women, and was comparable in men (16.4% versus 17.1%). High HDL-c level was observed among drinkers, compared with non-drinkers in both men and women. Low TG level and Systolic BP (SBP) were found only among rice wine drinkers in women, and high waist circumference, high TG and BP were found among beer and liquor drinkers in men. Furthermore, we found that the highest quartile of rice wine drink in women may decrease 24% risk of high TG, 30% risk of low HDL-c and 43% risk of high glucose among MS components cases respectively, compared with non-drinkers (p for trend Rice wine decreased both TG level and blood glucose in women only and it could be one of healthy alcoholic beverages in MS prevention in Chinese women. While excessive liquor consumption increased BP and waist circumference level and it may lead to hypertension and central

  8. Renal function and metabolic syndrome components on cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2008-04-01

    Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated their roles in CVD and all-cause death among ethnic Chinese population. We followed up a cohort of 11429 men and 7472 women aged 20 years and older for an average 4.9 years (median: 3.5, inter-quartile range: 2.7-7.9) from the tertiary hospital health check-up population. CVD death rates increased when the quintiles of each variable progressed. Metabolic syndrome was a significant predictor for CVD death, with relative risk of up to 4.68. In the multivariate adjusted model that included metabolic syndrome, quintiles of serum creatinine concentrations, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and uric acids were significantly associated CVD death, with the highest relative risk of creatinine concentration (11.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.43-51.7, P for trend: creatinine concentrations and estimated GFR had the higher areas under ROC curves of CVD death (0.76, 95% CI: 0.71-0.80 for creatinine and 0.76, 95% CI: 0.72-0.81 for estimated GFR). The two marker models showed that metabolic syndrome and impaired renal function had the most significant roles in predicting CVD deaths; the multivariate relative risk was 30.6 (95% CI: 3.7-254, P: 0.002) in participants with the highest creatinine and presence of metabolic syndrome compared with those with the lowest and absence of metabolic syndrome. Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for CVD and all-cause deaths among ethnic Chinese.

  9. Association between Exposure to Ambient Air Particulates and Metabolic Syndrome Components in a Saudi Arabian Population

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    Magdy Shamy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulates may be a factor in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS. In this novel study, we investigated the relationship between particulate levels and prevalence of MetS component abnormalities (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity in a recruited cohort (N = 2025 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We observed significant associations between a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and increased risks for MetS (Risk Ratio (RR: 1.12; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.06–1.19, hyperglycemia (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.03–1.14, and hypertension (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.14. PM2.5 from soil/road dust was found to be associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.19 and hypertension (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.05–1.18, while PM2.5 from traffic was associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.05–1.71. We did not observe any health associations with source-specific mass exposures. Our findings suggest that exposure to specific elemental components of PM2.5, especially Ni, may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic disorders.

  10. Systemic markers of oxidative stress in relation to metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Mihaela; Vesa, Ştefan; Suciu, Şoimiţa; Blaga, Sorin Nicu

    2013-01-01

    The potential role of oxidative stress (OS) in metabolic syndrome (MetS) is rapidly evolving. Reported results support the concept that increased OS may play a key role in the development of atherosclerosis, hypertension and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical correlates of systemic OS markers in a well characterized group of patients with MetS. 72 hospitalized patients with a mean age 59.19+/-5.26 years were studied between October 2010 and June 2011. MetS was diagnosed based on the AHA/NHLBI/IDF 2009 definition. OS was assessed by urinary 8-isoprostaglandinF2α (8-isoPGF2α) (immunometric assays) and plasmatic uric acid (UA). Antioxidant status was evaluated by plasmatic glutathione peroxidase (GPx). These data were compared to those of 100 subjects without MetS (mean age 59.93+/-4.7 years). All biomarkers were significantly higher in MetS patients as compared with healthy individuals (pblood pressure (all pHigh blood pressure seems to be the key component linking OS to MetS. Antioxidant status is influenced by the number of MetS components with GPx being a risk factor for MetS.

  11. Advanced oxidation protein products are more related to metabolic syndrome components than biomarkers of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Danielle; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Dichi, Isaias

    2015-09-01

    Although advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been reported as the most appropriate parameter for determination of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a direct comparison between protein and lipid peroxidation has not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to compare protein peroxidation with lipid peroxidation measured by 2 different methodologies (tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay). The hypothesis of this study was that AOPPs would be more related to MetS than to oxidative markers of lipid peroxidation. This cross-sectional study evaluated 76 patients with MetS and 20 healthy subjects. Prooxidant-antioxidant index (PAI) assessed as AOPP/total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter ratio progressively increased (P protein (r = 0.275, P protein (r = 0.278, P protein peroxidation determined by AOPPs, and especially by PAI, is more related to MetS components than lipid peroxidation. In addition, PAI progressively increased with the number of MetS components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between serologic markers of periodontal bacteria and metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepika; Choi, Youn-Hee; Zhang, Jiajia; Hazlett, Linda J; Merchant, Anwar T

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis is a result of a complex biologic alteration of the periodontal microenvironment and a distributional shift of key periodontal pathogens. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complex cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, has been linked to periodontal diseases; however, the contribution of periodontal bacteria to systemic conditions remains unclear. The study population comprised 7,848 United States adults who participated in an interview, underwent a clinical oral-health examination, and had serum immunoglobulin G titers measured against 19 periodontal bacteria as part of the third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. The z-score antibody titers were clustered into four mutually exclusive groups and named after Socransky's classification of periodontal bacteria (Orange-Red, Red-Green, Yellow-Orange, and Orange-Blue). Survey logistic regression was used to investigate the independent associations between the cluster scores, and MetS and each component, including hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, central obesity, and elevated fasting glucose. The Orange-Red cluster score (that included Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella spp.) was positively associated (odds ratio [OR] = 1.067, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.12) and the Orange-Blue cluster score (which included Actinomyces naeslundii and Eubacterium nodatum) was inversely associated (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97) with elevated fasting glucose (≥ 110 mg/dL) after adjustment for clusters and potential confounders. Neither MetS nor its other remaining MetS components were associated with a particular cluster score. The associations between specific antibody clusters (Orange-Red and Orange-Blue) against periodontal bacteria and elevated plasma glucose were in qualitatively opposite directions after multivariable adjustment in a large, adult population. The periodontal bacterial profile was not found to be associated with metabolic

  13. Systematic review of clinical studies related to pork intake and metabolic syndrome or its components

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    Stettler N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Stettler,1 Mary M Murphy,1 Leila M Barraj,1 Kimberly M Smith,2 Rexford S Ahima3 1Exponent Inc, Washington, DC, USA; 2Exponent Inc, Derby, United Kingdom; 3Translational Research Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Globally, both the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the consumption of meat, in particular pork meat, have increased, concurrently. Processed meats have been associated with an increased risk for diabetes in observational studies. Therefore, it is important to understand the possible mechanisms of this association and the impact of meats from different species. The goal of this systematic review was to assess experimental human studies of the impact of pork intake compared with other protein sources on early markers for the development of diabetes, ie, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and the components of the metabolic syndrome. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and EMBASE and using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. Eight studies were eligible and critically reviewed. Five studies were based on a single meal or single day exposure to pork, as compared with other sources of protein. The glucose-insulin response following the pork meals did not differ compared with beef, shrimp, or mixed sources of proteins. However, compared with eggs, ham (processed meat led to a larger insulin response in nonobese subjects. Compared with whey, ham led to a smaller insulin response and a larger glucose response. These findings suggest possible mechanisms for the association between processed meat and the development of diabetes. Nonprocessed pork meats were not compared with eggs or whey. The three longer interventions (11 days to 6 months did not show a significant impact of pork on the components of the metabolic syndrome, with the exception of a possible benefit on waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (one study each with

  14. WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE AS INDICATOR COMPONENTS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN THE SIBERIAN POPULATION

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    G. I. Simonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Object of research: to determine the cut-off point of waist circumference (WC identify the components of metabolic syndrome (MS in a large industrial center of Western Siberia.In the period from 2003 to 2005 in the screening population surveyed 9362 people, including 4268 men (45.6% and 5094 women (54.4%.The response rate was 61%. The study protocol included a sociodemographic data, measurement of blood pressure (BP, anthropometry (height, weight, WC, the definition of biochemical parameters. Statistical analysis was performed using the package SPSS. To determine the cut-off points of the used ROC model.In the group with ≥2 components of MS cut-off point WC from the men was 93.3 cm (sensitivity 72%, specificity 83%, women – 90.2 cm (sensitivity 72%, specificity 62%.The lowest cut-off point WC marked BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg for men – 90 cm (sensitivity 66.8%, specificity 58.1%, for women – 86.5 cm (sensitivity 71.0%, specificity 55.7%. The highest cut-off point from the defined patients with diabetes for men was 99.0 cm (sensitivity 61%, specificity 70.2%, for women – cm (sensitivity 64.1%, specificity 65.9%.Conclusions: Cut-off point from the persons with the presence of ≥2 MS components in Siberian population 45–69 years, in accordance with the ROC analysis are 93.3 cm for men and 90.2 cm for women. The lowest cut-off point WC marked BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg for men – 90 cm, for women – 86.5 cm. The highest cut-off point from the defined patients with diabetes for men was 99.0 cm, for women – 95 cm.

  15. Serum vitamin d levels and the components of metabolic syndrome: an analytical cross-sectional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roomi, M.A.; Farooq, A.; Ullah, E.; Lone, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was planned to determine the serum vitamin D levels and its relation with the various components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in MetS positive and MetS negative subjects. Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study on 88 subjects who were divided into two groups based on whether they fulfill the diagnostic criteria for MetS or not. Fasting serum glucose, lipid profile, insulin, HOMA-IR and vitamin D levels were measured. Two sample-t test and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the differences. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests were used to observe the correlations. Results: BMI (p=0.001), waist/hip ratio (p=0.001), systolic blood pressure (p=0.010), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.010), fasting serum TGs (p = 0.001), TG/HDL ratio (p=0.001), fasting blood sugar (p=0.010), fasting serum insulin (p = 0.001) and HOMA-IR (p=0.001) were significantly high in MetS positive than MetS negative subjects. In MetS Positive subjects, serum vitamin D levels were found to have negative correlation with serum LDL (r= -0.485, p=0.001), total cholesterol (r= -0.408, p=0.007) and total cholesterol/HDL ratio (r= -0.355, p=0.019). Moreover, serum vitamin D levels were found to have positive correlation with HDL/LDL ratio (r= 0.443, p=0.003). Other components of MetS did not show significant correlation with serum vitamin D levels in MetS positive subjects. In MetS negative subjects, serum vitamin D levels did not show any significant correlation with any of the study parameters. Conclusions: Serum vitamin D levels were correlated with a number of MetS components which may be controlled by optimizing vitamin D levels. (author)

  16. Frequency of metabolic syndrome and its components in 300 Pakistani obese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, I.; Ishaq, T.; Fida, Z.; Rehman, F.U.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its constituents in a sample of Pakistani obese patients. Methodology: In this descriptive and cross-sectional study, we used a sample of 300 patients from Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan from April 2016 to November 2016. They were randomly selected and their mean age was between 15 and 25 years. The variables obtained included BMI, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride levels, LDL- cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, waist to hip ratio, waist circumference and insulin resistance. Results: Of the 300 patients, the frequency of MS was 20%. There were no significant differences in the frequency of developing MS between the genders. The order of frequency of the components as observed was as follows; abdominal obesity was 88%, high triglyceride level was 85%, males were 40%, 40% of the sampled population resided in the urban area. Meanwhile, 35% of the patients had hypertension while only 5% had hyperglycemia. The frequency of developing MS was 70 times higher in patients with high triglyceride levels in their when compared to those with normal levels. Conclusion: The frequency of MS and its components in Pakistani adolescent patients is high. The high levels of triglyceride and a sedentary lifestyle profoundly contributed to MS. Moreover, the findings signify the importance of early treatment and prevention of obesity in working toward reducing the rate of diabetes mellitus type 2; as glucose intolerance had a strong relationship with the components of MS, and cardiovascular diseases such coronary artery disease. (author)

  17. The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome, Its Components, and Dry Eye: A Cross-Sectional Study.

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    Erdur, Sevil Karaman; Aydin, Rukiye; Ozsutcu, Mustafa; Olmuscelik, Oktay; Eliacik, Mustafa; Demirci, Goktug; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate tear osmolarity and tear film function and ocular surface changes in patients with metabolic syndrome. 108 eyes of 64 patients with metabolic syndrome (group 1) and 110 eyes of 55 healthy individuals (group 2) were included in this cross-sectional study. All participants were evaluated using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, Schirmer I test, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and tear osmolarity. Main outcome measures were Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, Schirmer I test, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and tear osmolarity values. Tear osmolarity values and OSDI scores were significantly higher in group 1 (314.4 ± 19.1 mOsm and 38.9 ± 1.1, respectively) compared with group 2 (295 ± 14.3 mOsm and 18.69 ± 17.2, respectively) (p = 0.01 for both). The Schirmer test values and TBUT in group 1 (10 ± 3.7 mm and 14.8 ± 3.6 sec, respectively) were significantly lower compared with group 2 (16.8 ± 2.6 mm and 18.1 ± 0.5 sec, respectively) (p metabolic syndrome can influence tear osmolarity and tear film function. Patients with metabolic syndrome showed tear hyperosmolarity and tear film dysfunction.

  18. Association of HMOX1 and NQO1 Polymorphisms with Metabolic Syndrome Components.

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    Angélica Martínez-Hernández

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is among the most important public health problems worldwide, and is recognized as a major risk factor for various illnesses, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, oxidative stress has been suggested as part of MetS aetiology. The heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 genes are crucial mediators of cellular defence against oxidative stress. In the present study, we analysed the associations of HMOX1 (GTn and NQO1 C609T polymorphisms with MetS and its components. Our study population comprised 735 Mexican Mestizos unrelated volunteers recruited from different tertiary health institutions from Mexico City. In order to know the HMOX1 (GTn and NQO1 C609T allele frequencies in Amerindians, we included a population of 241 Amerindian native speakers. Their clinical and demographic data were recorded. The HMOX1 (GTn polymorphism was genotyped using PCR and fluorescence technology. NQO1 C609T polymorphism genotyping was performed using TaqMan probes. Short allele (<25 GT repeats of the HMOX1 polymorphism was associated with high systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and the T allele of the NQO1 C609T polymorphism was associated with increased triglyceride levels and decreased HDL-c levels, but only in individuals with MetS. This is the first study to analyse the association between MetS and genes involved in oxidative stress among Mexican Mestizos. Our data suggest that polymorphisms of HMOX1 and NQO1 genes are associated with a high risk of metabolic disorders, including high systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL-c levels in Mexican Mestizo individuals.

  19. Impact of Metabolic Syndrome Components on Asthma Control and Life Quality of Patients

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    Andrey V. Budnevsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of the clinical course of asthma in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS and to analyze the influence of the MetS components on the course of asthma, control of asthma symptoms, and the the quality of life (QL of patients with asthma. Materials and Methods: We examined 95 asthma patients aged from 18 to 60 years. The patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 35 patients without MetS (24/68.6% women and 11/31.4% men; mean age, 49.81±0.77 years, and Group 2 included 60 patients with MetS(45/75.0% women and 15/25.0% men; mean age, 49.82±0.77 years. Results: The patients with asthma and MetS have a more severe clinical course of asthma, with frequent exacerbations and uncontrolled asthma symptoms, low spirometry results and a low level of QL.

  20. Plasma concentrations of retinol in obese children and adolescents: relationship to metabolic syndrome components

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    Marcia Teske

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate obese children and adolescents' retinol plasma levels and to correlate them with metabolic syndrome components. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 61 obese children and adolescents (body mass index Z score - ZBMI>+2. Pubertal development, arterial blood pressure, body weight and height for nutritional classification and waist circumference were obtained. A 15mL blood sample was collected (after a 12-hour fasting in a low luminosity room for retinol determination (cut-off inadequate if <30µg/dL, lipid profile (HDL-c, LDL-c, and triglycerides, oral glucose tolerance test (fasting and 120 minutes and for high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Spearman correlation and multiple linear regression were used in the statistical analysis. Results: Mean age was 10.7±2.7 years. There was a predominance of male gender 38/61 (62% and pre-pubertal 35/61 (57% subjects. The average plasmatic retinol was 48.5±18.6ug/dL. Retinol deficiency and severe obesity were observed in 6/61 (10% and 36/61 (59%, respectively. Glucose level at 120 minutes was the independent and predictive variable of plasma retinol levels [β=-0.286 (95%CI -0.013 - -0.001]. Conclusions: An independent and inverse association between plasma retinol levels and glucose tolerance was observed, suggesting an important contribution of this vitamin in the morbidities associated to obesity in children and adolescents.

  1. Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Is Associated with Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents

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    Te-Fu Chan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs are the principle source of added sugar in diets. Cardiometabolic disturbances can occur from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the gender-specific association of SSB intake with metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components among adolescents in Taiwan. A total of 2727 adolescents aged 12 to 16 years randomly selected from three diverse economic areas in Southern Taiwan by using a multistage-sampling strategy participated in this study. Demographic, dietary, physical and anthropometric parameters were measured, and serum lipid profiles and glucose levels were determined. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF specifies that MetS requires abdominal obesity and ≥2 abnormal components, and Cook criteria for MetS require ≥3 abnormal components. We applied survey-data modules to data analyses, and used multiple regression and logistic models to adjust for covariates. An increased SSB intake was linked to a greater waist circumference in both sexes and to systolic blood pressure in boys (P for trend: ≤0.043. Male moderate and high consuming SSB drinkers exhibited triglyceride levels that were 8.0 and 8.2 mg/dL significantly higher, respectively, than those of nondrinkers. Compared with nondrinkers, boys who consumed >500 mL/day (high quantity of SSBs exhibited 10.3-fold (95% confidence intervals (CIs: 1.2-90.2 and 5.1-fold (95% CIs: 1.01-25.5 risks of contracting MetS, as defined by the IDF and Cook criteria for MetS, respectively. In girls, the risk estimates for the same comparison were not significant by the IDF criteria (6.5-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.9-∞ or Cook criteria (5.9-fold risk, 95% CIs: 0.8-43.8 for MetS. High SSB consumption was also linked to 1.9-fold (95% CIs: 1.1-3.1 and 2.7-fold (95% CIs: 1.3-5.7 higher risks of being at a greater overall metabolic risk in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, a high SSB intake is associated with adolescent

  2. Investigation of relationship of visceral body fat and inflammatory markers with metabolic syndrome and its components among apparently healthy individuals.

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    Turker, Yasemin; Baltaci, Davut; Turker, Yasin; Ozturk, Serkan; Sonmez, Cemil Isik; Deler, Mehmet Harun; Sariguzel, Yunus Cem; Sariguzel, Feyza; Ankarali, Handan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of disorders and great risk for cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate association between severity of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and anthropometric measurements, and to evaluate correlation of MetS and its components with metabolic deterioration and inflammatory indexes. The cross-sectional study enrolled 1474 patients with obesity and overweight. The patients were grouped as MetS and Non-MetS, and were sub-grouped as group 1 (three criteria), 2 (four criteria) and 3 (≥ five criteria) according to NCEP ATP III. Mean age was 38.7 ± 11.9 years and BMI was 35.1 ± 6.3 kg/m(2). Lipid profile, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, liver function tests, bioelectric impedance body fat compositions, insulin resistance and HbA1c, and spot urinary albumin-creatinine ratio were significantly different between groups of MetS and Non-MetS. Age, lipid profile, bioelectric impedance fat analyses, BMI, blood pressure values, glucose, insulin resistance, uric acid and hs-CRP levels were significantly different between groups of MetS component groups. ROC analysis revealed that hs-CRP was found to be more predictive for severity of metabolic syndrome components 3 and 4 (P=0.030); uric acid and visceral fat were more actual to predict severity of metabolic syndrome between 3 and 5 MetS components, (P=0.006) and uric acid was detected as more actual to predict severity of MetS between 4 and 5 components (P=0.023). In conclusion, uric acid, hs-CRP and visceral body fat composition were useful to predict to severity of MetS in primary care.

  3. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN YOUNG MEXICANS: A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON ITS COMPONENTS.

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    Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Jiménez-Flores, J Rafael; Sigrist-Flores, Santiago C; Tapia-Pancardo, Diana C; Jiménez-Ramos, Arnulfo; Méndez-Cruz, A René; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael

    2015-07-28

    obesity is a worldwide epidemic, and the high prevalence of diabetes type II (DM2) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is in great part a consequence of that epidemic. Metabolic syndrome is a useful tool to estimate the risk of a young population to evolve to DM2 and CVD. to estimate the MetS prevalence in young Mexicans, and to evaluate each parameter as an independent indicator through a sensitivity analysis. the prevalence of MetS was estimated in 6 063 young of the México City metropolitan area. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to estimate the performance of each one of the components of MetS, as an indicator of the presence of MetS itself. Five statistical of the sensitivity analysis were calculated for each MetS component and the other parameters included: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value or precision, negative predictive value, and accuracy. the prevalence of MetS in Mexican young population was estimated to be 13.4%. Waist circumference presented the highest sensitivity (96.8% women; 90.0% men), blood pressure presented the highest specificity for women (97.7%) and glucose for men (91.0%). When all the five statistical are considered triglycerides is the component with the highest values, showing a value of 75% or more in four of them. Differences by sex are detected for averages of all components of MetS in young without alterations. Mexican young are highly prone to acquire MetS: 71% have at least one and up to five MetS parameters altered, and 13.4% of them have MetS. From all the five components of MetS, waist circumference presented the highest sensitivity as a predictor of MetS, and triglycerides is the best parameter if a single factor is to be taken as sole predictor of MetS in Mexican young population, triglycerides is also the parameter with the highest accuracy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting glucose intolerance with normal fasting plasma glucose by the components of the metabolic syndrome

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    Pei, D.; Lin, J.; Kuo, S.; Wu, D.; Li, J.; Hsieh, C.; Wu, C.; Hung, Y.; Kuo, K.

    2007-01-01

    Surprisingly it is estimated that about half of type 2 diabetics remain undetected. The possible causes may be partly attributable to people with normal fasting plasma glucose (FPG) but abnormal postprandial hyperglycemia. We attempted to develop an effective predictive model by using the metabolic syndrome (MeS) components as parameters to identify such persons. All participants received a standard 75 gm oral glucose tolerance test which showed that 106 had normal glucose tolerance, 61 had impaired glucose tolerance and 6 had diabetes on isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia. We tested five models which included various MeS components. Model 0: FPG; Model 1 (Clinical history model): family history (FH), FPG, age and sex; Model 2 (MeS model): Model 1 plus triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure; Model 3: Model 2 plus fasting plasma insulin (FPI); Model 4: Model 3 plus homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the predictive discrimination of these models. The area under the ROC curve of the Model 0 was significantly larger than the area under the diagonal reference line. All the other 4 models had a larger area under the ROC curve than Model 0. Considering the simplicity and lower cost of Model 2, it would be the best model to use. Nevertheless, Model 3 had the largest area under the ROC curve. We demonstrated that Model 2 and 3 have a significantly better predictive discrimination to identify persons with normal FPG at high risk for glucose intolerance. (author)

  5. The effect of psoriasis treatment on body composition, components of metabolic syndrome and psoriatic arthritis

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    Funda Tamer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immun mediated skin disorder with unknown etiology. The chronic inflammation in psoriasis have role in the development of metabolic and vascular disorders related with associating comorbidities. Recent studies have suggested a strong association exists between metabolic syndrome, obesity and complexity of the association between psoriasis, body mass index (BMI and psoriasis tratment. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of psoriasis treatment with methotrexate, cyclosporine and biological agents on body composition, comorbidities and associated laboratory findings. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients treated with methotrexate, cyclosporin and biological agents were included in our study. Demographic characteristics, body composition analysis, psoriasis related comorbidities and laboratory examinations were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of systemic treatment. Results: Comorbidities and metabolic syndrome tended to be more frequent in the anti tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α treated group. Increase in body fat and weight detected in patiens receiving biologic drug therapy. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that severe psoriasis patients with longer disease duration were more likely to have metabolic syndrome because of severe and long term inflammation in pathogenesis of comorbidities.

  6. Associations between serum uric acid concentrations and metabolic syndrome and its components in the PREDIMED study.

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    Babio, N; Martínez-González, M A; Estruch, R; Wärnberg, J; Recondo, J; Ortega-Calvo, M; Serra-Majem, L; Corella, D; Fitó, M; Ros, E; Becerra-Tomás, N; Basora, J; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a relationship between increased serum uric acid (SUA) concentrations and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the oriental population. However, to the best of our knowledge, the association between SUA and MetS has never been investigated in elderly European individuals at high cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-sectional and prospective evaluation of the associations between SUA concentrations and the MetS in elderly individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Men and women (55-80 years of age) from different PREDIMED (Prevención con DIeta MEDiterránea) recruiting centers were studied. Baseline cross-sectional (n = 4417) and prospective assessments (n = 1511) were performed. MetS was defined in accordance with the updated harmonized criteria. Anthropometric measurements and biochemical determinations were assessed at baseline and yearly during follow-up. Unadjusted and adjusted regression models were fitted to assess the risk of MetS and its components according to the levels of baseline SUA. Participants in the highest baseline sex-adjusted SUA quartile showed an increased prevalence of MetS than those in the lowest quartile, even after adjusting for potential confounders (odd ratio (OR): 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-2.8); P < 0.001). Participants in the highest baseline sex-adjusted SUA quartile presented a higher incidence of new-onset MetS than those in the lowest quartile (hazard ratios (HR): 1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.9); P < 0.001). Participants initially free at baseline of hypertriglyceridemia (HR: 1.9 (1.6-2.4); P < 0.001), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (HR: 1.4 (1.1-1.7); P = 0.002), and hypertension components of MetS (HR: 2.0 (1.2-3.3); P = 0.008) and who were in the upper quartile of SUA had a significantly higher risk of developing these MetS components during follow-up. Elevated SUA concentrations are significantly associated with the development of Met

  7. Uric acid blood levels and relationship with the components of metabolic syndrome in hypertensive patients.

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    Papavasileiou, M V; Karamanou, A G; Kalogeropoulos, P; Moustakas, G; Patsianis, S; Pittaras, A

    2016-07-01

    Associations between high serum uric acid (SUA) levels and high blood pressure (BP), as well as between SUA levels and metabolic syndrome (MetS) have already been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the components of MetS with the SUA levels as also between SUA and apolipoproteins A1 and B (apoA1 and apoB) ratio in hypertensive patients. A total of 2577 consecutive hypertensive patients (1193 male and 1384 female) aged 57.5±13.3 years, were enrolled in our research. Samples were taken to measure SUA, glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL-C), components of the MetS and apoA1 and apoB. The study population was divided into two groups: group A: SUA levels above normal range (men ⩾7 mg dl(-1), women ⩾6 mg dl(-1)) and group B: SUA levels within normal range. In the overall study population, SUA levels showed a statistically significant correlation with waist circumference (WC; r=0.293, P<0.000), triglycerides (r=0.197, P<0.000), glucose (r=0.085, P<0.000), apoB/apoA1 (r=0.136, P<0.000) and HDL-C (r=-0.235, P<0,001). In newly diagnosed untreated hypertensive patients there was also a statistically significant correlation of SUA levels with WC (r=0.331, P<0.001), triglycerides (r=0.228, P<0.001) apoB/apoA1 ratio (r=0.202, P<0.001) and HDL-C (r=-0.278, P<0.001). In hyperurecemic hypertensives there was a statistically significant correlation between SUA levels with WC (r=0.168, P=0.007), apoB/apoA1 ratio (r=0.256, P=0.003) and HDL-C (r=-0.202, P<0.001). SUA levels correlate significantly with all the components of MetS, as well as with the risk factor apoB/apoA1 ratio, in hypertensive patients.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome Components After Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Prevalence and the Impact of Obesity and Immunosuppression.

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    Perito, E R; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, P

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with long-term morbidity and mortality after adult liver transplantation (LT). Whether pediatric LT recipients have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome remains controversial. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated pediatric LT recipients aged 8-30 years using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) protocols. LT recipients were matched by gender, race/ethnicity, and age with controls from NHANES. Pediatric LT recipients (n = 83), after adjusting for overweight/obesity and glucocorticoid use, had increased prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 2-h glucose after oral glucose tolerance test ≥140 mg/dL), and low high-density lipoprotein compared to matched NHANES controls (n = 235) despite a lower prevalence of overweight/obesity. Among LT recipients, the adjusted odds of IGT doubled for every 7.5 years taking calcineurin inhibitors (odds ratio = 2.10, 95% confidence interval 1.06-4.17 per 7.5 years taking calcineurin inhibitors, p = 0.03). Among all subjects with IGT, LT recipients had a lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and less insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance) than did controls with IGT. Among normal weight subjects, LT recipients were significantly more likely than controls to have prehypertension/hypertension, IGT, low high-density lipoprotein, and metabolic syndrome. Pediatric LT recipients have unique metabolic syndrome profiles and risk factors and will require tailored screening and management protocols. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Association of lifestyle risk factors with metabolic syndrome components: A cross-sectional study in Eastern India

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    Pragya Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 20%–25% of the world adult population and nearly 30% of Indians have metabolic syndrome disorder. Our objective was designed to find out the association between important nutrients and potential lifestyle risk factors such as diet, physical inactivity, and smoking and alcohol consumption with the number of metabolic syndrome components. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 205 patients of metabolic syndrome were enrolled for this study. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was done on the basis of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria (NCEP ATP III 2004.Dietary data were collected with the validated food frequency questionnaire and 24 h dietary recall method, and the nutrient intake was calculated with the specially designed software. Results: Unhealthy dietary habits were seen more among the participants who had more than 3 risk factors. Results showed the odds of taking> 5 times junk foods was 3 times higher (odds ratio [OR]: 2.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.61–5.47, and sweet dishes was 2.3 times higher (OR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.28–4.24 among the participants who had 4–5 risk factors. However, milk and dairy products > 4 servings/day (OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.175–1.67 and pulses and legumes more than 2 servings/day (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.25–1.29 was protective against hypertension. Mean carbohydrate, saturated fat, and sodium intake was significantly higher in the participants who had 4–5 metabolic risk factors compared to 3 risk factors (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: It was concluded that low intake of fruits, vegetables, and higher intake of flesh food and inadequate physical activity significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome risk factors.

  10. Relationship between sleep duration and clustering of metabolic syndrome diagnostic components

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    Katano S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sayuri Katano1, Yasuyuki Nakamura1,2, Aki Nakamura1, Yoshitaka Murakami3, Taichiro Tanaka4, Toru Takebayashi5, Akira Okayama6, Katsuyuki Miura2, Tomonori Okamura7, Hirotsugu Ueshima2, for HIPOP-OHP Research Group1Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Kyoto Women's University, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Health Science, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan; 4Department of Health Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Chuo, Japan; 5Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 6The First Institute of Health Service, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Preventive Cardiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, JapanObjective: To examine the relation between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome (MetS.Methods: We examined the baseline data from 4356 healthy workers (3556 men and 800 women aged 19–69 years. The physical activity of each participant was classified according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. We defined four components of MetS diagnostic components in this study as follows: 1 high blood pressure (BP systolic BP [SBP] ≥ 130 mmHg, or diastolic BP [DBP] ≥ 85 mmHg, or on medication; 2 dyslipidemia (high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration ,40 mg/dL, or triglycerides concentration ≥150 mg/dL, or on medication; 3 impaired glucose tolerance (fasting blood sugar concentration ≥ 110 mg/dL, or if less than 8 hours after meals ≥ 140 mg/dL, or on medication; and 4 overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2, or obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. There were 680 participants in the group, with sleep duration <6 hours (15.6%.Results: Those who had 0–4 MetS diagnostic components, including overweight, accounted for 2159, 1222, 674, 255, and 46 participants, respectively, in

  11. Association of Dietary Patterns with Components of Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammation among Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome in Taiwan

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    Ahmad Syauqy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the correlation of dietary patterns with components of metabolic syndrome (MetS and inflammation among middle-aged and older adults with MetS in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study used data from the Mei Jau International Health Management Institution in Taiwan between 2004 and 2013. A total of 26,016 subjects aged 35 years and above were selected for analysis. MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. Three dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis. High intake of a meat–instant food dietary pattern (rich in animal protein, saturated fat, sweets, sodium, and food additives was positively associated with components of MetS and C-reactive protein (CRP, while high intake of a vege–seafood dietary pattern (rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and unsaturated fat or a cereal–dairy dietary pattern (rich in dietary fiber, antioxidants, phytochemicals, complex carbohydrate, prebiotics, and probiotics was inversely associated with components of MetS and CRP. Our findings suggested that intake of a vege–seafood dietary pattern or a cereal–dairy dietary pattern decreased the risk of developing MetS and inflammation among middle-aged and older adults with MetS.

  12. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among Chinese professional athletes of strength sports with different body weight categories.

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    Jianjun Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an increasing concern on cardiometabolic health in young professional athletes at heavy-weight class. OBJECTIVE: Our cross-sectional survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of metabolic risk factors in a population of young and active professional athletes of strength sports in China. METHODS: From July 2006 to December 2008, a total of 131 male and 130 female athletes of strength sports were enrolled. We used two criteria provided by the Chinese Diabetes Society (2004 and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (2002 to define the metabolic syndrome and its individual components, respectively. RESULTS: Regardless of their similar ages (mean: 21 years and exercise levels, athletes in the heaviest-weight-class with unlimited maximum body weight (UBW boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 130 kg and 38 kg/m(2 for men, 110 kg and 37 kg/m(2 for women had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than did those in all other body-weight-class with limited body weight (LBW boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 105 kg and 32 kg/m(2 for men, 70 kg and 26 kg/m(2 for women. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using CDS criteria (UBW vs. LBW: 89% vs. 18% for men, 47% vs. 0% for women and its individual components, including central obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, and impaired fasting glucose, were all significantly higher in athletes at the heaviest weight group with UBW than all other weight groups with LBW. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that professional athletes of strength sports at the heaviest-weight-class are at a significant increased risk of cardiometabolic disease compared with those at all other weight categories. The findings support the importance of developing and implementing the strategy of early screening, awareness, and interventions for weight-related health among young athletes.

  13. Serum Thyrotropin Is Positively Correlated with the Metabolic Syndrome Components of Obesity and Dyslipidemia in Chinese Adolescents

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    Jingfan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a medical disorder characterized by obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Thyroid hormone has been shown to affect many metabolic processes. This study was undertaken to explore the relationship between serum thyrotropin and components of metabolic syndrome in Chinese adolescents. Waist circumference (76.4 ± 10.7 versus 70.0 ± 10.6 cm, P = 0.006 and body mass index (23.90 ± 4.20 versus 21.51 ± 4.16 kg/m2, P = 0.011 were significantly greater among adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism compared with euthyroid subjects. The risk of obesity in the subclinical hypothyroid group was 3.444 times that in the euthyroid group (odds ratio = 3.444, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.570–7.553. Serum TSH was significantly positively correlated with waist circumference (β = 1.512, P = 0.019, TC (β = 0.160, P = 0.003, LDL-C (β = 0.032, P = 0.008, and TG (β = 0.095, P = 0.001. The TSH level in the metabolic syndrome group was significantly higher than that in nonmetabolic syndrome group (2.65 [2.28–3.80] versus 2.53 [1.92–3.45] mIU/L, P = 0.032. Serum TSH within the reference range was positively associated with TC (β = 0.173, P = 0.013, LDL-C (β = 0.031, P = 0.043, and TG (β = 0.132, P = 0.021. Increased serum TSH in adolescents may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome.

  14. Serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome.

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    Ciarla, Sara; Struglia, Manuela; Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Necozione, Stefano; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the relationship among serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome. Anthropometric parameters, serum uric acid and metabolic parameters were evaluated in 139 subjects. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in subjects with than without metabolic syndrome (p metabolic syndrome components (p for trend uric acid significantly correlated with various anthropometric and serum metabolic parameters. Serum uric acid levels were higher in individuals with rather than without metabolic syndrome and raised gradually as the number of metabolic syndrome components increased. The relationship between serum uric acid levels and various metabolic parameters suggests that uric acid might be considered as a component of metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia is a common finding in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies indicated that hyperuricemia may be also a predictor of metabolic syndrome development.

  15. Gaining weight and components of metabolic syndrome in the period of menopause

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    Simoncig-Netjasov Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Menopause induces redistribution of fat mass and development of abdominal obesity, increasing risk for metabolic syndrome (MS by 60%. Related cardiovascular diseases become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women after fifty years of age. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gaining weight on components of MS in the menopause. METHOD The study included 50 obese women, BMI=31.92± 5.83 kg/m2, age 54.40±3.64, time since menopause 5.90±5.46 years, and 37 normal weight women, BMI=23.50±2.13 kg/m2, age 53.92±3.95, time since menopause 5.96±4.92 years. Both groups were divided according to the presence of MS into two subgroups. Anthropometric characteristics and blood pressure were measured. Blood was taken at 8 am for the following: fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, apolipoprotein A (ApoA, apolipoprotein B (ApoB, lipoprotein(a (Lp(a, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, FSH, LH, prolactin, oestrogen, progesterone, testosterone and sex hormonebinding globulin (SHBG. RESULTS 66% of obese women had MS compared with 22% normal weight women. Significant differences between groups were found for the following: weight, BMI, waist, hip circumference, waist/hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure, Lp(a, FSH, LH, prolactin (all p<0.01 and fasting glucose (p<0.05. Obese women with and without MS were significantly diverse for the following: waist/hip ratio, systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose (all p<0.01; age, BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL, Lp(a and SHBG (all p<0.05. Normal weight women with and without MS had significantly different values of waist/hip ratio, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides (all p<0.01; HDL and testosterone (p<0.05. Significant differences were found between obese and normal weight women with MS in anthropometric characteristics, ApoA, Lp(a, fibrinogen (all p<0.01 and FSH (p<0.05. CONCLUSION Abdominal obesity significantly

  16. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

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    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

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    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  18. Association between the serum concentration of triiodothyronine with components of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk, and diet in euthyroid post-menopausal women without and with metabolic syndrome.

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    Luna-Vazquez, Fabiola; Cruz-Lumbreras, Rosalía; Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Cervantes-Rodríguez, Margarita; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; Castelán, Francisco; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Cuevas, Estela

    2014-01-01

    To determine the association between the serum concentration of triiodothyronine (T3) with components of metabolic syndrome (MetS), cardiovascular risk (CVR), and diet in euthyroid post-menopausal women without and with MetS. A cross-sectional study was performed in 120 voluntary women of an indigenous population from Tlaxcala-México. Euthyroid status was assessed measuring the serum concentration of thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroid hormones, while that of estradiol was measured to confirm the postmenopausal condition. MetS was diagnosed using the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Scientific Statement (AHA/NHLBI) criterion. Estimation of CVR was calculated based on the Framingham scale. Diet components were evaluated based on survey applications. Correlations, logistic regression analyses, ANOVA or Kruskall-Wallis, and chi-square tests were used to determine significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) between women without MetS and women with MetS having different serum concentrations of T3. Triiodothyronine was positively correlated with insulin but negatively correlated with glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and CVR. Compared to women without MetS, women with MetS and low-normal T3 concentration showed a high risk for hyperglycemia and moderate/high risk for CVR. In contrast, a high-normal T3 concentration increased the risk to have a big waist circumference, a high concentration of HDL-C, and insulin resistance. Diet analysis showed a high grade of malnutrition in women from all groups. The intake of calories was positively affected by the T3 concentration, albeit it did not affect the extent of malnutrition. In contrast to concentrations of TSH, total thyroxin (T4), and free T4, the concentration of serum T3 was strongly correlated with cardio-metabolic variables in euthyroid postmenopausal women. In comparison to women without MetS, a high-normal serum concentration of T3 in women with MetS is positively

  19. Metabolic syndrome and its components in Polish women of childbearing age: a nationwide study

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    Dorota Szostak-Węgierek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal body mass and related metabolic disorders may affect female reproductive health. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of underweight, overweight, obesity, lipid and glucose metabolism disorders, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome, among Polish women of childbearing age. Methods One thousand five hundred eighty-eight non-pregnant Polish women of childbearing age (20–49 years who participated in the Multi-Centre National Population Health Examination Survey (WOBASZ II study in 2013–2014, were assigned to 3 age groups: 20–29 years (n = 403, 30–39 years (n = 600 and 40–49 years (n = 585. Measurements of weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipids, and blood glucose were taken. For statistical analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis, Chi-Square, and Cohran-Armitage tests were used. Results Of the participants, 4.3% were determined to be underweight, 25.2% were overweight, 15% were obese, and 53.1% had abdominal obesity. With age, the prevalence of both excessive body mass and abdominal obesity tended to increase, and that of underweight to decrease. Frequency of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia found in the whole group were 50% and 12.6% respectively, and also tended to rise with age. Low serum HDL-cholesterol (high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were found in 15.1% of the participants. Prevalence of impaired fasting glucose in the whole group was 8.2% and tended to increase with age. Diabetes was found in 1.2% of the participants and its prevalence also tended to rise with age, at the borderline of significance. Frequency of arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome in the whole group was 15.7% and 14.1% respectively and both tended to increase with age. Conclusions Overweight and obesity, especially of abdominal type, and the related metabolic abnormalities are common in Polish women of childbearing age. Their prevalence tends to increase with

  20. Clinical study on the prevalence and comparative analysis of metabolic syndrome and its components among Chinese breast cancer women and control population.

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    Wu, Yu-Tuan; Luo, Qing-Qing; Li, Xin; Arshad, Bilal; Xu, Zhou; Ran, Liang; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Wu, He; Shi, Yan-Ling; Chen, Hao-Ran; Li, Hao; Li, Hong-Yuan; Wu, Kai-Nan; Kong, Ling-Quan

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been previously identified as a risk factor for breast cancer and is increasingly a public health concern. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among primary breast cancer and control population. The clinical data of metabolic syndrome and its components in the breast cancer (605 cases) and control population (3212 cases), from Breast Cancer Center and Physical Examination Center of Chongqing, China, from July 2015 to February 2017, were collected for comparative analysis. This study was prospectively registered in Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (http://www.chictr.org.cn/, number: ChiCTR-OOB-15007543). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer (32.6%) was obviously higher than that in control population (18.2%) (pmetabolic syndrome in breast cancer group aged below 60 years (24.9%, pmetabolic syndrome and its components in Chinese breast cancer women, and metabolic syndrome is closely related with breast cancer. Therefore, screening and prevention strategy of metabolic syndrome should be carried out in the management of breast cancer.

  1. Trends in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in South Korea: Findings from the Korean National Health Insurance Service Database (2009–2013)

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    Lee, Seung Eun; Han, Kyungdo; Kang, Yu Mi; Kim, Seon-Ok; Cho, Yun Kyung; Ko, Kyung Soo; Park, Joong-Yeol; Lee, Ki-Up

    2018-01-01

    Background The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has markedly increased worldwide. However, studies in the United States show that it has remained stable or slightly declined in recent years. Whether this applies to other countries is presently unclear. Objectives We examined the trends in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Korea. Methods The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components was estimated in adults aged >30 years from the Korean National Health Insurance Service data from 2009 to 2013. The revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria were used to define metabolic syndrome. Results Approximately 10 million individuals were analyzed annually. The age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased from 28.84% to 30.52%, and the increasing trend was more prominent in men. Prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol, and impaired fasting plasma glucose significantly increased. However, the prevalence of hypertension decreased in both genders. The prevalence of abdominal obesity decreased in women over 50 years-of-age but significantly increased in young women and men (metabolic syndrome is still increasing in Korea. Trends in each component of metabolic syndrome are disparate according to the gender, or age groups. Notably, abdominal obesity among young adults increased significantly; thus, interventional strategies should be implemented particularly for this age group. PMID:29566051

  2. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among People with Type 2 Diabetes in the Ho Municipality, Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    James Osei-Yeboah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cooccurrence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome potentiates the cardiovascular risk associated with each of the conditions; therefore characterizing metabolic syndrome among people with type 2 diabetes is beneficial for the purpose of cardiovascular disease prevention. This study aims at evaluating the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among 162 patients with type 2 diabetes attending the diabetic clinic of the Ho Municipal Hospital, Ghana. Data obtained included anthropometric indices, blood pressure, serum lipids, glucose, and sociodemographics and clinical information. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome among the study population was 43.83%, 63.58%, and 69.14% using the NCEP-ATP III, the WHO, and the IDF criteria, respectively. The most predominant component among the study population was high blood pressure using the NCEP-ATP III (108 (66.67% and WHO (102 (62.96 criteria and abdominal obesity (112 (69.14% for IDF criteria. High blood pressure was the most prevalent component among the males while abdominal obesity was the principal component among the females. In this population with type 2 diabetes, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome exists. Gender vulnerability to metabolic syndrome and multiple cluster components were skewed towards the female subpopulation with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

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    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  4. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

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    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  5. Prevalence of overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome components in children, adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

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    Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Levek-Motola, Noa; Kaidar, Kfir; Boyko, Valentina; Tisch, Efrat; Mazor-Aronovitch, Kineret; Graf-Barel, Chana; Landau, Zohar; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Frumkin Ben-David, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children, adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and to assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components. The study cohort comprised 326 (168 women) consecutive patients aged 5 to 30 years diagnosed with T1DM and followed up in the Juvenile Diabetes Clinic, Maccabi Health Care Services. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, presence of additional diseases, other medications, HbA1c , triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were obtained. The mean age in the study group was 18.5 ± 6.0 years, and the mean diabetes duration was 8.7 ± 5.0 years. Mean HbA1c level was 8.1 ± 1.3%. Nineteen per cent of the study population was overweight (85th > body mass index prevalence of overweight and obesity compared with healthy men in the general population. There was no difference in the age of onset, disease duration, HbA1c levels, treatment with anti-depressants and associated morbidities between the normal weight, overweight and obese groups. Obese patients had lower levels of HDL and increased prevalence of hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Overweight but not obesity was more prevalent in women with T1DM. Metabolic syndrome and its components were more prevalent among overweight and obese individuals with T1DM than among normal weight individuals. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Current Views on Therapeutic and Preventive Nutrition and the Most Effectivenes European Diet in Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components

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    D.K. Miloslavskyi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This review contains literature information about pathogenetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of metabolic syndrome development, its main components, national recommendations on nutrition for the citizens of some countries, the results of multicenter studies on the role of alimentary factors, molecular targets of favorable effects of certain nutrients in this pathology. The basic dietary recommendations, the most important and special European diets with proven efficacy (Mediterranean Diet, DASH diet, TLC, D. Ornish, the Polymeal diet, Omni Heart, the Mayo clinic, Weight Watchers, the characteristics of their prescription in hypertension, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, purine metabolism disorders, obesity, diabetes mellitus type 2, as well as a short recommendation on lifestyle modification and physical activity increasing in these patients were present.

  7. Association between Metabolic Syndrome Criteria and Body-composition Components in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Forough Saki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Metabolic syndrome (MES consists of central obesity, hypertension, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL, elevated serum triglycerides and high Fasting blood sugar (FBS. They are susceptible to cardio-vascular disease, and insulin resistance. The goal of present research was to assess any relation between the composition of the body in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM children and having components of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods This cross sectional study included all T1DM children who were referred to the pediatric clinic of diabetes, affiliated to the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran during Jul 2013 to Aug 2014. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, lipids and body mass indices like android and gynoid fat mass was done by one physician with standard scale and techniques. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS-18. Results Overall 87cases with definite diagnosis of T1DM were admitted in this duration (2013-2014.There was a positive correlation appeared between hypertriglyceridemia and Android fat mass (r=0.1 and P =0.046.  Otherwise, there wasn’t any relation between body composition criteria and the reduced HDL level, high blood pressure, Abdominal obesity and elevated FBS (P>0.05 . Conclusion It was revealed that hypertriglyceridemia was associated with Android fat mass. However, more pathophysiological research is needed to reveal the association of MES components and body-composition in T1DM children.

  8. Nutrition, insulin resistance and dysfunctional adipose tissue determine the different components of metabolic syndrome

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    Paniagua, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an excessive accumulation of body fat that may be harmful to health. Today, obesity is a major public health problem, affecting in greater or lesser proportion all demographic groups. Obesity is estimated by body mass index (BMI) in a clinical setting, but BMI reports neither body composition nor the location of excess body fat. Deaths from cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes accounted for approximately 65% of all deaths, and adiposity and mainly abdominal adiposity are associated with all these disorders. Adipose tissue could expand to inflexibility levels. Then, adiposity is associated with a state of low-grade chronic inflammation, with increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release, which interfere with adipose cell differentiation, and the action pattern of adiponectin and leptin until the adipose tissue begins to be dysfunctional. In this state the subject presents insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, probably the first step of a dysfunctional metabolic system. Subsequent to central obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, hypertension and fatty liver are grouped in the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS). In subjects with MetS an energy balance is critical to maintain a healthy body weight, mainly limiting the intake of high energy density foods (fat). However, high-carbohydrate rich (CHO) diets increase postprandial peaks of insulin and glucose. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are also increased, which interferes with reverse cholesterol transport lowering high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition, CHO-rich diets could move fat from peripheral to central deposits and reduce adiponectin activity in peripheral adipose tissue. All these are improved with monounsaturated fatty acid-rich diets. Lastly, increased portions of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, and complement the healthy diet that is recommended in patients with MetS. PMID

  9. Association between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and metabolic syndrome (MetS) components in personnel of Shahroud University of Medical Sciences.

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    Abbasian, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Delvarianzadeh, Mehrei; Norouzi, Pirasteh; Fazli, Mozhgan

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid level has been suggested to be associated with metabolic syndrome risk factors. However, the association between metabolic syndrome and serum uric acid is still controversial and challenging. This study was aimed to investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome components in personnel of the Shahroud University of Medical Sciences. This case-control study was conducted on 499 personnel aged 30-60 years old who were working in Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, in 2015. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. The relationship between serum UA level and the number of metabolic components was determined by linear regression analysis. In this study, the mean concentration of serum uric acid in men with the syndrome was higher than that in women. Mean serum UA level increased as the number of metabolic factors increased. The mean serum uric acid levels was 4.98±1.64 in patients with metabolic syndrome and 4.5±1.28 in non-patients (p=0.005). Subject with abnormal uric acid were almost 2.62 times more likely than other subject to develop the syndrome. The results of this study showed that only hypertriglyceridemia is a component which increases the risk of hyperuricemia. In addition, hyperuricemia increases the risk of metabolic syndrome by more than two fold. It seems that high uric acid can be considered as a predisposing factor for metabolic syndrome; thus, it is recommended to measure serum uric acid in routine tests. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

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    Ju, Sang-Yhun; Lee, June-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2017-11-01

    There is increasing evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mortality. However, previous research examining metabolic syndrome and mortality in older populations has produced mixed results. In addition, there is a clear need to identify and manage individual components of metabolic syndrome to decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this meta-analysis, we searched the MEDLINE databases using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. Based on 20 prospective cohort studies, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-1.32; I = 55.9%] and CVD mortality (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11-1.39; I = 58.1%). The risk estimates of all-cause mortality for single components of metabolic syndrome were significant for higher values of waist circumference or body mass index (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-1.00), higher values of blood glucose (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05-1.34), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21). In the elderly population, metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, increased blood glucose and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with increased mortality. However, older obese or overweight individuals may have a decreased mortality risk. Thus, the findings of the current meta-analysis raise questions about the utility of the definition of metabolic syndrome in predicting all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in the elderly population.

  11. Impact of the components of metabolic syndrome on oxidative stress and enzymatic antioxidant activity in essential hypertension.

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    Abdilla, N; Tormo, M C; Fabia, M J; Chaves, F J; Saez, G; Redon, J

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the impact of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its individual components on oxidative stress (OX) and on the activity of antioxidant enzymes of patients with essential hypertension. One hundred and eighty-seven hypertensives, 127 (61.9%) of them having criteria for MS according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria and 30 healthy normotensive subjects were included. OX status was assessed by measuring glutathione oxidized/glutathione reduced and reactive oxygen species-induced byproducts of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde, and DNA damage, 8-oxo-dG genomic and mitochondrial. Antioxidant enzymatic activity of Cu/Zn extracellular-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) was measured in plasma and glutathione peroxidase 1 in hemolysed erythrocytes. In mononuclear cells, total-SOD activity, CAT and glutathione peroxidase 1, were assessed as well. The OX state in both blood and peripheral mononuclear cells observed in hypertensives were not enhanced by the addition of components of the so-called MS. Likewise, the reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, both extracellular and cytoplasmic, was not affected by the presence of additional components of the MS. Neither the number of components nor the individual addition of each of them, low high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, abdominal obesity or fasting glucose, further impact in the OX abnormalities observed in those with only hypertension in absence of other components. In conclusion, the present data indicates that contribution of MS components to the OX burden generated by high blood pressure is minimal.

  12. All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components.

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    Sung, Ki-Chul; Ryu, Seungho; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, SungHo; Cheong, EunSun; Kim, Jang-Young; Wild, Sarah H; Byrne, Christopher D

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to investigate associations between underweight, overweight and obesity and all cause, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, excluding subjects with known CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline. The study population consisted of examinees participating in a health screening in Korea from 2002 to 2013. Data were analyzed in 162,194 subjects (in a retrospective cohort study design-median (interquartile range (IQR) follow-up 4.9 (1.8-8.5years))). The outcomes were all cause mortality, cancer and CVD. The mean (age range) and median age (IQR) at baseline were 36.9(20.0-85.3) and 35.2 (30.8-40.6) years. There were 436 deaths during follow-up. For men and women together, the fully adjusted HR for underweight and all cause mortality, cancer and CVD was 1.53 (95% CIs 1.06-2.20), 1.21 (95% CIs 0.68-2.14) and 1.34 (95% CIs 0.40-4.49) respectively. In contrast, the fully adjusted HR for overweight/obesity combined and all cause mortality was 0.77 (95%CIs 0.63-0.95) and there were non significant trends towards decreased cancer and CVD mortality. The association between overweight/obesity and all cause mortality was similar for men and women considered separately and for overweight and obesity as separate BMI categories. Smoking did not seem to explain the increased HR in the underweight BMI category. In a young metabolically healthy adult cohort, underweight was associated with increased all cause mortality and overweight/obesity was associated with decreased all cause mortality if CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are excluded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serum uric acid predicts both current and future components of the metabolic syndrome.

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    Osgood, Kristy; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie

    2013-06-01

    Uric acid (UA) is known to be associated with excess adiposity and insulin resistance. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between UA and the factors associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), both initially and longitudinally. Serum UA was assessed as a potential determinant of concurrent blood pressure, serum lipids, glucose regulation measured via an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), acute insulin response (AIR), and insulin action (M) measured with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 245 participants (72% Native American, 56% male). UA was also assessed as a predictor of the above variables in 60 participants with follow-up data available (median follow-up time=11.2 years [interquartile range (IQR)=8.1, 13.6 years]. The impact of UA on the risk of T2DM was determined as 36 of the 245 participants developed T2DM after the baseline visit. UA was negatively associated with both concurrent and future M, such that for every 1 mg/dL increase in serum UA, M decreased 7.6% (P<0.001) and future M decreased 6.3% (P=0.02). However, UA was not associated with AIR (P=0.7). UA concentrations were a predictor of T2DM [hazard risk ratio (HRR)=1.5; P=0.02]. UA was positively associated with both concurrent blood pressure and lipids and also predicted future increases in blood pressure and total cholesterol. Not only did UA associate with concomitant insulin action, blood pressure, and lipids, it also predicted future declines in insulin action and T2DM. UA is a potential target for preventing decreases in insulin sensitivity and rises in blood pressure and cholesterol.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

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    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  15. Evaluation of the relationship between self-reported physical activity and metabolic syndrome and its components in apparently healthy women.

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    Suárez-Ortegón, Milton Fabián; Arbeláez, Alejandra; Mosquera, Mildrey; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Aguilar-De Plata, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a set of metabolic anomalies that include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and inflammation, is an important tool to explore factors associated to cardiometabolic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of the levels of self-reported physical activity and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire items and the metabolic syndrome and the variables related to cardiovascular risk in 89 women. The short version of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was applied to classify participating subjects into three categories: insufficient, sufficient and very active physical activity. The metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Biochemical and anthropometrical parameters were measured . Twenty-two participants (23%) presented metabolic syndrome and 66 women (74.2%) were classified in the insufficient physical activity category. No association was found between insufficient physical activity and metabolic syndrome . Inverse correlations were found among the days and minutes per week of physical activity of moderate-intensity, waist circumference ( r =-0.327, and r =-0.313, pphysical activity was found in the study participants, but this was not associated with metabolic syndrome . Moderate but not vigorous physical activity items from the International Physical Activity Questionnaire correlated inversely with anthropometrical markers related to cardiovascular risk.

  16. COMPONENTS OF THE METABOLIC SYNDROME IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF VITAMIN D: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Svetlana I. Malyavskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vitamin D is a significant risk factor for atherogenic disorders. It is of interest to study the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the components of the metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and markers of chronic inflammation in different age groups.Objective.  Our aim was to study association of the components  of the metabolic syndrome and pro-atherogenic  metabolic disorders with vitamin D levels in children and adolescents.Methods. In a cross-sectional (one-stage study, the serum 25(OHD level in children and adolescents was determined. The relationship between the 25(ОНD level and the presence of the metabolic syndrome was assessed in quartile groups.Results. The study included 319 children and adolescents (49% — girls aged 10–15 years. In the quartile I in terms of the 25(ОНD level, higher (as compared with the quartile IV mean level values of insulin (11.5 ± 6.3 and 7.3 ± 4.0 mmol/L, p <0.001, HOMA index (2.4 ± 0.8 and 1.6 ± 0.7, p <0.001, body mass index (22.6 ± 4.3 and 19.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2, p = 0.012, waist circumference (68 ± 11 and 61 ± 12 cm, p = 0.034, blood concentration of C-reactive protein (2.3 ± 1 and 0.9 ± 0.7 mg/ml, p <0.001, diastolic blood pressure (70 ± 7 and 65 ± 6 mm Hg, р = 0.028, uric acid (0.29 ± 0.06 and 0.21 ± 0.06 mmol/L, р = 0.021, glucose (4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.6 ± 0.6 mmol/L, p = 0.011, triglycerides (0.86 ± 0.37 and 0.72 ± 0.31 mmol/L, р = 0.017, and lower mean level values of highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (1.38 ± 0.36 and 1.58 ± 0.31 mmol/L, p = 0.011 were noted. Multivariate regression analysis showed an independent  relationship between the 25(ОНD level, C-reactive  protein level (β = -0.55,  p <0.001,  and HOMA index (β = -0.96, p < 0.001.Conclusion. A low vitamin D level in the blood serum in children is associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Dietary determinants of subclinical inflammation, dyslipidemia and components of the metabolic syndrome in overweight children: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Aeberli, I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review and summarize the dietary determinants of the metabolic syndrome, subclinical inflammation and dyslipidemia in overweight children. Design: Review of the current literature, focusing on pediatric studies. Participants: Normal weight, overweight, or obese children and

  18. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THYROID HORMONES AND OBESITY SEVERITY, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ITS COMPONENTS IN TURKISH CHILDREN WITH OBESITY.

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    Özer, Samet; Bütün, İlknur; Sönmezgöz, Ergün; Yılmaz, Resul; Demir, Osman

    2015-08-01

    we investigated the relationships between thyroid function and obesity severity, metabolic syndrome (MS) and MS components in 260 obese children and adolescents 10-17 years of age. we aimed to determine the association of thyroid functions with obesity severity and the components of metabolic syndrome (MS) in pediatric obese patients. only obese children and adolescents were included, and divided the obese children into three groups according to body mass index (BMI)-SDS quartiles. The first quartile was group 1, the second and third quartiles were group 2, and the fourth quartile was group 3. Group 3 indicated severe obesity. The modified WHO criteria adapted for children were used to diagnose MS. We assessed anthropometric data and serum biochemical parameters, including the lipid profile and fasting glucose (FG), insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), and free triiodothyronine (fT3) levels. Blood pressure (BP) was measured with a standard digital sphygmomanometer. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was calculated to determine insulin resistance (IR). TSH level was significantly higher in obese children with MS than that in the others (p = 0.045). Mean TSH level was not different among the BMI-SDS groups (p = 0.590). TSH levels and the fT3/fT4 ratio were not different in children with dyslipidemia, IR or hypertension (p = 0.515, 0.805, 0.973, 0.750, 0.515, and 0.805, respectively). obesity severity does not affect TSH level or the fT3/fT4 ratio in obese children and adolescents. IR is in close relationship with TSH level. Elevated TSH level is a risk factor for MS. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

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    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  20. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus

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    Abdurrazzak Gehani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality from cardiovascular disease in the Middle East is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in acute coronary syndrome (ACS continues to raise interest, but data from the Middle East is limited, especially in non-diabetic patients. This study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of MS and frequency of its components, individually and in combination, in a male population presenting with ACS, but without a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods: This is a prospective study of 467 consecutive male patients hospitalized for ACS. They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: The mean age was (49.7±10.7 years. Of the 467 patients, 324 (69.4% fulfilled the criteria for MS. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI was identified in 178 patients (54.9%, and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS in 146 patients (45.1%. These proportions were not significantly different from those without MS (STEMI 51.7% vs. NSTE-ACS 48.3%, respectively. However, patients with MS were older (50.6±10 vs. 47.9±11 years; p=0.012, and more than half of those with MS were above 50 years. The most common abnormal metabolic components were reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c; 94.1%, elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG; 89.8%, and elevated triglycerides (81.8%, followed by increased waist circumference (61.7% and raised blood pressure (40.4%. The majority of patients with MS had three or more metabolic components (326 patients, 69.4%, and 102 (21.8% had two components, but only 37 (8.4% had a single component. Conclusions: In ACS patients, without previous history of DM, MS is highly prevalent. Reduced HDL, elevated FBG and triglycerides were the most frequent metabolic components. The majority had multiple components. These findings raise alarm and show that drug therapy alone may

  1. Association of vitamin D status with metabolic syndrome and its components: A cross-sectional study in a population of high educated Iranian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Masoume; Abasi, Roshanak; Nasiri, Morteza; Sharifi, Farshad; Vesaly, Sedyghe; Sadeghi, Omid; Rahimi, Nayere; Sharif, Nasrin Akbary

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to assess the association of vitamin D status with metabolic syndrome and its components among high educated Iranian adults. In this cross-sectional study, 352 faculty members with age of 35 years or more, belong to Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran, were recruited during 2016 and 2017. Fasting blood samples were obtained to quantify serum 25(OH)D concentrations, glycemic indicators and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III). Multivariate logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders was used to evaluate the association between vitamin D status and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and vitamin D insufficiency were prevalent among 26% and 60.2% of subjects, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome across quartiles of 25(OH)D levels either before or after adjusting for potential confounders (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.43-1.95). In terms of metabolic syndrome components, subjects in the highest quartile of vitamin D levels had 59% decreased risk of abdominal obesity compared with those in the lowest quartile (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.17-0.99), after adjusting for potential confounders. Such inverse relationship was also seen for elevated blood pressure (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.99), and abnormal glucose homeostasis (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.85). Serum levels of 25(OH)D was inversely associated with the risk of abdominal obesity, hypertension, and abnormal glucose homeostasis. However, no significant relationship was seen for metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

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    Bhalli, M.A.; Aamir, M.; Mustafa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  3. The metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetSy) is increasingly common in Australia. It is associated with the rise in obesity and lifestyle risk behaviours. It is also controversial - its value in predicting cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk and in guiding therapy has been challenged. This article aims to provide advice on the diagnosis of the MetSy and the principles for its prevention and management in the context of primary care, taking into consideration aetiological factors and the complexity of managing its constituent risk factors. Diagnosis of the MetSy is useful in focusing attention on central adiposity and insulin resistance as risk factors both for the syndrome, and cardiovascular and diabetes morbidity and mortality. Its assessment requires measurement of waist circumference - a simple but seldom performed procedure in general practice. The most essential components for the prevention and management of the MetSy are measures to change diet and physical activity in order to achieve and sustain weight loss.

  4. Relationship between number of metabolic syndrome components and dietary factors in middle-aged and elderly Japanese subjects.

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    Otsuka, Rei; Imai, Tomoko; Kato, Yuki; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of risk factors for atherosclerosis and is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The role of diet in the etiology of MetS is poorly understood, especially among Asian subjects. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationship between diet and the number of MetS components among Japanese men (n=609) and women (n=631). Mean (s.d.) age and body mass index were 57.1 (12.1) years and 22.8 (2.8) kg m(-2) for men and 55.5 (12.0) years and 22.0 (3.0) kg m(-2) for women, respectively. Diet was assessed by a 3-day dietary record that included photographs: 16 nutrients, 11 food groups, and energy % of protein and dietary fat were selected as a dietary index. The definition of MetS was based on modified National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and the number of clustering MetS components was calculated by adding the presence of each five MetS components. A total of 61 men (10.0%) and 46 women (7.3%) were determined to have MetS. After adjusting for age, energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking status and physical activity, a lower intake of vitamin B6 and dietary fiber in men, and lower intake of calcium, milk and dairy products and higher intake of cereal in women were related to the number of MetS components. These results suggest that some dietary factors were related to the number of MetS components among community-dwelling Japanese men and women.

  5. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating

  6. Paradoxically High Adiponectin in Obese 16-Year-Old Girls Protects against appearance of the Metabolic Syndrome and its components 7 years later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J.; Daniels, Stephen; Wang, Ping; Stroop, Davis

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationships of adiponectin levels at age 16 years in obese schoolgirls to metabolic syndrome and its components at age 23 years. Study design Seven year prospective study of 381 females. Results In 144 white and 129 black non-obese 16-year old girls (BMI specific median adiponectin levels (white 12 mg/L, black 11) was used to identify paradoxically high adiponectin levels in obese girls. Of 34 white and 74 black obese girls, 12 (35%) and 19 (26%) had paradoxically high adiponectin levels. In these 108 obese girls, adiponectin levels at age 16 years independently predicted HDLC (positive) and waist (negative), insulin (negative), and glucose (negative) at age 23 years; paradoxically high adiponectin levels at age 16 years was a negative independent predictor for waist, HOMA IR, and for the number of abnormal components of the metabolic syndrome at age 23 years. In 31 pairs of obese girls with and without paradoxically high adiponectin levels, matched by race and age 16 BMI, adiponectin levels at age 16 years was a negative predictor for the number of abnormal metabolic syndrome components at age 23 years. Conclusion Paradoxically high adiponectin levels in obese 16 year old girls protects against metabolic syndrome and its components at age 23 years. PMID:20869727

  7. Paradoxically high adiponectin in obese 16-year-old girls protects against appearance of the metabolic syndrome and its components seven years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J; Daniels, Stephen; Wang, Ping; Stroop, Davis

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the relationships of adiponectin levels at age 16 years in obese schoolgirls to metabolic syndrome and its components at age 23 years. Seven-year prospective study of 381 females. In 144 white and 129 black non-obese 16-year old girls (body mass index specific median adiponectin levels (white 12 mg/L, black 11) was used to identify paradoxically high adiponectin levels in obese girls. Of 34 white and 74 black obese girls, 12 (35%) and 19 (26%) had paradoxically high adiponectin levels. In these 108 obese girls, adiponectin levels at age 16 years independently predicted high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (positive) and waist (negative), insulin (negative), and glucose (negative) at age 23 years; paradoxically high adiponectin levels at age 16 years was a negative independent predictor for waist, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and for the number of abnormal components of the metabolic syndrome at age 23 years. In 31 pairs of obese girls with and without paradoxically high adiponectin levels, matched by race and age 16 body mass index, adiponectin levels at age 16 years was a negative predictor for the number of abnormal metabolic syndrome components at age 23 years. Paradoxically high adiponectin levels in obese 16 year old girls protects against metabolic syndrome and its components at age 23 years. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between Alcohol Consumption and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Population from Maracaibo City, Venezuela

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    Valmore Bermúdez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although the relationships between alcohol and disorders such as cancer and liver disease have been thoroughly researched, its effects on cardiometabolic health remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the association between alcohol consumption, the Metabolic Syndrome (MS, and its components in our locality. Materials and Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling, which included 2,230 subjects of both genders. Two previously determined population-specific alcohol consumption pattern classifications were utilized in each gender: daily intake quartiles and conglomerates yielded by cluster analysis. MS was defined according to the 2009 consensus criteria. Association was evaluated through various multiple logistic regression models. Results. In univariate analysis (daily intake quartiles, only hypertriacylglyceridemia was associated with alcohol consumption in both genders. In multivariate analysis, daily alcohol intake ≤3.8 g/day was associated with lower risk of hypertriacylglyceridemia in females (OR = 0.29, CI 95%: 0.09–0.86; p=0.03. Among men, subjects consuming 28.41–47.33 g/day had significantly increased risk of MS, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, hypertriacylglyceridemia, and elevated waist circumference. Conclusions. The relationship between drinking, MS, and its components is complex and not directly proportional. Categorization by daily alcohol intake quartiles appears to be the most efficient method for quantitative assessment of alcohol consumption in our region.

  9. Relationship between Alcohol Consumption and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Population from Maracaibo City, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Olivar, Luis Carlos; Morillo, Jessenia; Mejías, José Carlos; Rojas, Milagros; Salazar, Juan; Rojas, Joselyn; Añez, Roberto; Cabrera, Mayela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Although the relationships between alcohol and disorders such as cancer and liver disease have been thoroughly researched, its effects on cardiometabolic health remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the association between alcohol consumption, the Metabolic Syndrome (MS), and its components in our locality. Materials and Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling, which included 2,230 subjects of both genders. Two previously determined population-specific alcohol consumption pattern classifications were utilized in each gender: daily intake quartiles and conglomerates yielded by cluster analysis. MS was defined according to the 2009 consensus criteria. Association was evaluated through various multiple logistic regression models. Results. In univariate analysis (daily intake quartiles), only hypertriacylglyceridemia was associated with alcohol consumption in both genders. In multivariate analysis, daily alcohol intake ≤3.8 g/day was associated with lower risk of hypertriacylglyceridemia in females (OR = 0.29, CI 95%: 0.09–0.86; p = 0.03). Among men, subjects consuming 28.41–47.33 g/day had significantly increased risk of MS, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, hypertriacylglyceridemia, and elevated waist circumference. Conclusions. The relationship between drinking, MS, and its components is complex and not directly proportional. Categorization by daily alcohol intake quartiles appears to be the most efficient method for quantitative assessment of alcohol consumption in our region. PMID:26779349

  10. Association between Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Young Chinese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, X; Song, Zh; Zhao, Ch; Jiang, Y

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in young Chinese population and assess the association between HOMA-IR and different components of MetS in young Chinese men. Overall 5576 young Chinese subjects (age range [19-44 yr], 3636 men) were enrolled in, who visited our Health Care Center for a related health checkup from March to December 2008. The international diabetes federation (IDF) definition for MetS was used. The SPSS statistical package, version 11.5 was used for the statistical analysis. The prevalence of MetS was 21.81% in young men and 5.62% in young women. According to suffering from different numbers of MetS components, the male subjects were divided into four groups. Numbers of MetS components were more and HOMA-IR values were significantly higher. In this male population, the quartile of HOMA-IR was higher, values of triglyceride (TG), fasting plasma glucose (FBG), systolic blood pressure(SBP), diastolic blood pressure(DBP) and waist circumference (WC) were all significantly higher, as well as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) value was significantly lower (P= 0.000). In Spearman's correlation analysis, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with TG, FBG, SBP, DBP and WC, and negatively correlated with HDL-C (r= 0.460, 0.464, 0.362, 0.346, 0.586, -0.357, respectively, all P value= 0.000). The prevalence of MetS in these young Chinese men was obviously high. Insulin resistance played an important role in occurrence and development of MetS. Waist circumference was the best correlation with HOMA-IR among all components of MetS.

  11. Effect of cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic syndrome and its components: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Kasaei, Zahra; Sajjadieh-Khajooie, Hamidreza; Heidari, Ramin; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Although the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prognosis has been well-documented by several systematic reviews, none have focused on the effect of CR on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its related components. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of CR on MetS and its components. PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane library, and Google Scholar database were searched up to February 2014 with no date and language restrictions. The random effects model was used to assess the overall effect of CR on MetS prevalence and the change in metabolic or anthropometric measures. Fifteen studies with 19,324 subjects were included in the present systematic review and meta-analysis. Our analysis showed that the CR could significantly reduce MetS prevalence [reduction rate: 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21, 0.3, P value <0.001; P value for heterogeneity <0.001, I-squared: 86.2%]. Additionally, results showed the protective role of CR on all MetS components including high density lipoprotein cholesterol [mean difference (MD): 2.13 mg/dL, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.1], triglyceride (MD: -27.45 mg/dL, 95% CI: -36.92, -17.98), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (MD: -6.20 mmHg, 95% CI: -8.41, -3.99), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (MD: -2.53 mmHg, 95% CI: -3.64, -1.41), fasting blood sugar (FBS) (MD: -6.42 mg/dL, 95% CI: -6.85, -5.99), and waist circumference (WC) (MD: -2.25 cm, 95% CI: -3.15, -1.35). CR has resulted in improvement in MetS and its entire components, and could be considered as a useful tool for MetS patients, especially among those with CVD.

  12. White Blood Cell Counts as Risk Markers of Developing Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in the Predimed Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babio, Nancy; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Bulló, Mònica; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Wärnberg, Julia; Salaverría, Itziar; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Estruch, Ramón; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Covas, Maria Isabel; Sorli, José Vicente; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background The Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that includes hyperglucemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity, conferring an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The white blood cell (WBC) count has been proposed as a marker for predicting cardiovascular risk. However, few prospective studies have evaluated the relationship between WBC subtypes and risk of MetS. Methods Participants were recruited from seven PREDIMED study centers. Both a baseline cross-sectional (n = 4,377) and a prospective assessment (n = 1,637) were performed. Participants with MetS at baseline were excluded from the longitudinal analysis. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipid profile and WBC counts were assessed at baseline and yearly during the follow-up. Participants were categorized by baseline WBC and its subtype count quartiles. Adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to assess the risk of MetS and its components. Results Of the 4,377 participants, 62.6% had MetS at baseline. Compared to the participants in the lowest baseline sex-adjusted quartile of WBC counts, those in the upper quartile showed an increased risk of having MetS (OR, 2.47; 95%CI, 2.03–2.99; P-trend<0.001). This association was also observed for all WBC subtypes, except for basophils. Compared to participants in the lowest quartile, those in the top quartile of leukocyte, neutrophil and lymphocyte count had an increased risk of MetS incidence. Leukocyte and neutrophil count were found to be strongly associated with the MetS components hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol. Likewise, lymphocyte counts were found to be associated with the incidence of the MetS components low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose. An increase in the total WBC during the follow-up was also associated with an increased risk of MetS. Conclusions Total WBC counts, and some subtypes, were positively

  13. White blood cell counts as risk markers of developing metabolic syndrome and its components in the PREDIMED study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Babio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that includes hyperglucemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity, conferring an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The white blood cell (WBC count has been proposed as a marker for predicting cardiovascular risk. However, few prospective studies have evaluated the relationship between WBC subtypes and risk of MetS. METHODS: Participants were recruited from seven PREDIMED study centers. Both a baseline cross-sectional (n = 4,377 and a prospective assessment (n = 1,637 were performed. Participants with MetS at baseline were excluded from the longitudinal analysis. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipid profile and WBC counts were assessed at baseline and yearly during the follow-up. Participants were categorized by baseline WBC and its subtype count quartiles. Adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to assess the risk of MetS and its components. RESULTS: Of the 4,377 participants, 62.6% had MetS at baseline. Compared to the participants in the lowest baseline sex-adjusted quartile of WBC counts, those in the upper quartile showed an increased risk of having MetS (OR, 2.47; 95%CI, 2.03-2.99; P-trend<0.001. This association was also observed for all WBC subtypes, except for basophils. Compared to participants in the lowest quartile, those in the top quartile of leukocyte, neutrophil and lymphocyte count had an increased risk of MetS incidence. Leukocyte and neutrophil count were found to be strongly associated with the MetS components hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol. Likewise, lymphocyte counts were found to be associated with the incidence of the MetS components low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose. An increase in the total WBC during the follow-up was also associated with an increased risk of MetS. CONCLUSIONS: Total WBC counts, and some subtypes

  14. Clinical study on the prevalence and comparative analysis of metabolic syndrome and its components among Chinese breast cancer women and control population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-tuan; Luo, Qing-qing; Li, Xin; Arshad, Bilal; Xu, Zhou; Ran, Liang; Zhao, Chun-xia; Wu, He; Shi, Yan-ling; Chen, Hao-ran; Li, Hao; Li, Hong-yuan; Wu, Kai-nan; Kong, Ling-quan

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been previously identified as a risk factor for breast cancer and is increasingly a public health concern. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among primary breast cancer and control population. The clinical data of metabolic syndrome and its components in the breast cancer (605 cases) and control population (3212 cases), from Breast Cancer Center and Physical Examination Center of Chongqing, China, from July 2015 to February 2017, were collected for comparative analysis. This study was prospectively registered in Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (http://www.chictr.org.cn/, number: ChiCTR-OOB-15007543). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer (32.6%) was obviously higher than that in control population (18.2%) (p<0.001; OR: 2.173, 95%CI: 1.793 to 2.633). With age stratification, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer group aged below 60 years (24.9%, p<0.001; OR: 2.216, 95%CI: 1.744 to 2.816) and equal/above 60 years (58.3%, p<0.001; OR: 2.291, 95%CI: 1.580 to 3.322) were also statistically higher than those (13.0% & 37.9%) in control population, respectively. Breast cancer women were more likely to have preobese (BMI 25.0-29.9) or obesity (BMI ≥30.0), broader waist circumference, lower HDL-C level, higher systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure and higher fasting blood glucose level compared to the control population, corresponding prevalence were 31.7%vs.19.4%, 76.0%vs.29.6%, 37.4%vs.30.4%, 34.2%/27.3%vs.27.6%/14.2% and 25.0%vs.20.1%, respectively (p<0.01). In summary, there is high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Chinese breast cancer women, and metabolic syndrome is closely related with breast cancer. Therefore, screening and prevention strategy of metabolic syndrome should be carried out in the management of breast cancer. PMID:29483960

  15. [Metabolic syndrome after kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbálková, Marta; Svojanovský, Jan; Trnavský, Karel; Kuman, Milan; Jarkovský, Jiří; Karpíšek, Michal; Souček, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Higher risk of the metabolic syndrome and its components in patients after kidney transplantation is caused by immunosuppressive therapy. THE AIM OF OUR STUDY was to evaluate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in kidney transplant recipients and to analyse their influence on allograft function and albuminuria. In the study we monitored 69 patients after cadaveric kidney transplantation. The prevalence of the meta-bolic syndrome was 61.3 % 3 years after kidney transplantation. The prevalence of new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was 27 % and that of abdominal obesity 59.7 % of patients. The age of kidney transplant recipients with the metabolic syndrome was higher than of these without it, but not statistically significant. The age of kidney transplant recipients with new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was significantly higher, 54.0 (35.0; 69.0) years, than in patients without it, 45.5 (27.0; 60.0) years, OR (95% IS) 1.116 (1.031; 1.207), p = 0.006.The number of components of the metabolic syndrome was negatively correlated with the graft function (rs -0,275, p = 0,031). In patients with impaired renal function with estimated glomerular filtration (using MDRD equation) metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridaemia was significantly higher. Chronic allograft dysfunction was predicted by donor age, delayed allograft function, rejection, low level of HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia was the only significant predictor of allograft dysfunction independently of the presence of delayed allograft function, rejection episodes and donor age. The metabolic syndrome, elevation of apolipoprotein B and nonHDL-cholesterol and increased systolic blood pressure were associated with albuminuria. Higher levels of apolipoprotein B and total cholesterol were independent predictors of increased albumin-creatinine ratio. Obesity

  16. Neuroinflammatory basis of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-10-05

    Inflammatory reaction is a fundamental defense mechanism against threat towards normal integrity and physiology. On the other hand, chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis, have been causally linked to chronic, low-grade inflammation in various metabolic tissues. Recent cross-disciplinary research has led to identification of hypothalamic inflammatory changes that are triggered by overnutrition, orchestrated by hypothalamic immune system, and sustained through metabolic syndrome-associated pathophysiology. While continuing research is actively trying to underpin the identity and mechanisms of these inflammatory stimuli and actions involved in metabolic syndrome disorders and related diseases, proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ), the downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and some related molecules in the hypothalamus were discovered to be pathogenically significant. This article is to summarize recent progresses in the field of neuroendocrine research addressing the central integrative role of neuroinflammation in metabolic syndrome components ranging from obesity, glucose intolerance to cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  17. Relationship between long-term coffee consumption and components of the metabolic syndrome: the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, L.J.; Hoekstra, T.; Twisk, J.W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type II (DM II) are both major health problems. A large risk factor for these diseases is the presence of the metabolic syndrome. It is known that the risk of DM II can be decreased by coffee consumption. Therefore, we examined the association between

  18. Relationship between long-term coffee consumption and components of the metabolic syndrome : the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, Lisanne; Hoekstra, T.; Twisk, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type II (DM II) are both major health problems. A large risk factor for these diseases is the presence of the metabolic syndrome. It is known that the risk of DM II can be decreased by coffee consumption. Therefore, we examined the association between

  19. Association of blood pressure and metabolic syndrome components with magnesium levels in drinking water in some Serbian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasic-Milutinovic, Zorica; Perunicic-Pekovic, Gordana; Jovanovic, Dragana; Gluvic, Zoran; Cankovic-Kadijevic, Milce

    2012-03-01

    Chronic exposure to insufficient levels of magnesium (Mg) in drinking water increases the risk of magnesium deficiency and its association with hypertension, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to assess the potential association of mineral contents in drinking water with blood pressure and other components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) (BMI as measure of obesity, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin resistance, index-HOMA IR), in a healthy population. This study was conducted in three randomly selected municipalities (Pozarevac, Grocka and Banovci), and recruited 90 healthy blood donors, aged 20-50 years. The Pozarevac area had a four times higher mean Mg level in drinking water (42 mg L(-1)) than Grocka (11 mg L(-1)). Diastolic blood pressure was lowest in subjects from Pozarevac. Serum Mg (sMg) was highest, and serum Ca(2+)/Mg (sCa/Mg) lowest in subjects from Pozarevac, and after adjustment for confounders (age, gender, BMI), only total cholesterol and sMg levels were independent predictors of diastolic blood pressure, sMg levels were independent predictors of triglycerides, and sCa/Mg predicted glucose levels. These results suggest that Mg supplementation in areas of lower magnesium levels in drinking water may be an important measure in the prevention of hypertension and MetS in general.

  20. Associations of uric acid and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) with obesity and components of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A P S; Choi, K C; Ho, C S; Chan, M H M; Ozaki, R; Chan, C W H; Chan, J C N

    2013-10-01

    The combined effect of uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and cardiovascular risk factors clustering in the youth remains under-explored. The objective of this study was to examine the association between uric acid, GGT, obesity and the individual components of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. We performed a cross-sectional observational study of 2067 children and adolescents (875 boys and 1192 girls) aged 6-20 years who were healthy volunteers and were recruited from primary and secondary schools in Hong Kong between 2007 and 2008. Subjects were divided into two strata (75th percentile as cut-off) for comparison between odds of cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, subjects in upper stratum, i.e., >75th percentile, of either serum uric acid or GGT levels were associated with obesity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level and high blood pressure (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] ranged from 1.63 to 5.82, all P uric acid and GGT in the association with obesity, low HDL-C and high blood pressure (AOR ranged from 2.60 to 10.69, all P Uric acid and GGT have combined effect in association with obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. Working hours and incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components in a Mediterranean cohort: the SUN project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Adriano M; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Sayon-Orea, Carmen; Gea, Alfredo; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Enrique; Lopez-Iracheta, Roberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important and priority public health problem globally. Long working hours have been proposed as a modifiable risk factor for MetS, despite sparse epidemiological evidence. Thus, the aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the associations between working hours and incidence of MetS and each of its components. We assessed 6845 participants of a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort of university graduates (the SUN project), initially free of any specific criteria of MetS, and followed-up for a median of 8.3 years. Weekly working hours were collected at baseline and grouped into four categories: >0-24, 25-39, 40-49 and ≥50 h. MetS was defined according to the updated harmonizing criteria. We estimated multivariable adjusted Relative Risks (RR) of MetS and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI), using Poisson regression models. The cumulative incidence of MetS was 6.0%. Working hours were not independently related to MetS (25-39 h/week = RR: 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.25; 40-49 h/week = RR: 1.45, 95% CI 0.91-2.30; ≥50 h/week = RR: 1.49, 95% CI 0.91-2.42, P for trend = 0.235) nor to any of its individual definition criteria. Our findings do not suggest that long working hours increase the risk of MetS development or each of its components. Further longitudinal studies in general population should be conducted to confirm these results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Canuto; Marcos Pascoal Pattussi; Jamile Block Araldi Macagnan; Ruth Liane Henn; Maria Teresa Anselmo Olinto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers.METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (...

  5. Increasing Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Soo; Shin, Hayley; Song, Jung Han; Kwak, Soo Heon; Kang, Seon Mee; Won Yoon, Ji; Choi, Sung Hee; Cho, Sung Il; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Jang, Hak Chul; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The number of people with metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide, and changes in socioenvironmental factors contribute to this increase. Therefore, investigation of changes in metabolic syndrome and its components in South Korea, where rapid socioenvironmental changes have occurred in recent years, would be foundational in setting up an effective strategy for reducing this increasing trend. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We compared the prevalence and pattern of metabolic syndrome ...

  6. Overweight modifies the longitudinal association between uric acid and some components of the metabolic syndrome: The Tromsø Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvik, Jon V; Storhaug, Hilde M; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Jenssen, Trond G; Zykova, Svetlana N; Eriksen, Bjørn O; Solbu, Marit D

    2016-05-10

    Elevated uric acid (UA) is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a prospective cohort study, we assessed whether baseline and longitudinal change in UA were risk factors for development of MetS and its individual components. We included 3087 women and 2996 men who had UA measured in the population based Tromsø Study 1994-95. The participants were stratified according to body mass index (BMI). Endpoints were MetS and each component of the syndrome after 7 years, according to the revised National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) definition. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that higher baseline UA was associated with higher odds of developing elevated blood pressure in overweight subjects (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2), odds ratio [OR] per 59 μmol/L UA increase 1.44, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.17-1.77, P = 0.001), but not in normal-weight subjects (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), P for interaction = 0.04). Overweight also modified the association between baseline UA and the development of elevated fasting glucose (P for interaction = 0.01). UA was a predictor of MetS in all subjects (OR per 59 μmol/L UA increase 1.29, 95 % CI 1.18-1.41, P < 0.001). Furthermore, longitudinal UA change was independently associated with the development of MetS in all subjects (OR per 59 μmol/L UA increase over 7 years 1.28, 95 % CI 1.16-1.42, P < 0.001). Increased levels of baseline UA independently predicted development of elevated blood pressure and higher fasting glycemia in the overweight, but not the normal-weight subjects. Baseline UA and longitudinal increase in UA over 7 years was associated with the development of MetS in all subjects. Whether increased UA should be treated differently in normal-weight and overweight persons needs further study.

  7. Different types of alcoholic beverages and incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components in a Mediterranean cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio-Lopez, Maria T; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Sayon-Orea, Carmen; Garcia-Lopez, Martin; Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro; Gea, Alfredo; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2013-10-01

    We prospectively assessed the association between alcohol consumption and the incidence of Metabolic Syndrome (MS) in a Mediterranean cohort. We included 8103 (mean age: 35.4 years) University graduates free of any MS criteria and followed-up during ≥6 years. Alcohol consumption was collected with a validated 136-item food frequency questionnaire. New-onset cases of MS were defined according to the updated harmonizing criteria. We observed 341 incident cases of MS. Consumers of ≥7 drinks/wk presented a significantly higher risk of developing MS (aOR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.22-2.66; p Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Albornoz López, Raúl; Pérez Rodrigo, Iciar

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activ...

  9. Low-Grade Albuminuria Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Micro-albuminuria has been well established as one of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS. However, the association of MetS and its components with low-grade albuminuria among those with normal urinary albumin excretion has not been clearly elucidated in Chinese population.A cross-sectional study was conducted among 9,579 participants with normal urinary albumin excretion, who were recruited from Jia Ding District, Shanghai, China. The single-void first morning urine sample was collected for urinary albumin and creatinine measurements, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR was calculated as urinary albumin divided by creatinine. Low-grade albuminuria was classified as sex-specific upper UACR quartile in this population. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The prevalence of MetS and its components increased across the UACR quartiles (all P trend <0.01. A multivariable adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that the prevalence of MetS was gradually elevated according to the UACR quartiles (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] were 1.14, 1.24 and 1.59 for UACR quartiles 2, 3 and 4, compared with the lowest quartile; P trend<0.0001. In the further stratified logistic regression analyses, the associations between low-grade albuminuria and MetS were significant in both sex strata (male and female, both age strata (<60 and ≥60 years, both body mass index strata (<24 and ≥24 kg/m(2, and both diabetes strata (yes and no. Compared to the lowest UACR quartile, the participants in the highest quartile of UACR had the highest prevalence of central obesity (OR = 1.43; 95%CI = 1.25-1.63, high blood pressure (OR = 1.64; 95%CI = 1.43-1.87, hyperglycemia (OR = 1.52; 95%CI = 1.30-1.78 and high triglycerides (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.04-1.37.Low-grade albuminuria was significantly associated with the increasing prevalence of MetS and its

  10. Impact of metabolic syndrome and its components on cardiovascular disease event rates in 4900 patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to placebo in the field randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Russell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with the metabolic syndrome are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD events.We aimed to establish whether CVD event rates were influenced by the metabolic syndrome as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and to determine which component(s of the metabolic syndrome (MS conferred the highest cardiovascular risk in in 4900 patients with type 2 diabetes allocated to placebo in the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD trial. Research design and methods We determined the influence of MS variables, as defined by NCEP ATPIII, IDF and WHO, on CVD risk over 5 years, after adjustment for CVD, sex, HbA1c, creatinine, and age, and interactions between the MS variables in a Cox proportional-hazards model. Results About 80% had hypertension, and about half had other features of the metabolic syndrome (IDF, ATPIII. There was no difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome variables between those with and without CVD at study entry. The WHO definition identified those at higher CVD risk across both sexes, all ages, and in those without prior CVD, while the ATPIII definition predicted risk only in those aged over 65 years and in men but not in women. Patients meeting the IDF definition did not have higher risk than those without IDF MS. CVD risk was strongly influenced by prior CVD, sex, age (particularly in women, baseline HbA1c, renal dysfunction, hypertension, and dyslipidemia (low HDL-c, triglycerides > 1.7 mmol/L. The combination of low HDL-c and marked hypertriglyceridemia (> 2.3 mmol/L increased CVD risk by 41%. Baseline systolic blood pressure increased risk by 16% per 10 mmHg in those with no prior CVD, but had no effect in those with CVD. In those without prior CVD, increasing numbers of

  11. High serum carotenoids associated with lower risk for the metabolic syndrome and its components among Japanese subjects: Mikkabi cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Minoru; Nakamura, Mieko; Ogawa, Kazunori; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Yano, Masamichi

    2015-11-28

    Recent epidemiological studies show the association of carotenoids with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but thorough longitudinal cohort studies regarding this association have not been well conducted. The objective of this study was to investigate longitudinally whether serum carotenoids are associated with the risk of developing the MetS and its components in Japanese subjects. We conducted a follow-up study on 1073 men and women aged 30-79 years at the baseline from the Mikkabi prospective cohort study. Those who participated in the baseline and completed follow-up surveys were examined longitudinally. Over the 10-year period, 910 subjects (295 men and 615 women) took part in the follow-up survey at least once. Over a mean follow-up period of 7·8 (sd 2·9) years, thirty-six men and thirty-one women developed new MetS. After adjustments for confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) for the MetS in the highest tertile of serum β-carotene against the lowest tertile was 0·47 (95 % CI 0·23, 0·95). On the other hand, significantly lower risks for dyslipidaemia were observed in the highest tertiles of serum α- and β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin (HR 0·66; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·96; HR, 0·54; 95 % CI 0·37, 0·79; and HR 0·66; 95 % CI 0·44, 0·99, respectively). Other significant associations between the risks for obesity, high blood pressure and hyperglycaemia with serum carotenoids were not observed. Our results further support the hypothesis that eating a diet rich in carotenoids might help prevent the development of the MetS and its complications in Japanese subjects.

  12. [Nutrition and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matía Martín, Pilar; Lecumberri Pascual, Edurne; Calle Pascual, Alfonso L

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient evidence exists in relation to the association in clinical practice between disorders in the metabolism of glucose, lipoproteins, insulin action, arterial hypertension and centrally-distributed obesity. This association is named Metabolic Syndrome. Despite the existence thereof had been questioned by the ADA and EASD, it is a useful tool affording the possibility of identifying individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome and/or its individual components are associated with a high incidence rate of cardiovascular disease. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are underlying risk factors along this syndrome's pathway to disease, changes in living habits therefore being a first-line intervention in the prevention and treatment of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, aterogenic dyslipemia and arterial hypertension. Weight loss and exercise are the keys to the overall plan, one of the most important non-pharmacological cardiovascular risk reduction strategies however still being diet. Epidemiological studies have found a high intake of simple sugars, of foods having a glycemic index and of diets with a high glycemic load to be associated to insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol figures. Los saturated fat intake in favor of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids has been implied in a reduction of the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipemia, although the debate is ongoing. Unrefined grain fiber in the diet has been beneficial in reducing the risk of diabetes. Among the diet patterns, the Mediterranean diet has been related to a lower incidence of diabetes and a reduction in the risk of death. Studies for intervention in the prevention of type II diabetes have suggested low-fat diets (reducing saturated and trans-fats), with a high degree of fiber and low glycemic index. Clinical trials have shown diets with small amounts of carbohydrates, low glycemic

  13. A comparison of predictability of cardiovascular events between each metabolic component in patients with metabolic syndrome based on the revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Kon; Jee, Sun-Ha; Kang, Hee-Cheol

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) generally varies depending on its diagnostic definition, and many different definitions inevitably lead to substantial confusion and lack of comparability between studies. Despite extensive research, there is still no gold standard for the definition of MetS, which continues to be a matter of debate. In this study, we investigate whether and to what extent its individual components are related to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Korean population. We used data from the 2005 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is a nationally representative survey of the noninstitutionalized civilian population. The study sample consisted of 1,406 Korean adults (587 men, 819 women) who were diagnosed with MetS based on the revised National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. Central obesity is defined as a waist circumference cutoff point reported in Asia-Pacific criteria for obesity based on waist circumference by the World Health Organization. CVD was defined as presence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or angina pectoris on a medical history questionnaire. The CVD prevalence among the subjects was 6.8% for men and 8.6% for women. Besides age, the components of MetS showing a significant difference in the number of CVD events were high fasting glucose (FG) in men and high blood pressure (BP) and high FG in women. After adjusting for gender and age, high FG was shown to yield a significant difference (odds ratio: unadjusted 2.08, adjusted 1.81), alone among all MetS components. However, after adjusting for only age, no significant difference was found. Fasting glucose level is the highest predicting factor for CVD in Korean patients with MetS based on the revised NECP definition.

  14. Estimates of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in children and adolescents with and without components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frithioff-Bøjsøe, Christine; Trier, Cæcilie; Esmann Fonvig, Cilius

    2017-01-01

    obtained from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived indices in lean and obese children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 2-hour OGTT was administered in 83 children aged 7-17 years. 47 children were obese and recruited from a childhood obesity clinic and 36 were lean age- and sex-matched controls. Surrogate......INTRODUCTION: The accumulation of components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a disturbed glucose metabolism in obese children. AIM OF STUDY: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between MetS and estimates of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function...

  15. Impact of HSD11B1 polymorphisms on BMI and components of the metabolic syndrome in patients receiving psychotropic treatments

    KAUST Repository

    Quteineh, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associated with psychiatric disorders and psychotropic treatments represents a major health issue. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) is an enzyme that catalyzes tissue regeneration of active cortisol from cortisone. Elevated enzymatic activity of 11β-HSD1 may lead to the development of MetS. Methods We investigated the association between seven HSD11B1 gene (encoding 11β-HSD1) polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in a psychiatric sample treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs (n=478). The polymorphisms that survived Bonferroni correction were analyzed in two independent psychiatric samples (n R1 =168, n R2 =188) and in several large population-based samples (n 1 =5338; n 2 =123 865; n 3 >100 000). Results HSD11B1 rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers were found to be associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure compared with the reference genotype (P corrected <0.05). These associations were exclusively detected in women (n=257) with more than 3.1 kg/m 2, 7.5 cm, and 4.2 mmHg lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, in rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers compared with noncarriers (P corrected <0.05). Conversely, carriers of the rs846906-T allele had significantly higher waist circumference and triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol exclusively in men (P corrected =0.028). The rs846906-T allele was also associated with a higher risk of MetS at 3 months of follow-up (odds ratio: 3.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-7.17, P corrected =0.014). No association was observed between HSD11B1 polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in the population-based samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that HSD11B1 polymorphisms may contribute toward the development of MetS in psychiatric patients treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs, but do not

  16. Clinical biomarkers in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Silva, Veronica; Singer, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A biomarker can be defined as a measurable variable that may be used as an indicator of a given biological state or condition. Biomarkers have been used in health and disease for diagnostic purposes, as tools to assess effectiveness of nutritional or drug intervention, or as risk markers to predict the development of certain diseases. In nutrition studies, selecting appropriate biomarkers is important to assess compliance, or incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism, and in the diagnosis and prognosis of nutrition-related diseases. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that occur simultaneously in the same individual, and it is associated with systemic alterations that may involve several organs and tissues. Given its close association with obesity and the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide, identifying obese individuals at risk for metabolic syndrome is a major clinical priority. Biomarkers for metabolic syndrome are therefore potential important tools to maximize the effectiveness of treatment in subjects who would likely benefit the most. Choice of biomarkers may be challenging due to the complexity of the syndrome, and this article will mainly focus on nutrition biomarkers related to the diagnosis and prognosis of the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Relationship of metabolic syndrome and its components with -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 gene polymorphisms in Mexican children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De la Cruz-Mosso Ulises

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several association studies have shown that -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphisms are related with increase of PAI-1 levels, obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia, which are components of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to analyze the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms in PAI-1 gene and its association with metabolic syndrome and its components in a sample of Mexican mestizo children. Methods This study included 100 children with an age range between 6-11 years divided in two groups: a 48 children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and b 52 children metabolically healthy without any clinical and biochemical alteration. Metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of three or more of the following criteria: fasting glucose levels ≥ 100 mg/dL, triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL, HDL-cholesterol th percentile, systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP ≥ 95th percentile and insulin resistance HOMA-IR ≥ 2.4. The -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Results For the -844 G/A polymorphism, the G/A genotype (OR = 2.79; 95% CI, 1.11-7.08; p = 0.015 and the A allele (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.10-4.43; p = 0.015 were associated with metabolic syndrome. The -844 G/A and A/A genotypes were associated with increase in plasma triglycerides levels (OR = 2.6; 95% CI, 1.16 to 6.04; p = 0.02, decrease in plasma HDL-cholesterol levels (OR = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.06 to 5.42; p = 0.03 and obesity (OR = 2.6; 95% CI, 1.17-5.92; p = 0.01. The C/G and G/G genotypes of the HindIII C/G polymorphism contributed to a significant increase in plasma total cholesterol levels (179 vs. 165 mg/dL; p = 0.02 in comparison with C/C genotype. Conclusions The -844 G/A PAI-1 polymorphism is related with the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia, and the HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphism was associated with the

  18. Association of the components of the metabolic syndrome with non- alcoholic fatty liver disease among normal-weight, overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelishadi Roya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, abnormalities of liver enzymes and sonographic fatty liver, as well as the inter-related associations in normal weight, overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of 1107 students (56.1% girls, aged 6-18 years in Isfahan, Iran. In addition to physical examination, fasting blood glucose, serum lipid profile and liver enzymes were determined. Liver sonography was performed among 931 participants. These variables were compared among participants with different body mass index (BMI categories. Results From lower to higher BMI category, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and systolic blood pressure increased, and HDL-cholesterol decreased significantly. Elevated ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were documented in respectively 4.1%, 6.6% and 9.8% of normal weight group. The corresponding figure was 9.5%, 9.8% and 9.1% in overweight group, and 16.9%, 14.9% and 10.8% in obese group, respectively. In all BMI categories, ALT increased significantly by increasing the number of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Odds ratio for elevated liver enzymes and sonographic fatty liver increased significantly with higher number of the components of the metabolic syndrome and higher BMI categories before and after adjustment for age. Conclusions Because of the interrelationship of biochemical and sonographic indexes of fatty liver with the components of the metabolic syndrome, and with increase in their number, it is suggested to determine the clinical impact of such association in future longitudinal studies.

  19. The effect of dietary changes on distinct components of the metabolic syndrome in a young Sri Lankan population at high risk of CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Nicola; Wijesuriya, Mahen; Vasantharajah, Laksha; Gulliford, Martin; Viberti, Giancarlo; Gnudi, Luigi; Karalliedde, Janaka

    2016-08-01

    South Asian populations are predisposed to early onset of the metabolic syndrome. Lifestyle intervention programmes have demonstrated a reduction in the metabolic syndrome and CVD risk; however, the most effective components of the multi-faceted lifestyle interventions are unknown. We studied 2637 Sri Lankan males (n 1237) and females (n 1380), with a mean BMI of 23·9 (sd 4·2) kg/m2, aged 22·5 (sd 10·0) years, who had participated in a 5-year lifestyle-modification programme to examine the effect of dietary changes on distinct components of the metabolic syndrome. The dietary intervention comprised advice to replace polished starches with unpolished starches, high-fat meat and dairy products with low-fat products and high-sugar beverages and snacks with low-sugar varieties. For the purposes of this analysis, data from the control and intensive lifestyle groups were combined. Anthropometric and biochemical data were recorded, and a FFQ was completed annually. Multiple regression was used to determine the effect of the dietary changes on distinct components of the metabolic syndrome. The ratio unpolished:polished rice was inversely related to change in fasting glucose (β=-0·084, P=0·007) and TAG (β=-0·084, P=0·005) and positively associated with change in HDL-cholesterol (β=0·066, P=0·031) at the 5-year follow-up after controlling for relevant confounders. Red meat intake was positively associated with fasting glucose concentrations (β=0·05, P=0·017), whereas low-fat (β=-0·046, P=0·018) but not high-fat dairy products (β=0·003, P=0·853) was inversely related to glucose tolerance at the follow-up visit. Replacement of polished with unpolished rice may be a particularly effective dietary advice in this and similar populations.

  20. Urine Levels of Phthalate Metabolites and Bisphenol A in Relation to Main Metabolic Syndrome Components: Dyslipidemia, Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes. A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecha, Roman; Svačina, Štěpán; Malý, Marek; Vrbík, Karel; Lacinová, Zdenka; Haluzík, Martin; Pavloušková, Jana; Vavrouš, Adam; Matějková, Dagmar; Müllerová, Dana; Mráz, Miloš; Matoulek, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Human exposure to organic pollutants (some of them also called endocrine disruptors) can be associated with adverse metabolic health outcomes including type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to compare the urine levels of bisphenol A and phthalate metabolites in subgroups of patients with metabolic syndrome composed of patients with and without three important components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes). We have investigated 24 hr urine samples of 168 patients with metabolic syndrome from the Metabolic Outpatient Department of General University Hospital in Prague. Using standard metabolic syndrome criteria, we classified patients as dyslipidemic (n=87), hypertensive (n=96), and type 2 diabetic (n=58). Bisphenol A and 15 metabolites of phthalates were evaluated in relation to creatinine excretion. Samples were analysed with enzymatic cleavage of glucuronide using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in one laboratory with external quality control. Four metabolites, mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate showed significantly higher levels in diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients (p<0.001, p=0.002, p=0.002, and p=0.005, respectively). The differences remained significant after adjustment to hypertension, dyslipidemia, age, and BMI. No difference was found between either the hypertensive and non-hypertensive or dyslipidemic and non-dyslipidemic patients. There was no significant relation of bisphenol A level to diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age, and BMI. Urine levels of four phthalate metabolites were significantly higher in type 2 diabetics independently on specified predictors. Phthalate levels can be in relation to beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients but this study is not able to show if the relation is causal. Copyright© by the National

  1. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels but Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botha, Jaco; Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty......-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1-1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles...... not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome...

  2. Relationships among personality traits, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome scores: The Kakegawa cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohseto, Hisashi; Ishikuro, Mami; Kikuya, Masahiro; Obara, Taku; Igarashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Satomi; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Shigihara, Michiko; Yamanaka, Chizuru; Miyashita, Masako; Mizuno, Satoshi; Nagai, Masato; Matsubara, Hiroko; Sato, Yuki; Metoki, Hirohito; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Kuriyama, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome and the presence of metabolic syndrome components are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association between personality traits and metabolic syndrome remains controversial, and few studies have been conducted in East Asian populations. We measured personality traits using the Japanese version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (Revised Short Form) and five metabolic syndrome components-elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose-in 1322 participants aged 51.1±12.7years old from Kakegawa city, Japan. Metabolic syndrome score (MS score) was defined as the number of metabolic syndrome components present, and metabolic syndrome as having the MS score of 3 or higher. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome components and multiple regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and MS scores adjusted for age, sex, education, income, smoking status, alcohol use, and family history of CVD and diabetes mellitus. We also examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome presence by multiple logistic regression analyses. "Extraversion" scores were higher in those with metabolic syndrome components (elevated waist circumference: P=0.001; elevated triglycerides: P=0.01; elevated blood pressure: P=0.004; elevated fasting glucose: P=0.002). "Extraversion" was associated with the MS score (coefficient=0.12, P=0.0003). No personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Higher "extraversion" scores were related to higher MS scores, but no personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between the metabolic syndrome and its components and gait speed among U.S. adults aged 50 years and older: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Zhong, Yuna; Ford, Earl S; Balluz, Lina S; Strine, Tara W; Mokdad, Ali H

    2006-11-14

    To examine the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and its components and gait speed among older U.S. men and women. Whether these associations are independent of physical activity was also explored. Eight hundred and thirty-five men and 850 women aged > or =50 years from the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 were examined. We used the definition of the metabolic syndrome developed by the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. Gait speed was measured with a 6.10-meter timed walk examination. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 40.2% in men and 45.6% in women (P = .127). The prevalence of gait speed impairment was 29.3% in men and 12.5% in women (P gait speed impairment. After including the individual components of the metabolic syndrome in a logistic model adjusted for age and leisure-time physical activity, abdominal obesity, low HDL cholesterol, and high fasting glucose were significantly associated with gait speed impairment among women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.26 to 0.89; AOR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.75; and AOR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.12 to 3.74, respectively). Further adjustment for race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, arthritis status, and use of an assistive device attenuated these associations; among women, abdominal obesity and low HDL cholesterol remained significantly associated with gait speed impairment (AOR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.76 and AOR = 2.45, 95% CI = 1.07 to 5.63, respectively) while the association between hyperglycemia and impaired gait speed attenuated to nonsignificance. Among women, gait speed impairment is associated with low HDL cholesterol and inversely with abdominal obesity. These associations may be sex-dependent and warrant further research.

  4. Role of Uric Acid Metabolism-Related Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Metabolic Syndrome Components Such as Atherosclerosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Mori, Keiichi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine metabolism and can reportedly act as an antioxidant. However, recently, numerous clinical and basic research approaches have revealed close associations of hyperuricemia with several disorders, particularly those comprising the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we first outline the two molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation occurrence in relation to UA metabolism; one is inflammasome activation by UA crystallization and the other involves superoxide free radicals generated by xanthine oxidase (XO). Importantly, recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic or preventive effects of XO inhibitors against atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which were not previously considered to be related, at least not directly, to hyperuricemia. Such beneficial effects of XO inhibitors have been reported for other organs including the kidneys and the heart. Thus, a major portion of this review focuses on the relationships between UA metabolism and the development of atherosclerosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and related disorders. Although further studies are necessary, XO inhibitors are a potentially novel strategy for reducing the risk of many forms of organ failure characteristic of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  6. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Cunningham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS. Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and met...

  8. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status), socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift), and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration) of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2). The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2), followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64), workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93) and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24). On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73). CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status, socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift, and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2. The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2, followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64, workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93 and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73. CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  10. Association between the metabolic syndrome and its components and gait speed among U.S. adults aged 50 years and older: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strine Tara W

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and its components and gait speed among older U.S. men and women. Whether these associations are independent of physical activity was also explored. Methods Eight hundred and thirty-five men and 850 women aged ≥50 years from the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002 were examined. We used the definition of the metabolic syndrome developed by the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. Gait speed was measured with a 6.10-meter timed walk examination. Results The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 40.2% in men and 45.6% in women (P = .127. The prevalence of gait speed impairment was 29.3% in men and 12.5% in women (P Conclusion Among women, gait speed impairment is associated with low HDL cholesterol and inversely with abdominal obesity. These associations may be sex-dependent and warrant further research.

  11. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  12. [Microbiota and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Yüksel; Batman, Adnan

    2017-04-01

    The role of gut bacteria in the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases has been a focus of attention in the last 10 years. Prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases continues to increase, in spite of technological developments and treatment alternatives. Microbial dysbiosis, described as the decrease of useful bacteria and the increase of harmful bacteria, has been associated with diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome. In microbial dysbiosis, increase of harmful metabolites and changes to composition of bile acids occur via carbohydrate and protein fermentation. As a result, insulin resistance pathways are activated, which initiate the processes of obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Healthy diet recommendations, including prebiotic and probiotic foods and the use of probiotic agents, look promising for future treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Effects of Pioglitazone on Asymmetric Dimethylarginine and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Nondiabetic Patients (EPICAMP Study: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Shokouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present trial aimed to investigate the effects of pioglitazone on the serum level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, a marker of endothelial function, and some indices of inflammation and glucose and lipid metabolism in nondiabetic metabolic syndrome patients. 104 eligible participants (57% female; age between 20 and 70 were enrolled in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial and were randomized to receive either pioglitazone (uptitrated to 30 mg/day or matching placebo for 24 weeks. Participants were clinically examined and a blood sample was obtained at baseline and at the end of the trial. Pioglitazone significantly improved C-reactive protein level irrespective of changes in insulin sensitivity. Compared with the placebo group, alanine and aspartate transaminases were decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was increased after treatment with pioglitazone. A considerably greater weight gain was also recorded in the intervention group. We failed to observe any significant changes in serum ADMA in either group and between groups with and without adjustment for age, sex, and components of the metabolic syndrome. In a nutshell, pioglitazone seems to have positive effects on lipid profile, liver transaminases, and systemic inflammation. However, its previously demonstrated endothelial function-improving properties do not seem to be mediated by ADMA.

  14. Effects of dietary fibre intake during adolescence on the components of the metabolic syndrome at the age of 36 years: The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, L.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Driessen, M.T.; Samoocha, D.; Twisk, J.W.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is increasing, especially in young individuals. Most of the previous studies that have investigated the association between dietary fibre intake and the metabolic syndrome are cross-sectional or of short duration, and their results are

  15. Testosterone and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men are closely Linked. Epidemiological studies have shown that Low testosterone Levels are associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an adverse Lipid profile in men. Conversely in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have a high prevalence of hypogonadism. Metabolic syndrome and Low testosterone status are both independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Observational and experimental data ...

  16. Lean Fish Consumption Is Associated with Beneficial Changes in the Metabolic Syndrome Components: A 13-Year Follow-Up Study from the Norwegian Tromsø Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tørris

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fish consumption may have beneficial effects on metabolic syndrome (MetS; however, limited information of such associations exists. This study investigated possible associations between fish consumption and changes in MetS components during a 13-year follow-up period. Methods: The sample included participants (26–69 years from the Tromsø Study 4 (1994–1995, n = 23,907 and Tromsø Study 6 (2007–2008, n = 12,981. Data were collected using questionnaires including food frequency questions, non-fasting blood samples, and physical examinations. MetS was defined using the Joint Interim Societies (JIS definition, in which one point was given for each MetS criteria fulfilled (metabolic score. Longitudinal analyses were performed using Linear mixed models. Results: For both genders, lean fish consumption once a week or more was significantly associated with decreased future metabolic score, decreased triglycerides, and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol, whereas decreased waist circumference and blood pressure was identified only for men (age adjusted models. Fatty fish consumption was significantly associated with increased waist circumference for both genders and increased HDL-cholesterol levels in men. Conclusion: The results suggest that fatty and lean fish consumption may influence MetS differently and that lean fish consumption in particular seems to be associated with beneficial changes in the MetS components.

  17. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, as a component of the metabolic syndrome, and its causal correlations with other extrahepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmos, Tamás; Suba, Ilona

    2017-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common non-infectious chronic liver-disease in our age, and is a spectrum of all the diseases associated with increased fat accumulation in the hepatocytes. Its development is promoted by sedentary life-style, over-feeding, and certain genetic predisposition. Prevalence in the adult population, even in Hungary is ~30%. In a part of cases, this disease may pass into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, later into fibrosis, rarely into primary hepatocellular cancer. Fatty liver is closely and bidirectionally related to the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and nowadays there is a general consensus that fatty liver is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic sycndrome. The importance of the fatty liver has been highly emphasized recently. In addition to the progression into steatohepatitis, its causal relationship with numerous extrahepatic disorders has been discovered. In our overview, we deal with the epidemiology, pathomechanism of the disease, discuss the possibilities of diagnosis, its relationship with the intestinal microbiota, its recently recognized correlations with bile acids and their receptors, and its supposed correlations with the circadian CLOCK system. Hereinafter, we overview those extrahepatic disorders, which have been shown to be causal link with the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Among these, we emphasize the metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, chronic kidney disease, sleep apnea/hypoventilation syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer's disease, osteoporosis, and psoriasis, as well. Based on the above, it can be stated, that high risk individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease need systemic care, and require the detection of other components of this systemic pathological condition. While currently specific therapy for the disease is not yet known, life-style changes, adequate use of available medicines can prevent disease progression. Promising research

  18. Prevalence of metabolic components in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Ana Roberta Vilarouca da; Sousa, Luana Savana Nascimento de; Rocha, Telma de Sousa; Cortez, Ramiro Marx Alves; Macêdo, Layla Gonçalves do Nascimento; Almeida, Paulo César de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the frequency of components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among university students.METHOD: descriptive study with 550 students, from various courses run by a public university. The socioeconomic data, lifestyle, and components of MetS were filled out using a questionnaire. Blood sample collection was undertaken in the university itself by a contracted clinical analysis laboratory.RESULTS: 66.2% were female, with a mean age of 22.6±4.41; 71.7% were sedentary; 1.8% stated...

  19. A sequential two meal challenge reveals abnormalities in postprandial TAG but not glucose in men with increasing numbers of metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kim G; Walden, Charlotte M; Murray, Peter; Smith, Adrian M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Minihane, Anne M; Williams, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of increasing numbers of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components on postprandial lipaemia. Healthy men (n=112) underwent a sequential meal postprandial investigation, in which blood samples were taken at regular intervals after a test breakfast (0min) and lunch (330min). Lipids, glucose and insulin were measured in the fasting sample, with triacylglycerol (TAG), non-esterified fatty acids and glucose analysed in the postprandial samples. Subjects were grouped according to the number of MetS components regardless of the combinations of components (0/1, 2, 3 and 4/5). As expected, there was a trend for an increase in body mass index, blood pressure, fasting TAG, glucose and insulin, and a decrease in fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with increasing numbers of MetS components (P≤0.0004). A similar trend was observed for the summary measures of the postprandial TAG and glucose responses. For TAG, the area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (maxC) were significantly greater in men with ≥3 than postprandial TAG and glucose responses. Furthermore, the two meal challenge discriminated a worsening of postprandial lipaemic control in subjects with ≥3 MetS components. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic syndrome components and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on creatinine and/or cystatin C in young adults: A gender issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Thalia; do Rosário, Natalia Fonseca; Gama, Nycole Abreu; Mérida, Lyris Anunciata Demétrio; Storch, Amanda Sampaio; Ferraz, Leda; de Fátima Lopes, Patricia; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Almeida, Jorge Reis

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to identify correlations between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) based on creatinine and/or cystatin C (Cr, CysC) with metabolic syndrome (MS) components in young adults, according to gender. This is a cross sectional study, where young adults aged between 18 and 30 were matched by gender, age and body mass index. All subjects underwent clinical evaluation and blood sampling for laboratory measurements. MS was determined according to the JIS criteria. The eGFR was estimated using CKD-EPI equations (eGFR Cr ; eGFR CysC ; eGFR Cr-CysC ). We evaluated 78 subjects with a mean age of 24.5 years. 10.2% had MS, with higher incidence among males (15.4% ♂ vs. 5.1% ♀). Elevated waist circumference was the MS component most observed. Significant correlations (Pearson; pmetabolic markers were observed only in males. In addition, we observed a significant association between the increase of MS components and the decay of eGFR Cr and eGFR Cr-CysC (zero vs. two or more components, ANOVA, p<0.05) only among males. eGFR decay associated with components of MS and insulin resistance in young male adults could represent a worrying specific risk and indicate that further studies are needed to better understand these findings. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; pacute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; pacute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Utilizing the metabolic syndrome component count in workers' health surveillance: An example of day-time vs. day-night rotating shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu Cheng; Hsieh, I-Chun; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2015-01-01

    To establish a practical method for assessing the general metabolic health conditions among different employee groups, this study utilized the total count of metabolic syndrome (MetS) elements as a parameter, and performed a retrospective analysis comparing changes of MetS component count (MSC) of 5 years among day-time work (DW) and day-andnight rotating shift work (RSW) employees. The data of personal histories, physical examinations, blood tests, abdominal sonographic examinations and occupational records were collected from a cohort of workers in an electronics manufacturing company. We first defined the arithmetic mean value of MSC as MSC density (MSCD) for the employee group; then we compared the changes of MSCD over 5 years between DW and RSW workers. Occupational, personal and health records were analyzed for the 1077 workers with an initial mean age of 32.4 years (standard deviation (SD): 6.2 years), including 565 RSW workers (52%). The initial MSCDs were 1.26 and 1.12 (p = 0.06) for DW and RSW workers, respectively; after 5 years, the increments of MSCD for DW and RSW workers were 0.10 and 0.39, respectively (p group; MSC, MSCD and their transitional changes can be applied as simple and standardized tools for monitoring metabolic health risk profiles when managing employee health, at both the individual and company levels. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Apr 13,2017 What are the symptoms ... Syndrome? This content was last reviewed August 2016. Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  5. Thyroid function in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: metabolic syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are two common disorders encountered in the metabolic clinic. Recently, there has been increased interest in the association between the two disorders because of the similarities between symptoms of hypothyroidism and components of the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  8. SIRT1 and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mac-Marcjanek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Both obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two major components of metabolic syndrome, become healthepidemics in the world. Over the past decade, advances in understanding the role of some regulators participatingin lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis have been made.Of them, SIRT1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast Sir2 protein has been identified. SIRT1 is a nuclearNAD+-dependent deacetylase that targets many transcriptional modulators, including PPAR-α and -γ (peroxisomeproliferator-activated receptors α and γ, PGC-1α (PPAR-γ coactivator-1α, FOXO (forkhead box O proteins,and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, thereby this enzyme mediates a wide range of physiological processes like apoptosis,fat metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and neurodegeneration.In this article, we discuss how SIRT1 regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin secretion indifferent metabolic organs/tissue, including liver, muscle, pancreas, and fat. Additionally, the role of this enzymein reduction of inflammatory signalling is highlighted.

  9. Metabolic syndrome-like components and prostate cancer risk: results from the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourbeer, Katharine N.; Howard, Lauren E.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J.; Vidal, Adriana C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between number of metabolic syndrome (MetS)-like components and prostate cancer diagnosis in a group of men where nearly all biopsies were taken independent of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, thus minimising any confounding from how the various MetS-like components may influence PSA levels. Subjects/Patients and Methods We analysed data from 6426 men in the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study with at least one on-study biopsy. REDUCE compared dutasteride vs placebo on prostate cancer risk among men with an elevated PSA level and negative pre-study biopsy and included two on-study biopsies regardless of PSA level at 2 and 4 years. Available data for MetS-like components included data on diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and body mass index. The association between number of these MetS-like components and prostate cancer risk and low-grade (Gleason sum 7) vs no prostate cancer was evaluated using logistic regression. Results In all, 2171 men (34%) had one MetS-like component, 724 (11%) had two, and 163 (3%) had three or four. Men with more MetS-like components had lower PSA levels (P = 0.029). One vs no MetS-like components was protective for overall prostate cancer (P = 0.041) and low-grade prostate cancer (P = 0.010). Two (P = 0.69) or three to four (P = 0.15) MetS-like components were not significantly related to prostate cancer. While one MetS-like component was unrelated to high-grade prostate cancer (P = 0.97), two (P = 0.059) or three to four MetS-like components (P = 0.02) were associated with increased high-grade prostate cancer risk, although only the latter was significant. Conclusion When biopsies are largely PSA level independent, men with an initial elevated PSA level and a previous negative biopsy, and multiple MetS-like components were at an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer, suggesting the link between MetS-like components and high-grade prostate

  10. Sex difference in the association of serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome and its components: a cross-sectional study in a Chinese Yi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanshan; Liu, Xirun; Li, Hui; Xu, Wangdong; Jia, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Since the association between serum uric acid (SUA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been reported extensively, it remains unclear whether SUA is associated with MetS and its components in a Chinese Yi population. This study recruited 1,903 people (912 men, 991 women) older than 18 years old from the Liangshan region in Sichuan province. Anthropometric measurements and biochemical indexes were measured by a standard protocol. SUA levels were divided into four quartiles by sex. The prevalence of hyperuricemia and MetS is 21.0% and 17.1%, respectively. The levels of SUA were positively correlated with waist circumference, body mass index and triglycerides while negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both sexes. Increased SUA levels were accompanied with prevalence of MetS and several components in both sexes (P < 0.05). Men with the highest SUA quartile had an increased risk of MetS [OR (95% CI): 3.101 (1.281-7.504)], and men with higher SUA levels had an increased risk of central obesity, high blood pressure and hypertriglyceridemia compared to the lowest SUA quartile. Women with higher SUA levels had an increased risk of MetS, central obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and a lower risk of high blood pressure compared to the lowest SUA quartile. SUA levels were closely associated with MetS and several components by sex in Chinese Yi population.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and dietary components are associated with coronary artery disease risk score in free-living adults: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Mauro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease (CAD is among the main causes of death in developed countries, and diet and lifestyle can influence CAD incidence. Objective To evaluate the association of coronary artery disease risk score with dietary, anthropometric and biochemical components in adults clinically selected for a lifestyle modification program. Methods 362 adults (96 men, 266 women, 53.9 ± 9.4 years fulfilled the inclusion criteria by presenting all the required data. The Framingham score was calculated and the IV Brazilian Guideline on Dyslipidemia and Prevention of Atherosclerosis was adopted for classification of the CAD risks. Anthropometric assessments included waist circumference (WC, body fat and calculated BMI (kg/m2 and muscle-mass index (MMI kg/m2. Dietary intake was estimated through 24 h dietary recall. Fasting blood was used for biochemical analysis. Metabolic Syndrome (MS was diagnosed using NCEP-ATPIII (2001 criteria. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds of CAD risks according to the altered components of MS, dietary, anthropometric, and biochemical components. Results For a sample with a BMI 28.5 ± 5.0 kg/m2 the association with lower risk ( Conclusion Recommended intake of saturated fat and dietary fiber, together with proper muscle mass, are inversely associated with CAD risk score. On the other hand, the presence of MS and high plasma uric acid are associated with CAD risk score.

  12. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a cohort of Chinese schoolchildren: comparison of two definitions and assessment of adipokines as components by factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although attention to metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children has increased, there is still no universally accepted definition and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Our aim was to compare the current definitions of childhood MetS in a Chinese cohort and to examine the clustering pattern of MetS risk factors, particularly inclusion of leptin and adiponectin as additional components. Methods 3373 schoolchildren aged 6 to 18 years were recruited. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters and adipokines were measured. MetS was identified using both the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and a modified Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) definitions. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to establish grouping of metabolic characteristics. Results For children ≥10 years, the prevalence of MetS was 14.3% in the obese group and 3.7% in the overweight group according to the new IDF definition, and 32.3% in the obese group and 8.4% in the overweight group according to the modified ATPIII definition. Frequency of hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), impaired fasting glucose, elevated blood pressure, and central obesity according to the new IDF definition was 16.7%, 20.7%, 15.8%, 25.5% and 75.5% in obese boys and 14.7%, 24.0%, 12.0%, 11.0% and 89.0% in obese girls, respectively. Metabolic abnormalities in children under 10 years of age were also noted. Using factor analysis on eight conventional variables led to the extraction of 3 factors. Waist circumference (WC) provided a connection between two factors in boys and all three factors in girls, suggesting its central role in the clustering of metabolic risk factors. Addition of leptin and adiponectin also led to the extraction of 3 factors, with leptin providing a connection between two factors in girls. When using WC, mean arterial pressure, triglyceride/HDL-C ratio, HOMA-IR and leptin/adiponectin ratio as variables, a single-factor model was extracted. WC had the

  13. Carnosic acid as a major bioactive component in rosemary extract ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yantao; Sedighi, Rashin; Wang, Pei; Chen, Huadong; Zhu, Yingdong; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-05-20

    In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of carnosic acid (CA) as a major bioactive component in rosemary extract (RE) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome in mice. The mice were given a low-fat diet, a high-fat diet or a high-fat diet supplemented with either 0.14% or 0.28% (w/w) CA-enriched RE (containing 80% CA, RE#1L and RE#1H), or 0.5% (w/w) RE (containing 45% CA, RE#2), for a period of 16 weeks. There was the same CA content in the RE#1H and RE#2 diets and half of this amount in the RE#1L diet. The dietary RE supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, percent of fat, plasma ALT, AST, glucose, insulin levels, liver weight, liver triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels in comparison with the mice fed with a HF diet without RE treatment. RE administration also decreased the levels of plasma and liver malondialdehyde, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and the liver expression of receptor for AGE (RAGE) in comparison with those for mice of the HF group. Histological analyses of liver samples showed decreased lipid accumulation in hepatocytes in mice administrated with RE in comparison with that of HF-diet-fed mice. Meanwhile, RE administration enhanced fecal lipid excretion to inhibit lipid absorption and increased the liver GSH/GSSG ratio to perform antioxidant activity compared with HF group. Our results demonstrate that rosemary is a promising dietary agent to reduce the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  14. Factors Affecting Gender Differences in the Association between Health-Related Quality of Life and Metabolic Syndrome Components: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Amiri

    Full Text Available Using structural equation modeling, this study is one of the first efforts aimed at assessing influential factors causing gender differences in the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL and metabolic syndrome.A sample of 950 adults, from Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study were recruited for this cross sectional study in 2005-2007. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the Iranian version of SF-36. Metabolic syndrome components (MetSCs and physical and mental HRQoL were considered as continuous latent constructs explaining the variances of their observed components. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the association between the constructs of MetSCs and the physical and mental HRQoL within the two gender groups.Based on the primary hypothesis, MetSCs and HRQoL were fitted in a model. The negative effect of MetSCs on HRQoL was found to be significant only in the physical domain and only in women. The proportion of all the cardio-metabolic risk factors as well as subscales of physical HRQoL that have been explained via the two constructs of MetSCs and HRQoL, respectively, were significantly higher in women. Physical activity in both men (β = 3.19, p<0.05 and women (β = 3.94, p<0.05, age (β = -3.28, p<0.05, education (β = 2.63, p<0.05 only in women and smoking (β = 2.28, p<0.05 just in men, directly affected physical HRQoL. Regarding the mental domain, physical activity (β = 3.37, p<0.05 and marital status (β = 3.44, p<0.05 in women and age (β = 2.01, p<0.05 in men were direct effective factors. Age and education in women as well as smoking in men indirectly affected physical HRQoL via MetSCs.Gender differences in the association between MetSCs and physical HRQoL could mostly be attributed to the different structures of both MetSCs and physical HRQoL constructs in men and women. Age and smoking are the most important socio-behavioral factors which could affect this gender-specific association in

  15. Association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome components in prepubertal obese children (Tanner Stage I) from Nuevo León, Mexico - a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Elizabeth Solis; Medina, Mario Alberto González; Lomeli, Manuel Lopez-Cabanillas; González, Verónica Tijerina; Pérez, Jesús Zacarías Villarreal; Lavalle González, Fernando J; Imrhan, Victorine; Juma, Shanil; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Boonme, Kittipong; Prasad, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Previous studies in obese children demonstrating a positive association between serum uric acid (sUA) and components of MetS are confounded by lack of uniformity in age and pubertal status of children. Therefore, we have examined the role of sUA in MetS and its components in pre-pubertal children (Tanner Stage I, age ≤ 9 years). Pre-pubertal obese children (32 boys, 27 girls, age 6-9 years) were recruited from Nuevo Leon, Mexico. For comparison, an equal number of children with normal body mass index (BMI) in the same age range (22 Boys, 39 girls, age 6-9 years) were also recruited from the same community. Presence of MetS and its components was defined according to the criteria of International Diabetes Federation. Fasting blood was analyzed for lipids, glucose, insulin, and uric acid. Among the obese children, sUA was positively associated with insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia and negatively associated with high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLc). Subjects were three times more likely to have a MetS diagnosis per one unit (md/dL) difference in sUA. Of the 59 obese pre-pubertal children, 20 were classified as having MetS defined by the presence of abdominal obesity and two or more of other components described under methods. Of these, 57.1% (20/61) had sUA between 5.1 and 7.1 mg/dl. The findings of this study clearly indicate a positive relationship between uric acid and MetS and its components in pre-pubertal obese children with Tanner stage I and ≤9 years of age.

  16. Sleep symptoms predict the development of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Wendy M; Buysse, Daniel J; Matthews, Karen A; Kip, Kevin E; Strollo, Patrick J; Hall, Martica; Drumheller, Oliver; Reis, Steven E

    2010-12-01

    Sleep complaints are highly prevalent and associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. This is the first prospective study to report the association between commonly reported sleep symptoms and the development of the metabolic syndrome, a key CVD risk factor. Participants were from the community-based Heart Strategies Concentrating on Risk Evaluation study. The sample was comprised of 812 participants (36% African American; 67% female) who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline, had completed a baseline sleep questionnaire, and had metabolic syndrome evaluated 3 years after baseline. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured cross-sectionally using a portable monitor in a subset of 290 participants. Logistic regression examined the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and its components according to individual sleep symptoms and insomnia syndrome. Specific symptoms of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep [DFA] and "unrefreshing" sleep), but not a syndromal definition of insomnia, were significant predictors of the development of metabolic syndrome. Loud snoring more than doubled the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and also predicted specific metabolic abnormalities (hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). With further adjustment for AHI or the number of metabolic abnormalities at baseline, loud snoring remained a significant predictor of metabolic syndrome, whereas DFA and unrefreshing sleep were reduced to marginal significance. Difficulty falling asleep, unrefreshing sleep, and, particularly, loud snoring, predicted the development of metabolic syndrome in community adults. Evaluating sleep symptoms can help identify individuals at risk for developing metabolic syndrome.

  17. Metabolic syndrome among Ghanaian patients presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a general risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Western populations. This study assessed the relationship between MetS and its compo-nents in Ghanaian patients presenting with CKD. The study population comprised of 146 non-dialysed individuals with CKD with ...

  18. The metabolic syndrome in HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe W; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a term used to describe the clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including elevated triglyceride (TG), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), hypertension, hyperglycemia/ insulin resistance and intra-abdominal obesity. This paper...

  19. Major components of metabolic syndrome and nutritional intakes in different genotype of UCP2 -866G/A gene polymorphisms in patients with NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Mohseni, Fatemeh; Farajnia, Safar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad-Asghari

    2016-06-14

    It has been suggested that dietary modifications in combination with genetic predisposition play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In the current study we aimed to investigate the major components of metabolic syndrome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nutritional intakes according to different genotype of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) -866G/A gene polymorphism in these patients. In this study 151 participants including 75 patients with NAFLD and 76 healthy individuals were enrolled. Dietary intakes were assessed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Physical activity was obtained by metabolic equivalent questionnaire. Anthropometric assessments were conducted by a trained researcher and body mass index and waist to hip ratio were calculated. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and biochemical assays including fasting serum glucose, liver enzymes and lipid profiles were measured. Polymorphisms of -866G/A UCP2 gene was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum triglyceride concentrations in 53.3 % of NAFLD patients compared with 35.5 % of control group was more than 150 mg/dl (P = 0.034). A significantly higher prevalence of low serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations was also observed in female NAFLD patients (P  0.05). However, according to genotypes patients with AG genotype had significantly higher protein consumption compared with control group (P consumption of dietary iron and copper in NAFLD patients with AG genotype was only observed among patients with NAFLD. However, the comparison of macro and micronutrient intakes in control group sound for stronger differences for AA genotype although these differences did not achieve significant threshold. A high prevalence of metabolic abnormalities was reported among NAFLD patients. Additionally, among NAFLD group, patients with AG genotype

  20. Equine metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  1. Revisiting the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gerard T; Gan, Seng Khee; Watts, Gerald F

    2006-10-16

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) refers to the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors - including abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and elevated blood pressure - that are thought to be linked to insulin resistance. MS is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. MS is common, affecting a quarter to a third of adults, and its prevalence is rising, in parallel with increasing obesity and population ageing. Operational definitions of MS have been proposed by the World Health Organization and the National Cholesterol Education Program. Recently, the International Diabetes Federation proposed a global definition that emphasised the importance of central adiposity. In cardiovascular risk assessment, MS encapsulates the contribution of non-traditional risk factors and provides a clinically useful framework for early identification of people at increased long-term risk. It should be used in conjunction with standard algorithms based on conventional risk factors, which better predict short-term risk. Management of MS should emphasise lifestyle interventions (eg, physical activity, healthy diet and weight reduction) to reduce long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Those at increased short-term risk should also have individual risk factors treated according to established guidelines.

  2. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Ellervik, Christina; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE An association between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis, has been suggested.Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a more localized chronic inflammation of the skin, has been speculated to have a similar association......,predominantly female, and more often smokers compared with the non-HS group.EXPOSURE Hidradenitis suppurativa.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Metabolic syndrome and its components of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity.RESULTS When compared with the non-HS group, the odds ratios (ORs...

  3. The pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask Larsen, Julie; Dima, Lorena; Correll, Christoph U; Manu, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome includes a constellation of several well-established risk factors, which need to be aggressively treated in order to prevent overt type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While recent guidelines for the treatment of individual components of the metabolic syndrome focus on cardiovascular benefits as resulted from clinical trials, specific recent recommendations on the pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome are lacking. The objective of present paper was to review the therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome and its components, the available evidence related to their cardiovascular benefits, and to evaluate the extent to which they should influence the guidelines for clinical practice. Areas covered: A Medline literature search was performed to identify clinical trials and meta-analyses related to the therapy of dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, glucose metabolism and obesity published in the past decade. Expert commentary: Our recommendation for first-line pharmacological are statins for dyslipidemia, renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibitors for arterial hypertension, metformin or sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors or glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) for glucose intolerance, and the GLP-1RA liraglutide for achieving body weight and waist circumference reduction.

  4. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. APPLICATILITY OF THE VISCERAL ADIPOSITY INDEX (VAI) IN THE PREDICTION OF THE COMPONENTS OF THE METABOLIC SYNDROME IN ELDERLY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldani, Heloisa; Adami, Fernanda Scherer; Antunes, Maria Terezinha; Rosa, Luis Henrique; Fassina, Patrícia; Quevedo Grave, Magali Terezinha; Morelo Dal Bosco, Simone

    2015-10-01

    The nutritional assessment may detect a state of malnutrition, overweight and cardiometabolic risk in the elderly. Easy to apply instruments enable the identification of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). to analyze the applicability of Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) in the prediction of MS components in the elderly. cross-sectional study with 221 elderly at a mean age of 70.65 ± 7.34 years; 53.4% female and 46.4% male. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC), fasting glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and blood pressure (BP), data was obtained, as well as information about lifestyle. There were calculated the Body Mass Index (BMI), the Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR), and the VAI. The adiposity measures were compared with the components of MS, and for the VAI there was determined the capability of predicting the occurrence of MS components. by analyzing the association among the biochemical and pressoric variables and MS components with the anthropometric indicators of obesity, there was a direct and significant correlation of the BMI, the weight and the VAI with blood glucose, HDL and TG (p. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = -3.6, p = 0.0003, r(2)  = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (ppeople with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; p<0.001) and all its components, except for hypertension (p = 0.07). These data suggest that the risk for MetS is similarly elevated in the diagnostic subgroups of severe mental illness. Routine screening and multidisciplinary management of medical and behavioral conditions is needed in these patients. Risks of individual antipsychotics should be considered when making treatment choices. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  7. Comparison of glycated hemoglobin with fasting plasma glucose in definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghorbani, Mohsen; Amini, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the utility of glycated hemoglobin (GHb) versus the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a non-diabetic Iranian population. A cross-sectional study of first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with type 2 diabetes was conducted from 2003 to 2005. A total of 2410 non-diabetic FDRs of consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes 30-60 years old were examined. All subjects underwent a standard 75 g 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and GHb measurement. Consensus criteria in 2009 were used to identify MetS. Glycemic component of MetS was defined as either FPG≥100 mg/dl or GHb≥5.7%. The mean (SD) age of participants was 43.6 (6.5) years. The prevalence of MetS was 33.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 31.6, 35.4) based on FPG criterion alone and 28.6% (95% CI: 26.8, 30.4) based on GHb criterion alone. Use of combination of both criteria increased the prevalence of MetS (36.7%; 95% CI: 34.8, 38.6). There was 88.7% (95% CI: 87.5, 90.0) agreement between the GHb and FPG when either was used to define MetS (κ coefficient=0.737). These data indicate that using GHb may be an acceptable surrogate of FPG to define glycemic component of MetS. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Escasany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in female nurses in the Hospital Juan A. Fernandez (HJAF, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to determine whether work, rest, diet, and health, are predictive of it.Materials and methods: For the first objective, a descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was conducted, and for the second, a multivariate cross-sectional observational multivariate analysis was made comparing independent samples. A total of 192 nurses were studied between October 2008 and March 2009. They completed a questionnaire that include indicators that could be predictors of MS. Anthropometric measurements, including blood pressure were taken, was well as a blood sample to analyze fasting glucose, HDL-C and plasma triglycerides.Results: It was found that 35% and 41% of nurses were overweight and obese, respectively. A total of 92% had centro-abdominal obesity. The prevalence of MS found was 33.3% (95%CI, 26.7 to 40.5. Those who had this disease were between 53±9 years. Statistically significant differences were found in the bivariate analysis between MS and the variables, age, length of service, time worked during night shift, and academic studies.Conclusions: The prevalence of MS was 64/192 in HJAF nurses (33.3% I 95%CI, 26.7-40.5. There were no statistically significant differences with the indicators of, age, “time worked during night shift”, and “studies”. These results suggest that age is the most important variable in predicting the onset of MS in the population of nurses.

  9. Utilizing the metabolic syndrome component count in workers’ health surveillance: An example of day-time vs. day-night rotating shift workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cheng Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To establish a practical method for assessing the general metabolic health conditions among different employee groups, this study utilized the total count of metabolic syndrome (MetS elements as a parameter, and performed a retrospective analysis comparing changes of MetS component count (MSC of 5 years among day-time work (DW and day-andnight rotating shift work (RSW employees. Material and Methods: The data of personal histories, physical examinations, blood tests, abdominal sonographic examinations and occupational records were collected from a cohort of workers in an electronics manufacturing company. We first defined the arithmetic mean value of MSC as MSC density (MSCD for the employee group; then we compared the changes of MSCD over 5 years between DW and RSW workers. Occupational, personal and health records were analyzed for the 1077 workers with an initial mean age of 32.4 years (standard deviation (SD: 6.2 years, including 565 RSW workers (52%. Results: The initial MSCDs were 1.26 and 1.12 (p = 0.06 for DW and RSW workers, respectively; after 5 years, the increments of MSCD for DW and RSW workers were 0.10 and 0.39, respectively (p < 0.01. By performing multivariate logistic regression analyses, and comparing with DW co-workers, final results indicated that the workers exposed to RSW have 1.7-fold increased risk of elevated MSCD (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.28–2.25, p < 0.01; and are 38% less likely (adjusted rate ratio (aRR 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45–0.86, p < 0.01 to attain decreased MSCD. Conclusions: These observations demonstrate that changes of MSCD are significantly different between DW and RSW workers, and are increasingly associated with RSW exposure. In conclusion, MSCD can represent the general metabolic health conditions of a given employee group; MSC, MSCD and their transitional changes can be applied as simple and standardized tools for monitoring metabolic health risk profiles when managing employee health

  10. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive biomarker for advanced glycation end products, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and its individual components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waateringe, Robert P.; Slagter, Sandra N.; van Beek, Andre P.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Graaff, Reindert; Paterson, Andrew D.; Lutgers, Helen L.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises several cardiometabolic risk factors associated with increased risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive bio-marker of advanced glycation end products accumulation, is associated with

  11. a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Maria Banaś

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Material and methods. The study group comprised 325 children and adolescents (177♀, 148♂ aged 7, 13 and 16 years. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference were made, along with the determination of blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid levels. Overweight states and obesity were assessed according to the IOTF criteria. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were evaluated using growth charts appropriate for the age, gender and height of the children of Lodz. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the NCEP/AT P III criteria. Results . Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 6.5% of the subjects. In children aged 13 and 16 years – 7.6% (p > 0.05 vs. 7 years, aged 7 years – 3.9% (p > 0.05 vs. 13, 16 years, boys (8.8%; p > 0.05, girls (4.5%; p > 0.05. Among children with excessive body weight, metabolic syndrome was observed in every fourth child (25.4%, more often in those with obesity (44.1% than with abdominal obesity (32% and those who were overweight (19.2%, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. metabolic syndrome. The number of components of metabolic syndrome elevated with increasing body weight (p < 0.001. Abdominal obesity was observed in 17.5% of the subjects. Children with abdominal obesity had higher levels of triglycerides (p < 0.05 and lower HDL cholesterol (p 110 mg/dl in 85 (26.1% and excessive body weight in 71 subjects (21.8%. Conclusions . The presence of metabolic syndrome correlated with overweight state, obesity and abdominal obesity

  12. Effectiveness of a Smartphone Application for the Management of Metabolic Syndrome Components Focusing on Weight Loss: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ramos, Tatiana; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Kim, Youngin; Michaelides, Andreas; Oh, Tae Jung; Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2017-11-01

    There are inconsistent results for the effectiveness of using smartphone applications (apps) or websites on weight loss. We investigated the efficacy of a smartphone intervention using a designated app that utilizes a lifestyle intervention-focused approach, including a human coaching element, toward weight loss in overweight or obese Korean adults. One hundred four adults aged 20-60 years with a body mass index ≥23 kg/m 2 , who signed up for a smartphone program for weight loss (using the Noom app), were recruited. Participants received an in-person orientation about the study and app use, and a baseline blood sample was obtained. The in-app intervention with daily behavior and nutrition education content and coaching lasted 15 weeks. The primary endpoint of the study was a change in weight. The secondary endpoints were changes in metabolic risk factors such as blood pressure, waist circumference, and glucose and lipid profiles. Body composition changes were also assessed, and body weight at 52 weeks was measured to ascertain long-term effects. Participants showed a clinically significant weight loss effect of -7.5% at the end of the 15-week program (P weight loss effect of -5.2% was maintained. At 15 weeks, percent body fat and visceral fat decreased by -6.0 ± 5.4% and -3.4 ± 2.7 kg, respectively (both P frequency of logging meals and exercise was associated with body fat loss. This advanced smartphone app was a useful tool to maintain weight loss in overweight or obese people.

  13. Fatty acid metabolism: target for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wakil, Salih J.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi A.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acids are a major energy source and important constituents of membrane lipids, and they serve as cellular signaling molecules that play an important role in the etiology of the metabolic syndrome. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 (ACC1 and ACC2) catalyze the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the substrate for fatty acid synthesis and the regulator of fatty acid oxidation. They are highly regulated and play important roles in the energy metabolism of fatty acids in animals, including humans. They...

  14. Metabolic syndrome and its components with neuron-specific enolase: a cross-sectional study in large health check-up population in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yi; Zha, Xiao-Juan; Zhu, Xin-Ying; Li, Wen-Bo; Ma, Jun; Wu, Ze-Wei; Wu, Huan; Jiang, Ming-Fei; Wen, Yu-Feng

    2018-04-10

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Cross-sectional study. Chinese health check-up population. 40 684 health check-up people were enrolled in this study from year 2014 to 2016. OR and coefficient for MS. The percentage of abnormal NSE and MS was 26.85% and 8.85%, respectively. There were significant differences in sex, body mass index, drinking habit, triglycerides (TGs), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), blood pressure and MS between low-NSE and high-NSE groups. In logistic regression analysis, elevated NSE was present in MS, higher body mass index, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypertension and low-HDL groups. Stepwise linear analysis showed a negative correlation between NSE and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (<6.0 mmol/L), and a positive correlation between NSE and TGs (<20 mmol/L), systolic blood pressure (75-200 mm Hg), HDL-C (0.75-2.50 mmol/L), diastolic blood pressure (<70 mm Hg) and FBG (6.00-20.00 mmol/L). Furthermore, MS was positively correlated with NSE within the range of 2.00-7.50 ng/mL, but had a negative correlation with NSE within the range of 7.50-23.00 ng/mL. There are associations between NSE with MS and its components. The result suggests that NSE may be a potential predictor of MS. Further research could be conducted in discussing the potential mechanism involved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Prevalence of Reduced Kidney Function by Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Using an Equation Based on Creatinine and Cystatin C in Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Ho; Jeong, Dong Wook; Son, Seok Man

    2016-09-01

    It is known that metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with chronic kidney disease. We evaluated and compared the prevalence of reduced kidney function in MetS and its components by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using an equation based on creatinine (eGFRcr), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and combined creatinine-cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys) in Korean adults. We analyzed data from 3,649 adults who participated in a comprehensive health examination. Mean values of eGFRcys were higher compared with mean values of eGFRcr (96.1±18.2 mL/min/1.73 m² vs. 91.2±13.6 mL/min/1.73 m²) in total subjects. The prevalence of reduced kidney function increased with age (9.6% for eGFRcys vs. 5.8% for eGFRcr-cys vs. 4.9% for eGFRcr, in subjects aged ≥60 years), and significantly increased with MetS, abdominal obesity, hypertension, high triglyceride, low high density lipoprotein (HDL), and high insulin resistance. The prevalence of MetS, abdominal obesity, hypertension, high insulin resistance, low HDL, and hepatic steatosis was significantly increased in subjects with reduced kidney function. This increased prevalence and the odds ratio of reduced kidney function for prevalence of MetS was highest for eGFRcys, followed by those of eGFRcr-cys, and eGFRcr. The prevalence of reduced kidney function by eGFR was significantly increased in subjects with MetS and its related components. eGFRcys and eGFRcr-cys were superior to eGFRcr in detecting reduced kidney function.

  16. Metabolic syndrome components as markers to prognosticate the risk of developing chronic kidney disease: evidence-based study with 6492 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorrodian, Davoud; Khajavi-Rad, Abolfazl; Avan, Amir; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Nematy, Mohsen; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Emamian, Marzieh; Sadeghzade, Mahsa; Mirhafez, Seyed Reza; Mohammadi, Maryam; Mousavi, Mina; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Moohebati, Mohsen; Parizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2015-06-01

    The global prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) appears to be increasing and the impact of this condition on potential comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease is high. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a potential comorbidity of MetS but the method of screening for this is somewhat controversial. Thus, predictive markers that can predict the risk of developing CKD are warranted for identification of patients with MetS at an increased risk. We investigated the occurrence of CKD in 6492 individuals, either with or without MetS. Our results showed that the prevalence of CKD was markedly higher in those individuals with MetS, and increased progressively with the number of MetS components and age. Waist circumference, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly (pcreatinine, and were related to the increased risk of CKD (eg, OR 1.293 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.52; p=0.002)). The relative risk of CKD remained statistically significant for uric acid following multivariate analyses and adjusting for MetS-associated factors. Our data demonstrated the association of MetS components with CKD in our population and revealed that susceptibility to CKD was increased with the number of defining features of MetS. These findings prompt prospective studies to determine the impact of preventing and detecting MetS on the risk of developing CKD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Prevalence of Reduced Kidney Function by Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Using an Equation Based on Creatinine and Cystatin C in Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in Korean Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ho Kang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is known that metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with chronic kidney disease. We evaluated and compared the prevalence of reduced kidney function in MetS and its components by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using an equation based on creatinine (eGFRcr, cystatin C (eGFRcys, and combined creatinine-cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys in Korean adults.MethodsWe analyzed data from 3,649 adults who participated in a comprehensive health examination.ResultsMean values of eGFRcys were higher compared with mean values of eGFRcr (96.1±18.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 vs. 91.2±13.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 in total subjects. The prevalence of reduced kidney function increased with age (9.6% for eGFRcys vs. 5.8% for eGFRcr-cys vs. 4.9% for eGFRcr, in subjects aged ≥60 years, and significantly increased with MetS, abdominal obesity, hypertension, high triglyceride, low high density lipoprotein (HDL, and high insulin resistance. The prevalence of MetS, abdominal obesity, hypertension, high insulin resistance, low HDL, and hepatic steatosis was significantly increased in subjects with reduced kidney function. This increased prevalence and the odds ratio of reduced kidney function for prevalence of MetS was highest for eGFRcys, followed by those of eGFRcr-cys, and eGFRcr.ConclusionThe prevalence of reduced kidney function by eGFR was significantly increased in subjects with MetS and its related components. eGFRcys and eGFRcr-cys were superior to eGFRcr in detecting reduced kidney function.

  18. Influences of gender in metabolic syndrome and its components among people living with HIV virus using antiretroviral treatment in Hawassa, southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirigo, Agete Tadewos; Tesfaye, Demo Yemane

    2016-03-05

    Data regarding the influences of gender in metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients using antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Ethiopia is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the influences of gender in MetS and its components among HIV-infected patients receiving ART. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2012 and April 2013. Data on demographic, clinical and anthropometric characteristics were collected from 185 HIV patients using ART. Glucose and lipid profiles were measured from overnight fast blood. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and United States national cholesterol education program: adult treatment (US NCEP-ATP) panel III criteria were used to define MetS. A total number of 185 (36.8% males and 63.2% females) participants were recruited in this study. The overall prevalence of MetS was 24.3 and 17.8%, diagnosed using IDF and NCEP-ATP criteria respectively. Using IDF criteria, MetS was significantly higher in females compared to males (33.3 vs. 8.8%; p = 25 kg/m(2) was significantly associated with MetS in both IDF and NCEP-ATP criteria: unadjusted (UOR) and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% CI were 3.0 (1.3-6.5) and 3.8 (1.5-9.8); as well as 3.2 (1.4-7.4) and 3.4 (1.4-7.4) respectively. Furthermore age >40 years was significantly associated with MetS using NCEP-ATP: UOR and AOR (95% CI) were 3.1 (1.2-8.3), and 3.8 (1-13.70) respectively. Comprehensive medical care approach including with MetS components are a crucial instruments in order to minimize the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in HIV-infected patients using ART.

  19. Independent and joint associations of TV viewing time and snack food consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components; a cross-sectional study in Australian adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Television (TV) viewing time is positively associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults. However, the mechanisms through which TV viewing time is associated with MetS risk remain unclear. There is evidence that the consumption of energy-dense, nutrient poor snack foods increases during TV viewing time among adults, suggesting that these behaviors may jointly contribute towards MetS risk. While the association between TV viewing time and the MetS has previously been shown to be independent of adult’s overall dietary intake, the specific influence of snack food consumption on the relationship is yet to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and joint associations of daily TV viewing time and snack food consumption with the MetS and its components in a sample of Australian adults. Methods Population-based, cross-sectional study of 3,110 women and 2,572 men (>35 years) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Participants were recruited between May 1999 and Dec 2000 in the six states and the Northern Territory of Australia. Participants were categorised according to self-reported TV viewing time (low: 0-2 hr/d; high: >2 hr/d) and/or consumption of snack foods (low: 0-3 serves/d; high: >3 serves/d). Multivariate odds ratios [95% CI] for the MetS and its components were estimated using gender-specific, forced entry logistic regression. Results OR [95% CI] for the MetS was 3.59 [2.25, 5.74] (p≤0.001) in women and 1.45 [1.02, 3.45] (p = 0.04) in men who jointly reported high TV viewing time and high snack food consumption. Obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension (women only) were also jointly associated with high TV viewing time and high snack food consumption. Further adjustment for diet quality and central adiposity maintained the associations in women. High snack food consumption was also shown to be independently associated with MetS risk [OR: 1.94 (95% CI: 1.45, 2.60), p TV viewing time was

  20. Metabolic Syndrome and Incident Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Earl S.; Li, Chaoyang; Sattar, Naveed

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?Our objective was to perform a quantitative review of prospective studies examining the association between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Using the title terms ?diabetes? and ?metabolic syndrome? in PubMed, we searched for articles published since 1998. RESULTS?Based on the results from 16 cohorts, we performed a meta-analysis of estimates of relative risk (RR) and incident diabetes. The random-effects summary RRs were 5.17 (95% CI 3.99?6....

  1. Historical perspectives of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Eiji

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance syndrome is a constellation of obesity-related metabolic derangements predisposing to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In 1998, WHO defined the first criteria of MetS. Three years later, the user-friendly National Cholesterol Education Program criteria of MetS were proposed. Different criteria were issued by the International Diabetes Federation in 2005, making abdominal obesity a necessary component. Several international societies, including The International Diabetes Federation, jointly adopted the revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria as harmonizing criteria of MetS in 2009. WHO warned the next year that MetS has limited practical utility as a management tool. Adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be a fundamental mechanism of metabolic derangements, associated with ectopic lipid deposit and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and the liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Poor glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome and their relative incidence among recently diagnosed diabetic patients in Tamale ...

  3. Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycaemic Control, Dyslipidaemia and Metabolic Syndrome among Recently Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. ... West African Journal of Medicine ... BACKGROUND: Poor glycaemic control, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Accessing Autonomic Function Can Early Screen Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Mian; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend metabolic syndrome components (p for trend metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61–0.64) for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. Conclusions and Significance In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome. PMID:22916265

  5. Pharmacological treatment and therapeutic perspectives of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder based on insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is diagnosed by a co-occurrence of three out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressures, elevated glucose, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome is that it increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased globally, particularly in the last decade, to the point of being regarded as an epidemic. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the USA is estimated to be 34% of adult population. Moreover, increasing rate of metabolic syndrome in developing countries is dramatic. One can speculate that metabolic syndrome is going to induce huge impact on our lives. The metabolic syndrome cannot be treated with a single agent, since it is a multifaceted health problem. A healthy lifestyle including weight reduction is likely most effective in controlling metabolic syndrome. However, it is difficult to initiate and maintain healthy lifestyles, and in particular, with the recidivism of obesity in most patients who lose weight. Next, pharmacological agents that deal with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia can be used singly or in combination: anti-obesity drugs, thiazolidinediones, metformin, statins, fibrates, renin-angiotensin system blockers, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists, sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors, and some antiplatelet agents such as cilostazol. These drugs have not only their own pharmacologic targets on individual components of metabolic syndrome but some other properties may prove beneficial, i.e. anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. This review will describe pathophysiologic features of metabolic syndrome and pharmacologic agents for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, which are currently available.

  6. Accessing autonomic function can early screen metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001. Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001. Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0-24, participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50-100 had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.64 for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome.

  7. Impact of HbA1c criterion on the definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome: the China health and nutrition survey 2009.

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    Sun, Xingxing; Du, Tingting; Huo, Rui; Yu, Xuefeng; Xu, Lixian

    2013-11-05

    In 2009, a unified definition of metabolic syndrome (MetS) was proposed, of which, the glycemic component is defined on the basis of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended the use of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as an alternative to FPG to define prediabetes. Hence, we aim to compare the performance of HbA1c and FPG in the definition of glycemic component of the MetS among Chinese adults. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 7641 Chinese participants aged ≥18 years using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey 2009. MetS was defined according to the consensus criteria in 2009. We compared the use of HbA1c versus FPG in the definition of the glycemic component of MetS. Increased HbA1c value was defined following the criterion of HbA1c cut-off point of ≥5.7% recommended by the ADA. Overall, 1136 (14.9%) had MetS according to FPG ≥ 5.6 mmol/l, and 1640 (21.5%) had MetS according to HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. Compared with individuals with FPG-based diagnosis of MetS, individuals with HbA1c-based diagnosis of MetS were older, had higher levels of LDL-C, magnesium, and transferrin, and lower levels of uric acid. Of those found to have MetS according to either FPG or HbA1c (n = 2008), overlap between HbA1c- and FPG-based diagnosis of MetS was limited (n = 768, 38.2%). The overlap index regarding MetS diagnosed by FPG or HbA1c persisted low in each evaluated subgroup (≤ 50.0%). We note limited overlap and poor agreement between FPG- and HbA1c-based diagnosis of MetS. Screening MetS through introduction of HbA1c in addition to FPG could contribute to identification of more people with MetS.

  8. Independent and joint associations of TV viewing time and snack food consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components; a cross-sectional study in Australian adults.

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    Thorp, Alicia A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W

    2013-08-09

    Television (TV) viewing time is positively associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults. However, the mechanisms through which TV viewing time is associated with MetS risk remain unclear. There is evidence that the consumption of energy-dense, nutrient poor snack foods increases during TV viewing time among adults, suggesting that these behaviors may jointly contribute towards MetS risk. While the association between TV viewing time and the MetS has previously been shown to be independent of adult's overall dietary intake, the specific influence of snack food consumption on the relationship is yet to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and joint associations of daily TV viewing time and snack food consumption with the MetS and its components in a sample of Australian adults. Population-based, cross-sectional study of 3,110 women and 2,572 men (>35 years) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Participants were recruited between May 1999 and Dec 2000 in the six states and the Northern Territory of Australia. Participants were categorised according to self-reported TV viewing time (low: 0-2 hr/d; high: >2 hr/d) and/or consumption of snack foods (low: 0-3 serves/d; high: >3 serves/d). Multivariate odds ratios [95% CI] for the MetS and its components were estimated using gender-specific, forced entry logistic regression. OR [95% CI] for the MetS was 3.59 [2.25, 5.74] (p≤0.001) in women and 1.45 [1.02, 3.45] (p = 0.04) in men who jointly reported high TV viewing time and high snack food consumption. Obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension (women only) were also jointly associated with high TV viewing time and high snack food consumption. Further adjustment for diet quality and central adiposity maintained the associations in women. High snack food consumption was also shown to be independently associated with MetS risk [OR: 1.94 (95% CI: 1.45, 2.60), p snack food consumption are independently and

  9. Metabolic Syndrome Derived from Principal Component Analysis and Incident Cardiovascular Events: The Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA and Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC

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    Subhashish Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The NCEP metabolic syndrome (MetS is a combination of dichotomized interrelated risk factors from predominantly Caucasian populations. We propose a continuous MetS score based on principal component analysis (PCA of the same risk factors in a multiethnic cohort and compare prediction of incident CVD events with NCEP MetS definition. Additionally, we replicated these analyses in the Health, Aging, and Body composition (Health ABC study cohort. Methods and Results. We performed PCA of the MetS elements (waist circumference, HDL, TG, fasting blood glucose, SBP, and DBP in 2610 Caucasian Americans, 801 Chinese Americans, 1875 African Americans, and 1494 Hispanic Americans in the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA cohort. We selected the first principal component as a continuous MetS score (MetS-PC. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between MetS-PC and 5.5 years of CVD events (n=377 adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking and LDL-C, overall and by ethnicity. To facilitate comparison of MetS-PC with the binary NCEP definition, a MetS-PC cut point was chosen to yield the same 37% prevalence of MetS as the NCEP definition (37% in the MESA cohort. Hazard ratio (HR for CVD events were estimated using the NCEP and Mets-PC-derived binary definitions. In Cox proportional models, the HR (95% CI for CVD events for 1-SD (standard deviation of MetS-PC was 1.71 (1.54–1.90 (P<0.0001 overall after adjusting for potential confounders, and for each ethnicity, HRs were: Caucasian, 1.64 (1.39–1.94, Chinese, 1.39 (1.06–1.83, African, 1.67 (1.37–2.02, and Hispanic, 2.10 (1.66-2.65. Finally, when binary definitions were compared, HR for CVD events was 2.34 (1.91–2.87 for MetS-PC versus 1.79 (1.46–2.20 for NCEP MetS. In the Health ABC cohort, in a fully adjusted model, MetS-PC per 1-SD (Health ABC remained associated with CVD events (HR=1.21, 95%CI 1.12–1.32 overall, and for each ethnicity, Caucasian (HR

  10. Metabolic Syndrome Derived from Principal Component Analysis and Incident Cardiovascular Events: The Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC).

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    Agarwal, Subhashish; Jacobs, David R; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Sibley, Christopher T; Jorgensen, Neal W; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Andrews, Jeanette S; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanaya, Alka; Newman, Anne B; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Herrington, David M

    2012-01-01

    Background. The NCEP metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of dichotomized interrelated risk factors from predominantly Caucasian populations. We propose a continuous MetS score based on principal component analysis (PCA) of the same risk factors in a multiethnic cohort and compare prediction of incident CVD events with NCEP MetS definition. Additionally, we replicated these analyses in the Health, Aging, and Body composition (Health ABC) study cohort. Methods and Results. We performed PCA of the MetS elements (waist circumference, HDL, TG, fasting blood glucose, SBP, and DBP) in 2610 Caucasian Americans, 801 Chinese Americans, 1875 African Americans, and 1494 Hispanic Americans in the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. We selected the first principal component as a continuous MetS score (MetS-PC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between MetS-PC and 5.5 years of CVD events (n = 377) adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking and LDL-C, overall and by ethnicity. To facilitate comparison of MetS-PC with the binary NCEP definition, a MetS-PC cut point was chosen to yield the same 37% prevalence of MetS as the NCEP definition (37%) in the MESA cohort. Hazard ratio (HR) for CVD events were estimated using the NCEP and Mets-PC-derived binary definitions. In Cox proportional models, the HR (95% CI) for CVD events for 1-SD (standard deviation) of MetS-PC was 1.71 (1.54-1.90) (P definitions were compared, HR for CVD events was 2.34 (1.91-2.87) for MetS-PC versus 1.79 (1.46-2.20) for NCEP MetS. In the Health ABC cohort, in a fully adjusted model, MetS-PC per 1-SD (Health ABC) remained associated with CVD events (HR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.12-1.32) overall, and for each ethnicity, Caucasian (HR = 1.24, 95%CI 1.12-1.39) and African Americans (HR = 1.16, 95%CI 1.01-1.32). Finally, when using a binary definition of MetS-PC (cut point 0.505) designed to match the NCEP definition in terms of prevalence in the Health ABC cohort (35

  11. Fructose Containing Sugars at Normal Levels of Consumption Do Not Effect Adversely Components of the Metabolic Syndrome and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

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    Theodore J. Angelopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to explore our hypothesis that average consumption of fructose and fructose containing sugars would not increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS. A randomized, double blind, parallel group study was conducted where 267 individuals with BMI between 23 and 35 kg/m2 consumed low fat sugar sweetened milk, daily for ten weeks as part of usual weight-maintenance diet. One group consumed 18% of calories from high fructose corn syrup (HFCS, another group consumed 18% of calories from sucrose, a third group consumed 9% of calories from fructose, and the fourth group consumed 9% of calories from glucose. There was a small change in waist circumference (80.9 ± 9.5 vs. 81.5 ± 9.5 cm in the entire cohort, as well as in total cholesterol (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 4.7 ± 1.0 mmol/L, p < 0.01, triglycerides (TGs (11.5 ± 6.4 vs. 12.6 ± 8.9 mmol/L, p < 0.01, and systolic (109.2 ± 10.2 vs. 106.1 ± 10.4 mmHg, p < 0.01 and diastolic blood pressure (69.8 ± 8.7 vs. 68.1 ± 9.7 mmHg, p < 0.01. The effects of commonly consumed sugars on components of the MetS and CVD risk factors are minimal, mixed and not clinically significant.

  12. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Urolithiasis

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    Yee V. Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall’s plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

  13. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Urolithiasis

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    Wong, Yee V.; Cook, Paul; Somani, Bhaskar K.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures. PMID:25873954

  14. Omega-3, Metabolic Syndrome, and Schizophrenia: A review

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    Seyedeh Narjes Roudbaraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature, schizophrenia is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome. This mental disorder has such manifestations as visceral obesity, impaired lipid metabolism, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. The prevalence rate of schizophrenia varies in different countries. There is a body of evidence about the higher incidence of cardiovascular events in the schizophrenic patients with metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the prevention or treatment of this condition in sthese patients is a matter of fundamental importance. Fish oils, commonly used by people, contain omega-3 fatty acid. Omega-3 has been demonstrated to be effective in the patients with metabolic syndrome.

  15. The prevalence trend of metabolic syndrome and its components and risk factors in Korean adults: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2013

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    Binh Thang Tran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in the clinical markers of metabolic syndrome (MS are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and some cancers. MS prevalence in Korea increased between the mid-1990s and mid-2000s; however, no data on the recent trends of MS prevalence are available. Thus, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of MS, the five components of MS, and the related risk factors in Korean adults by using recent data. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2008 and 2013 were used. The revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria were used for defining MS. A multivariate logistic regression analyses was used to estimate the relationship between the related risk factors including behaviors, dietary factors, and the prevalence of MS. Results A total of 34,587 men and women were included in the analysis. Age-adjusted prevalence of MS in 2013 was 28.9% without a significant increasing or decreasing trend between 2008 and 2013. Among the five components of MS, abdominal obesity decreased in both men and women (annual percent change: −2.0 and −2.5%, respectively, the decrease being significant only in women, whereas blood pressure and blood glucose significantly increased in men (+1.9 and +2.7%, respectively. Age and obesity (odds ratio = 6.7, 95% confidence interval = 5.9–7.5 for body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 vs. body mass index <25 kg/m2 were associated with increased MS risk in both men and women. Smoking and alcohol drinking were significantly associated with increased MS risk in men, and association between MS and vitamin D deficiency was at the edge of statistical significance. Higher education and income level were significantly associated with decreased MS risk in women. During this period, smoking rate and physical activity, sodium intake, and serum vitamin D level significantly decreased. Education level

  16. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

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    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  17. Metabolic syndrome: the danger signal in atherosclerosis

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    Patrick Mathieu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Mathieu1, Philippe Pibarot2, Jean-Pierre Després31Department of Surgery, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, Canada; 3Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital Laval/Institut de Cardiologie de Québec, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by infiltration of blood vessels by lipids and leukocytes. There is a growing body of evidence that among risk factors that promote atherosclerosis, the metabolic syndrome is a powerful and prevalent predictor of cardiovascular events. The systemic inflammatory process associated with the metabolic syndrome has numerous deleterious effects that promote plaque activation, which is responsible for clinical events. Interactions between the innate immune system with lipidderived products seem to play a major role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in relation with the metabolic syndrome. The multiple links among adipose tissue, the vascular wall, and the immune system are the topics of this review, which examines the roles of oxidized low density lipoprotein, inflammatory cytokines, and adipokines in triggering and perpetuating a danger signal response that promotes the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, therapeutic options that specifically target the metabolic syndrome components are reviewed in light of recent developments. Keywords: atherosclerosis, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, innate immune system, danger signal theory

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome is positively related to metabolic syndrome: a population-based cross-sectional study.

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    Yinting Guo

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome is a common gastrointestinal disorder that may affect dietary pattern, food digestion, and nutrient absorption. The nutrition-related factors are closely related to metabolic syndrome, implying that irritable bowel syndrome may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, few epidemiological studies are available which are related to this potential link. The purpose of this study is to determine whether irritable bowel syndrome is related to metabolic syndrome among middle-aged people. We designed a cross-sectional study of 1,096 subjects to evaluate the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome and its components. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was based on the Japanese version of the Rome III Questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American Heart Association scientific statements of 2009. Dietary consumption was assessed via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Principal-components analysis was used to derive 3 major dietary patterns: "Japanese", "sweets-fruits", and "Izakaya (Japanese Pub "from 39 food groups. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome were 19.4% and 14.6%, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the dietary pattern factor score tertiles and irritable bowel syndrome. After adjustment for potential confounders (including dietary pattern, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides for subjects with irritable bowel syndrome as compared with non-irritable bowel syndrome are 2.01(1.13-3.55 and 1.50(1.03-2.18, respectively. Irritable bowel syndrome is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and it components. This study is the first to show that irritable bowel syndrome was significantly related to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides among an adult population. The findings suggest that

  19. A Comprehensive Review on Metabolic Syndrome

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    Jaspinder Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is defined by a constellation of interconnected physiological, biochemical, clinical, and metabolic factors that directly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and all cause mortality. Insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, genetic susceptibility, elevated blood pressure, hypercoagulable state, and chronic stress are the several factors which constitute the syndrome. Chronic inflammation is known to be associated with visceral obesity and insulin resistance which is characterized by production of abnormal adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, leptin, and adiponectin. The interaction between components of the clinical phenotype of the syndrome with its biological phenotype (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, etc. contributes to the development of a proinflammatory state and further a chronic, subclinical vascular inflammation which modulates and results in atherosclerotic processes. Lifestyle modification remains the initial intervention of choice for such population. Modern lifestyle modification therapy combines specific recommendations on diet and exercise with behavioural strategies. Pharmacological treatment should be considered for those whose risk factors are not adequately reduced with lifestyle changes. This review provides summary of literature related to the syndrome’s definition, epidemiology, underlying pathogenesis, and treatment approaches of each of the risk factors comprising metabolic syndrome.

  20. Structural changes in the liver in metabolic syndrome

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    D. V. Vasendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientifically proven close relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with development of metabolic syndrome and its individual components involves the conclusion that the target organ in metabolic symptom, even regardless of the severity of obesity, the liver occupies a dominant position, as the body undergoes the first characteristic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease changes, involving violation of metabolism in the body. Dislipoproteinemia plays an important role in the formation of metabolic syndrome in obesity and other obesity-associated diseases. Altered liver function are the root cause of violations of processes of lipid metabolism and, consequently, abnormal functioning of the liver may be a separate, additional and independent risk factor for development of dyslipidemia and obesity as the main component of the metabolic syndrome.

  1. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

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    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The association between metabolic syndrome and its components with systemic lupus erythematosus: a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

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    Hallajzadeh, J; Khoramdad, M; Izadi, N; Karamzad, N; Almasi-Hashiani, A; Ayubi, E; Qorbani, M; Pakzad, R; Sullman, M J M; Safiri, S

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Based upon inflammatory-related factors in chronic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as the long-term prescription of corticosteroids, metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence is expected to be higher in SLE patients than among those without SLE. The aim of this study was to systematically analyze: (1) the worldwide prevalence of MetS in patients with SLE using different criteria, (2) the risk of MetS in patients with SLE compared with those without SLE, and (3) the risk of MetS component in patients with SLE compared with healthy controls. Methods We searched international databases, such as: Web of Science, Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, CABI, CINAHL, DOAJ and Google Scholar. The articles which reported the prevalence of MetS in SLE patients, between 2006 and 2017, were included in the study if they had a: clear study design, study time and location, sound sampling approach and appropriate statistical analyses. Studies without sufficient data to determine the prevalence of MetS were excluded. Also, studies in patients suffering from other clinical diseases were not included. Results The meta-analyses of the prevalence (40 studies ( n = 6085)) and risk (20 studies ( n = 2348)) of MetS in SLE patients were conducted separately. The pooled prevalence of MetS among SLE patients was found to be 26% (95% confidence interval (CI): 22-30%), but varied from 18% (95% CI: 11-25%) to 34% (95% CI: 25-42%), depending upon the diagnostic criteria used. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) of MetS in SLE patients, compared with healthy controls, was (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.86-3.35), but this ranged from (OR = 1.23; 95% CI: 0.61-2.49) to (OR = 10.71; 95% CI: 1.33-86.48), depending upon the criteria used. Also, the risk of high fasting blood sugar (FBS; OR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.05-2.40), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; OR = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.02-2.01), high blood pressure (BP; OR = 2.76; 95% CI: 2.19-3.47), high

  3. Metabolic syndrome 2 years after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

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    Guilbert, Lizbeth; Ortiz, Cristian J; Espinosa, Omar; Sepúlveda, Elisa M; Piña, Tatiana; Joo, Paul; Zerrweck, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The latest diabetes consensus identified obesity as key component of the metabolic syndrome. The role of bariatric surgery over such syndrome has been less explored with a lack of long term studies, and especially among Mexicans. Retrospective study including patients with metabolic syndrome submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass at a single institution with complete data after 24 months. The objective was to analyze the improvement of the syndrome and each component. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters were analyzed at 12 and 24 months. Secondarily weight loss and other parameters were also analyzed. Finally, an analysis of syndrome improvement related to weight loss was performed. Sixty-three patients were included. The 2 most common components associated with obesity were reduced HDL and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes. There was a significant improvement of metabolic syndrome and its components, as well as for the rest of the analyzed data, from the first check point and throughout follow-up. Prevalence of such syndrome was 6.3% at 12 and 24 months. Hypertension and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes were the components with the greatest and fastest improvement; HDL levels and obesity were the least improved. There was a direct relationship between percentage of excess weight loss or percentage of excess BMI loss, and syndrome's improvement. Patients with metabolic syndrome improved after gastric bypass, with results lasting after 2 years; other metabolic parameters important for cardiovascular risk were also positively affected. There was a relationship between the amount of weight loss and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Loci Identified in Genome-Wide Association Studies with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in a Chinese Population with Type 2 Diabetes.

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    Xiaomu Kong

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2D patients. The comorbidity of MetS and T2D increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of the present study was to determine the T2D-related genetic variants that contribute to MetS-related components in T2D patients of Chinese ancestry. We successfully genotyped 25 genome wide association study validated T2D-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among 5,169 T2D individuals and 4,560 normal glycemic controls recruited from the Chinese National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study (DMS. We defined MetS in this population using the harmonized criteria (2009 combined with the Chinese criteria for abdominal obesity. The associations between SNPs and MetS-related components, as well as the associations between SNPs and risk for T2D with or without MetS, were subjected to logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Results showed that the T2D risk alleles of rs243021 located near BCL11A, rs10830963 in MTNR1B, and rs2237895 in KCNQ1 were related to a lower risk for abdominal obesity in T2D patients (rs243021: 0.92 (0.84, 1.00, P = 4.42 × 10-2; rs10830963: 0.92 (0.85, 1.00, P = 4.07 × 10-2; rs2237895: 0.89 (0.82, 0.98, P = 1.29 × 10-2. The T2D risk alleles of rs972283 near KLF14 contributed to a higher risk of elevated blood pressure (1.10 (1.00, 1.22, P = 4.48 × 10-2, while the T2D risk allele of rs7903146 in TCF7L2 was related to a lower risk for elevated blood pressure (0.74 (0.61, 0.90, P = 2.56 × 10-3. The T2D risk alleles of rs972283 near KLF14 and rs11634397 near ZFAND6 were associated with a higher risk for elevated triglycerides (rs972283: 1.11 (1.02, 1.24, P = 1.46 × 10-2; rs11634397: 1.14 (1.00, 1.29, P = 4.66 × 10-2, while the T2D risk alleles of rs780094 in GCKR and rs7903146 in TCF7L2 were related to a lower risk of elevated triglycerides (rs780094: 0.86 (0.80, 0.93, P = 1.35 × 10-4; rs7903146: 0.82 (0.69, 0.98, P = 3.18 × 10-2. The

  5. Metabolic syndrome: definition and therapeutic implications.

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    Prasad, Hari; Ryan, Debra A; Celzo, Ma Florence; Stapleton, Dwight

    2012-01-01

    The collection of impaired glucose metabolism, central obesity, elevated blood pressure, and dyslipidemia is identified as metabolic syndrome (MetS). It is estimated that approximately 25% of the world's population has MetS. In the United States, MetS is more common in men and Hispanics, and its incidence increases with age. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The underlying risk factors include insulin resistance and abdominal obesity. Confusion about MetS exists in part due to the lack of a consensus definition and treatment protocol. Treatment of MetS begins with therapeutic lifestyle changes and then pharmacologic treatment of the syndrome's individual components. Effective interventions include diet modification, exercise, and use of pharmacologic agents to treat risk factors. Weight loss and increasing physical activity significantly improve all aspects of MetS. A diet that includes more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, monounsaturated fats, and low-fat dairy products will benefit most patients with MetS. Physicians can be most effective in advising patients by customizing specific lifestyle recommendations after assessing patients for the presence of risk factors.

  6. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Microalbuminuria in Korean Adults.

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    Lee, Hyun-Ok; Bak, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jin-Young; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of Korean adults to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria as a marker for early-stage chronic kidney disease. A total of 8,497 adults (3,625 men and 4,872 women) who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2011 and 2012 were included. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to recommendation from a joint interim statement of international organizations published in 2009. Microalbuminuria was defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g. The association between metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria was evaluated using logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates while considering sampling weights and the complex survey design. The prevalence of microalbuminuriain subjects with metabolic syndrome was 11% for men and 14.4% for women, whereas the prevalence in subjects without metabolic syndrome was 3.1% for men and 6.7% for women. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with an increased risk of microalbuminuriain both women (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 2.01 to 3.88) and men (odds ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.27). All components of the metabolic syndrome were associated with a significantly increased risk of microalbuminuria with the strongest association for high blood pressure. The risk of microalbuminuria increased in a dose-dependent manner (P-value for trend metabolic syndrome components observed for both sexes. These findings suggest that metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease from an early stage.

  7. The Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Paul L; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Friedman, Daniel J; Mulder, Hillary; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Rosamond, Wayne R; Lopes, Renato D; Gersh, Bernard J; Mark, Daniel B; Curtis, Lesley H; Post, Wendy S; Prineas, Ronald J; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2017-08-23

    Prior studies have demonstrated a link between the metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Whether the metabolic syndrome is associated with sudden cardiac death is uncertain. We characterized the relationship between sudden cardiac death and metabolic syndrome status among participants of the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study (1987-2012) free of prevalent coronary heart disease or heart failure. Among 13 168 participants, 357 (2.7%) sudden cardiac deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 23.6 years. Participants with the metabolic syndrome (n=4444) had a higher cumulative incidence of sudden cardiac death than those without it (n=8724) (4.1% versus 2.3%, P metabolic syndrome, the metabolic syndrome was independently associated with sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio, 1.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.37-2.12, P metabolic syndrome criteria components. The risk of sudden cardiac death varied according to the number of metabolic syndrome components (hazard ratio 1.31 per additional component of the metabolic syndrome, 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.44, P metabolic syndrome was associated with a significantly increased risk of sudden cardiac death irrespective of sex or race. The risk of sudden cardiac death was proportional to the number of metabolic syndrome components. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. RESISTANT HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    O. M. Drapkina; J. S. Sibgatullina

    2016-01-01

    Clinical case of resistant hypertension in a patient with metabolic syndrome is presented. Features of hypertension in metabolic syndrome and features of metabolic syndrome in women of pre- and postmenopausal age are also considered. Understanding the features of metabolic syndrome in women, as well as features of hypertension and metabolic syndrome will improve the results of treatment in patients with resistant hypertension.

  9. Impact of age and gender on the prevalence and prognostic importance of the metabolic syndrome and its components in Europeans. The MORGAM Prospective Cohort Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram, Julie K K; Borglykke, Anders; Andreasen, Anne H

    2014-01-01

    of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the revised National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII), increased across age groups for both genders (P...OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of age and gender on the prevalence and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Europeans presenting with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). METHODS: Using 36 cohorts from the MORGAM-Project with baseline between 1982-1997, 69094 men and women aged 19-78 years......, without known CVD, were included. During 12.2 years of follow-up, 3.7%/2.1% of men/women died due to CVD. The corresponding percentages for fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke were 8.3/3.8 and 3.1/2.5. RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS, according to modified definitions...

  10. Comparison of Accuracy of Diabetes Risk Score and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Assessing Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafizadeh, Tracy B; Moler, Edward J; Kolberg, Janice A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Given the increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes, methods to assess diabetes risk which would identify those at highest risk are needed. We compared two risk-stratification approaches for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and a previously...... developed diabetes risk score, PreDxH Diabetes Risk Score (DRS). DRS assesses 5 yr risk of incident T2DM based on the measurement of 7 biomarkers in fasting blood. Methodology/Principal Findings: DRS was evaluated in baseline serum samples from 4,128 non-diabetic subjects in the Inter99 cohort (Danes aged...... 30–60) for whom diabetes outcomes at 5 years were known. Subjects were classified as having MetS based on the presence of at least 3 MetS risk factors in baseline clinical data. The sensitivity and false positive rate for predicting diabetes using MetS was compared to DRS. When the sensitivity...

  11. Influence of non-dietary factors on the prevalence of abdominal obesity as a major component of the metabolic syndrome among 17-18-year-old youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Ewa; Broniecka, Anna; Biernat, Jadwiga; Wyka, Joanna; Bronkowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Youth nutrition and their nutritional status are conditioned by many factors, some of the main ones being: economic, social, climatic, cultural, and psychological factors as well as nutritional knowledge. With the growing problem of overweight and obesity among children and young people, the incidence of the metabolic syndrome is also increasing. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of demographic, sociological and psychological factors on the incidence of obesity among 17-18-year-old adolescents from Wroclaw and vicinity as a major risk factor for the development of the metabolic syndrome. The study was conducted in three upper-secondary schools in Wroclaw, Poland. In the surveyed group (17-18 years old, n = 269) girls accounted for 59.5% and boys constituted 40.5%. Majority of young people were Wroclaw citizens (72.9%). Centile charts elaborated by the Children's Memorial Health Institute were adopted for the evaluation of anthropometric parameters. Evaluation of the impact of non-dietary factors on the manner of nutrition was carried out using own questionnaire. Based on the tests, abdominal obesity was determined among 34.5% of adolescents aged 17 years and among 65.5% of these aged 18 years. Obesity was more common in girls carrying genetic burden of the disease. Youth with the largest waist circumference most often declared to use slimming diets - 6.7%, and the lowest hunger sensation in stress - 3.4%. In addition, 30.5% of the adolescents with the smallest waist circumference and 11.5% with the largest waist circumference declared to be non-smoking. Occasional alcohol consumption was declared by 30.1% of young people with the smallest waist circumference, and 13.4% with the largest waist circumference. Youth with abdominal obesity significantly more likely than those with normal waist circumference applied slimming diets. Significant impact on the formation of abdominal obesity among girls had inherited disease burden.

  12. Metabolic syndrome--neurotrophic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, M; Aloe, L

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers of the metabolic syndrome assume that many mechanisms are involved in its complex pathophysiology such as an increased sympathetic activity, disorders of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, the action of chronic subclinical infections, proinflammatory cytokines, and the effect of adipocytokines or psychoemotional stress. An increasing body of scientific research in this field confirms the role of the neurotrophins and mastocytes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune diseases. Recently it has been proved that neurotrophins and mastocytes have metabotrophic effects and take part in the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the early stage of the metabolic syndrome we established a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of the nerve growth factor. In the generalized stage the plasma levels of the neutrophines were statistically decreased in comparison to those in the healthy controls. We consider that the neurotrophin deficit is likely to play a significant pathogenic role in the development of the metabolic anthropometric and vascular manifestations of the generalized stage of MetSyn. We suggest a hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome based on the neuro-immuno-endocrine interactions. The specific pathogenic pathways of MetSyn development include: (1) increased tissue and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1(IL-1), Interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) and tumor necrosis factor - alpha (TNF-alpha) caused by inflammatory and/or emotional distress; (2) increased plasma levels of neurotrophin - nerve growth factor (NGF) caused by the high IL-1, IL-6 and TNFalpha levels; (3) high plasma levels of NGF which enhance activation of: the autonomous nerve system--vegetodystonia (disbalance of neurotransmitters); Neuropeptide Y (NPY)--enhanced feeding, obesity and increased leptin plasma levels; hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis--increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and

  13. Comparison of the Effect of Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy on Metabolic Syndrome and its Components in a Cohort: Tehran Obesity Treatment Study (TOTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzin, Maryam; Motamedi, Mohammad Ali Kalantar; Serahati, Sara; Khalaj, Alireza; Arian, Peyman; Valizadeh, Majid; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hosseinpanah, Farhad

    2017-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a prevalent counterpart of morbid obesity. With the surgical technique of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) gaining widespread acceptance for weight loss in morbid obese patients, we aimed to undertake a study to compare its effectiveness to gastric bypass (GB) for metabolic control in these patients. A total of 425 patients from a prospectively collected database of morbid obese subjects between 18 and 65 years of age undergoing a primary bariatric procedure from March 2013 to September 2015 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using general estimation equation and propensity scores, and odds ratios were calculated. Three hundred nineteen patients underwent SG and 106 underwent GB. Mean age of the patients was 37.8 ± 11.7, and mean body mass index (BMI) was 44.3 ± 5.9 kg/m 2 . MetS was present in 61.4% of patients and diabetes mellitus in 48.6%. MetS prevalence decreased from 60 and 64% in the SG and GB groups to 16 and 10% at 12 months, respectively. These improvements were consistent throughout the study period in both groups, with no significant difference between the two groups (for all variables: P trend   .05). After propensity score-adjusted analysis, neither surgical technique showed superiority over the other regarding metabolic improvement (OR for MetS resolution: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.49-1.34). In this short-term study with 1-year follow-up, SG showed similar results to GB in terms of weight loss, MetS resolution, and glycemic control in a large Middle Eastern cohort. Long-term studies are needed to further investigate the effectiveness of SG in this regard.

  14. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents - criteria for diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Marcio C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a greater concern about the presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. It is evident that each component of the syndrome must be identified as early as possible in order to prevent definitive lesions. The question is how to do this and which cut-offs must be adopted for this diagnosis. For a matter of convenience, the definition chosen as the most appropriate is the one proposed by the IDF, with cut-offs fixed for pressure, lipids and glycemia, and abdominal circumference points assessed by percentile. Although on the one hand this definition could fail to include some children in the diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome, on the other hand, it would be of easier acceptance as it does not use multiple tables to assess several anthropometric and metabolic criteria. PMID:19840386

  15. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  16. Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    Background: The metabolic syndrome refers to a clustering of risk factors including
    abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia,
    and hypertension and it is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus type

  17. The metabolic syndrome - background and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Zwieten, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MBS) is characterised by a clustering of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. This syndrome is now widely recognised as a distinct pathological entity, and it is receiving a great deal of attention in the medical literature but also in the lay press.

  18. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat

  19. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents - criteria for diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, there has been a greater concern about the presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. It is evident that each component of the syndrome must be identified as early as possible in order to prevent definitive lesions. The question is how to do this and which cut-offs must be adopted for this diagnosis. For a matter of convenience, the d...

  20. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  1. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN GRANITE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilakshmi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS has significantly increased over the last few decades and has become a main health challenge worldwide. Prevalence of MS is quickly rising in developing countries due to changing lifestyle. It was considered worthwhile to study MS and its components in granite workers since granite factories are situated in and around Khammam area. Moreover, no studies of MS in granite workers have been reported in literature. OBJECTIVES: Aim of our study is to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in granite workers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 210 male workers in the age group of 20 - 50 working in granite industries located in and around the Khammam town of Telangana State are selected for the present study. Blood pressures (BP, waist circumference (WC were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected for the estimation of glucose and lipids. RESULTS: 69 subjects out of 210 were identified as having MS based on updated National cholesterol education programme - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP - ATP III guidelines. CONCLUSION: MS should be identified and remedial measures may be suggested, so that the risk of hypertension, cardiovascular risk, diabetes and the resultant morbidity is minimized and can be delayed

  2. Metabolic syndrome and risk of incident diabetes: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study

    OpenAIRE

    Joost Hans-Georg; Bergmann Manuela M; Pischon Tobias; Schulze Matthias B; Ford Earl S; Boeing Heiner

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Several aspects concerning the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes are incompletely understood including the magnitude of the risk estimate, potential gender differences in the associations between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, the associations between the components of the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, and whether the metabolic syndrome provides additional prediction beyond its components. To shed light on these is...

  3. [Epidemiological significance of the metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, D; Azeem, K; Dumbrovská, L; Vlčková, J; Horák, V; Kollárová, H

    From an epidemiological point of view, the metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors causally, rather than coincidentally, related to insulin resistance. The metabolic syndrome is a condition with relatively high prevalence rates in both the Czech Republic and in other developed countries. There is a clear trend of increasing prevalence in both sexes depending on age. In the Czech Republic, the syndrome is less common in females (25.5%) than in males (37.6%). Epidemiological studies found white (Europoid race) males to be at higher risk due to abdominal obesity. The definition of the metabolic syndrome has evolved over time and helps to identify individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, hence the use of the term cardiometabolic syndrome. Early detection of metabolic syndrome symptoms including insulin resistance should be performed mainly by general practitioners as part of regular check-ups.

  4. Diacylglycerol oil for the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Excess adiposity has been shown to play a crucial role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. The elevated fasting and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoprotein levels is the central lipid abnormality observed in the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies have indicated that diacylglycerol (DAG is effective for fasting and postprandial hyperlipidemia and preventing excess adiposity by increasing postprandial energy expenditure. We will here discuss the mechanisms of DAG-mediated improvements in hyperlipidemia and in postprandial energy expenditure, and effects of DAG oil on lipid/glucose metabolism and on body fat. Further, the therapeutic application of DAG for the metabolic syndrome will be considered.

  5. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Roger S; Danilewitz, Marlon; Liauw, Samantha S; Kemp, David E; Nguyen, Ha T T; Kahn, Linda S; Kucyi, Aaron; Soczynska, Joanna K; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Lachowski, Angela; Kim, Byungsu; Nathanson, Jay; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad; Taylor, Valerie H

    2010-11-01

    The ubiquity and hazards posed by abnormal body composition and metabolic parameters in the bipolar population are a priority research and clinical issue. Herein, we summarize and synthesize international studies describing the rate of US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III [ATP III])- and International Diabetes Federation (IDF)-defined metabolic syndrome and its criterion components in individuals with bipolar disorder. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 2005 and July 2009 with the following search terms: metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder, mania and manic-depression. Articles selected for review were based on adequacy of sample size, the use of standardized experimental procedures, validated assessment measures, and overall manuscript quality. The rate of metabolic syndrome in individuals with bipolar disorder is increased relative to the general population. Disparate estimates are reported ranging from comparability to approximately twofold greater than the general population. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome amongst bipolar individuals is now documented in twelve countries from Europe, Australia, Asia, North and South America. The co-occurrence of metabolic syndrome in the bipolar population is associated with a more complex illness presentation, less favourable response to treatment, and adverse course and outcome. The association between metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder is mediated/moderated by both iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic factors. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome in bipolar populations is due to the clustering of traditional (and emerging) risk factors as well as iatrogenic and health systems factors. Extant data support recommendations for prioritizing, surveillance, prevention, diagnosis and management of metabolic syndrome as routine care

  6. The metabolic syndrome in long-term cancer survivors, an important target for secondary preventive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Postma, A; Sleijfer, DT; Gietema, JA

    With increasing numbers of cancer survivors, attention has been drawn to long-term complications of curative cancer treatment, including a range of metabolic disorders. These metabolic disorders often resemble the components of the so-called metabolic syndrome, or syndrome X, which is an important

  7. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. Areas Covered This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Expert Opinion Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics. PMID:26488852

  8. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in South Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Asia is home to one of the largest population of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The prevalence of MetS in South Asians varies according to region, extent of urbanization, lifestyle patterns, and socioeconomic/cultural factors. Recent data show that about one-third of the urban population in large cities in India has the MetS. All classical risk factors comprising the MetS are prevalent in Asian Indians residing in India. The higher risk in this ethnic population necessitated a lowering of the cut-off values of the risk factors to identify and intervene for the MetS to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are underway in MetS to assess the efficacy in preventing the diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this ethnic population.

  10. Association of the Apolipoprotein B/Apolipoprotein A-I Ratio, Metabolic Syndrome Components, Total Cholesterol, and Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol with Insulin Resistance in the Population of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaza Makaridze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to assess the association between insulin resistance (IR and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio (ApoB/ApoA-I ratio, metabolic syndrome (MetS components, total cholesterol (TC, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C in the nondiabetic population of Georgia. The subjects were 1522 Georgians of Caucasian origin (mean age = 45 years, 653 women without diabetes who had visited the clinics for a related health checkup between 2012 and 2013. IR was calculated using the computer homeostasis model assessment (HOMA2-IR and was defined as the upper quartile. MetS was diagnosed using the updated ATP-III definition of the metabolic syndrome. Logistic and multiple regression models were used to estimate the association between IR and other components. IR was positively correlated with age, ApoB, ApoB/ApoA-I ratio, MetS components (excluding high-density lipoprotein cholesterol—HDL-C, LDL-C, fasting insulin, and TC and negatively correlated with HDL-C and ApoA-I in both sexes (all P<0.001. In the logistic regression models, gender, age, ApoB/ApoA-I ratio, diastolic pressure, HDL-C, LDL-C, fasting glucose, and triglycerides were the covariates significantly associated with IR (OR: 8.64, 1.03, 17.95, 1.06, 0.13, 1.17, 3.75, and 2.29, resp.; all P<0.05. Multiple regression models demonstrated that these components (except for HDL-C made an independent contribution to the prediction of HOMA2 (all P<0.05.

  11. Metabolic syndrome in asthmatic patients of hazara division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Kazim, S.M.; Gillani, S.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a common disease and most asthmatics are obese. Both asthma and obesity are showing parallel trends in their increasing prevalence. Obesity is also the main component of metabolic syndrome and several studies have shown metabolic syndrome to be associated with bronchial asthma. The present study was, therefore, designed to determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome among patients with chronic asthma in our setup. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Department of Medicine, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from May to November, 2014. One hundred and fifty-four asthmatic patients were enrolled in this study. Samples for blood glucose, triglycerides and HDL Cholesterol were taken after an overnight fast. Sitting blood pressure was measured with mercury sphygmomanometer after 10 minutes of rest. Waist circumference was measured at the level of the midpoint between the high point of the iliac crest and the last rib. Results: Out of 154 patients, 80 were males and 74 were females. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 46 (29.87 percent) patients. When metabolic syndrome was stratified according to age, sex and duration of asthma, the results were found to be insignificant (p-0.89, 0.30 and 0.85). Conclusion: This study showed that metabolic syndrome was present in almost one third of study population. (author)

  12. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia. We evaluated 103 patients less than 40 years of age, from a low-income population, and without history of cardiovascular disease, in all of them the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. In all patients, fasting serum uric acid levels were measured; hyperuricaemia was defined as serum uric acid values 6.5 mg/dl in men and 5.1 mg/dl in women. Statistical analysis was performed with odds ratio. 83 of our patients (80.5%) suffered metabolic syndrome, the odds ratio for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with hyperuricaemia was 5.1 (p=0.002, I.C 1.8- 14.5). When patients were evaluated by gender a significantly association between hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was found in women (odds ratio 3.6, p=0.048, C.I. 1.0-12.9), and men (odds ratio 10.2, p= 0.015, IC 1.5-13.2). When uric acid was correlated with the components of metabolic syndrome, we only found a positive correlation with waist circumference (r=0.483). Our results showed a significant association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults in Mexico. DR is associated with estimated risk of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Job Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Moradi, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    The occupation of the people can influence the development of metabolic syndrome. To determine the association between metabolic syndrome and its determinants with the job rank in workers of a large car factory in Iran. 3989 male workers at a large car manufacturing company were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric data of the participants, including age, height, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured. Blood samples were taken to measure lipid profile and blood glucose level. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in each participant based on ATPIII 2001 criteria. The workers were categorized based on their job rank into 3 groups of (1) office workers, (2) workers with physical exertion, and (3) workers with chemical exposure. The study characteristics, particularly the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its determinants were compared among the study groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study was 7.7% (95% CI 6.9 to 8.5). HDL levels were significantly lower in those who had chemical exposure (p=0.045). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in those who had mechanical exertion (p=0.026). The frequency of metabolic syndrome in the office workers, workers with physical exertion, and workers with chemical exposure was 7.3%, 7.9%, and 7.8%, respectively (p=0.836). Seemingly, there is no association between metabolic syndrome and job rank.

  14. [Obesity or overweight and metabolic syndrome in Mexico City teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Yamamoto-Kimura, Liria; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Caracas-Portilla, Nacú A; Posadas-Romero, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    aim: To know the metabolic syndrome and its components prevalence in Mexico City adolescents sample. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 772 men and 1078 women, 12 to 16 years old, from 8 randomly selected public junior high schools in Mexico City. Anthropometric variables, lipids, lipoproteins, Apo AI and B, glucose and insulin were determined. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 12.5%, 11.15% in men and 13.5% en women (p ns). The most frequently metabolic syndrome component found in México City adolescents was low HDL-C levels (38%), followed by hypertriglyceridemia (25.5%), hypertension (19.2%), central obesity (11.8%) and elevated fasting glucose (1.7). Except by the hypertriglyceridemia, higher in woman than in men, 28.2% vs. 21.6%, p obesity in Mexico City adolescents, increases the risk of premature development of coronary atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus in this population.

  15. Psychosocial risk factors for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Lund, Rikke; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Metabolic deregulations and development of metabolic syndrome may be an important pathway underlying the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We aim to estimate the effect of a comprehensive range of psychosocial factors on the risk of developing metabolic...... syndrome in men and women. Methods: The study population consisted of 3621 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline and reexamined after 10 years. The data was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, income.......11) to be risk factors for developing the metabolic syndrome in women, while vital exhaustion (OR 2.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 4.59) and intake of sleep medications (OR 2.54, 95% CI 0.92 to 5.96) may play a more important role in men. Conclusions: Experiencing major life events in work and adult life and...

  16. ERICA: prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Schaan, Beatriz; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício T L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS We evaluated 37,504 adolescents who were participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, school-based, national study. The adolescents, aged from 12 to 17 years, lived in cities with populations greater than 100,000 inhabitants. The sample was stratified and clustered into schools and classes. The criteria set out by the International Diabetes Federation were used to define metabolic syndrome. Prevalences of metabolic syndrome were estimated according to sex, age group, school type and nutritional status. RESULTS Of the 37,504 adolescents who were evaluated: 50.2% were female; 54.3% were aged from 15 to 17 years, and 73.3% were from public schools. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 2.6% (95%CI 2.3-2.9), slightly higher in males and in those aged from 15 to 17 years in most macro-regions. The prevalence was the highest in residents from the South macro-region, in the younger female adolescents and in the older male adolescents. The prevalence was higher in public schools (2.8% [95%CI 2.4-3.2]), when compared with private schools (1.9% [95%CI 1.4-2.4]) and higher in obese adolescents when compared with nonobese ones. The most common combinations of components, referring to 3/4 of combinations, were: enlarged waist circumference (WC), low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) and high blood pressure; followed by enlarged WC, low HDL-c and high triglycerides; and enlarged WC, low HDL-c, high triglycerides and blood pressure. Low HDL was the second most frequent component, but the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome (26.8%) was observed in the presence of high triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS ERICA is the first Brazilian nation-wide study to present the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and describe the role of its components. Despite the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome being low, the high prevalences of some

  17. Association of uric acid levels with components of metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in overweight or obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Anajás S; Gonzaga, Nathalia C; Medeiros, Carla C M; Carvalho, Danielle F de

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between serum uric acid concentration according to the presence or absence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and/or metabolic syndrome (MS) in overweight or obese children and adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study conducted from April of 2009 to March of 2010, including 129 children and adolescents treated at the Center for Childhood Obesity. Anthropometric data, blood pressure measurements, and laboratory test results were obtained, and NAFLD diagnosis was made by ultrasound. The diagnosis of MS was made using the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III, adapted to age range. The chi-squared test or or Fisher's test were used to evaluate the association of uric acid with the groups, with a 95% confidence interval. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for comparison of means. Multiple logistic regression was used for adjustment of variables. The data were analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), release 17. High levels of uric acid were significantly associated with adolescence, MS, and systolic blood pressure. The highest quartile of uric acid showed significantly higher values of body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR), and lower mean values of HDL cholesterol. In the final model, only age range and the presence of MS remained associated with uric acid levels. High levels of uric acid were associated with MS and adolescence, which was not observed with NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Links between nutrition, drug abuse, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Ashraf; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed; Gaetani, Franco

    2006-08-01

    Nutritional deficiency in combination with drug abuse may increase risk of developing the metabolic syndrome by augmenting cell damage, excitotoxicity, reducing energy production, and lowering the antioxidant potential of the cells. We have reviewed here the following points: effects of drugs of abuse on nutrition and brain metabolism; effects of nutrition on actions of the drugs of abuse; drug abuse and probability of developing metabolic syndrome; role of genetic vulnerability in nutrition/drug abuse and brain damage; and the role of neuroprotective supplements in drug abuse. Nutrition education is an essential component of substance abuse treatment programs and can enhance substance abuse treatment outcomes. The strategies available, in particular the nutritional approach to protect the drug abusers from the metabolic syndrome and other diseases are discussed.

  19. [Circulating levels of MCP-1, VEGF-A, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sVE-cadherin: Relationship with components of metabolic syndrome in young population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris Paola; Zaragoza-García, Oscar; Vences-Velázquez, Amalia; Castro-Alarcón, Natividad; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2016-11-18

    Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are considered the primary manifestations of the cardiovascular disease. Studies have established a relationship among components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with inflammatory markers and the loss of permeability, vasoconstriction and vasodilatation endothelial. To determine the relationship among the concentrations of soluble endothelial dysfunction molecules and inflammation cytokines and components of the metabolic syndrome in young population. A study was performed in 240 young adult students ages 18-28 years. To define the presence of clinical and metabolic alterations and MetS the modified ATP-III criteria was considered. In all subjects were determined sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures and the metabolic profile. Circulating levels of MCP-1, VEGF-A, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sVE-cadherin were determined by ELISA immunoassay (Bioscience). Statistical analysis was performed using STATA statistical software v. 9.2. From all the participants, 44.6% had obesity, 59.9% had abdominal obesity, 49.6% low HDL-c and 16.7% high levels triglycerids. The 16.25% of the population showed 3 or more components of the MetS. Elevated MCP-1, sICAM-1 and sE-selectin levels were linked to the presence of obesity. In a model adjusted by age-gender, high soluble levels of MCP-1 and VEGF-A were linked with abdominal obesity (OR=1.83; 1.02-3.28 and OR=2.03; 1.15-3.56, respectively), as well as to the presence of the 2 components of MetS. sVCAM-1 levels were associated with impaired glucose (OR=4.74; 1.32-17.0); sE-selectin with low HDL-c (OR=1.99; 1.05-3.75), although sICAM-1 and sVE-cadherin were associated with impaired systolic blood pressure (OR=4.04; 1.24-13.1 and OR=6.28; 1.90-20.7, respectively). Levels of circulating MCP-1 and VEGF-A were associated with adiposity, levels of sVCAM-1 with the presence of impaired glucose, sE-selectin with low HDL-c, while the levels of sICAM-1 and sVE-cadherin were

  20. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang S Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a special constellation of reversible major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main, diagnostic, components are reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose, all of which are related to weight gain, specifically intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation and a large waist circumference. Using internationally adopted arbitrary cut-off values for waist circumference, having metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease, but offers an effective treatment approach through weight management. Metabolic syndrome now affects 30–40% of people by age 65, driven mainly by adult weight gain, and by a genetic or epigenetic predisposition to intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation related to poor intra-uterine growth. Metabolic syndrome is also promoted by a lack of subcutaneous adipose tissue, low skeletal muscle mass and anti-retroviral drugs. Reducing weight by 5–10%, by diet and exercise, with or without, anti-obesity drugs, substantially lowers all metabolic syndrome components, and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking should be corrected as a priority. Anti-diabetic agents which improve insulin resistance and reduce blood pressure, lipids and weight should be preferred for diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery offers an alternative treatment for those with BMI ≥ 40 or 35–40 kg/m 2 with other significant co-morbidity. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is expected to rise along with the global obesity epidemic: greater emphasis should be given to effective early weight-management to reduce risk in pre-symptomatic individuals with large waists.

  1. Justice at Work and Metabolic Syndrome: the Whitehall II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, David; Tabák, Ádám G.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Shipley, Martin J.; De Vogli, Roberto; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence shows that high levels of justice are beneficial for employee health, although biological mechanisms underlying this association are yet to be clarified. We aim to test whether high justice at work protects against metabolic syndrome. Methods A prospective cohort study of 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II study) including 6123 male and female British civil servants aged 35 to 55 years without prevalent CHD at baseline (1985-1990). Perceived justice at work was determined by means of questionnaire on two occasions between 1985 and 1990. Follow-up for metabolic syndrome and its components occurring from 1990 through 2004 was based on clinical assessments on three occasions over more than 18 years. Results Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, ethnicity and employment grade showed that men who experienced a high level of justice at work had a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome than employees with a low level of justice (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.89). There was little evidence of an association between organizational justice and metabolic syndrome or its components in women (hazard ratio 0.88; 95%CI: 0.67-1.17). Conclusions Our prospective findings provide evidence of an association between high levels of justice at work and the development of metabolic syndrome in men. PMID:19819861

  2. KUDESAN EFFICACY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Kolesnikova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic abnormalities in metabolic syndrome affect the functioning of practically all organs and systems, and most seriously — cardio-vascular system. Cardio-vascular abnormalities in metabolic syndrome manifest as arterial hypertension, Riley-Day syndrome and endothelial dysfunction that can lead to decrease of adaptive and reserve capabilities. Co-enzyme Q10 possesses cardioprotective,  stress-protective and anti-ischaemic activity. Clinical study performed on 40 children aged 10 to 17 years with constitutive obesity, complicated metabolic syndrome, has proven validity of co-enzyme Q10 treatment in patients with metabolic syndrome. The use of co-enzyme Q10 15 mg/day during 30 days has lead to improvement of psycho-emotional condition, decrease in anxiety complaints, sleep improvement, decrease in asthenic syndrome symptoms, improvement in electrophysiological heart indices Key words: metabolic syndrome, co-enzyme Q10. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 102–106.

  3. The role of interleukin-18 in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seljeflot Ingebjørg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metabolic syndrome is thought to be associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation, and a growing body of evidence suggests that interleukin-18 (IL-18 might be closely related to the metabolic syndrome and its consequences. Circulating levels of IL-18 have been reported to be elevated in subjects with the metabolic syndrome, to be closely associated with the components of the syndrome, to predict cardiovascular events and mortality in populations with the metabolic syndrome and to precede the development of type 2 diabetes. IL-18 is found in the unstable atherosclerotic plaque, in adipose tissue and in muscle tissue, and is subject to several regulatory steps including cleavage by caspase-1, inactivation by IL-18 binding protein and the influence of other cytokines in modulating its interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of IL-18 in the metabolic syndrome, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular risk and the potential effect of life style interventions.

  4. Dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome among type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is raising worldwide; however, the role of diet in the origin of metabolic syndrome is not understood well. This study identifies major dietary patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with and without metabolic syndrome; and its association with metabolic syndrome ...

  5. Associations Between Adiposity and Metabolic Syndrome Over Time: The Healthy Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun-Mi; Sung, Joohon; Lee, Kayoung

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the association between changes in adiposity traits including anthropometric and fat mass indicators and changes in metabolic syndrome traits including metabolic syndrome clustering and individual components over time. We also assessed the shared genetic and environmental correlations between the two traits. Participants were 284 South Korean twin individuals and 279 nontwin family members had complete data for changes in adiposity traits and metabolic syndrome traits of the Healthy Twin study. Mixed linear model and bivariate variance-component analysis were applied. Over a period of 3.1 ± 0.6 years of study, changes in adiposity traits [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, total fat mass, and fat mass to lean mass ratio] had significant associations with changes in metabolic syndrome clustering [high blood pressure, high serum glucose, high triglycerides (TG), and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol] after adjusting for intra-familial and sibling correlations, age, sex, baseline metabolic syndrome clustering, and socioeconomic factors and health behaviors at follow-up. Change in BMI associated significantly with changes in individual metabolic syndrome components compared to other adiposity traits. Change in metabolic syndrome component TG was a better predictor of changes in adiposity traits compared to changes in other metabolic components. These associations were explained by significant environmental correlations but not by genetic correlations. Changes in anthropometric and fat mass indicators were positively associated with changes in metabolic syndrome clustering and those associations appeared to be regulated by environmental influences.

  6. Metabolic syndrome among garage workers in the automobile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes but little is known about its prevalence among the active healthy population whose occupational activity is mainly manual and energy based. The aim of this study therefore, was to determine the prevalence of MetS and its components ...

  7. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Psychiatric Patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study seeks to find the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), its indi-vidual components and oxidative stress in psychiatric patients on antipsychotic medication com-pared to newly diagnosed patients attending ... Keywords: Diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress, mental illness

  8. Symptom Dimensions of Depression and Anxiety and the Metabolic Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppino, Floriana S.; Dortland, Arianne K. B. van Reedt; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Bouvy, Paul F.; Giltay, Erik J.; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: To investigate the association between depression and anxiety symptoms and the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), using a dimensional approach. The association between depression and anxiety, on the one hand, and the MetSyn as a cluster or its individual components, on the other hand, is

  9. Circulating Haptoglobin and Metabolic Syndrome in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minović, Isidor; Eisenga, Michele F.; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Berg, van den Else; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; Frenay, Anne-Roos S.; Goor, van Harry; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Levy, Andy P.; Ajm Gaillard, Carlo; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Eggersdorfer, Manfred L.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Kema, Ido P.; Bakker, Stephan L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that has recently been linked to components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aimed to evaluate Hp as marker of MetS, and to assess its association with long-term outcome in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We measured plasma Hp in a prospective

  10. Relation between usual daily walking time and metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are several studies about the positive relation between physical inactivity or low cardio respiratory fitness with development of metabolic syndrome (MS). In contrast, physical activity had favourable effects on all components of MS but the quantity and the frequency of physical activity necessary to produce ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahi, Gita; LeBlanc, Paul J.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.; O'Leary, Debra; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have higher rates of obesity compared to children with typical motor development, and, as a result may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of MetS and its components among children with and without DCD. This…

  12. Comparison of accuracy of diabetes risk score and components of the metabolic syndrome in assessing risk of incident type 2 diabetes in Inter99 cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy B Shafizadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes, methods to assess diabetes risk which would identify those at highest risk are needed. We compared two risk-stratification approaches for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS and a previously developed diabetes risk score, PreDx® Diabetes Risk Score (DRS. DRS assesses 5 yr risk of incident T2DM based on the measurement of 7 biomarkers in fasting blood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DRS was evaluated in baseline serum samples from 4,128 non-diabetic subjects in the Inter99 cohort (Danes aged 30-60 for whom diabetes outcomes at 5 years were known. Subjects were classified as having MetS based on the presence of at least 3 MetS risk factors in baseline clinical data. The sensitivity and false positive rate for predicting diabetes using MetS was compared to DRS. When the sensitivity was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly lower false positive rate. Similarly, when the false positive rate was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly higher specificity. In further analyses, subjects were classified by presence of 0-2, 3 or 4-5 risk factors with matching proportions of subjects distributed among three DRS groups. Comparison between the two risk stratification schemes, MetS risk factors and DRS, were evaluated using Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI. Comparing risk stratification by DRS to MetS factors in the total population, the NRI was 0.146 (p = 0.008 demonstrating DRS provides significantly improved stratification. Additionally, the relative risk of T2DM differed by 15 fold between the low and high DRS risk groups, but only 8-fold between the low and high risk MetS groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DRS provides a more accurate assessment of risk for diabetes than MetS. This improved performance may allow clinicians to focus preventive strategies on those most in need of urgent intervention.

  13. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with shared pathophysiology who are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. By considering the central features of the metabolic syndrome and how they are related, we may better understand the underlying pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis. A comprehensive definition for the metabolic syndrome and its key features would facilitate research into its causes and hopefully lead to new insights into pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment approaches.

  14. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ahmad, T.; Hussain, S.J.; Javed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity and Ischaemic Heart Disease have become a problem of public health magnitude with substantial economic burden both in the developed as well as the developing countries. Obesity is quite frequent in Type 2 diabetics and also plays a central role in causing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Metabolic Syndrome significantly increases the incidence of cardiovascular complications. This study was done to determine the frequency of MetS in our Type 2 diabetic patients as most of the components of MetS can be modified and identifying/managing these at an early stage might be of considerable help in reducing cardiovascular complications. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in Medical B and Medical A wards of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Nov, 08 to April, 09. Type 2 Diabetic patients aged above 40 years who gave informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome was estimated according to the IDF consensus worldwide definition of the MetS. Results: Of the 100 patients enrolled in this study 56 were females and 44 were males with a mean age of 59.9 years. Out of these 100 participants seventy six (76%) were diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Of the 56 females, forty eight (85.71%) were having metabolic syndrome while twenty eight (63.63%) of the 44 male participants were having the syndrome. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: Frequency of MetS was found to be significantly high in this study with female preponderance. All the components, except Hypertension were more frequent in females. Diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome need more aggressive approach in management so as to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular complications. (author)

  15. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with sh...

  16. The association between the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score and pulmonary function in non-smoking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun; Gi, Mi Young; Cha, Ju Ae; Yoo, Chan Uk; Park, Sang Muk

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the association of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score with the predicted forced vital capacity and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) values in Korean non-smoking adults. We analysed data obtained from 6684 adults during the 2013-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. After adjustment for related variables, metabolic syndrome ( p metabolic syndrome score ( p metabolic syndrome score with metabolic syndrome score 0 as a reference group showed no significance for metabolic syndrome score 1 [1.061 (95% confidence interval, 0.755-1.490)] and metabolic syndrome score 2 [1.247 (95% confidence interval, 0.890-1.747)], but showed significant for metabolic syndrome score 3 [1.433 (95% confidence interval, 1.010-2.033)] and metabolic syndrome score ⩾ 4 [1.760 (95% confidence interval, 1.216-2.550)]. In addition, the odds ratio of restrictive pulmonary disease of the metabolic syndrome [1.360 (95% confidence interval, 1.118-1.655)] was significantly higher than those of non-metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were inversely associated with the predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values in Korean non-smoking adults. In addition, metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were positively associated with the restrictive pulmonary disease.

  17. Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Laboratory Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Victoria; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric overweight and obesity is an emerging public health priority as rates have rapidly increased worldwide. Obesity is often clustered with other metabolic abnormalities including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This cluster of risk factors, termed the metabolic syndrome, has traditionally been reported in adults. However, with the increased prevalence of pediatric obesity, the metabolic syndrome is now evident in children and adolescents. This complex cluster of risk factors is the result of the pathological interplay between several organs including adipose tissue, muscle, liver, and intestine with a common antecedent - insulin resistance. The association of the metabolic syndrome with several systemic alterations that involve numerous organs and tissues adds to the complexity and challenge of diagnosing the metabolic syndrome and identifying useful clinical indicators of the disease. The complex physiology of growing and developing children and adolescents further adds to the difficulties in standardizing laboratory assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis for the diverse pediatric population. However, establishing a consensus definition is critical to identifying and managing children and adolescents at high risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. As a result, the examination of novel metabolic syndrome biomarkers which can detect these metabolic abnormalities early with high specificity and sensitivity in the pediatric population has been of interest. Understanding this complex cluster of risk factors in the pediatric population is critical to ensure that this is not the first generation where children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This review will discuss the pathophysiology, consensus definitions and laboratory assessment of pediatric metabolic syndrome as well as potential novel biomarkers.

  18. On the surgical treatment of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y I Sedletsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present he results of surgical treatment of 136 patients with metabolic syndrome at long-term period of evaluation (up to 15 years. All patients had jejunoileal bypass surgery in modification prof. Y.I. Sedletsky. We show the effect of surgery on overweight, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. We've traced above changes depending on the period elapsed since the time of the operation. The results prove the efficiency and stability of effects of jejunoileal bypass surgery on components of the metabolic syndrome. Evaluation of the complications rate of this method is also presented in the article.

  19. Patients with old age or proximal tumors benefit from metabolic syndrome in early stage gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-li Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. METHODS: Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P=0.036. Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P=0.009 in multivariate analysis or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P=0.047 in multivariate analysis. No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P=0.052 in univariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors.

  20. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DAILY AMBULATION IN CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND YOUNG ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Krishnan, Sowmya; Chalmers, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Purposes To compare daily ambulatory measures in children, adolescents, and young adults with and without metabolic syndrome, and to assess which metabolic syndrome components, demographic measures, and body composition measures are associated with daily ambulatory measures. Methods Two-hundred fifty subjects between the ages of 10 and 30 years were assessed on metabolic syndrome components, demographic and clinical measures, body fat percentage, and daily ambulatory strides, durations, and cadences during seven consecutive days. Forty-five of the 250 subjects had metabolic syndrome, as defined by the International Diabetes Federation. Results Subjects with metabolic syndrome ambulated at a slower daily average cadence than those without metabolic syndrome (13.6 ± 2.2 strides/min vs. 14.9 ± 3.2 strides/min; p=0.012), and they had slower cadences for continuous durations of 60 minutes (p=0.006), 30 minutes (p=0.005), 20 minutes (p=0.003), 5 minutes (p=0.002), and 1 minute (p=0.001). However, the total amount of time spent ambulating each day was not different (p=0.077). After adjustment for metabolic syndrome status, average cadence is linearly associated with body fat percentage (pmetabolic syndrome ambulate more slowly and take fewer strides throughout the day than those without metabolic syndrome, even though the total amount of time spent ambulating is not different. Furthermore, the detrimental influence of metabolic syndrome on ambulatory cadence is primarily a function of body fatness. PMID:22811038

  1. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Iran: A 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshad, Sina; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Etemad, Koorosh; Meysamie, Alipasha; Afarideh, Mohsen; Khajeh, Elias; Asgari, Fereshteh; Mousavizadeh, Mostafa; Rafei, Ali; Neishaboury, Mohamadreza; Ghajar, Alireza; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its individual components among the Iranian adult population in 2011 and to investigate changes between 2007 and 2011. Data from two rounds of the Surveillance of Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases national surveys conducted in 2007 and 2011 were pooled. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. In 2007, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among adults aged 25-64 years was 35.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.27-37.63), which decreased to 32.96 (95% CI 30.73-35.18) in 2011 (P = 0.0108). Despite this overall decline, the prevalence of central obesity (P = 0.1383), raised triglycerides (P = 0.3058), and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P = 0.5595) remained constant. There was a trend towards a decline in the proportion of individuals with increased blood pressure (P = 0.0978), and the proportion of adults with increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased (P metabolic syndrome has decreased slightly in Iran, although prevalence of increased FPG has increased significantly. One-third of the Iranian adult population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome

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    Zhou Shi-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body’s total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body’s antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body’s total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin’s antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn and metabolic syndrome are also discussed.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, S.; Naveed, T.; Shakoor, T.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Cross-sectional, descriptive study. A total of 100 subjects with ischemic heart disease, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Demographic data (age and gender) and the 5 component conditions of the metabolic syndrome were noted. Subjects were physically assessed for the abdominal obesity, based on waist circumference. Fasting blood samples for glucose and lipid profile in first 24 hours after acute coronary insult were drawn and tested in central laboratory. Variables were processed for descriptive statistics. In this study population, 68% were male and 32% were female with mean age of 52 +-13.6 years in men and 56 +- 12.5 years in women. Frequency of metabolic syndrome was 32% in men and 28% in women. It increased with age. The highest rate of metabolic syndrome was in men diagnosed as STEMI (odds ratio: 3.39, 95% CI=1.36-8.41). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was high among the patients with IHD. It supports the potential for preventive efforts in persons with high-risk of IHD. (author)

  5. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

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    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  6. Gout and Metabolic Syndrome: a Tangled Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottam, Gabrielle E; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-08-26

    The complexity of gout continues to unravel with each new investigation. Gout sits at the intersection of multiple intrinsically complex processes, and its prevalence, impact on healthcare costs, and association with important co-morbidities make it increasingly relevant. The association between gout and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, renal disease, and obesity suggest that either gout, or its necessary precursor hyperuricemia, may play an important role in the manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we analyze the complex interconnections between gout and metabolic syndrome, by reviewing gout's physiologic and epidemiologic relationships with its major co-morbidities. Increasing evidence supports gout's association with metabolic syndrome. More specifically, both human studies and animal models suggest that hyperuricemia may play a role in promoting inflammation, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, adipogenesis and lipogenesis, insulin and glucose dysregulation, and liver disease. Fructose ingestion is associated with increased rates of hypertension, weight gain, impaired glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia and is a key driver of urate biosynthesis. AMP kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of processes that tend to mitigate against the metabolic syndrome. Within hepatocytes, leukocytes, and other cells, a fructose/urate metabolic loop drives key inhibitors of AMPK, including AMP deaminase and fructokinase, that may tilt the balance toward metabolic syndrome progression. Preliminary evidence suggests that agents that block the intracellular synthesis of urate may restore AMPK activity and help maintain metabolic homeostasis. Gout is both an inflammatory and a metabolic disease. With further investigation of urate's role, the possibility of proper gout management additionally mitigating metabolic syndrome is an evolving and important question.

  7. Aldosterone synthase gene polymorphism in alimentary obesity, metabolic syndrome components, some secondary forms of arterial hypertension, pathology of the adrenals glands core (literature review

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    S.N. Koval

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal factors of adrenal origin belong to the pathophysiological mechanisms of the formation and progression of arterial hypertension (AH and should be consi­dered while developing differentiated approaches to the treatment and prevention of hypertensive states, their primary, secondary and resistant forms. The first thing we should point up is aldosterone (AL, enzyme aldosterone synthase (AS, which takes a direct part in the formation of this hormone, as well as gene polymorphisms of AS, which have not only molecular genetic, but also differential diagnostic and therapeutic significance for secondary forms of arterial hypertension, abdominal obesity (AO, metabolic syndrome (MS, adrenal pathology and other endocrine disorders. AL is a steroid (mineralocorticoid hormone of the adrenal cortex, which is synthesized from cholesterol (CH, mainly in the glomerular zone of the adrenal glands, is released under the action of angiotensin II (A II and potassium ions (K+. AL acti­vity is mediated through the corresponding mineralocorticoid receptors (MKR. The particular importance in AH and MS development belongs to AL activation and MKR density in adipocytes, this phenomenon is accompanied by increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, leptin, an adipogenic effect, and the inhibition of MCR activity is accompanied by increased production of adiponectin, which is more pronounced in patients with AH. Aldosterone synthase, a mitochondrial human enzyme encoded by the CYP11B2 gene (cytochrome P450, family 11, subfamily B, polypeptide 2 is located on the 8th chromosome. AS belongs to the superfamily of cytochrome P450 and regulates the synthesis of AL hormone. The CYP11B2 gene encodes the key enzyme for the synthesis of AL 18-hydroxylase. In scientific papers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of AS gene is often studied, such as 5312T, Intron 2, Lys-173/Arg; T-344C, 3097 C/A. 227 SNP of the AS gene were identified in different

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  9. Toxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2006-01-01

    (HAART) may encounter the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), which attenuates patient compliance to this treatment. HALS is characterised by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review depicts the metabolic abnormalities associated...... with HAART by describing the key cell and organ systems that are involved, emphasising the role of insulin resistance. An opinion on the remedies available to treat the metabolic abnormalities and phenotype of HALS is provided....

  10. Obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate decreased activation of reward-related brain centers in response to food cues in both the fed and fasting states: a preliminary fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, O M; Mantzoros, C S

    2017-03-01

    It remains unknown whether obese individuals with more components of the metabolic syndrome and/or prediabetes demonstrate altered activation of brain centers in response to food cues. We examined obese individuals with prediabetes (n=26) vs obese individuals without prediabetes (n=11) using fMRI. We also performed regression analyses on the basis of the number of MetS components per subject. Obese individuals with prediabetes have decreased activation of the reward-related putamen in the fasting state and decreased activation of the salience- and reward-related insula after eating. Obese individuals with more components of MetS demonstrate decreased activation of the putamen while fasting. All these activations remain significant when corrected for BMI, waist circumference (WC), HbA1c and gender. Decreased activation in the reward-related central nervous system areas among the obese is more pronounced in subjects with prediabetes and MetS. Prospective studies are needed to quantify their contributions to the development of prediabetes/MetS and to study whether they may predispose to the exacerbation of obesity and the development of comorbidities over time.

  11. Holter registers and metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Aguilar-Molina, A. M.; Zamora-Justo, J. A.; Gutiérrez-Calleja, R. A.; Virgilio-González, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    There is a relationship between the state of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndrome (MS). A way to diagnose the heart state of a person is to monitor the electrical activity of the heart using a 24 hours Holter monitor. Scanned ECG signal can be analyzed beat-by-beat by algorithms that separate normal of abnormal heartbeats. If the percentage of abnormal heartbeats is too high it could be argued that the patient has heart problems. We have algorithms that can not only identify the abnormal heartbeats, but they can also classify them, so we classified and counted abnormal heartbeats in patients with MS and subjects without MS. Most of our patients have large waist circumference, high triglycerides and high levels of LDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol although some of them have high blood pressure. We enrolled adult patients with MS free of diabetes in a four month lifestyle intervention program including diet and physical aerobic exercise, and compared with healthy controls. We made an initial registration with a Holter, and 24 hours ECG signal is analyzed to identify and classify the different types of heartbeats. The patients then begin with diet or exercise (at least half an hour daily). Periodically Holter records were taken up and we describe the evolution in time of the number and type of abnormal heartbeats. Results show that the percentage of abnormal heartbeats decreases over time, in some cases the decline is very significant, and almost a reduction to half or less of abnormal heartbeats after several months since the patients changed their eating or physical activity habits.

  12. Docosahexaenoic Acid Levels in Blood and Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Children: Is There a Link?

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    Carlotta Lassandro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing in the pediatric population. Considering the different existing criteria to define metabolic syndrome, the use of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria has been suggested in children. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA has been associated with beneficial effects on health. The evidence about the relationship of DHA status in blood and components of the metabolic syndrome is unclear. This review discusses the possible association between DHA content in plasma and erythrocytes and components of the metabolic syndrome included in the IDF criteria (obesity, alteration of glucose metabolism, blood lipid profile, and blood pressure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children. The current evidence is inconsistent and no definitive conclusion can be drawn in the pediatric population. Well-designed longitudinal and powered trials need to clarify the possible association between blood DHA status and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Thyroid function and the metabolic syndrome in older persons: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heima, N.E.; Eekhoff, E.M.W.; Oosterwerff, M.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; van Schoor, N.M.; Simsek, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies suggest an association between a high TSH and (individual components of) the metabolic syndrome. Only a few studies have been performed in the general older population. Objective: This study investigates the association between serum TSH and the metabolic syndrome in a

  14. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome: The link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranabir Salam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS or "Syndrome X" which is a constellation of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and increased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglyceride (TG levels. It is one of the main threats for public health in the 21st century with its associated risk of cardiovascular disease. This condition affects a major chunk of mankind. International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated that around 20-25% of the adult population of the world has MetS. Several definitions have been put forward by different expert bodies leading to confusion. To overcome this, joint new statement of many expert group have been issued. Serum testosterone (T has been shown to be associated with MetS. Several studies have shown a higher prevalence of MetS in subjects with low testosterone. There are also several studies showing a significant difference in serum T between those with MetS and those without. Serum T has also been shown to be associated with components of MetS and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT improves various metabolic and anthropometric parameters in MetS. Patients with androgen deprivation for treatment of various cancers have also been reported to have higher prevalence of MetS. But the evidence of association is not sufficient evidence for the causation of MetS by low testosterone and long-term studies are needed to confirm whether T deficiency is the cause or is a feature of MetS.

  15. Metabolic syndrome in non-obese Taiwanese: new definition of metabolically obese, normal-weight individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-huang

    2009-11-05

    Not only the obese, but also the non-obese adults have the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the upper normal weight. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome and its individual components in non-obese adult Taiwanese (body mass index (BMI) metabolic syndrome, defined by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (2005), were analyzed in the BMI category according to 2.0 unit increments, in individuals seeking a health examination. The higher the BMI categories, the more prevalent the metabolic syndrome was in women and in men (P metabolic syndrome in women were 1.3 (95%CI: 0.5 - 3.2) with BMI 21.0 - 22.9 kg/m(2), 3.0 (1.3 - 7.1) with BMI 23.0 - 24.9 kg/m(2), and 8.6 (3.6 - 20.8) for women with BMI 25.0 - 26.9 kg/m(2), after controlling for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, betel nut chewing, blood routine, biochemical data, hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus. The corresponding odds ratios in men were 1.6 (0.6 - 4.2), 3.7 (1.6 - 8.8), and 9.9 (4.2 - 23.2). Individuals in the upper normal weight and slightly overweight BMI range have relatively high prevalence and increased risk of having metabolic syndrome. Therefore, physicians should screen metabolic syndrome in not only obese but also non-obese individuals for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  17. Nutritional intervention in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingjing; Zhu, Wenhua; Dai, Honglei; Chen, Zhouwen; Chen, Leiqian; Fang, Lizheng

    2007-01-01

    Through an interventional study in the metabolic syndrome, evaluate the feasibility of the standard nutritional intervention. Select metabolic syndrome patients from people who received a health check in our hospital and randomly allocate them into four groups. The standard interventional group received both the nutritional intervention and health education; the simple interventional group only received the nutritional intervention; the simple health educational group only received health education; the control group did not receive any intervention measure. Examine the related index of the metabolic syndrome of each group before and half a year after the intervention: waistline, blood pressure, triglyceride, fasting plasma glucose etc. K-W test and Chi-square test, Bonferroni correction was used in our study. The index of the metabolic syndrome was significantly different for each of the four groups before and after intervention (pnutritional interventional group and for, the simple health education group was significantly different, but there was no difference for the other indices (p>0.05) between the standard nutritional interventional group and simple nutritional interventional group, except that the waistline difference (pnutritional intervention is an effective strategy for patients with the metabolic syndrome.

  18. Influence of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome groups on quality of life in women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Wen; Chen, I-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; zhōng yī) syndrome groups are based on the symptoms of human diseases and guide the use of Chinese herbs. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TCM syndrome groups on biochemical characteristics and quality of life (QOL) in women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Among the 1080 registered female patients screened at our outpatient clinic, a total of 322 women aged between 18 and 65 years and meeting the requirements of MS were enrolled. All the patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire on metabolic TCM syndrome groups and a questionnaire on the QOL, the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Short Form-12 (SF-12). Data of biochemical characteristics were collected at the same time. The present study showed MS women in TCM syndrome groups had significantly lower physical and mental component scores in SF-12 compared with those not in TCM syndrome groups. We also found MS patients in TCM syndrome groups, except Kidney Deficiency syndrome, showed higher body mass indexes, waist circumference, and hip circumference. However, there was almost no difference in most biochemical characteristics between TCM syndrome groups. The MS patients diagnosed as belonging to TCM syndrome groups had poor QOL.

  19. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  20. Dietary energy density and the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaillzadeh, A; Azadbakht, L

    2011-05-01

    In a comparison of women worldwide, Iranian women were found to have the highest prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, specific characteristics of diet in Middle-Eastern countries might provide additional information on the diet-disease relations. This study was performed to assess the association between dietary energy density and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women. Usual dietary intakes were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 486 Iranian adult women by the use of a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary energy density was calculated as each individual's reported daily energy intake (kcal/d) into total weight of foods (excluding beverages) consumed (g/d). Anthropometric measures, fasting plasma glucose, serum lipid profiles and blood pressure were evaluated. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Mean dietary energy density was 1.77 ± 0.35 kcal/g. Individuals in the top tertile of dietary energy density had 80% (odds ratio: 1.80; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 3.15) greater odds of having the metabolic syndrome. Even after further adjustment for body mass index, this association remained significant. Higher dietary energy density was also significantly associated with greater odds of having abdominal adiposity (4.23; 2.51, 7.18), high-serum triacylglycerol concentrations (3.55; 2.31, 5.93) and low-serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.80; 1.13, 2.84). No overall significant associations were found between higher dietary energy density and risk of having elevated blood pressure or abnormal glucose homeostasis. Higher dietary energy density was significantly associated with a greater risk of the metabolic syndrome and most of its components. Further studies are required to focus on lowering dietary energy density as a probable strategy for preventing metabolic syndrome.

  1. The association between self-reported sleep quality and metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Chang Hung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Short and long sleep duration are associated with metabolic syndrome. However, there is limited research on the association between sleep quality and metabolic syndrome, and thus the aim of this study is to investigate this relationship. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cross-sectional baseline data were collected from the decoded database of the Prevention Health Center of National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2002 to 2006. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was according to the statement of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. A higher global PSQI score indicates poorer sleep quality, and a global PSQI score greater than five differentiates poor from good sleepers. RESULTS: Of the 3,435 subjects recruited, 899 (26.2% had metabolic syndrome. Subjects with metabolic syndrome had higher PSQI and prevalence of poor sleepers than those without metabolic syndrome. The multivariate lineal regression analysis showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, snoring, alcohol drinking, and habitual exercise were independent predictors of PSQI. When substituting metabolic syndrome with the five components, hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were positively associated with PSQI. The multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, and snoring were independently associated with being poor sleepers. Of the five components, only low HDL-C was an independent predictor of being poor sleepers. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with metabolic syndrome have higher global PSQI scores and a higher risk of being poor sleepers. Of the five components of metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia and low HDL-C are independently associated with the global PSQI scores, while low HDL-C is an independent predictor of being poor sleepers.

  2. Rodent Models for Metabolic Syndrome Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Panchal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodents are widely used to mimic human diseases to improve understanding of the causes and progression of disease symptoms and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension, together known as the metabolic syndrome, are causing increasing morbidity and mortality. To control these diseases, research in rodent models that closely mimic the changes in humans is essential. This review will examine the adequacy of the many rodent models of metabolic syndrome to mimic the causes and progression of the disease in humans. The primary criterion will be whether a rodent model initiates all of the signs, especially obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dysfunction of the heart, blood vessels, liver and kidney, primarily by diet since these are the diet-induced signs in humans with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that the model that comes closest to fulfilling this criterion is the high carbohydrate, high fat-fed male rodent.

  3. Ghrelin in Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pulkkinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of related risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and liver disease. Obesity, which has become a global public health problem, is one of the major risk factors for development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Obesity is a complex disease, caused by the interplay between environmental and genetic factors. Ghrelin is one of the circulating peptides, which stimulates appetite and regulates energy balance, and thus is one of the candidate genes for obesity and T2DM. During the last years both basic research and genetic association studies have revealed association between the ghrelin gene and obesity, metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes

  4. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents

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    Folić Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents is serious problem of modern society. In order to prevent development of possible complications (cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 later in life, early recognition of children at risk for developing metabolic syndrome is of great importance. Previous differences in criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents have been significantly decreased by new criteria issued by the International Diabetes Federation. From the aspect of prevention, key elements are proper nutrition and regular physical activity. In a view of treatment recommendations, initial steps should be regulation of energy balance in the diet and increase in physical activity; the drug treatment is reserved for patients with high risk of complications. .

  5. Cardiorespiratory fitness and the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedell-Neergaard, Anne-Sophie; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Petersen, Gitte Lindved

    2018-01-01

    -fitness was inversely associated with an overall metabolic syndrome score, as well as triglycerides, glycated haemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and directly associated with high-density lipoprotein. Single inflammatory biomarkers and a combined inflammatory score partly explained......OBJECTIVE: Individuals with metabolic syndrome have increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to test the hypothesis that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CR-fitness), counteracts accumulation of visceral fat, decreases inflammation and lowers risk factors...... of the metabolic syndrome. METHOD: The study sample included 1,293 Danes (age 49-52 years) who from 2009 to 2011 participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank, including a questionnaire, physical tests, and blood samples. Multiple linear regression models were performed with CR-fitness as exposure...

  6. Nature of fatty acids in high fat diets differentially delineates obesity-linked metabolic syndrome components in male and female C57BL/6J mice

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    El Akoum Souhad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse effects of high-fat diets (HFD on metabolic homeostasis are linked to adipose tissue dysfunction. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of the HFD nature on adipose tissue activity, metabolic disturbances and glucose homeostasis alterations in male mice compared with female mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were fed either a chow diet or HFD including vegetal (VD or animal (AD fat. Body weight, plasmatic parameters and adipose tissue mRNA expression levels of key genes were evaluated after 20 weeks of HFD feeding. Results HFD-fed mice were significantly heavier than control at the end of the protocol. Greater abdominal visceral fat accumulation was observed in mice fed with AD compared to those fed a chow diet or VD. Correlated with weight gain, leptin levels in systemic circulation were increased in HFD-fed mice in both sexes with a significant higher level in AD group compared to VD group. Circulating adiponectin levels as well as adipose tissue mRNA expression levels were significantly decreased in HFD-fed male mice. Although its plasma levels remained unchanged in females, adiponectin mRNA levels were significantly reduced in adipose tissue of both HFD-fed groups with a more marked decrease in AD group compared to VD group. Only HFD-fed male mice were diabetic with increased fasting glycaemia. On the other hand, insulin levels were only increased in AD-fed group in both sexes associated with increased resistin levels. VD did not induce any apparent metabolic alteration in females despite the increased weight gain. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors gamma-2 (PPARγ2 and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα mRNA expression levels in adipose tissue were decreased up to 70% in HFD-fed mice but were more markedly reduced in male mice as compared with female mice. Conclusions The nature of dietary fat determines the extent of metabolic alterations reflected in adipocytes through modifications in the pattern of

  7. Coexistence of Metabolic Syndrome and Psoriasis Vulgaris

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    Reyhan Çelik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is one of the chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Crohn's disease, in which the inflammation is responsible for the pathogenesis. Recently, some studies reported the importance of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and an association of chronic inflammatory systemic diseases with atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine coexistence of psoriasis vulgaris with various severity and metabolic syndrome.Material and Method: One hundred psoriasis vulgaris patients and one hundred sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI was used for evaluating the disease severity in psoriasis patients. A PASI score below 7 was accepted as mild, between 7-12 as moderate, and above 12 as severe. We evaluated metabolic syndrome in both patient and control groups by using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III metabolic syndrome criteria. SPSS 10.0 for Windows was used in analyzing data. For comparison, the student’s-t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test were used. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Metabolic syndrome, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, high waist circumference and lower high-density lipoprotein levels were more common in patients with psoriasis than in controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference in these parameters between these two groups (p>0.05. We found that the mean value of triglyceride levels was statistically higher in the psoriasis group (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant difference was observed between patients with mild, moderate, severe psoriasis and controls for the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, the mean value of triglyceride levels in psoriasis patients was higher and the mean value

  8. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a danish population of women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus is three-fold higher than in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity, components of the metabolic syndrome, are common characteristics of women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Due to increasing incidence of diabetes and obesity, the metabolic syndrome might comprise a major health problem among these women....

  9. The criteria for metabolic syndrome and the national health screening and education system in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Two major definitions of metabolic syndrome have been proposed. One focuses on the accumulation of risk factors, a measure used by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); the other focuses on abdominal obesity, a measure used by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Japanese government. The latter definition takes waist circumference (WC) into consideration as an obligatory component, whereas the former does not. In 2009, the IDF, NHLBI, AHA, and other organizations attempted to unify these criteria; as a result, WC is no longer an obligatory component of those systems, while it remains obligatory in the Japanese criteria. In 2008, a new Japanese cardiovascular screening and education system focused on metabolic syndrome was launched. People undergoing screening are classified into three groups according to the presence of abdominal obesity and the number of metabolic risk factors, and receive health educational support from insurers. This system has yielded several beneficial outcomes: the visibility of metabolic syndrome at the population level has drastically improved; preventive measures have been directed toward metabolic syndrome, which is expected to become more prevalent in future generations; and a post-screening education system has been established. However, several problems with the current system have been identified and are under debate. In this review, we discuss topics related to metabolic syndrome, including (1) the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome; (2) metabolic syndrome and the universal health screening and education system; and (3) recent debates about Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  10. The criteria for metabolic syndrome and the national health screening and education system in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Yamagishi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two major definitions of metabolic syndrome have been proposed. One focuses on the accumulation of risk factors, a measure used by the American Heart Association (AHA and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI; the other focuses on abdominal obesity, a measure used by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and the Japanese government. The latter definition takes waist circumference (WC into consideration as an obligatory component, whereas the former does not. In 2009, the IDF, NHLBI, AHA, and other organizations attempted to unify these criteria; as a result, WC is no longer an obligatory component of those systems, while it remains obligatory in the Japanese criteria. In 2008, a new Japanese cardiovascular screening and education system focused on metabolic syndrome was launched. People undergoing screening are classified into three groups according to the presence of abdominal obesity and the number of metabolic risk factors, and receive health educational support from insurers. This system has yielded several beneficial outcomes: the visibility of metabolic syndrome at the population level has drastically improved; preventive measures have been directed toward metabolic syndrome, which is expected to become more prevalent in future generations; and a post-screening education system has been established. However, several problems with the current system have been identified and are under debate. In this review, we discuss topics related to metabolic syndrome, including (1 the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome; (2 metabolic syndrome and the universal health screening and education system; and (3 recent debates about Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  11. The Definition and Prevalence of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Increase in prevalence of obesity has become a worldwide major health problem in adults, as well as among children and adolescents. Furthermore, total adiposity and truncal subcutaneous fat accumulation during adolescence are positively and independently associated with atherosclerosis at adult ages. Centrally accumulation of body fat is associated with insulin resistance, whereas distribution of body fat in a peripheral pattern is metabolically less important. Obesity is associated with a large decrease in life expectancy. The effect of extreme obesity on mortality is greater among younger than older adults. In this respect, obesity is also associated with increased risk of several cancer types. However, up to 30% of obese patients are metabolically healthy with insulin sensitivity similar to healthy normal weight individuals, lower visceral fat content, and lower intima media thickness of the carotid artery than the majority of metabolically "unhealthy" obese patients.Abdominal obesity is the most frequently observed component of metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome; clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension, is a major public health challenge. The average prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 31%, and is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of all-cause mortality.

  12. Incidence and Major Metabolic Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study involved 300 (92 males and 208 females) type 2 diabetic patients and was conducted at the Tamale Teaching/Regional Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Programme, Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) criteria. The incidence of the ...

  13. [Obesity and metabolic syndrome in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Villarreal, Velia Margarita; Rizo-Baeza, María M; Cortés Castell, Ernesto

    2009-03-01

    In spite of the lack of a uniform definition for metabolic syndrome in pediatry, recent studies have shown that it develops during childhood and is highly prevalent among children and adolescents who suffer from obesity. In light of the current epidemic of obesity in this age category in western countries, and specifically in Mexico, it becomes essential to know the means to prevent, detect and treat this syndrome. Nurses play an important role in promoting childhood health with regards to metabolic syndrome. To put into practice the strategies which resolve underlying problems related with this syndrome is a priority for the well-being of this age group. These strategies should include the application and management of public policies; the collaboration by health services, social services and schools; but, furthermore, the prevention and the management of this syndrome require a family commitment, while the changes in living habits benefit the entire family. This review article proposes to introduce prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies which nursing personnel can carry out while dealing with metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

  14. Fat-soluble micronutrients and metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. MetS prevalence has been associated with diet inadequacy. Conversely, the cumulative incidence of MetS has been inversely associated with a Mediterranean-style diet that includes many different health-beneficial nutrients. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet could reduce or at least stabilize metabolic risk factors. Recent findings Low serum level...

  15. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available John J Chen,1,2,* Lucas J Wendel,1,3,* Emily S Birkholz,1 John G Vallone,4 Anne L Coleman,5,6 Fei Yu,7 Vinit B Mahajan1,3,8 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, 7Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: A retrospective case–control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups.Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001 (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76–10.49; P=0.0004. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates

  16. Review of Hyperuricemia as New Marker for Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doaty, Sarah; Katz, James D.; Velasquez, Manuel T.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia has long been established as the major etiologic factor in gout. In recent years, a large body of evidence has accumulated that suggests that hyperuricemia may play a role in the development and pathogenesis of a number of metabolic, hemodynamic, and systemic pathologic diseases, including metabolic syndrome, hypertension, stroke, and atherosclerosis. A number of epidemiologic studies have linked hyperuricemia with each of these disorders. In some studies, therapies that lower uric acid may prevent or improve certain components of the metabolic syndrome. There is an association between uric acid and the development of systemic lupus erythematosus; the connection between other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis is less clear. The mechanism for the role of uric acid in disorders other than gout is not well established but recent investigations point towards systemic inflammation induced by urate, as the major pathophysiological event common to systemic diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:24693449

  17. Sedentary activity associated with metabolic syndrome independent of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bankoski, Andrea; Harris, Tamara B; McClain, James J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults.......This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults....

  18. Pre-morbid intelligence, the metabolic syndrome and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G D; Gale, C R; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between pre-morbid intelligence quotient (IQ) and the metabolic syndrome, and assessed the role of the metabolic syndrome as a mediating factor in the association of IQ with total and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality....

  19. Metabolic Syndrome after Kidney Transplantation - Are You at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of serious complications that may result from having metabolic syndrome. Treatment recommendations mirror those mentioned above for prevention of ... achieve these goals, as well as others for treatment of metabolic syndrome. If these strategies are not sufficient, your physician ...

  20. Monitoring and prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome in military veterans with serious mental illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameed Ahmed M Khatana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality among patients with serious mental illness (SMI and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome--a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors--is significantly higher in these patients than in the general population. Metabolic monitoring among patients using second generation antipsychotics (SGAs--a risk factor for metabolic syndrome--has been shown to be inadequate despite the release of several guidelines. However, patients with SMI have several factors independent of medication use that predispose them to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Our study therefore examines monitoring and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI, including those not using SGAs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We retrospectively identified all patients treated at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder during 2005-2006 and obtained demographic and clinical data. Incomplete monitoring of metabolic syndrome was defined as being unable to determine the status of at least one of the syndrome components. Of the 1,401 patients included (bipolar disorder: 822; schizophrenia: 222; and schizoaffective disorder: 357, 21.4% were incompletely monitored. Only 54.8% of patients who were not prescribed SGAs and did not have previous diagnoses of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia were monitored for all metabolic syndrome components compared to 92.4% of patients who had all three of these characteristics. Among patients monitored for metabolic syndrome completely, age-adjusted prevalence of the syndrome was 48.4%, with no significant difference between the three psychiatric groups. CONCLUSIONS: Only one half of patients with SMI not using SGAs or previously diagnosed with hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were completely monitored for metabolic syndrome components compared to greater than 90% of those with these characteristics

  1. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies MJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Davies,1 Katherine W Merton,1 Ujjwala Vijapurkar,2 Dainius A Balis,2 Mehul Desai2 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Methods: This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1 and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2. Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <1.0 mmol/L (men or <1.3 mmol/L (women; waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men, ≥88 cm (non-Asian women, >90 cm (Asian men, or >80 cm (Asian women; diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg. Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports.Results: In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus

  2. Relationship Between Vitamin D Deficiency and the Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Morbid Obesity, Before and 1 Year After Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass or Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obispo Entrenas, Ana; Legupin Tubio, David; Lucena Navarro, Fabiola; Martin Carvajal, Francisco; Gandara Adan, Norberto; Redondo Bautista, Maximino; Abiles Osinaga, Jimena

    2017-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS). After bariatric surgery (BS), high rates of VDD often persist and some patients are refractory to the resolution of comorbidities. The aim of the present study is to analyse the relationship between the levels of vitamin D and the persistence of MS components at 12 months after BS, according to the surgical technique used. We performed a retrospective study of 46 patients undergoing BS: 23 underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) and 23 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). These patients had an average BMI of 45 kg/m 2 (34-63). Levels of vitamin D were classified as deficient (30 ng/dl) and analysed in relation to the components of MS (high blood pressure (HBP), dyslipidaemia (DL) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. VDD was observed in 77% of the patients prior to surgery. There were no significant associations between predisposing factors and baseline vitamin D. After surgery, plasma levels of vitamin D increased in both groups, but only 18% of the patients achieved normal values. Both groups had achieved significant improvements in MS components. Thus, 63% of all the patients achieved complete resolution of HBP, 54% that of DL and 77% that of T2DM. Moreover, MS was present in 11% of the patients, compared to 63% at baseline, and the MS resolution rate was 83%, with no significant differences between LRYGBP and LSG. There is a relationship between VDD and persistence of MS, and particularly so with T2DM. VDD could represent a predictor of MS persistence at 12 months after surgery.

  3. [ASSOCIATION OF AGE OBESITY AND METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkhasov, B B; Selyatitskaya, V G; Karapetyan, A R; Lutov, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The study included 253 men aged 22 to 74 years. Was shown that at the end of the first period of middle age the accumulation of adipose tissue was enhanced that was associated with the change of dominance from the gynoid to the android type of obesity. The most pronounced increase in the frequency of occurrence of individual components and the overall metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in men in the second period of middle age with a following decrease in the frequency such components as hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglycemia in elderly age. In the all three age groups the value of the index of visceral obesity was significantly higher in men with android type of obesity compared with gynoid. Thus, the men with gynoid compared with android type of obesity have a lower risk of development metabolic syndrome in all age groups.

  4. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed t...

  5. Metabolic syndrome in Tunisian bipolar I patients | Ezzaher | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender, age, illness episode and treatment were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, while patients under lithium had higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than those under valproic acid, carbamazepine or antipsychotics. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significant higher levels of HOMA-IR and ...

  6. Metabolic syndrome in urban city of North-Western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... elevated (49.8%). Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is common in residents of North- Western Nigeria, commoner in the females than males. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome should be detected in normal individuals for implementing effective preventive measures. Key words: Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, obesity ...

  7. Background and treatment of metabolic syndrome: a therapeutic challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, Pieter A.; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a clustering of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. This syndrome is now widely recognized as a distinct pathologic entity. It is receiving a great deal of attention in the medical literature and also in the lay press. People with metabolic syndrome have

  8. Hypertension in Metabolic Syndrome: Vascular Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizábal, Yolanda; Llorens, Silvia; Nava, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and cardiovascular symptoms: insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipemia. Hypertension and vascular disorders are central to this syndrome. After a brief historical review, we discuss the role of sympathetic tone. Subsequently, we examine the link between endothelial dysfunction and IR. NO is involved in the insulin-elicited capillary vasodilatation. The insulin-signaling pathways causing NO release are different to the classical. There is a vasodilatory pathway with activation of NO synthase through Akt, and a vasoconstrictor pathway that involves the release of endothelin-1 via MAPK. IR is associated with an imbalance between both pathways in favour of the vasoconstrictor one. We also consider the link between hypertension and IR: the insulin hypothesis of hypertension. Next we discuss the importance of perivascular adipose tissue and the role of adipokines that possess vasoactive properties. Finally, animal models used in the study of vascular function of metabolic syndrome are reviewed. In particular, the Zucker fatty rat and the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat (SHROB). This one suffers macro- and microvascular malfunction due to a failure in the NO system and an abnormally high release of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, all this alleviated with glitazones used for metabolic syndrome therapy. PMID:23573411

  9. THE METABOLIC SYNDROME AMONG PATIENTS WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of occurrence of the Metabolic Syndrome among patients presenting with cardiovascular disease at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Methods: This was a case-control study of 100 con-secutive cardiovascular disease patients and 100 age- and sex- matched controls who ...

  10. Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and microalbuminuria, and more recently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and atherosclerosis. Although the concept of the MetS is subject to debate due to lack of a unifying underlying mechanism, the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome phenotype is rapidly increasing worldwide. Moreover, it is increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents of obese mothers. Evidence from both epidemiological and experimental animal studies now demonstrates that MetS onset is increasingly likely following exposure to suboptimal nutrition during critical periods of development, as observed in maternal obesity. Thus, the developmental priming of the MetS provides a common origin for this multifactorial disorder. Consequently, the mechanisms leading to this developmental priming have recently been the subject of intensive investigation. This review discusses recent data regarding the epigenetic modifications resulting from nutrition during early development that mediate persistent changes in the expression of key metabolic genes and contribute toward an adult metabolic syndrome phenotype. In addition, this review considers the role of the endogenous molecular circadian clock system, which has the potential to act at the interface between nutrient sensing and epigenetic processing. A continued and greater understanding of these mechanisms will eventually aid in the identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, and help develop therapeutic interventions, in accordance with current global government strategy.

  11. Cortisol in hair and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Alexander, N.; Bornstein, S.R.; Gao, W.; Miller, R.; Stark, S.; Bosch, J.A.; Fischer, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Although exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids is known to contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), the importance of physiological variation in basal cortisol secretion is less clear. This issue can be addressed by using hair cortisol analysis,

  12. Metabolic Syndrome among Undergraduate Students Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Laboratory Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, 2Department of Community Medicine - College of Medicine, ... undergraduate students in three Sudanese universities. Methods: A total of 384 first-year ... Keywords: Metabolic syndrome, Obesity, Hypertension, Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Anthropometric. Tropical ...

  13. Metabolic Syndrome X and Colon Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Svačina, Š.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana; Visokai, V.; Lipská, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, suppl. 1 (2003), s. 86 ISSN 0307-0565. [European Congress on Obesity /12./. 29.05.2003-01.06.2003, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : metabolic syndrome X * colon cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  14. Metabolic complications in the small intestine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Rafael; Orozco, Reynaldo

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic complications in the syndrome of small intestine is presented in a patient of masculine sex, 27 years old, who consulted for a square of inflammation gingival, migraine, fever, anorexia and adinamia for three days, followed by maculopapular-eritematose eruption for 8 days, coincident with the ampicillin ingestion, and later on severe abdominal pain and diarrhea

  15. Hypertension in Metabolic Syndrome: Vascular Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Mendizábal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and cardiovascular symptoms: insulin resistance (IR, obesity, dyslipemia. Hypertension and vascular disorders are central to this syndrome. After a brief historical review, we discuss the role of sympathetic tone. Subsequently, we examine the link between endothelial dysfunction and IR. NO is involved in the insulin-elicited capillary vasodilatation. The insulin-signaling pathways causing NO release are different to the classical. There is a vasodilatory pathway with activation of NO synthase through Akt, and a vasoconstrictor pathway that involves the release of endothelin-1 via MAPK. IR is associated with an imbalance between both pathways in favour of the vasoconstrictor one. We also consider the link between hypertension and IR: the insulin hypothesis of hypertension. Next we discuss the importance of perivascular adipose tissue and the role of adipokines that possess vasoactive properties. Finally, animal models used in the study of vascular function of metabolic syndrome are reviewed. In particular, the Zucker fatty rat and the spontaneously hypertensive obese rat (SHROB. This one suffers macro- and microvascular malfunction due to a failure in the NO system and an abnormally high release of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, all this alleviated with glitazones used for metabolic syndrome therapy.

  16. Cortisol: the villain in Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Paredes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This article reviews the state of the art regarding the association between glucocorticoid actions and both obesity and insulin resistance, two main features of the metabolic syndrome. Methods A methodological assessment of the literature on PubMed and SciELO databases was conducted by using the following terms: stress, metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoids, obesity, insulin resistance, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Results Chronic stress, mainly through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, promotes the accumulation of visceral fat. Reciprocally, obesity promotes a systemic low-grade inflammation state, mediated by increased adipokine secretion, which can chronically stimulate and disturb stress system. This vicious cycle, probably initiated by visceral adipose tissue dysfunction, might be the trigger for the development of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Given the strong evidences linking glucocorticoid release, obesity and type 2 diabetes, better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this connection might be useful for prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Zirie, Mahmoud; Musallam, Manal; Khader, Yousef S; Al-Hamaq, Abdulla O A A

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among adult Qatari population according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), assess which component contributed to the increased risk of the metabolic syndrome, and identify the characteristics of the subjects with metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study. The survey was carried out in urban and semiurban primary health-care centers. The survey was conducted from January, 2007, to July, 2008, among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 1496 subjects who were approached to participate in the study, 1204 (80.5%) gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the NCEP ATP III as well as IDF criteria. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome in studied subjects was 26.5% and 33.7% according to ATP III and IDF criteria (P education and physical activity. Also, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was more common in women. Among the components of metabolic syndrome, central obesity was significantly higher in the studied subjects. The IDF definition of metabolic syndrome gave a higher prevalence in all age groups. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components according to IDF criteria was higher in the studied subjects than the estimates given by the ATP III. Multivariate logistics regression analysis (ATP III and IDF) showed that age and BMI were significant contributors for metabolic syndrome. Both definitions strongly supported age and obesity as associated factors for metabolic syndrome. The current study found a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Qataris. There was a steady increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome through the decades, independent of the definition. Age and BMI were important

  18. Association of Serum Ceruloplasmin Level with Obesity: Some Components of Metabolic Syndrome and High-Sensitive C-Reactive Protein in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Morteza Safavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the mechanisms that has been suggested for obesity related metabolic disturbances is obesity-induced inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines generated in adipose tissue can increase hepatic synthesis of inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins (ISPs including ceruloplasmin (Cp. In this study we aimed to investigate the relation between serum Cp level and obesity. Methods. 61 persons with body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (case group and 61 persons with BMI < 25 kg/m2 (control group were included in this study with a case-control design. Serum Cp levels, triglyceride level, fating blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and hsCRP were measured in both groups. Results. We did not observe any significant association between serum Cp level and BMI in all subjects [OR: 1.02 (CI, 0.967 to 1.07] and in case (β=0.012, P=0.86 and control groups (β=0.49, P=0.07 separately. However, in control group, this positive association was marginally significant. We found a positive correlation between serum Cp level and serum triglyceride level. Conclusion. Serum Cp level was not related to obesity in this group of subjects. None of the baseline variables could predict obesity in this group of subjects, including serum Cp level, FBS, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL- cholesterols and hsCRP.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa.

  20. Metabolic aspects of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

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    M. R. Bonsignore

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is often associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS and could contribute to cardiovascular risk in OSAS. Sleep loss and intermittent hypoxia could contribute to the pathogenesis of the metabolic alterations associated with obesity, a common feature of OSAS. The biology of the adipocyte is being increasingly studied, and it has been found that hypoxia negatively affects adipocyte function. In November 2007, the European Respiratory Society and two EU COST Actions (Cardiovascular risk in OSAS (B26 and Adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome (BM0602, held a Research Seminar in Düsseldorf, Germany, to discuss the following: 1 the effects of hypoxia on glucose metabolism and adipocyte function; 2 the role of inflammatory activation in OSAS and obesity; 3 the alarming rates of obesity and OSAS in children; 4 the harmful effects of the metabolic syndrome in OSAS; 5 the effects of OSAS treatment on metabolic variables; and 6 the relationship between daytime sleepiness and hormonal and inflammatory responses. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, the role of the endocannabinoid system and novel pharmacological approaches to treat insulin resistance were also discussed. As obesity and hypoxia could be the basic links between OSAS and adipocyte dysfunction, further research is needed to translate these new data into clinical practice.

  1. The metabolic syndrome among Danish seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a cluster of risk factors related to insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is a strong risk factor for chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and is related to nutritional factors, sleep patterns, work-related stress, fatigue, and physical......-for-duty examination by seamen’s doctors at baseline, 141 seafarers (mean age 41.3 years) were tracked and re-examined after 2 years. At baseline all participants received general advice regarding lifestyle issues. Seafarers with MS were additionally given specific advice regarding treatment. The seafarers provided...... questionnaire information about their workplace on board, about treatment of hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, and about previously diagnosed type 2-diabetes. In order to define MS, we collected data about waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose. Results: Out...

  2. Association of Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with metabolic syndrome and its components among adult Arabs from the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hayder A; AbuOdeh, Ra'ed O; Muda, Wan Abdul Manan Bin Wan; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Bin Jan; Samsudin, Ab Rani

    2017-12-01

    The aim was to investigate relationships of Vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) polymorphisms to the components of MetS among Arabs adult residing in the United Arab Emirates. A cross-sectional study of 198 Arabs adult (50 males and 148 females). Serum levels of glucose, vitamin D, HDL-C, and TG, and blood pressure were measured. FokI, BsmI & TaqI genotyping of VDR were investigated using PCR-RFLP technique. Age of the participants was 21(9) years with a BMI of 26.8(7.8) kg/m 2 . About 15% had MetS with serum vitamin D levels of 25.5(18.2) nmol/L. VDR genotyping yielded: FokI: 57.1% FF and 38.9% Ff, BsmI: 29.8% bb and 51.5% Bb, while TaqI showed 39.4% TT and 43.4% Tt. The ff carriers had higher total cholesterol [174(12.4) mg/dl] than FF and Ff genotypes. Bb carriers showed higher BMI and LDL-C than BB and bb genotypes. In females, FokI VDR polymorphism showed significant association with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and F allele carriers were at higher risk of developing high SBP [x 2 =4.4, df1, OR=0.29 (95%CI: 0.087-0.98), p=0.035]. VDR gene polymorphisms were not associated with MetS, yet it may affect the severity of some of components of MetS, namely the association of BsmI with obesity, FokI and BsmI with dyslipidemia and FokI with SBP. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Volek, Jeff S; Feinman, Richard D

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) represents a constellation of markers that indicates a predisposition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other pathologic states. The definition and treatment are a matter of current debate and there is not general agreement on a precise definition or, to some extent, whether the designation provides more information than the individual components. We consider here five indicators that are central to most definitions and we provide evidence from the lit...

  4. Association of Serum Uric Acid With Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome in Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN-III Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiri, Saeid; Qorbani, Mostafa; Heshmat, Ramin; Tajbakhsh, Ramin; Eslami Shahr Babaki, Amir; Djalalinia, Shirin; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Tajadini, Mohammad Hasan; Asayesh, Hamid; Safari, Omid; Kelishadi, Roya

    2016-05-01

    There is controversial evidence on association of serum acid uric (SUA) with cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in adults. This study aimed to investigate the associations of SUA levels, components of metabolic syndrome, and other cardiometabolic risk factors, in a nationally representative sample of Iranian adolescents. This study included 132 participants who met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and 235 participants without metabolic syndrome. The participants were grouped according to the tertiles of SUA. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified for children and adolescents. The relationship between SUA and cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome was assessed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the participants was 15.21 ± 2.35 years, with no significant difference between the boys and the girls. The participants whose SUA was categorized in the 2nd tertile and those falling into the 3rd tertile had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (P Metabolic syndrome was associated with the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of SUA as compared to the lower tertile(s), in the adjusted model (P metabolic syndrome had higher SUA levels. Its association with some components of metabolic syndrome supports that SUA might be an additional component of metabolic syndrome even during adolescence.

  5. Association of Metabolic Syndrome with the Cardioankle Vascular Index in Asymptomatic Korean Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su-Hyun; Kang, Sung-Goo; Lee, Yun-Ah; Song, Sang-Wook; Rho, Jun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a cluster of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors. The cardioankle vascular index (CAVI) reflects arterial stiffness and may be used as an indicator of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the association of CAVI with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1,144 adults were included in this study. We measured CAVIs and examined blood samples to identify metabolic syndrome according to WHO Asia Pacific criteria and NCEP-ATPIII criteria. AST, ALT, r-GTP, BUN, creatinine, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and uric acid were also measured. CAVI values were significantly higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome than those without metabolic syndrome and increased according to the number of metabolic syndrome components present. Subjects with high fasting blood sugar levels or high blood pressure showed high CAVI values. Multiple regression analysis showed that age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, and uric acid were independent predictors of CAVI. Subjects with metabolic syndrome had high CAVIs, which indicated arterial stiffness, and were closely associated with an increase in the number of metabolic risk factors. The individual risk factors for metabolic syndrome have the synergistic effect of elevating arterial stiffness in asymptomatic Korean population.

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among elderly Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, María Araceli; Yáñez-Velasco, Lucía; Carnevale, Alessandra; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Bernal, Demetrio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rojas, Rosalba; Villa, Antonio; Tur, Josep A

    2017-11-01

    One of the most prevalent chronic diseases among elderly population is the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MetS and associated factors among Mexican elderly people. Cross-sectional survey carried out in Mexico (2007). A random sample (n=516) of the elderly population (≥65years; 277 female, 239 male) was interviewed. Anthropometric and analytical measurements, and a general questionnaire incorporating questions related to socio-demographic and life-style factors were used. MetS definition AHA/NHLBI/IDF was applied. The prevalence of MetS in the elderly (≥65years) was of 72.9% (75.7% men; 70.4% women). Participants with values above MetS cut-off points were 92.4% (hypertension), 77.8% (hypertriglyceridemia), 77.1% (low HDL-cholesterol), 71.1% (hyperglycaemia), and 65.4% (central obesity). People with MetS showed higher values of anthropometric and biochemical variables than those without MetS, except for the height, cholesterol and creatinine. Mid-high education level (9-12 years), no smokers and former smokers, and Central-Western inhabitants of Mexico were associated with MetS components. BMI status was the main determinant of MetS prevalence and MetS components. The reported prevalence of MetS among the elderly Mexican population was higher than those previously obtained in the geographical area, showing a major public health problem in Mexican elders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The association of metabolic syndrome markers with adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel C; Gans, Itai; Park, Min Jung; Carey, James L; Kelly, John D

    2014-07-01

    Research has associated adhesive capsulitis with diabetes mellitus but suggests that glucose-mediated injury may begin before diabetes is diagnosed. The period preceding diabetes is often marked by metabolic syndrome. We investigated the relationship between metabolic syndrome components (insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity) and the development of adhesive capsulitis using a case-control study. We retrospectively reviewed 150 consecutive adhesive capsulitis patient charts to determine the prevalence of obesity and of medications used for treating metabolic syndrome elements and compared these with previously reported nationwide values. The prevalence of anti-hyperglycemia medications in the adhesive capsulitis cohort was 18.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.9%-25.7%), twice the national rate of diagnosed diabetes of 7.6% (95% CI, 6.7%-8.5%). In the 20- to 39-year-old group, the prevalence of anti-hyperglycemic medications, 26.3% (95% CI, 11.8%-48.8%), was over 10 times the nationwide rate. The overall prevalence of hypertensive medication use in the adhesive capsulitis group, 33.1% (95% CI, 25.9%-41.2%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate, 21.6% (95% CI, 19.8%-23.4%). In the 40- to 64-year-old group, the prevalence of hypertensive medication use, 36.8% (95% CI, 28.6%-46.0%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate of 24.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-27.0%). The prevalence of anti-lipid medications and obesity was similar between the groups. The relationship between adhesive capsulitis and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Our results confirm previous work associating hyperglycemia with adhesive capsulitis. We have also shown a possible association of hypertension, part of metabolic syndrome and a proinflammatory condition, with adhesive capsulitis, which has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictors of Kidney Damage in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

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    Dara Kutsyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is an epidemic of XXI century. Each of the components of metabolic syndrome (arterial hypertension, hyperglycemia or dyslipidemia can be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. However, it remains unknown what plays a key role in the progression of the disease. The objective of the research was to identify early detectors of kidney damage in patients with metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The study involved 70 patients with metabolic syndrome. In addition to standard examination methods, markers of endothelial disfunction (hydrogen sulfide and nitrogen monooxide were measured in venous blood samples and the urine was tested for microalbuminuria. All the patients were divided into 3 groups according to the degree of albuminuria: normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. To compare the indices between the groups, the Student’s t-test was used; to determine the relationship between the individual values, the Pearson correlation coefficient (r was applied. Results. The indicator of systolic blood pressure was higher in patients with microalbuminuria compared to those with normoalbuminuria (163.4±14.4 mmHg, versus 153.0±17.7 mmHg; p<0.01. Hydrogen sulfide level was higher in patients with normoalbuminuria (66.8±7.2 µmol. There was a moderate positive correlation between systolic blood pressure and microalbuminuria (r=0.3804; p<0.01 and a moderate negative correlation between hydrogen sulfide and microalbuminuria (r=0.3404; p<0.01. Conclusions. We revealed a decrease in hydrogen sulfide level to 57.4±7.9 µmol in patients with metabolic syndrome. This may be an early predictor of kidney damage.

  9. The metabolic syndrome in thyroid disease: A report from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonia O Ogbera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in people with thyroid disorders. Materials and Methods: 112 subjects with a history of thyroid disorders were consecutively enrolled for the study. Clinical data were obtained by interviewing the patients and referring to their case folders and prescriptions. The subjects were categorized into three: thyrotoxic, those with hypothyroidism and those with nontoxic goiters, based on clinical parameters and or thyroid function tests. The study subjects were weighed and their anthropometric indices were documented. The laboratory parameters that were analyzed included total cholesterol, high-density and low-density cholesterol and triglyceride. Statistical analysis was performed using Student′s t test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test and chi-square test. Results: The study subjects were aged between 14 and 76 years, with a mean age of 44.5 years, and the female:male ratio was 97:15. The mean age and anthropometric indices were comparable in subjects with thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and euthyroidism. The overall prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 28% and the frequency of occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism and nontoxic goiter was 24%, 40% and 42%, respectively. The commonest occurring metabolic syndrome defining criterion was dysglycemia, while hypertension and elevated triglyceride were the least documented of the criteria. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome occurs in 1 in every 4 persons with thyroid disorders, and as such, routine screening for this cardiovascular risk factor may be of benefit in this group of people, especially in those with hypothyroidism.

  10. Serum uric acid level as a determinant of the metabolic syndrome: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khichar, Satyendra; Choudhary, Shyama; Singh, Veer Bahadur; Tater, Priyanka; Arvinda, R V; Ujjawal, Vivek

    To determine whether elevations of uric acid levels are associated with the cluster of disorders described in metabolic syndrome and to evaluate whether hyperuricemia may be considered a component of this syndrome. One year case-control study was conducted in Bikaner, Rajasthan, India from January to December 2013. The study population consisted of 200 subjects, 100 with metabolic syndrome (case) and 100 without metabolic syndrome (control) aged between 18 and 80 years, attending OPD at PBM Hospital were studied. Controls were age and sex matched to the cases. Blood tests and all physical variables were examined using standard methods. Subjects were divided into 6 groups according to their possession of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 components of the metabolic syndrome. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA, linear regression analysis and multivariate linear regression model. Mean serum UA level was significantly associated with all components of metabolic syndrome (pmetabolic factors increased showing a highly significant trend (pmetabolic syndrome. The current multivariate regression analysis clearly infers that uric acid can be considered as a marker and potential modifier of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and periodontitis in Gullah African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sora, Nicoleta D; Marlow, Nicole M; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Leite, Renata S; Slate, Elizabeth H; Fernandes, Jyotika K

    2013-06-01

    To assess associations of metabolic syndrome, and its individual components, with extent of severe periodontitis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a secondary data analysis (N = 283) using a cross-sectional study population of Gullah African Americans with T2DM. Extent of severe periodontitis was assessed as total diseased tooth-sites/person [evaluated as separate outcomes: 6+mm clinical attachment level (CAL), 5+mm periodontal probing depth (PPD)] using negative binomial regression techniques. Primary independent variables assessed in separate models included metabolic syndrome (yes/no), each metabolic syndrome component (low HDL, hypertension, high triglycerides, large waist circumference) and glycemic control (poor/good). Multivariable CAL-model results showed a significant association for metabolic syndrome status with extent of severe periodontitis (RR = 2.77, p = 0.03). The separate multivariable CAL-model including each metabolic syndrome component showed marginally increased rates among those with large waist circumference (RR = 2.33, p = 0.09) and those with HbA1c ≥ 7% (RR = 1.73, p = 0.06). Multivariable PPD-models showed marginally increased rates among those with metabolic syndrome (RR = 2.18, p = 0.06). Metabolic syndrome is associated with the extent of severe periodontitis in this Gullah population with T2DM. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Kyung; Larson, Janet L

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been reported to be 20% to 50% in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because such people are sedentary and physically inactive, they are at risk of metabolic syndrome. The extent of this problem, however, is not fully understood. This study examined the relationship of sedentary time and physical activity to metabolic syndrome and the components of metabolic syndrome in a population-based sample of people with COPD. This was a secondary analysis of existing cross-sectional data. Subjects with COPD (n = 223) were drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set (2003-2006). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Waist circumference, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level were used to describe metabolic syndrome. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Fifty-five percent of the sample had metabolic syndrome. No significant differences in sedentary time and level of physical activity were found in people with COPD and metabolic syndrome and people with COPD only. However, those with a mean activity count of greater than 240 counts per minute had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference and glucose level were significantly associated with the time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in people with COPD, and greater physical activity and less sedentary time are associated with lower rates of metabolic syndrome. This suggests that interventions to decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in people with COPD should include both reducing sedentary time and increasing the time and intensity of physical activity.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in youth: current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Terry T-K; Ball, Geoff D C; Franks, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    The current paper reviews the important issues and challenges facing children and adolescents with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Studies suggest that the MetS and its risk components may be on the rise in children along with rising rates of obesity; however, further study remains warranted. The topics reviewed encompass the definition of the syndrome, its prevalence, clustering and tracking of metabolic risk factors, the role of physical activity and diet in the development of the MetS, criticisms and utility of the MetS definition, and special considerations needed in the pediatric population. Physical activity and diet may play important roles in the MetS; however, research with precise measurements of activity, diet, and metabolic outcomes is needed. The paper concludes by emphasizing that regardless of one's position in the ongoing debate about the MetS, the long-term risks attributable to each individual risk component are real. The abnormality of one component should automatically prompt the screening of other components. Among children and adolescents, lifestyle modification should always serve as the frontline strategy. Prevention during childhood is key to the largest possible impact on adult health at the population level.

  14. [Nutrition, metabolic syndrome and morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano Gil, M; Silvestre Teruel, V; Aguirregoicoa García, E; Criado Gómez, L; Duque López, Y; García-Blanch, G

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and specifically morbid obesity (MO), is a chronic disease with serious health consequences related to the associated comorbidities and constitutes a leading risk factor for the metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the present study we analyze the abnormalities related to MO in the plasmatic levels of nutrients (both macro and micronutrients). We retrospectively evaluated data of 497 patients, 369 women and 128 men diagnosed of MO. The average age of the patients was 40.07 (rank: 16-62). Previous to the study anthropometric measures, blood pressure (BP) and plasma levels of insulin and macronutrients and micronutrients were measured. The higher body mass index (BMI) in women and the waist circumference (WC) in both sexes demonstrates the existence of visceral obesity. Hypertensive disease (HD) was found in 18.6% of men and 33.5% of women. 55.1% of the men and 42.3% of the women had three or more criteria defining the risk of developing MetS. We found hyperglycemia, insulinemia and dyslipemia. We did not find protein malnutrition, but there were elevated values of reactive C-protein. Biochemical indicators of macro and micronutrients were not altered. The high incidence of patients with HD, carriers of three or more criteria that defines the metabolic syndrome (SM), suggests that a very significant part of our patients suffered the metabolic syndrome (MS). The term metabolic syndrome defines the group of factors of metabolic risk of CVD, which is confirmed by the elevated levels of reactive C-protein. We did not find abnormalities in the plasmatic levels of biochemical markers of nutrients.

  15. Angiotensin Receptor Blockers: Cardiovascular Protection in the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash C Deedwania

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognised that the metabolic syndrome, a constellation of risk factors including obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications and the development of Type 2 diabetes. Consequently, timely identification and management of all components of the metabolic syndrome is warranted. In particular, guidelines have emphasised the importance of targeting elevated blood pressure (BP and dyslipidaemia as a method of reducing global cardiovascular risk.Findings from the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE trial show that the angiotensin receptor blocker, valsartan, reduces cardiovascular events and the development of Type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. This profile is being further explored in the ongoing Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR trial.Given the potential advantages to patients and physicians of tackling more than one of the components of the metabolic syndrome, antihypertensive agents such as valsartan would appear to be an important addition to the management of vulnerable patients at high risk of cardiovascular events.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  17. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D'Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-31

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or "sick fat" formation.The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity.

  18. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Chinese psoriasis patients: A hospital-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xin-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Jin, Hong-Zhong; Zuo, Ya-Gang; Wu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis, a chronic autoimmune skin disorder, is believed to contribute to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. Psoriasis's association with the components of metabolic syndrome has been reported previously. However, large-scale cross-sectional studies about psoriasis and metabolic syndrome are rare in China. We assessed the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Chinese psoriasis patients and controls. A total of 859 psoriasis patients and 1,718 controls were recruited in an age- and sex-matched cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome occurred in 14.3% of the psoriasis patients as opposed to 10.0% of the control participants (P = 0.001). Psoriasis patients had a higher prevalence of overweight/obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia when compared with controls. Meanwhile, psoriasis patients with metabolic syndrome were older, and had an older age of onset and a longer disease duration when compared with those without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is higher in the Chinese psoriatic population, which can favor cardiovascular events. The present study strengthens the value of treating psoriasis patients not only dealing with the skin lesions, and we suggest appropriate screening and relevant health education be carried out in the treatment of psoriasis patients. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and periodontitis: is oxidative stress a common link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, P; Morillo, J M; Ramirez-Tortosa, M C; Quiles, J L; Newman, H N; Battino, M

    2009-06-01

    A review of pathological mechanisms that can explain the relationship between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is necessary to improve the management of both conditions. Metabolic syndrome is a combination of obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia. All these have been examined in recent years in terms of their relationship to periodontitis. Reviewed data indicate an association between some of them (body mass index, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides, high blood pressure, among others) and periodontitis. Oxidative stress may act as a potential common link to explain relationships between each component of metabolic syndrome and periodontitis. Both conditions show increased serum levels of products derived from oxidative damage, with a pro-inflammatory state likely influencing each other bidirectionally. Adipocytokines might modulate the oxidant/anti-oxidant balance in this relationship.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in first-time hospitalized patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, L; Vestergaard, C H; Lund, Hans

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies on metabolic syndrome (MetS) in younger patients with depression are few. We examined the prevalence and progression of MetS in first-time hospitalized patients with depression during 1 year of follow-up. Furthermore, we explored putative risk factors of MetS. METHOD: We...... increase in WC and triglycerides and a non-significant increase in the prevalence of MetS. Antipsychotic medication (OR 10.5, 95% CI 1.18-94.14) and low aerobic fitness (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68-0.93) were significantly correlated with MetS (P Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent...... evaluated MetS and its components in first-time hospitalized patients with depression (N = 52) and healthy controls (N = 50) (18-45 years). Physical activity, aerobic fitness, sleeping disturbances, smoking and dietary habits, and psychopharmacological treatment were recorded at baseline for all...

  1. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  2. Equine metabolic syndrome: Etiopathogenesis, diagnostics and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trailović Dragiša R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS is a term adopted in 2002 in aim to define the complex pathology involving obesity, insulin resistance and laminitis in horses and ponies. The EMS was terminologically derived upon similar condition in humans. The metabolic disturbance in equines is developed sequentially to the primary chronic overfeeding, i.e. intake of surplus food to individual needs combined with insufficient activity of animal. The syndrome has been reported more frequently in ponies than in other breeds although genetic background of EMS has not been confirmed. The characteristic symptoms include regional collection of adipose tissue under the skin often distributed regionally i.e. in crest (neck from pool to withers, behind the shoulders, at the dock of the tail and in prepuce in males or in the udder in mares; as well as impaired locomotion and/or lameness in all four limbs and cycling disturbance in mares.

  3. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Oh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, a person with a body mass index (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a person with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 is classified as severely obese. Central obesity is defined as a waist circumference ≥90 cm for Korean men and ≥85 cm for Korean women. Recent epidemiologic data show that the prevalence of severe obesity and metabolic syndrome is steadily increasing. These epidemics increased morbidity and mortality of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, and other cancers in Korea. Decreased physical activity, increased fat and alcohol consumption, heavy smoking, and stress/depressed mood are the primary modifiable life-style risk factors for Koreans. Recently, public health interventions to encourage life-style changes have shown promising results in reducing the prevalence of severe obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Ana-Mari; Mătăsaru, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MS) in children and adolescents. Investigation conducted in the interval October 2010 - June 2011 in 3103 school children aged 7-18 years. After body weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure were measured, 262 school children were found to be obese, of which 120 agreed to testing for defining the metabolic syndrome: triglycerides (TG), cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, blood glucose, insulinemia, OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test), SGOT, SGPT, urea, creatinine, and ESR. Using IDF 2009 modified criteria, the prevalence of MS in the study series was 55.8%. The most common criteria for defining MS were: TG > or = 95th percentile, BP > or = 95th percentile, and blood glucose > or = 100mg/dl. Applying IDF 2009 criteria, 55.8% of the obese subjects presented 3-5 criteria, thus meeting the diagnostic criteria for MS in children.

  5. AMPK, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Neil B; Carling, David; Prentki, Marc; Cacicedo, José M

    2013-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, as are central adiposity, dyslipidemia, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers. Regular exercise and calorie restriction have long been known to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease the prevalence of these disorders. The subsequent identification of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its activation by exercise and fuel deprivation have led to studies of the effects of AMPK on both IR and metabolic syndrome-related diseases. In this review, we evaluate this body of literature, with special emphasis on the hypothesis that dysregulation of AMPK is both a pathogenic factor for these disorders in humans and a target for their prevention and therapy.

  6. Prevalence of Hypertension within the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Grünfeldová, H.; Peleška, Jan; Hanuš, P.; Marušiaková, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30 (2007), s. 371-372 ISSN 1420-4096. [Central European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. 11.10.2007-13.10.2007, Kraków] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  7. Presence of metabolic syndrome in football linemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Jackie L; Calland, Doug; Hanks, Fiona; Johnston, Bruce; Pester, Benjamin; Sweeney, Robert; Thorne, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of symptoms associated with abdominal obesity that demonstrates a high risk for cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. To evaluate football linemen in National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III schools for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria as well as to document other related biomarkers. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Three university locations on the first full day of football camp in early morning. Of 76 football linemen, 70 were able to provide blood samples. Height, mass, blood pressure, upper-body skinfolds, and waist circumference were measured at various stations. Two small venous samples of blood were collected and analyzed in a hospital laboratory for fasting insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and glycosylated hemoglobin. The last station was a verbal family history for cardiovascular disease and diabetes; also, athletes filled out a nutrition attitudes questionnaire. Of the 70 athletes, 34 were identified as having metabolic syndrome according to measures of blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. The mean total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio for the group was 4.95, with 32 participants displaying values higher than 5.0. Twelve volunteers had total cholesterol levels greater than 200 mmol/L, 15 had high levels of C-reactive protein, and 9 had slightly elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin. Although athletes might be assumed to be protected from risks of cardiovascular disease, we found a high incidence of metabolic syndrome and other associated adverse biomarkers for heart disease in collegiate football linemen. Early screening, awareness, and intervention may have favorable effects on the overall health outcomes of football linemen.

  8. AMPK, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ruderman, Neil B.; Carling, David; Prentki, Marc; Cacicedo, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, as are central adiposity, dyslipidemia, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers. Regular exercise and calorie restriction have long been known to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease the prevalence of these disorders. The subsequent identification of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its activation by exercise and fuel depr...

  9. The Global Epidemic of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklayen, Mohammad G

    2018-02-26

    Metabolic syndrome, variously known also as syndrome X, insulin resistance, etc., is defined by WHO as a pathologic condition characterized by abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Though there is some variation in the definition by other health care organization, the differences are minor. With the successful conquest of communicable infectious diseases in most of the world, this new non-communicable disease (NCD) has become the major health hazard of modern world. Though it started in the Western world, with the spread of the Western lifestyle across the globe, it has become now a truly global problem. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is often more in the urban population of some developing countries than in its Western counterparts. The two basic forces spreading this malady are the increase in consumption of high calorie-low fiber fast food and the decrease in physical activity due to mechanized transportations and sedentary form of leisure time activities. The syndrome feeds into the spread of the diseases like type 2 diabetes, coronary diseases, stroke, and other disabilities. The total cost of the malady including the cost of health care and loss of potential economic activity is in trillions. The present trend is not sustainable unless a magic cure is found (unlikely) or concerted global/governmental/societal efforts are made to change the lifestyle that is promoting it. There are certainly some elements in the causation of the metabolic syndrome that cannot be changed but many are amenable for corrections and curtailments. For example, better urban planning to encourage active lifestyle, subsidizing consumption of whole grains and possible taxing high calorie snacks, restricting media advertisement of unhealthy food, etc. Revitalizing old fashion healthier lifestyle, promoting old-fashioned foods using healthy herbs rather than oil and sugar, and educating people about choosing healthy/wholesome food over junks

  10. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Paoletti; Chiara Bolego; Andrea Poli; Andrea Cignarella

    2006-01-01

    Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI), Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also...

  11. Impact of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome and their different combinations on the prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease in type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes in Germany (DIG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benke Inge

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major controversies surrounding the metabolic syndrome (MetS in type 2 diabetes is whether its single components act synergistically as risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD. We aimed to answer this by evaluating the relationship, and its various combinations to AVD in comparison to single traits in a population-based study with type 2 diabetes in Germany. Methods and results 4020 unselected patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 – 80 years. MetS was: diabetes plus ≥ 2 traits of the MetS by AHA/NHBLI definition. AVD was: history of myocardial infarction and/or coronary revascularization and/or stroke. The occurrence of AVD in relation to overall MetS/single traits/combinations was presented as OR (95% CI. Multiple logistic regression, including established cardiovascular risk factors, modeled their associations. The prevalence of overall MetS was 74.4% and the OR for AVD was 1.41 (1.12–1.78, which however was higher for hypertension as single trait (OR 4.76. Different combinations of MetS presented a wide range of ORs (0.47 to 10.90 and strong sex differences. Some clusters of MetS including hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol presented a higher risk factor than single traits or their sum, whereas the others out of 11 possible carried no increased AVD risk. Multiple logistic regression showed independent association between AVD and overall MetS. Conclusion The overall MetS in type 2 diabetes comprises 11 heterogenous clusters of traits. Overall MetS increases the risk of AVD in type 2 diabetes and individual traits in some clusters with hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol may act synergistically as risk factors particularly in women.

  12. Remission of screen-detected metabolic syndrome and its determinants: an observational study

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    den Engelsen Corine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection and treatment of the metabolic syndrome may prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our aim was to assess remission of the metabolic syndrome and its determinants after a population based screening without predefined intervention in the Netherlands. Methods In 2006 we detected 406 metabolic syndrome cases (The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III definition among apparently healthy individuals with an increased waist circumference. They received usual care in a primary care setting. After three years metabolic syndrome status was re-measured. We evaluated which baseline determinants were independently associated with remission. Results The remission rate among the 194 participants was 53%. Baseline determinants independently associated with a remission were the presence of more than three metabolic syndrome components (OR 0.46 and higher levels of waist circumference (OR 0.91, blood pressure (OR 0.98 and fasting glucose (OR 0.60. Conclusions In a population with screen-detected metabolic syndrome receiving usual care, more than half of the participants achieved a remission after three years. This positive result after a relatively simple strategy provides a solid basis for a nation-wide implementation. Not so much socio-demographic variables but a higher number and level of the metabolic syndrome components were predictors of a lower chance of remission. In such cases, primary care physicians should be extra alert.

  13. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Berry Fruit Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome

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    Stefano Vendrame

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which often includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, as well as a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-thrombotic environment. This leads to a dramatically increased risk of developing type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death both in the United States and worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that berry fruit consumption has a significant potential in the prevention and treatment of most risk factors associated with Metabolic Syndrome and its cardiovascular complications in the human population. This is likely due to the presence of polyphenols with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, such as anthocyanins and/or phenolic acids. The present review summarizes the findings of recent dietary interventions with berry fruits on human subjects with or at risk of Metabolic Syndrome. It also discusses the potential role of berries as part of a dietary strategy which could greatly reduce the need for pharmacotherapy, associated with potentially deleterious side effects and constituting a considerable financial burden.

  15. Nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita de Carvalho, Cláudia; Dias Mendonça, Dayana; Haas Piovesan, Carla; Edler Macagnan, Fabrício; Pandolfo Feoli, Ana Maria

    2014-11-16

    The nutritional approach in the treatment of metabolic syndrome is a fundamental factor. It is important to raise awareness to patients about the benefits of following the treatments when you want to promote changes in lifestyle. The aim of this study was to assess nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome according to the dietary recommendations prescribed. Quasi-experimental research with 72 subjects with metabolic syndrome, held in southern Brazil. A nutritional orientation was conducted, related or not with physical exercise for three months. A 24-hour recall and two-day food record, were the reference method of dietary intake assessment. Nutritional adequacy was determined by the energy and nutrient intakes as defined by the Brazilian Food Guide Pyramid groups. Volunteers reached on average 80% of the energy consumption recommended. Protein and lipid intake was higher, and carbohydrate consumption was lower than recommended levels. There was a low intake of cereals, vegetables, dairy product and beans (pnutritional adequacy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN ADULTS WITH THE METABOLIC SYNDROME IN BENIN CITY: PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oghenekaro Egbi

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, CKD is prevalent in patients with the metabolic syndrome and may be due to a synergistic effect of the various components of the syndrome. Diastolic blood pressure and obesity may predict CKD in MetS patients. Albuminuria may also be prevalent in MetS patients; increasing with increasing number of MetS traits.

  17. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  18. Natural AMPK Activators: An Alternative Approach for the Treatment and Management of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hitender; Kumar, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    This review covers recent discoveries of phytoconstituents, herbal extracts and some semi-synthetic compounds for treating metabolic syndrome with AMPK activation as one of their mechanisms of action. Recent researches have demonstrated AMPK activation to ameliorate multiple components of metabolic syndrome by regulating a balance between anabolic and catabolic cellular reactions. The review attempts to delineate the AMPK activation by natural agents from the perspective of its functional consequences on enzymes, transcription factors and signaling molecules and also on other potential factors contributing in the amelioration of metabolic syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Relation between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in subjects with cardiometabolic risk

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Hellen Abreu da; Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify possible relations between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and its components in a population with cardiometabolic risk. Methods This cross-sectional study included 80 subjects (46 women), with mean age of 48±16 years, seen at the Cardiovascular Health Program. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome was 6.3% and 47.1%, respectively. Uric acid level was significantly higher in individuals with metabolic syndrome (5.1±1.6mg/dL), a...

  20. Targeted High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics differentiates metabolic syndrome from obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fanyi; Xu, Mengyang; Bruno, Richard S; Ballard, Kevin D; Zhu, Jiangjiang

    2017-04-01

    Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome are risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Identification of novel biomarkers are needed to distinguish metabolic syndrome from equally obese individuals in order to direct them to early interventions that reduce their risk of developing further health problems. We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to evaluate the associations between metabolite profiles and established metabolic syndrome criteria (i.e. elevated waist circumference, hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in plasma samples from obese men ( n = 29; BMI = 35.5 ± 5.2 kg/m 2 ) and women ( n = 40; 34.9 ± 6.7 kg/m 2 ), of which 26 met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (17 men and 9 women). Compared to obese individuals without metabolic syndrome, univariate statistical analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis showed that a specific group of metabolites from multiple metabolic pathways (i.e. purine metabolism, valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation, and tryptophan metabolism) were associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Receiver operating characteristic curves generated based on the PLS-DA models showed excellent areas under the curve (0.85 and 0.96, for metabolites only model and enhanced metabolites model, respectively), high specificities (0.86 and 0.93), and good sensitivities (0.71 and 0.91). Moreover, principal component analysis revealed that metabolic profiles can be used to further differentiate metabolic syndrome with 3 versus 4-5 metabolic syndrome criteria. Collectively, these findings support targeted metabolomics approaches to distinguish metabolic syndrome from obesity alone, and to stratify metabolic syndrome status based on the number of criteria met. Impact statement We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to

  1. [Plasma testosterone, obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Gaëtan; Eas, Florence; Kuhn, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    The frequency of diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome rises concurrently with that of body mass index (BMI). In adult men, plasma testosterone level changes evolve inversely to that of BMI. Plasma total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and free testosterone are significantly lower in adult men with a clinical and biological pattern of metabolic syndrome (MetS) than in those without such a pattern. After adjustment for confounding factors, diabetes type 2 (DT2) remains associated with a significant decrease of plasma testosterone level. The androgenic blockade, used as a treatment for disseminated prostate cancer, induces a metabolic pattern similar to MetS. In men older than 65 years, a decrease of plasma testosterone level is associated with an increased risk of stroke or of death linked to a cardiovascular event. After exclusion of contraindications, the substitution with androgens of a demonstrated hypogonadism in a obese patient, notably when obesity is associated with a pattern of MetS and/or a DT2, could have some metabolic and cardiovascular advantages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Andrographolide, a New Hope in the Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Muhammad T. Islam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of plant-derived medicines is increasing interest in the prevention and treatment of a variety of disorders including metabolic syndromes. Metabolic syndrome is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and incidence of mortality worldwide. Scientific evidence suggests that Andrographis paniculata and its derived components, especially andrographolide (AGL and its analogs/derivatives have a broad spectrum of biological activities. This review aims to sketch the activity of AGL and its analogs/derivatives against the components of metabolic syndromes such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Additionally, AGL activity against CVDs is also summarized. The finding suggests that AGL and its analogs/derivatives have a potential role in the management of metabolic syndrome; however, more studies should be conducted to evaluate their effectiveness.

  3. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    A number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, and elevated blood pressure are collectively known as metabolic syndrome (MS). Since mitochondrial activity is modulated by the availability of energy in cells, the disruption of key regulators of metabolism in MS not only affects the activity of mitochondria but also their dynamics and turnover. Therefore, a link of MS with mitochondrial dysfunction has been suspected since long. As a chronobiotic/cytoprotective agent, melatonin has a special place in prevention and treatment of MS. Melatonin levels are reduced in diseases associated with insulin resistance like MS. Melatonin improves sleep efficiency and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, partly for its role as a metabolic regulator and mitochondrial protector. We discuss in the present review the several cytoprotective melatonin actions that attenuate inflammatory responses in MS. The clinical data that support the potential therapeutical value of melatonin in human MS are reviewed.

  4. Relationship between rectus abdominis muscle thickness and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Sil; Cho, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jung-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has been suggested as an important factor in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. During the aging process, muscle mass is lost in specific body parts. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between site-specific muscle loss assessed using computed tomography (CT) and metabolic syndrome. This study was conducted to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and rectus abdominis muscle thickness at the umbilicus level (RAM), which reflects site-specific muscle loss of the abdomen using CT image. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 725 middle-aged Korean men. Anthropometric evaluation and biochemical tests were performed. The RAMs of the subjects were measured from CT images taken at the umbilicus level. The mean RAM (mean ±SD) of subjects with metabolic syndrome was 2.46 ±0.01, which was thinner than that of subjects without metabolic syndrome (2.52 ±0.01, pmetabolic syndrome components increased (p-value for trendcreatinine (r = 0.12, pmetabolic syndrome (OR: 0.861, 95%CI, 0.779-0.951, pmetabolic syndrome in middle-aged men. Moreover, site-specific muscle loss at the abdomen, as evaluated by RAM, also may be a predictor of metabolic syndrome like SMI.

  5. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among employees in Northeast China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X; Yang, Fang; Bots, Michiel L.; Guo, Wei Ying; Zhao, Bing; Hoes, Arno W.; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of metabolic abnormalities and has been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among employees in Northeast China. Methods:

  6. A role for metabolism in Rett syndrome pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Monica J; Buchovecky, Christie M; Kyle, Stephanie M; Djukic, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurological disorder caused by mutations in MECP2, may have a metabolic component. We reported a genetic suppressor screen in a Mecp2-null mouse model to identify pathways for therapeutic improvement of RTT symptoms. Of note, one suppressor mutation implied that cholesterol homeostasis was perturbed in Mecp2 null mice; indeed, cholesterol synthesis was elevated in the brain and body system. Remarkably, the genetic effect of downregulating the cholesterol pathway could be mimicked chemically by statin drugs, improving motor symptoms, and increasing longevity in the mouse. Our work linked cholesterol metabolism to RTT pathology for the first time. Both neurological and systemic effects of perturbed cholesterol homeostasis overlap with many RTT symptoms. Here we show in patients that peripheral cholesterol, triglycerides, and/or LDLs may be elevated early in RTT disease onset, providing a biomarker for patients that could be aided by therapeutic interventions that modulate lipid metabolism. PMID:25003017

  7. Combined Association of Serum Uric Acid and Metabolic Syndrome with Chronic Kidney Disease in Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haijiang; Lu, Shijuan; Tang, Xiaohong; Lu, Minggen; Chen, Ruifang; Chen, Zhiheng; Yang, Pingting; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Honghao; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the major complications of hypertension. It is not only associated with the future burden of end-stage renal disease but also affects mortality and cardiovascular outcomes caused by hypertension. To help understand the pathogenesis and early prevention of progressive CKD, this large-scale study is designed to determine the complex association between serum uric acid (SUA), metabolic syndrome and the prevalence of CKD in hypertensive patients. A total of 19,848 hypertensive subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Patients with proteinuria and/or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of metabolic syndrome, as well as higher levels of SUA, BMI, waist circumference (WC), SBP, DBP, TG, fasting blood glucose and lower levels of HDL-C. Compared to patients without CKD, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [ORs, 95% confidence interval (CI)] for CKD patients were 2.30 (2.02-2.63) for hyperuricemia, 1.21 (1.04-1.41) for abdominal obesity, 1.21 (1.06-1.38) for elevated TG, 1.29 (1.06-1.56) for low HDL-C, 1.54 (1.36-1.75) for elevated fasting glucose, and 1.49 (1.30-1.71) for metabolic syndrome. Increasing SUA levels and number of individual metabolic syndrome components were associated with an increased prevalence of CKD. Compared with patients classified in the lowest SUA categories and with ≤1 metabolic syndrome components, subjects with HUA and 4 metabolic syndrome components had a 5.77-fold increased OR for CKD based on the multivariate-adjusted analysis. Both elevated SUA and metabolic syndrome are associated with an increased prevalence of CKD in hypertensive subjects. Subjects with higher SUA and sum of individual metabolic syndrome components simultaneously have a higher prevalence of CKD. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaia D. Raikou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Methods: 149 patients (77 males/72 females were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results: The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x2 = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x2 = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6–17.8 higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2–8.8 higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1–11.3. Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x2 = 11.8, p = 0.003, x2 = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x2 = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively, and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x2 = 5.7, p = 0.06. A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x2 = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x2 = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively was found. Conclusion: The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Poor breakfast habits in adolescence predict the metabolic syndrome in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Per E; Wennberg, Patrik; Hammarström, Anne

    2015-01-01

    To analyse whether poor breakfast habits in adolescence predict the metabolic syndrome and its components in adulthood. Previous studies suggest that regular breakfast consumption improves metabolic parameters. Prospective. Breakfast habits and other lifestyle variables at age 16 years were assessed from questionnaires. Poor breakfast habits were defined as skipping breakfast or only drinking or eating something sweet. At age 43 years, the effective sample consisted of 889 participants defined as having the metabolic syndrome or not, using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals. The Northern Swedish Cohort, a longitudinal population-based cohort with 27-year follow-up. Adolescents (age 16 years). Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at age 43 years was 27·0 %. Of the participants, 9·9 % were classified with poor breakfast habits at age 16 years. Adjusted odds for the metabolic syndrome at age 43 years was OR = 1·68 (95 % CI 1·01, 2·78) for those with poor breakfast habits at age 16 years compared with breakfast eaters. Looking at the metabolic syndrome components, poor breakfast habits at age 16 years were associated with central obesity (OR = 1·71; 95 % CI 1·00, 2·92) and high fasting glucose (OR = 1·75; 95 % CI 1·01, 3·02) at age 43 years, even after multivariate adjustments. Poor breakfast habits in adolescence predicted the metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Of the metabolic syndrome components, poor breakfast habits in adolescence predicted central obesity and high fasting glucose in adulthood. Further research is needed to fully understand the relationship between early breakfast habits and adult metabolic syndrome.

  10. Membrane lipid alterations in the metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, Javier S

    2017-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of pathological conditions, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and low HDL levels that is of great concern worldwide, as individuals with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance, the key feature of the metabolic syndrome, might be at the same time cause and consequence of impaired lipid composition in plasma membranes of insulin-sensitive tissues like liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Diet intervention has been proposed as a powerful tool to prevent the development of the metabolic syndrome, since healthy diets have been shown to have a protective role against the components of the metabolic syndrome. Particularly, dietary fatty acids are capable of modulating the deleterious effects of these conditions, among other mechanisms, by modifications of the lipid composition of the membranes in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, there is still scarce data based of high-level evidence on the effects of dietary oils on the effects of the metabolic syndrome and its components. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of dietary oils on improving alterations of the components of the metabolic syndrome. It also examines their influence in the modulation of plasma membrane lipid composition and in the functionality of membrane proteins involved in insulin activity, like the insulin receptor, GLUT-4, CD36/FAT and ABCA-1, and their effect in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol, and, in turn, the key features of the metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among older adults in Ecuador: Results of the SABE survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orces, Carlos H; Gavilanez, Enrique Lopez

    2017-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among older adults in Ecuador. A secondary objective was to examine the relationship between metabolic syndrome and its components and insulin resistance among non-diabetic participants. The National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging survey was used to examine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to demographic, behavioral, and health characteristics of the participants. Logistic regression models adjusted for covariates were used to examine the independent association of metabolic syndrome and its components and insulin resistance in non-diabetic older adults. Of 2298 participants with a mean age of 71.6 (SD 8.1) years, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 66.0% (95% CI, 62.6%, 69.3%) in women and 47.1% (95% CI, 43.2%, 50.9) in men. However, even higher prevalence rates were seen among literate individuals, residents from urban areas of the coastal and Andes Mountains region, obese subjects, those diagnosed with diabetes, and participants with≥2 comorbidities. Overall, abdominal obesity followed by elevated blood pressure were the metabolic syndrome components more prevalent and associated with insulin resistance among older Ecuadorians. Moreover, after adjustment for covariates, older adults defined as having metabolic syndrome had a 3-fold higher odds of having insulin resistance as compared with those without. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is high among older adults in Ecuador. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement programs of lifestyle and behavioral modification targeting older adults at increased risk for this cardio metabolic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic syndrome across Europe: different clusters of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuteri, Angelo; Laurent, Stephane; Cucca, Francesco; Cockcroft, John; Cunha, Pedro Guimaraes; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mattace Raso, Francesco U; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Ryliškytė, Ligita; Rietzschel, Ernst; Strait, James; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Völzke, Henry; Lakatta, Edward G; Nilsson, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains a controversial entity. Specific clusters of MetS components - rather than MetS per se - are associated with accelerated arterial ageing and with cardiovascular (CV) events. To investigate whether the distribution of clusters of MetS components differed cross-culturally, we studied 34,821 subjects from 12 cohorts from 10 European countries and one cohort from the USA in the MARE (Metabolic syndrome and Arteries REsearch) Consortium. In accordance with the ATP III criteria, MetS was defined as an alteration three or more of the following five components: elevated glucose (G), fasting glucose ≥110 mg/dl; low HDL cholesterol, 102 cm for men or >88 cm for women. MetS had a 24.3% prevalence (8468 subjects: 23.9% in men vs. 24.6% in women, p definition of MetS is not a unique entity rather a constellation of cluster of MetS components, likely selectively risky for CV disease, whose occurrence differs across countries. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Effects of 6-month aerobic interval training on skeletal muscle metabolism in middle-aged metabolic syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guadalupe-Grau, A; Fernández-Elías, V E; Ortega, J F

    2018-01-01

    ). The remaining components of cardio-metabolic health measured (body weight, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose) were not changed after the intervention, and likewise, insulin sensitivity (CSi) remained unchanged. Total AMPK (23.4%), GLUT4 (20.5%), endothelial lipase (33.3%) protein expression......Aerobic interval training (AIT) improves the health of metabolic syndrome patients (MetS) more than moderate intensity continuous training. However, AIT has not been shown to reverse all metabolic syndrome risk factors, possibly due to the limited duration of the training programs. Thus, we...... assessed the effects of 6 months of AIT on cardio-metabolic health and muscle metabolism in middle-aged MetS. Eleven MetS (54.5±0.7 years old) underwent 6 months of 3 days a week supervised AIT program on a cycle ergometer. Cardio-metabolic health was assessed, and muscle biopsies were collected from...

  14. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and decreased excretion of uric acid causing endothelial dysfunction in kidney leads to renal disease and cardiovascular disorders. This review focus on the role of uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome and onthe possible pathophysiology. PMID:26064845

  15. The relationship of alanine aminotransferase to metabolic syndrome in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Hoon; Cho, Doo Yeoun; Joo, Nam Seok; Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Kyu Nam

    2018-01-01

    Although associations between serum alanine aminotransferase and metabolic syndrome are well-recognized in Western countries, only a limited number of prospective studies have been performed in Asian populations. The aim of the study was to cross-sectionally and longitudinally examine whether serum alanine aminotransferase levels are associated with metabolic syndrome and its associated components in a Korean population. A total of 31,832 subjects who received health screenings were included in cross-sectional analyses; a subgroup of 4.070 subjects without metabolic syndrome at baseline was included in the longitudinal analyses. The metabolic syndrome definition was based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel criteria with modification on waist circumference cut-off to be more appropriate for an Asian population. In the cross-sectional analyses, serum alanine aminotransferase is positively associated with metabolic syndrome and its components. In the longitudinal analyses, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased across serum alanine aminotransferase quartiles in a dose-dependent manner after extensive adjustments (hazard ratios were 1.000, 1.609, 2.601, and 3.015 for quartiles, 1 through quartile 4; P for trendmetabolic syndrome and elevated serum alanine aminotransferase in a Korean population.

  16. Association between habitual coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, B; Ahola, A J; Harjutsalo, V; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H

    2018-02-01

    In the general population, habitual coffee consumption is inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome, a syndrome that is rather common also in patients with type 1 diabetes. However, whether coffee intake is beneficially related to the metabolic syndrome also in type 1 diabetes, is not known. We, therefore, studied the potential association between coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome in a large population of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, we investigated whether coffee consumption is associated with insulin resistance (estimated glucose disposal rate, eGDR), kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR), and low-grade chronic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP). Data from 1040 participants in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Metabolic syndrome was assumed if at least 3 of the following cardiovascular risk factors were present: central obesity, high blood pressure, low HDL-cholesterol concentration, high triglyceride concentration, and hyperglycaemia. Subjects were categorized based on self-reported daily coffee intake: non-consumers (metabolic syndrome. Moreover, any level of coffee consumption was associated with increased risk of the blood pressure-component. An increasing trend was observed in the eGFR with increasing coffee consumption. In type 1 diabetes, high coffee intake is associated with the metabolic syndrome, and especially its blood pressure-component. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    syndrome after liver transplantation. METHODS: The databases Medline and Scopus were searched for observational studies evaluating prevalence and risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. Meta-analyses were performed based on odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable analyses...

  18. Relationship of tooth brushing to metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Kenji; Furuta, Michiko; Takeshita, Toru; Suma, Shino; Shinagawa, Takashi; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2018-02-08

    To examine the effect of tooth brushing on the development of metabolic syndrome, including assessment of periodontal status, in middle-aged adults. This 5-year follow-up retrospective study was performed in 3722 participants (2897 males and 825 females) aged 35-64 years who underwent both medical check-ups and dental examinations. Metabolic components included obesity, elevated triglycerides, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and reduced high-density lipoprotein. Tooth brushing frequency was assessed using a questionnaire. Periodontal disease was defined as having at least one site with a pocket depth of ≥4 mm. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between tooth brushing frequency at the baseline examination and the development of metabolic syndrome (≥3 components). During follow-up, 11.1% of participants developed metabolic syndrome. After adjusting for potential confounders including periodontal disease, participants with more frequent daily tooth brushing tended to have significantly lower odds of developing metabolic syndrome (P for trend = 0.01). The risk of development of metabolic syndrome was significantly lower in participants brushing teeth ≥3 times/day than in those brushing teeth ≤1 time/day (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.45-0.92). Frequent daily tooth brushing was associated with lower risk of development of metabolic syndrome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic syndrome among rural Indian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Anamitra; Das, Kausik; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Rai, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    To prevent an increasing level of mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease among the rural Indian population, a management strategy of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) should be devised. This study aims to estimate the burden of MetS and its associated risk factors. Data from the Birbhum Population Project covering 9886 individuals (4810 male and 5076 female population) aged ≥18 years were used. The burden of metabolic syndrome, as defined by the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel, was determined. Bivariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses were used to attain the study objective. Over 10.7% of the males and 20.3% of the females were diagnosed with MetS. Irrespective of sex, older individuals, being overweight/obese (body mass index of ≥23 kg/m 2 ) had higher probability of developing MetS, whereas being underweight is deemed a protective factor against MetS. Low physical activity among women appeared to be a risk factor for MetS. The prevalence of MetS is concerning even in rural India. Any intervention designed to address the issue could emphasize on weight loss, and physical activity, focusing on women and people at an advanced stage of life. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Connexins, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Romain; Allagnat, Florent; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Diabetes and the related metabolic syndrome are multi system disorders that result from improper interactions between various cell types. Even though the underlying mechanism remains to be fully understood, it is most likely that both the long and the short distance range cell interactions, which normally ensure the physiologic functioning of the pancreas, and its relationships with the insulin-targeted organs, are altered. This review focuses on the short-range type of interactions that depend on the contact between adjacent cells and, specifically, on the interactions that are dependent on connexins. The widespread distribution of these membrane proteins, their multiple modes of action, and their interactions with conditions/molecules associated to both the pathogenesis and the treatment of the 2 main forms of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, make connexins an essential part of the chain of events that leads to metabolic diseases. Here, we review the present state of knowledge about the molecular and cell biology of the connexin genes and proteins, their general mechanisms of action, the roles specific connexin species play in the endocrine pancreas and the major insulin-targeted organs, under physiological and patho-physiological conditions.