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Sample records for metabolic risk factors

  1. Psychosocial risk factors for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Lund, Rikke; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Metabolic deregulations and development of metabolic syndrome may be an important pathway underlying the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We aim to estimate the effect of a comprehensive range of psychosocial factors on the risk of developing metabolic...... syndrome in men and women. Methods: The study population consisted of 3621 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline and reexamined after 10 years. The data was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, income.......11) to be risk factors for developing the metabolic syndrome in women, while vital exhaustion (OR 2.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 4.59) and intake of sleep medications (OR 2.54, 95% CI 0.92 to 5.96) may play a more important role in men. Conclusions: Experiencing major life events in work and adult life and...

  2. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    syndrome after liver transplantation. METHODS: The databases Medline and Scopus were searched for observational studies evaluating prevalence and risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. Meta-analyses were performed based on odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable analyses...

  3. Vascular risk factors and adipocyte dysfunction in metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajer, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    The cluster of vascular risk factors closely associated with obesity, consists of fasting and postprandial dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, also known as metabolic syndrome, is associated with an increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition, adipose tissue in

  4. Omentin as a novel biomarker of metabolic risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Rei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omentin is an adipocytokine that is abundantly expressed in visceral fat tissue. We investigated the association of omentin with the number of metabolic risk factors. Finding The study population comprised 201 Japanese men who underwent annual health checkups. Plasma omentin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We divided the subjects into 4 groups according to omentin levels. A reduction of plasma omentin levels significantly correlated with an increase in the mean number of metabolic risk factors such as increased waist circumference, dyslipidemia, high blood pressure and glucose intolerance. Conclusions Circulating omentin levels negatively correlated with the multiplicity of metabolic risk factors, suggesting that omentin acts as a biomarker of metabolic disorders.

  5. Metabolic risk factors in depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reedt Dortland, Arianne Klaartje Beraldine van

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to clarify which aspects of depression and anxiety are related to an increased metabolic risk, and which factors contribute to these associations. Taken together, our findings indicate that people with more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety are at particular risk

  6. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  7. Work stress and metabolic and hemostatic risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijkotte, T. G.; van Doornen, L. J.; de Geus, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A high level of work stress has been associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. This study examined the effect of work stress on a cluster of metabolic and hemostatic risk factors. Blood was collected three times, on

  8. Incidence and Major Metabolic Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study involved 300 (92 males and 208 females) type 2 diabetic patients and was conducted at the Tamale Teaching/Regional Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Programme, Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) criteria. The incidence of the ...

  9. Does weight cycling promote obesity and metabolic risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Grace M; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Tam, Charmaine S

    There remains common belief in the general community that weight cycling or 'yo-yo dieting' is associated with potential adverse effects on obesity and metabolic risk factors. In 1994, a review by the National Task Force on the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity concluded that weight cycling did not impact metabolism, and that weight loss attempts should not be discouraged. This study is an updated review of the literature published since 1994, to determine if weight cycling is associated with metabolic risk factors for obesity and type 2 diabetes. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, ISI Web of Science and SCOPUS to identify primary studies that examined weight cycling in relation to obesity and metabolic risk factors. Thirty-one studies with human subjects were retained. Fifty-eight percent (11/19) of publications reported that a history of weight cycling was correlated with increased body fat and central adiposity. Another fifty percent (4/8) of studies reported that the presence of weight cycling increased the likelihood of future weight gain, suggesting that weight cycling is potentially problematic for individuals attempting to lose weight. The majority of studies (13/17; 76%) did not show a detrimental effect of weight cycling on risk of type 2 diabetes. There is some evidence showing that weight cycling has no effect on risk of type 2 diabetes and inconclusive evidence that a history or presence of weight cycling influences body composition, or predisposes to future obesity. The available evidence so far suggests that there is little detrimental effect of weight cycling on current and future obesity and metabolic risk, and therefore weight loss efforts in individuals with overweight/obesity should continue to be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Personality as a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommersteeg, Paula M C; Pouwer, Francois

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Personality can be defined as a stable set of behavioral characteristics of a person. In this review we systematically reviewed whether different personality...... characteristics are associated with the risk of having or developing the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Systematic review. RESULTS: In total 18 studies were included. Thirteen cross-sectional analyses, and ten longitudinal analyses were grouped according to personality constructs: hostility, anger, and Type...... A behavior, temperament, neuroticism, and Type D personality. Conflicting evidence was reported on persons with high hostility, neuroticism, or Type D personality scores to be associated with an increased metabolic syndrome prevalence and development. All significant findings do point in the same direction...

  11. Dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome risk factors among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojee Joung

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Unbalanced diets and decreased physical activity have contributed to increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adolescents. We have performed a systematic review and data analysis to examine the association between dietary pattern and metabolic syndrome risk factors in adolescents. Methods: We searched the PubMed and BioMedLib databases for appropriate articles published during the past 10 years and selected 6 articles. The studies reviewed applied factor analysis or cluster analysis to extract dietary patterns. For data analysis, we examined the association between dietary patterns and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome risk factors using data of 3,168 adolescents (13 to 18 years obtained from 4 consecutive Korean Nutrition Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1998, 2001, 2005, and 2007 to 2009. Results: Our systematic review confirmed that western dietary patterns are positively associated with metabolic syndrome risk factors such as obesity and elevated triglycerides, while traditional dietary patterns were negatively associated. Data analysis found that the number of adolescents aged 16 to 18 years who had “Rice & Kimchi” dietary pattern decreased, while the number having western dietary patterns increased during the 1998 to 2009 time frame. There were no changes in the dietary patterns in adolescents aged 13 to 15 years. The risk of elevated serum triglycerides and reduced serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was high in the “Rice & Kimchi” dietary pattern compared to the other dietary pattern groups.Conclusion: Because adolescents’ dietary patterns are changing continuously and have long-term effects, further studies on the dietary patterns of adolescents and their health effects into adulthood are necessary.

  12. Metabolic risk-factor clustering estimation in children: to draw a line across pediatric metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, P; Lissau, I; Flodmark, C-E

    2007-01-01

    derived from a child's family and personal history; the lack of consensus on insulin levels, lipid parameters, markers of inflammation or steato-hepatitis; the lack of an additive relevant effect of the MS definition to obesity per se. We propose the adoption of 10 evidence-based items from which...... to quantify metabolic risk-factor clustering, collected in a multilevel Metabolic Individual Risk-factor And CLustering Estimation (MIRACLE) approach, and thus avoiding the use of the current MS term in children. CONCLUSION: Pediatricians should consider a novel and specific approach to assessing children...

  13. Metabolic syndrome: a multifaceted risk factor for kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Fernando; Serra, Adelaide

    2014-10-01

    Kidney stones and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are common conditions in industrialized countries. There is growing evidence of associations between kidney stone disease and MetS or some of its components. The link between uric acid stones and MetS is well understood, but the link with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones, the most common kidney stone composition, is more complex, and MetS is frequently overlooked as a risk factor for calcium nephrolithiasis. The physiopathological mechanisms of kidney stone disease in MetS are reviewed in this article. Uric acid stones are a consequence of the excessively acidic urine that results from insulin resistance. The pathophysiology of CaOx stones may include: increased excretion of lithogenesis promoters and decreased excretion of inhibitors; increased risk of Randall's plaque development; and inflammatory damage to renal epithelia by oxidative stress, as a consequence of the insulin-resistant milieu that characterizes MetS. The last mechanism contributes to the adhesion of CaOx crystals to subepithelial calcium deposits working as anchor sites where stones can grow. The predominant MetS features could determine the chemical composition of the stones in each patient. Kidney stones may be a renal manifestation of MetS and features of this syndrome should be looked for in patients with idiopathic nephrolithiasis.

  14. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (pmetabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (pmetabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk Factors for the Development of Metabolic Disorders: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    External factors impact on the hormones and enzymes which trigger development of metabolic disorders. The aim of this review was to highlight major hormonal and enzymatic factors that differentially predispose males and females to obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The research was a literaturebased ...

  16. Prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Jensen, Olaf C; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since Iran's economy is based on the sale of petroleum products, seafaring is considered a crucial job. Little research has been done on issues related to seafarers' health in Iranian maritime industry. The present study investigated the prevalence and associated factors of cardio......-metabolic risk factors in seafarers of National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed on 234 Iranian male seafarers of NITC in 2015. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was diagnosed according to the reports of National Committee of Obesity. Three main blood parameters......S was 14.9%. The common cardio-metabolic risk factors were excess weight (51.1%), abdominal obesity (38.5%), and smoking (27.8%) among Iranian seafarers. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.09) and body mass index (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.27) were associated with the increase...

  17. Effects of Rimonabant on Metabolic Risk Factors in Overweight Patients with Dyslipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Salas ; Jean-Pierre Després; Alain Golay; Lars Sjöström; Rimonabant in Obesity

    2005-01-01

    Effects of Rimonabant on Metabolic Risk Factors in Overweight Patients with Dyslipidemia BACKGROUND: Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1) blocker, has been shown to reduce body weight and improve cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients. The Rimonabant in Obesity-Lipids (RIO-Lipids) study examined the effects of rimonabant on metabolic risk factors, including adiponectin levels, in high-risk patients who are overweight or obese and have dyslipidemia. METHODS: ...

  18. Fatty liver as a risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy to metabolically abnormal in non-overweight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Fukuda, Takuya; Ohbora, Akihiro; Kojima, Takao; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies identified that metabolically abnormal non-obese phenotype is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that fatty liver had a clinical impact on progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. In this retrospective cohort study, 14,093 Japanese (7557 men and 6736 women), who received the health-checkup program from 2004 to 2012, were enrolled. Overweight and obesity were defined as body mass index 23.0-25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m 2 . Four metabolic factors (impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and low high density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration) were used for definition of metabolically healthy (less than two factors) or metabolically abnormal (two or more). We divided the participants into three groups: metabolically healthy non-overweight (9755 individuals, men/women = 4290/5465), metabolically healthy overweight (2547 individuals, 1800/747) and metabolically healthy obesity (1791 individuals, 1267/524). Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasonography. Over the median follow-up period of 5.3 years, 873 metabolically healthy non-overweight, 512 metabolically healthy overweight and 536 metabolically healthy obesity individuals progressed to metabolically abnormal. The adjusted hazard risks of fatty liver on progression were 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.83, p = 0.005) in metabolically healthy non-overweight, 1.37 (1.12-1.66, p = 0.002) in metabolically healthy overweight and 1.38 (1.15-1.66, p overweight individuals.

  19. Assessment and Screening of the Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is chronic inflammatory epidemic state contributing to total and cardiovascular mortality. The current study planned to assess and screen risk factors for MetS and its components. A cross-sectional study conducted to assess age, gender, social status, employment, education, family history, physical activity, dietary habits, alcohol, sleep, body mass index and stress as determinants of MetS. The results were analyzed by Chi Square test with statistical significance of p value <0.05. The frequency of MetS was 17.38% as per modified National Cholesterol Education Program–Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Females (57.38%, age >50 years (86.90%; p < 0.05, middle socioeconomic status (70.50%, illiteracy (39.35%, and unemployment (81.97%; p < 0.05 were found contributing though to different extents. Subjects with a sedentary lifestyle (72.14%, positive family history (42.63%, omnivore diet (47.55%, stress (78.69%; p < 0.05, insomnia (29.51% and increased BMI (83.62%; p < 0.001 had shown predisposition to MetS. However, the protective role of alcohol (38.28%, an active lifestyle (36.21%, vegetarian diet (62.07% and adequate sleep (73.11% was observed. A significant hypertension (98.37%; p < 0.001, dyslipidemia (77.05%; p < 0.001, dysglycemia (75.41%; p < 0.001 and obesity (59.02%; p < 0.001 was reported in MetS. Common concerns of female gender, increasing age and BMI, sedentary lifestyle, stress and positive family history should be considered for early identification and appropriate intervention to fight the growing MetS epidemic.

  20. Risk factors that affect metabolic health status in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaogullari, Selin; Demirel, Fatma; Hatipoglu, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    While some obese children are metabolically healthy (MHO), some have additional health problems, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis, which increase mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) during adulthood. These children are metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) children. In this study we assessed the factors that affect metabolic health in obesity and the clinical and laboratory findings that distinguish between MHO and MUO children. In total, 1085 patients aged 6-18 years, with age- and sex-matched BMI exceeding the 95th percentile were included in the study (mean 11.1±2.9 years, 57.6% female, 59.7% pubertal). Patients without dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatosteatosis, or hypertension were considered as MHO. Dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol level over 200 mg/dL, triglyceride over 150 mg/dL, LDL over 130 mg/dL, or HDL under 40 mg/dL. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model of assesment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Hepatosteatosis was evaluated with abdominal ultrasound. Duration of obesity, physical activity and nutritional habits, screen time, and parental obesity were questioned. Thyroid and liver function tests were performed. Six hundred and forty-two cases (59.2%) were MUO. Older age, male sex, increased BMI-SDS, and sedentary lifestyle were associated with MUO. Excessive junk food consumption was associated with MUO particularly among the prepubertal obese patients. Our results revealed that the most important factors that affect metabolic health in obesity are age and BMI. Positive effects of an active lifestyle and healthy eating habits are prominent in the prepubertal period and these habits should be formed earlier in life.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors associated with the progression of IgA nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kov?cs, Tibor; Vas, Tibor; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; K?s?i, Istv?n; S?gi, Bal?zs; Wittmann, Istv?n; Nagy, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome is associated with modest but independent and additive risk of new onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) in several studies. The purpose of our study was to determine whether metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors (hyperuricaemia and smoking) are associated with the progression of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Methods Two hundred and twenty three IgAN patients (107 with and 116 without metabolic syndrome) were examined. The primary renal end point wa...

  2. Prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    Background: Since Iran’s economy is based on the sale of petroleum products, seafaring is considered a crucial job. Little research has been done on issues related to seafarers’ health in Iranian maritime industry. The present study investigated the prevalence and associated factors of cardio......-metabolic risk factors in seafarers of National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC). Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 234 Iranian male seafarers of NITC in 2015. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was diagnosed according to the reports of National Committee of Obesity. Three main blood parameters......S was 14.9%. The common cardio-metabolic risk factors were excess weight (51.1%), abdominal obesity (38.5%), and smoking (27.8%) among Iranian seafarers. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09) and body mass index (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.27) were associated with the increase...

  3. Cardiovascular metabolic risk factors and glomerular filtration rate: a rural Chinese population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Qian, Geng; Hao, Wenjun; Geng, Xiaodong; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei; Wu, Di

    2016-10-12

    A total of 2426 study subjects from rural China aged 35 years and above (934 men and 1492 women) were enrolled in a cross-sectional survey. The eGFR calculation was based on the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. The strength of the association between cardiovascular metabolic risk factors and eGFR was analyzed using a linear regression model. Cardiovascular metabolic risk factors, including age, body weight, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), creatinine (Cr), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure, were associated with eGFR. Additionally, the eGFR level gradually decreased and showed a linear trend with the increase in metabolic syndrome risk factors. Metabolic risk factors are correlated with a reduction in renal function and CKD.

  4. Metabolic syndrome risk factors and dry eye syndrome: a Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ye-Lei; Cheng, Ya-Lan; Ren, Yu-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Ning; Shentu, Xing-Chao

    2016-01-01

    To explore the relationship between metabolic risk factors and dry eye syndrome (DES). Retrieved studies on the association of metabolic syndrome risk factors (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity, and hyperlipidemia) and DES were collected from PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library in December 2015. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were pooled to evaluate the final relationship. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to diagnostic criteria of DES. Nine cross-sectional studies and three case-control studies were included in this Meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that people with hypertension, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia had a higher risk of suffering from DES (PDES symptoms. On the other hand, obesity did not increase the risk of DES. The present Meta-analysis suggests that all metabolic risk factors except obesity were risk factors for DES.

  5. [Decreased skin function may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-Xing; Li, Da; Li, Chun-Yan; Zhou, Shi-Sheng

    2012-06-25

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is closely related to environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Increasing evidence suggests that environmental risk factors may involve an increase in xenobiotic exposure, for example due to environmental toxins, medications, high meat intake, food additives and supplements; while lifestyle risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyles, may involve a decrease in the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics. The skin, the body's largest organ, plays a distinct role in the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and the body lipid homeostasis, which is affected by sedentary lifestyle and physical activity, as well as by ambient temperature. Thus, it seems that decreased skin biotransformation and excretion, for example due to low ambient temperature and sedentary lifestyle, may be an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome. This review aims to provide insight into the role of the skin in the development of metabolic syndrome.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rodrigues de Araújo Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most common liver disease nowadays, which is also the most frequent cause of elevated transaminases and cryptogenic cirrhosis. The greatest input of fatty acids into the liver and consequent increased beta-oxidation contribute to the formation of free radicals, release of inflammatory cytokines and varying degrees of hepatocytic aggression, whose histological expression may vary from steatosis (HS to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The differentiation of these forms is required by the potential risk of progression to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about the major risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome, focusing on underlying mechanisms and prevention. METHOD: PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analysis was performed to identify studies describing the link between risk factors for metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. A combination of descriptors was used, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic syndrome and risk factors. At the end, 96 clinical and experimental studies, cohorts, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of great impact and scientific relevance to the topic, were selected. RESULTS: The final analysis of all these data, pointed out the central obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension as the best risk factors related to NAFLD. However, other factors were highlighted, such as gender differences, ethnicity, genetic factors and the role of innate immunity system. How these additional factors may be involved in the installation, progression and disease prognosis is discussed. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome expands the prospects to 1 recognize patients with metabolic syndrome at high risk for NAFLD, 2 elucidate pathways common to other co-morbidities, 3

  7. Screening for and monitoring of cardio-metabolic risk factors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Recent findings suggest that premature death in patients with severe mental illness (SMI) can be attributed to the high comorbidity of cardio-metabolic disorders. This study investigated the prevalence and monitoring of some risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease in a cohort with SMI, compared to the general ...

  8. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence and risk factors in Korean gout patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Song, Gwan Gyu; Ji, Jong Dae; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Young Ho; Choi, Sung Jae

    2016-10-12

    We performed this study to investigate associations between metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and gout. We reviewed the medical records of 151 patients with gout at the Department of Rheumatology in Korea University Ansan Hospital. The following measures were examined: waist circumference, blood pressure, alcohol consumption, and levels of triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting serum glucose, serum uric acid (SUA), creatinine, insulin, and C-peptide. We assessed metabolic syndrome by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and renal function by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation; patients were classified according to World Health Organization Asia-Pacific obesity criteria. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in gout patients (50.8%) was higher than in non-gout patients. The mean SUA level was significantly higher in gout patients with metabolic syndrome (9.13 ± 3.15 mg/dL) than in gout patients without metabolic syndrome (8.14 ± 2.07 mg/dL). The mean SUA level was also significantly higher in patients with gout and CKD (9.55 ± 2.86 mg/dL) than in patients with gout but no CKD (7.74 ± 2.27 mg/dL). In gout patients, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with waist circumference (r = 0.409, p = 0.001). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with gout was 50.8%, which is higher than the prevalence in the general Korean population. Hyperuricemia in gout patients was correlated with metabolic syndrome and CKD. Insulin resistance may provide clues to better understand the relationship between metabolic syndrome, CKD, and gout.

  9. Low muscle strength is associated with metabolic risk factors in Colombian children: the ACFIES study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dylan Cohen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In youth, poor cardiorespiratory and muscular strength are associated with elevated metabolic risk factors. However, studies examining associations between strength and risk factors have been done exclusively in high income countries, and largely in Caucasian cohorts. The aim of this study was to assess these interactions in schoolchildren in Colombia, a middle income Latin American country. METHODS: We measured body mass index, body composition, handgrip strength (HG, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF and metabolic risk factors in 669 low-middle socioeconomic status Colombian schoolchildren (mean age 11.52±1.13, 47% female. Associations between HG, CRF and metabolic risk factors were evaluated. RESULTS: HG and CRF were inversely associated with blood pressure, HOMA index and a composite metabolic risk score (p = 0.001, HOMA (β = -0.164; p = 0.005, triglycerides (β = -0.583; p = 0.026 and CRP (β = -0.183; p = 0.037 but not glucose (p = 0.698 or HDL cholesterol (p = 0.132. The odds ratios for having clustered risk in the weakest quartile compared with the strongest quartile were 3.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.81-4.95. CONCLUSIONS: In Colombian schoolchildren both poorer handgrip strength/kg body mass and cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with a worse metabolic risk profile. Associations were stronger and more consistent between handgrip and risk factors than between cardiorespiratory fitness and these risk factors. Our findings indicate the addition of handgrip dynamometry to non-invasive youth health surveillance programs would improve the accuracy of the assessment of cardio-metabolic health.

  10. Metabolic syndrome among urban Indian young adults: prevalence and associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Dinaker; Uthappa, Chengapp Kechamada; Kattula, Sri Rama; Allam, Ramesh Reddy; Chava, Nalini; Oruganti, Ganesh

    2014-09-01

    We estimated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among urban Indian young adults (18-25 years) as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), Internation Diabetes Federation (IDF), and Indian consensus statement criteria. We included 473 urban young adults through simple random sampling methodology to estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was estimated to be 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-5.8], 6.6% (95% CI 4.6-9.1), and 8.7% (95% CI 6.4-11.6) using the NCEP ATP III, IDF, and Indian consensus statement criteria, respectively. Men had significantly higher waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, whereas mean concentrations of both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and total cholesterol were significantly higher among women. Low HDL-C (38.9%), high blood pressure (26%), and central obesity (16.1%) were the most common component risk factors. Although less than 4% of normal weight adults met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, rates increased in overweight individuals and reached a prevalence of 87% in the obese participants. In all, 61.3% of the total population had one or more risk factors for metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is high among urban young adults in India, and it increased with increase in body mass index (BMI). Each component risk factor in isolated form-increased BMI, smoking, and history of hypertension--is an associated risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome screening in young Indians as a means to prevent adverse cardiovascular health outcomes is appropriate, healthy lifestyles should nevertheless be encouraged, and young adults should be considered as an important group for cardiovascular risk reduction programs.

  11. Division IAA Football Players and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovich, Wendy E. S.; Babcock, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body composition and blood pressure (BP), two markers for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), were correlated in college football players. Height, weight, BMI, systolic (SBP) and Diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and body composition (three measures) were assessed in a Division IAA football team (N = 55). Data…

  12. Personality as a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommersteeg, Paula M C; Pouwer, François

    2012-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Personality can be defined as a stable set of behavioral characteristics of a person. In this review we systematically reviewed whether different personality characteristics are associated with the risk of having or developing the metabolic syndrome. Systematic review. In total 18 studies were included. Thirteen cross-sectional analyses, and ten longitudinal analyses were grouped according to personality constructs: hostility, anger, and Type A behavior, temperament, neuroticism, and Type D personality. Conflicting evidence was reported on persons with high hostility, neuroticism, or Type D personality scores to be associated with an increased metabolic syndrome prevalence and development. All significant findings do point in the same direction: a more negative, or hostile personality type is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its development over time. There was no clear association between personality measures and the occurrence and development of the metabolic syndrome. There is, however, a cluster of risk factors that include the presence of the metabolic syndrome, as well as a more negative prone personality style, that both predispose to the development of coronary heart disease and diabetes. Future studies should investigate the role of personality measures in the development of these conditions, while taking into account metabolic syndrome, lifestyle and socio-demographic factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Toxic-Metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sohail Z.; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D.; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies and their rationale. Methods We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: (a) hyperlipidemia, (b) hypercalcemia, (c) chronic renal failure, (d) smoking exposure, (e) alcohol, and (f) medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Results Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dl or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and by-stander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. Conclusions The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/ removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children. PMID:26594832

  14. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    This PhD is based on data from an intervention study with milk and milk proteins conducted in Danish adolescents with overweight. There is a high prevalence of overweight in Danish adolescents. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors related to overweight and believed to increase the risk...... of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A well...... skimmed milk, whey, casein or water for three months. The background for the intervention is that milk is an important source of protein in the Western diet and epidemiological studies in children have shown that children drinking low amounts of milk have higher concentrations of the metabolic risk...

  15. Liver fat percent is associated with metabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in a high-risk vascular cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenig, Michel R; Cowin, Gary; Buckley, Raymond; McHenery, Christine; Coulthard, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether liver fat percent (LFP) is associated with the metabolic syndrome independently of visceral fat area (VFA). Methods 43 High-risk vascular patients not on lipid-lowering therapy were evaluated for the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) metabolic syndrome criteria and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify VFA and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) at the L4-L5 disc and liver magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify LFP. Comparisons: 1. ...

  16. Metabolic syndrome across Europe: different clusters of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuteri, Angelo; Laurent, Stephane; Cucca, Francesco; Cockcroft, John; Cunha, Pedro Guimaraes; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mattace Raso, Francesco U; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Ryliškytė, Ligita; Rietzschel, Ernst; Strait, James; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Völzke, Henry; Lakatta, Edward G; Nilsson, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains a controversial entity. Specific clusters of MetS components - rather than MetS per se - are associated with accelerated arterial ageing and with cardiovascular (CV) events. To investigate whether the distribution of clusters of MetS components differed cross-culturally, we studied 34,821 subjects from 12 cohorts from 10 European countries and one cohort from the USA in the MARE (Metabolic syndrome and Arteries REsearch) Consortium. In accordance with the ATP III criteria, MetS was defined as an alteration three or more of the following five components: elevated glucose (G), fasting glucose ≥110 mg/dl; low HDL cholesterol, 102 cm for men or >88 cm for women. MetS had a 24.3% prevalence (8468 subjects: 23.9% in men vs. 24.6% in women, p definition of MetS is not a unique entity rather a constellation of cluster of MetS components, likely selectively risky for CV disease, whose occurrence differs across countries. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Liver fat percent is associated with metabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in a high-risk vascular cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McHenery Christine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine whether liver fat percent (LFP is associated with the metabolic syndrome independently of visceral fat area (VFA. Methods 43 High-risk vascular patients not on lipid-lowering therapy were evaluated for the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII metabolic syndrome criteria and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to quantify VFA and subcutaneous fat area (SFA at the L4-L5 disc and liver magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to quantify LFP. Comparisons: 1. Baseline differences in patients with and without the metabolic syndrome 2. Forward binary logistic regression analysis of predictors of the metabolic syndrome with VFA, SFA and LFP as independents 3. Correlates of LFP. Results 43 patients were included in analysis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had greater VFA, SFA and LFP than patients without the metabolic syndrome (all p Conclusions LFP is associated with the metabolic syndrome and renders the current gold standard of VFA redundant in this analysis. This measure of obesity-related cardiovascular risk requires further validation and evaluation in a prospective cohort.

  18. Gender differences in metabolic risk factor prevalence in a South African student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carine; Essop, M Faadiel

    2009-01-01

    We determined selected risk factors for the metabolic syndrome and assessed the metabolic risk status (using IDF criteria) of third-year physiology students at Stellenbosch University (88 males and 178 females). Outcome measures included anthropometry [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio], blood pressure (BP), resting pulse rate, and fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. In addition, students completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A number of gender-based differences were found, with male students displaying a greater incidence of risk factors for the metabolic syndrome: 6% of males versus 3% of females displayed a cluster of three risk factors. Twenty-five per cent of female students (but only 14% of males) exhibited waist circumferences above the accepted range, which was positively correlated, for males and females, with both systolic and diastolic BP, and in females only, also with total cholesterol levels. Male students on average exercised more than their female counterparts, but also exhibited poorer eating habits. Average blood triglyceride levels for both male and female students exceeded the accepted threshold (1.85 +/- 1.62 mmol/l and 2.15 +/- 1.79 mmol/l, respectively). We concluded that metabolic risk factors were evident in a much younger population than commonly expected. Moreover, the gender-specific differences observed may impact on future risk assessment and preventative measures adopted.

  19. Population Risk Factors in the Genesis of Bone Metabolism Didorders in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pankiv

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents population risk factors involved in the genesis of bone metabolism disorders in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT. The results of the study of bone mineral density in patients with AIT are provided. The importance of population risk factors (female sex, menopause in women, weight deficit, age in the genesis of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis in patients with AIT has been studied.

  20. Association between selenium nutritional status and metabolic risk factors in men with visceral obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutakin; Meiliana, Anna; Wijaya, Andi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Previous evidence has suggested an association between selenium and cardiovascular disease, which is main outcome of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to examine possible correlation between selenium nutritional status and metabolic risk factors in men with visceral obesity. Plasma samples were collected from 123 Indonesian men with visceral obesity. Their metabolic risk factors and selenium nutritional status were analyzed. The eligible subjects (n=78) were stratified according to the International Diabetes Federation: obese, obese plus one component, and obese plus two components or more. Obese plus two components or more were diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Pearson's correlation was performed to examine the correlation in each group. In the obese group, selenium positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (r=0.390, Pmetabolic syndrome group, selenium negatively correlated with monocytes chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (r=-0.429, Pnutritional status and metabolic risk factors is limited to particular group of obese men with or without metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. NPAS2 and PER2 are linked to risk factors of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aromaa Arpo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian circadian clocks control multiple physiological events. The principal circadian clock generates seasonal variations in behavior as well. Seasonality elevates the risk for metabolic syndrome, and evidence suggests that disruption of the clockwork can lead to alterations in metabolism. Our aim was to analyze whether circadian clock polymorphisms contribute to seasonal variations in behavior and to the metabolic syndrome. Methods We genotyped 39 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP from 19 genes which were either canonical circadian clock genes or genes related to the circadian clockwork from 517 individuals drawn from a nationwide population-based sample. Associations between these SNPs and seasonality, metabolic syndrome and its risk factors were analyzed using regression analysis. The p-values were corrected for multiple testing. Results Our findings link circadian gene variants to the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome, since Npas2 was associated with hypertension (P-value corrected for multiple testing = 0.0024 and Per2 was associated with high fasting blood glucose (P-value corrected for multiple testing = 0.049. Conclusion Our findings support the view that relevant relationships between circadian clocks and the metabolic syndrome in humans exist.

  2. The Relationship Between Shift Work and Metabolic Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proper, Karin I; van de Langenberg, Daniëlla; Rodenburg, Wendy; Vermeulen, Roel C H; van der Beek, Allard J; van Steeg, Harry; van Kerkhof, Linda W M

    2016-05-01

    Although the metabolic health effects of shift work have been extensively studied, a systematic synthesis of the available research is lacking. This review aimed to systematically summarize the available evidence of longitudinal studies linking shift work with metabolic risk factors. A systematic literature search was performed in 2015. Studies were included if (1) they had a longitudinal design; (2) shift work was studied as the exposure; and (3) the outcome involved a metabolic risk factor, including anthropometric, blood glucose, blood lipid, or blood pressure measures. Eligible studies were assessed for their methodologic quality in 2015. A best-evidence synthesis was used to draw conclusions per outcome. Thirty-nine articles describing 22 studies were included. Strong evidence was found for a relation between shift work and increased body weight/BMI, risk for overweight, and impaired glucose tolerance. For the remaining outcomes, there was insufficient evidence. Shift work seems to be associated with body weight gain, risk for overweight, and impaired glucose tolerance. Overall, lack of high-methodologic quality studies and inconsistency in findings led to insufficient evidence in assessing the relation between shift work and other metabolic risk factors. To strengthen the evidence, more high-quality longitudinal studies that provide more information on the shift work schedule (e.g., frequency of night shifts, duration in years) are needed. Further, research to the (mediating) role of lifestyle behaviors in the health effects of shift work is recommended, as this may offer potential for preventive strategies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Health-promoting lifestyles and cardio-metabolic risk factors among international students in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun-Ja; Park, Jeewon; Kang, Se-Won

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the health-promoting lifestyles and cardio-metabolic risks among international students in Korea. This descriptive, cross-sectional study design enrolled a convenience sample of 118 international students at a university in Korea. Collected data included items from the Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile (II) scale and cardiovascular risk factors. The participants had a moderately health-promoting lifestyle (2.5 of 4). Men engaged in more physical activity than did women (p = .002). The most prevalent risk factor was elevated blood lipid profiles (26.3%), followed by overweight/obesity (25.4%), elevated blood pressure (17.8%), and elevated fasting glucose levels (5.1%). More than half of the participants (54.2%) had one or more cardiac risk factors, and these participants also scored lower in health-promoting lifestyle factors than other students (p = .034). Regular health check-ups are needed to identify the cardio-metabolic risks of international students. A university-based programme aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles could help prevent cardio-metabolic risks among international students.

  4. [Risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a case control study in Temuco, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philco L, Patricia; Serón S, Pamela; Muñoz N, Sergio; Navia B, Pilar; Lanas Z, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming an important public health problem in affluent societies. To identify factors associated to metabolic syndrome in a Southern Chilean city. Using a case control design, 200 participants, aged 35 to 70 years with at least three criteria for metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP_ATPIII) and 200 subjects with less than three criteria, were studied. Both groups were compared in terms of ethnic background, educational level, family history of diabetes and coronary artery disease, menopausal status, smoking, stress and depression, physical activity, changes in body mass index in the last five years and diet. Among subjects aged more than 54 years, among males and among overweight individuals, having a Mapuche origin was a risk factor with odds ratios (OR) of 7.2; 88 and 3.9 respectively. Among subjects aged more than 54 years, among women and among overweight individuals, a family history of diabetes was a risk factor with OR of 17.7; 3.2 and 3.9 respectively. Among subjects aged more than 54 years and among women a change in body mass index of more than three points was a risk factor with OR of 12.5 and 7.4, respectively. Depression also was a risk factor among subjects aged more than 54 years (OR 3.3). Regular consumption of wine was a protective factor among participants of more than 54 years, with an OR of 0.17. The risk factors for metabolic syndrome detected in this group of participants, were having a Mapuche origin, a family history of diabetes mellitus and depression. Wine consumption was associated with a lower risk.

  5. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hydrie, Muhammad Zafar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of metabolic syndrome on the basis of ATP III and IDF definition in subjects aged 25 years and above from an urban population of Karachi. Also to see the association of risk factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. And finally to prove the hypothesis of intervention effect on the onset of type 2 diabetes in a high risk urban population and evaluate the rate of conversion of IGT to diabetes by these interve...

  6. The Metabolic Syndrome in Children and Adolescents: Shifting the Focus to Cardiometabolic Risk Factor Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magge, Sheela N; Goodman, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Sarah C

    2017-07-24

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was developed by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, identifying adults with at least 3 of 5 cardiometabolic risk factors (hyperglycemia, increased central adiposity, elevated triglycerides, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure) who are at increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The constellation of MetS component risk factors has a shared pathophysiology and many common treatment approaches grounded in lifestyle modification. Several attempts have been made to define MetS in the pediatric population. However, in children, the construct is difficult to define and has unclear implications for clinical care. In this Clinical Report, we focus on the importance of screening for and treating the individual risk factor components of MetS. Focusing attention on children with cardiometabolic risk factor clustering is emphasized over the need to define a pediatric MetS. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Metabolomics Reveals Protection of Resveratrol in Diet-Induced Metabolic Risk Factors in Abdominal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoyou; Ye, Guozhu; Zhang, Xinbo; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Tu, Yingfeng; Ye, Zengjie; Liu, Jincheng; Guo, Qi; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Lin; Dong, Sijun; Fan, Yuhua

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal obesity is recognized as the main reason of metabolic syndrome, which is closely related to disordered skeletal and/or abdominal muscle metabolic functions. Metabolomics is a comprehensive assessment system in biological metabolites. The aim of our present study is to investigate the diet-induced metabolic risk factors by metabolic in the abdominal muscles and clarify the relationship between atheroprotective effects of Resveratrol (Rev) and abdominal muscles metabolic components during the development of atherosclerosis. The mice were randomly divided into three groups including normal group (N), high fat diet (HFD or H) group and high fat diet with Rev treated group (HR). GC-MS combined with pattern recognition approaches were employed to obtain comprehensive metabolic signatures and related differential metabolites after 24 week HFD feeding. Oil Red O staining and Electron microscopy technology (EMT) were employed to detect the size of fatty plaques and intracellular lipid accumulation, respectively. The result indicated that 22 types of metabolites in the abdominal muscles were obviously altered by HFD feeding group. Moreover, Rev treatment obviously increased 11 different kinds of metabolites, most of which were involved in the carbohydrate, amino acid and lipid metabolisms. Importantly, these elevated different metabolites were involved in pathways mainly related to galactose metabolism, alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism in abdominal muscles. Oil Red O staining and Electron microscopy showed less lipid accumulation in the lesions and decreased intracellular lipid deposition in the foam cells in HR group. We concluded that Rev produced a beneficial effect partially by modulating multiple metabolism pathways and metabolites in the abdominal muscles, which may provide a new protective mechanism of Rev on the progression of atherosclerosis. These notably changed metabolites might be potential biomarkers

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for the metabolic syndrome in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultink, I E M; Turkstra, F; Diamant, M; Dijkmans, B A C; Voskuyl, A E

    2008-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and the relationship between metabolic syndrome score (MetS score) and disease characteristics and cardiovascular events (CVEs) in women with SLE. Demographic and clinical data were collected in 141 female SLE patients. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was defined by a modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP/ATP III) definition. Metabolic syndrome was defined as MetS score >or= 3. Twenty-three (16%) of the 141 SLE patients (mean age 39+/-12 years, mean disease duration 6.2+/-6.6 years) fulfilled the criteria of the metabolic syndrome. The mean MetS score was significantly higher in patients with SLE and a history of cardiovascular events (CVEs) than in those without a previous CVE. In linear multiple regression analysis, a high MetS score was significantly associated with previous intravenous methylprednisolone use, older age, higher ESR, higher C3 levels and higher serum creatinine levels. In our female SLE patients, a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was found as compared to healthy women in the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study. Independent risk factors for high MetS score in patients with SLE are previous treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, renal insufficiency, older age, higher ESR and higher C3 levels. These results suggest that assessment of the metabolic syndrome in patients with SLE might be important to identify subgroups of patients that are at disproportional high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors associated with the progression of IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tibor; Vas, Tibor; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Késõi, István; Sági, Balázs; Wittmann, István; Nagy, Judit

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with modest but independent and additive risk of new onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) in several studies. The purpose of our study was to determine whether metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors (hyperuricaemia and smoking) are associated with the progression of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Two hundred and twenty three IgAN patients (107 with and 116 without metabolic syndrome) were examined. The primary renal end point was doubling of serum creatinine; secondary end points were reaching eGFR of ≤ 60 ml/min/1,73m(2) or eGFR of ≤30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and end-stage renal disease, ESRD (the composite of serum creatinine ≥500 μmol/l, initiation of dialysis treatment or transplantation). The association of metabolic syndrome with renal end points was examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models. Metabolic syndrome established at the diagnosis or during follow-up of IgAN patients was significantly associated with the primary renal end point (unadjusted hazard ratio of doubling of serum creatinine, 95% confidence interval: 1.96 (1.17-1.33, p = 0.011). The association remained significant after adjustment for confounders: 1.70 (1.02-3.83, p = 0.040). Results were similar for secondary end points except ESRD which was not associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricaemia and smoking were independent risk factors of progression. Survival curves stratified on metabolic syndrome status showed significant differences for the end points (p = 0.017-0.001) except for ESRD. Early diagnosis and treatment of metabolic syndrome, hyperuricaemia and smoking may be an additional cost-effective strategy for preventing the progression of IgAN.

  10. Ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome in malaysia: an analysis by risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew K G; Dunn, Richard A; Yen, Steven T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Malaysia. Data were obtained from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 (2005/2006). Logistic regressions of metabolic syndrome health risks on sociodemographic and health-lifestyle factors were conducted using a multiracial (Malay, Chinese, and Indian and other ethnic groups) sample of 2,366 individuals. Among both males and females, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome amongst Indians was larger compared to both Malays and Chinese because Indians are more likely to exhibit central obesity, elevated fasting blood glucose, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We also found that Indians tend to engage in less physical activity and consume fewer fruits and vegetables than Malays and Chinese. Although education and family history of chronic disease are associated with metabolic syndrome status, differences in socioeconomic attributes do not explain ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome incidence. The difference in metabolic syndrome prevalence between Chinese and Malays was not statistically significant. Whereas both groups exhibited similar obesity rates, ethnic Chinese were less likely to suffer from high fasting blood glucose. Metabolic syndrome disproportionately affects Indians in Malaysia. Additionally, fasting blood glucose rates differ dramatically amongst ethnic groups. Attempts to decrease health disparities among ethnic groups in Malaysia will require greater attention to improving the metabolic health of Malays, especially Indians, by encouraging healthful lifestyle changes.

  11. Circadian rhythm, sleep pattern, and metabolic consequences: an overview on cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Roberta Marcondes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi

    2014-04-01

    Sleep duration is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Alteration in sleep pattern can induce the loss of circadian rhythmicity. Chronically, this desynchronization between endogenous rhythm and behavioral cycles can lead to an adverse metabolic profile, a proinflammatory condition and can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The circadian cycle can vary due to environmental cues. The circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei; this central clock coordinates the circadian rhythm in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The mechanisms involved in sleep disturbance, circadian misalignment and adverse metabolic effects have yet to be fully elucidated. This review looks over the association among sleep alteration, circadian rhythm and the development of risk factors implicated in cardiovascular disease.

  12. Risk factors clustering within the metabolic syndrome: a pattern or by chance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parapid, Biljana; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Lalic, Nebojsa M; Micic, Dragan; Damjanovic, Svetozar; Bubanja, Dragana; Simic, Dragan; Lalic, Katarina; Polovina, Snezana; Marinkovic, Jelena; Milic, Natasa M

    2014-01-01

    An accumulation of various cardiovascular risk factors has been noted to occur within the clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. However, it remains unclear whether specific risk factors aggregate following a predefined pattern or whether this happens by chance. This cross-sectional study involved 1715 adults, 37% males and 63% females, aged 34-80 years, who were consecutively recruited from cardiology and endocrinology outpatient clinics, and from internal medicine specialists in the primary healthcare physician office setting in Serbia, on a one-third basis. According to the AHA/NHLBI criteria, the actual prevalence of a combination of 3 or more of the following risk factors was determined: abnormal waist circumference, hypertension, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and abnormal fasting glucose. In addition, the prevalence of a corresponding combination of 3 factors was predicted from the prevalence of each factor in a given population, assuming that their combination occurred as the result of chance. The most frequent risk factor was hypertension (87%), followed by waist circumference (60%), dyslipidemia (55%), and abnormal fasting glucose level (50%). Metabolic syndrome was identified in 1135 participants (66.2%). The actual prevalence of the combination of increased waist circumference, elevated blood sugar and hypertension was found to be 5 times more frequent than would be expected to occur by chance (10% actual vs. 2% predicted; prisk factors within the metabolic syndrome was found for abdominal obesity, abnormal fasting glucose and hypertension. These risk factors do cluster more frequently than coincidental phenomena in the subjects of the given population, implying common underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  13. Influence of physical fitness on cardio-metabolic risk factors in European children. The IDEFICS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqout, M; Michels, N; Bammann, K; Ahrens, W; Sprengeler, O; Molnar, D; Hadjigeorgiou, C; Eiben, G; Konstabel, K; Russo, P; Jiménez-Pavón, D; Moreno, L A; De Henauw, S

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the associations of individual and combined physical fitness components with single and clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors in children. This 2-year longitudinal study included a total of 1635 European children aged 6-11 years. The test battery included cardio-respiratory fitness (20-m shuttle run test), upper-limb strength (handgrip test), lower-limb strength (standing long jump test), balance (flamingo test), flexibility (back-saver sit-and-reach) and speed (40-m sprint test). Metabolic risk was assessed through z-score standardization using four components: waist circumference, blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), blood lipids (triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein) and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment). Mixed model regression analyses were adjusted for sex, age, parental education, sugar and fat intake, and body mass index. Physical fitness was inversely associated with clustered metabolic risk (Pfitness, except for upper-limb strength (β=0.057; P=0.002) where the opposite association was found. Cardio-respiratory fitness (β=-0.124; Pcardio-respiratory fitness were even independent of the amount of vigorous-to-moderate activity (β=-0.059; P=0.029). Among all the metabolic risk components, blood pressure seemed not well predicted by physical fitness, while waist circumference, blood lipids and insulin resistance all seemed significantly predicted by physical fitness. Poor physical fitness in children is associated with the development of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Based on our results, this risk might be modified by improving mainly cardio-respiratory fitness and lower-limb muscular strength.

  14. Personality traits and childhood trauma as correlates of metabolic risk factors : The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dortland, Arianne K. B. van Reedt; Giltay, Erik J.; van Veen, Tineke; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Personality and childhood trauma may affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, evidence for an association with metabolic risk factors for CVD is limited and ambiguous. Moreover, despite their interrelatedness, personality and childhood trauma were not yet studied simultaneously.

  15. Personality traits and childhood trauma as correlates of metabolic risk factors: The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reedt Dortland, A.K.B.; Giltay, E.J.; van Veen, T.; Zitman, F.G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Personality and childhood trauma may affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, evidence for an association with metabolic risk factors for CVD is limited and ambiguous. Moreover, despite their interrelatedness, personality and childhood trauma were not yet studied simultaneously.

  16. Profile of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease, Normal and Impaired Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І.V. Cherniavska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to conduct the comparative analysis of the profile of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and normal either impaired carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods. One hundred and forty two patients were observed. In order to estimate the rate of different forms of CHD depending on the state of carbohydrate metabolism such groups were formed: the first group consisted of 83 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, the second group involved 34 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, the third group consisted of 25 patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. The ischemic changes of myocardium were detected by ambulatory ECG monitoring with the obligatory achievement of submaximal heart rate during the research. Results. Silent myocardial ischemia was educed in 19 (22.9 % patients with type 2 DM, in 3 (8.8 % persons with IGT and in 2 (8.0 % patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. Smoking, burdened heredity, violation in the haemostatic system more often occurred in the group of patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia in comparison with the patients with type 2 DM without CHD. The profile of general population cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CHD and type 2 DM belongs to the most unfavorable. At the same time for patients with early violations of carbohydrate metabolism and normal carbohydrate metabolism such profile statistically does not differentiate meaningfully. Conclusions. Patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia as compared to patients with type 2 DM without CHD have more expressed violations of indexes of general population cardiovascular risk factors for certain.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome as a Powerfulcardiovascular Risk Factor | Non-Invasive Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome as a Powerfulcardiovascular Risk Factor As far as we know, the Metabolic syndrome (MetS ) was first described in German in the 1920-ties. It was later redescribed by two groups in 1988. In 1998, the first uniform definition of the syndrome was given by WHO, but three years later the NECP/ATP III- committee suggested the definition that has been most commonly used in epidemiological research. By this definition, a subject with the MetS should show at least 3 out of maximal 5...

  18. Subcutaneous to visceral fat ratio: a possible risk factor for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases

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    Shafqat MN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Nabeel Shafqat,1 Miqdad Haider,2 1Department of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences “Serafin Ruiz de Zarate” Villa Clara (UCMVC, Villa Clara, Cuba; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Fatima Memorial Hospital, Fatima Memorial College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, PakistanWe would like to comment, with great interest, about the recently published article “Visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio as a predictor of the multiple metabolic risk factors for subjects with normal waist circumference in Korea” by Oh et al,1 which we found very interesting and valuable. This study is a good step to determine the predictive value of visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (VSR in persons with normal waist circumference for the diagnosis of risk factors for metabolic syndrome.View the original paper by Oh and colleagues.

  19. Influence of physical fitness on cardio-metabolic risk factors in European children: the IDEFICS study

    OpenAIRE

    Zaqout, Mahmoud; Michels, Nathalie; Bammann, K; Ahrens, W; Sprengeler, O; Molnar, D; Hadjigeorgiou, C; Eiben, G; Konstabel, K; Russo, P; Jiménez-Pavón, D; Moreno, LA; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the associations of individual and combined physical fitness components with single and clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors in children. SUBJECTS/METHODS: This 2-year longitudinal study included a total of 1635 European children aged 6-11 years. The test battery included cardio-respiratory fitness (20-m shuttle run test), upper-limb strength (handgrip test), lower-limb strength (standing long jump test), balance (flamingo test), flexib...

  20. Iron in Child Obesity. Relationships with Inflammation and Metabolic Risk Factors

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    Dominique Bouglé

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe sequestration is described in overweight and in its associated metabolic complications, i.e., metabolic syndrome (MetS and non-alcoholic liver fatty disease (NAFLD; however, the interactions between Fe, obesity and inflammation make it difficult to recognize the specific role of each of them in the risk of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Even the usual surrogate marker of Fe stores, ferritin, is influenced by inflammation; therefore, in obese subjects inflammation parameters must be measured together with those of Fe metabolism. This cross-sectional study in obese youth (502 patients; 57% girls: 11.4 ± 3.0 years old (x ± SD; BMI z score 5.5 ± 2.3, multivariate regression analysis showed associations between Fe storage assessed by serum ferritin with risk factors for MetS and NAFLD, assessed by transaminase levels, which were independent of overweight and the acute phase protein fibrinogen. Further studies incorporating the measurement of complementary parameters of Fe metabolism could improve the comprehension of mechanisms involved.

  1. Perirenal Fat and Association With Metabolic Risk Factors: The Uberlândia Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roever, Leonardo; Resende, Elmiro S; Veloso, Fernando C; Diniz, Angélica L D; Penha-Silva, Nilson; Casella-Filho, Antonio; Dourado, Paulo M M; Chagas, Antonio C P

    2015-09-01

    Perirenal fat (PRF) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Gender differences in the correlations of cardiovascular disease risk factors and PRF in the Brazilian population are lacking.Cross-sectional study with 101 (50.49% men; mean age 56.5 ± 18, range 19-74 years) drawn from the Uberlândia Heart Study underwent ultrasonography assessment of abdominal adipose. For the PRF, a 3.5 MHz transducer was measured in the middle third of the right kidney, with the transducer positioned at the axillary midline. The examinations were always performed by the same examiner. The PRF thickness was examined in relation to waist circumference, blood pressure, and metabolic risk factors. The PRF was significantly associated with the levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase (P < 0.05, r = 0.08), fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05, r = 0.07), waist circumference (P < 0.05, r = 0.10), and metabolic syndrome (P < 0.001, r = 0.38) in men, and with the levels of fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05) in women.The PRF was correlated with most cardiovascular risk factors in men and only in glucose at the women.

  2. DIETARY RISK FACTORS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN DIBRUGARH DISTRICT OF ASSAM

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    Tulika Goswami Mahanta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND As India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world, a huge burden of undiagnosed Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a possibility. Early intervention can be planned if MetS can be detected early along with risk factor assessment to avert cardiovascular morbidities. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary risk factor of metabolic syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Dibrugarh District of Assam with multistep sampling. Study area, i.e. four rural sub-centres and two urban electoral blocks were selected randomly. From the list of population of selected area, the consenting eligible were included. Sample size was 1700 population with MetS. Socio-demographic information, World Health Organisation’s STEPS questionnaire for behavioural risk factors along with dietary history, anthropometric assessment and laboratory investigations were conducted in three stages. Food frequency questionnaire was used for dietary assessment. Statistical analysis was done using rates, ratio, proportion, univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS MetS was 47.6% (1606 of 3372 screened. Mean age of study population was 47.1 ± 10.9 years. Behavioural risk factors like tobacco, alcohol consumption was high and significantly associated with metabolic syndrome (p= 0.000. Similarly financial stress, feeling stressed in last one year (p=0.034, lower physical activity level were also significantly associated with metS (p=0.000. Consumption of meat (p=0.000, egg (p=0.000, fast food (p=0.000, pickled vegetable (p=0.000 and sweet snacks (p=0.000 was found significantly higher amongst those with metabolic syndrome. Significant association was also seen with number of meals served per day and metS (p=0.000. CONCLUSION Dietary risk factors of cardiovascular diseases were rampant amongst persons with MetS. Dietary risk factor survey and counselling on healthy diet can be implemented in these population to give

  3. The study on risk factor of metabolic diseases in pancreatic steatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin Young; Ye, Soo Young; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The body of the fat tissue increased in obese represented by risk factors such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, metabolic disease and dyslipidemia. Such metabolic diseases and the like of the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, increase in the adipose tissue of the pancreas is known to be a risk factor of these diseases. Study on the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer was conducted actively, case studies on pancreatic steatosis is not much. In this study, divided into a control group diagnosed with pancreatic steatosis as a result of ultrasonography to evaluation the physical characteristics and serologic tests and blood pressure and arterial stiffness. The control group and the test pancreas steatosis age and waist circumference, body mass index, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, arterial elasticity is higher in pancreatic steatosis. And the lower ankle brachial stenosis and HDLcholesterol were lower than the normal control group, so the pancreatic steatosis harmful to blood vessels.(P <0.05). The difference between the control group and it was confirmed that the pancreatic jibanggun statistically significant. In conclusion, pancreatic steatosis at abdominal ultrasound can predict the risk of metabolic diseases, and there was a correlation with cardiovascular disease

  4. The study on risk factor of metabolic diseases in pancreatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jin Young; Ye, Soo Young; Kim, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The body of the fat tissue increased in obese represented by risk factors such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, metabolic disease and dyslipidemia. Such metabolic diseases and the like of the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, increase in the adipose tissue of the pancreas is known to be a risk factor of these diseases. Study on the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer was conducted actively, case studies on pancreatic steatosis is not much. In this study, divided into a control group diagnosed with pancreatic steatosis as a result of ultrasonography to evaluation the physical characteristics and serologic tests and blood pressure and arterial stiffness. The control group and the test pancreas steatosis age and waist circumference, body mass index, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, arterial elasticity is higher in pancreatic steatosis. And the lower ankle brachial stenosis and HDLcholesterol were lower than the normal control group, so the pancreatic steatosis harmful to blood vessels.(P <0.05). The difference between the control group and it was confirmed that the pancreatic jibanggun statistically significant. In conclusion, pancreatic steatosis at abdominal ultrasound can predict the risk of metabolic diseases, and there was a correlation with cardiovascular disease.

  5. High prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors in a young urban Sri-Lankan population.

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    Mahen Wijesuriya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: South-Asian's are predisposed to early onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM. The prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk-factors in young Sri-Lankans is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine by questionnaire and anthropometry the prevalence of first degree family history (FH of T2DM, physical inactivity, raised waist circumference (WC and raised body mass index (BMI in a representative healthy urban population selected by cluster sampling. Those with ≥ 2 risk-factors were evaluated for metabolic syndrome (MS and recruited for an intervention trial. Of 23,296 participants screened, 22,507 (53% Female were eligible [8,497 aged 10-14 yrs, 4,763 aged 15-19 yrs and 9,247 aged 20-40 yrs]. 51% had none of the 4 risk-factors, 26% 1 risk-factor and 23% (5,163 ≥ 2 risk-factors of whom 4,532 were assessed for MS. Raised BMI was noted in 19.7% aged 10-14 yrs, 15.3% between 15-19 yrs, and between 20-40 yrs, 27.4% of males vs. 21.8% of females p<0.001. Prevalence of raised WC was greater in females for each age group: 42.7% vs. 32.1%; 28.1% vs. 16.1%; 34.5% vs. 25.7% (p<0.05 for all as was physical inactivity: 39.9% vs. 14.5%; 51.7% vs. 20.0%; 62.7% vs. 41.3% which rose in both sexes with age (p<0.05 for all. FH of T2DM was present in 26.2%. In 4532 (50%<16 yrs with ≥ 2 risk-factors, impaired fasting glycaemia/impaired glucose tolerance (pre-diabetes prevalence was 16%. MS was more prevalent in males [10-16 yrs (13.0% vs. 8.8%, 16-40 yrs (29.5% vs. 20.0% p<0.001 for both]. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is a high prevalence of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk-factors in young urban Sri-Lankans with significant gender differences. A primary prevention intervention trial is ongoing in this cohort. Clinical Trial Registration Number SLCTR/2008/World Health Organization (WHO international clinical trial registry platform.

  6. Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Adverse Metabolic Outcomes in North American Testicular Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Mohammad Abu; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Fung, Chunkit; Monahan, Patrick O; El-Charif, Omar; Williams, Annalynn M; Feldman, Darren R; Hamilton, Robert J; Vaughn, David J; Beard, Clair J; Cook, Ryan; Althouse, Sandra K; Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard, Shirin; Dinh, Paul C; Sesso, Howard D; Einhorn, Lawrence H; Fossa, Sophie D; Travis, Lois B

    2018-03-01

    Background: Testicular cancer survivors (TCS) are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), with metabolic syndrome (MetS) an established risk factor. No study has addressed clinical and genetic MetS risk factors in North American TCS. Patients and Methods: TCS were aged testosterone, and soluble cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) evaluated. A single nucleotide polymorphism in rs523349 (5-α-reductase gene, SRD5A2 ), recently implicated in MetS risk, was genotyped. Using standard criteria, MetS was defined as ≥3 of the following: hypertension, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, and diabetes. Matched controls were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results: We evaluated 486 TCS (median age, 38.1 years). TCS had a higher prevalence of hypertension versus controls (43.2% vs 30.7%; P low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels (17.7% vs 9.3%; P testosterone level ≤3.0 ng/mL (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; P =.005), and elevated sICAM-1 level (OR highest vs lowest quartile , 3.58; P =.001) were significantly associated with MetS. Conclusions and Recommendations: Metabolic abnormalities in TCS are characterized by hypertension and increased LDL and total cholesterol levels but lower rates of decreased HDL levels and abdominal obesity, signifying possible shifts in fat distribution and fat metabolism. These changes are accompanied by hypogonadism and inflammation. TCS have a high prevalence of CVD risk factors that may not be entirely captured by standard MetS criteria. Cancer treatment-associated MetS requires further characterization. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  7. The Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, and Metabolic Syndrome among Iranian Military Parachutists

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    Alireza Khoshdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is rapidly increasing worldwide. Occupation-related stress such as military parachuting has been considered to be a potentially important cardiovascular risk factor. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome among military parachutists which provides a guideline to prevent catastrophic cardiovascular events. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among 96 military parachutists in southern IR Iran; who were evaluated in the military clinic in Shiraz, Southern IR Iran. Information regarding demographic and life style were obtained from each subject. Arterial blood pressure, weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and hip circumference (HC, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile consisting of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were measured by standard methods. Results: The mean age of participants was 37.4±6.4 years. There were 5 (5.2% cases under treatment for cardiovascular diseases, 4 (4.2% participants were pre-diabetics and 5 (5.2% suffered from diabetes mellitus. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia were seen in 23 (24% and 46 (47% military parachutists respectively. Conclusions: Although war-related stressors and high intensity physical activities are associated with both acute cardiac events and cardiac risk factors, our data is in favor of lower frequency of cardiovascular risk factors among military parachutists. However, routine monitoring of military parachutists is necessary to find the cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

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    Davies MJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Davies,1 Katherine W Merton,1 Ujjwala Vijapurkar,2 Dainius A Balis,2 Mehul Desai2 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Methods: This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1 and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2. Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <1.0 mmol/L (men or <1.3 mmol/L (women; waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men, ≥88 cm (non-Asian women, >90 cm (Asian men, or >80 cm (Asian women; diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg. Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports.Results: In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus

  9. Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in obese Kuwaiti adolescents

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    Boodai SA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shurooq A Boodai,1 Lynne M Cherry,2 Naveed A Sattar,2 John J Reilly3 1University of Glasgow School of Medicine, Yorkhill Hospitals, Glasgow, Scotland; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland; 3University of Strathclyde Physical Activity for Health Group, School of Psychological Sciences and Health, Glasgow, Scotland Background: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a sample of obese Kuwaiti adolescents, as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. Methods: Eighty obese Kuwaiti adolescents (40 males with a mean (standard deviation age of 12.3 years (1.1 years participated in the present study. All participants had a detailed clinical examination and anthropometry, blood pressure taken, and assessment of fasting levels of C-reactive protein, intracellular adhesion molecule, interleukin-6, fasting blood glucose, insulin, liver function tests (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lipid profile (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment, and adiponectin. MetS was assessed using two recognized criteria modified for use in younger individuals. Results: The cardiometabolic risk factors with highest prevalence of abnormal values included aspartate aminotransferase (88.7% of the sample and insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (67.5%, intracellular adhesion molecule (66.5%, fasting insulin (43.5%, C-reactive protein (42.5%, low

  10. Metabolic risk factors in pediatric stone formers: a report from an emerging economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Kiran; Zafar, Mirza Naqi; Ozair, Uzma; Khan, Sadia; Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate metabolic risk factors in pediatric stone formers in an emerging economy. A prospective, data collection enrolled 250 children age ammonia and oxalate in urine. All reported values were two sided and statistical significance was considered at p value ≤0.05. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.50 ± 3.56 years with a male to female ratio of 1.84:1. A family history of urolithiasis was found in 41 (16.4 %), urinary tract infection in 18 (7 %) and chronic diarrhea in 75 (30 %). Hypercalcemia was seen in 37 (14.8 %), hyperuricemia in 23 (9.2 %) and hyperphosphatemia in 6 (2.4 %). Urinary metabolic abnormalities were identified in 248 (98 %) of the cases. Hypocitraturia was found in 207 (82.8 %), hyperoxaluria in 62 (26.4 %), hyperuricosuria in 82 (32.8 %), hypercalciuria in 51 (20.4 %), hyperphosphaturia in 46 (18.4 %), hyperammonuria in 10 (4 %), hypocalciuria in 82 (32.8 %), and hypovolemia in 73 (29.2 %). Risk factors were similar between genders except higher rates of hyponatriuria, hypophosphaturia, and hypocalciuria in females. Hyperuricosuria, hyponatriuria, and hypovolemia were highest in 1-5 years (52, 49, 49 %) as compared to (18, 21, 12 %) those in 11-15 years (p < 0.001), respectively. This study shows that careful metabolic analysis can identify risk factors in 98 % of the children where appropriate metaphylaxis can be undertaken both for treatment and prevention of recurrence.

  11. A combined continuous and interval aerobic training improves metabolic syndrome risk factors in men

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    Sari-Sarraf V

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vahid Sari-Sarraf,1 Akbar Aliasgarzadeh,2 Mohammad-Mahdi Naderali,3 Hamid Esmaeili,1 Ebrahim K Naderali4 1Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Tabriz, 2Bone Research Centre, Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3The School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, 4Faculty of Science, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Individuals with metabolic syndrome have significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes leading to premature death mortality. Metabolic syndrome has a complex etiology; thus, it may require a combined and multi-targeted aerobic exercise regimen to improve risk factors associated with it. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined continuous and interval aerobic training on patients with metabolic syndrome. Thirty adult male with metabolic syndrome (54±8 years were randomly divided into two groups: test training group (TTG; n=15 and control group (CG; n=15. Subjects in TTG performed combined continuous and interval aerobic training using a motorized treadmill three times per week for 16 weeks. Subjects in CG were advised to continue with their normal activities of life. Twenty-two men completed the study (eleven men in each group. At the end of the study, in TTG, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 reductions in total body weight (-3.2%, waist circumference (-3.43 cm, blood pressure (up to -12.7 mmHg, and plasma insulin, glucose, and triacylglyceride levels. Moreover, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 increases VO2max (-15.3% and isometric strength of thigh muscle (28.1% and high-density lipoprotein in TTG. None of the above indices were changed in CG at the end of 16-week study period. Our study suggests that adoption of a 16-week combined continuous and interval aerobic training regimen in men

  12. Red-fleshed sweet orange juice improves the risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Jacqueline Q; Dourado, Grace K Z S; Cesar, Thais B

    2015-01-01

    Orange juice consumption can promote lower levels of oxidative stress and inflammation due to the antioxidant activity of citrus flavonoids and carotenoids. In addition, red-fleshed sweet orange juice (red orange juice) also contains lycopene. This study investigated the effects of red orange juice consumption on risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Volunteers consumed red orange juice daily for 8 weeks, with clinical and biochemical assessments performed at baseline and on the final day. There was no change in the abdominal obesity, but low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein decreased, while there was an increase of the antioxidant activity in serum after red orange juice consumption. Insulin resistance and systolic blood pressure were reduced in normal-weight volunteers, while diastolic blood pressure decreased in overweight volunteers after intervention. Red orange juice showed anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and lipid-lowering properties that may prevent the development of metabolic syndrome.

  13. Cranberry Supplement and Metabolic Risk Factors in Obese and Overweight Females

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    Eftekhari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Due to the higher susceptibility of metabolic syndrome (MS-afflicted patients to different metabolic abnormalities, treatment programs are vital parts of MS management. One of the possible adjunctive therapies is taking cranberry supplements as important sources of polyphenols that bear antioxidative and health-promoting properties. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cranberry extract on some components of metabolic syndrome. Patients and Methods In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 48 obese and overweight females diagnosed with MS were assigned into two groups to receive cranberry supplement or placebo for an eight-week period. Serum glucose, lipoproteins, inflammatory markers and blood pressure were evaluated at the baseline and at the end of the treatment phase. Results Cranberry supplements had no effect on any of the variables including glucose, insulin, malondialdehyde (MDA, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and blood pressure, except for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, which significantly increased (P < 0.05 at the eighth-week period compared with the placebo samples. Conclusions The results of the present study revealed that cranberry supplement might only ameliorate low HDL-c as a component of metabolic syndrome, and not the other risk factors of MS.

  14. Risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folić, Nevena; Folić, Marko; Marković, Slavica; Andjelković, Marija; Janković, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    High prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children and adolescents is a great concern of the modern society. bjective: Our aim was to determine the influence of previously investigated, but also and potentially novel risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. Observational case-control clinical study was conducted involving children and adolescents with obesity/metabolic syndrome, treated on inpatient basis from January 2008 to January 2012 at the Pediatric Clinic of the Clinical Centre Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia. The group of"cases"(n=28) included patients aged 10-16 years with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria, while the control group included twice as many obese patients (n=56) matched to the compared group. Presence of maternal gestational diabates (ORadjusted: 39.426; 95% Cl: 1.822-853.271; p=0.019), and/or lack of breastfeeding in the first six months of life (ORadjusted: 0.079; 95% CI: 0.009-0.716; p=0.024) were significant predictors for developing MetS. Also, microalbuminuria is associated with MetS in obese children and adolescants (ORadjusted: 1.686; 95% Cl: 1.188-2.393; p=0.003) CONCLUSION: Presence of maternal gestational diabetes and/or lack of infant breastfeeding are considered as relevant factors that may contribute to the increased risk of developing MetS syndrome, while microalbuminuria is frequently associated with MetS in obese children and adolescents.

  15. Circulating irisin levels are positively associated with metabolic risk factors in sedentary subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; Delgado, Elías; Sanchez-Ragnarsson, Cecilia; Valdés, Sergio; Botas, Patricia; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A physically active life-style plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, activates thermogenesis in rodents through increasing beige fat cells abundance within white fat. We aimed to investigate circulating irisin levels in association with the degree of physical activity and various metabolic parameters in humans. Circulating irisin levels (ELISA) and metabolic parameters were analyzed in 428 subjects (195 men/233 women). Participants were classified according to their self-reported physical activity and to their area of residence. Circulating irisin levels were higher in active than in sedentary subjects (p = 0.006). Rural inhabitants showed higher circulating irisin levels than urban subjects (p sedentary participants, irisin levels were positively associated with metabolic risk factors (BMI, fasting insulin, HOMA and fasting triglycerides). The area of residence (β = - 0.592, p = sedentary participants, circulating irisin levels were positively associated with parameters related to an increased cardiometabolic risk. The present study confirmed that an active lifestyle increases circulating irisin levels, but only among subjects living in a rural environment. Area of residence might be a determinant of irisin levels.

  16. Circulating irisin levels are positively associated with metabolic risk factors in sedentary subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Moreno

    Full Text Available A physically active life-style plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, activates thermogenesis in rodents through increasing beige fat cells abundance within white fat. We aimed to investigate circulating irisin levels in association with the degree of physical activity and various metabolic parameters in humans.Circulating irisin levels (ELISA and metabolic parameters were analyzed in 428 subjects (195 men/233 women. Participants were classified according to their self-reported physical activity and to their area of residence.Circulating irisin levels were higher in active than in sedentary subjects (p = 0.006. Rural inhabitants showed higher circulating irisin levels than urban subjects (p < 0.0001. The increase in irisin levels related to an active lifestyle was only observed in rural citizens (p = 0.014. Among sedentary participants, irisin levels were positively associated with metabolic risk factors (BMI, fasting insulin, HOMA and fasting triglycerides. The area of residence (β = - 0.592, p = < 0.0001 contributed independently to circulating irisin levels variance after controlling for age, gender, BMI, HOMAIR, triglycerides and physical activity.In sedentary participants, circulating irisin levels were positively associated with parameters related to an increased cardiometabolic risk. The present study confirmed that an active lifestyle increases circulating irisin levels, but only among subjects living in a rural environment. Area of residence might be a determinant of irisin levels.

  17. NAFLD in the absence of metabolic syndrome: different epidemiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, risk factors for disease progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that have been associated with an increased risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Insulin resistance and central obesity are the key components of MetS, ultimately leading to liver fat accumulation and the subsequent development of necroinflammatory liver injury. However, the origin and nature of the metabolic stressors responsible for stimulating the progression of simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) remain to be clearly identified. In addition, epidemiologic research on the association between MetS and NAFLD has provided only limited information to guide the development of targeted interventions, in particular, nutrition and pharmacologic prevention programs. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the proposal that NAFLD is not invariably associated with the presence of MetS, and mechanisms other than insulin resistance may contribute to the chronic inflammatory processes that underpin the development of liver fat accumulation and the subsequent architectural distortion of the liver. A special focus is given to increased hemoglobin as a risk factor for the development of NAFLD in the absence of MetS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Association of Serum Uric Acid With Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome in Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN-III Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiri, Saeid; Qorbani, Mostafa; Heshmat, Ramin; Tajbakhsh, Ramin; Eslami Shahr Babaki, Amir; Djalalinia, Shirin; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Tajadini, Mohammad Hasan; Asayesh, Hamid; Safari, Omid; Kelishadi, Roya

    2016-05-01

    There is controversial evidence on association of serum acid uric (SUA) with cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in adults. This study aimed to investigate the associations of SUA levels, components of metabolic syndrome, and other cardiometabolic risk factors, in a nationally representative sample of Iranian adolescents. This study included 132 participants who met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and 235 participants without metabolic syndrome. The participants were grouped according to the tertiles of SUA. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified for children and adolescents. The relationship between SUA and cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome was assessed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the participants was 15.21 ± 2.35 years, with no significant difference between the boys and the girls. The participants whose SUA was categorized in the 2nd tertile and those falling into the 3rd tertile had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (P Metabolic syndrome was associated with the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of SUA as compared to the lower tertile(s), in the adjusted model (P metabolic syndrome had higher SUA levels. Its association with some components of metabolic syndrome supports that SUA might be an additional component of metabolic syndrome even during adolescence.

  19. Gender aspects of the role of the metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Lehmkuhl, Elke; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokufeh

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the risk factors of abdominal obesity, disturbed glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, and hypertension is believed to represent a distinct entity, termed the metabolic syndrome (MetS), that leads to a greater increase in cardiovascular risk than does the sum of its components. We reviewed currently available information regarding gender differences in the role of the MetS as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Using the search terms women, men, sex, gender, sex differences, and gender differences in combination with the metabolic syndrome, we conducted a systematic review of the available literature on sex differences in the MetS. The National Institutes of Health, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases were searched retrospectively from 2007 to 1987. Reference lists of identified articles were also used as a source, and articles were not restricted to the English language. In recent years, the MetS has been more prevalent in men than in women but has risen particularly in young women, where it is mainly driven by obesity. Diagnostic criteria for the MetS vary for the cutoff points and definition of its components in a gender-specific manner. Based on the definition of impaired glucose homeostasis and pathologic abdominal circumference or waist/hip ratio, more or fewer women are included. Glucose and lipid metabolism are directly modulated by estrogen and testosterone, with a lack of estrogen or a relative increase in testosterone inducing insulin resistance and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Hypertension is a strong risk factor in both sexes, but the prevalence of hypertension increases more rapidly in aging women than in men. Menopause and polycystic ovary syndrome contribute to the development of MetS by the direct effects of sex hormones. Some components of the MetS (eg, diabetes and hypertension) carry a greater risk for CVD in women. Future gender-related clinical and research activities should focus on the identification of sex- and

  20. Metabolic risk factors in mice divergently selected for BMR fed high fat and high carb diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Julita; Gębczyński, Andrzej K; Konarzewski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Factors affecting contribution of spontaneous physical activity (SPA; activity associated with everyday tasks) to energy balance of humans are not well understood, as it is not clear whether low activity is related to dietary habits, precedes obesity or is a result of thereof. In particular, human studies on SPA and basal metabolic rates (BMR, accounting for >50% of human energy budget) and their associations with diet composition, metabolic thrift and obesity are equivocal. To clarify these ambiguities we used a unique animal model-mice selected for divergent BMR rates (the H-BMR and L-BMR line type) presenting a 50% between-line type difference in the primary selected trait. Males of each line type were divided into three groups and fed either a high fat, high carb or a control diet. They then spent 4 months in individual cages under conditions emulating human "sedentary lifestyle", with SPA followed every month and measurements of metabolic risk indicators (body fat mass %, blood lipid profile, fasting blood glucose levels and oxidative damage in the livers, kidneys and hearts) taken at the end of study. Mice with genetically determined high BMR assimilated more energy and had higher SPA irrespective of type of diet. H-BMR individuals were characterized by lower dry body fat mass %, better lipid profile and lower fasting blood glucose levels, but higher oxidative damage in the livers and hearts. Genetically determined high BMR may be a protective factor against diet-induced obesity and most of the metabolic syndrome indicators. Elevated spontaneous activity is correlated with high BMR, and constitutes an important factor affecting individual capability to sustain energy balance even under energy dense diets.

  1. Associations of Leg Fat Accumulation with Adiposity-Related Biological Factors and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Hu, Emily A.; Wu, Hongyu; Malik, Vasanti; Sun, Qi

    2012-01-01

    The association between regional fat mass distribution and cardiometabolic risk factors has been inconsistent in the literature, and data for ethnic minority groups, such as non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, are lacking. We aimed to examine this association among 8802 US residents who participated in the 1999-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Leg fat indices included leg fat mass (FM), leg fat mass percent (FM%), leg to whole body FM ratio (leg/whole) and leg to trunk FM ratio (leg/trunk). We evaluated the correlation between leg fat indices and adiposity-related risk factors, as well as the association of these indices with metabolic syndrome (MetS). After adjusting for covariates including age, gender, and trunk FM or trunk FM%, higher leg FM and leg FM% were, in general, correlated favorably with adiposity-related risk factors and associated with lower odds of MetS in all ethnicities, including non-Hispanic whites and blacks and Hispanic groups. In addition, in all multivariate-adjusted models, leg/whole and leg/trunk ratios were strongly associated with lower levels of most risk factors and decreased odds of MetS in these ethnicities (all odds ratios comparing extreme quintiles leg fat accumulation is inversely associated with adiposity-related biological factors and risk of MetS in both whites and ethnic groups, suggesting that regional fat distribution plays an important role in the etiology of adiposity-related diseases in these populations. PMID:23404933

  2. Metabolic Abnormalities of Erythrocytes as a Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease

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    Elena A. Kosenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a slowly progressive, neurodegenerative disorder of uncertain etiology. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, accumulation of non-soluble amyloid β peptides (Aβ in the Central Nervous System (CNS is the primary cause initiating a pathogenic cascade leading to the complex multilayered pathology and clinical manifestation of the disease. It is, therefore, not surprising that the search for mechanisms underlying cognitive changes observed in AD has focused exclusively on the brain and Aβ-inducing synaptic and dendritic loss, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. However, since Aβ depositions were found in normal non-demented elderly people and in many other pathological conditions, the amyloid cascade hypothesis was modified to claim that intraneuronal accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers, rather than monomer or insoluble amyloid fibrils, is the first step of a fatal cascade in AD. Since a characteristic reduction of cerebral perfusion and energy metabolism occurs in patients with AD it is suggested that capillary distortions commonly found in AD brain elicit hemodynamic changes that alter the delivery and transport of essential nutrients, particularly glucose and oxygen to neuronal and glial cells. Another important factor in tissue oxygenation is the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC to transport and deliver oxygen to tissues, which are first of all dependent on the RBC antioxidant and energy metabolism, which finally regulates the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. In the present review, we consider the possibility that metabolic and antioxidant defense alterations in the circulating erythrocyte population can influence oxygen delivery to the brain, and that these changes might be a primary mechanism triggering the glucose metabolism disturbance resulting in neurobiological changes observed in the AD brain, possibly related to impaired cognitive function. We also discuss the possibility of using

  3. Cardiovascular Risks Factors and their Relationship with Disorders of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism

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    Lilian Leguen Gulgar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in Cuba, where studies on emerging cardiovascular risk factors as predictors of cardiovascular risk are scarce. Objective: to determine the association between cardiovascular risk factors and disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Methods: a correlational study was conducted with a sample of 105 men and women selected from a total of 346 workers of the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos from June 2011 through July 2012. The variables analyzed were age, sex, blood pressure, waist circumference, tobacco use, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and B, TC/HDL ratio and apo B/apo AI ratio. Results: women older than 45 years had a higher prevalence of elevated waist circumference (60.0 %, hypertension (46.7 % and type 2 diabetes mellitus (54.3 % with hypertriglyceridemia (43.3 %, low HDLc levels (36.7 % and were 2.8 times more likely to develop elevated waist circumference; 66.7 % of the diabetic patients had low HDLc levels, 33.3 % developed hypertriglyceridemia and 66.7 % had a high total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. Conclusions: an association between age older than 45 years, female sex, obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus was observed. There was a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol levels in obese and diabetic patients. Increased risk of low HDL cholesterol and high total cholesterol / HDL cholesterol ratio were also found.

  4. Circuit weight training vs jogging in metabolic risk factors of overweight/obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Carlos Alexandre; Fett, Waléria Christiane Rezende; Marchini, Julio Sérgio

    2009-11-01

    Resisted and aerobic exercises are recommended to reduce weight and improve health, but which exercise modality offers the best results is still unclear. The aims of this study were to compare circuit weight training (CWT) with jogging (JOGG) on multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD), metabolic risk factors and fitness of overweight and obese women (body composition, lipid profile, uric acid, glucose, metabolic equivalent (MET), heart rate, blood pressure, flexibility, resting energy expenditure (REE) and nitrogen balance (NB)). Fifty women were randomly divided in two groups, but only 26 finished it: CWT (n=14; 36+/-12 years old; body mass index, BMI=32+/-7 kg/m(2)) and JOGG (n=12; 37+/-9; BMI=29+/-2). The first month of training consisted of 60 min x 03 days/week and the second month of training consisted of 04 days/week for both protocols and a dietary reeducation. Both groups reduced total body mass, fat body mass, BMI, plasma uric acid and increase in MET (p<0.05); there was no change in lean body mass, REE and resting heart rate. CWT reduced total cholesterol, plasma triglycerides, NB and increased flexibility; JOGG reduced waist/hip ratio, glucose, systolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (p<0.05). Both protocols improved CVD and metabolic risk factors. The CWT presented favorable changes regarding lipid profile and flexibility; JOGG on glucose, waist/hip ratio and blood pressure. These results suggest that resisted exercise combined with aerobics should be considered for obese people. Nevertheless, regarding some basal differences between the groups , it was not possible to conclude that changes were due to exercise type or intra-group variability.

  5. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A well...... factors than children having a high milk intake. The aim of the intervention study was to examine whether it is beneficial for overweight adolescents with a habitual low milk intake to increase the consumption of low fat milk and whether a potential beneficial effect is caused by whey or casein. The data...... and casein for prevention of cardiovascular diseases in overweight children. Also, this study indicates that increasing the intake of skimmed milk to 1L per day is not advice-able due to the apparent increase in body weight. Drinking water showed to be harmless and may even be beneficial in overweight...

  6. Relationship of Adipocyte Size with Adiposity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Asian Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Ved Prakash; Seenu, V.; Sharma, M. C.; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Gupta, Nandita; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Pandey, Ravindra M.; Luthra, Kalpana; Vikram, Naval K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enlargement of adipocyte is associated with their dysfunction and alterations in metabolic functions. Objectives We evaluated the association of adipocyte size of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue with body composition and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians. Methodology Eighty (40 males and 40 females) non-diabetic adult subjects undergoing elective abdominal surgery were included. Pre-surgery evaluation included anthropometric measurements, % body fat by bioimpedance, abdominal fat area at L2–3 level (computed tomography) and biochemical investigations (fasting blood glucose and insulin, lipids and hsCRP). During surgery, about 5 grams each of omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for adipocyte size determination. Results Females had higher BMI, % body fat, skinfold thickness, total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area as compared to males. Overweight was present in 42.5% and 67.5%, and abdominal obesity in 5% and 52.5% males and females, respectively. Subcutaneous adipocyte size was significantly higher than omental adipocyte size. Omental adipocyte size correlated more strongly than subcutaneous adipocyte size with measures of adiposity (BMI, waist circumference, %BF), total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area and biochemical measures (fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and HOMA-IR), the correlations being stronger in females. The correlation of adipocyte size with metabolic parameters was attenuated after adjusting for measures of adiposity. Conclusion Omental adipocyte size, though smaller than the subcutaneous adipocyte size, was more closely related to measures of adiposity and metabolic parameters. However, the relationship was not independent of measures of adiposity. PMID:25251402

  7. Relationship of adipocyte size with adiposity and metabolic risk factors in Asian Indians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ved Prakash Meena

    Full Text Available Enlargement of adipocyte is associated with their dysfunction and alterations in metabolic functions.We evaluated the association of adipocyte size of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue with body composition and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians.Eighty (40 males and 40 females non-diabetic adult subjects undergoing elective abdominal surgery were included. Pre-surgery evaluation included anthropometric measurements, % body fat by bioimpedance, abdominal fat area at L2-3 level (computed tomography and biochemical investigations (fasting blood glucose and insulin, lipids and hsCRP. During surgery, about 5 grams each of omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for adipocyte size determination.Females had higher BMI, % body fat, skinfold thickness, total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area as compared to males. Overweight was present in 42.5% and 67.5%, and abdominal obesity in 5% and 52.5% males and females, respectively. Subcutaneous adipocyte size was significantly higher than omental adipocyte size. Omental adipocyte size correlated more strongly than subcutaneous adipocyte size with measures of adiposity (BMI, waist circumference, %BF, total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area and biochemical measures (fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and HOMA-IR, the correlations being stronger in females. The correlation of adipocyte size with metabolic parameters was attenuated after adjusting for measures of adiposity.Omental adipocyte size, though smaller than the subcutaneous adipocyte size, was more closely related to measures of adiposity and metabolic parameters. However, the relationship was not independent of measures of adiposity.

  8. The preventable causes of death in the United States: comparative risk assessment of dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarz Danaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the number of deaths caused by risk factors is needed for health policy and priority setting. Our aim was to estimate the mortality effects of the following 12 modifiable dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors in the United States (US using consistent and comparable methods: high blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure; overweight-obesity; high dietary trans fatty acids and salt; low dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids (seafood, and fruits and vegetables; physical inactivity; alcohol use; and tobacco smoking.We used data on risk factor exposures in the US population from nationally representative health surveys and disease-specific mortality statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics. We obtained the etiological effects of risk factors on disease-specific mortality, by age, from systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that had adjusted (i for major potential confounders, and (ii where possible for regression dilution bias. We estimated the number of disease-specific deaths attributable to all non-optimal levels of each risk factor exposure, by age and sex. In 2005, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure were responsible for an estimated 467,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 436,000-500,000 and 395,000 (372,000-414,000 deaths, accounting for about one in five or six deaths in US adults. Overweight-obesity (216,000; 188,000-237,000 and physical inactivity (191,000; 164,000-222,000 were each responsible for nearly 1 in 10 deaths. High dietary salt (102,000; 97,000-107,000, low dietary omega-3 fatty acids (84,000; 72,000-96,000, and high dietary trans fatty acids (82,000; 63,000-97,000 were the dietary risks with the largest mortality effects. Although 26,000 (23,000-40,000 deaths from ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes were averted by current alcohol use, they were outweighed by 90,000 (88,000-94,000 deaths from

  9. [Sedentary lifestyle is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors independent of physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Ana María; Martínez, María Adela; Cristi-Montero, Carlos; Salas, Carlos; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Díaz Martínez, Ximena; Aguilar-Farías, Nicolás; Celis-Morales, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Sedentary behavior is a main risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. To investigate the association between sedentary behavior and metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors. We assessed 322 participants aged between 18 to 65 years. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured with accelerometers (Actigraph®). Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, percentage of body fat, diet and blood markers (glucose, lipid profile, insulin and HOMA-IR) were measured with standardized protocols. Thirty four percent of participants were physically inactive and spent on average 8.7 h/day on sedentary activities. Per one hour increase in sedentary behavior there were significant adverse changes in glucose (4.79 mg/dl), insulin (2.73 pmol/l), HOMA-IR (0.75), BMI (0.69 kg/m²), waist circumference (1.95 cm), fat mass (1.03%), total cholesterol (9.73 mg/dl), HDL-cholesterol (-3.50 mg/dl), LDL-cholesterol (10.7 mg/dl) and triglycerides (12.4 mg/dl). These findings were independent of main confounding factors including total physical activity, dietary factors, BMI and socio-demographics. The detrimental effect of sedentary behaviors on cardiometabolic and obesity-related traits is independent of physical activity levels. Therefore, reducing sedentary time should be targeted in the population apart from increasing their physical activity levels.

  10. Longitudinal child-oriented dietary intervention: Association with parental diet and cardio-metabolic risk factors. The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Johanna M; Pahkala, Katja; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma; Niinikoski, Harri; Jokinen, Eero; Lagström, Hanna; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli

    2017-11-01

    Background The child-oriented dietary intervention given in the prospective Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) has decreased the intake of saturated fat and lowered serum cholesterol concentration in children from infancy until early adulthood. In this study, we investigated whether the uniquely long-term child-oriented intervention has affected also secondarily parental diet and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods The STRIP study is a longitudinal, randomized infancy-onset atherosclerosis prevention trial continued from the child's age of 8 months to 20 years. The main aim was to modify the child's diet towards reduced intake of saturated fat. Parental dietary intake assessed by a one-day food record and cardio-metabolic risk factors were analysed between the child's ages of 9-19 years. Results Saturated fat intake of parents in the intervention group was lower [mothers: 12.0 versus 13.9 daily energy (E%), p cardio-metabolic risk factors were similar in the study groups. Conclusions Child-oriented dietary intervention shifted the dietary fat intakes of parents closer to the recommendations and tended to decrease total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intervention mothers. Dietary intervention directed to children benefits also parents.

  11. Arterial stiffness and its association with clustering of metabolic syndrome risk factors

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    Wanda R. P. Lopes-Vicente

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with structural and functional vascular abnormalities, which may lead to increased arterial stiffness, more frequent cardiovascular events and higher mortality. However, the role played by clustering of risk factors and the combining pattern of MetS risk factors and their association with the arterial stiffness have yet to be fully understood. Age, hypertension and diabetes mellitus seem to be strongly associated with increased pulse wave velocity (PWV. This study aimed at determining the clustering and combining pattern of MetS risk factors and their association with the arterial stiffness in non-diabetic and non-hypertensive patients. Methods Recently diagnosed and untreated patients with MetS (n = 64, 49 ± 8 year, 32 ± 4 kg/m2 were selected, according to ATP III criteria and compared to a control group (Control, n = 17, 49 ± 6 year, 27 ± 2 kg/m2. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by PWV in the carotid-femoral segment. Patients were categorized and analyzed according MetS risk factors clustering (3, 4 and 5 factors and its combinations. Results Patients with MetS had increased PWV when compared to Control (7.8 ± 1.1 vs. 7.0 ± 0.5 m/s, p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the variables that remained as predictors of PWV were age (β = 0.450, p < 0.001, systolic blood pressure (β = 0.211, p = 0.023 and triglycerides (β = 0.212, p = 0.037. The increased number of risk factors reflected in a progressive increase in PWV. When adjusted to systolic blood pressure, PWV was greater in the group with 5 risk factors when compared to the group with 3 risk factors and Control (8.5 ± 0.4 vs. 7.5 ± 0.2, p = 0.011 and 7.2 ± 0.3 m/s, p = 0.012. Similarly, the 4 risk factors group had higher PWV than the Control (7.9 ± 0.2 vs. 7.2 ± 0.3, p = 0.047. Conclusions The number of risk factors seems to increase arterial stiffness. Notably, besides

  12. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

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    Robert Carreras-Torres

    Full Text Available Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR, or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer.We identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,426 squamous cell and 2,664 small cell cases and 56,450 controls. The MR risk analysis suggested a causal effect of body mass index (BMI on lung cancer risk for two of the three major histological subtypes, with evidence of a risk increase for squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio (OR [95% confidence interval (CI] = 1.20 [1.01-1.43] and for small cell lung cancer (OR [95%CI] = 1.52 [1.15-2.00] for each standard deviation (SD increase in BMI [4.6 kg/m2], but not for adenocarcinoma (OR [95%CI] = 0.93 [0.79-1.08] (Pheterogeneity = 4.3x10-3. Additional analysis using a genetic instrument for BMI showed that each SD increase in BMI increased cigarette consumption by 1.27 cigarettes per day (P = 2.1x10-3, providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl, while fasting insulin was positively associated (OR [95%CI] = 1.63 [1.25-2.13] per SD of 44.4 pmol/l. Sensitivity analyses including a weighted-median approach and MR-Egger test did not detect other pleiotropic effects biasing the main results.Our results are consistent with a causal role of fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lung cancer etiology, as well as for BMI in squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The latter relation may be mediated by a previously unrecognized effect of obesity on smoking behavior.

  13. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Johansson, Mattias; Haycock, Philip C; Wade, Kaitlin H; Relton, Caroline L; Martin, Richard M; Davey Smith, George; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Andrew, Angeline; Arnold, Susanne M; Bickeböller, Heike; Bojesen, Stig E; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E; Chen, Chu; Christiani, David C; Christian, W Jay; Doherty, Jennifer A; Duell, Eric J; Field, John K; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Goodman, Gary E; Grankvist, Kjell; Haugen, Aage; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Heijden, Erik H F M; Kraft, Peter; Johansson, Mikael B; Lam, Stephen; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loïc; Liu, Geoffrey; Melander, Olle; Park, Sungshim L; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Angela; Haura, Eric B; Scelo, Ghislaine; Zaridze, David; Mukeriya, Anush; Savić, Milan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Swiatkowska, Beata; Janout, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Mates, Dana; Schabath, Matthew B; Shen, Hongbing; Tardon, Adonina; Teare, M Dawn; Woll, Penella; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wu, Xifeng; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hung, Rayjean J; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James; Brennan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer. We identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,426 squamous cell and 2,664 small cell cases) and 56,450 controls. The MR risk analysis suggested a causal effect of body mass index (BMI) on lung cancer risk for two of the three major histological subtypes, with evidence of a risk increase for squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.20 [1.01-1.43] and for small cell lung cancer (OR [95%CI] = 1.52 [1.15-2.00]) for each standard deviation (SD) increase in BMI [4.6 kg/m2]), but not for adenocarcinoma (OR [95%CI] = 0.93 [0.79-1.08]) (Pheterogeneity = 4.3x10-3). Additional analysis using a genetic instrument for BMI showed that each SD increase in BMI increased cigarette consumption by 1.27 cigarettes per day (P = 2.1x10-3), providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl), while fasting insulin was positively associated (OR [95%CI] = 1.63 [1.25-2.13] per SD of 44.4 pmol/l). Sensitivity analyses including a weighted-median approach and MR-Egger test did not detect other pleiotropic effects biasing the main results. Our results are consistent with a causal role of fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lung cancer etiology, as well as for BMI in squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The latter relation may be mediated by a previously unrecognized effect of obesity on smoking behavior.

  14. Associations between heart rate variability, metabolic syndrome risk factors, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Kiviniemi, Antti; Gill, Dawn P; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in heart rate variability (HRV) in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to determine associations between HRV parameters, MetS risk factors, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Participants (n = 220; aged 23-70 years) were assessed for MetS risk factors (waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and 5-min supine HRV (time and frequency domain and nonlinear). HRV was compared between those with 3 or more (MetS+) and those with 2 or fewer MetS risk factors (MetS-). Multiple linear regression models were built for each HRV parameter to investigate associations with MetS risk factors and HOMA-IR. Data with normal distribution are presented as means ± SD and those without as median [interquartile range]. In women, standard deviation of R-R intervals 38.0 [27.0] ms, 44.5 [29.3] ms; p = 0.020), low-frequency power (5.73 ± 1.06 ln ms(2), 6.13 ± 1.05 ln ms(2); p = 0.022), and the standard deviation of the length of the Poincaré plot (46.8 [31.6] ms, 58.4 [29.9] ms; p = 0.014) were lower and heart rate was higher (68 [13] beats/min, 64 [12] beats/min; p = 0. 018) in MetS+ compared with MetS-, with no differences in men. Waist circumference was most commonly associated with HRV, especially frequency domain parameters. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate. In conclusion, MetS+ women had a less favourable HRV profile than MetS- women, but there were no differences in men. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate, not HRV.

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors are really linked in the metabolic syndrome: this phenomenon suggests clustering rather than coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Kamimura, Norihito; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Makiyama, Yashiro; Usuda, Yoshimaru; Watanabe, Tohru; Kurashina, Yoshiaki

    2006-05-10

    The accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors can be seen in a single person but it needs to be determined if this occurs more frequently than might be explained by mere coincidence. This study involved 119,412 adults: 41,819 males and 77,593 females, who were 40 years of age or older and who underwent an annual health examination. From the clinical and biochemical data, the actual prevalence of a combination of 3 or more factors: abnormal body mass index (> or =25.0), hypertension, high triglyceride (> or =150 mg/dl), low HDL cholesterol (metabolism (fasting blood sugar > or =110 mg/dl or HbA1c. > or =5.5%) was determined. Then, the prevalence of a corresponding combination of 3-5 factors was predicted from the prevalence of each factor on the assumption that their combination occurs as a result of coincidence. The criteria of metabolic syndrome (> or =3 risk factors) was met in 17,842 (14.9%) of the examinees. The actual prevalence of any combination of 3-5 factors of metabolic syndrome was more frequent than those expected to occur by coincidence (P metabolic syndrome compared to that in the total examinees but it was 1.7 to 2.1 times higher in hypertension and high triglyceride. The former two were clustering more than hypertension or high triglyceride in metabolic syndrome. Abnormal levels of serum creatinine and total cholesterol were found more often in metabolic syndrome. Combinations of risk factors of metabolic syndrome were found more frequently than coincidental phenomenon in the subjects from the general population. These finding suggest that these risk factors do cluster and obesity and insulin resistance were suggested to be linked with metabolic syndrome more than hypertension or high triglyceride.

  16. Socioeconomic factors and the risk of metabolic syndrome in the adult Polish population: the WOBASZ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygnowska, Elżbieta; Piwońska, Aleksandra; Waśkiewicz, Anna; Broda, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and its development is determined by certain socioeconomic and lifestyle factors. To investigate the impact of socioeconomic and lifestyle factors on the risk of MetS and the underlying contributing factors in the Polish population aged 20-74 years. Between 2003 and 2005, as part of the National Multicentre Health Survey (WOBASZ, Wieloośrodkowe Badanie Stanu Zdrowia Ludności), a random sample of Polish residents aged 20 to 74 years was investigated. Data on sociodemographic and anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, lipid and glucose levels and medical history were collected. MetS was defined according to the criteria proposed by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) and by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2005. Data necessary to evaluate MetS and the socioeconomic characteristics were obtained for 5940 men and 6627 women. MetS was identified in 26.0% of men and 23.9% of women according to the AHA/NHLBI definition, and in 30.7% of men and 26.8% of women according to the IDF definition. In both genders older age, higher body mass index and current smoking increased the risk of developing MetS, whereas higher physical activity and good self-rated health decreased the risk. Moreover, women with higher education and in the higher quartile of alcohol intake were associated with a lower risk of having MetS. Household per-capita income did not affect the risk of having MetS in either gender. A relatively high percentage of individuals with MetS was observed in the Polish population aged 20 to 74 years. In both sexes, the risk of MetS and its contributing factors was significantly associated with age and the following lifestyle factors: body mass index, smoking, self-rated health and, additionally for women, higher education and alcohol intake.

  17. Association between yogurt consumption, dietary patterns, and cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Hubert; Thifault, Élisabeth; Garneau, Véronique; Tremblay, Angelo; Drapeau, Vicky; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-03-01

    To examine whether yogurt consumption is associated with a healthier dietary pattern and with a better cardio-metabolic risk profile among healthy individuals classified on the basis of their body mass index (BMI). A 91-item food frequency questionnaire, including data on yogurt consumption, was administered to 664 subjects from the INFOGENE study. After principal component analysis, two factors were retained, thus classified as the Prudent and Western dietary patterns. Yogurt was a significant contributor to the Prudent dietary pattern. Moreover, yogurt consumption was associated with lower body weight, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference and tended to be associated with a lower BMI. Consumers had lower levels of fasting total cholesterol and insulin. Consumers of yogurt had a positive Prudent dietary pattern mean score, while the opposite trend was observed in non-consumers of yogurt. Overweight/obese individuals who were consumers of yogurts exhibited a more favorable cardio-metabolic profile characterized by lower plasma triglyceride and insulin levels than non-consumers within the same range of BMI. There was no difference in total yogurt consumption between normal-weight individuals and overweight/obese individuals. However, normal-weight subjects had more daily servings of high-fat yogurt and less daily servings of fat-free yogurt compared to overweight/obese individuals. Being a significant contributor to the Prudent dietary pattern, yogurt consumption may be associated with healthy eating. Also, yogurt consumption may be associated with lower anthropometric indicators and a more beneficial cardio-metabolic risk profile in overweight/obese individuals.

  18. Health Behavior and Metabolic Risk Factors Associated with Normal Weight Obesity in Adolescents.

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    Anna S Olafsdottir

    Full Text Available To explore health behaviors and metabolic risk factors in normal weight obese (NWO adolescents compared with normal weight lean (NWL peers.A cross-sectional study of 18-year-old students (n = 182, 47% female in the capital area of Iceland, with body mass index within normal range (BMI, 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Body composition was estimated via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, fitness was assessed with maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max during treadmill test, dietary intake through 24-hour recall, questionnaires explained health behavior and fasting blood samples were taken. NWO was defined as normal BMI and body fat >17.6% in males and >31.6% in females.Among normal weight adolescents, 42% (n = 76 were defined as NWO, thereof 61% (n = 46 male participants. Fewer participants with NWO were physically active, ate breakfast on a regular basis, and consumed vegetables frequently compared with NWL. No difference was detected between the two groups in energy- and nutrient intake. The mean difference in aerobic fitness was 5.1 ml/kg/min between the groups in favor of the NWL group (p<0.001. NWO was positively associated with having one or more risk factors for metabolic syndrome (Odds Ratio OR = 2.2; 95% confidence interval CI: 1.2, 3.9 when adjusted for sex. High waist circumference was more prevalent among NWO than NWL, but only among girls (13% vs 4%, p = 0.019.High prevalence of NWO was observed in the study group. Promoting healthy lifestyle with regard to nutrition and physical activity in early life should be emphasized regardless of BMI.

  19. Takeaway food consumption and cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K J; Blizzard, L; McNaughton, S A; Gall, S L; Dwyer, T; Venn, A J

    2012-05-01

    Takeaway food consumption is positively associated with adiposity. Little is known about the associations with other cardio-metabolic risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether takeaway food consumption is associated with fasting glucose, insulin, lipids, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and blood pressure. A national sample of 1896, 26-36 year olds completed a questionnaire on socio-demographics, takeaway food consumption, physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Waist circumference and blood pressure were measured, and a fasting blood sample was taken. For this analysis, takeaway food consumption was dichotomised to once a week or less and twice a week or more. Linear regression was used to calculate differences in the adjusted mean values for fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, HOMA and blood pressure. Models were adjusted for age, employment status, leisure time physical activity and TV viewing. Compared with women who ate takeaway once a week or less, women who ate takeaway twice a week or more had significantly higher adjusted mean fasting glucose (4.82 vs 4.88 mmol/l, respectively; P=0.045), higher HOMA scores (1.27 vs 1.40, respectively, P=0.034) and tended to have a higher mean fasting insulin (5.95 vs 6.45 mU/l, respectively, P=0.054). Similar associations were observed for men for fasting insulin and HOMA score, but the differences were not statistically significant. For both women and men adjustment for waist circumference attenuated the associations. Consuming takeaway food at least twice a week was associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors in women but less so in men. The effect of takeaway food consumption was attenuated when adjusted for obesity.

  20. Independent associations of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness with metabolic risk factors in children: the European youth heart study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, U; Anderssen, S A; Froberg, K

    2007-01-01

    , time spent sedentary, and time spent in light, moderate and vigorous intensity PA) to metabolic risk factors in children and the relative importance of these factors. METHODS: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study in 9- to 10- and 15- to 16-year-old boys and girls from three regions...

  1. Effect of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors Clustering with or without Arterial Hypertension on Arterial Stiffness: A Narrative Review

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    Vasilios G. Athyros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors, either when called metabolic syndrome (MetS or not, substantially increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and causes mortality. One of the possible mechanisms for this clustering's adverse effect is an increase in arterial stiffness (AS, and in high central aortic blood pressure (CABP, which are significant and independent CVD risk factors. Arterial hypertension was connected to AS long ago; however, other MetS components (obesity, dyslipidaemia, dysglycaemia or MetS associated abnormalities not included in MetS diagnostic criteria (renal dysfunction, hyperuricaemia, hypercoaglutability, menopause, non alcoholic fatty liver disease, and obstructive sleep apnea have been implicated too. We discuss the evidence connecting these cardio-metabolic risk factors, which negatively affect AS and finally increase CVD risk. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of possible lifestyle and pharmacological interventions on all these cardio-metabolic risk factors, in an effort to reduce CVD risk and identify features that should be taken into consideration when treating MetS patients with or without arterial hypertension.

  2. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

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    Gitt A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anselm Gitt1, Christina Jannowitz2, Marthin Karoff3, Barbara Karmann2, Martin Horack1, Heinz Völler4,51Institut für Herzinfarktforschung an der Universität Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen,2Medical Affairs, MSD Sharp and Dohme GmbH, Haar, 3Klinik Königsfeld der Deutschen Rentenversicherung Westfalen in Ennepetal (NRW, Klinik der Universität Witten-Herdecke, 4Kardiologie, Klinik am See, Rüdersdorf, 5Center of Rehabilitation Research, University Potsdam, GermanyAim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR, and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1 patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2 risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3 control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR.Methods: Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status.Results: In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male, with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819 compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085 were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%. Patients with Met

  3. Sociocultural Characteristic, Lifestyle, and Metabolic Risk Factors Among a Sample of Kuwaiti Male University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sejari, Maha

    2017-03-01

    In the past six decades, the Kuwaiti population has been exposed to rapid transformation in the quality of diet intake, daily activities, and career types. This major socioeconomic shift was accompanied by the introduction of both communicable and noncommunicable chronic diseases afflicting people of all ages. This article aims to detect a relationship between sociocultural characteristics-such as physical activity, dietary habits, and smoking-and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted among 262 male university students in Kuwait; participants were selected by using a convenient nonrandom opportunistic sample. Associated social and health factors were obtained using a closed-ended questionnaire. BMI and blood tests that include clusters of MetS risk components were drawn from participants in primary health care clinics. More than half of the participants were overweight and obese; 74.4% of the participants reported they did not visit a nutritionist; 69.8% said that they are currently not on a diet; 53.4% of the students were nonsmokers; 42.7% reported moderate to very low daily physical activity. The prevalence of MetS components increased among students with older age, employed, and married ( p students needs to be considered by Kuwaiti community members and the government to highlight the risk factors of MetS on individuals' well-being, quality of life, and life expectation.

  4. Selenium, zinc, and copper plasma levels in patients with schizophrenia: relationship with metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidović, Bojana; Dorđević, Brižita; Milovanović, Srđan; Škrivanj, Sandra; Pavlović, Zoran; Stefanović, Aleksandra; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the plasma selenium (Se), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) levels and to evaluate their possible association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) components in patients with schizophrenia. The study group consisted of 60 patients with schizophrenia and 60 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and biochemical analysis of fasting blood were performed in all subjects. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher plasma Cu concentrations compared with controls (0.97 ± 0.31 vs. 0.77 ± 0.32 mg/L, p = 0.001). The plasma Cu concentration showed a positive correlation with plasma glucose and diastolic blood pressure in the patient groups (r s = 0.263, p < 0.05 and r s = 0.272, p < 0.05, respectively). The plasma Se level correlated positive with MetS score (r s = 0.385, p < 0.01), waist circumference (r s = 0.344, p < 0.05), plasma glucose (r s = 0.319, p < 0.05), and triglyceride concentrations (r s = 0.462, p < 0.001) in patients with schizophrenia. Plasma Zn did not correlate with any of the MetS components. These results suggest that alterations in plasma Cu and Se levels in medicated patients with schizophrenia could be associated with metabolic risk factors.

  5. Prevalence of Risk Factors for the Metabolic Syndrome in the Middle Income Caribbean Nation of St. Lucia

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    Colleen O’Brien Cherry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to measure the presence of metabolic syndrome risk factors in a sample population in the middle income Caribbean nation of St. Lucia and to identify the demographic and behavioral factors of metabolic syndrome among the study participants. Interviews and anthropometric measures were conducted with 499 St. Lucians of ages 18–99. Descriptive statistics were used for the analysis. Fifty-six percent of females and 18 percent of males had a waist size equal to or above the indicator for the metabolic syndrome. Behavioral risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle, smoking, and alcohol consumption varied by gender. Thirty-six percent of women and 22% of men reported a sedentary lifestyle and 43% of women and 65% of men reported any alcohol consumption. More research should be done to determine the cultural norms and gender differences associated with modifiable risk behaviors in St. Lucia.

  6. Association of lifestyle risk factors with metabolic syndrome components: A cross-sectional study in Eastern India

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    Pragya Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 20%–25% of the world adult population and nearly 30% of Indians have metabolic syndrome disorder. Our objective was designed to find out the association between important nutrients and potential lifestyle risk factors such as diet, physical inactivity, and smoking and alcohol consumption with the number of metabolic syndrome components. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 205 patients of metabolic syndrome were enrolled for this study. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was done on the basis of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria (NCEP ATP III 2004.Dietary data were collected with the validated food frequency questionnaire and 24 h dietary recall method, and the nutrient intake was calculated with the specially designed software. Results: Unhealthy dietary habits were seen more among the participants who had more than 3 risk factors. Results showed the odds of taking> 5 times junk foods was 3 times higher (odds ratio [OR]: 2.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.61–5.47, and sweet dishes was 2.3 times higher (OR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.28–4.24 among the participants who had 4–5 risk factors. However, milk and dairy products > 4 servings/day (OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.175–1.67 and pulses and legumes more than 2 servings/day (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.25–1.29 was protective against hypertension. Mean carbohydrate, saturated fat, and sodium intake was significantly higher in the participants who had 4–5 metabolic risk factors compared to 3 risk factors (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: It was concluded that low intake of fruits, vegetables, and higher intake of flesh food and inadequate physical activity significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome risk factors.

  7. National and subnational mortality effects of metabolic risk factors and smoking in Iran: a comparative risk assessment

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    Farzadfar Farshad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from cardiovascular and other chronic diseases has increased in Iran. Our aim was to estimate the effects of smoking and high systolic blood pressure (SBP, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, total cholesterol (TC, and high body mass index (BMI on mortality and life expectancy, nationally and subnationally, using representative data and comparable methods. Methods We used data from the Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance Survey to estimate means and standard deviations for the metabolic risk factors, nationally and by region. Lung cancer mortality was used to measure cumulative exposure to smoking. We used data from the death registration system to estimate age-, sex-, and disease-specific numbers of deaths in 2005, adjusted for incompleteness using demographic methods. We used systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiologic studies to obtain the effect of risk factors on disease-specific mortality. We estimated deaths and life expectancy loss attributable to risk factors using the comparative risk assessment framework. Results In 2005, high SBP was responsible for 41,000 (95% uncertainty interval: 38,000, 44,000 deaths in men and 39,000 (36,000, 42,000 deaths in women in Iran. High FPG, BMI, and TC were responsible for about one-third to one-half of deaths attributable to SBP in men and/or women. Smoking was responsible for 9,000 deaths among men and 2,000 among women. If SBP were reduced to optimal levels, life expectancy at birth would increase by 3.2 years (2.6, 3.9 and 4.1 years (3.2, 4.9 in men and women, respectively; the life expectancy gains ranged from 1.1 to 1.8 years for TC, BMI, and FPG. SBP was also responsible for the largest number of deaths in every region, with age-standardized attributable mortality ranging from 257 to 333 deaths per 100,000 adults in different regions. Discussion Management of blood pressure through diet, lifestyle, and pharmacological interventions should be a priority in Iran

  8. Frequency of Metabolic Risk Factors in Children with Urinary Tract Stones Referred to Hamadan Pediatric Nephrology Clinic

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    H.E. Momtaz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Urinary stones are among the most common complaints referred to nephrologist and urologists. Although incidence of urolithiasis is low in children compared to adults and only 7% of all urinary stones are diagnosed before the age of 16 but stones are detected more frequently in pediatric age group in recent years. Metabolic derangements, infection, neurogenic bladder and urinary obstruction are major risk factors of urolithiasis. Common metabolic risk factors of urolithiasis in children are hypercalciuria, uricosuria, hypocitraturia, hyperoxaluria, metabolic acidosis and cystinuria. There are many clinical studies about the frequency of these metabolic risk factors with different results reflecting difference in diet, geographic area and genetics in study populations. In this study we tried to evaluate the frequency of metabolic causes of urinary stones in children referred to Hamadan pediatric nephrology clinic.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study 156 patients referred due to urinary stones to pediatric nephrology clinic underwent thorough metabolic evaluations including: serum calcium,phosphorus, uric acid, creatinine and non fasting random urine sample for calcium, creatinine , uric acid , oxalate, citrate and cystine . urine solute: creatinine ratios were calculated and compared with normative data.Results: Of 156 patients 136(87.2% had metabolic derangements including: hyperuricosuria in 71 (45.5%, hypercalciuria in 41(26.3%, hypocitraturia in 26 (16.7%, hyperoxaluria in 16(10.3%,cystinuria in 1(0.6% and metabolic acidosis in 39 (25%.Conclusion: High rate of metabolic derangement in pediatric urinary stone patients mandates proper metabolic evaluation in all of them. hyperuricosuria was the most common metbolic finding instead of hypercalciuria in this study. This could be due to differences in diet, geographic area and genetic background in various populations.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci

  9. Metabolic syndrome's risk factors and its association with nutritional status in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Fabiana Costa; Pereira, Flavia Erika Felix; Pereira, Avany Fernandes; Ribeiro, Beatriz Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    The metabolic risk factors (RF) to the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been evidenced at early ages, including children. The aim of the present study was to identify the prevalence of RF to the diagnosis of MetS and its association with nutritional status of schoolchildren from 6 to 10 years old. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 505 students of municipal schools in Macae, Brazil, conducted from 2013 to 2014. The RF evaluated were: blood pressure (mm Hg), triglycerides (mmol/L), HDL-cholesterol (mmol/L) fasting glucose (mmol/L) and waist circumference (cm). At least one RF was present in 61% ( n  = 308) of the sample. By nutritional status, there was higher prevalence of RF in overweight/obese schoolchildren compared to those with normal weight, except in the concentration of HDL-c. The prevalence of one, two and three RF (MetS) were 34.7% ( n  = 175), 21.0% ( n  = 106) and 5.3% ( n  = 27), respectively. Two RF were more present in overweight (28.2% 95%CI 19.0; 39.0) and obese (41.5% 95%CI 31.4; 52.1) compared to normal weight children (13.5% 95%CI 9.9; 17.8). Three or more RF were more frequent among obese (25.5% 95%CI 17.0; 35.5) in relation to overweight (2.4% 95%CI 0.2; 8.2) and normal weight children (0.3% 95%CI 0; 1.7). The data indicate high prevalence of RF and its relationship with the magnitude of body weight excess. Therefore, the identification and early treatment of these RF might minimize the risk of MetS and related diseases.

  10. Metabolic syndrome's risk factors and its association with nutritional status in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Costa Teixeira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic risk factors (RF to the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS have been evidenced at early ages, including children. The aim of the present study was to identify the prevalence of RF to the diagnosis of MetS and its association with nutritional status of schoolchildren from 6 to 10 years old. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 505 students of municipal schools in Macae, Brazil, conducted from 2013 to 2014. The RF evaluated were: blood pressure (mm Hg, triglycerides (mmol/L, HDL-cholesterol (mmol/L fasting glucose (mmol/L and waist circumference (cm. At least one RF was present in 61% (n = 308 of the sample. By nutritional status, there was higher prevalence of RF in overweight/obese schoolchildren compared to those with normal weight, except in the concentration of HDL-c. The prevalence of one, two and three RF (MetS were 34.7% (n = 175, 21.0% (n = 106 and 5.3% (n = 27, respectively. Two RF were more present in overweight (28.2% 95%CI 19.0; 39.0 and obese (41.5% 95%CI 31.4; 52.1 compared to normal weight children (13.5% 95%CI 9.9; 17.8. Three or more RF were more frequent among obese (25.5% 95%CI 17.0; 35.5 in relation to overweight (2.4% 95%CI 0.2; 8.2 and normal weight children (0.3% 95%CI 0; 1.7. The data indicate high prevalence of RF and its relationship with the magnitude of body weight excess. Therefore, the identification and early treatment of these RF might minimize the risk of MetS and related diseases.

  11. Association between sleeping hours and cardiometabolic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Jason; Wu, Fen; Chen, Yu; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Alkhatim, Alser A; Abdou, Mamdouh H; Costa, Max

    2015-11-30

    Epidemiological and molecular studies have shown that sleep duration is associated with metabolic syndrome (MtS), a disease that is on the rise in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We aim to investigate the association between sleep duration and selected cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Secondary care was given to the participants. There were 2 participating centres, shopping malls in North and South Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We recruited 2686 participants over a 1-year study period. Participants were selected based on their willingness. The only criterion for exclusion was living in the area (North or South Jeddah) for less than 15 years. Participants were measured for blood sugar levels, blood pressure and body mass index. All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire. There was a positive association between longer sleep duration and obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia. The adjusted ORs for obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia were 1.54 (95% CI 1.20 to 1.98), 1.89 (95% CI 1.45 to 2.48) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.13), respectively, in participants sleeping >8 h/night, as compared with those sleeping 7 h. The positive associations between longer sleep duration, defined as sleeping >7 h, and the disease status, did not differ from other risk factors such as physical activity and nutrition. This is the first epidemiological study reporting on the association between sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Sleep durations of 8 h or greater were found to be associated with all 3 cardiometabolic risk factors: obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia, and this relationship was not confounded by quality of nutrition or physical activity levels. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Endothelial and metabolic disorders in adolescence: low birth weight is not an isolated risk factor.

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    dos Santos Alves, Priscila de Jesus; P T Henriques, Ana Ciléia; Pinto, Livia R M; S Mota, Rosa Maria; M Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Alves, Renata S; C Carvalho, Francisco Herlânio

    2015-03-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) seems to be a determining factor for many cardiovascular diseases in adult life. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with LBW and compare them with subjects with normal birth weights (NBW). This retrospective cohort study evaluated 172 adolescents (86 in each group) aged 10-20 years, who were born in a reference maternity hospital. The following criteria were adopted: International Diabetes Federation parameters for the diagnosis of MetS and flow-mediated brachial artery dilatation for endothelial dysfunction. Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney tests were used for continuous variables (depending on the normality of distribution evaluated by the Shapiro-Wilk test), and the Fisher exact test was used for categorical variables. The significance level was determined at 0.05. MetS was present in three cases of LBW and in four cases of NBW (p=0.70). The number of components of the syndrome was, on average, 0.6 and 0.5 in LBW and NBW, respectively (p=0.77). Endothelial dysfunction occurred in 25 (29.1%) cases of LBW and in 31 (36.1%) cases of NBW (p=0.33). LBW did not represent a risk factor in the occurrence of MetS or endothelial dysfunction in adolescence.

  13. Prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    Background: Since Iran’s economy is based on the sale of petroleum products, seafaring is considered a crucial job. Little research has been done on issues related to seafarers’ health in Iranian maritime industry. The present study investigated the prevalence and associated factors of cardio-met...

  14. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Sleepiness in Truck Drivers

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    Antonio de Padua Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Truck driver sleepiness is a primary cause of vehicle accidents. Several causes are associated with sleepiness in truck drivers. Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS are associated with sleep disorders and with primary risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD. We analyzed the relationship between these conditions and prevalence of sleepiness in truck drivers.Methods:We analyzed the major risk factors for CVD, anthropometric data and sleep disorders in 2228 male truck drivers from 148 road stops made by the Federal Highway Police from 2006 to 2011. Alcohol consumption, illicit drugs and overtime working hours were also analyzed. Sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.Results:Mean age was 43.1 ± 10.8 years. From 2006 to 2011, an increase in neck (p = 0.011 and abdominal circumference (p < 0.001, total cholesterol (p < 0.001, triglyceride plasma levels (p = 0.014, and sleepiness was observed (p < 0.001. In addition, a reduction in hypertension (39.6% to 25.9%, p < 0.001, alcohol consumption (32% to 23%, p = 0.033 and overtime hours (52.2% to 42.8%, p < 0.001 was found. Linear regression analysis showed that sleepiness correlated closely with body mass index (β = 0.19, Raj2 = 0.659, p = 0.031, abdominal circumference (β = 0.24, Raj2 = 0.826, p = 0.021, hypertension (β = -0.62, Raj2 = 0.901, p = 0.002, and triglycerides (β = 0.34, Raj2 = 0.936, p = 0.022. Linear multiple regression indicated that hypertension (p = 0.008 and abdominal circumference (p = 0.025 are independent variables for sleepiness.Conclusions:Increased prevalence of sleepiness was associated with major components of the MetS.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of metabolic syndrome in the Korean population--Korean National Health Insurance Corporation Survey 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Shil; Ko, Yu Kyung; Ban, Keum Ok

    2013-07-01

    To determine the factors affecting the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in younger and older Koreans. Metabolic syndrome, in combination with other, interrelated predisposing factors, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In Korea, the prevalence of this syndrome, like those of other chronic diseases, has increased continually in recent years. This is an analytic, descriptive cross-sectional study. This survey targeted 690,283 examinees that had undergone a medical examination on a life transition period performed by the National Health Insurance Corporation from January-December 2008. For the purpose of this study, the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on the criteria of the American Heart Association and the Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The relationship between the risk factors and prevalence rate was shown using a multiple logistic regression model. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 24·8% in the 40 year olds and 40·8% in the 66 year olds. Among the younger adults, the prevalence in women was only 0·57 times that in men. A multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that heavy obesity and family history of cardiovascular disease are the strongest independent predictors of metabolic syndrome among younger and older Koreans. As a management strategy, a nursing intervention strategy for the improvement of lifestyle factors including self-care through proper diet and exercise should be developed and implemented. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Comparison of metabolic syndrome with growing epidemic syndrome Z in terms of risk factors and gender differences.

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    Uyar, Meral; Davutoğlu, Vedat; Aydın, Neriman; Filiz, Ayten

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare metabolic syndrome with syndrome Z growing epidemic in terms of risk factors, demographic variables, and gender differences in our large cohort at southeastern area in Turkey. Data of patients admitted to sleep clinic in University of Gaziantep from January 2006 to January 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. ATP III and JNC 7 were used for defining metabolic syndrome and hypertension. Data of 761 patients were evaluated. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in patients with syndrome Z than in patients without metabolic syndrome. Age, waist/neck circumferences, BMI, triglyceride, glucose, and Epworth sleepiness scale score were detected higher, whereas the minimum oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome was more common in sleep apneic subjects than in controls (58 versus 30 %). Female sleep apneics showed higher rate of metabolic syndrome than those of males (74 versus 52 %). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and left ventricular hypertrophy were detected higher in males with syndrome Z than in males without metabolic syndrome. Snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were detected higher in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Systemic/pulmonary hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Complaints of headache and systemic/pulmonary hypertension were more common among females than males with syndrome Z. Female syndrome Z patients had lower minimum oxygen saturation than male patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome in sleep apneic patients is more prevalent than in controls. All metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly different among obstructive sleep apneic patients with respect to gender with more severe

  17. Effect of aerobic exercise training followed by a low-calorie diet on metabolic syndrome risk factors in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; So, R; Shimojo, N; Tanaka, K

    2015-09-01

    Whether low-volume, high-intensity, interval training (HIIT) is an adequate exercise method for improving metabolic risk factors is controversial. Moreover, it is not known if performing a short-term, low-calorie diet intervention (LCDi) after a HIIT program affects risk factors. This study investigated how an 8-week, 3 times/week exercise intervention (EXi) incorporating either HIIT or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) followed by a 4-week LCDi affects risk factors. Twenty-six male workers with metabolic risk factors (47.4 ± 7.1 years; cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2peak) of 28.5 ± 3.9 ml/kg/min) were randomly assigned to either the HIIT (3 sets of 3-min cycling with a 2-min active rest between sets, 180 kcal) or MICT (45 min, 360 kcal) group. After the EXi, all subjects participated in a 4-week LCDi (4 counseling sessions). During the EXi, VO2peak improved more (P strategy consisting of 8 weeks of either HIIT or MICT followed by a 4-week LCDi has a positive effect on metabolic risk factors. UMIN11352. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Personality, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers, and metabolic components as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocnet, Cornelia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Glaus, Jennifer; Rossier, Jérôme; Preisig, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality traits, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers and metabolic components as cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). A total of 2543 participants from the general population (CoLaus|PsyCoLaus) had provided complete information on physical health and unhealthy behaviors and completed the Revised NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Our results show a strong cross-correlation between obesity markers and metabolic components suggesting that their combination could represent an important CVRF. Moreover, socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, and physical inactivity were associated with both obesity markers and metabolic components latent traits. The conscientiousness personality trait was significantly associated with obesity markers, but played a modest role. Indeed, higher conscientiousness was associated with lower level of obesity indicators. However, no link between personality and metabolic components were found. In sum, our data suggest that health related behaviours have more effect on the development of cardiovascular diseases than personality traits.

  19. Metabolic profile and cardiovascular risk factors in adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

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    Mouna Feki Mnif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, long-term glucocorticoid treatment coupled with increased androgens may lead to undesirable metabolic effects. The aim of our report was to determine the prevalence of metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors in a population of adult patients with CAH due to 21 hydroxylase deficiency. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients (11 males and 15 females, mean age ± SD=27.4±8.2 years were recruited. Anthropometry, body composition, metabolic parameters and cardiovascular risk factors were studied. Results: Obesity (overweight included was noted in 16 patients (61.5%, with android distribution in all cases. Bioelectrical impedance showed increased body fat mass in 12 patients (46.1%. Lipid profile alterations and carbohydrate metabolism disorders were detected in seven (26.9% and five (19.2% patients respectively. Moderate hepatic cytolysis, associated with hepatic steatosis, was found in one patient. Seven patients (27% had insulin resistance. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring showed abnormalities in six patients (23%. Increased carotid intima media thickness was found in 14 patients (53.8%. Conclusion: Adult CAH patients tend to have altered metabolic parameters and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. Lifelong follow-up, lifestyle modifications, and attempts to adjust and reduce the glucocorticoid doses seem important.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

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    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  1. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil.

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    Marcia C de Oliveira Otto

    Full Text Available Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil.Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Brazil in 2010. Information on national diets and metabolic risks were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization database, and large observational studies including Brazilian adults. Relative risks for each risk factor were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials or prospective cohort studies; and disease-specific mortality from the GBD 2010 database. We quantified uncertainty using probabilistic simulation analyses, incorporating uncertainty in dietary and metabolic data and relative risks by age and sex. Robustness of findings was evaluated by sensitivity to varying feasible optimal levels of each risk factor.In 2010, high systolic blood pressure (SBP and suboptimal diet were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths in Brazil, responsible for 214,263 deaths (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 195,073 to 233,936 and 202,949 deaths (95% UI: 194,322 to 211,747, respectively. Among individual dietary factors, low intakes of fruits and whole grains and high intakes of sodium were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths. For premature cardiometabolic deaths (before age 70 years, representing 40% of cardiometabolic deaths, the leading risk factors were suboptimal diet (104,169 deaths; 95% UI: 99,964 to 108,002, high SBP (98,923 deaths; 95%UI: 92,912 to 104,609 and high body-mass index (BMI (42,643 deaths; 95%UI: 40,161 to 45,111.suboptimal diet, high SBP, and high BMI are major causes of

  2. Cardiorespiratory fitness and TV viewing in relation to metabolic risk factors in Portuguese adolescents.

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    Mota, Jorge; Santos, Rute; Moreira, Carla; Martins, Clarice; Gaya, Anelise; Santos, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, José Carlos; Vale, Susana

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether adolescents who have high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) co-existing with low levels of television (TV) viewing present a better metabolic risk profile compared to their low fit and high TV viewing counterparts. A total of 372 students (aged 12-15 years old) comprised the sample of this study. Anthropometric data (body mass index and waist circumference) was collected. CRF was calculated based upon the 20 metres shuttle run test. A questionnaire was used to estimate weekly TV viewing. Information about biological maturity and parental education was collected. Participants were then categorized into one of four category profiles according to the scores they achieved: low TV-Fit; high TV-Fit; low TV-Unfit and high TV-Unfit. Metabolic risk score (MRS) was calculated based on the sum of the Z-scores of all the metabolic variables analysed. Logistic regression analyses indicated that the high TV-Unfit group was almost 3-times more likely to be assigned to the high MRS group (OR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.08-7.50) compared to their low TV-Fit group counterparts. The data showed that the high TV-Unfit group was associated with an increased metabolic risk in adolescents after adjustment for gender, age, biological maturity and parental education.

  3. Association between cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic risk factors in a population with mild to severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kathy; Brown, Ruth E; Wharton, Sean; Ardern, Chris I; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    Previous literature suggests the beneficial effects of fitness on abdominal obesity may be attenuated in obesity and abolished in severe obesity. It is unclear whether the beneficial association between fitness and health is similarly present in those with mild and severe obesity. Patients from the Wharton Medical Clinic ( n  = 853) completed a clinical examination and maximal treadmill test. Patients were categorized into fit and unfit based on age- and sex-categories and body mass index (BMI) class (mild: ≤ 34.9 kg/m 2 , moderate: 35-39.9 kg/m 2 or severe obesity: ≥ 40 kg/m 2 ). Within the sample, 41% of participants with mild obesity had high fitness whereas only 25% and 11% of the participants with moderate and severe obesity, respectively, had high fitness. BMI category was independently associated with most of the metabolic risk factors, while fitness was only independently associated with systolic blood pressure and triglycerides ( P  fitness groups were only significantly different in their relative risk for prevalent pre-clinical hypertension within the severe obesity group ( p  = 0.03). High fitness was associated with smaller waist circumferences, with differences between high and low fitness being larger in those with severe obesity than mild obesity (Men: P  = 0.06, Women: P  = 0.0005). Thus, in contrast to previous observations, the favourable associations of having high fitness and health may be similar if not augmented in individuals with severe compared to mild obesity.

  4. Restorative Yoga and Metabolic Risk Factors: The Practicing Restorative Yoga vs. Stretching for the Metabolic Syndrome (PRYSMS) randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Alka M.; Araneta, Maria Rosario G.; Pawlowsky, Sarah B.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Grady, Deborah; Vittinghoff, Eric; Schembri, Michael; Chang, Ann; Carrion-Petersen, Mary Lou; Coggins, Traci; Tanori, Daniah; Armas, Jean M.; Cole, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Intensive lifestyle change prevents type 2 diabetes but is difficult to sustain. Preliminary evidence suggests that yoga may improve metabolic factors. We tested a restorative yoga intervention vs. active stretching for metabolic outcomes. Methods In 2009–2012, we conducted a 48-week randomized trial comparing restorative yoga vs. stretching among underactive adults with the metabolic syndrome at the Universities of California, San Francisco and San Diego. We provided lifestyle counseling and a tapering series of 90-minute group classes in the 24-week intervention period and 24-week maintenance period. Fasting and 2-hour glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, insulin, systolic blood pressure, visceral fat, and quality of life were assessed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Results 180 participants were randomized and 135 (75%) completed the trial. At 12 months, fasting glucose decreased more in the yoga group than in the stretching group (−0.35 mmol/L vs. −0.03 mmol/L; p=0.002); there were no other significant differences between groups. At 6 months favorable changes within the yoga group included reductions in fasting glucose, insulin, and HbA1c and an increase in HDL-cholesterol that were not sustained at 1 year except changes in fasting glucose. The stretching group had a significant reduction in triglycerides at 6 months which was not sustained at 1 year but had improved quality of life at both time-points. Conclusions Restorative yoga was marginally better than stretching for improving fasting glucose but not other metabolic factors. PMID:24418351

  5. Are metabolic signatures mediating the relationship between lifestyle factors and hepatocellular carcinoma risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assi, Nada; Thomas, Duncan C; Leitzman, Michael

    2018-01-01

    were related to targeted serum metabolites. METHODS: Lifestyle and targeted metabolomic data were available from 147 incident HCC cases and 147 matched controls. Partial Least Squares analysis related 7 lifestyle variables from a modified HLI to a set of 132 serum-measured metabolites and a liver......BACKGROUND: The "meeting-in-the-middle" (MITM) is a principle to identify exposure biomarkers that are also predictors of disease. The MITM statistical framework was applied in a nested case-control study of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within EPIC where healthy lifestyle index (HLI) variables...... function score. Mediation analysis evaluated whether metabolic profiles mediated the relationship between each lifestyle exposure and HCC risk. RESULTS: Exposure-related metabolic signatures were identified. Particularly, the BMI-associated metabolic component was positively related to glutamic acid...

  6. Effects of superfoods on risk factors of metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of human intervention trials.

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    van den Driessche, José J; Plat, Jogchum; Mensink, Ronald P

    2018-03-20

    Functional foods can be effective in the prevention of metabolic syndrome and subsequently the onset of cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes mellitus. More recently, however, another term was introduced to describe foods with additional health benefits: "superfoods", for which, to date, no generally accepted definition exists. Nonetheless, their consumption might contribute to the prevention of metabolic syndrome, for example due to the presence of potentially bioactive compounds. This review provides an overview of controlled human intervention studies with foods described as "superfoods" and their effects on metabolic syndrome parameters. First, an Internet search was performed to identify foods described as superfoods. For these superfoods, controlled human intervention trials were identified until April 2017 investigating the effects of superfood consumption on metabolic syndrome parameters: waist circumference or BMI, blood pressure, or concentrations of HDL cholesterol, triacylglycerol or glucose. Seventeen superfoods were identified, including a total of 113 intervention trials: blueberries (8 studies), cranberries (8), goji berries (3), strawberries (7), chili peppers (3), garlic (21), ginger (10), chia seed (5), flaxseed (22), quinoa (1), cocoa (16), maca (1), spirulina (7), wheatgrass (1), acai berries (0), hemp seed (0) and bee pollen (0). Overall, only limited evidence was found for the effects of the foods described as superfoods on metabolic syndrome parameters, since results were not consistent or the number of controlled intervention trials was limited. The inconsistencies might have been related to intervention-related factors, such as duration or dose. Furthermore, conclusions may be different if other health benefits are considered.

  7. Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors in Blacks and Whites: Dissecting Racial Paradox of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Kwame Osei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain as the leading cause of mortality in the western world and have become a major health threat for developing countries. There are several risk factors that account for the CVD and the associated mortality. These include genetics, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, and abnormal lipids and lipoproteins. The constellation of these risk factors has been termed metabolic syndrome (MetS. MetS varies among racial and ethnic populations. Thus, race and ethnicity account for some of the differences in the MetS and the associated CVD and T2DM. Furthermore, the relationships among traditional metabolic parameters and CVD differ, especially when comparing Black and White populations. In this regard, the greater CVD in Blacks than Whites have been partly attributed to other non-traditional CVD risk factors, such as subclinical inflammation (C-reactive protein, homocysteine, increased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, lipoprotein a, adiponectin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, etc. Thus, to understand CVD and T2DM differences in Blacks and Whites with MetS, it is essential to explore the contributions of both traditional and non-traditional CVD and T2DM risk factors in Blacks of African ancestry and Whites of Europoid ancestry. Therefore, in this mini review, we propose that non-traditional risk factors should be integrated in defining MetS as a predictor of CVD and T2DM in Blacks in the African diaspora in future studies.

  8. Evolution of metabolic risk factors over a two-year period in a cohort of first episodes of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioque, Miquel; García-Portilla, M A Paz; García-Rizo, Clemente; Cabrera, Bibiana; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Corripio, Iluminada; Vieta, Eduard; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Bobes, Julio; Gutiérrez-Fraile, Miguel; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Mezquida, Gisela; Llerena, Adrián; Saiz-Ruiz, Jeronimo; Bernardo, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    Patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) display a broad range of metabolic risk factors related to the development of diverse medical comorbidities. Initial stages of these disorders are essential in understanding the increased vulnerability of developing cardiometabolic disturbances, associated with a reduced life expectancy. This study aimed to evaluate the metabolic profile of a cohort of patients with a FEP and its evolution during a two year follow-up, as well as the factors that influence the changes in their metabolic status. 16 participating centers from the PEPs Project recruited 335 subjects with a FEP and 253 matched healthy controls, aged 9-35years. We investigated a set of anthropometric measures, vital signs and laboratory data obtained from each participant over two years in a prospective, naturalistic study. From the beginning of the study the FEP group showed differences in the metabolic profile compared to the control group, together with a progressive worsening in the major part of the analyzed variables during the follow-up period, with higher rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Certain risk factors were related to determinate clinical variables such as male gender, the presence of affective symptoms or an early onset or to treatment variables such as the use of antipsychotic polypharmacy, antidepressants or mood stabilizers. Our results highlight the extremely high risk of patients at early phases of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders of developing cardiovascular comorbidity and the fast worsening of the metabolic profile during the first two years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A prospective study of dairy consumption in relation to changes in metabolic risk factors: the Hoorn Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Marieke B; van Dam, Rob M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Hiddink, Gerrit J; Heine, Robert J; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2008-03-01

    Higher dairy consumption has been suggested to reduce the risk of obesity and metabolic disturbances. The aim of our study was to investigate the prospective association between dairy consumption and changes in weight and metabolic disturbances. Baseline dairy intake (servings/day) was assessed by a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire in 1,124 participants of the Hoorn Study. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between dairy intake and 6.4-year change in weight, fat distribution, and metabolic risk factors (glucoses, lipids, blood pressure) and the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS). Baseline dairy consumption was not associated with changes in fasting and post-load glucose concentrations, serum lipid levels (high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides), or blood pressure, nor with the risk of developing the MS in 6.4 years (odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was 0.86 (0.52-1.42) comparing highest with lowest quartile of dairy consumption). In subjects with BMI consumption was significantly associated with an increase in BMI, weight, waist, and a decrease in high-density lipoprotein. Our results do not support the hypothesis that a higher dairy consumption protects against weight gain and development of metabolic disturbances in a Dutch elderly population.

  10. Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Complications of Pregnancy and Maternal Risk Factors for Offspring Cardio-Metabolic Disease

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    Melinda Phang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA are important nutrients during periods of rapid growth and development in utero and infancy. Maternal health and risk factors play a crucial role in birth outcomes and subsequently offspring cardio-metabolic health. Evidence from observational studies and randomized trials have suggested a potential association of maternal intake of marine n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy with pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, there is inconsistency in the literature on whether marine n-3 PUFA supplementation during pregnancy can prevent maternal complications of pregnancy. This narrative literature review summarizes recent evidence on observational and clinical trials of marine n-3 PUFA intake on maternal risk factors and effects on offspring cardio-metabolic health. The current evidence generally does not support a role of maternal n-3 PUFA supplementation in altering the incidence of gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, or pre-eclampsia. It may be that benefits from marine n-3 PUFA supplementation are more pronounced in high-risk populations, such as women with a history of complications of pregnancy, or women with low marine n-3 PUFA intake. Discrepancies between studies may be related to differences in study design, dosage, fatty acid interplay, and length of treatment. Further prospective double-blind studies are needed to clarify the impact of long-chain marine n-3 PUFAs on risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease in the offspring.

  11. Distribution and characteristics of risk factors for cardiovascular–metabolic disease in a rural Kenyan community

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    James Muchira

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions/recommendations: The prevalence of CVMD was high but some risk factors usually associated with CVMD were not observed. There is need for locally-tailored approaches in treatment and prevention of CVMD at the local level.

  12. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Sales, Allan Robson Kluser [Unidade de Reabilitação Cardiovascular e Fisiologia do Exercício - Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da, E-mail: anobrega@id.uff.br [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p{sub sex} < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  13. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p sex < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions

  14. Associations between the GNB3 C825T polymorphism and obesity-related metabolic risk factors in Korean obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, K D; Kim, K K; Suh, H S; Hwang, I C

    2014-11-01

    It is important to identify a 'metabolically unhealthy obese' subset with higher cardiovascular risk among obese individuals. We investigated the associations between the GNB3 C825T polymorphism and obesity-related metabolic risk factors among Korean obese women. This study was a sub-investigation of a double-blind randomized controlled trial that examined the additive effect of or list at on weight loss with sibutramine. A sample of 111 obese women were divided into T-carriers (CT/TT) or a homozygous CC group, according to the presence of the 825T allele at GNB3. These groups were compared to determine their associations with obesity-related metabolic risk factors, i.e., fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin/insulin resistance, and abdominal fat amounts. The allele frequencies of the GNB3 polymorphism were C allele = 59.5% and T allele = 40.5%. The T allele was found to be significantly associated with greater visceral fat and higher serum lipids, and these significances remained robust after adjusting for potential covariates. The GNB3 825T polymorphism is significantly associated with greater visceral fat and higher serum lipids in Korean obese women and it suggests that the GNB3 C825T is a determinant of obesity-related metabolic traits in this population.

  15. The Effect of a Resistance Training Course on Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Females with Metabolic Syndrome

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    M Salesi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metabolic syndrome is considered as a risk factor for many chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The syndrome is caused by such factors as poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle, and genetic predisposition, while higher muscle strength levels are associated with a lower metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the response of some cardiovascular risk factors in females with metabolic syndrome after 10 weeks of resistance training (RT. Methods: In this study, 26 postmenopausal sedentary women without any diseases participated, who were selected via voluntary purposive sampling and randomly divided into two experimental and control groups. The subjects participated in anthropometric tests, including height, waist and hip ratios, weight, subcutaneous fat and blood sampling. The experimental group performed the RT for 3sessions in 10weeks with 40 to 50 percent of maximum repetition. Results: The study results suggested that after 10 weeks of RT in the experimental group, weight (p<0.001, total cholesterol (p<0.03 and triglyceride (p<0.001 indices were significantly decreased in comparison with those of the control group. BMI, waist ratio, fat percentage, systolic blood pressure and HDL significantly changed between pre and post-test of the experimental group, though these changes were not reported to be significant between the experimental and control groups. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed that a regular resistance training program could improve the cardiovascular risk factor in females with metabolic syndrome. However, the effective mechanisms in improving metabolic syndrome symptoms subsequent to exercise are not clearly recognized yet.

  16. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Johansson, Mattias; Haycock, Philip C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR), or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cance......-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lung cancer etiology, as well as for BMI in squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The latter relation may be mediated by a previously unrecognized effect of obesity on smoking behavior........1x10-3), providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl), while fasting insulin...

  17. Metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic risk factors as determinants of blood sugar control in diabetic patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuengsamarn, Somlak; Rattanamongkoulgul, Suthee

    2010-02-01

    To examine the effects of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic risk factors on blood sugar control in diabetic patients. This present retrospective cohort study of two hundreds of medical records of diabetes patients treated at the outpatient internal medicine department during the year 2006-2007. Data were collected using a case record form containing biochemical profile characteristics of patients and metabolic components by the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. The affecting factors to optimal treatment were analyzed to give descriptive (percent = %, mean, SD, median, range) and inferential statistics (odds ratio = OR). There were 200 diabetic patients included in the present study with males of 30.5% and females of 69.5%. Patients who have a higher number of components of criteria of metabolic syndrome tend to have difficulties in controlling their blood sugar (OR for 4 vs. control their blood sugar with OR of 3.87 (95% CI = 1.53-9.76). Diabetic patients who have higher components of metabolic syndrome and younger age tend to have difficulties in controlling their blood sugar. However, the association between having atherosclerotic risk factors and outcome of blood sugar control is inconclusive and needs further studies with a larger sample size.

  18. METABOLIC AND AUTOIMMUNE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE (CAD IN HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

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    T. A. Khalilulin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most essential autoimmunity risk factors for development of CAD are increasing level of anticardiolipin antibodies and homocystein. This report presents retrospective analyses of 39 heart transplant recipients with maximal follow up over 16 years. Our results showed that hyperhomocystenemia and high levels of anticardiolipin antibodies play great value in development of CAD. Thus relative risks for development of CAD in presence both high levels of anticardiolipin antibodies and homocysteine are higher, than in traditional nonimmune risk factors

  19. Hypogonadism in testicular cancer patients is associated with risk factors of cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogefors, C; Isaksson, S; Bobjer, J; Kitlinski, M; Leijonhufvud, I; Link, K; Giwercman, A

    2017-07-01

    More than 95% of testicular cancer are cured but they are at increased long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. The risk of cardiovascular disease and treatment intensity was reported, but it is unknown whether this effect of cancer therapy is direct or indirect, mediated through androgen deficiency. Our aim was, therefore, to evaluate whether testicular cancer patients have increased the prevalence of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and if these risk factors are associated with hypogonadism and/or the cancer treatment given. In 92 testicular cancer patients (mean 9.2 years follow-up) and age-matched controls, blood samples were analysed for lipids, total testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), glucose and insulin. An estimate of insulin resistance, HOMAir was calculated. Hypogonadism was defined as total testosterone  10 IU/L and/or androgen replacement. In testicular cancer men with hypogonadism, compared with eugonadal patients, higher insulin (mean difference: 3.10 mIU/L; p = 0.002) and HOMAir (mean difference: 0.792; p = 0.007) were detected. Hypogonadism group presented with increased risk (OR = 4.4; p = 0.01) of metabolic syndrome. Most associations between the treatment given and the metabolic parameters became statistically non-significant after adjustment for hypogonadism. In conclusion, testicular cancer patients with signs of hypogonadism presented with significantly increased risk of metabolic syndrome and investigation of endocrine and metabolic parameters is warranted in these patients. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Butyrate Reduces HFD-Induced Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Metabolic Risk Factors in Obese LDLr-/-.Leiden Mice

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    Charlotte E. Pelgrim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue (AT has a modulating role in obesity-induced metabolic complications like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM via the production of so-called adipokines such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin. The adipokines are believed to influence other tissues and to affect insulin resistance, liver function, and to increase the risk of T2DM. In this study, we examined the impact of intervention with the short-chain fatty acid butyrate following a high-fat diet (HFD on AT function and other metabolic risk factors associated with obesity and T2DM in mice during mid- and late life. In both mid- and late adulthood, butyrate reduced HFD-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and elevations in leptin levels, which were associated with body weight, and cholesterol and triglyceride levels. HFD feeding stimulated macrophage accumulation primarily in epididymal AT in both mid- and late life adult mice, which correlated with liver inflammation in late adulthood. In late-adult mice, butyrate diminished increased insulin levels, which were related to adipocyte size and macrophage content in epididymal AT. These results suggest that dietary butyrate supplementation is able to counteract HFD-induced detrimental changes in AT function and metabolic outcomes in late life. These changes underlie the obesity-induced elevated risk of T2DM, and therefore it is suggested that butyrate has potential to attenuate risk factors associated with obesity and T2DM.

  1. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Vinicius Pacheco Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. Objective: To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. Methods One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors, MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. Results: The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p 0.05. The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01. Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (psex < 0.01. Conclusions: Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, N.; Sarfraz, T.; Mumtaz, Z.; Rizwan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factors leading to metabolic syndrome among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian. Study was carried out over a period of six months from Jan 2015 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 110 patients were included in this study. Past history was taken to rule out alcohol intake, viral and drug induced etiology, to determine the presence of co-morbidities like obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia. Physical examination was carried to determine the arterial blood pressure and to determine anthropometric data that is weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity by measuring waist circumference. Results: Mean age of the patients was 49.95 +- 8.86 years. There were 72 male patients (65.5%) while 38 (34.5%) patients were female. Different metabolic factors were central obesity in 82 patients (74.5%), raised high density lipoprotein (HDL) in 19 patients (17.3%), raised cholesterol in 87 patients (79.1%), raised blood pressure in 65 patients (59.1%) and raised fasting plasma glucose in 82 patients (74.5%). Mean BMI was 26.31 kg/m2 +- 2.68, mean waist circumference was 109.82 cm +- 18.41, mean cholesterol was 237.50 +- 48.47mg/dl, mean systolic blood pressure was 148.88mmHg +- 22.10, mean diastolic blood pressure was 90.41mmHg +- 12.25 and mean fasting plasma glucose was 113.28mg/dl +- 22.80. Stratification with regard to age was carried out. Conclusion: A considerable number of patients with NAFLD had metabolic syndrome. There was a close correlation between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome. (author)

  3. Is age a risk factor for liver disease and metabolic alterations in ataxia Telangiectasia patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Talita Lemos; Rafael, Marina Neto; Hix, Sonia; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Kochi, Cristiane; Suano-Souza, Fabíola Isabel; da Silva, Rosangela; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T; Sarni, Roseli O S

    2017-08-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes and the risk for development of cardiovascular disease was recently associated as an extended phenotype of the disease. We aimed to assess IR; liver involvement; carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and metabolic alterations associated to cardiovascular risk in A-T patients, and relate them with age. Glucose metabolism alterations were found in 54.6% of the patients. Hepatic steatosis was diagnosed in 11/17 (64.7%) A-T patients. AST/ALT ratio > 1 was observed in 10/17 (58.8%). A strong positive correlation was observed between insulin sum concentrations with ALT (r = 0.782, p < 0.004) and age (r = 0.818, p = 0.002). Dyslipidemia was observed in 55.5% of the patients. The apolipoprotein (Apo-B)/ApoA-I ratio (r = 0.619; p < 0.01), LDL/HDL-c (r = 0.490; p < 0.05) and the Apo-B levels (r = 0.545; p < 0.05) were positively correlated to cIMT. Metabolic disorders implicated in cardiovascular and liver diseases are frequently observed in adolescent A-T patients and those tend to get worse as they become older. Therefore, nutritional intervention and the use of drugs may be necessary.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  5. Association of gender-specific risk factors in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases: an NHANES-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-E; Cheng, Bei; Wang, Qian; Wan, Jing-Jing

    2018-01-01

    In the present cross-sectional study, based on National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2007-2010) cohorts, various risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were analyzed (n=12,153). The variables analyzed include, demographics, comorbidities associated with MetS or CVD, behavioral and dietary factors, while the primary endpoints were the prevalence of MetS and CVD. The prevalence of MetS and CVD was slightly higher in males as compared with females (42.50% and 7.65% vs 41.29% and 4.13%, respectively). After controlling for confounding factors, advanced age, family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), overweight, and obesity were significantly associated with the likelihood of MetS, irrespective of gender differences. In males, the diagnosis of prostate cancer and regular smoking were additional risk factors of MetS, whereas, advanced age, family history of heart attack or angina, health insurance coverage, diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis or depression, obesity and low calorie intake were identified as risk factors for CVD. In addition to the above risk factors, higher physical activity and vitamin D insufficiency were also found to increase the risk of CVD in females. Furthermore, obesity was a higher risk factor for MetS than CVD. Emerging risk factors for CVD identified in this study has major clinical implications. Of interest is the correlation of higher physical activity and the risk of CVD in women and the role of depression and lower calorie intake in general population. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Influence of muscle fitness test performance on metabolic risk factors among adolescent girls

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    Mota Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the association between muscular fitness (MF, assessed by 2 components of Fitnessgram test battery, the Curl-Up and Push-Ups tests and the metabolic risk score among adolescent girls. Methods A total of 229 girls (aged 12-15 years old comprised the sample of this study. Anthropometric data (height, body mass, waist circumference were collected. Body mass index (BMI was also calculated. Muscular strength was assessed taking into account the tests that comprised the FITNESSGRAM test battery, i.e. the curl-up and the push-up. Participants were then categorized in one of 3 categories according the number of tests in which they accomplished the scores that allow them to be classified in health or above health zone. The blood pressure [BP], fasting total cholesterol [TC], low density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C], high density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides [TG], glucose, and a metabolic risk score (MRS were also examined. Physical Activity Index (PAI was obtained by questionnaire. Results Higher compliance with health-zone criteria (good in the 2 tests, adjusted for age and maturation, were positive and significantly (p ≤ 0.05 associated with height (r = 0.19 and PAI (r = 0.21, while a significant but negative association was found for BMI (r = -0.12; WC (r = -0.19; TC (r = -0.16; TG (r = -0.16; LDL (r = -0.16 and MRS (r = -0.16. Logistic regression showed that who were assigned to MF fittest group were less likely (OR = 0.27; p = 0.003 to be classified overweight/obese and less likely (OR = 0.26; p = 0.03 to be classified as having MRS. This last association was also found for those whom only performed 1 test under the health zone (OR = 0.23; p = 0.02. Conclusions Our data showed that low strength test performance was associated with increased risk for obesity and metabolic risk in adolescent girls even after adjustment for age and maturation.

  7. Prospective associations of depression subtypes with cardio-metabolic risk factors in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A M; Strippoli, M-P F; Glaus, J; Gholam-Rezaee, M; Vandeleur, C L; Castelao, E; Marques-Vidal, P; Waeber, G; Vollenweider, P; Preisig, M

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms and temporal sequence underlying the association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardio-metabolic diseases are still poorly understood. Recent research suggests subtyping depression to study the mechanisms underlying its association with biological correlates. Accordingly, our aims were to (1) assess the prospective associations of the atypical, melancholic and unspecified subtypes of MDD with changes of fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, (2) determine the potential mediating role of inflammatory marker or adipokine concentrations, eating behaviors and changes in waist circumference during follow-up. Data stemmed from CoLaus|PsyCoLaus, a prospective cohort study including 35-66-year-old randomly selected residents of an urban area. Among the Caucasian participants who underwent the physical and psychiatric baseline evaluations, 2813 (87% participation rate) also accepted the physical follow-up exam (mean follow-up duration=5.5 years). Symptoms of mental disorders were elicited using a semi-structured interview. The atypical MDD subtype, and only this subtype, was prospectively associated with a higher incidence of the metabolic syndrome (OR=2.49; 95% CI 1.30-4.77), a steeper increase of waist circumference (β=2.41; 95% CI 1.19-3.63) and independently of this, with a steeper increase of the fasting glucose level (β=131; 95% CI 38-225) during follow-up. These associations were not attributable to or mediated by inflammatory marker or adipokine concentrations, eating behaviors, comorbid psychiatric disorders or lifestyle factors. Accordingly, our results further support the subtyping of MDD and highlight the particular need for prevention and treatment of metabolic consequences in patients with atypical MDD.

  8. Relationship between TG/HDL-C ratio and metabolic syndrome risk factors with chronic kidney disease in healthy adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-I; Chen, Jau-Yuan; Chen, Shou-Yen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Weng, Yi-Ming; Tsao, Yu-Chung; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    The triglycerides-to-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio has been identified as a biomarker of insulin resistance and a predictor for atherosclerosis. The objectives of this study were to investigate which the TG/HDL-C ratio is useful to detect metabolic syndrome (MS) risk factors and subclinical chronic kidney disease (CKD) in general population without known CKD or renal impairment and to compare predictive accuracy of MS risk factors. This was a cross-sectional study. A total 46,255 subjects aged ≥18 years undergoing health examination during 2010-2011 in Taiwan. The independent associations between TG/HDL-C ratio quartiles, waist circumstance (WC) waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), mean atrial pressure (MAP), and CKD prevalence was analyzed by using logistic regression models. Analyses of the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were performed to determine the accuracy of MS risk factors in predicting CKD. A dose-response manner was observed for the prevalence of CKD and measurements of MS risk factors, showing increases from the lowest to the highest quartile of the TG/HDL-C ratio. Males and females in the highest TG/HDL-C ratio quartile (>2.76) had a 1.4-fold and 1.74-fold greater risk of CKD than those in the lowest quartile (≤1.04), independent of confounding factors. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) had the highest AUC for predicting CKD among MS risk factors. The TG/HDL-C ratio was an independent risk factor for CKD, but it showed no superiority over MAP in predicting CKD. A TG/HDL-C ratio ≥2.76 may be useful in clinical practice to detect subjects with worsened cardiometabolic profile who need monitoring to prevent CKD. TG/HDL-C ratio is an independent risk factor for CKD in adults aged 18-50 years. MAP was the most powerful predictor over other MS risk factors in predicting CKD. However, longitudinal and comparative studies are required to demonstrate the predictive value of TG/HDL-C on the onset and progression of CKD over

  9. [Metabolic syndrome and risk factors associated with life style among adolescents in a city in Argentina, 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo, Williams; Rascón, María Castillo; Bonneau, Graciela; de Pianesi, María Ibáñez; Olivera, Carlos Castro; de Aragón, Sonia Jiménez; Ceballos, Blanca; Gauvry, Gabriela

    2008-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among adolescents in a city in Argentina and to establish its association with certain risk factors linked to life style. Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of 532 middle and high school students from 11-20 years of age (mean: 15.3 years; females: 60%) in the city of Posadas, province of Misiones, Argentina, from July-October 2005. Surveys were conducted of individuals' dietary habits, anthropometric measurements, sedentary levels, blood pressure readings, and laboratory results. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed if three or more of the following conditions were present: fasting glucose > or = 110 mg/dL; triglycerides > or = 110 mg/dL; HDL cholesterol 90th percentile; and waist circumference > 90th percentile. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 4.5%; significantly higher among males than among females (7.5% vs. 2.5%; P = 0.006) and among the 15-20 year old age group than among the 11-14 year old group (6.3% vs. 2.5%; P = 0.037). Of the adolescents, 44.7% had one or more components of metabolic syndrome. The risk of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescents was elevated (odds ratio = 119.73; 95% confidence interval: 27.6-519.41). Dietary habits and frequency of food consumption were similar among students with and without metabolic syndrome; however, the first group consumed fattening foods more frequently. Of all the adolescents in the sample, 84.8% were sedentary (100% of those with metabolic syndrome). In the city of Posadas, some 1 400 students suffer from metabolic syndrome and about 13 000 have at least one metabolic syndrome component. Joint efforts by the state government and the community are needed to change dietary habits and increase physical activity, mainly among boys, those 15-20 years of age, and the obese, to reverse the situation and reduce the morbidity/mortality that results from metabolic syndrome.

  10. Prevalence of abdominal obesity and its association with cardio metabolic risk factors among older adults in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orces, Carlos H; Montalvan, Martha; Tettamanti, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of abdominal obesity and its association with cardio metabolic risk factors among older adults in Ecuador. The present study used data from the National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging survey to examine the prevalence of abdominal obesity according to certain demographic, behavioral, and health characteristics of the participants. Logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used to evaluate the association of abdominal obesity with cardio metabolic risk factors. Of 2053 participants aged 60 years and older, the prevalence of abdominal obesity was 65.9% (95% CI; 62.2%, 69.4%) in women and 16.3% (95% CI; 13.8%, 19.2%) in men. Notably, a higher prevalence of abdominal obesity was seen among residents in the urban areas of the country, those who reported their race as black or mulatto, individuals with sedentary lifestyle and obesity, and older adults with greater number of comorbidities. Moreover, after adjustment for potential confounders, women with abdominal obesity were 2.0, 2.8, and 1.6 times more likely to have diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, and hypertriglyceridemia as compared with those without, respectively. Likewise, men with abdominal obesity had 51% and 22% higher rates of hypertension and diabetes than their non-obese counterparts, respectively. the prevalence of abdominal obesity is high among older adults in Ecuador. Moreover, abdominal obesity is significantly associated with cardio metabolic risk factors. Therefore, further research is needed to evaluate sociodemographic and nutritional determinants of this emerging public health burden among older Ecuadorians. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors in parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and microalbuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Tossavainen, Päivi H; Owen, Katharine; Fullah, Catherine; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul; Masi, Stefano; Ong, Ken; Nguyen, Helen; Chiesa, Scott T; Dalton, R Neil; Deanfield, John; Dunger, David B

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the association between a clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors in parents and the development of microalbuminuria (MA) in their offspring with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). The study population comprised 53 parents (mean age [±SD]: 56.7±6.2 years) of 35 T1D young people with MA (MA+) and 86 parents (age: 56.1±6.3 years) of 50 matched offspring with normoalbuminuria (MA-), who underwent clinical, biochemical and cardiovascular imaging assessments. The primary study endpoint was the difference between parents from the MA+ and MA- groups in a cardio-metabolic risk score, calculated as the average value of the standardized measures (z-scores) for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Cardiovascular parameters, including carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), were also assessed. A DXA scan was performed to assess body composition. The cardio-metabolic risk score was significantly higher in parents of MA+ compared to parents of MA- offspring (mean [95% CI]: 1.066[0.076; 2.056] vs -0.268[-0.997; 0.460], P = .03). Parents of MA+ offspring had slightly higher values of waist circumference, lipids, insulin and blood pressure, although only diastolic blood pressure was statistically different between the 2 groups (P = .0085). FMD, cIMT, PWV (all P > .3), and DXA parameters (all P > .2) were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Parents of young offspring with childhood-onset T1D and MA showed an abnormal metabolic profile, reflected by a calculated risk score. The finding supports the role of a familial predisposition to risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennery, M.; Dupont, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the development of risk management in the gas sector business: why a risk factor legal mention must precede any published financial information? Do gas companies have to face new risks? Is there specific risks bound to gas activities? Why companies want to master their risks? Is it mandatory or just a new habit? Do they expect a real benefit in return? These are the risk management questions that are analyzed in this article which is based on the public communication of 15 gas companies randomly selected over the world. The information comes from their annual reports or from documents available on their web sites. The intention of this document is not to be exhaustive or to make statistics but only to shade light on the risk factors of the gas sector. (J.S.)

  13. Increased cardiometabolic risk factors and inflammation in adipose tissue in obese subjects classified as metabolically healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Catalán, Victoria; Rodríguez, Amaia; Andrada, Patricia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Ibáñez, Patricia; Vila, Neus; Romero, Sonia; Margall, María A; Gil, María J; Moncada, Rafael; Valentí, Víctor; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-10-01

    It has been suggested that individuals with the condition known as metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) may not have the same increased risk for the development of metabolic abnormalities as their non-metabolically healthy counterparts. However, the validity of this concept has recently been challenged, since it may not translate into lower morbidity and mortality. The aim of the current study was to compare the cardiometabolic/inflammatory profile and the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in patients categorized as having MHO or metabolically abnormal obesity (MAO). We performed a cross-sectional analysis to compare the cardiometabolic/inflammatory profile of 222 MHO and 222 MAO patients (62% women) matched by age, including 255 lean subjects as reference (cohort 1). In a second cohort, we analyzed the adipokine profile and the expression of genes involved in inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling in visceral adipose tissue (VAT; n = 82) and liver (n = 55). The cardiometabolic and inflammatory profiles (CRP, fibrinogen, uric acid, leukocyte count, and hepatic enzymes) were similarly increased in MHO and MAO in both cohorts. Moreover, above 30%of patients classified as MHO according to fasting plasma glucose exhibited IGT or T2D [corrected]. The profile of classic (leptin, adiponectin, resistin) as well as novel (serum amyloid A and matrix metallopeptidase 9) adipokines was almost identical in MHO and MAO groups in cohort 2. Expression of genes involved in inflammation and tissue remodeling in VAT and liver showed a similar alteration pattern in MHO and MAO individuals. The current study provides evidence for the existence of a comparable adverse cardiometabolic profile in MHO and MAO patients; thus the MHO concept should be applied with caution. A better identification of the obesity phenotypes and a more precise diagnosis are needed for improving the management of obese individuals. © 2014 by the American Diabetes

  14. Zinc Status Biomarkers and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Erika P. S.; Cunha, Aline T. O.; Aquino, Sephora L. S.; Pedrosa, Lucia F. C.; Lima, Severina C. V. C.; Lima, Josivan G.; Almeida, Maria G.; Sena-Evangelista, Karine C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) involves pathophysiological alterations that might compromise zinc status. The aim of this study was to evaluate zinc status biomarkers and their associations with cardiometabolic factors in patients with MS. Our case control study included 88 patients with MS and 37 controls. We performed clinical and anthropometric assessments and obtained lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory profiles. We also evaluated zinc intake, plasma zinc, erythrocyte zinc, and 24-h urinary zinc excretion. The average zinc intake was significantly lower in the MS group (p 0.05) between the two groups. We found significantly higher erythrocyte zinc concentration in the MS group (p < 0.001) independent from co-variable adjustments. Twenty-four hour urinary zinc excretion was significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.008), and adjustments for age and sex explained 21% of the difference (R2 = 0.21, p < 0.001). There were significant associations between zincuria and fasting blood glucose concentration (r = 0.479), waist circumference (r = 0.253), triglyceride concentration (r = 0.360), glycated hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.250), homeostatic model assessment—insulin resistance (r = 0.223), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration (r = 0.427) (all p < 0.05) in the MS group. Patients with MS had alterations in zinc metabolism mainly characterized by an increase in erythrocyte zinc and higher zincuria. PMID:28241426

  15. Zinc Status Biomarkers and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika P. S. Freitas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS involves pathophysiological alterations that might compromise zinc status. The aim of this study was to evaluate zinc status biomarkers and their associations with cardiometabolic factors in patients with MS. Our case control study included 88 patients with MS and 37 controls. We performed clinical and anthropometric assessments and obtained lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory profiles. We also evaluated zinc intake, plasma zinc, erythrocyte zinc, and 24-h urinary zinc excretion. The average zinc intake was significantly lower in the MS group (p < 0.001. Regression models indicated no significant differences in plasma zinc concentration (all p > 0.05 between the two groups. We found significantly higher erythrocyte zinc concentration in the MS group (p < 0.001 independent from co-variable adjustments. Twenty-four hour urinary zinc excretion was significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.008, and adjustments for age and sex explained 21% of the difference (R2 = 0.21, p < 0.001. There were significant associations between zincuria and fasting blood glucose concentration (r = 0.479, waist circumference (r = 0.253, triglyceride concentration (r = 0.360, glycated hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.250, homeostatic model assessment—insulin resistance (r = 0.223, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration (r = 0.427 (all p < 0.05 in the MS group. Patients with MS had alterations in zinc metabolism mainly characterized by an increase in erythrocyte zinc and higher zincuria.

  16. Effect of urinary tract infection on the urinary metabolic characteristic as a risk factor in producing urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eskandarifar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary metabolic disorders are one of the most common causes of stone formation in children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of urinary tract infections in the urinary metabolic characteristics as a risk factor in the incidence of urolithiasis. This case-control study was conducted in 222 children with urolithiasis in the range of 6 months to 16 years old in Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran during 2012-14. Patients were divided into two groups based on those with urinary tract infection and without urinary tract infection. Then, urine samples were collected from both groups, and levels of calcium, oxalate, citrate, uric acid, creatinine, and cysteine were measured. The collected information was analyzed using software SPSS (version 16. The ratio Average levels of calcium, magnesium, oxalate, cysteine, uric acid to creatinine in urine showed no significant difference between two groups based on statistical analysis. However, the amount of citrate to creatinine in children with urinary tract infection and urolithiasis was clearly less P=0.01. The results of this study show that the urinary tract infection cannot change the urinary metabolic characteristics, but it can be considered as a risk factor in kidney stone formation due to the reduced amount of citrate in the urine.

  17. Maternal Gene Polymorphisms Involved in Folate Metabolism as Risk Factors for Down Syndrome Offspring in Southern Brazil

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    Ana Paula Carneiro Brandalize

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the role of maternal polymorphisms, as well as their risk genotypes combinations of MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, CBS 844ins68, and RFC A80G, involved in folate/homocysteine metabolism, as possible risk factors for Down syndrome (DS in Southern Brazil. A case-control study was conducted with 239~mothers of DS children and 197 control mothers. The investigation of polymorphisms was performed by PCR and PCR-RFLP. The distribution of genotypic variants was similar in both groups when they were analyzed separately. An investigation of combined risk genotypes showed that the risk of having a DS child for one, two or three risk genotypes was 6.23, 6.96 and 5.84 (95%CI 1.48–26.26; 1.69–28.66; 1.37–24.86, respectively. The combined MTRR 66G and MTHFR 677T alleles were significantly more common among mothers of children with DS than among control mothers (OR 1.55; IC 95% 1.03–2.35. The results show that individual polymorphisms studied in this work are not associated with DS; however, the effects of the combined risk genotypes among MTR, MTRR, CBS and RFC genes are considered maternal risk factors for DS offspring in our population.

  18. Factor Structure of Indices of the Second Derivative of the Finger Photoplethysmogram with Metabolic Components and Other Cardiovascular Risk Indicators

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    Tomoyuki Kawada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe second derivative of the finger photoplethysmogram (SDPTG is an indicator of arterial stiffness. The present study was conducted to clarify the factor structure of indices of the SDPTG in combination with components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, to elucidate the significance of the SDPTG among various cardiovascular risk factors.MethodsThe SDPTG was determined in the second forefinger of the left hand in 1,055 male workers (mean age, 44.2±6.4 years. Among 4 waves of SDPTG components, the ratios of the height of the "a" wave to that of the "b" and "d" waves were expressed as b/a and d/a, and used as SDPTG indices for the analysis.ResultsPrincipal axis factoring analysis was conducted using age, SDPTG indices, components of MetS, and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and uric acid. Three factors were extracted, and the SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age as the third factor. Metabolic components and the SDPTG indices were independently categorized. These three factors explained 44.4% of the total variation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed age, d/a, serum uric acid, serum CRP, and regular exercise as independent determinants of the risk of MetS. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 1.08 (1.04 to 1.11, 0.10 (0.01 to 0.73, 1.24 (1.06 to 1.44, 3.59 (2.37 to 5.42, and 0.48 (0.28 to 0.82, respectively.ConclusionThe SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age, and they differed in characteristics from components of MetS or inflammatory markers. In addition, this cross-sectional study also revealed decrease of the d/a as a risk factor for the development of MetS.

  19. Effect of discontinuation of long-term growth hormone treatment on carbohydrate metabolism and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in girls with Turner syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.K. van Pareren (Yvonne); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); Th. Stijnen (Theo); T.C.J. Sas (Theo); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractGH treatment increases insulin levels in girls with Turner syndrome (TS), who are already predisposed to develop diabetes mellitus and other risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated carbohydrate metabolism and

  20. Relationships between alanine aminotransferase (ALT), visceral adipose tissue (AT) and metabolic risk factors in a middle-aged Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Rie; Yagi, Kunimasa; Nakanishi, Chiaki; Konno, Tetsuo; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Hayashi, Kenshi; Nohara, Atsushi; Inazu, Akihiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The commonly observed relationship between increased visceral adiposity and metabolic abnormalities may be partly mediated by a concomitant increase in liver fat content. We evaluated the independent association between the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as a surrogate marker of the liver fat content and the incidence of metabolic abnormalities after adjusting for the amount of visceral adipose tissue (AT). The subjects included 1,118 Japanese individuals (44% women) who underwent computed tomography to assess the amount of visceral AT on medical checkups. Cross-sectional associations between the serum ALT, visceral AT and metabolic risk factors were examined. The ALT level and visceral AT were found to show a significant correlation(r=0.41 in men and r=0.36 in women, p<0.001). In a multivariable linear regression analysis, the ALT level and visceral AT were found to be independently associated with blood pressure in men and triglycerides and 2-hour post-challenge glucose in both genders(p<0.01), whereas only visceral AT was found to be associated with HDL-cholesterol(p<0.01). When the participants were classified into four subgroups based on the 75th percentiles of ALT and visceral AT, the low ALT/high-visceral AT group, but not the high-ALT/low-visceral AT group, had a significantly higher odds ratio for low HDL-cholesterol among both genders(p<0.05) and for hypertriglyceridemia in men only(p<0.05). Meanwhile, the high-ALT/low-visceral AT group, but ot the low-ALT/high-visceral AT group, had a significantly higher odds ratio for IGT among women(p<0.05). Although the ALT level and visceral AT were found to be independently associated with most metabolic risk factors, visceral AT had a dominant association with dyslipidemia in both genders, while the ALT level appeared to have a closer association with IGT in women.

  1. One-carbon metabolism markers are associated with cardiometabolic risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Mads Vendelbo; Lauritzen, Lotte; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Alterations to one-carbon metabolism, especially elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy), have been suggested to be both a cause and a consequence of the metabolic syndrome (MS). A deeper understanding of the role of other one-carbon metabolites in MS, including s-adenosylmethioni......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Alterations to one-carbon metabolism, especially elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy), have been suggested to be both a cause and a consequence of the metabolic syndrome (MS). A deeper understanding of the role of other one-carbon metabolites in MS, including s...

  2. Comprehensive analysis of circulating adipokines and hsCRP association with cardiovascular disease risk factors and metabolic syndrome in Arabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of death worldwide including the Middle East. This is caused in part by the dysregulation of adipose tissue leading to increased production of pro-inflammatory adipokines and reduction in cardio-protective adipokines such as adiponectin. Ethnicity has been recognized as a major factor in the association between CVD risk factors and the different circulating adipokines. In this study, for the first time, the relationship between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and circulating level of adipokines in Arab ethnicity was investigated. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey on 379 adult Arab participants living in Kuwait. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure (BP), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG) were measured. Plasma levels of circulating Leptin, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI-1) visfatin, adiponectin, resistin and adipsin were assessed using the multiplexing immunobead-based assay. Results Circulating levels of High sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP), Leptin, PAI-1 and adiponectin were significantly higher in Arab women than men (p Arabs. PMID:24716628

  3. Effect of soy on metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscica, Massimiliano; Pavanello, Chiara; Gandini, Sara; Gomaraschi, Monica; Vitali, Cecilia; Macchi, Chiara; Morlotti, Beatrice; Aiello, Gilda; Bosisio, Raffaella; Calabresi, Laura; Arnoldi, Anna; Sirtori, Cesare R; Magni, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are currently the commonest cause of death worldwide. Different strategies for their primary prevention have been planned, taking into account the main known risk factors, which include an atherogenic lipid profile and visceral fat excess. The study was designed as a randomized, parallel, single-center study with a nutritional intervention duration of 12 weeks. Whole soy foods corresponding to 30 g/day soy protein were given in substitution of animal foods containing the same protein amount. Soy nutritional intervention resulted in a reduction in the number of MetS features in 13/26 subjects. Moreover, in the soy group we observed a significant improvement of median percentage changes for body weight (-1.5 %) and BMI (-1.5 %), as well as for atherogenic lipid markers, namely TC (-4.85 %), LDL-C (-5.25 %), non-HDL-C (-7.14 %) and apoB (-14.8 %). Since the majority of the studied variables were strongly correlated, three factors were identified which explained the majority (52 %) of the total variance in the whole data set. Among them, factor 1, which loaded lipid and adipose variables, explained the 22 % of total variance, showing a statistically significant difference between treatment arms (p = 0.002). The inclusion of whole soy foods (corresponding to 30 g/day protein) in a lipid-lowering diet significantly improved a relevant set of biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk.

  4. Self-management levels of diet and metabolic risk factors according to disease duration in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sukyung; Kim, Minkyeong; Park, Kyong

    2018-02-01

    Metabolic risk factors should be managed effectively in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to prevent or delay diabetic complications. This study aimed to compare the self-management levels of diet and metabolic risk factors in patients with T2DM, according to the duration of illness, and to examine the trends in self-management levels during the recent decades. Data were collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES, 1998-2014). In our analysis, 4,148 patients with T2DM, aged ≥ 30 years, were categorized according to the duration of their illness (accounting for the complex survey design of the KNHANES. In the multivariable adjusted models, patients with a longer duration (≥ 10 years) of T2DM had a higher prevalence of hyperglycemia than those with a shorter duration of T2DM (management has been found in those with a longer disease duration. These findings suggest the need for well-planned and individualized patient education programs to improve self-management levels and quality of life by preventing or delaying diabetic complications.

  5. Association of uric acid with risk factors for chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Shingo; Tsutsui, Kensuke; Fujii, Takurou; Yamazaki, Kouji; Anzawa, Ryuko; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Hyperuricemia has recently been recognized to not only be a predictor of cardiovascular disease but also a marker of metabolic syndrome. We examined the association between uric acid levels and various clinical parameters, including the components of metabolic syndrome, in essential hypertension. One hundred forty-six untreated Japanese hypertensive patients (mean 58.3 years) without overt cardiovascular disease were divided into low and high uric acid groups by the median uric acid value (cut-off: 6.3 for men and 4.4 mg/dL for women). The high uric acid group had higher serum creatinine (0.74 vs. 0.67 mg/dL, p = 0.019) and a larger body mass index (BMI) (25.2 vs. 23.6 kg/m(2), p = 0.018) compared to the low group. Men from the high uric acid group were younger and had higher blood pressure (BP) than men from the low group. Uric acid levels were correlated with creatinine in both genders, with blood pressure, triglycerides in men only, and with BMI, fasting glucose in women only. Multiple regression analysis also indicated a significant correlation of uric acid with creatinine in both genders, with triglycerides in men, and with glucose in women. Metabolic syndrome (modified NCEP-ATPIII definition) was found in 37.0% of the high uric acid group (men 45.0, women 27.3%) and 20.8% of the low group. Results suggest that an increase of uric acid is associated with impaired renal function and constitutes a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Uric acid may also be a useful index for initial risk stratification of untreated patients with essential hypertension.

  6. Adult mortality of diseases and injuries attributable to selected metabolic, lifestyle, environmental, and infectious risk factors in Taiwan: a comparative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Ku, Chu-Chang; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Chen, Chi-Ling; Lai, Mei-Shu; Lin, Hsien-Ho

    2017-05-03

    To facilitate priority-setting in health policymaking, we compiled the best available information to estimate the adult mortality (>30 years) burden attributable to 13 metabolic, lifestyle, infectious, and environmental risk factors in Taiwan. We obtained data on risk factor exposure from nationally representative health surveys, cause-specific mortality from the National Death Registry, and relative risks from epidemiological studies and meta-analyses. We applied the comparative risk assessment framework to estimate mortality burden attributable to individual risk factors or risk factor clusters. In 2009, high blood glucose accounted for 14,900 deaths (95% UI: 11,850-17,960), or 10.4% of all deaths in that year. It was followed by tobacco smoking (13,340 deaths, 95% UI: 10,330-16,450), high blood pressure (11,190 deaths, 95% UI: 8,190-14,190), ambient particulate matter pollution (8,600 deaths, 95% UI: 7,370-9,840), and dietary risks (high sodium intake and low intake of fruits and vegetables, 7,890 deaths, 95% UI: 5,970-9,810). Overweight-obesity and physical inactivity accounted for 7,620 deaths (95% UI: 6,040-9,190), and 7,400 deaths (95% UI: 6,670-8,130), respectively. The cardiometabolic risk factors of high blood pressure, high blood glucose, high cholesterol, and overweight-obesity jointly accounted for 12,120 deaths (95% UI: 11,220-13,020) from cardiovascular diseases. For domestic risk factors, infections from hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were responsible for 6,300 deaths (95% UI: 5,610-6,980) and 3,170 deaths (95% UI: 1,860-4,490), respectively, and betel nut use was associated with 1,780 deaths from oral, laryngeal, and esophageal cancer (95% UI: 1,190-2,360). The leading risk factors for years of life lost were similar, but the impact of tobacco smoking and alcohol use became larger because the attributable deaths from these risk factors occurred among young adults aged less than 60 years. High blood glucose, tobacco smoking

  7. Metabolic risk factors associated with serum creatinine in a non-diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronborg, Jens; Jenssen, Trond; Njølstad, Inger; Toft, Ingrid; Eriksen, Bjørn O

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance, low HDL-cholesterol and microalbuminuria are important components of the metabolic syndrome as defined by WHO. Insulin resistance and low HDL-cholesterol are also common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but it is not clear whether they are early or late phenomenons in the development of renal failure. This study examined whether low-grade albuminuria (microalbuminuria), lipoprotein fractions, and the insulin/glucose ratio (IGR)-a surrogate marker of insulin resistance-were related to renal function (expressed as serum creatinine) in persons without diabetes and with apparently normal renal function. The study included 4,131 men and women aged 55-75 years from the cross-sectional Tromsø IV survey (1994-1995). Lifestyle factors, waist circumference and blood pressure were included in the analyses. Gender stratified multivariate analysis was used to assess the relationship between serum creatinine and microalbuminuria, lipoprotein fractions and IGR. Serum creatinine was positively associated with microalbuminuria in men (beta = 2.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-4.34), but not in women. HDL-cholesterol and IGR were strongly associated with creatinine in both genders (HDL-cholesterol: Men: beta = -4.82, 95% CI -6.27 to -3.37; women: beta = -2.12, 95% CI -3.28 to -0.96. IGR: Second, third and fourth quartile compared with first quartile, men: beta = 0.94, 95% CI -0.63 to 2.51; 2.10, 95% CI 0.52-3.69 and 2.40, 95% CI 0.75-4.04; women: beta = 1.91, 95% CI 0.59-3.22; 2.61, 95% CI 1.28-3.95 and 3.20, 95% CI 1.80-4.60). These findings suggest that even early impairment of renal function may be associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, regardless of renal albumin leakage.

  8. Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and its Related Metabolic Risk Factors in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Atoosa; Maleki, Shahab; Adibi, Peyman; Etminani, Reza; Hovsepian, Silva

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its related risk factors among the general population of Isfahan city located in the central part of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of NAFLD among 483 general adult populations was determined using ultrasonography. Anthropometric and biochemical variables were compared in groups with and without NAFLD and their predictive value for occurrence of NAFLD was investigated also. Results: Prevalence of NAFLD was 39.3%. Frequency of focal fatty infiltration (FFI), Grade I, Grade II, and Grade III of NAFLD was 9.5%, 21.1%, 7.2%, 1.4%, respectively. Prevalence of different types of NAFLD and FFI, was not different between female and male participants (P = 0.238). Ordinal regression was determined that all of the studied variables have significant predictive value for NAFLD (P < 0.001, γ = 0.615). Spearman correlation indicated that there was a significant relationship between NAFLD and BMI (r = 0.37, P < 0.001), age (r = 0.15, P = 0.001), FBS (r = 0.20, P < 0.001), cholesterol (r = 0.19, P < 0.001), triglyceride (r = 0.20, P < 0.001), LDL (r = 0.16, P < 0.001), AST (r = 0.17, P < 0.001), and ALT (r = 0.31, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of NAFLD specially its lower grades among Isfahani adult general population and their association with studied variables, it seems that interventional studies which target-related mentioned risk factors could reduce the overall occurrence of NAFLD. PMID:28503502

  9. Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and its Related Metabolic Risk Factors in Isfahan, Iran

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    Atoosa Adibi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and its related risk factors among the general population of Isfahan city located in the central part of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of NAFLD among 483 general adult populations was determined using ultrasonography. Anthropometric and biochemical variables were compared in groups with and without NAFLD and their predictive value for occurrence of NAFLD was investigated also. Results: Prevalence of NAFLD was 39.3%. Frequency of focal fatty infiltration (FFI, Grade I, Grade II, and Grade III of NAFLD was 9.5%, 21.1%, 7.2%, 1.4%, respectively. Prevalence of different types of NAFLD and FFI, was not different between female and male participants (P = 0.238. Ordinal regression was determined that all of the studied variables have significant predictive value for NAFLD (P < 0.001, γ = 0.615. Spearman correlation indicated that there was a significant relationship between NAFLD and BMI (r = 0.37, P< 0.001, age (r = 0.15, P = 0.001, FBS (r = 0.20, P< 0.001, cholesterol (r = 0.19, P< 0.001, triglyceride (r = 0.20, P< 0.001, LDL (r = 0.16, P< 0.001, AST (r = 0.17, P< 0.001, and ALT (r = 0.31, P< 0.001. Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of NAFLD specially its lower grades among Isfahani adult general population and their association with studied variables, it seems that interventional studies which target-related mentioned risk factors could reduce the overall occurrence of NAFLD.

  10. Clustering of cardio metabolic risk factors in Iranian adult population: A growing problem in the north of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian-Tilaki, K; Heidari, B; Firouzjahi, A R

    2017-11-01

    The clustering of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a major concern in a transition population because of dramatic changing toward modern life styles. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of clustering of various combinations of MetS and its association with obesity. In a population- based cross-sectional study, a representative samples of 1000 adults were recruited in Babol, the north of Iran. The demographic data, blood pressure, body mass index and waist circumference (WC) were measured with standard method. Fasting blood sugar, serum levels of triglycerides, high density lipoprotein were measured with enzymatic method. A quarter of population had only one component of MetS. The prevalence of just two components was 30.7% and 26.2% in men and women respectively and about 67.1% of men and 73.3% of women had ≥2 risk factors (P=0.001). While the joint prevalence of three and four components was 22.0% and 12.0% in male and 27.3% and 16.5% in female respectively. The combination of high WC with any of other four components of MetS were significantly higher compared with any other joint combinations in particularly among women (P=0.001). The adjusted odds ratio for having clustering (≥2 risk factors) increased 5.6 times (95%CI: 2.15, 6.04) in obese subjects and remained at significant level after adjustment for age, sex, level of education. An emerging high rate of clustering of joint combination of cardio metabolic risk factors highlights an urgent intervention for life style modification in public health management. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factor assessment and counselling for 12 months reduces metabolic and cardiovascular risk in overweight or obese patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: The CRESSOB study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Pulido, Susana; Azanza, Jose R; Bernardo, Miguel; Rojo, Luis; Mesa, Francisco J; Martínez-Ortega, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular risk factors (CRF) have been associated with patients with schizophrenia. The main objective is to assess the evolution of CRF and prevalence of MS for 12 months in a cohort of overweight patients diagnosed with schizophrenia schizophreniform disorder or schizoaffective disorder in which the recommendations for the assessment and control of metabolic and cardiovascular risk were applied. The Control of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Schizophrenia and Overweight (CRESSOB) study is a 12-month, observational, prospective, open-label, multicentre, naturalistic study including 109 community mental health clinics of Spain. The study included a total of 403 patients, of whom we could collect all variables related to CRF and MS in 366 patients. Of these 366 patients, 286 completed the follow-up, (baseline, months 3, 6 and 12) where they underwent a complete physical examination and a blood test (glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides), they were asked about their health-related habits (smoking, diet and exercise) and they were given a series of recommendations to prevent cardiovascular risk and MS. A total of 403 patients were included, 63% men, mean age (mean; (SD)) 40.5 (10.5) years. After 12 months, the study showed statistically significant decrease in weight (prisk of heart disease at 10 years (p=0.0353). Overweight patients with schizophrenia who receive appropriate medical care, including CRF monitoring and control of health-related habits experience improvements with regard to most CRFs.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome in South African Patients with Severe Mental Illness: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors.

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    Shamima Saloojee

    Full Text Available There is a surge of cardiovascular disease (CVD in Africa. CVD is the leading cause of mortality among patients with severe mental illness (SMI in developed countries, with little evidence from the African context.To determine the prevalence and risk factors for MetS among South African patients with SMI.In a cross sectional study, individuals with SMI treated with antipsychotics and a control group without a mental illness, matched for age, gender and ethnicity were evaluated for MetS using the 2009 Joint Interim statement (JIS criteria.Of the 276 study group subjects, 65.9% were male, 84.1% black African, 9.1% white, 5.4% of Indian descent and 1.5% coloured (mixed race with a mean age of 34.7 years (±12.5. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis (73.2% and 40% were taking first generation antipsychotics. The prevalence of MetS was 23.2% (M: 15.4%, F: 38.3% in the study group and 19.9% (M: 11.9%, F: 36.3% in the control group (p = 0.4. MetS prevalence was significantly higher in study subjects over 55 years compared to controls (p = 0.03. Increased waist circumference (p< 0.001 and low high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (p = 0.003 were significantly more prevalent in study subjects compared to controls. In study subjects, risk factors associated with MetS included age (OR: 1.09, 95% CI 1.06-1.12, p < 0.001, female gender (OR: 2.19, 95% CI 1.06-4.55, p = 0.035 and Indian descent (OR: 5.84, 95% CI 1.66-20.52, p = 0.006 but not class of antipsychotic (p = 0.26.The overall MetS prevalence was not increased in patients with SMI compared to controls; however, the higher prevalence of the individual components (HDL cholesterol and waist circumference suggests an increased risk for CVD, especially in patients over 55 years.

  13. Correlation of Visceral Fat Area with Metabolic Risk Factors in Romanian Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Hâncu Anca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between visceral fat area (VFA, estimated by bioimpedance, and cardiovascular risk factors independent of BMI and waist circumference in a cohort of Romanian patients. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, in which were collected data from 751 patients ≥18 years of age from Cluj-Napoca. Anthropometric, biochemistry, body composition and medical history parameters were recorded from patients’ files. Results: Compared with the participants with VFA <100 cm2, those with VFA ≥100 cm2 had significantly worse levels of the laboratory parameters describing the glycemic metabolism, lipid metabolism and liver functions (p <0.05 for all. A higher percentage of participants with VFA ≥100 cm2 had diabetes, obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia (p <0.05 for all. VFA was correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and LDL-cholesterol levels, triglycerides, ALT, previous diagnosis of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia independent of BMI and waist circumference. Conclusions: Among this cohort of Romanian adults, an increasing level of visceral adiposity was correlated with worse lipid and glucose metabolism parameters as well as with increased levels of ALT, which probably reflects liver fat deposition.

  14. Impact of early psychosocial factors (childhood socioeconomic factors and adversities on future risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic disturbances and obesity: a systematic review

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    Tamayo Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological factors and socioeconomic status (SES have a notable impact on health disparities, including type 2 diabetes risk. However, the link between childhood psychosocial factors, such as childhood adversities or parental SES, and metabolic disturbances is less well established. In addition, the lifetime perspective including adult socioeconomic factors remains of further interest. We carried out a systematic review with the main question if there is evidence in population- or community-based studies that childhood adversities (like neglect, traumata and deprivation have considerable impact on type 2 diabetes incidence and other metabolic disturbances. Also, parental SES was included in the search as risk factor for both, diabetes and adverse childhood experiences. Finally, we assumed that obesity might be a mediator for the association of childhood adversities with diabetes incidence. Therefore, we carried out a second review on obesity, applying a similar search strategy. Methods Two systematic reviews were carried out. Longitudinal, population- or community-based studies were included if they contained data on psychosocial factors in childhood and either diabetes incidence or obesity risk. Results We included ten studies comprising a total of 200,381 individuals. Eight out of ten studies indicated that low parental status was associated with type 2 diabetes incidence or the development of metabolic abnormalities. Adjustment for adult SES and obesity tended to attenuate the childhood SES-attributable risk but the association remained. For obesity, eleven studies were included with a total sample size of 70,420 participants. Four out of eleven studies observed an independent association of low childhood SES on the risk for overweight and obesity later in life. Conclusions Taken together, there is evidence that childhood SES is associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity in later life. The database on the role of

  15. Lower-normal TSH is associated with better metabolic risk factors: a cross-sectional study on spanish men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and aims: Subclinical thyroid conditions, defined by normal thyroxin (T4) but abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, may be associated with cardiovascular and metabolic risk. More recently, TSH levels within the normal range have been suggested to be associated with metabolic ...

  16. Adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines in relation to metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Terumi; Murakami, Kentaro; Livingstone, M Barbara E; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-28

    While Japanese diets have attracted considerable attention because of, for example, the long-life expectancy in Japan, their health benefits have not been examined. In the present study, we cross-sectionally examined whether adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines is associated with metabolic risk factors in 1083 Japanese women aged 18-22 years. Based on the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top, adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines was assessed using dietary information on consumed servings of grain dishes, vegetable dishes, fish and meat dishes, milk and fruits and energy from snacks and alcoholic beverages during the preceding month, which was derived from a comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Higher dietary adherence was associated with higher intakes of protein, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, Na, K and vitamin C, and lower intakes of total and saturated fat. There was also an inverse association between dietary adherence and dietary energy density. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, dietary adherence was inversely associated with waist circumference (P for trend = 0·002). It also showed an inverse association with LDL-cholesterol concentrations (P for trend = 0·04). There was no association with the other metabolic risk factors examined, including BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and HDL-cholesterol, TAG, glucose, glycated Hb and insulin concentrations. In conclusion, higher adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines, which was characterised by favourable dietary intakes of foods and nutrients as well as lower energy density, was associated with lower waist circumference and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in this group of young Japanese women.

  17. Association of body composition assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis with metabolic risk factor clustering among middle-aged Chinese

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    Linfeng Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Body composition monitor (BCM based on the bioelectric impedance analysis is very convenient to use. However, whether percentage body fat (PBF and visceral fat index (VFI that acquired by BCM are superior to anthropometric measures is unknown. The study explored whether PBF and VFI are better than anthropometric indexes [body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and waist circumference to height ratio(WHtR] in predicating metabolic risk factor clustering in a representive sample across China which included 9574 Chinese men and women that were investigated in 2009–2010. PBF and VFI were compared with the BMI, WC, and WHtR through the area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and logistic regression. The results showed that the AUC for VFI was higher than BMI and PBF but lower than WHtR and WC in both men and Women. The AUC for WHtR, WC, VFI, BMI and PBF was 0.710, 0.706, 0.700, 0.693, 0.656 in men and 0.705, 0.699, 0.698, 0.675, 0.657 in women, respectively. After adjusting for the potential confounding factors, the odds ratios (ORs tended to increase with all the indexes. The curve of ORs for WHtR was steepest and the curve for PBF was flattest in both men and women; the curve for VFI was similar to WC in women, but flatter than WC in men. From the data we concluded that VFI seems better than BMI and PBF, but not superior to WC and WHtR in predicating metabolic risk factor clustering in the middle-aged Chinese.

  18. The relation between AKT1, cannabis use and metabolic risk factors in psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith; Bruins, Jojanneke; Van Beveren, Nico J.M.; Bruggeman, Richard; Alizadeh, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular and metabolic problems combined with a bad lifestyle are a major cause of a shortened life expectancy in chronic psychotic disorders. While the incidence of cannabis use is twice as high in psychosis compared to the general population, use of cannabis has been associated

  19. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Related Risk Factors among College Men and Women

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    Morrell, Jesse S.; Lofgren, Ingrid E.; Burke, Joanne D.; Reilly, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence of overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome (MbS) and its criteria, and nutrient intakes of college-age men and women via a large-scale screening. Participants and Methods: From August 2005 to July 2008, 2,722 subjects were recruited for the ongoing, cross-sectional…

  20. Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Diabetes, Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Metabolic Syndrome) in Older People with Intellectual Disability: Results of the HA-ID Study

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    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In older people with intellectual disability (ID), CVD is a substantial morbidity risk. The aims of the present study, which was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, were (1) to…

  1. Ethnic disparities in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in the Suriname Health Study: A cross-sectional population study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.K. Krishnadath (Ingrid S.K.); J.R. Toelsie (Jerry R.); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground The metabolic syndrome (MetS) indicates increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. We estimated the overall and ethnic-specific prevalence of MetS and explored the associations of risk factors with MetS among Amerindian, Creole, Hindustani, Javanese, Maroon

  2. Accuracy of body fat percent and adiposity indicators cut off values to detect metabolic risk factors in a sample of Mexican adults.

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    Macias, Nayeli; Quezada, Amado D; Flores, Mario; Valencia, Mauro E; Denova-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Quiterio-Trenado, Manuel; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Barquera, Simon; Salmerón, Jorge

    2014-04-10

    Although body fat percent (BF%) may be used for screening metabolic risk factors, its accuracy compared to BMI and waist circumference is unknown in a Mexican population. We compared the classification accuracy of BF%, BMI and WC for the detection of metabolic risk factors in a sample of Mexican adults; optimized cutoffs as well as sensitivity and specificity at commonly used BF% and BMI international cutoffs were estimated. We also estimated conditional BF% means at BMI international cutoffs. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data on body composition, anthropometry and metabolic risk factors(high glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol and hypertension) from 5,100 Mexican men and women. The association between BMI, WC and BF%was evaluated with linear regression models. The BF%, BMI and WC optimal cutoffs for the detection of metabolic risk factors were selected at the point where sensitivity was closest to specificity. Areas under the ROC Curve (AUC) were compared among classifiers using a non-parametric method. After adjustment for WC, a 1% increase in BMI was associated with a BF% rise of 0.05 percentage points (p.p.) in men (Pwomen (Pmen and 41.2±0.07 in women. Estimated BF% cutoffs for detection of metabolic risk factors were close to 30.0 in men and close to 44.0 in women. In men WC had higher AUC than BF% for the classification of all conditions whereas BMI had higher AUC than BF% for the classification of high triglycerides and hypertension. In womenBMI and WC had higher AUC than BF% for the classification of all metabolic risk factors. BMI and WC were more accurate than BF% for classifying the studied metabolic disorders. International BF% cutoffs had very low specificity and thus produced a high rate of false positives in both sexes.

  3. Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in an Urban and Rural Population in the Ashanti Region-Ghana: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

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    Obirikorang, Christian; Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Anto, Enoch Odame; Amponsah, Samuel Opoku; Adarkwa, Opei Kwafo

    2015-01-01

    There is a surge in chronic diseases in the developing world, driven by a high prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors. This study described differences in prevalence of obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors between urban and rural settlements in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. This comparative cross-sectional study included 672 participants (median age 50 years), of which 312 were from Kumasi (urban) and 360 from Jachie-Pramso (rural). Demographic, anthropometric and other cardio-metabolic risk factors were gathered and venous blood samples were drawn for biochemical assays. Results suggested significant differences in diastolic blood pressure (80.0 mmHg vs 79.5 mmHg; p = 0.0078), and fasting blood sugar (5.0 mmo/l vs 4.5 mmol/l; p urban area. Participants in the urban area were more likely than rural participants, to have high total cholesterol and LDL-c (p urban area. Markers of adiposity were higher amongst females than males in both areas (p urban area, hypertension, diabetes and lifestyle risk factors were more prevalent amongst males than females. Differences in risk factors by urban/rural residence remained significant after adjusting for gender and age. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are more prevalent amongst urban settlers, highlighting an urgent need to avert the rise of diet and lifestyle-related chronic diseases.

  4. Cross-sectional assessment of nut consumption and obesity, metabolic syndrome and other cardiometabolic risk factors: the PREDIMED study.

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    Núria Ibarrola-Jurado

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Prospective studies have consistently suggested that nut consumption is inversely related to fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease. Limited data are available on the epidemiological associations between nut intake and cardiometabolic risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate associations between frequency of nut consumption and prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors [obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS, type-2 diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia] in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 7,210 men and women (mean age, 67 y recruited into the PREDIMED study. MetS was defined by the harmonized ATPIII and IDF criteria. Diabetes and hypertension were assessed by clinical diagnosis and dyslipidemia (high triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and hypercholesterolemia by lipid analyses. Nut consumption was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and categorized as 3 servings/wk. Control of confounding was done with multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to participants consuming 3 servings/wk had lower adjusted odds ratios (OR for obesity (0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.68; P-trend <0.001, MetS (0.74, 0.65 to 0.85; P-trend<0.001, and diabetes (0.87, 0.78 to 0.99; P-trend = 0.043. Higher nut consumption was also associated with lower risk of the abdominal obesity MetS criterion (OR 0.68, 0.60 to 0.79; P-trend<0.001. No significant associations were observed for the MetS components high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, or elevated fasting glucose. CONCLUSIONS: Nut consumption was inversely associated with the prevalence of general obesity, central obesity, MetS, and diabetes in subjects at high cardiovascular risk.

  5. Cross-Sectional Assessment of Nut Consumption and Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: The PREDIMED Study

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    Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Bulló, Mònica; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Ros, Emilio; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Corella, Dolores; Fiol, Miquel; Wärnberg, Julia; Estruch, Ramón; Román, Pilar; Arós, Fernando; Vinyoles, Ernest; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Covas, María-Isabel; Basora, Josep; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prospective studies have consistently suggested that nut consumption is inversely related to fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease. Limited data are available on the epidemiological associations between nut intake and cardiometabolic risk factors. Objective To evaluate associations between frequency of nut consumption and prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors [obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), type-2 diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia] in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study of 7,210 men and women (mean age, 67 y) recruited into the PREDIMED study. MetS was defined by the harmonized ATPIII and IDF criteria. Diabetes and hypertension were assessed by clinical diagnosis and dyslipidemia (high triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, and hypercholesterolemia) by lipid analyses. Nut consumption was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire and categorized as 3 servings/wk. Control of confounding was done with multivariate logistic regression. Results Compared to participants consuming 3 servings/wk had lower adjusted odds ratios (OR) for obesity (0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.68; P-trend <0.001), MetS (0.74, 0.65 to 0.85; P-trend<0.001), and diabetes (0.87, 0.78 to 0.99; P-trend = 0.043). Higher nut consumption was also associated with lower risk of the abdominal obesity MetS criterion (OR 0.68, 0.60 to 0.79; P-trend<0.001). No significant associations were observed for the MetS components high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, or elevated fasting glucose. Conclusions Nut consumption was inversely associated with the prevalence of general obesity, central obesity, MetS, and diabetes in subjects at high cardiovascular risk. PMID:23460844

  6. [Nutritional and metabolic factors as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in an adult population in the city of Maracibo, Estado Zulia, Venezuela].

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    García-Araujo, M; Semprún-Fereira, M; Sulbarán, T A; Silva, E; Calmón, G; Campos, G

    2001-03-01

    To analyze the nutritional and metabolic risk factors for Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) present in a group of people in the city of Maracaibo a study was performed with 209 volunteers (145 women and 64 men) between 20 and 89 years of age who underwent: a) Anthropometric Evaluation: Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR) and Physical Examination: Systolic (SBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP); b) Dietetic Evaluation (24 hours recall), and c) Biochemical Evaluation: Glycemia (GLYC), Triglycerides (TG), Total Cholesterol (CHOL), HDL-C, LDL-C and VLDL-C, applying enzymatic methods. It was also investigated, their Age, Family History of Metabolic Alterations (FHMA), physical activity, smoking habits and alcohol consumption. More than 50% of the individuals showed a BMI > 25; 64% of women showed a WHR value > 0.8; 34 and 28% of men and women respectively had a high fat ingestion (HFI); 36% of men had hypertriglyceridemia and high levels of VLDL-C; 41% of women and 30% of men showed decreased HDL-C. A high frequency of FHMA was found in 85% of women and 78% of men followed by sedentary life in 64% of men and 79% of women. The age significantly (p < 0.05) affected the values for WHR, SBP, DBP, GLYC, CHOL, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C and VLDL-C. The dietetic evaluation showed a diet that was low in calories, high in protein, normal in fat and low in carbohydrates. It is concluded that the population elected for this study might be considered under a high risk for CVD, since both nutritional and metabolic factors, as well as the other risk factors analyzed, were present in a high percentage of the individuals studied.

  7. Length of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity bouts and cardio-metabolic risk factors in elementary school children.

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    Willis, Erik A; Ptomey, Lauren T; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N; Honas, Jeffery J; Lee, Jaehoon; Washburn, Richard A; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in bouts of 10 min is associated with improved cardio-metabolic risk factors (CMRF) in adults. To assess the association between the lengths of MVPA bouts and CMRF in elementary school age children. The sample included 396, 2nd and 3rd grade students from eastern Kansas (182 boys, 214 girls; age 7.6 ± 0.6 years; Body Mass Index Percentile [BMI%ile]: 61.6 ± 9.3) in the fall of 2011. Analyses were conducted in 2014. MVPA bouts were defined as sporadic (Children who accumulated MVPA with a higher percentage of short (5-children who accumulated MVPA with a lower percentage short and medium-to-long bouts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationships of physical fitness and obesity with metabolic risk factors in children and adolescents: Chungju city cohort study

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    Hyo Jin Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of physical fitness and obesity with metabolic risk factors in children and adolescents.MethodsThis cohort study was conducted in Chungju city, South Korea. Total 843 subjects were enrolled, including 193 elementary school 4th grade male (E4M, 189 elementary school 4th grade female (E4F and 461 male-middle school students (M1M. The subjects were also classified into 2 groups by body mass index; normal weight (NW group and overweight included obesity (OW/OB group. Physical fitness was measured by shuttle run (cardiorespiratory fitness, CRF, sit and reach (flexibility, handgrip strength (muscular strength and stand long jump (agility.ResultsThe prevalence of OW/OB was respectively 33.7% (65 of 193 among E4M, 28.6% (54 of 189 among E4F, and 28.0% (129 of 461 among M1M. Hematocrit, white blood cell, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were higher, while high-density lipoprotein were lower in the OW/OB group than in the NW group. The OW/OB group presented significantly lower CRF (P<0.01 and lower agility, but higher muscular strength compared with NW group. CRF was negatively correlated with obesity indices and metabolic risk factors. After adjustments for potential confounders, odds ratios for 4th–5th grade CRF of OW/OB compared NW in the E4M, E4F, M1M, were 7.38 (95 % CI, 3.24–16.83, 4.10 (95% CI, 1.83–9.18, 16.06 (95% CI, 8.23–31.00 (P<0.01.ConclusionOur study has shown that CRF has negative correlation with OW/OB in children and adolescents of Chungju city. We suggest that improvement of CRF through regular physical activity would be an important method for reducing the metabolic risks of childhood obesity.

  9. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

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    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  10. Metabolic risk factors, coping with stress, and psychological well-being in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavar, Ivan; Lovrić, Sanjin; Vukojević, Mladenka; Sesar, Irena; Petric-Vicković, Ivanka; Sesar, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the risk factors (age, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, consumption of alchohol and drugs, positive family history, and exposure to sunlight), coping with stress, psychological well-being and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Forty patients with ARMD (case group) and 63 presbyopes (control group) participated in the study. Patient data were collected through general information questionnaire including patient habits, the COPE questionnaire that showed the way the patients handling stress, and the GHQ that analyzed the psychological aspects of their quality of life. These questionnaires were administered to the patients during ophthalmologic examination. The study involved 46 (44.66%) men and 57 (55.33%) women. Statistical analysis showed that the major risks for the development of ARMD were elevated cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in plasma. A significantly higher number ofARMD patients had a positive family history when compared with presbyopes. This study showed presbyopes to cope with emotional problems significantly better and to have a lower level of social dysfunction when compared with ARMD patients. However, it is necessary to conduct further studies in a large number of patients to determine more accurately the pathophysiological mechanisms of metabolic factors as well as the impact of the disease on the quality of life in patients with ARMD.

  11. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease among women with polycystic ovary syndrome in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.

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    Shaman, Amani Ali; Mukhtar, Hytham Bahaeldin; Mirghani, Hyder Osman

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the commonest endocrine disorder at a reproductive age. It is associated with a high risk of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To measure the prevalence of MS in women with PCOS and to assess the global cardiovascular risk (CVR) among them. This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Khalid Hospital, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia during the period from February through December 2014. A total of 404 infertile women were randomly selected, and checked for diagnosing PCOS, MS and estimated CVD probability. Data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 22, using independent-samples t-test, Chi-square, and conditional logistic regression. A p-value of women with and without PCOS respectively (p<0.00). Results showed a statistically significant association between the two syndromes. Patients with the two syndromes showed high averages of clinical and biochemical values (p<0.00), high rate of predicted CVR, a high percentage of clustering of MS factors, and that weight-waist circumference - HDL are predictive for the occurrence of MS. PCOS is associated with the risk of development of MS, and CVD. Screening for early detection of PCOS and MS and the application of cohort studies are recommended to better explore the role of PCOS in the development of CVD and to assess the significance of interventions.

  12. Vitamin D status and associated metabolic risk factors among North Korean refugees in South Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Sun Hwa; An, Jee Hyun; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Young; Seo, Ji A; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Nam Hoon

    2015-11-30

    Vitamin D deficiency is now recognised as a common health problem associated with various chronic diseases; however, it has not been fully elucidated among the minority groups. Here, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its associated metabolic risk factors among North Korean refugees living in South Korea. Cross-sectional analysis from the longitudinal cohort, the North Korean refugee health in South Korea (NORNS) study. A total of 386 North Korean refugees aged ≥30 years, who measured serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) level. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D South Korea, physical activity and BMI. Vitamin D deficiency is very common among North Korean refugees in South Korea. Despite their lower BMI, vitamin D deficiency was associated with metabolic syndrome in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. The relation of metabolic syndrome according to five definitions to cardiovascular risk factors - a population-based study

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    Lai Ming-May

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI, World Health Organization (WHO, and the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS have been commonly used by studies, little is known about agreement among these five definitions. We examined the agreement among these five definitions and explored their relationship with risk factors of cardiovascular disease in a Taiwan population. Methods A total of 1305 subjects aged 40 years and over in Taiwan were analyzed. Biomedical markers and anthropometric indices were measured. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the odds of a high cardiovascular risk group for five definitions of MetS. Results The agreement among the NCEP, IDF, and AHA/NHLBI definitions was from substantial to very good, and agreement between the WHO and EGIR definitions was also substantial. All MetS definitions were significantly associated prevalence of microalbuminuria, elevated highly sensitive CRP (hs-CRP, and arterial stiffness only in women. In men, MetS by NCEP and AHA/NHLBI was associated with elevated level of hs-CRP and arterial stiffness. MetS by WHO and EGIR were significantly associated with microalbuminuria. And MetS by WHO was the only MetS definition that significantly associated with prevalence of arterial stiffness (OR: 2.75, 95% CI: 1.22-6.19. Conclusions The associations of these five definitions with cardiovascular risk factors were similar in women, and it was evident that the five definitions performed better in women than in men, with higher ORs observed in relation to arterial stiffness, elevated hs-CRP, and higher Framingham risk scores.

  14. Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study.

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    Subramanyam, Malavika A; Diez-Roux, Ana V; Hickson, Demarc A; Sarpong, Daniel F; Sims, Mario; Taylor, Herman A; Williams, David R; Wyatt, Sharon B

    2012-04-01

    Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N=5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic syndrome factors and risk of postoperative depression in high-grade glioma patients in a 1.5-year prospective study.

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    Jiao, Jian-Tong; Jiang, Chen; Huang, Jin; Dai, Min-Chao; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Chao; Shao, Jun-Fei

    2014-10-01

    To date, the relationship between metabolic syndrome factors and the risk of glioma-related depression is still unclear, and no study investigates this relationship. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome factors and the risk of postoperative depression in high-grade patients. A total of 386 high-grade glioma patients participated in blood sample collection for metabolic syndrome factors analysis and the hospital anxiety and depression scale testing. The association between metabolic syndrome factors and the risk of postoperative depression was assessed using Cox regression proportional hazards models, and Student's t tests were used to evaluate the differences in demographic variables and clinical characteristics in subgroups. The incidence of postoperative depression in our 1.5-year follow-up was 30.5%. We found the risk of postoperative depression was elevated with increased blood glucose level [hazard ratios (HR) 2.277, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.201-4.320, top vs. bottom quartile]. The hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of blood glucose (HR 1.672 per unit standard deviation, 95% CI 1.311-2.133] and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (HR 1.080, 95% CI 1.000-1.167). In addition, risk of postoperative depression risk was increased in high-grade glioma patients with high blood glucose levels (≥6.0 mmol/l) (HR 2.084, 95% CI 1.235-3.515). However, we did not find significant associations between postoperative depression and other metabolic syndrome factors, including body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Depression is prevalent among patients with high-grade glioma after operation. Blood glucose level is positively associated with the risk of postoperative depression, and might be involved in the etiology of postoperative depression, and may predict its development in high-grade glioma patients.

  16. Separate and joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors in working adults: a cross-sectional study.

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    Madina Saidj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The workplace is a main setting for prolonged sitting for some occupational groups. Convincing evidence has recently accumulated on the detrimental cardio-metabolic health effects of leisure-time sitting. Yet, much less is known about occupational sitting, and the potential health risk attached compared to leisure-time sitting. OBJECTIVE: To explore the separate and joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors in working adults. METHODS: All working adults (N = 2544 from the Health2006, a Danish population-based study, were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants reported hours of sitting during work, during leisure-time along with socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics, including physical activity. Cardio-metabolic risk factors (waist circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose were measured. Associations were explored by linear regression for leisure-time, occupational, and overall sitting time. RESULTS: Statistically significant (p<.05 detrimental associations of leisure-time sitting were observed with all cardio-metabolic risk factors, except hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose. Similarly, occupational sitting time was significantly detrimentally associated with HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin. For categories of sitting time, a joint adverse association of sitting much during both work-time and leisure-time was observed. CONCLUSION: The associations of occupational sitting time with cardio-metabolic risk factors were fewer and weaker compared to leisure-time sitting. Yet, the joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors were higher than the separate. Our findings amplify the need for further focus in this area prior to making assumptions about equivalent health risks across

  17. Impact of Metabolic Diseases, Drugs, and Dietary Factors on Prostate Cancer Risk, Recurrence, and Survival: A Systematic Review by the European Association of Urology Section of Oncological Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Riccardo; Brookman-May, Sabine D; Subiela Henríquez, Jose Daniel; Akdoğan, Bülent; Brausi, Maurizio; Klatte, Tobias; Langenhuijsen, Johan F; Linares-Espinos, Estefania; Marszalek, Martin; Roupret, Morgan; Stief, Christian G; Volpe, Alessandro; Minervini, Andrea; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar

    2018-04-13

    To date, established risk factors for prostate cancer (PCa) are limited to age, race, family history, and certain genetic polymorphisms. Despite great research efforts, available evidence on potentially modifiable risk factors is conflicting. Moreover, most studies on PCa risk factors did not consider the impact of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on PCa diagnosis. To provide a detailed overview of the latest evidence on the role of metabolic diseases, drugs, and dietary factors for risk of PCa incidence, recurrence, and survival in men exposed to PSA testing. A systematic review of the English-language literature was performed using the MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses recommendations. Randomized, case-control, or cohort studies published during the periods 2008-2017 (on drugs and metabolic diseases) and 2003-2017 (on dietary factors), with extensive follow-up (≥8-10yr for studies on PCa risk; ≥2-5yr for studies on PCa recurrence, progression, and survival, depending on the review subtopic) and adjusting of the analyses, beyond established risk factors, for either rate of PSA testing (for risk analyses) or PCa stage and primary treatment (for survival analyses), were eligible for inclusion. Overall, 39 reports from 22 observational studies were included. Studies were heterogeneous regarding definitions of exposure or outcomes, length of follow-up, risk of bias, and confounding. For some risk factors, evidence was insufficient to assess potential effects, while for others there was no evidence of an effect. For selected risk factors, namely metformin, aspirin and statin use, diabetes, obesity, and specific dietary intakes, there was low-quality evidence of modest effects on PCa risk. Current evidence from long-term observational studies evaluating the effect of drugs, metabolic diseases, and dietary factors for PCa risk

  18. Meal replacement based on Human Ration modulates metabolic risk factors during body weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Alves, Natalia Elizabeth Galdino; Enes, Bárbara Nery; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia Gonçalves; Ribeiro, Sônia Machado Rocha

    2014-04-01

    A meal replacement may be an effective strategy in the management of obesity to increase antioxidant intake, attenuating oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of a new nutritional supplement to reduce metabolic risk parameters in obese women. In a randomized controlled crossover study (2 × 2), 22 women (percentage body fat 40.52 ± 3.75%; body mass index-BMI 28.72 ± 2.87 kg/m²; 35.04 ± 5.6 years old) were allocated into two treatments: hypocaloric diet and drink containing "Human Ration" (HR) consumption (CRHR), and hypocaloric diet and control drink consumption (CR). The study consisted of 2 periods of 5 weeks with 1 week of washout in two orders (CR → CRHR and CRHR → CR). Caloric restriction was 15%, based on estimated energy requirement. Anthropometric, clinical and metabolic risk parameters were assessed at baseline and at the end of each period. Some metabolic risk factors were favorably modulated in both interventions: reduction in body weight (CR -0.74 ± 1.27 kg; p = 0.01; CRHR -0.77 ± 1.3 kg; p = 0.02), body mass index (BMI) (CR -0.27 ± 0.51 kg/m²; p = 0.02; CRHR -0.30 ± 0.52 kg/m²; p = 0.01) and HOMA-IR (CR -0.35 ± 0.82; p = 0.02, CRHR -0.41 ± 0.83; p = 0.03). However, CRHR reduced waist circumference (-2.54 ± 2.74 cm; p < 0.01) and gynoid fat (-0.264 ± 0.28 g; p < 0.01), and increased HDL-c levels (0.08 ± 0.15 mmol/l; p = 0.04). Associated with hypocaloric diet, the intake of a nutritional supplement rich in phytochemicals as a breakfast substitute for 5 weeks had no additional effect on weight reduction than caloric restriction alone, but increased central lipolysis and improved the lipoprotein profile.

  19. Review: Efficacy of alginate supplementation in relation to appetite regulation and metabolic risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Georg; Pedersen, C; Kristensen, Mette Bredal

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a critical update on human and animal studies investigating the effect of alginate supplementation on appetite regulation, glycaemic and insulinemic responses, and lipid metabolism with discussion of the evidence on potential mechanisms, efficacy and tolerability. Dependent...... on vehicle applied for alginate supplementation, the majority of animal and human studies suggest that alginate consumption does suppress satiety and to some extent energy intake. Only one long-term intervention trial found effects on weight loss. In addition, alginates seem to exhibit beneficial influence...... on postprandial glucose absorption and insulin response in animals and humans. However, alginate supplementation was only found to have cholesterol-lowering properties in animals. Several mechanisms have been suggested for the positive effect observed, which involve delayed gastric emptying, increased viscosity...

  20. Relationship between body fat percentage determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis and metabolic risk factors in Syrian male adolescents (18–19 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bachir Mahfouz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between increasing obesity and metabolic syndrome among adolescent and the adverse consequences in adulthood including type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease is well documented. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the major metabolic risk factors and some clinical important parameters in Syrian male adolescents (18-19 years old, and to assess the correlations between BF% determined by BIA-man prediction equation and metabolic risk factors in the same group. The correlations between body fat percentage (BF% based on BIA-man predictive equations, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar (FBS, cholesterol (Chol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, triglycerides (TG, Hematocrit (Ht, and hemoglobin (Hb in 1596 healthy Syrian adolescents aged 18-19 years and the mean values of these parameters were examined. Data showed that, DBP, Chol, TG, LDL and TG/HDL-C were significantly (p<0.05 higher in overweight and obese subjects in compression to normal weight cases. Whereas, SBP, FBS and Ht were significantly (p<0.05 higher in obese subjects in compression to normal weight. However, all measured variable related to metabolic syndrome risk factors increased with increasing the BF% determined by BIA-man. The present study suggests that % BF by BIA-man is a good predictor of metabolic risks factors for Syrian adolescents.

  1. The effect of UHT processed dairy milk on cardio-metabolic risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Kromann; Klingenberg, Lars; Larsen, Lotte Bach

    2017-01-01

    . No effects of type of milk were found for blood pressure, insulin, glucose concentration and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) or body weight. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that UHT processing of milk increases the risk of CVD.European Journal...

  2. The Age-Specific Quantitative Effects of Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Gitanjali M; Danaei, Goodarz; Farzadfar, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not availa...

  3. Cheese Consumption and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and the Metabolic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raziani, Farinaz

    and postprandial insulin and triacylglycerols (TAGs), high blood pressure (BP), and small, dense LDL particles may contribute on their own to increased CVD risk. In several countries, the CVDrelated dietary guidelines proposed by health authorities focus on reducing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFAs...

  4. New features correction of the dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes mellitus and metabolic cardiovascular risk factors

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    V. V. Syvolap

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The prospects of using new drug of statine class – pitavastatine – in the prophylaxis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases have been considered in this review. The data of international іnvestigations on the comparative effi cacy of pitavastatine have been given; its pleiotropic effects, high profi le safety and tolerance, the decrease in the risk of drugs’ interaction have been shown.

  5. Dietary and cardio-metabolic risk factors in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: cross-sectional study

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    Marta Stelmach-Mardas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Little is known about the role of dietary intake in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, which could prove important in improving clinical outcomes for people with obesity and/or cardiovascular disease within these populations. Reduction in energy intake typically results in weight loss, markedly improving metabolic parameters and ameliorating OSA severity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of dietary and cardio-metabolic risk factors with OSA severity. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 75 volunteers at risk of OSA were recruited from 153 patients suffering from sleep disturbance at the Department of Pulmonology, Allergology and Respiratory Oncology at the Poznan University of Medical Sciences. Polysomnography was used for OSA diagnosis. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Blood pressure, parameters of glucose (fasting glucose, glucose tolerance test and lipid metabolism (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, TG were assessed using routine enzymatic methods. Dietary intake was evaluated by 24-hr dietary recalls and Food Frequency Questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression models were used for association of background characteristics and dietary intake with OSA severity. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking and alcohol intake. Results A higher percentage of smokers were observed in patients with mild OSA, while alcohol intake was the highest in severe OSA patients. Approximately 60% of the studied patients were self-reported poor sleepers. Results from ordinal logistic regression models showed that higher intakes of alcohol intake were associated with increased odds of severe OSA; whereas higher HDL-C levels were associated with lower odds (OR 0.01; 95% CI [0.0003–0.55]. Significantly higher odds of high OSA severity were observed in patients with disturbed sleep stages and obstructive sleep apnea. Moreover, the investigation of nutrient intake in relation to OSA severity

  6. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the 'Gold Standard' Tarnished?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Denise L; Beilin, Lawrence J; Hands, Beth; Burrows, Sally; Pennell, Craig E; Lye, Stephen J; Mountain, Jennifer A; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. 1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA) and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR. Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA) was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.

  7. The effect of UHT-processed dairy milk on cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C K; Klingenberg, L; Larsen, L B; Lorenzen, J K; Sørensen, K V; Astrup, A

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of death worldwide. Whereas dairy generally is associated with a neutral or a beneficial CVD effect, the consumption of ultra-high temperature (UHT)-treated milk has been reported to increase levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in an uncontrolled study. Our aim was to examine whether semi-skimmed UHT dairy milk increases the risk of CVD development compared with pasteurized (PAST) dairy milk in overweight healthy adults. Nineteen healthy men and women participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. The effect of intake of 1.5 l of UHT dairy milk or PAST milk, similar in nutritional content, was examined as a supplement to the participant's habitual diet for 21 days in each intervention period. Intake of other dairy products was not allowed during the intervention period. Clinical evaluation and blood samples took place preintervention and postintervention. There was no significant effect by type of milk on LDL-C (P=0.29). No effects of type of milk were observed in other blood lipid levels, such as total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides. No effects of type of milk were found for blood pressure, insulin, glucose concentration and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) or body weight. This study does not support the hypothesis that UHT processing of milk increases the risk of CVD.

  8. Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in an Urban and Rural Population in the Ashanti Region-Ghana: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obirikorang

    Full Text Available There is a surge in chronic diseases in the developing world, driven by a high prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors. This study described differences in prevalence of obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors between urban and rural settlements in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. This comparative cross-sectional study included 672 participants (median age 50 years, of which 312 were from Kumasi (urban and 360 from Jachie-Pramso (rural. Demographic, anthropometric and other cardio-metabolic risk factors were gathered and venous blood samples were drawn for biochemical assays. Results suggested significant differences in diastolic blood pressure (80.0 mmHg vs 79.5 mmHg; p = 0.0078, and fasting blood sugar (5.0 mmo/l vs 4.5 mmol/l; p < 0.0001 between the two groups. Further differences in anthropometric measures suggested greater adiposity amongst participants in the urban area. Participants in the urban area were more likely than rural participants, to have high total cholesterol and LDL-c (p < 0.0001 respectively. Risk factors including BMI ≥ 25 (p < 0.0001, BMI ≥ 30 (p < 0.0001, high waist circumference (p < 0.0001, high waist-to-height ratio (p < 0.0001 and alcohol consumption (p = 0.0186 were more prevalent amongst participants in the urban area. Markers of adiposity were higher amongst females than males in both areas (p < 0.05. In the urban area, hypertension, diabetes and lifestyle risk factors were more prevalent amongst males than females. Differences in risk factors by urban/rural residence remained significant after adjusting for gender and age. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are more prevalent amongst urban settlers, highlighting an urgent need to avert the rise of diet and lifestyle-related chronic diseases.

  9. Metabolic syndrome but not obesity measures are risk factors for accelerated age-related glomerular filtration rate decline in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Vidar T N; Schei, Jørgen; Solbu, Marit D; Jenssen, Trond G; Melsom, Toralf; Eriksen, Bjørn O

    2018-01-22

    Rapid age-related glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline increases the risk of end-stage renal disease, and a low GFR increases the risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease. High body mass index and the metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, but their role in accelerating age-related GFR decline independent of cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes is not adequately understood. We studied body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio and metabolic syndrome as risk factors for accelerated GFR decline in 1261 middle-aged people representative of the general population without diabetes, cardiovascular disease or kidney disease. GFR was measured as iohexol clearance at baseline and repeated after a median of 5.6 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined as fulfilling three out of five criteria, based on waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. The mean GFR decline rate was 0.95 ml/min/year. Neither the body mass index, waist circumference nor waist-hip ratio predicted statistically significant changes in age-related GFR decline, but individuals with baseline metabolic syndrome had a significant mean of 0.30 ml/min/year faster decline than individuals without metabolic syndrome in a multivariable adjusted linear regression model. This association was mainly driven by the triglyceride criterion of metabolic syndrome, which was associated with a significant 0.36 ml/min/year faster decline when analyzed separately. Results differed significantly when GFR was estimated using creatinine and/or cystatin C. Thus, metabolic syndrome, but not the body mass index, waist circumference or waist-hip ratio, is an independent risk factor for accelerated age-related GFR decline in the general population. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic syndrome in men with low testosterone levels: relationship with cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities and with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cruz, Eduardo; Leibar-Tamayo, Asier; Romero, Javier; Piqueras, Marta; Luque, Pilar; Cardeñosa, Oscar; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Testosterone deficiency and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are strongly associated. Patients consulting for sexual dysfunction may have testosterone deficiency, providing a valuable opportunity to assess MetS. The identification of variables predicting MetS is of great importance. To identify cardiovascular comorbidities and risk factors, including erectile dysfunction (ED), associated with MetS in men aged≥45 with total testosterone (TT)testosterone was testosterone deficiency. Subjects with data for MetS assessment were included in this analysis. Other data available were anthropometrics, toxic habits, cardiovascular comorbidities, ED diagnosis, and TT values. The MetS harmonized definition was used. Waist circumference threshold was 94 cm. ED was diagnosed and classified using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for MetS. Mean age was 61.2±8.1 years. Prevalences of ED and MetS were 97.6% and 69%, respectively, both increasing with age. Bivariate analysis showed that moderate or severe ED, obesity, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were the variables associated with the greatest odds of MetS (OR=2.672 and 2.514, respectively), followed by alcohol intake (OR=1.911). Tobacco use, ag,e and testosterone deficiency severity had a minimal effect that disappeared on multivariate analysis. Elevated triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol were MetS risk factors associated with a lower TT level. The high prevalence of MetS among men with testosterone deficiency highlights the opportunity to assess cardiovascular health in patients consulting for sexual dysfunction. Moderate to severe ED, obesity, PVD, and alcohol intake significantly increase the likelihood of MetS. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Horse-, rider-, venue- and environment-related risk factors for elimination from Fédération Equestre Internationale endurance rides due to lameness and metabolic reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A; Murray, J K; Dyson, S J

    2014-05-01

    There is limited information on risk factors for elimination from endurance rides. To assess risk factors for elimination for lameness and metabolic reasons from Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) endurance rides of 80-160 km distance. Unmatched case-control. Venue-, horse- and rider-related data were collected from the FEI website. Data on weather conditions and terrain were collected at the venue. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to assess risk factors for elimination for lameness and metabolic reasons, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression on 1435 horse starts revealed that the venue was significantly associated with elimination for lameness (P = 0.013). The horse's previous experience at a greater distance than the current ride (odds ratio [OR] = 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-0.95, P = 0.008) and > 90 days elapsed since the last FEI ride (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62-0.99, P = 0.044) significantly reduced the risk of elimination for lameness. In the multivariable model for elimination for metabolic reasons, the venue (P = 0.011), increasing number of started horses (OR = 1.008, 95% CI 1.00-1.01, P = 0.001) and deep sand or soil on the track (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.17-3.35, P = 0.001) significantly increased the risk of elimination for metabolic reasons. Reducing the frequency of racing may contribute to decreased risk of elimination for lameness. Competing in deep sand or soil may contribute to exhaustion, leading to elimination for metabolic reasons. Eliminations are likely to be the end result of a complex process, and not every aspect was or can be measured. Further studies with a larger number of horse starts and assessment of variables that could not be measured in this study may identify additional risk factors that can be modified. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  12. The global cardiovascular risk transition: associations of four metabolic risk factors with national income, urbanization, and Western diet in 1980 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Singh, Gitanjali M; Paciorek, Christopher J; Lin, John K; Cowan, Melanie J; Finucane, Mariel M; Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A; Riley, Leanne M; Lu, Yuan; Rao, Mayuree; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-04-09

    It is commonly assumed that cardiovascular disease risk factors are associated with affluence and Westernization. We investigated the associations of body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose, systolic blood pressure, and serum total cholesterol with national income, Western diet, and, for BMI, urbanization in 1980 and 2008. Country-level risk factor estimates for 199 countries between 1980 and 2008 were from a previous systematic analysis of population-based data. We analyzed the associations between risk factors and per capita national income, a measure of Western diet, and, for BMI, the percentage of the population living in urban areas. In 1980, there was a positive association between national income and population mean BMI, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol. By 2008, the slope of the association between national income and systolic blood pressure became negative for women and zero for men. Total cholesterol was associated with national income and Western diet in both 1980 and 2008. In 1980, BMI rose with national income and then flattened at ≈Int$7000; by 2008, the relationship resembled an inverted U for women, peaking at middle-income levels. BMI had a positive relationship with the percentage of urban population in both 1980 and 2008. Fasting plasma glucose had weaker associations with these country macro characteristics, but it was positively associated with BMI. The changing associations of metabolic risk factors with macroeconomic variables indicate that there will be a global pandemic of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus, together with high blood pressure in low-income countries, unless effective lifestyle and pharmacological interventions are implemented.

  13. Bariatric surgery, lipoprotein metabolism and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailleux, Anne; Rouskas, Konstantinos; Pattou, François; Staels, Bart

    2015-08-01

    To summarize recent epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies on the effects of Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGBP) surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and the underlying mechanisms. Although RYGBP has mechanical effects on the gastrointestinal tract, the reduced gastric pouch and intestinal calorie absorption cannot fully explain the metabolic improvements. Obesity predisposes to cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hypertension. In contrast to the limited success of pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, RYGBP induces sustained weight loss, metabolic improvements and decreases morbidity/mortality. In line, RYGBP reduces cardiovascular risk factors. Although the mechanisms are not entirely understood, RYGBP induces complex changes in the gut affecting other organs through endocrine and metabolic signals from the intestine to all key metabolic organs, which can link RYGBP and decreased cardiovascular risk. Here, we discuss the roles of changes in lipid absorption and metabolism, bile acid metabolism, gut hormones and the microbiote as potential mechanisms in the decreased cardiovascular risk and metabolic improvement after RYGBP.

  14. Separate and Joint Associations of Occupational and Leisure-Time Sitting with Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Working Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saidj, Madina; Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke K

    2013-01-01

    The workplace is a main setting for prolonged sitting for some occupational groups. Convincing evidence has recently accumulated on the detrimental cardio-metabolic health effects of leisure-time sitting. Yet, much less is known about occupational sitting, and the potential health risk attached...... compared to leisure-time sitting....

  15. The effect of interaction between Melanocortin-4 receptor polymorphism and dietary factors on the risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochakpoor, Gelareh; Daneshpour, Maryam S; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Sedaghatikhayat, Bahareh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Controversial data is available on the effect of the Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene variation on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and ineffectiveness of diet in managing MetS. Effects of the interaction between MC4R polymorphism and dietary factors on MetS were investigated in this study. Subjects of this nested case-control study were selected from among participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Each case (n = 815) was pair matched randomly with a control by age (±5 years) and sex from among those who had not developed ≥1 MetS components at the time that the corresponding case developed MetS. Dietary patterns were determined using factor analysis on 25 foods groups using a valid and reliable, 168-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). MC4R rs12970134 were genotyped by Tetra-Primer ARMS-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Adjusted conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the interactions of SNP with quartiles of dietary factors in relation to MetS. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment panel III. Two dietary patterns were extracted. The healthy dietary pattern was loaded heavily on vegetables, legumes, low fat dairy, whole grains, liquid oils and fruits; the western dietary pattern consisted of a high intake of soft drinks, fast foods, sweets, solid oils, red meats, salty snacks, refined grains, high fat dairy, tea and coffee, eggs and poultry. Among A allele carriers, being in the highest quartiles of western dietary pattern score and saturated fatty acid intake had an increased risk of MetS, compared to those in the lowest quartile (P trend = 0.007). Saturated fatty acid intake could modulate the association of A allele carriers of MC4R with MetS (P interaction = 0.03). A significant interaction was observed between rs12970134 with total fat and iron intake on the risk of abdominal obesity (P interaction < 0.05). Our findings suggest an interaction between rs

  16. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Josep Bonet1, Albert Martinez-Castelao2, Beatriz Bayés11Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain; 2Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant.Patients and methods: This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI.Results: A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%. Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%, followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%, abdominal obesity (36.2%, hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%, and impaired glucose (8.9%. After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6% and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2

  17. Joint association of sitting time and physical activity with metabolic risk factors among middle-aged Malays in a developing country: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H Y Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged sitting is associated with increased weight and higher risks for abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension among the adult population. This has been well documented in the West, but studies on these associations are lacking in developing countries, including Malaysia. OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the joint association of sitting time and physical activity with metabolic risk factors among middle-aged working adults. METHODOLOGY: A total of 686 Malay men and women participated (mean age 45.9 ± 6.5 years. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed from the modified NCEP ATP III criteria. Self-reported sitting time was obtained with the validated Malay version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Participants were asked about their time spent sitting during travel in a motor vehicle, e.g., car, motorcycle or bus, over the preceding 7 days. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio with the confidence interval for the combined effects of sitting quartiles and physical activity categories with metabolic risk factors. RESULTS/SIGNIFICANCE: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our participants was 31.9%. Their average total sitting time (including transportation was 7.6 ± 2.4 h/day. After we adjusted for gender and educational level, higher sitting quartiles and physically inactive groups were associated with higher odds for metabolic syndrome compared with the referent group (sitting <6 h/day and physically active. In the physically active stratum, the odds for metabolic syndrome in participants who sat ≥ 9.3 h/day was 3.8 times that of participants who sat <6 h/day. Both higher sitting quartiles and insufficient physical activity were associated with adverse effects on abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycaemia. CONCLUSION: In joint analyses of sitting time and physical activity, higher sitting time and insufficient physical activity

  18. Joint association of sitting time and physical activity with metabolic risk factors among middle-aged Malays in a developing country: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Anne H Y; Moy, Foong Ming

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged sitting is associated with increased weight and higher risks for abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension among the adult population. This has been well documented in the West, but studies on these associations are lacking in developing countries, including Malaysia. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the joint association of sitting time and physical activity with metabolic risk factors among middle-aged working adults. A total of 686 Malay men and women participated (mean age 45.9 ± 6.5 years). Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed from the modified NCEP ATP III criteria. Self-reported sitting time was obtained with the validated Malay version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Participants were asked about their time spent sitting during travel in a motor vehicle, e.g., car, motorcycle or bus, over the preceding 7 days. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio with the confidence interval for the combined effects of sitting quartiles and physical activity categories with metabolic risk factors. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our participants was 31.9%. Their average total sitting time (including transportation) was 7.6 ± 2.4 h/day. After we adjusted for gender and educational level, higher sitting quartiles and physically inactive groups were associated with higher odds for metabolic syndrome compared with the referent group (sitting <6 h/day and physically active). In the physically active stratum, the odds for metabolic syndrome in participants who sat ≥ 9.3 h/day was 3.8 times that of participants who sat <6 h/day. Both higher sitting quartiles and insufficient physical activity were associated with adverse effects on abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycaemia. In joint analyses of sitting time and physical activity, higher sitting time and insufficient physical activity were deleteriously associated with odds for metabolic risk factors in middle

  19. Prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors in a nationally representative sample of Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: This study proposes that in addition to national health policies on preventing cardiometabolic risk factors, specific interventions should be considered according to the regional SES level.

  20. Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at high risk. SERMS may cause side effects , such as hot flashes , so they are not often used for prevention of cancer. See the PDQ summary on Breast Cancer Prevention for more information. Finasteride has been ...

  1. Role of ω3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in reducing cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Patten, Glen S

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in many economically developed nations, and its incidence is increasing at a rapid rate in emerging economies. Diet and lifestyle issues are closely associated with a myriad of cardiovascular disease risk factors including abnormal plasma lipids, hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity, suggesting that diet-based approaches may be of benefit. Omega-3 longchain-polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFA) are increasingly being used in the prevention and management of several cardiovascular risk factors. Both the ω3 and ω6 PUFA families are considered essential, as the human body is itself unable to synthesize them. The conversion of the two precursor fatty acids - linoleic acid (18:2ω6) and α-linoleic acid (α18:3ω3) - of these two pathways to longer (≥C(20)) PUFA is inefficient. Although there is an abundance of ω6 PUFA in the food supply; in many populations the relative intake of ω3 LC-PUFA is low with health authorities advocating increased consumption. Fish oil, rich in eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5ω3) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6ω3) acids, has been found to cause a modest reduction in blood pressure at a dose level of >3g/d both in untreated and treated hypertensives. Whilst a multitude of mechanisms may contribute to the blood pressure lowering action of ω3 LC-PUFA, improved vascular endothelial cell function appears to play a central role. Recent studies which evaluated the potential benefits of fish oil in type-2 diabetes have helped to alleviate concerns raised in some previous studies which used relatively large dose (5-8 g/d) and reported a worsening of glycemic control. Several meta-analyses have confirmed that the most consistent action of ω3 LC-PUFA in insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes is the reduction in triglycerides. In some studies, fish oil has been found to cause a small rise in LDL-cholesterol, but a change in the LDL particle size, from the smaller more

  2. Risk factors of disturbances in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and some pleiotropic effects of antihypertensive therapy in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Padyganova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The any kind of hypertension developing during the pregnancy, associated with high cardiovascular risk in the future. At the pregnancy complicated by development by arterial hypertension, there are more expressed changes of a carbohydrate and lipide metabolism, than it is peculiar to normally proceeding pregnancy, were by important pathogenetic links of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular complications. Identification of new mechanisms of action of antihypertensive means associated with positive influences on exchange processes, is represented very demanded, considering pandemic nature of prevalence of metabolic violations in modern population.

  3. Association between serum zinc and later development of metabolic syndrome in middle aged and older men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yary, Teymoor; Virtanen, Jyrki K; Ruusunen, Anu; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Voutilainen, Sari

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations of serum zinc with incident metabolic syndrome and its components in middle-aged and older Finnish men. An 11-y prospective follow-up study conducted among 683 men from the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study who were 42 to 60 y old at baseline in 1984 to 1989. The main outcome was incident metabolic syndrome, defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. Other outcomes were the individual components of the NCEP metabolic syndrome: Fasting blood glucose, serum triacylglycerols, serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, hypertension, and waist circumference. During the average follow-up of 11 y, 139 men (20.4%) developed metabolic syndrome. Those in the highest tertile of serum zinc had 84% higher risk (95% confidence interval 12 to 201%, P trend across tertiles = 0.015) to develop metabolic syndrome compared with those in the lowest tertile, after adjustment for several potential confounders. The association between serum zinc and incident metabolic syndrome was attenuated by adjustment for waist circumference, serum HDL cholesterol, or hypertension. Serum zinc was also directly associated with higher waist circumference and hypertension and inversely associated with HDL cholesterol at the 11 y examinations. We found a direct association between serum zinc and incidence of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older eastern Finnish men. Further studies are warranted to explore the mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uric acid is an independent risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis in a Japanese elderly population without metabolic syndrome

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    Takayama Shuzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT is an useful surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease. Associations between uric acid (UA, metabolic syndrome (MetS and carotid IMT have been reported, but findings regarding the relationship have been inconsistent. Methods A total of 1,579 Japanese elderly subjects aged ≥65 years {663 men aged, 78 ± 8 (mean ± standard deviation years and 916 women aged 79 ± 8 years} were divided into 4 groups according to UA quartiles. We first investigated the association between UA concentrations and confounding factors including MetS; then, we assessed whether there is an independent association of UA with carotid IMT and atherosclerosis in participants subdivided according to gender and MetS status. Results Carotid IMT was significantly increased according to the quartiles of UA in both genders without MetS and women with MetS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that odds ratio (OR {95% confidence interval (CI} in men for carotid atherosclerosis was significantly increased in the third (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.02-3.02, and fourth quartiles (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.12-3.60 of UA compared with that in the first quartile of UA, and the OR in women was significantly increased in the fourth quartile (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.30-3.39. Similarly, the ORs were significantly associated with increasing quartiles of UA in both genders without MetS, but not necessarily increased in those with MetS. Conclusions UA was found to be an independent risk factor for incidence of carotid atherosclerosis in both genders without MetS.

  5. Differences in muscle and adipose tissue gene expression and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the members of physical activity discordant twin pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, Tuija; Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Rita; Rintala, Mirva; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Pöllänen, Eija; Alen, Markku; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kovanen, Vuokko; Rahkila, Paavo; Oresic, Matej; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M

    2010-09-16

    High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50-74 years) who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased 'high-risk' ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are associated with reduced

  6. Differences in muscle and adipose tissue gene expression and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the members of physical activity discordant twin pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Leskinen

    Full Text Available High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50-74 years who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased 'high-risk' ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are

  7. Sex difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular-related risk factors in urban adults from 33 communities of China: The CHPSNE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing-Bin; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yu-Qin; Zhang, Jian; Xin, Shi-Jie; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of metabolic syndrome in urban areas of China. To estimate the prevalence of MetS and identify its cardiovascular-related factors in men and women, a representative sample of 15,477 urban adults aged 18-74 years in Northeast China was selected from 2009 to 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on criteria set by the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.4% (men 27.9% and women 26.8%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that a higher education level and a higher family income were associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men, but associated with lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome among women. Higher physical activity was associated with a decreased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men (adjusted odds ratios (aORs) = 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-0.99), but associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in women (aOR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.00-1.29). Compared with rice as the major staple food, cooked wheaten foods were associated with lower adjusted odds for metabolic syndrome both in men (aOR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.90) and in women (aOR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56-0.92). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in urban areas of China, and there is heterogeneity by sex in the relationships between risk factors and metabolic syndrome prevalence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk factors ... do smoke, quit. Controlling your cholesterol through diet, exercise, and medicines . Controlling high blood pressure through diet, ...

  9. Food environment, walkability, and public open spaces are associated with incident development of cardio-metabolic risk factors in a biomedical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Catherine; Coffee, Neil T; Haren, Matthew T; Howard, Natasha J; Adams, Robert J; Taylor, Anne W; Daniel, Mark

    2014-07-01

    We investigated whether residential environment characteristics related to food (unhealthful/healthful food sources ratio), walkability and public open spaces (POS; number, median size, greenness and type) were associated with incidence of four cardio-metabolic risk factors (pre-diabetes/diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, abdominal obesity) in a biomedical cohort (n=3205). Results revealed that the risk of developing pre-diabetes/diabetes was lower for participants in areas with larger POS and greater walkability. Incident abdominal obesity was positively associated with the unhealthful food environment index. No associations were found with hypertension or dyslipidaemia. Results provide new evidence for specific, prospective associations between the built environment and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcription factor 7-like 2 polymorphism and context-specific risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia

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    Abbasali Palizban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transcription factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2 is an element of the Wnt signaling pathway. There is lack of evidence if TCF7L2 has a functional role in lipid metabolism and regulation of the components constitutes the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the risk allele of TCF7L2 gene polymorphism is associated with dyslipidemia and MetSyn. Materials and Methods: The MetSyn subjects were participated only based on the National Cholesterol Education Program – Third Adult Treatment Panel criteria. In this case–control study, the DNA from MetSyn patients without (n = 90 and with type 2 diabetes (T2D (n = 94 were genotyped. Results: The results show that the genotype-phenotype for CC, CT/TT of TCF7L2 gene polymorphism correlated with body mass index and waist circumference in MetSyn and MetSyn + T2D subjects (r = −0.949 and r = −0.963, respectively. The subjects that only possess MetSyn but are not diabetics show the 2 h postprandial glucose and fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin significantly lower (P < 0.05 than those subjects have both abnormality. The level of triglyceride in CT/TT carriers in MetSyn was higher than CC carriers (P = 0.025. A comparison with the controls subjects, the frequencies of the T allele in the groups of MetSyn (46.66% and MetSyn + T2D (47.34% show significantly different (P < 0.05. The odds ratios for T allele in (MetSyn/(normal, (MetSyn + T2D/(normal, and in (MetSyn + T2D/(MetSyn were 3.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–9.67, P = 0.0093, 3.76 (95% CI, 1.40–10.07, P = 0.0068, and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.55– 2.11, P = 0.834, respectively. Conclusion: The results revealed the important insights essential for the role of TCF7L2 that the T allele of TCF7L2 plays a significant role in the susceptibility to dyslipidemia, MetSyn, and T2D.

  11. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients according to World Health Organization, Third Report National Cholesterol Education Program, and International Diabetes Federation definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Angel; Delgado-Cohen, Helena; Reviriego, Jesús; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel

    2010-12-16

    The availability of several definitions of the metabolic syndrome has created potential confusion concerning its prognostic utility. At present, little data exist about the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients. To identify risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to three diagnostic criteria: World Health Organization (WHO), Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF). A logistic regression model was used to identify demographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables related with metabolic syndrome (N = 1259). Hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) ≥7% were associated with increased risk of WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-3.40; OR, 1.79 95% CI: 1.25-2.55; and OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 1.12-2.22, respectively). The risk of presenting metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATP III criteria was increased in female patients (OR, 2.02; 95% CI: 1.37-2.97), elevated fasting glucose levels (OR, 5.99; 95% CI: 3.56-10.07), dyslipidemia (OR, 2.28; 95% CI: 1.57-3.32), hypertension (OR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.59-3.53), and endocrine disorders (OR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.06-2.57). For the IDF criteria, female patients and patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or insulin treatment were at higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 2.35-6.80; OR, 2.72 95% CI: 1.22-6.04; and OR, 1.96 95% CI: 1.24-3.11, respectively). The risk factors for metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are highly dependent on the criteria used to define the syndrome, supporting the need for a single clinically useful and epidemiologically useful definition.

  12. Inflammatory characteristics of distinct abdominal adipose tissue depots relate differently to metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease Distinct fat depots and vascular risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, Mariette E. G.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Stupkova, Tereza; de Jager, Wilco; Vink, Aryan; Moll, Frans L.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Visseren, Frank L. J.

    Objective: Abdominal obesity is associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, specific contributions of distinct adipose tissue (AT) depots to metabolic complications of obesity are still unclear. In this study, the inflammatory profile of four distinct abdominal AT-depots and

  13. Breakfast patterns and their likelihood of increased risk of overweight/obesity and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in adults 19+ years: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the relationship of specific types of breakfast consumed and the risk of overweight/obesity or risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Cluster analysis using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008 data identified 12 breakfast clusters—including no breakfast, in...

  14. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the 'Gold Standard' Tarnished?

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    Denise L Demmer

    Full Text Available Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR.Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults.

  15. Associations between Metabolic Risk Factors and the Hypothalamic Volume in Childhood Leukemia Survivors Treated with Cranial Radiotherapy.

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    Cecilia Follin

    Full Text Available Metabolic complications are prevalent in individuals treated with cranial radiotherapy (CRT for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The hypothalamus is a master regulator of endocrine and metabolic control. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hypothalamic volume would be associated to metabolic parameters in ALL survivors. Thirty-eight (21 women survivors participated in this study 34 years after diagnosis and with a median age of 38 (27-46 years. All were treated with a median CRT dose of 24 Gy and 11 years (3-13 of complete hormone supplementation. Comparisons were made to 31 matched controls. We performed analyses of fat mass, fat free mass, plasma (p-glucose, p-insulin, Homa-Index (a measure of insulin resistance, serum (s-leptin, s-ghrelin and of the hypothalamic volume in scans obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 3 Tesla. Serum leptin/kg fat mass (r = -0.4, P = 0.04 and fat mass (r = -0.4, P = 0.01 were negatively correlated with the HT volume among ALL survivors, but not among controls. We also detected significantly higher BMI, waist, fat mass, p-insulin, Homa-Index, leptin/kg fat mass and s-ghrelin and significantly lower fat free mass specifically among female ALL survivors (all P<0.01. Interestingly, s-ghrelin levels increased with time since diagnosis and with low age at diagnosis for childhood ALL. Our results showed that leptin/kg fat mass and fat mass were associated with a reduced HT volume 34 years after ALL diagnosis and that women treated with CRT after ALL are at high risk of metabolic abnormalities. Taken together our data suggest that the hypothalamus is involved in the metabolic consequences after CRT in ALL survivors.

  16. Is there any association of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with various risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a healthy adult population of karachi, pakistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Mussarat; Fawwad, Asher; Hydrie, M Zafar Iqbal; Basit, Abdul; Shera, A Samad

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to discover the association of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with various risk factors for metabolic syndrome in an urban population of Karachi, Pakistan. In this cross-sectional study, 337 healthy adults (108 males and 229 females, mean age 40.7 ± 14.2 years) participated. The subjects were randomly selected in Lyari Town in Karachi using a geographical imaging system (GIS). Their demographic, anthropometric [body mass index (BMI), hip and waist circumferences, waist-to-hip circumference ratio (W-HR), and biochemical (fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, fasting lipid profile, and hsCRP)] parameters were recorded. Insulin resistance was calculated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Correlation of CRP and fasting insulin levels with various parameters of metabolic syndrome were calculated using Pearson correlation. Median CRP levels were found to be higher in females 0.81 (0.20-1.38) compared with males 0.77 (0.19-1.35). Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 108 (31.12%) subjects. No significant difference between CRP levels in the metabolic syndrome-positive and metabolic syndrome-negative groups was observed. Similarly, no correlation was observed between hsCRP and fasting insulin levels, insulin resistance, and other parameters of MS. There is lack of correlation between hsCRP levels and various risk factors for metabolic syndrome in our urban population. Further large-scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Effect of a 21 day Daniel Fast on metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women

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    Bloomer Richard J

    2010-09-01

    ' mood and satiety were both 7.9 ± 0.2. The following variables were significantly (p 3·μL-1, blood urea nitrogen (13.07 ± 0.58 vs. 10.14 ± 0.59 mg·dL-1, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (14.74 ± 0.59 vs. 11.67 ± 0.68, protein (6.95 ± 0.07 vs. 6.77 ± 0.06 g·dL-1, total cholesterol (171.07 ± 4.57 vs. 138.69 ± 4.39 mg·dL-1, LDL-C (98.38 ± 3.89 vs. 76.07 ± 3.53 mg·dL-1, HDL-C (55.65 ± 2.50 vs. 47.58 ± 2.19 mg·dL-1, SBP (114.65 ± 2.34 vs. 105.93 ± 2.12 mmHg, and DBP (72.23 ± 1.59 vs. 67.00 ± 1.43 mmHg. Insulin (4.42 ± 0.52 vs. 3.37 ± 0.35 μU·mL-1; p = 0.10, HOMA-IR (0.97 ± 0.13 vs.0.72 ± 0.08; p = 0.10, and CRP (3.15 ± 0.91 vs. 1.60 ± 0.42 mg·L-1; p = 0.13, were lowered to a clinically meaningful, albeit statistically insignificant extent. No significant difference was noted for any anthropometric variable (p > 0.05. As expected, multiple differences in dietary intake were noted (p Conclusion A 21 day period of modified dietary intake in accordance with the Daniel Fast is 1 well-tolerated by men and women and 2 improves several risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Larger scale, randomized studies, inclusive of a longer time period and possibly a slight modification in food choice in an attempt to maintain HDL cholesterol, are needed to extend these findings.

  18. Impact of dining out on nutritional intake and metabolic syndrome risk factors: data from the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chorong; Kim, Hak-Seon; No, Jae-Kyung

    2015-02-14

    The frequency of dining out has rapidly increased; however, the independent associations between dining out, metabolic syndrome risk factors and nutritional status have not been well characterised. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between dining out, nutritional intakes and metabolic syndrome risk factors among Korean adults, using data from the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Frequency of dining out was significantly associated with intake of nutrients such as energy, water, protein, fat, carbohydrate, Ca, Na, vitamin A and carotene. Especially, the result revealed that Korean adults had insufficient Ca intake compared with the Korean reference intake (700 mg). As the frequency of dining out increased, so did energy intake. In addition, individuals who dined out seven or more times per week experienced a 64% higher likelihood of blood pressure abnormalities, an 88% higher likelihood of waist circumference abnormalities, and a 32% higher likelihood of low HDL-cholesterol levels than those who dined out less than once per week. BMI was not associated with the frequency of dining out. Our findings suggest that strategies to modify dining-out behaviour could reduce metabolic syndrome risk factors via improved nutrition.

  19. [The effects of a physical activity-behavior modification combined intervention(PABM-intervention) on metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese elementary school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Young-Ran; An, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Young-A; Woo, Hae-Young

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a physical activity-behavior modification combined intervention(PABM-intervention) on metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese elementary school children. Thirty-two participants (BMI>or=85 percentile or relative obesity>or=10) were allocated to the PABM-intervention group and behavior modification only intervention group. The PABM-intervention was composed of exercise intervention consisting of 50 minutes of physical activity(Hip-hop dance & gym-based exercises) twice a week and the behavior modification intervention consisted of 50 minutes of instruction for modifying lifestyle habits(diet & exercise) once a week. Effectiveness of intervention was based on waist circumference, BP, HDL-cholesterol, TG, and fasting glucose before and after the intervention. The proportion of subjects with 1, 2, 3 or more metabolic risk factors were 28.1, 43.8, and 15.6%, respectively. After the 8-week intervention, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HDL-cholesterol changed significantly(p<.01) in the PABM group. This provides evidence that a PABM-intervention is effective in changing metabolic risk factors such as waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HDL-cholesterol in overweight and obese elementary school children.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors for prostate cancer patients from the RADAR trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, Daniel A; Spry, Nigel; Taaffe, Dennis R; Denham, James; Joseph, David; Lamb, David S; Levin, Greg; Duchesne, Gillian; Newton, Robert U

    2009-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy leads to a number of adverse effects including deterioration of the musculoskeletal system and increased risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects, efficacy, retention and compliance of a physical exercise intervention in a large established cohort of prostate cancer patients from the Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy (RADAR) study. Specifically, we aim to compare short- and long-term effects of a prostate cancer-specific supervised exercise program to a standard public health physical activity strategy utilizing printed resources on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Our primary outcomes are cardiorespiratory capacity, abdominal obesity, and lipid and glycemic control, while secondary outcomes include self-reported physical activity, quality of life and psychological distress. Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 370 men from the RADAR study cohort undergoing treatment or previously treated for prostate cancer involving androgen deprivation therapy in the cities of Perth and Newcastle (Australia), and Wellington (New Zealand). Participants will be randomized to (1) supervised resistance/aerobic exercise or (2) printed material comprising general physical activity recommendations. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 6 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months (end of intervention), and at 6 months follow-up. This study uses a large existent cohort of patients and will generate valuable information as to the continuing effects of exercise specifically targeting cardiovascular function and disease risk, insulin metabolism, abdominal obesity, physical function, quality of life and psychological distress. We expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce risk factors for the development of co-morbid diseases commonly associated with androgen

  1. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still ... Scientists are working diligently to understand what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does ...

  2. Rice Cakes Containing Dietary Fiber Supplemented with or without Artemisia Annua and Gynura Procumbens Merr. Alleviated the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Na Rae; Yoon, Sun; Lee, Seung-Min

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether the consumption of Korean rice cakes enriched with dietary fiber with or without polyphenol rich plants might decrease the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rice cakes were manufactured using fructooligosaccharides, resistant starch, and psyllium as sources of dietary fibers with and without polyphenol rich Artemisia annua and Gynura procumbens Merr. (RC+FP and RC+F, respectively), and prepared in three forms (songpyeon, seolgidduk, and chaldduk). Ninety subjects with at least one MetS risk factor were recruited for 6 weeks of dietary intervention. Sixty subjects were finally included for the analysis. Compared to the initial values, RC+FP group had decreased levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), HOMA-IR and blood pressure after 6 weeks, whereas RC+F group didn't have significant changes in them. Regarding the improvement of individual MetS risk factors, RC+FP group showed significant reduction in FBG and blood pressures but RC+F group only had reduction in systolic blood pressure. After the intervention, a reduction in the number of MetS risk factors was greatert in the RC+FP group than in the RC+F group. In conclusion, Dietary fiber enriched rice cakes with or without polyphenols decreased the number and/or the levels of MetS risk factors. Polyphenol rich plant components may provide additional health benefits in controlling FBG and blood pressure.

  3. Effect of a relatively high-protein, high-fiber diet on body composition and metabolic risk factors in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morenga, L Te; Williams, S; Brown, R; Mann, J

    2010-11-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities are worldwide problems. Approaches to reducing obesity and its associated metabolic derangements typically emphasize fat and energy restriction, but for many achieving and maintaining weight loss is difficult. Diets that focus on substantially altering macronutrient distribution rather than energy restriction are promising alternatives, but have generally included large amounts of protein, fiber or fat. To compare the effects of dietary advice including moderate increases in protein and fiber without specifying energy intake with standard low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary recommendations on body composition and metabolic risk factors. 89 overweight or obese women aged 18-65 years were randomized to either a standard diet that was intended to be low in fat and relatively high in carbohydrate (n=42) or to a relatively high-protein (up to 30% of energy), relatively high-fiber (>35g per day; HPHF) diet (n=47) for 10 weeks. Advice regarding strict adherence to energy intake goals was not given. Participants on the HPHF diet lost more body weight (1.3kg; 95% CI, 0.7, 1.9; Pfiber improved body composition and metabolic risk factors compared with standard dietary advice.

  4. A Retrospective Study in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: Diabetic Risk Factor Response to Daily Consumption of Agaricus bisporus (White Button Mushrooms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Mona S; Mehrotra, Anita; Beelman, Robert B; Nadkarni, Girish; Wang, Lingzhi; Cai, Weijing; Goh, Boon Cher; Kalaras, Michael D; Uribarri, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Adults with metabolic syndrome from different race/ethnicities are often predisposed to developing type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, growing evidence suggests that healthy diets and lifestyle choices can significantly slow or prevent progression to T2D. This poorly understood relationship to healthy dietary patterns and prevention of T2D motivated us to conduct a retrospective analysis to determine the potential impact of a minor dietary lifestyle change (daily mushroom consumption) on known T2D risk factors in racially diverse adults with confirmed features of the metabolic syndrome. Retrospectively, we studied 37 subjects who had participated in a dietary intervention focused on vitamin D bioavailability from white button mushrooms (WBM). All 37 had previously completed a 16-week study where they consumed 100 g of WBM daily and were then followed-up for one month during which no mushrooms were consumed. We analyzed differences in serum risk factors from baseline to 16-week, and from baseline to one-month follow-up. Measurement of serum diabetic risk factors included inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and the antioxidant component naturally rich in mushrooms, ergothioneine. Significant beneficial health effects were observed at 16-week with the doubling of ergothioneine from baseline, increases in the antioxidant marker ORAC (oxygen radical absorption capacity) and anti-inflammatory hormone, adiponectin and significant decreases in serum oxidative stress inducing factors, carboxymethyllysine (CML) and methylglyoxal (MG), but no change in the lipid oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane, leptin or measures of insulin resistance or glucose metabolism. We conclude that WBM contain a variety of compounds with potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant health benefits that can occur with frequent consumption over time in adults predisposed to T2D. Well-controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings and identify the specific mushroom components

  5. Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanyam, Malavika A.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Sims, Mario; Taylor, Herman A.; Williams, David R.; Wyatt, Sharon B

    2012-01-01

    Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000–2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the associati...

  6. Alexithymia as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemche, Alexandra V; Chaban, Oleg S; Lemche, Erwin

    2014-02-28

    Alexithymia is a clinical trait consisting of diminished introspective and interoceptive capacities that has been shown to implicate elevated autonomic outflow and to bias for hypertension. To estimate relative risk associated with alexithymia in the metabolic syndrome (MetS), we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of patients with manifest type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or familial diabetes risk (N=101; 67 females; age 45.6±13.96) in a nationwide sampled treatment cohort for MetS in the Ukrainian governmental health care system. Laboratory data of single components of the MetS according to International Diabetes Federation Consensus were dependent measures in multivariable regression models with self-reported alexithymia severity (TAS-20) and socio-demographic data. TAS-20 as the sole surviving psychometric predictor for T2DM in the simplest regression equation provided the best model fit: OR 1.073, Z=19.04, (95%CIs 1.065-1.081). For microalbuminuria, the best fitting model was OR 1.030, Z=3.49 (95%CIs 1.013-1.048). TAS-20 predicted also triglyceride level at Wald-χ(2)=1299.27, Z=36.05 (95%CIs 0.052-0.058) and blood pressure maximum at Wald-χ(2)=2309.05, Z=48.05 (95%CIs 2.402-2.606). Our results show that alexithymia severity contributes to MetS by covarying with several of its single components, and that it may be a substantial concurrent indicator of T2DM and cardiovascular risks in MetS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory status in older women with and without metabolic syndrome: is there a correlation with risk factors?

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    Oliveira Silva A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro de Oliveira Silva,1,2 Ramires Alsamir Tibana,1 Margo Gomes Oliveira Karnikowski,3 Silvana Schwerz Funghetto,3 Jonato Prestes1 1Graduation Program in Physical Education and Health, Catholic University of Brasilia, 2Physical Education Department, Universitary Center of Brasilia, 3Ceilandia Faculty, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil Purpose: To compare the inflammatory status in older women with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS and to correlate inflammatory parameters, anthropometric measures, metabolic profile, and blood pressure with MetS Z-score. Methods: This cohort transversal study included 129 older women assigned into two groups: with MetS (n = 48; 66.4 ± 4.4 years; 68.1 ± 8.3 kg; 1.51 ± 0.06 m; 29.8 ± 3.9 kg/m2 and without MetS (n = 81; 68.0 ± 5.8 years; 61.0 ± 9.4 kg; 1.53 ± 0.06 m; 26.0 ± 3.9 kg/m2. Body composition was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (General Electric-GE model 8548 BX1L, year 2005, Lunar DPX type, software Encore 2005; Rommelsdorf, Germany and cytokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: There was no difference between the groups regarding age, height, fat mass, glycosylated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, older women with MetS presented higher body mass, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, waist–hip and waist–height ratio, systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, MetS Z-score, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and lower lean body mass values compared to women without MetS. Moreover, there were correlations between MetS Z-score and body mass (r = 0.20, waist circumference (r = 0.26, waist–hip (r = 0.32 and waist–height ratio (r = 0.24, blood glucose (r = 0.24, insulin (r = 0.24, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = 0.32, triglycerides (r = 0.39, tumor necrosis factor-α (r = 0.28, interferon-γ (r

  8. PREVALENCE OF OVERWEIGHT, OBESITY, PAEDIATRIC METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS AMONG CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP OF 10-16 YEARS IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS OF SHIMLA CITY

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    Anmol Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Paediatric obesity is a complex and growing global problem which is escalating much more rapidly in developing countries like India and considered an important predecessor to NCD multi-morbidity due to changing life style as a result of rapid urbanisation and mechanisation. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, paediatric metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors among children in the age group of 10-16 years in private schools of Shimla city. MATERIALS AND METHODS At total of 2100 adolescents attending school (aged 10-16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. All the anthropometric, clinical and biochemical assessment was done after proper consent. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was assessed by using IOTF guidelines and the metabolic syndrome was determined by the Paediatric International Diabetic Federation definition modified for age group. RESULTS The prevalence of overweight, obesity and paediatric metabolic syndrome was 14.5%, 4.1% & 4.3% respectively. In the groups with PMS, hypertension, waist circumference, and TG were significantly higher, and HDL-C was significantly lower. Significant difference was observed in gender, physical activity level, metabolic equivalent, consumption of junk food & time spent on TV in the distribution of overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION Our study highlights the possible role of change in the dietary pattern and physical activity pattern in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in early stage of life. Collective efforts of parents and schools are required to institute early preventive measures to reduce progression towards obesity and its future complications.

  9. Associations of sleep disturbance and duration with metabolic risk factors in obese persons with type 2 diabetes: data from the Sleep AHEAD Study

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    St-Onge MP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Pierre St-Onge,1 Gary Zammit,2 David M Reboussin,3 Samuel T Kuna,4 Mark H Sanders,8 Richard Millman,6 Anne B Newman,5 Thomas A Wadden,4 Rena R Wing,6 F Xavier Pi-Sunyer,1 Gary D Foster7 Sleep AHEAD Research Group*1New York Obesity Research Center, St Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 2Clinilabs, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 7Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA*A full list of the members of the Sleep AHEAD Research Group is available in an online appendixPurpose: Some studies have found an association between sleep disturbances and metabolic risk, but none has examined this association in individuals with type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between sleep disturbances and metabolic risk factors in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.Patients and methods: This study was a cross-sectional examination of the relationship between sleep parameters (apnea/hypopnea index [AHI], time spent in various sleep stages and metabolic risk markers (fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipids using baseline data of the Sleep AHEAD cohort. Subjects (n = 305 were participants in Sleep AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes, a four-center ancillary study of the Look AHEAD study, a 16-center clinical trial of overweight and obese participants with type 2 diabetes, designed to assess the long-term effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular events. All participants underwent one night of in-home polysomnography

  10. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors in a group of obese Saudi children and adolescents: A hospital-based

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, Doris; Ahmed, Omaima; Sadiq Bakr bin

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the distribution of risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome in a group of obese Saudi children and adolescents. No previous studies had addressed this issue in the Saudi pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients evaluated for obesity between 2004 and 2008 and collected data on age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), BP, fasting lipid profile, fasting glucose, insulin concentrations, and insulin resistance based on the homeostasis assessment model-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score. Obesity was defined as a BMI above the 95th percentile for age and gender and metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to standard criteria. We studied 57 obese Saudi children and adolescents with a mean (standard deviation) age of 9.8 (3.5) years. Mean weight and body mass index (BMI) were 63.7 (28.3) kg and 31.6 (8.0) kg/m 2 , respectively. Systolic BP was elevated in 24 (42%) of the 57 subjects. Of the 39 children who had a lipid profile in their records, 10 had hypertriglyceridemia, 8 had hypercholesterolemia, 6 had elevated LDL cholesterol levels, and 6 had low HDL cholesterol levels. Impaired fasting glucose was found in 10 of 38 patients in which it was measured, and 9 of 25 patients had fasting hyperinsulinemia. Eleven of 37 patients (29.7%) met the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. Diastolic BP correlated positively with BMI (r=0.440, P =.001), and HDL cholesterol correlated negatively with weight and BMI (r=-0.487, P =.002 and r=-0.317, P =.05). HOMA-IR correlated positively with BMI and triglyceride levels and negatively with HDL cholesterol levels. Obese Saudi children and adolescents have multiple risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. (author)

  11. Aerobic Capacity, Physical Activity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Firefighters Compared with Police Officers and Sedentary Clerks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischik, Roman; Foshag, Peter; Strauß, Markus; Littwitz, Henning; Garg, Pankaj; Dworrak, Birgit; Horlitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association between the physical work environment and physiological performance measures, physical activity levels and metabolic parameters among German civil servants. A main focus in this study was to examine the group differences rather than measuring the absolute values in an occupational group. We prospectively examined 198 male German civil servants (97 firefighters [FFs], 55 police officers [POs] and 46 sedentary clerks [SCs]). For each parameter, the groups were compared using a linear regression adjusted for age. The 97 FFs showed a similar maximal aerobic power (VO2max l/min) of 3.17±0.44 l/min compared with the POs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 3.13±0.62 l/min (estimated difference, POs vs. FFs: 0.05, CI: -0.12-0.23, p=0.553). The maximal aerobic power of the FFs was slightly higher than that of the SCs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 2.85±0.52 l/min (-0.21, CI: -0.39-0.04, p=0.018 vs. FFs). The average physical activity (in metabolic equivalents [METS]/week) of the FFs was 3953±2688, whereas those of the POs was 2838±2872 (vs. FFs: -985, CI: -1941-30, p = 0.043) and of the SCs 2212±2293 (vs. FFs: -1598.8, CI: -2477-721, p = 0.000; vs. POs: -613.6, CI: -1617.4–390.3, p = 0.229), respectively [corrected]. For the FFs, the average body fat percentage was 17.7%±6.2, whereas it was 21.4%±5.6 for the POs (vs. FFs: 2.75, CI: 0.92-4.59, p=0.004) and 20.8%±6.5 for the SCs (vs. FFs: 1.98, CI: -0.28-4.25, p=0.086; vs. POs: -0.77, CI: 3.15-1.61, p=0.523). The average waist circumference was 89.8 cm±10.0 for the FFs, 97.8 cm±12.4 (5.63, CI: 2.10-9.15, p=0.002) for the POs, and 97.3±11.7 (vs. FFs: -4.89, CI: 1.24-8.55, p=0.009; vs. POs: -0.73, CI: -5.21-3.74, p=0.747) for the SCs. The FFs showed significantly higher physical activity levels compared with the SCs. The PO group had the highest cardiovascular risk of all of the groups because it included more participants with metabolic syndrome; furthermore, the POs had

  12. Aerobic Capacity, Physical Activity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Firefighters Compared with Police Officers and Sedentary Clerks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Leischik

    Full Text Available This study examined the association between the physical work environment and physiological performance measures, physical activity levels and metabolic parameters among German civil servants. A main focus in this study was to examine the group differences rather than measuring the absolute values in an occupational group.We prospectively examined 198 male German civil servants (97 firefighters [FFs], 55 police officers [POs] and 46 sedentary clerks [SCs]. For each parameter, the groups were compared using a linear regression adjusted for age.The 97 FFs showed a similar maximal aerobic power (VO2max l/min of 3.17±0.44 l/min compared with the POs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 3.13±0.62 l/min (estimated difference, POs vs. FFs: 0.05, CI: -0.12-0.23, p=0.553. The maximal aerobic power of the FFs was slightly higher than that of the SCs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 2.85±0.52 l/min (-0.21, CI: -0.39-0.04, p=0.018 vs. FFs. The average physical activity (in metabolic equivalents [METS]/week of the FFs was 3953±2688, whereas those of the POs was 2838±2872 (vs. FFs: -985, CI: -1941-30, p = 0.043 and of the SCs 2212±2293 (vs. FFs: -1598.8, CI: -2477-721, p = 0.000; vs. POs: -613.6, CI: -1617.4–390.3, p = 0.229, respectively [corrected]. For the FFs, the average body fat percentage was 17.7%±6.2, whereas it was 21.4%±5.6 for the POs (vs. FFs: 2.75, CI: 0.92-4.59, p=0.004 and 20.8%±6.5 for the SCs (vs. FFs: 1.98, CI: -0.28-4.25, p=0.086; vs. POs: -0.77, CI: 3.15-1.61, p=0.523. The average waist circumference was 89.8 cm±10.0 for the FFs, 97.8 cm±12.4 (5.63, CI: 2.10-9.15, p=0.002 for the POs, and 97.3±11.7 (vs. FFs: -4.89, CI: 1.24-8.55, p=0.009; vs. POs: -0.73, CI: -5.21-3.74, p=0.747 for the SCs.The FFs showed significantly higher physical activity levels compared with the SCs. The PO group had the highest cardiovascular risk of all of the groups because it included more participants with metabolic syndrome; furthermore, the POs

  13. Differences in traditional and emerging cardiovascular risk factors of subjects discordantly classified by metabolic syndrome definitions of the International Diabetes Federation and the National Cholesterol Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, M; Saavedra, P; Varillas, V F; Wagner, A M; López-Plasencia, Y; Alberiche, M P; Nóvoa, F J

    2009-07-01

    Several working definitions of metabolic syndrome have been proposed for clinical use. However, individuals can be discordantly classified as having or not having metabolic syndrome depending on the choice of one or another definition. This study compared the cardiovascular risk profile of subjects concordantly and discordantly diagnosed by the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the criteria of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nine hundred and twenty-nine non-diabetic adult subjects belonging to a cross-sectional population-based study in Gran Canaria island (Spain) were assessed. Participants completed a questionnaire and underwent physical examination, fasting blood analyses, and a standardized oral glucose tolerance test. Two hundred and four subjects (22%) had metabolic syndrome according to both definitions, 31 (3.3%) only by the IDF criteria, and 5 (0.5%) only by the NCEP criteria. Participants fulfilling both proposals showed more adverse age and sex-adjusted measures of BMI, waist, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, post-load glucose, HOMA-IR and plasminogen inhibitor activator-1 (PAI-1) than individuals exclusively satisfying the IDF criteria. Moreover, in contrast to subjects meeting both criteria, those that fulfilled only the IDF criteria had levels of BMI, waist, total and HDL cholesterol, post-load glucose, glycated HbA1c, C-reactive protein, PAI-1 and fibrinogen not significantly different from those observed in subjects without metabolic syndrome. The IDF definition identifies a surplus of individuals whose cardiovascular risk profile, particularly regarding to some non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, is less adverse than that observed in subjects also diagnosed by the NCEP definition.

  14. Metabolic Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Correlated Glycemic Control/Complications: A Cross-Sectional Study between Rural and Urban Uygur Residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guo-Li; Su, Yin-Xia; Yao, Hua; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Qi; Tuerdi, Ablikm; He, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Shu-Xia; Su, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major global public health problem driven by a high prevalence of metabolic risk factors. To describe the differences of metabolic risk factors of type 2 diabetes, as well as glycemic control and complicated diabetic complications between rural and urban Uygur residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. This comparative cross-sectional study, conducted among 2879 urban and 918 rural participants in Xinjiang, China, assessed the metabolic risk factors of diabetes and related complications differences between urban and rural settlements. Compared to rural areas, urban participants had higher education level and more average income, little physical activity, less triglycerides and higher HDL-c (p metabolic risk factors by urban/rural residence included overweight or obesity, triglycerides (≥1.71mmol/l), HDL-c (8% (48.1% versus 54.5%, p = 0.019) between rural and urban diabetic participants. No significant difference in the prevalence of type 2 diabetic complications between urban and rural participants (74.9% versus 72.2%; p = 0.263) was detected. Compared to rural participants, the most prevalent modifiable risk factors associated with diabetic complications in urban participants were obesity (BMI ≥ 28 Kg/m2), HDL-c (Urban settlers were significantly more likely to have metabolic risk factors highlighting the need for public health efforts to improve health outcomes for these vulnerable populations. Diabetes related complications risk factors were prevalent amongst rural and urban diabetes settlers.

  15. Effect of 12 Weeks High Oleic Peanut Consumption on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors and Body Composition

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    Jayne A. Barbour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance. We investigated effects of high oleic peanut consumption vs. a nut free diet on adiposity and cardio-metabolic risk markers. In a randomised cross-over design, 61 healthy subjects (65 ± 7 years, body mass index (BMI 31 ± 4 kg/m2 alternated either high oleic peanuts (15%–20% of energy or a nut free diet for 12 weeks. Body composition and mass, waist circumference, C-reactive protein (CRP, lipids, glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and after each phase. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA compared the two diets. Consistent with other nut studies, there were no differences in lipids, CRP, glucose and insulin with peanut consumption. In contrast, some reports have demonstrated benefits, likely due to differences in the study cohort. Energy intake was 10% higher (853 kJ, p < 0.05, following peanut consumption vs. control, attributed to a 30% increase in fat intake (p < 0.001, predominantly monounsaturated (increase 22 g, p < 0.05. Despite greater energy intake during the peanut phase, there were no differences in body composition, and less than predicted increase (0.5 kg in body weight for this additional energy intake, possibly due to incomplete nutrient absorption and energy utilisation.

  16. Managing Metabolic Syndrome and CHD Risk Factors: Evidence based re-examination of macro nutrients from the Malaysian Population Prospective Study

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    Kalyana Sundram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of dietary factors and habits associated with coronary heart disease (CHD risk are undergoing dramatic rethinking in light of fast emerging new scientific data. Multiple risk assessments, especially in understanding Metabolic Syndrome triggers in the population have further confounded understanding and management of traditional risk factors. By far the largest change-impact is being made with regard to fat consumption, especially saturated fats. Emerging evidence, largely through meta-analysis and population studies have regularly challenged the association of saturated fats with increased CHD risk. Indeed there is a growing appreciation that saturates no longer glove-fit risk assessment especially when newer biochemical factors such as lipoprotein particle sizes have emerged to partially explain observed anomalies. The fats we eat may not necessarily be associated with making us fat (obese and obesity is a major health challenge globally. This has redirected dietary assessments more towards excess carbohydrate consumption and their possible adverse outcomes. Drawing on an ongoing population prospective study in Malaysia, such observations are similarly amplified in an urban Malaysian population. Significant carbohydrate associated negative impacts on CHD risk is seen emerging, especially when evaluated against more advanced biochemical markers. Differences in the ethnic groups of the population, modulated through cultural dietary preferences are similarly apparent. In this model, a surprisingly lower risk contributor is the prevailing fat consumption trends in the country. These observations are explained in this presentation aimed at creating better awareness of food factors impacting disease outcomes in an urban Malaysian environment whose make-up includes a substantive South Indian population as well.

  17. Social determinants of common metabolic risk factors (high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high body mass index and high waist-hip ratio) of major non-communicable diseases in South Asia region: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudesh Raj; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Wagle, Kusum; Page, Rachel; Matheson, Anna; Lambrick, Danielle; Faulkner, James; Lounsbury, David; Vaidya, Abhinav

    2017-09-07

    Prevalence of non-communicable diseases has been increasing at a greater pace in developing countries and, in particular, the South Asia region. Various behavioral, social and environmental factors present in this region perpetuate common metabolic risk factors of non-communicable diseases. This study will identify social determinants of common metabolic risk factors of major non-communicable diseases in the context of the South Asian region and map their causal pathway. A systematic review of selected articles will be carried out following Cochrane guidelines. Review will be guided by Social Determinants of Health Framework developed by the World Health Organization to extract social determinants of metabolic risk factors of non-communicable diseases from studies. A distinct search strategy will be applied using key words to screen relevant studies from online databases. Primary and grey literature published from the year 2000 to 2016 and studies with discussion on proximal and distal determinants of non-communicable risk factors among adults of the South Asia region will be selected. They will be further checked for quality, and a matrix illustrating contents of selected articles will be developed. Thematic content analysis will be done to trace social determinants and their interaction with metabolic risk factors. Findings will be illustrated in causal loop diagrams with social determinants of risk factors along with their interaction (feedback mechanism). The review will describe the interplay of social determinants of common NCD metabolic risk factors in the form of causal loop diagram. Findings will be structured in two parts: the first part will explain the linkage between proximal determinants with the metabolic risk factors and the second part will describe the linkage among the risk factors, proximal determinants and distal determinants. Evidences across different regions will be discussed to compare and validate and/or contrast the findings. Possible

  18. Low birthweight (LBW and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH in an Indian cohort: association of homocysteine, its metabolic pathway genes and micronutrients as risk factors.

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    Krishna Kishore Sukla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Indian subcontinent has the highest child mortality rates along with a very high frequency of low birthweight (LBW. Folate and vitamin B12 (Vit-B12 are necessary during foetal development and their deficiency prevalence in Indians is very high. The objective of the present paper is to assess whether foetal homocysteine (Hcy/folate metabolic pathway genes, their cofactors and homocysteine level independently (or collectively predispose children to Low birth weight. METHODS: Cord blood was collected for the study. Frequency of 5 SNPs in 4-Hcy-pathway genes, and levels of Hcy, Vit-B12 and folate were evaluated. RESULTS: Of the 421 newborns recruited for the study, 38% showed low birth weight (<2.5 kg and 16% were preterm babies. 101 neonates developed neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH. High prevalence of Vit-B12 (65% and folate (27% deficiency was observed in newborns along with hyperhomocystinemia (hypHcy-25%. Preterm delivery, micronutrient deficiency, hypHcy and MTHFR 677T SNP are associated as risk factor while G allele of TCN2 C776G is protective against LBW. MTHFR 677T allele and folate deficiency are also independent risk factors for NNH. CONCLUSION: We record the highest incidence of Vit-B12, folate deficiency and elevated Hcy levels, of all the studies so far reported on neonates. These together with MTHFR 677T are potential risk factors for LBW. Association of impaired folate/Hcy metabolism with NNH is reported for the first time and the possible way of interaction is discussed. It appears that proper nutritional management during pregnancy would reduce the risk of complex clinical outcomes.

  19. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for total hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study (the HUNT study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register

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    Hellevik AI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alf Inge Hellevik,1,2 Marianne Bakke Johnsen,3,4 Arnulf Langhammer,1 Valborg Baste,5 Ove Furnes,6,7 Kjersti Storheim,3,4 John Anker Zwart,3,4 Gunnar Birkeland Flugsrud,2 Lars Nordsletten2,4 1The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, 2Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, 3Research and Communication Unit for Musculoskeletal Health, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, 4Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, 5Uni Research Health, Bergen, 6The Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, 7Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Objective: Biochemical changes associated with obesity may accelerate osteoarthritis beyond the effect of mechanical factors. This study investigated whether metabolic syndrome and its components (visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance were risk factors for subsequent total hip replacement (THR or total knee replacement (TKR due to primary osteoarthritis.Design: In this prospective cohort study, data from the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 2 (HUNT2 were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register for identification of the outcome of THR or TKR. The analyses were stratified by age (<50, 50–69.9 and ≥70 years and adjusted for gender, body mass index, smoking, physical activity and education.Results: Of the 62,661 participants, 12,593 (20.1% were identified as having metabolic syndrome, and we recorded 1,840 (2.9% THRs and 1,111 (1.8% TKRs during a mean follow-up time of 15.4 years. Cox regression analyses did not show any association between full metabolic syndrome and THR or TKR, except in persons <50 years with metabolic syndrome who had a decreased risk

  20. Association of Anthropometric Measures with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome in Normal-Weight Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN III Study

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    Mostafa Qorbani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This nationwide study was conducted to determine the association of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MetS in Iranian normal-weight children and adolescents. Methods: We analyzed the data of 3,565 children and adolescents (50.3% boys, aged 10-18 years, with a normal BMI (5th-84th percentile obtained from the third survey of ‘Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable Disease' (CASPIAN III study. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Results: The prevalence of MetS for 10- to 13.9-year-old boys, 14- to 18-year-old boys, 10- to 13.9-year-old girls, and 14- to 18-year-old girls were 1.4, 2.8, 2.3, and 3.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age and sex, each unit increase in BMI (within normal range and waist circumference increased the odds of MetS from 6 to 72% and from 1 to 20%, respectively. The dominant pattern of dyslipidemia among the participants was high triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusion: This study complements recent research about the high frequency of metabolic risk factors among normal-weight individuals in the pediatric age group.

  1. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors in urban adults of Benin: Relationship with socio-economic status, urbanisation, and lifestyle patterns

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    Delisle Hélène

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of information on diet-related chronic diseases in West Africa. This cross-sectional study assessed the rate of obesity and other cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in a random sample of 200 urban adults in Benin and explored the associations between these factors and socio-economic status (SES, urbanisation as well as lifestyle patterns. Methods Anthropometric parameters (height, weight and waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids (HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. WHO cut-offs were used to define CVD risk factors. Food intake and physical activity were assessed with three non-consecutive 24-hour recalls. Information on tobacco use and alcohol consumption was collected using a questionnaire. An overall lifestyle score (OLS was created based on diet quality, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity. A SES score was computed based on education, main occupation and household amenities (as proxy for income. Results The most prevalent CVD risk factors were overall obesity (18%, abdominal obesity (32%, hypertension (23%, and low HDL-cholesterol (13%. Diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia were uncommon. The prevalence of overall obesity was roughly four times higher in women than in men (28 vs. 8%. After controlling for age and sex, the odds of obesity increased significantly with SES, while a longer exposure to the urban environment was associated with higher odds of hypertension. Of the single lifestyle factors examined, physical activity was the most strongly associated with several CVD risk factors. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the likelihood of obesity and hypertension decreased significantly as the OLS improved, while controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion Our data show that obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are highly prevalent among urban adults in Benin, which calls for urgent measures to avert the

  2. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factors are unique to women. These include: Menopause Use of hormonal birth control (certain types of combination pills, patches, ... risk factors are unique to women. These include: Menopause Use of hormonal birth control (certain types of combination pills, patches, ...

  3. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  4. The effect of a fibre supplement compared to a healthy diet on body composition, lipids, glucose, insulin and other metabolic syndrome risk factors in overweight and obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Khossousi, Alireza; Binns, Colin; Dhaliwal, Satvinder; Ellis, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Optimum levels and types of dietary fibre that provide the greatest beneficial effects on metabolic syndrome risk factors in overweight and obese individuals have yet to be determined in clinical trials. The present parallel design study compared the effects of fibre intake from a healthy diet v. a fibre supplement (psyllium) or a healthy diet plus fibre supplement on fasting lipids, glucose, insulin and body composition. Overweight/obese adults were randomised to either control (with placebo), fibre supplement (FIB), healthy eating plus placebo (HLT) or healthy eating plus fibre supplement (HLT-FIB). There was a significant increase in fibre intake in HLT-FIB, HLT and FIB groups up to 59, 31 and 55 g, respectively, at 12 weeks when compared to control (20 g). Weight, BMI and % total body fat were significantly reduced in FIB and HLT-FIB groups, with weight and BMI significantly reduced in the HLT group compared with control at 12 weeks. HLT-FIB and HLT groups had significant reductions in TAG and insulin compared with control at 6 and 12 weeks, and in insulin compared with the FIB group at 12 weeks. The HLT-FIB, HLT and FIB groups all had significant reductions in total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol compared with control after 6 and 12 weeks. The present study demonstrated that simply adding psyllium fibre supplementation to a normal diet was sufficient to obtain beneficial effects in risk factors. However, a high-fibre diet consisting of a psyllium supplement plus fibre from a healthy diet provided the greatest improvements in metabolic syndrome risk factors.

  5. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of Ganoderma lucidum for the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors of metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupp, Nerida L.; Kiat, Hosen; Bensoussan, Alan; Steiner, Genevieve Z.; Chang, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ganoderma lucidum for the treatment of hyperglycaemia and other cardiovascular risk components of metabolic syndrome using a prospective, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Eighty-four participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were randomised to one of three intervention groups: Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma lucidum with Cordyceps sinensis, or placebo. The dosage was 3 g/day of Ganoderma lucidum, with or without Cordyceps sinensis, for 16 weeks. The primary outcome measure was blood glucose (glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA1c] and fasting plasma glucose [FPG]); a number of secondary outcome measures were also tested. Data from the two intervention groups were combined. The combined intervention had no effect on any of the primary (baseline-adjusted difference in means: HbA1c = 0.13%, 95% CI [−0.35, 0.60], p = 0.60; FPG = 0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI [−0.90, 0.96], p = 0.95) or secondary outcome measures over the course of the 16-week trial, and no overall increased risk of adverse events with either active treatment. Evidence from this randomised clinical trial does not support the use of Ganoderma lucidum for treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in people with diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This Clinical Trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on November 23, 2006. Trial ID: ACTRN12606000485538 and can be accessed here: https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=81705. PMID:27511742

  6. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of Ganoderma lucidum for the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupp, Nerida L; Kiat, Hosen; Bensoussan, Alan; Steiner, Genevieve Z; Chang, Dennis H

    2016-08-11

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ganoderma lucidum for the treatment of hyperglycaemia and other cardiovascular risk components of metabolic syndrome using a prospective, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Eighty-four participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were randomised to one of three intervention groups: Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma lucidum with Cordyceps sinensis, or placebo. The dosage was 3 g/day of Ganoderma lucidum, with or without Cordyceps sinensis, for 16 weeks. The primary outcome measure was blood glucose (glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA1c] and fasting plasma glucose [FPG]); a number of secondary outcome measures were also tested. Data from the two intervention groups were combined. The combined intervention had no effect on any of the primary (baseline-adjusted difference in means: HbA1c = 0.13%, 95% CI [-0.35, 0.60], p = 0.60; FPG = 0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI [-0.90, 0.96], p = 0.95) or secondary outcome measures over the course of the 16-week trial, and no overall increased risk of adverse events with either active treatment. Evidence from this randomised clinical trial does not support the use of Ganoderma lucidum for treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in people with diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This Clinical Trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on November 23, 2006. Trial ID: ACTRN12606000485538 and can be accessed here: https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=81705.

  7. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in children with metabolic syndrome: a triple-masked controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this triple-masked controlled trial aimed to assess the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children and adolescents. METHODS: the study comprised 50 participants, aged 10 to16 years, who were randomly assigned into two groups of equal number. In this 12-week trial, one group received oral vitamin D (300,000 IU and the other group received placebo. Cardiometabolic risk factors, insulin resistance, and a continuous value of metabolic syndrome (cMetS were determined. Statistical analysis was conducted after adjustment for covariate interactions. RESULTS: overall, 21 patients in the vitamin D group and 22 in the placebo group completed the trial. No significant difference was observed in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. After the trial, in the vitamin D group, serum insulin and triglyceride concentrations, as well as HOM -IR and C-MetS decreased significantly, both when compared with the baseline and with the placebo group. No significant difference was observed when comparing total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, fasting blood glucose, and blood pressure. CONCLUSION: the present findings support the favorable effects of vitamin D supplementation on reducing insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children.

  8. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in children with metabolic syndrome: a triple-masked controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelishadi, Roya; Salek, Shadi; Salek, Mehdi; Hashemipour, Mahin; Movahedian, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    This triple-masked controlled trial aimed to assess the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children and adolescents. The study comprised 50 participants, aged 10 to 16 years, who were randomly assigned into two groups of equal number. In this 12-week trial, one group received oral vitamin D (300,000 IU) and the other group received placebo. Cardiometabolic risk factors, insulin resistance, and a continuous value of metabolic syndrome (cMetS) were determined. Statistical analysis was conducted after adjustment for covariate interactions. Overall, 21 patients in the vitamin D group and 22 in the placebo group completed the trial. No significant difference was observed in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. After the trial, in the vitamin D group, serum insulin and triglyceride concentrations, as well as HOM -IR and C-MetS decreased significantly, both when compared with the baseline and with the placebo group. No significant difference was observed when comparing total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, fasting blood glucose, and blood pressure. The present findings support the favorable effects of vitamin D supplementation on reducing insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. The global cardiovascular risk transition: associations of four metabolic risk factors with national income, urbanization, and Western diet in 1980 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Singh, Gitanjali M.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Lin, John K.; Cowan, Melanie J.; Finucane, Mariel M.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Riley, Leanne M.; Lu, Yuan; Rao, Mayuree; Ezzati, Majid; Aamodt, Geir; Abdeen, Ziad; Abdella, Nabila A.; Rahim, Hanan F. Abdul; Addo, Juliet; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afifi, Mustafa M.; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Aguilar Salinas, Carlos A.; Agyemang, Charles; Ali, Mohamed M.; Al-Nsour, Mohannad; Al-Nuaim, Abdul R.; Ambady, Ramachandran; Aro, Pertti; Azizi, Fereidoun; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Barbieri, Marco Antonio M.; Barceló, Alberto; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Barros, Henrique; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Benetos, Athanase; Bjerregaard, Peter; Björkelund, Cecilia; Bo, Simona; Bobak, Martin; Bonora, Enzo; Bontha, Babu V.; Botana, Manuel A.; Bovet, Pascal; Breckenkamp, Juergen; Breteler, Monique M.; Broda, Grazyna; Brown, Ian J.; Bursztyn, Michael; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Campos, Hannia; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Capuano, Vincenzo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Castellano, Maurizio; Castetbon, Katia; Cea, Luis; Chang, Chih-Jen; Chaouki, Noureddine; Chatterji, Somnath; Chen, Zhengming; Chen, Chien-Jen; Choi, Jin-Su; Chua, Lily; Cífková, Renata; Cobiac, Linda J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Costanza, Michael C.; Craig, Cora L.; Dankner, Rachel S.; Dastgiri, Saeed; Delgado, Elias; Dinc, Gonul; Doi, Yasufumi; Dong, Guang-Hui; Dorsi, Eleonora; Dragano, Nico; Drewnowski, Adam; Eggertsen, W.; Elliott, Paul; Engeland, Anders; Erem, Cihangir; Esteghamati, Alireza; Fall, Caroline H. D.; Fan, Jian-Gao; Ferreccio, Catterina; Fezeu, Leopold; Firmo, Josélia O.; Florez, Hermes J.; Fornés, Nélida S.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Franceschini, Guido; Frisk, Fredrik; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Fuller, Eva L.; Getz, Linn; Giampaoli, Simona; Gómez, Luis F.; Gomez-Zumaquero, Juan M.; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Grant, Janet F.; Guerrero Carvajal, Ramiro; Gulliford, Martin C.; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Prakash C.; Gureje, Oye; Hansen, Tine W.; Hata, Jun; He, Jiang; Heim, Noor; Heinrich, Joachim; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Hennis, Anselm; Herman, William H.; Herrera, Victor M.; Ho, Suzanne; Holdsworth, Michelle; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hopman, Wilma M.; Hussain, Akhtar; Husseini, Abdullatif; Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; Ikeda, Nayu; Jacobsen, Bjarne K.; Jaddou, Hashem Y.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Jasienska, Grazyna; Joffres, Michel R.; Jonas, Jost B.; Kadiki, Othman A.; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Kamadjeu, Raoul M.; Karalis, Ioannis; Kastarinen, Mika J.; Katz, Joanne; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Kelly, Paul; Khalilzadeh, Omid; Khang, Young-Ho; Kiechl, Stefan; Kim, Ki Woong; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Junji; Krause, Maressa P.; Kubínová, Růžena; Kurjata, Pawel; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.; Lam, Tai Hing; Langhammer, Arnulf; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Le, Cai; Lee, Jeannette; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Li, Yanping; Li, Yuqiu; Lim, Stephen; Lim, T. O.; Lin, Xu; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Lind, Lars; Lissner, Lauren; Liu, Xiaoqing; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Lorbeer, Roberto; Ma, Guansheng; Ma, Stefan; Macià, Francesc; MacLean, David R.; Maggi, Stefania; Magliano, Dianna J.; Makdisse, Marcia; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mannami, Toshifumi; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mbanya, Jean Claude N.; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Miccoli, Roberto; Miettola, Juhani; Minh, Hoang V.; Miquel, Juan F.; Miranda, J. Jaime; Mohamed, Mostafa K.; Mohan, V.; Mohanna, Salim; Mokdad, Ali; Mollentze, Willem F.; Morales, Dante D.; Morgan, Karen; Muiesan, Lorenza M.; Muntoni, Sergio; Nabipour, Iraj; Nakagami, Tomoko; Nangia, Vinay; Nemesure, Barbara; Neovius, Martin; Nerhus, Kjersti A.; Nervi, Flavio; Neuhauser, Hannelore; Nguyen, Minh; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Noale, Marianna; Oh, Sang W.; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Olivieri, Oliviero; Önal, Ayse Emel; Onat, Altan; Oróstegui, Myriam; Ouedraogo, Hermann; Pan, Wen-Harn; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Panza, Francesco; Park, Yongsoo; Passos, Valeria M. A.; Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Peres, Marco A.; Pérez, Cynthia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Pichardo, Rafael; Phua, Hwee Pin; Pistelli, Francesco; Plans, Pedro; Polakowska, Maria; Poulter, Neil; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Qiao, Qing; Rafiei, Masoud; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ramos, Luiz R.; Rampal, Sanjay; Rampal, Lekhraj; Rasmussen, Finn; Reddy, Kanala K. R.; Redon, Josep; Revilla, Luis; Reyes-García, Victoria; Roaeid, Ragab B.; Rodriguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Roth, Gregory A.; Sachdev, Harshpal S.; Sánchez, José R.; Sanisoglu, Selim Y.; Sans, Susana; Sarraf-Zadegan, Nizal; Scazufca, Marcia; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Schapochnik, Norberto; Schelleman, Hedi; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schooling, C. Mary; Schwarz, Bernhard; Sekuri, Cevad; Sereday, Martha S.; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Shaw, Jonathan; Shera, Abdul S.; Shi, Zumin; Shiri, Rahman; Shu, Xiao Ou; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Silva, Eglé; Simons, Leon A.; Smith, Margaret; Söderberg, Stefan; Soebardi, Suharko; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sonestedt, Emily; Soysal, Ahmet; Stattin, Pär; Stein, Aryeh D.; Stergiou, George S.; Stessman, Jochanan; Sudo, Akihiro; Suka, Machi; Sundh, Valter; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundström, Johan; Swai, Andrew B.; Tai, E. Shyong; Tambs, Kristian; Tesfaye, Fikru; Thomas, George N.; Thorogood, Margaret; Tilvis, Reijo S.; Tobias, Martin; Torheim, Liv E.; Trenkwalder, Peter; Tuomilehto, Jaakko O.; Tur, Josep A.; Tzourio, Christophe; Uhernik, Ana I.; Ukoli, Flora A.; Unwin, Nigel; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Vanderpump, Mark P.; Varo, Jose Javier; Veierød, B.; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Verschuren, Monique; Viet, Lucie; Villalpando, Salvador; Vioque, Jesus; Vollenweider, Peter; Volpato, Stefano; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Ya X.; Ward, Mark; Waspadji, Sarwono; Welin, Lennart X.; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Willeit, Johann; Woodward, Mark; Xavier, André J.; Xu, Fei; Xu, Liang; Yamamoto, Akira; Yang, Gonghuan; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yeh, Li-Chia; Yoon, Jin-Sang; You, Qisheng; Yu, Zhijie; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Maigeng

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that cardiovascular disease risk factors are associated with affluence and Westernization. We investigated the associations of body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose, systolic blood pressure, and serum total cholesterol with national income, Western diet, and, for BMI,

  10. Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrea, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Tarantino, Giovanni; Di Somma, Carolina; Pane, Elena; Balato, Nicola; Napolitano, Maddalena; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2015-09-16

    Western dietary pattern is included among the environmental dietary factors involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Nutritional data collection methods and gender differences might affect the association between diet and psoriasis. The 7-day food records is considered the "gold standard" of self-administered food frequency questionnaires. In this study, we evaluated the differences in the dietary intake, anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic risk profile in a group of psoriatic patients compared with an age and Body Mass Index (BMI)-matched control group. In addition, in the group of psoriatic patients we investigated the association between the dietary intake and clinical severity of psoriasis. Cross-sectional case control observational study. A total of 82 adult males, 41 treatment-naïve patients with psoriasis and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and BMI were included in the study. The clinical severity of psoriasis was by assessed by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. The dietary interview data were collected by a 7-day food records. Anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests and C-reactive protein levels were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HoMA-IR), Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) and the Fatty Liver Index (FLI) were calculated. Psoriatic patients consumed a higher percentage of total and simple carbohydrates, total fat, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio, and cholesterol, while the consumption of protein, complex carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), n-3 PUFA and fiber was lower than in the control group. In addition, psoriatic patients presented altered anthropometric measurements, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, and elevated values of HoMA-IR, VAI and FLI. PASI score well correlated with anthropometric measures, glucose and lipid profile, liver function tests, cardio-metabolic indices, and the dietary components

  11. Diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity are not significant risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in an HBV- and HCV-endemic area of Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Tung Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A prominent factor in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV. Diabetes mellitus (DM, metabolic syndrome (MetS, and obesity have also been implicated in HCC development, but these associations are not observed in all HBV- and HCV-endemic areas. We attempted to clarify the role of these factors in HCC development in an HBV- and HCV-endemic area in southern Taiwan. A community-based health examination was conducted in 2004 in Tainan County. After individuals with incomplete data and those with known HCC were excluded, there were 56,231 participants who were over 40 years of age. A further 262 HCC cases were identified from the National Cancer Registration Database records from 2005 to 2007. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg seropositivity, anti-HCV seropositivity, platelet count, serum biochemical data, blood pressure, sociodemographic information, and anthropometric measurements were analyzed. Survival analyses were used to identify the associations between these factors and HCC. For the 262 HCC cases, male gender and age greater than 65 years were risk factors. Furthermore, a high alanine aminotransferase level, chronic HBV and/or HCV infection, and liver cirrhosis were also risk factors for HCC. However, DM, MetS and obesity were not associated with HCC development in the non-HBV-/non-HCV-infected, HBV, HCV, or dual B/C groups. In this HBV- and HCV- endemic area, DM, MetS and obesity were not risk factors for developing HCC.

  12. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2011-01-06

    An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1), with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has been focused on salivary acetaldehyde that is formed either from ethanol metabolism in the epithelia or from microbial oxidation of ethanol by the oral microflora. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of the acetaldehyde that is found as a component of alcoholic beverages as an additional factor in the aetiology of oral cancer. Salivary acetaldehyde levels were determined in the context of sensory analysis of different alcoholic beverages (beer, cider, wine, sherry, vodka, calvados, grape marc spirit, tequila, cherry spirit), without swallowing, to exclude systemic ethanol metabolism. The rinsing of the mouth for 30 seconds with an alcoholic beverage is able to increase salivary acetaldehyde above levels previously judged to be carcinogenic in vitro, with levels up to 1000 μM in cases of beverages with extreme acetaldehyde content. In general, the highest salivary acetaldehyde concentration was found in all cases in the saliva 30 sec after using the beverages (average 353 μM). The average concentration then decreased at the 2-min (156 μM), 5-min (76 μM) and 10-min (40 μM) sampling points. The salivary acetaldehyde concentration depends primarily on the direct ingestion of acetaldehyde contained in the beverages at the 30-sec sampling, while the influence of the metabolic formation from ethanol becomes the major factor at the 2-min sampling point. This study offers a plausible mechanism to explain the increased risk for oral cancer associated with high acetaldehyde concentrations in

  13. Short-term salivary acetaldehyde increase due to direct exposure to alcoholic beverages as an additional cancer risk factor beyond ethanol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monakhova Yulia B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing body of evidence now implicates acetaldehyde as a major underlying factor for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages and especially for oesophageal and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde associated with alcohol consumption is regarded as 'carcinogenic to humans' (IARC Group 1, with sufficient evidence available for the oesophagus, head and neck as sites of carcinogenicity. At present, research into the mechanistic aspects of acetaldehyde-related oral cancer has been focused on salivary acetaldehyde that is formed either from ethanol metabolism in the epithelia or from microbial oxidation of ethanol by the oral microflora. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of the acetaldehyde that is found as a component of alcoholic beverages as an additional factor in the aetiology of oral cancer. Methods Salivary acetaldehyde levels were determined in the context of sensory analysis of different alcoholic beverages (beer, cider, wine, sherry, vodka, calvados, grape marc spirit, tequila, cherry spirit, without swallowing, to exclude systemic ethanol metabolism. Results The rinsing of the mouth for 30 seconds with an alcoholic beverage is able to increase salivary acetaldehyde above levels previously judged to be carcinogenic in vitro, with levels up to 1000 μM in cases of beverages with extreme acetaldehyde content. In general, the highest salivary acetaldehyde concentration was found in all cases in the saliva 30 sec after using the beverages (average 353 μM. The average concentration then decreased at the 2-min (156 μM, 5-min (76 μM and 10-min (40 μM sampling points. The salivary acetaldehyde concentration depends primarily on the direct ingestion of acetaldehyde contained in the beverages at the 30-sec sampling, while the influence of the metabolic formation from ethanol becomes the major factor at the 2-min sampling point. Conclusions This study offers a plausible mechanism to explain the increased risk for oral

  14. Investigating multiple candidate genes and nutrients in the folate metabolism pathway to detect genetic and nutritional risk factors for lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Swartz

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Folate metabolism, with its importance to DNA repair, provides a promising region for genetic investigation of lung cancer risk. This project investigates genes (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, CBS, SHMT1, TYMS, folate metabolism related nutrients (B vitamins, methionine, choline, and betaine and their gene-nutrient interactions. METHODS: We analyzed 115 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 15 nutrients from 1239 and 1692 non-Hispanic white, histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and controls, respectively, using stochastic search variable selection (a Bayesian model averaging approach. Analyses were stratified by current, former, and never smoking status. RESULTS: Rs6893114 in MTRR (odds ratio [OR] = 2.10; 95% credible interval [CI]: 1.20-3.48 and alcohol (drinkers vs. non-drinkers, OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.26-0.84 were associated with lung cancer risk in current smokers. Rs13170530 in MTRR (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10-2.87 and two SNP*nutrient interactions [betaine*rs2658161 (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.88 and betaine*rs16948305 (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.91] were associated with lung cancer risk in former smokers. SNPs in MTRR (rs13162612; OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; rs10512948; OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41-0.90; rs2924471; OR = 3.31; 95% CI: 1.66-6.59, and MTHFR (rs9651118; OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.95 and three SNP*nutrient interactions (choline*rs10475407; OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.11-2.42; choline*rs11134290; OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.27-0.92; and riboflavin*rs8767412; OR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.15-0.95 were associated with lung cancer risk in never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified possible nutrient and genetic factors related to folate metabolism associated with lung cancer risk, which could potentially lead to nutritional interventions tailored by smoking status to reduce lung cancer risk.

  15. Diabetes and Technology for Increased Activity (DaTA Study: The effects of exercise and technology on heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stuckey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that an eight-week exercise intervention supported by mobile health (mHealth technology would improve metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors and heart rate variability (HRV in a population with MetS risk factors. Participants (n=12; 3 male; aged 56.9±7.0y reported to the laboratory for assessment of MetS risk factors and fitness (VO2max at baseline (V0 and after eight-weeks (V2 of intervention. Participants received an individualized exercise prescription and a mHealth technology kit for remote monitoring of blood pressure (BP, blood glucose, physical activity and body weight via smartphone. Participants underwent 24-h ambulatory monitoring of R-R intervals following V0 and V2. Low and high frequency powers of HRV were assessed from the recording and the ratio of low-to-high frequency powers and low and high frequency power in normalized units were calculated. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that waist circumference (V0: 113.1±11.0cm, V2: 108.1±14.7cm; p=0.004 and diastolic BP (V0: 81±6mmHg, V2: 76±11mmHg; p=0.04 were reduced and VO2max increased (V0: 31.3ml/kg/min, V2: 34.8ml/kg/min; p=0.02 with no changes in other MetS risk factors. Low and high frequency powers in normalized units were reduced (V0: 75.5±12.0, V2: 72.0±12.1; p=0.03 and increased (V0: 24.5±12.0, V2: 28.0±12.1; p=0.03, respectively, with no other changes in HRV. Over the intervention period, changes in systolic BP were correlated negatively with the changes in R-R interval (r=-0.600; p=0.04 and positively with the changes in heart rate (r=0.611; p=0.03, with no other associations between MetS risk factors and HRV parameters. Thus, this eight-week mHealth supported exercise intervention improved MetS risk factors and HRV parameters, but only changes in systolic BP were associated with improved autonomic function.

  16. Adolescent health in rural Ghana: A cross-sectional study on the co-occurrence of infectious diseases, malnutrition and cardio-metabolic risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicke, Marie; Boakye-Appiah, Justice K.; Abdul-Jalil, Inusah; Henze, Andrea; van der Giet, Markus; Schulze, Matthias B.; Schweigert, Florian J.; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Bedu-Addo, George

    2017-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases and malnutrition constitute the main health problems in children, while adolescents and adults are increasingly facing cardio-metabolic conditions. Among adolescents as the largest population group in this region, we investigated the co-occurrence of infectious diseases, malnutrition and cardio-metabolic risk factors (CRFs), and evaluated demographic, socio-economic and medical risk factors for these entities. In a cross-sectional study among 188 adolescents in rural Ghana, malarial infection, common infectious diseases and Body Mass Index were assessed. We measured ferritin, C-reactive protein, retinol, fasting glucose and blood pressure. Socio-demographic data were documented. We analyzed the proportions (95% confidence interval, CI) and the co-occurrence of infectious diseases (malaria, other common diseases), malnutrition (underweight, stunting, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency [VAD]), and CRFs (overweight, obesity, impaired fasting glucose, hypertension). In logistic regression, odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs were calculated for the associations with socio-demographic factors. In this Ghanaian population (age range, 14.4–15.5 years; males, 50%), the proportions were for infectious diseases 45% (95% CI: 38–52%), for malnutrition 50% (43–57%) and for CRFs 16% (11–21%). Infectious diseases and malnutrition frequently co-existed (28%; 21–34%). Specifically, VAD increased the odds of non-malarial infectious diseases 3-fold (95% CI: 1.03, 10.19). Overlap of CRFs with infectious diseases (6%; 2–9%) or with malnutrition (7%; 3–11%) was also present. Male gender and low socio-economic status increased the odds of infectious diseases and malnutrition, respectively. Malarial infection, chronic malnutrition and VAD remain the predominant health problems among these Ghanaian adolescents. Investigating the relationships with evolving CRFs is warranted. PMID:28727775

  17. Effects of high and low fat dairy food on cardio-metabolic risk factors: a meta-analysis of randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatar, Jocelyne R; Sidhu, Karishma; Stewart, Ralph A H

    2013-01-01

    Clear guidelines on the health effects of dairy food are important given the high prevalence of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and increasing global consumption of dairy food. To evaluate the effects of increased dairy food on cardio metabolic risk factors. Searches were performed until April 2013 using MEDLINE, Science Direct, Google,Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings. Randomized controlled studies with healthy adults randomized to increased dairy food for more than one month without additional interventions. A standard list was used to extract descriptive, methodological and key variables from all eligible studies. If data was not included in the published report corresponding authors were contacted. 20 studies with 1677 participants with a median duration of dietary change of 26 (IQR 10-39) weeks and mean increase in dairy food intake of 3.6 (SD 0.92) serves/day were included. There was an increase in weight with low (+0.82, 0.35 to 1.28 kg, pfood (+0.41, 0.04 to 0.79 kg, p=0.03), but no significant change in waist circumference (-0.07, -1.24 to 1.10 cm) ; HOMA -IR (-0.94, -1.93 to 0.04 units); fasting glucose (+1.32, 0.19 to 2.45 mg/dl) ; LDL-c (1.85,-2.89 to 6.60 mg/dl); HDL-c (-0.19, -2.10 to 1.71 mg/dl); systolic BP (-0.4, -1.6 to 0.8 mmHg); diastolic BP (-0.4, -1.7 to 0.8 mmHg) or CRP (-1.07, -2.54 to 0.39 mg/L). Changes in other cardio-metabolic risk factors were similar for low and whole fat dairy interventions. Most clinical trials were small and of modest quality. . Increasing whole fat and low fat dairy food consumption increases weight but has minor effects on other cardio-metabolic risk factors. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000401752, http://www.anzctr.org.au. NTX/10/11/115.

  18. Butyrate Reduces HFD-Induced Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Metabolic Risk Factors in Obese LDLr-/-.Leiden Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, C.E.; Franx, B.A.A.; Snabel, J.; Kleemann, R.; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) has a modulating role in obesity-induced metabolic complications like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) via the production of so-called adipokines such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin. The adipokines are believed to influence other tissues and to affect insulin resistance,

  19. Factors associated with health-promoting behavior of people with or at high risk of metabolic syndrome: Based on the health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sally Wai Sze; Chair, Sek Ying; Lee, Fung Kam

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the associations between self-efficacy and the various factors in the Health Belief Model (HBM), and the health-promoting behaviors of people with, or at high risk of, Metabolic Syndrome (MS). 132 adults with two or more MS components were included in this cross-sectional study. Health-promoting behavior, self-efficacy and the four-constructs of HBM (perceived threat, cues, benefits, and barriers) were measured using validated tools. The contributions of each HBM factor towards the respective behavior were identified using a three-step hierarchical regression approach. After controlling for age, gender, education level, income and knowledge of MS, HBM factors accounted for 11% of the total variance in health-promoting behaviors. Beliefs about barriers were found to be a significant predictor of exercise (β=-.28, phealth-promoting behaviors. In the final model, self-efficacy explained an additional 31% of the variance in exercise behavior and 13% in diet management behavior. Self-efficacy and perceived barriers made independent contributions to health-promoting behavior among people with, or at high risk of, MS. Community health program targeting this particular group should tailor strategies that can enhance individuals' self-efficacy and address barriers perceived. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heterogeneity of the Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1 gene and metabolic risk factors in the EPIC-Potsdam study.

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    Maria Arregui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1 is an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism. In mice and humans its activity has been associated with traits of the metabolic syndrome, but also with the prevention of saturated fatty acids accumulation and subsequent inflammation, whereas for liver fat content inconsistent results have been reported. Thus, variants of the gene encoding SCD1 (SCD1 could potentially modify metabolic risk factors, but few human studies have addressed this question. METHODS: In a sample of 2157 middle-aged men and women randomly drawn from the Potsdam cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, we investigated the impact of 7 SCD1 tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1502593, rs522951, rs11190480, rs3071, rs3793767, rs10883463 and rs508384 and 5 inferred haplotypes with frequency >5% describing 90.9% of the genotype combinations in our population, on triglycerides, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and fetuin-A. RESULTS: No significant associations between any of the SNPs or haplotypes and BMI, WC, fetuin-A and hs-CRP were observed. Associations of rs10883463 with triglycerides, GGT and HbA1c as well as of rs11190480 with ALT activity, were weak and became non-significant after multiple-testing correction. Also associations of the haplotype harbouring the minor allele of rs1502593 with HbA1c levels, the haplotype harbouring the minor alleles of rs11190480 and rs508384 with activity of ALT, and the haplotype harbouring the minor alleles of rs522951, rs10883463 and rs508384 with triglyceride and HbA1C levels and GGT activities did not withstand multiple-testing correction. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that there are no associations between common variants of SCD1 or its inferred haplotypes and the investigated metabolic risk factors

  1. Early-menarche as Determinant Factor for Metabolic-risks: An Epidemiology Perspectives among Adolescent Girls aged 13-15 years old in Jakarta-Indonesia

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    Ririn Hariani

    2018-01-01

    A total of 194 adolescent girls were participated in this study. Early menarche was found in 22.68% of all subjects. There was no association between menarche status and daily macronutrients intake pattern and physical activity level score. Early menarche subjects had significantly higher BMI (p<0.001, CDC-percentile (p<0.001, WHO Z-score (p<0.001, and waist circumference values (p=0.02. Furthermore, early menarche subjects also had higher systolic blood pressure (p=0.035, total cholesterol level (p=0.028, LDL-cholesterol level (p=0.013, and triglyceride level (p=0.026. There was no association between menarche status and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, HDL-C level, lipid profile ratio. In conclusion, early menarche is an important determinant factor of metabolic risks, and balance between dietary intake and physical activity level should be prioritized among them.

  2. Effect of nutritional intervention on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and heart disease risk factors in urban Tehran (Tehran lipid and glucose study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezankhani, A; Mirmiran, P; Azizi, F

    2011-06-01

    In a case-control study a nutritional intervention consisting of an educational program based on the Therapeutic Lifestyle Change diet (TLC) guidelines was implemented in one area of Tehran. Data were collected from subjects in the intervention area (n =133) and controls from another area (n = 183), before and 3.8 years after the intervention. Mean energy and macronutrient intakes and prevalence of risk factors including metabolic syndrome were compared between and within cases and controls. Baseline and follow-up evaluations showed improvement in hypercholesterolemia and high LDL cholesterol levels in cases versus controls. Central obesity and low HDL cholesterol levels increased significantly in controls but not in cases. As there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in energy and macronutrient intakes, it is difficult to claim that nutritional interventions played an important role.

  3. Age associated differences in prevalence of individual rotterdam criteria and metabolic risk factors during reproductive age in 446 caucasian women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D; Mumm, H; Ravn, P

    2012-01-01

    Clinical manifestations and metabolic risk factors may differ according to age in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Therefore, a retrospective trans-sectional study in academic tertiary-care medical center was designed. A cohort of 446 premenopausal, Caucasian women (age range 15......-49 years) with PCOS were divided into 4 subgroups according to age: group 1 (15-19 years, n=42), group 2 (20-29 years, n=180), group 3 (30-39 years, n=187), group 4 (40-49 years, n=37) and underwent clinical evaluation (Ferriman-Gallwey score, BMI, waist, blood pressure), hormone analyses (sex hormones......, fasting lipids, insulin, glucose), transvaginal ultrasound, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) (n=234), and ACTH tests (n=201). BMI, waist, Ferriman-Gallwey score, blood pressure, and lipid profile were higher in older vs. younger age groups whereas androgen levels were lower. Measures of insulin...

  4. A-FABP Concentration Is More Strongly Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and the Occurrence of Metabolic Syndrome in Premenopausal Than in Postmenopausal Middle-Aged Women

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    Anna Stefanska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at the evaluation of the relationship between adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Additionally, we compared A-FABP with adipokines related to metabolic syndrome (MetS such as leptin and adiponectin. 94 premenopausal and 90 early postmenopausal middle-aged Caucasian women were subject to examinations. Postmenopausal women had higher A-FABP than premenopausal; this difference became insignificant after controlling for age. We found significantly higher correlation coefficients between A-FABP and TC/HDL-C ratio and number of MetS components in premenopausal women, compared to postmenopausal. Each 1 ng/dL increase in A-FABP concentration significantly increased the probability of occurrence of atherogenic lipid profile in premenopausal women, even after multivariate adjustment. All odds ratios became insignificant after controlling for BMI in postmenopausal women. A-FABP was more strongly associated with MetS than leptin and adiponectin in premenopausal women. Adiponectin concentration was a better biomarker for MetS after menopause. Our results suggest that the A-FABP is more strongly associated with some cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women. Higher values of A-FABP after menopause are mainly explained by the fact that postmenopausal women are older. Because of the limitation of study, these results should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Relationship between serum anti-Mullerian hormone with vitamin D and metabolic syndrome risk factors in late reproductive-age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunmie; Kim, Jin Ju; Kim, Min-Jeong; Han, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk; Choi, Young Min; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2018-04-01

    The relationship between serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) with vitamin D (25OH-D) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk was evaluated in healthy, late reproductive-age (35-49 years) women with regular menstrual cycles. Among the 291 participants (mean age = 42.5 years), most (76.6%, n = 223) were serum vitamin D insufficient (D were 2.04 ng/mL and 15.9 ng/mL, respectively. There was no correlation between AMH and 25OH-D after adjustment for age (r = -0.093, p = 0.113). Subjects with higher MetS score, higher waist circumference, and higher diastolic blood pressure had significantly higher serum AMH levels when adjusted for age, but the association attenuated when BMI was included. There was no significant correlation between MetS risk components with serum level of AMH or vitamin D. In conclusion, there was no association between AMH with serum 25OH-D or MetS risk factors in this population.

  6. Prevalence of the impaired glucose metabolism and its association with risk factors for coronary artery disease in women with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Katia; Portal, Vera Lúcia; Vieira, Matias; Behle, Ivo

    2008-03-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) has increased risk of diabetes (DM2), a coronary artery disease (CAD) equivalent. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) in GDM and its association with risk factors for CAD. A cohort of 109 women with GDM underwent a glucose tolerance test which classified them into three groups: diabetic (DM2) (fasting glucose (G) >or=126mg/dl or plasma glucose 2h (2-h G) >or=200mg/dl); impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (G 100-125mg/dl and/or 2-h G 140-199mg/dl); and normal (N) (GDM2, 39.4% IGT and 43.1% were N. PBMI, CBMI, SBP and DBP were significantly higher in the DM2 than N. G was higher in DM2 and IGT. HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher in the N (p=0.02) and the triglycerides (TG) were higher in DM2 (p=0.02). The groups showed significantly different levels of hsCRP (p=0.002). We conclude that the high prevalence of IGM, overweight/obesity, dyslipidemia and altered inflammatory markers, make GDM a high-risk situation for CAD.

  7. Coleus forskohlii Extract Supplementation in Conjunction with a Hypocaloric Diet Reduces the Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome in Overweight and Obese Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Hayley L. Loftus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Limited studies have shown that Coleus forskohlii extract may aid in weight management. This randomized, double blind placebo-controlled clinical study assessed the effects of supplementation with C. forskohlii extract on key markers of obesity and metabolic parameters in overweight and obese individuals. Thirty participants completed the trial and they were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of C. forskohlii extract (n = 15 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. All participants were advised to follow a hypocaloric diet throughout the study. Body weight, body mass index (BMI, waist and hip circumference, and waist to hip ratio, were monitored fortnightly. Dietary intake was assessed at the baseline and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales and blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids, ghrelin, leptin, glucose and insulin at the baseline and end of the intervention. Significant reductions to waist and hip circumference (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively were recorded in both experimental and placebo groups after the 12 week intervention. Furthermore, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C was significantly increased (p = 0.01 in both groups. The experimental group showed a favorable improvement in insulin concentration and insulin resistance (p = 0.001; 0.01 respectively compared to the placebo group. These findings suggest that C. forskohlii extract in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet may be useful in the management of metabolic risk factors.

  8. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

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    Ana Maria Pandolfo Feoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  9. The effect of 8 weeks of Circuit Resistance Training on metabolic syndrome risk factors and body composition in women over age 50 with diabetes mellitus type 2

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    Seyede Amene Azarmehr

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM increased significantly in the last three decades, and effective strategies to manage and prevent this disease are urgently needed. Physical activity and exercise training is an effective way for metabolic syndrome risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. However, the effects of Circuit Resistance Training (CRT program on patients T2DM are unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigation the effect of 8 weeks of Circuit resistance training (CRT on metabolic syndrome and body composition in women over age 50 with T2DM. Methods: Twenty women over 50 years old with diabetes Referred to diabetes Center of 17 Shahrivar hospital in Amol and they were divided randomly into two groups; Circuit resistance (n=10 and Control (n=10. Resistance training consisted of 10 stations for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week (Intensity 60-80% 1RM. Levels of Lipid profile and body composition before and after eight weeks training in both groups were measured. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by SPSS (v. 22. Results Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS levels (P=0.021, Triglycerides (0.010, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.042, significant decreased in CRT. Also after 8 weeks circuit resistance training, BMI (P= 0.003, WHR (P=0.004 and body fat present (0.019 significant decreased in CRT. Conclusion: According to our results, CRT was an effective approach to improve the Anthropometrics, FBS, lipid profile in women over age 50 with diabetes mellitus type 2. Moreover, CRT did have influence on LDL level.  Keywords: Circuit resistance training, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, body composition

  10. [Analysis of metabolic syndrome and pulse wave velocity in hemodialysis patients: diagnosis of obesity by bioelectrical impedance analysis and a novel risk factor for atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Shinichi; Saito, Takako; Ando, Yasuhiro; Kusano, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (Met S) is one of the risk factors of atherosclerotic vascular diseases related to visceral fat accumulation. However, it is well known that morbidity and mortality of hemodialysis (HD) patients are associated with malnutrition and emaciation rather than obesity, representing "reverse epidemiology". The risk of visceral fat accumulation or Met S in HD patients remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated atherosclerosis and Met S in HD patients using various markers of obesity by means of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and brachial-ankle PWV(baPWV). The subjects comprised 52 patients who were undergoing maintenance dialysis. In addition to a general physical examination and routine blood tests, immunoreactive insulin (IRI), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-R), serum adiponectin (ADPN) and C-reactive protein (CRP)were measured before dialysis. Furthermore, we measured various body fluid components, such as the ratio of extracellular water to total body water (ECW/TBW), body fat mass (BFM), percent body fat(PBF) and visceral fat accumulation (BIA-VFA), using a body composition analyzer (InBody S20)and baPWV as a marker of atherosclerosis. There was no significant difference between HD patients with and without Met S for baPWV. baPWV was positively correlated with age, systolic BP and ECW/TBW, and negatively correlated with serum albumin level, BMI and serum ADPN. However, no significant correlations were observed between baPWV and the durations of HD, Ca x P product, BIA-VFA, PBF, HOMA-R and CRP. The serum ADPN level was significantly lower in Met S than in non-Met S. In addition, the ADPN level was positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol, and negatively correlated with TG, HbA1c, CRP and various markers of obesity (Waist, BIA-VFA, BFM and PBF). In a multiple regression analysis for baPWV, the ECW/TBW ratio and serum ADPN level, as well as age and systolic BP, were independent predictors for the enhancement of ba

  11. The prevalence trend of metabolic syndrome and its components and risk factors in Korean adults: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2013

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    Binh Thang Tran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in the clinical markers of metabolic syndrome (MS are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and some cancers. MS prevalence in Korea increased between the mid-1990s and mid-2000s; however, no data on the recent trends of MS prevalence are available. Thus, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of MS, the five components of MS, and the related risk factors in Korean adults by using recent data. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2008 and 2013 were used. The revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria were used for defining MS. A multivariate logistic regression analyses was used to estimate the relationship between the related risk factors including behaviors, dietary factors, and the prevalence of MS. Results A total of 34,587 men and women were included in the analysis. Age-adjusted prevalence of MS in 2013 was 28.9% without a significant increasing or decreasing trend between 2008 and 2013. Among the five components of MS, abdominal obesity decreased in both men and women (annual percent change: −2.0 and −2.5%, respectively, the decrease being significant only in women, whereas blood pressure and blood glucose significantly increased in men (+1.9 and +2.7%, respectively. Age and obesity (odds ratio = 6.7, 95% confidence interval = 5.9–7.5 for body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 vs. body mass index <25 kg/m2 were associated with increased MS risk in both men and women. Smoking and alcohol drinking were significantly associated with increased MS risk in men, and association between MS and vitamin D deficiency was at the edge of statistical significance. Higher education and income level were significantly associated with decreased MS risk in women. During this period, smoking rate and physical activity, sodium intake, and serum vitamin D level significantly decreased. Education level

  12. Gender Differences in Major Dietary Patterns and Their Relationship with Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Year before Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) Surgery Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Ataie-Jafari, Asal; Najafi, Mahdi; Sarami Foroushani, Gholamreza; Mohajeri Tehrani, Mohammad Reza; Jahangiry, Leila

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies reported the association between dietary patterns and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other chronic disease. However, there are no studies reporting major dietary patterns in patients awaiting coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). The aim of this study was to obtain the major dietary patterns and their association with demographic, dietary factors and biochemical parameters in these patients. This was a cross-sectional study on 454 patients aged 35 - 80 years as candidates of CABG and hospitalized in the Tehran Heart Center. Anthropometric and demographic characteristics were obtained from all participants and a 138-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to evaluate dietary patterns by factor analysis. Biochemical parameters including HbA1c, serum lipids, hematocrit (HCT), albumin, creatinine and CRP were assessed by commercial laboratory methods. Five major dietary patterns, including: healthy, intermediate, neo-traditional, western and semi-Mediterranean patterns were extracted. Top quartile of healthy pattern was associated with higher educational attainment and lower serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), and total cholesterol (TC) in men, as well as  higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) concentrations in women (P habits, as well as the lower prevalence of diabetes, hyperlipidemia and hypertension (P eating patterns were associated with lower cardio-metabolic risk factors.

  13. Association between opium use and metabolic syndrome among an urban population in Southern Iran: Results of the Kerman Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factor Study (KERCADRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Najafipour, Hamid; Eslami, Mahmood; Salehi, Farank

    2015-01-01

    Along with the established effects of opium on metabolic parameters, stimulatory or inhibitory effects of opium on metabolic syndrome are also predictable. This study aimed to examine the association of opium use with metabolic syndrome and its components. This study was conducted on 5332 out of 5900 original sample participants enrolled in a population-based cohort entitled the Kerman Coronary Artery Disease Risk Study in Iran from 2009 to 2011. The subjects were divided into three groups of "non-opium users" (NOUs = 4340 subjects), "former opium users" (FOUs = 176 subjects), and dependent and occasional people named "current opium users" (COUs = 811 subjects). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to two International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) definition criteria. The overall prevalence of IDF defined-metabolic syndrome among NOUs, FOUs, and COUs was 36.4%, 27.3%, and 39.0%, respectively; which was significantly higher in the COUs group (P = 0.012). However, no significant difference was revealed across the three groups in prevalence of NCEP defined-metabolic syndrome (NOUs = 37.2%, FOUs = 30.1%, and COUs = 39.6%, P = 0.058). The odds for IDF defined-metabolic syndrome was higher in both COUs [odd ratio (OR) = 1.28, P = 0.028)] and FOUs (OR = 1.57, P = 0.045) compared with NOUs as the reference adjusting gender, age, body mass index, and cigarette smoking. However, the appearance of NCEP defined-metabolic syndrome could not be predicted by opium use. Opium use can be associated with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria and thus preventing the appearance of metabolic syndrome by avoiding opium use can be a certain approach to preventing cardiovascular disease.

  14. [Risk factors of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvisaari, Jaana

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a multifactorial, neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Disturbances of brain development begin prenatally, while different environmental insults further affect postnatal brain maturation during childhood and adolescence. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have succeeded in identifying hundreds of new risk variants for common, multifactorial diseases. In schizophrenia research, GWAS have found several rare copy number variants that considerably increase the risk of schizophrenia, and have shown an association between schizophrenia and the major histocompatibility complex. Research on environmental risk factors in recent years has provided new information particularly on risk factors related to pregnancy and childhood rearing environment. Gene-environment interactions have become a central research topic. There is evidence that genetically susceptible children are more vulnerable to the effects of unstable childhood rearing environment and other environmental risk factors.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a National Sample of Adolescent Population in the Middle East and North Africa: The CASPIAN III Study

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    Patricia Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The present study was designed to investigate the prevalence of different combinations of the metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors among a nationally representative sample of adolescents in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA. Methods. The study sample, obtained as part of the third study of the school-based surveillance system entitled CASPIAN III, was representative of the Iranian adolescent population aged from 10 to 18 years. The prevalence of different components of MetS was studied and their discriminative value was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis. Results. The study participants consisted of 5738 students (2875 girls with mean age of 14.7±2.4 years living in 23 provinces in Iran; 17.4% of participants were underweight and 17.7% were overweight or obese. Based on the criteria of the International Diabetes Federation for the adolescent age group, 24.2% of participants had one risk factor, 8.0% had two, 2.1% had three, and 0.3% had all the four components of MetS. Low HDL-C was the most common component (43.2% among the overweight/obese versus 34.9% of the normal-weight participants, whereas high blood pressure was the least common component. The prevalence of MetS was 15.4% in the overweight/obese participants, the corresponding figure was 1.8% for the normal-weight students, and 2.5% in the whole population studied. Overweight/obese subjects had a 9.68 increased odds of (95% CI: 6.65–14.09 the MetS compared to their normal-weight counterparts. For all the three risk factors, AUC ranged between 0.84 and 0.88, 0.83 and 0.87, and 0.86 and 0.89 in waist circumference, abdominal obesity, and BMI for boys and between 0.78 and 0.97, 0.67 and 0.93, and 0.82 and 0.96 for girls, respectively. Conclusion. The findings from this study provide alarming evidence-based data on the considerable prevalence of obesity, MetS, and CVD risk factors in the adolescent age group. These results are confirmatory

  16. Candy consumption was not associated with body weight measures, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or metabolic syndrome in US adults: NHANES 1999-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Carol E; Fulgoni, Victor L; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2011-02-01

    There is limited research examining the relationship of candy consumption by adults on diet and health. The purpose of this study was to determine total, chocolate, or sugar candy consumption and their effect on energy, saturated fatty acid and added sugar intake, weight, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diet quality in adults 19 years and older (n = 15,023) participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls were used to determine intake. Covariate-adjusted means ± SE and prevalence rates were determined for candy consumption groups. Odds ratios were used to determine the likelihood of cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. A total of 21.8%, 12.9%, and 10.9% of adults consumed total, chocolate, and sugar candy, respectively. Mean daily per capita intake of total, chocolate, and sugar candy was 9.0 ± 0.3, 5.7 ± 0.2, and 3.3 ± 0.2 g, respectively; intake in consumers was 38.3 ± 1.0, 39.9 ± 1.1, and 28.9 ± 1.3 g, respectively. Energy (9973 ± 92 vs 9027 ± 50 kJ; P candy consumers than nonconsumers. Body mass index (27.7 ± 0.15 vs 28.2 ± 0.12 kg/m(2); P = .0092), waist circumference (92.3 ± 0.34 vs 96.5 ± 0.29 cm; P = .0051), and C-reactive protein (0.40 ± 0.01 vs 0.43 ± 0.01 mg/dL; P = .0487) levels were lower in candy consumers than nonconsumers. Candy consumers had a 14% decreased risk of elevated diastolic blood pressure (P = .0466); chocolate consumers had a 19% decreased risk of lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = .0364) and a 15% reduced risk of MetS (P = .0453). Results suggest that the current level of candy consumption was not associated with health risks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding on Metabolic Syndrome and Its Risk Factors in Morbidly Obese Adolescents

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    Rushika Conroy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB on weight loss, inflammatory markers, and components of the Metabolic Syndrome (MeS in morbidly obese adolescents and determined if those with MeS lose less weight post-LAGB than those without. Data from 14–18 yr adolescents were obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months following LAGB. Significant weight loss and improvements in MeS components were observed 6 months and one year following LAGB. The incidence of MeS declined 56.8% after 6 months and 69.6% after 12 months. There was no significant difference in amount of weight lost post-LAGB between those with and without MeS at either timepoint. Correlations between change in weight parameters and components of MeS in those with and without MeS at baseline were examined and found to vary by diagnostic category. LAGB is effective for short-term improvement in weight, inflammatory markers, and components of MeS in morbidly obese adolescents.

  18. Spirituality moderates the relationship of psychosocial stress to metabolic risk factors among Afro-Caribbean immigrants in the US Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Eugene S; Doswell, Willa M; Cort, Malcolm A

    2015-03-01

    Spirituality may contribute to the health advantage of foreign-born blacks compared to United States (US)-born blacks. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that spirituality attenuates the association of psychosocial stress to stress-associated metabolic risk factors among foreign-born Caribbean blacks living in a US jurisdiction. Data on demographic factors, anthropometric measurements (height, weight and waist), fasting glucose and insulin, lifestyle behaviors (smoking and alcohol use), psychosocial stress and spirituality were collected from a population-based sample of 319 Afro-Caribbean immigrants, ages 20 and older, who were recruited between 1995 and 2000 in the Virgin Islands of the United States (USVI). Glucose and insulin measurements were used to estimate insulin resistance by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) method. Participants were classified into three levels of spirituality, "low", "medium" and "high" based on the distribution of spirituality scores. Stepwise regression analyses were used to identify the significant predictors of waist circumference and HOMA-IR within each level of spirituality. The predictors of waist circumference and HOMA-IR varied across the levels of spirituality. Psychosocial stress was an independent predictor of waist and HOMA-IR only among participants with a low level of spirituality. Spirituality appears to attenuate the association of psychosocial stress to waist circumference and insulin resistance among Afro-Caribbean immigrants in the USVI.

  19. Nutrigenetics, metabolic syndrome risk and personalized nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Phillips, Catherine M; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of metabolic risk factors reflecting overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle and its increasing prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions. The importance of MetS lies in its close association with the risk of cardiometabolic disease. In this scenario, the principal goals of pharmacological therapy for these patients are to achieve and maintain an optimal cardiometabolic control, including lipids, blood glucose and blood pressure; in order to prevent and treat potential complications. Moreover nutrition has commonly been accepted as a cornerstone of treatment for MetS, with the expectation that an appropriate intake of energy and nutrients will improve its control. However the question arises as to whether dietary therapy may require a more personalised approach. In this regard improvements in genetic analysis have enhanced our understanding of the role of genetics in this dietrelated condition. In this review we will present recent data highlighting the importance of gene-nutrient interactions in the context of MetS risk.

  20. Trend and risk factors of diverticulosis in Japan: age, gender, and lifestyle/metabolic-related factors may cooperatively affect on the colorectal diverticula formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutake Yamamichi

    Full Text Available Despite the marked increase of diverticulosis, its risk factors have not been adequately elucidated. We therefore aim to identify significantly associated factors with diverticulosis. We also aim to investigate the present state of diverticulosis in Japan.We reviewed the medical records from 1990 to 2010 that included the data of consecutive 62,503 asymptomatic colonoscopy examinees from the general population in Japan. Most recent 3,327 examinees were analyzed with 16 background factors.Among the 62,503 subjects (47,325 men and 15,178 women; 52.1 ± 9.2 years old, diverticulosis was detected in 11,771 subjects (18.8%; 10,023 men and 1,748 women. The incidences of diverticulosis in 1990-2000 and 2001-2010 were respectively 13.0% (3,771 of 29,071 and 23.9% (8,000 of 33,432: the latter was much higher than the former in all age groups and for both genders. Considering the anatomical locations of colorectal diverticula, left-sided ones have markedly increased with age but not significantly changed with times. Univariate analyses of the 3,327 subjects showed significant association of diverticulosis with four basic factors (age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, three life style-related factor (smoking, drinking, severe weight increase in adulthood, and two blood test values (triglyceride, HbA1c. The multiple logistic analysis calculating standardized coefficients (β and odds ratio (OR demonstrated that age (β = 0.217-0.674, OR = 1.24-1.96, male gender (β = 0.185, OR = 1.20, smoking (β = 0.142-0.200, OR = 1.15-1.22, severe weight increase in adulthood (β = 0.153, OR = 1.17, HbA1c (β = 0.136, OR = 1.15, drinking (β = 0.109, OR = 1.11, and serum triglyceride (β = 0.098, OR = 1.10 showed significantly positive association with diverticulosis whereas body mass index and blood pressure did not.The large-scale data of asymptomatic colonoscopy examinees from the general population from 1990 to 2010 indicated that the prevalence of

  1. Trend and risk factors of diverticulosis in Japan: age, gender, and lifestyle/metabolic-related factors may cooperatively affect on the colorectal diverticula formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Nobutake; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yu; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Kakimoto, Hikaru; Matsuda, Rie; Kataoka, Yosuke; Saito, Itaru; Tsuji, Yosuke; Yakabi, Seiichi; Takeuchi, Chihiro; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Niimi, Keiko; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Nakayama, Chiemi; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Wada, Ryoichi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Despite the marked increase of diverticulosis, its risk factors have not been adequately elucidated. We therefore aim to identify significantly associated factors with diverticulosis. We also aim to investigate the present state of diverticulosis in Japan. We reviewed the medical records from 1990 to 2010 that included the data of consecutive 62,503 asymptomatic colonoscopy examinees from the general population in Japan. Most recent 3,327 examinees were analyzed with 16 background factors. Among the 62,503 subjects (47,325 men and 15,178 women; 52.1 ± 9.2 years old), diverticulosis was detected in 11,771 subjects (18.8%; 10,023 men and 1,748 women). The incidences of diverticulosis in 1990-2000 and 2001-2010 were respectively 13.0% (3,771 of 29,071) and 23.9% (8,000 of 33,432): the latter was much higher than the former in all age groups and for both genders. Considering the anatomical locations of colorectal diverticula, left-sided ones have markedly increased with age but not significantly changed with times. Univariate analyses of the 3,327 subjects showed significant association of diverticulosis with four basic factors (age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure), three life style-related factor (smoking, drinking, severe weight increase in adulthood), and two blood test values (triglyceride, HbA1c). The multiple logistic analysis calculating standardized coefficients (β) and odds ratio (OR) demonstrated that age (β = 0.217-0.674, OR = 1.24-1.96), male gender (β = 0.185, OR = 1.20), smoking (β = 0.142-0.200, OR = 1.15-1.22), severe weight increase in adulthood (β = 0.153, OR = 1.17), HbA1c (β = 0.136, OR = 1.15), drinking (β = 0.109, OR = 1.11), and serum triglyceride (β = 0.098, OR = 1.10) showed significantly positive association with diverticulosis whereas body mass index and blood pressure did not. The large-scale data of asymptomatic colonoscopy examinees from the general population from 1990 to 2010 indicated that the prevalence of diverticulosis

  2. Diabetes and Technology for Increased Activity Study: The Effects of Exercise and Technology on Heart Rate Variability and Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Melanie I.; Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Petrella, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that an 8-week exercise intervention supported by mobile health (mHealth) technology would improve metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors and heart rate variability (HRV) in a population with MetS risk factors. Participants (n = 12; three male; aged 56.9 ± 7.0 years) reported to the laboratory for assessment of MetS risk factors and fitness (VO2max) at baseline (V 0) and after 8-weeks (V 2) of intervention. Participants received an individualized exercise prescription and a mHealth technology kit for remote monitoring of blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, physical activity, and body weight via smartphone. Participants underwent 24-h ambulatory monitoring of R–R intervals following V 0 and V 2. Low and high frequency powers of HRV were assessed from the recording and the ratio of low-to-high frequency powers and low and high frequency powers in normalized units were calculated. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that waist circumference (V 0: 113.1 ± 11.0 cm, V 2: 108.1 ± 14.7 cm; p = 0.004) and diastolic BP (V 0: 81 ± 6 mmHg, V 2: 76 ± 11 mmHg; p = 0.04) were reduced and VO2max increased (V 0: 31.3 ml/kg/min, V 2: 34.8 ml/kg/min; p = 0.02) with no changes in other MetS risk factors. Low and high frequency powers in normalized units were reduced (V 0: 75.5 ± 12.0, V 2: 72.0 ± 12.1; p = 0.03) and increased (V 0: 24.5 ± 12.0, V 2: 28.0 ± 12.1; p = 0.03), respectively, with no other changes in HRV. Over the intervention period, changes in systolic BP were correlated negatively with the changes in R–R interval (r = −0.600; p = 0.04) and positively with the changes in heart rate (r = 0.611; p = 0.03), with no other associations between MetS risk factors and HRV parameters. Thus, this 8-week mHealth supported exercise intervention improved MetS risk factors and HRV parameters, but only changes in systolic BP were

  3. Effects of exercise with or without blueberries in the diet on cardio-metabolic risk factors: an exploratory pilot study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Sofia; Gerring, Edvard; Gjellan, Solveig; Vergara, Marta; Lindström, Torbjörn; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2013-11-01

    The improvement of insulin sensitivity by exercise has been shown to be inhibited by supplementation of vitamins acting as antioxidants. To examine effects of exercise with or without blueberries, containing natural antioxidants, on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Fifteen healthy men and 17 women, 27.6 ± 6.5 years old, were recruited, and 26 completed a randomized cross-over trial with 4 weeks of exercise by running/jogging 5 km five times/week and 4 weeks of minimal physical activity. Participants were also randomized to consume 150 g of blueberries, or not, on exercise days. Laboratory variables were measured before and after a 5 km running-race at maximal speed at the beginning and end of each period, i.e. there were four maximal running-races and eight samplings in total for each participant. Insulin and triglyceride levels were reduced while HDL-cholesterol increased by exercise compared with minimal physical activity. Participants randomized to consume blueberries showed an increase in fasting glucose levels compared with controls, during the exercise period (blueberries: from 5.12 ± 0.49 mmol/l to 5.32 ± 0.29 mmol/l; controls: from 5.24 ± 0.27 mmol/l to 5.17 ± 0.23 mmol/l, P = 0.04 for difference in change). Triglyceride levels fell in the control group (from 1.1 ± 0.49 mmol/l to 0.93 ± 0.31 mmol/l, P = 0.02), while HDL-cholesterol increased in the blueberry group (from 1.51 ± 0.29 mmol/l to 1.64 ± 0.33 mmol/l, P = 0.006). Ingestion of blueberries induced differential effects on cardio-metabolic risk factors, including increased levels of both fasting glucose and HDL-cholesterol. However, since it is possible that indirect effects on food intake were induced, other than consumption of blueberries, further studies are needed to confirm the findings.

  4. Systematic review with meta-analysis: risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease suggest a shared altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile between lean and obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, S; Pirola, C J

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with the co-occurrence of multiple pathological conditions characterising the metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity in particular. However, NAFLD also develops in lean subjects, whose risk factors remain poorly defined. We performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies, along with the data pertaining to our own population (n=336 patients). Data from lean (n=1966) and obese (n=5938) patients with NAFLD were analysed; lean (n=9946) and obese (n=6027) subjects without NAFLD served as controls. Relative to the lean non-NAFLD controls, lean patients with NAFLD were older (3.79±0.72 years, P=1.36×10 -6 ) and exhibited the entire spectrum of the MetS risk factors. Specifically, they had a significant (P=10 -10 ) increase in plasma glucose levels (6.44±1.12 mg/dL) and HOMA-IR (0.52±0.094-unit increment), blood lipids (triglycerides: 48.37±3.6, P=10 -10 and total cholesterol: 7.04±3.8, mg/dL, P=4.2×10 -7 ), systolic (5.64±0.7) and diastolic (3.37±0.9) blood pressure (mm Hg), P=10 -10 , and waist circumference (5.88±0.4 cm, P=10 -10 ); values denote difference in means±SE. Nevertheless, the overall alterations in the obese group were much more severe when compared to lean subjects, regardless of the presence of NAFLD. Meta-regression suggested that NAFLD is a modifier of the level of blood lipids. Lean and obese patients with NAFLD share a common altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile. The former, while having normal body weight, showed excess of abdominal adipose tissue as well as other MetS features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Soluble and insoluble dietary fibre intake and risk factors for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in middle-aged adults: the AWHS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Franco, Belén; León Latre, Montserrat; Andrés Esteban, Eva María; Ordovás, José María; Casasnovas, José Antonio; Peñalvo, José Luis

    2014-12-01

    The Westernization of the Mediterranean lifestyle has led to a modification of certain dietary habits such as a decrease in the consumption of dietary fibre-rich foods. The impact of these changes on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been studied over the last few years and the effect of the different sources of fibre on cardiovascular risk parameters and coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to create controversy. To evaluate the association between the source of dietary fibre and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and other cardiovascular risk factors in a Spanish working population. The study was carried out in a sample of 1592 Spanish workers free of CVD (40-55 years old) within the Aragon Workers' Health Study (AWHS) cohort. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical data were collected. Fibre intake was assessed by means of a validated 136-items semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. MetS was defined by using the modified National Cholesterol Education Programme - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP- ATP III) definition. After adjusting for possible confounding factors, we found an inverse association between insoluble fibre intake and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B100 and ratio TG/HDL. Soluble fibre was inversely associated with triglycerides and apolipoprotein B100. Furthermore, prevalence of MetS was found to be lower (OR 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40-0.96) in those participants in the highest quartile of insoluble fibre intake. A higher intake of insoluble fibre could play an important role in the control and management of hypertension, lipid profile and MetS. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. The CoLaus study: a population-based study to investigate the epidemiology and genetic determinants of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirnadel Heide A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases and their associated risk factors remain the main cause of mortality in western societies. In order to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs in the Caucasian population of Lausanne, Switzerland, we conducted a population-based study (Colaus Study. A secondary aim of the CoLaus study will be to determine new genetic determinants associated with CVRFs. Methods Single-center, cross-sectional study including a random sample of 6,188 extensively phenotyped Caucasian subjects (3,251 women and 2,937 men aged 35 to 75 years living in Lausanne, and genotyped using the 500 K Affymetrix chip technology. Results Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2, smoking, hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg and/or treatment, dyslipidemia (high LDL-cholesterol and/or low HDL-cholesterol and/or high triglyceride levels and diabetes (fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7 mmol/l and/or treatment were present in 947 (15.7%, 1673 (27.0%, 2268 (36.7%, 2113 (34.2% and 407 (6.6% of the participants, respectively, and the prevalence was higher in men than in women. In both genders, the prevalence of obesity, hypertension and diabetes increased with age. Conclusion The prevalence of major CVRFs is high in the Lausanne population in particular in men. We anticipate that given its size, the depth of the phenotypic analysis and the availability of dense genome-wide genetic data, the CoLaus Study will be a unique resource to investigate not only the epidemiology of isolated, or aggregated CVRFs like the metabolic syndrome, but can also serve as a discovery set, as well as replication set, to identify novel genes associated with these conditions.

  7. Fructose Containing Sugars at Normal Levels of Consumption Do Not Effect Adversely Components of the Metabolic Syndrome and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

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    Theodore J. Angelopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to explore our hypothesis that average consumption of fructose and fructose containing sugars would not increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS. A randomized, double blind, parallel group study was conducted where 267 individuals with BMI between 23 and 35 kg/m2 consumed low fat sugar sweetened milk, daily for ten weeks as part of usual weight-maintenance diet. One group consumed 18% of calories from high fructose corn syrup (HFCS, another group consumed 18% of calories from sucrose, a third group consumed 9% of calories from fructose, and the fourth group consumed 9% of calories from glucose. There was a small change in waist circumference (80.9 ± 9.5 vs. 81.5 ± 9.5 cm in the entire cohort, as well as in total cholesterol (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 4.7 ± 1.0 mmol/L, p < 0.01, triglycerides (TGs (11.5 ± 6.4 vs. 12.6 ± 8.9 mmol/L, p < 0.01, and systolic (109.2 ± 10.2 vs. 106.1 ± 10.4 mmHg, p < 0.01 and diastolic blood pressure (69.8 ± 8.7 vs. 68.1 ± 9.7 mmHg, p < 0.01. The effects of commonly consumed sugars on components of the MetS and CVD risk factors are minimal, mixed and not clinically significant.

  8. Consumption of polyphenol-rich peach and plum juice prevents risk factors for obesity-related metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease in Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana; Martino, Hercia S D; Simbo, Sunday; Byrne, David; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-06-01

    Polyphenols from fruits have been implied in the prevention of risk factors for cardiometabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the consumption of peach and plum juice has a protective effect against obesity and metabolic disorders that promote the development of cardiovascular diseases. Obese Zucker and lean rats were fed with peach, plum juice ad libitum or placebo. Body weight gain, biochemical markers and molecular markers for inflammation and cardiovascular disease in heart tissue were quantified. Results show that peach and plum juice consumption protected against a combination of obesity-induced metabolic disorders including hyperglycemia, insulin and leptin resistance, dyslipidemia and low-density lipoprotein oxidation. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers in plasma and heart tissues including intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, NF-κB and foam cell adherence to aortic arches. In addition, peach and plum juice consumption decreased the levels of angiotensin II in plasma and its receptor Agtr1 in heart tissues, suggesting a role of peach and plum polyphenols as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists. Furthermore, only plum juice significantly prevented body weight gain and increased the ratio high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol in plasma. This effect is most likely attributed to the plum's higher content of polyphenols (three times that of peach). Altogether, these results imply that cardioprotective effects can be achieved by replacing drinks high in sugar content with fruit juice rich in polyphenols in a diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Obesity increases metabolic syndrome risk factors in school-aged children from an urban school in Mexico city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Schiffman-Selechnik, Esther; Barbato-Dosal, Annarella; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    To characterize the nutritional status of school-aged children from an urban public school in Mexico City, Mexico, and to assess the influence of obesity on health status in a subgroup of these children. Cross-sectional descriptive study. A nutrition screening was done for all children, including anthropometric (ie, weight, height, and waist circumference) and blood pressure assessment. In the subgroup of children, complementary dietary and biochemical assessment (ie, glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin, albumin, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels) was done. Children from an urban school in Mexico City (N=561) aged 6 to 13 years. The representative subgroup (n=88) was selected based on age (9 to 12 years) and weight status (ie, normal, overweight, or obese). Descriptive statistics, correlations, mean differences tests (analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U), and chi(2) tests (categorical variables) were done with SPSS version 13 (2005, SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). In the whole school, overweight and obesity prevalence were 27.1% and 21.4%, respectively. High systolic blood pressure was seen in 8.4% of children and 6.2% of children had prehypertension. Higher hypertension risk was seen in children with body mass index > or =95th percentile and waist circumference > or =90th percentile (88 cm). Significantly higher waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, insulin resistance indexes, and triglyceride levels were found among the obese when compared with normal-weight children. Childhood obesity prevalence is high in Mexico and it is having an influence on children's health. It is urgent to design, implement, and evaluate specific childhood obesity prevention programs.

  10. Vitamins B2 and B6 and Genetic Polymorphisms Related to One-Carbon Metabolism as Risk Factors for Gastric Adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, Simone J. P. M.; Vollset, Stein Emil; Hustad, Steinar; Midttun, Oivind; Meyer, Klaus; Fredriksen, Ase; Ueland, Per Magne; Jenab, Mazda; Slimani, Nadia; Ferrari, Pietro; Agudo, Antonio; Sala, Nuria; Capella, Gabriel; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buechner, Frederike L.; Carneiro, Fatima; Berrino, Franco; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Stenling, Roger; Hallmans, Goeran; Martinez, Carmen; Arrizola, Larraitz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Rodriguez, Laudina; Bingham, Sheila; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Morois, Sophie; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lund, Eiliv; Plebani, Mario; Riboli, Elio; Gonzalez, Carlos A.

    B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric

  11. The relationship of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed with overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity, other cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in young adults. NHANES 1999-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to examine the association between breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed with overweight /obesity, abdominal obesity, other cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. Three breakfast groups were identified (breakfast skippers, ready-to-eat-cereal ...

  12. Vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism as risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, S.J.; Vollset, S.E.; Hustad, S.; Midttun, O.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Ueland, P.M.; Jenab, M.; Slimani, N.; Ferrari, P.; Agudo, A.; Sala, N.; Capella, G.; Giudice, G. Del; Palli, D.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Carneiro, F.; Berrino, F.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Berglund, G.; Manjer, J.; Stenling, R.; Hallmans, G.; Martinez, C.; Arrizola, L.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C; Rodriguez, L.; Bingham, S.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Numans, M.E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Morois, S.; Trichopoulou, A.; Lund, E.; Plebani, M.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric

  13. Risk factors for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachner, A.; Grosche, B.

    1991-06-01

    A broad survey is given of risk factors for neoplasms. The main carcinogenic substances (including also ionizing radiation and air pollution) are listed, and are correlated with the risk factors for various cancers most frequently explained and discussed in the literature. The study is intended to serve as a basis for a general assessment of the incidence of neoplasms in children, and of cancer mortality in the entire population of Bavaria in the years 1983-1989, or 1979-1988, respectively, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment-related health survey. The study therefore takes into account not only ionizing radiation as a main risk factor, but also other risk factors detectable within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations and their effects, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or the social status. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Trespass event risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-12

    The Volpe Center has used three sources of datathe Federal Railroad Administrations required accident reports, locomotive video, and U.S. Census datato investigate common risk factors for railroad trespassing incidents, the leading cause of ...

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a potent risk factor for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis enhancing local and systemic inflammation associated with strong oxidative stress and metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisina I Onofrio

    2015-02-01

    , revealing an intense cross-talk between metabolically active tissues, such as the liver, and the immune system. Thus, T. cruzi infection must be considered as an additional risk factor since exacerbates the inflammation and accelerates the development of hepatic injury.

  16. Risk Factors for Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Diabetes in 248 HFE C282Y Homozygotes Identified by Population Screening in the HEIRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. Clayborn; Adams, Paul C.; Acton, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We sought to identify risk factors for insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes mellitus in 248 non-Hispanic white HFE C282Y homozygotes identified by population screening. Methods: We analyzed observations obtained prospectively in a postscreening examination: age; sex; body mass index (BMI); systolic/diastolic blood pressure; metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint hypertrophy; hepatomegaly; complete blood counts; alanine/aspartate aminotransferase levels; elevated C-reactive protein (>0.5 mg/dL); transferrin saturation; serum ferritin; homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); and MetS. Results: Twenty-six participants (10.5%) had diabetes diagnoses. A significant trend across HOMA-IR quartiles was observed only for blood neutrophils. Logistic regression on HOMA-IR fourth quartile revealed positive associations: age (P = 0.0002); male sex (P = 0.0022); and BMI (P HOMA-IR fourth quartile predicted MetS (P HOMA-IR fourth quartile, MetS, or diabetes. Conclusions: In screening C282Y homozygotes, age, male sex, and BMI predicted HOMA-IR fourth quartile. HOMA-IR fourth quartile alone predicted MetS. Diabetes was associated with greater age, male sex, MP joint hypertrophy, greater blood neutrophil counts, and MetS. PMID:26771691

  17. Effects of a weight management program delivered by social media on weight and metabolic syndrome risk factors in overweight and obese adults: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Monica; Hagger, Martin; Foster, Jonathan; Ho, Suleen; Kane, Robert; Pal, Sebely

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of using social media to augment the delivery of, and provide support for, a weight management program delivered to overweight and obese individuals during a twenty four week intervention. Participants randomly divided into either one of two intervention groups or a control group. The two intervention groups were instructed to follow identical weight-management program. One group received the program within a Facebook group, along with a support network with the group, and the other intervention group received the same program in a booklet. The control group was given standard care. Participants' weight and other metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured at baseline and at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24. The Facebook Group reported a 4.8% reduction in initial weight, significant compared to the CG only (p = 0.01), as well as numerically greater improvements in body mass index, waist circumference, fat mass, lean mass, and energy intake compared to the Pamphlet Group and the Control Group. These results demonstrate the potential of social media to assist overweight and obese individuals with respect to dietary and physical activity modifications for weight management, and justify further research into the inclusion of social media in clinical weight management programs. It is anticipated that social media will provide an invaluable resource for health professionals, as a low maintenance vehicle for communicating with patients, as well as a source of social support and information sharing for individuals undergoing lifestyle modifications.

  18. Adipocyte Hypertrophy, Fatty Liver and Metabolic Risk Factors in South Asians: The Molecular Study of Health and Risk in Ethnic Groups (mol-SHARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sonia S.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Rashid, Shirya; Schulze, Karleen M.; Desai, Dipika; Mente, Andrew; Rao, Sandy; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Sharma, Arya M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine if differences in the distribution and characteristics of adipose tissue between South Asians and white Caucasians account for differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Research Design and Methods We recruited 108 healthy South Asians (36.8 years) and white Caucasians (34.2 years) within three BMI strata. Body composition, adipocyte size, abdominal fat area, and hepatic adiposity were assessed and related to fasting glucose, insulin, lipids and adiponectin. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, South Asians compared to white Caucasians had higher ln fasting insulin (mean difference (md): 0.44; 95% CI: 0.20–0.69), lower HDL cholesterol (md: −0.13; 95% CI:−0.26 to −0.01), and lower adiponectin (md: −2.38; 95% CI: −3.59 to −1.17). South Asians also had more body fat (md: 2.69; 95% CI: 0.70 to 4.69), lower lean muscle mass (md: −3.25; 95%CI: −5.35 to −1.14), increased waist to hip ratio (md: 0.03; 95% CI: 0.01–0.05), less superficial subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (md: −2.94; 95% CI: −5.56 to−0.32), more deep/visceral to superficial adipose tissue ratio (md 0.34; 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.65), and more liver fat (md: 7.43%; 95% CI: 2.30 to 12.55%). Adipocyte area was increased in South Asians compared to white Caucasians (md: 64.26; 95% CI: 24.3 to 104.1) units2. Adjustment for adipocyte area attenuated the ethnic differences in insulin (md: 0.22; 95% CI: −0.07 to 0.51), HDL (md: −0.01; 95% CI: −0.16 to 0.13) and adiponectin (md: −1.11; 95% CI: −2.61 to 0.39). Adjustment for differences in adipocyte area and fat distribution attenuated the ethnic difference in liver fat (md: 5.19; 95% CI: 0.31 to 10.06). Conclusion South Asians have an increased adipocyte area compared to white Caucasians. This difference accounts for the ethnic differences in insulin, HDL cholesterol, adiponectin, and ectopic fat deposition in the liver. PMID:21829446

  19. Adipocyte hypertrophy, fatty liver and metabolic risk factors in South Asians: the Molecular Study of Health and Risk in Ethnic Groups (mol-SHARE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia S Anand

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine if differences in the distribution and characteristics of adipose tissue between South Asians and white Caucasians account for differences in risk factors for cardiovascular disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We recruited 108 healthy South Asians (36.8 years and white Caucasians (34.2 years within three BMI strata. Body composition, adipocyte size, abdominal fat area, and hepatic adiposity were assessed and related to fasting glucose, insulin, lipids and adiponectin. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, South Asians compared to white Caucasians had higher ln fasting insulin (mean difference (MD: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.20-0.69, lower HDL cholesterol (md: -0.13; 95% CI:-0.26 to -0.01, and lower adiponectin (md: -2.38; 95% CI: -3.59 to -1.17. South Asians also had more body fat (md: 2.69; 95% CI: 0.70 to 4.69, lower lean muscle mass (md: -3.25; 95%CI: -5.35 to -1.14, increased waist to hip ratio (md: 0.03; 95% CI: 0.01-0.05, less superficial subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (md: -2.94; 95% CI: -5.56 to-0.32, more deep/visceral to superficial adipose tissue ratio (md 0.34; 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.65, and more liver fat (md: 7.43%; 95% CI: 2.30 to 12.55%. Adipocyte area was increased in South Asians compared to white Caucasians (md: 64.26; 95% CI: 24.3 to 104.1 units(2. Adjustment for adipocyte area attenuated the ethnic differences in insulin (md: 0.22; 95% CI: -0.07 to 0.51, HDL (md: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.16 to 0.13 and adiponectin (md: -1.11; 95% CI: -2.61 to 0.39. Adjustment for differences in adipocyte area and fat distribution attenuated the ethnic difference in liver fat (md: 5.19; 95% CI: 0.31 to 10.06. CONCLUSION: South Asians have an increased adipocyte area compared to white Caucasians. This difference accounts for the ethnic differences in insulin, HDL cholesterol, adiponectin, and ectopic fat deposition in the liver.

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors over the life course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, G.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) usually manifests itself at middle age or beyond, but it is the result of an ongoing disease process. This stresses the need for insight into changes in lifestyle and metabolic risk factors that occur throughout the life course, and their effect on CVD. We studied risk

  1. Stability analysis of type 2 diabetes mellitus prognosis model with obesity as a trigger factor and metabolic syndrome as a risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, A. I.; Lestari, A. D.; Ratianingsih, R.; Puspitasari, J. W.

    2018-03-01

    Obesity is found in 90% of the world's patients with a type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnosis. If it is not being treatment, the disease advances to a metabolic syndrome related to some atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. In this study, a mathematical model was constructed that represent the prognosis of type 2 DM. The prognosis is started from the transition of vulnerable people to overweight and obese. The advanced prognosis makes the type 2 DM sufferer become a metabolic syndrome. The model has no disease-free critical point, while the implicit endemic critical point is guaranteed for some requirements. The analysis of the critical point stability, by Jacobian matrix and Routh Hurwitz criteria, requires a parameter interval that identified from the characteristic polynomial. The requirements show that we have to pay attention to the transition rate of overweight to obese, more over the transition rate of obese to type 2 DM. The simulations show that the unstable condition of type 2 DM is easier to achieve because of the tightness of the parameter stability interval.

  2. Amblyopia risk factor prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) published a set of risk factors for amblyopia. The intent was to promote uniformity of reporting and development in screening. Because this prevalence is not yet known, this meta-analysis is an attempt to estimate it. Major community preschool eye examination studies were reviewed and AAPOS cut-offs estimated. The approximate prevalence of anisometropia is 1.2%, hyperopia is 6%, astigmatism is 15%, myopia is 0.6%, strabismus is 2.5%, and visual acuity less than 20/40 is 6%. The mean combined prevalence is 21% ± 2% compared to a prevalence of amblyopia 20/40 and worse of 2.5%. Knowing risk factor prevalence simplifies validation efforts. Amblyopia screening with a risk factor sensitivity less than 100% is expected and desirable. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Longitudinal 10-year changes in dietary intake and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkvist, Anna; Klingberg, Sofia; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Wennberg, Maria; Renström, Frida; Hallmans, Göran; Boman, Kurt; Johansson, Ingegerd

    2017-03-28

    sucrose among women were associated with lower BMI at second visit (P = 0.02). In this large population-based sample, dietary changes over 10 years towards less carbohydrates and more protein and fat were noted. Individual changes towards the Nordic dietary recommendations were associated with healthier cardio-metabolic risk factor profile at second visit.

  4. Obesity and metabolic syndrome as risk factors for the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as diagnosed by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Gordana; Bjelaković, Goran; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Brzački, Vesna; Marković-Živković, Bojana

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease of a broad histological spectrum, characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in more than 5% of hepatocytes in the absence of consuming alcohol in quantities harmful to the liver. The aim of our study was to determine the importance of anthropometric and laboratory parameters as well as metabolic syndrome (MS) for the diagnosis of NAFLD and to estimate their influence on the degree of liver steatosis as evaluated by ultrasound (US). The study included 86 participants, 55 of whom had fatty liver diagnosed by ultrasound and they comprised the study group. The control group consisted of 31 control subjects. During the course of hospitalization at the Clinic of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Centre Niš, the patients had their anamnesis taken, and anthropometric measurements as well as biochemical blood analyses and abdominal ultrasound were performed. The patients with NAFLD had statistically higher values of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), levels of alanin and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT, AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (pobese patients. (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m2). The largest number of patients in the obesity group, 22 (40.00%) of them, had the first degree obesity (BMI from 30 kg/m2 to 34.99 kg/m2). The largest number of the NAFLD group patients - 23 (41.82%), had an ultrasound finding of grade 3 fatty liver, 20 patients (36.36%) had grade 2 and 12 (21.82%) grade 1 fatty liver. Kruskal-Wallis test and ANOVA analysis showed statistically significant differences between groups with different US grade for insulin, LDL-cholesterol, WC, BMI (pobesity, hypertension and DM type 2 (p<0.05). The results of our study have confirmed that a high percentage of patients with high risk factors (DM, MS, dyslipidemia, hypertension) have NAFLD.

  5. Risk factors for hypospadias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Roelofs, L.A.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Gier, R.P.E. de; Roeleveld, N.

    2007-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common congenital defects in boys, the etiology of hypospadias remains largely unknown. In this case-referent study, we evaluated a wide spectrum of potential risk factors for hypospadias. Cases were identified from the hospital information system, and referents were

  6. Perioperative allergy: risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, C; Stringari, G; Pajno, G B; Peroni, D G; Franceschini, F; Dello Iacono, I; Bernardini, R

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative anaphylactic as well as anaphylactoid reactions can be elicited by drugs, diagnostic agents, antiseptics, disinfectants and latex. In some individuals, allergic reactions occur in the absence of any evident risk factor. Previous history of specific safe exposure to a product does not permit to exclude the risk of having a reaction. We have systematically reviewed characteristics in the patient's history or clinical parameters that affect the risk of developing reactions during anesthesia. Evidence shows that patients with previous unexplained reaction during anesthesia are at risk for perioperative allergic reactions. An allergic reaction to an agent is associated with previous reaction to a product that is related with the culprit agent. Multiple surgery procedures, professional exposure to latex and allergy to fruit are associated with an increased frequency of latex allergy. It has been shown that in some instances, allergic perioperative reactions may be more common in atopic patients and in females.

  7. Cardio-metabolic risk factors and cortical thickness in a neurologically healthy male population: Results from the psychological, social and biological determinants of ill health (pSoBid) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnadas, Rajeev; McLean, John; Batty, G David; Batty, David G; Burns, Harry; Deans, Kevin A; Ford, Ian; McConnachie, Alex; McGinty, Agnes; McLean, Jennifer S; Millar, Keith; Sattar, Naveed; Shiels, Paul G; Velupillai, Yoga N; Packard, Chris J; Cavanagh, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Cardio-metabolic risk factors have been associated with poor physical and mental health. Epidemiological studies have shown peripheral risk markers to be associated with poor cognitive functioning in normal healthy population and in disease. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between cardio-metabolic risk factors and cortical thickness in a neurologically healthy middle aged population-based sample. T1-weighted MRI was used to create models of the cortex for calculation of regional cortical thickness in 40 adult males (average age = 50.96 years), selected from the pSoBid study. The relationship between cardio-vascular risk markers and cortical thickness across the whole brain, was examined using the general linear model. The relationship with various covariates of interest was explored. Lipid fractions with greater triglyceride content (TAG, VLDL and LDL) were associated with greater cortical thickness pertaining to a number of regions in the brain. Greater C reactive protein (CRP) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) levels were associated with cortical thinning pertaining to perisylvian regions in the left hemisphere. Smoking status and education status were significant covariates in the model. This exploratory study adds to a small body of existing literature increasingly showing a relationship between cardio-metabolic risk markers and regional cortical thickness involving a number of regions in the brain in a neurologically normal middle aged sample. A focused investigation of factors determining the inter-individual variations in regional cortical thickness in the adult brain could provide further clarity in our understanding of the relationship between cardio-metabolic factors and cortical structures.

  8. Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Compared with Anthropometry in Relation to Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in a Young Adult Population: Is the ‘Gold Standard’ Tarnished?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Beth; Pennell, Craig E.; Lye, Stephen J.; Mountain, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Assessment of adiposity using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been considered more advantageous in comparison to anthropometry for predicting cardio-metabolic risk in the older population, by virtue of its ability to distinguish total and regional fat. Nonetheless, there is increasing uncertainty regarding the relative superiority of DXA and little comparative data exist in young adults. This study aimed to identify which measure of adiposity determined by either DXA or anthropometry is optimal within a range of cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. Methods and Results 1138 adults aged 20 years were assessed by DXA and standard anthropometry from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed. Waist to height ratio was superior to any DXA measure with HDL-C. BMI was the superior model in relation to blood pressure than any DXA measure. Midriff fat mass (DXA) and waist circumference were comparable in relation to glucose. For all the other cardio-metabolic variables, anthropometric and DXA measures were comparable. DXA midriff fat mass compared with BMI or waist hip ratio was the superior measure for triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusion Although midriff fat mass (measured by DXA) was the superior measure with insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, the anthropometric measures were better or equal with various DXA measures for majority of the cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our findings suggest, clinical anthropometry is generally as useful as DXA in the evaluation of the individual cardio-metabolic risk factors in young adults. PMID:27622523

  9. Placental peptides metabolism and maternal factors as predictors of risk of gestational diabetes in pregnant women. A case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Ngala, Robert Amadu; Fondjo, Linda Ahenkorah; Gmagna, Peter; Ghartey, Frank Naku; Awe, Martin Akilla

    2017-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes is a risk factor for perinatal complications; include shoulder dystocia, birth injuries such as bone fractures and nerve palsies. It is associated with later development of type 2 diabetes, the risk of macrosomia and other long-term health effects of infants born to diabetic mothers. The study assesses placental peptides and maternal factors as potential predictors of gestational diabetes among pregnant women. Material and methods A total of 200 pregnant women ...

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Vera J M; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Evans, Ronald M; Jonker, Johan W; Downes, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  11. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  12. Risk Factors for Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hau Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a complex human disease. The incidence of dementia among the elderly population is rising rapidly worldwide. In the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading type of dementia and was the fifth and eighth leading cause of death in women and men aged ≥ 65 years, respectively, in 2003. In Taiwan and many other counties, dementia is a hidden health issue because of its underestimation in the elderly population. In Western countries, the prevalence of AD increases from 1–3% among people aged 60–64 years to 35% among those aged > 85 years. In Taiwan, the prevalence of dementia for people aged ≥ 65 years was 2–4% by 2000. Therefore, it is important to identify protective and risk factors for dementia to prevent this disease at an early stage. Several factors are related to dementia, e.g. age, ethnicity, sex, genetic factors, physical activity, smoking, drug use, education level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidity, and environmental factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have evaluated the association between these factors and the risk of dementia, especially AD and vascular dementia. We also suggest future research directions for researchers in dementia-related fields.

  13. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its associated factors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of metabolic disorders in long-term psychiatric patients, and the relationship between known risk factors ... cholesterol dyslipidaemia 32%, triglyceride dyslipidaemia 29%, low density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidaemia 50%, overweight 37%, and obesity 24%.

  14. Short sleep duration, shift work, and actual days taken off work are predictive life-style risk factors for new-onset metabolic syndrome: a seven-year cohort study of 40,000 male workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Osamu; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Tokiya, Mikiko; Jike, Maki; Murata, Atsushi; Nakagome, Sachi; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Ohida, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the effects of various lifestyle-related factors - including sleep duration, shift work, and actual days taken off work - on new-onset metabolic syndrome (MetS). A total of 39,182 male employees (mean age 42.4 ± 9.8 years) of a local government organization in Japan were followed up for a maximum of seven years, between 1999 and 2006. Multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazard method) identified seven high-risk lifestyle factors that were significantly associated with new-onset MetS or a range of metabolic factors (obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia): (1) short sleep duration (work, (3) insufficient number of days off work, (4) always eating until satiety, (5) not trying to take every opportunity to walk, (6) alcohol intake ≥60 g/day, and (7) smoking. In addition, a higher number of these high-risk lifestyle factors significantly promoted the onset of MetS. The hazard ratio for MetS associated with 0-1 high-risk lifestyle parameters per subject at the baseline was set at 1.00. Hazard ratios associated with the following numbers of high-risk lifestyle parameters were: 1.22 (95% CI 1.15-1.29) for 2-3 of these parameters; and 1.43 (1.33-1.54) for 4-7. An increase in the number of high-risk lifestyle factors - such as short sleep duration, shift work, and an insufficient number of days off work - increased the risk of MetS onset. Comprehensive strategies to improve a range of lifestyle factors for workers, such as sleep duration and days off work, could reduce the risk of MetS onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The metabolic syndrome: targeting dyslipidaemia to reduce coronary risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsberg, H.N.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2003-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a complex constellation of disorders, each one a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The increasing prevalence of this condition is a major concern for healthcare providers both in Europe and North America. The concern surrounding

  16. Under- and overnutrition and evidence of metabolic disease risk in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Stunting levels were higher in the boys than in the girls in mid to late childhood in a rural setting in South Africa, while the girls had a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than the boys. Pre-hypertension prevalence in the boys and girls was high. Other metabolic risk factors, i.e. impaired FG and lipids, ...

  17. Low muscle fitness is associated with metabolic risk in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Anderssen, Sigmund A; Kolle, Elin

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the independent associations of muscle fitness and cardiorespiratory fitness with clustered metabolic risk in youth. METHODS: In 2005-2006, a cohort of 9- and 15-yr-olds (N = 2818) was randomly selected from all regions of Norway. The participation rate was 89% and 74% among...... the 9-and 15-yr-olds, respectively. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured directly as peak oxygen uptake during a cycle ergometry test. Risk factors included in the composite risk factor score (sum of z......-scores) were systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, insulin resistance, and waist circumference. RESULTS: Muscle fitness was negatively associated with clustered metabolic risk, independent of cardiorespiratory fitness, and after adjustment for age, sex, and pubertal stage...

  18. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  19. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  20. Associations between clinical and psychosocial factors and metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders - Baseline and two-years findings from the CHANGE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch Jakobsen, Ane; Speyer, Helene; Nørgaard, Hans Christian Brix; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2018-02-28

    fitness, higher HDL and lower HbA1c at two year follow-up. Isolating the antipsychotic drugs known to give the worst metabolic adverse effects (olanzapine, clozapine, quetiapine), the dosage was positively associated with cholesterol, but not with any other outcome. Psychotic symptoms and duration of illness were not significantly associated with any outcome. Employment of any kind was significantly associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and negatively associated with waist circumference, BMI and systolic blood pressure. At two year follow-up associations were significant for the two year outcomes cardiorespiratory fitness and waist circumference. Friendship relations were negatively associated with waist circumference and positively with HDL cholesterol. None of the two year outcomes were predicted by friendship. We found various clinical and psychosocial factors to be associated with less healthy lifestyle factors and higher risk of cardiovascular disease, with negative symptoms building the strongest associations, although a possible bidirectional causality needs to be regarded. Reduction of negative symptoms should be investigated further in order to reduce the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Prevalence and Influencing Factors of Metabolic Syndrome Among Persons with Physical Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghee Jeong, RN, PhD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metabolic syndrome is an important cluster of coronary heart disease risk factors. However, it remains unclear to what extent metabolic syndrome is associated with demographic and potentially modifiable lifestyle factors among Korean persons with physical disabilities. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and influencing factors of metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities using the Korean National Health Insurance Service–National Sample Cohort. Methods: The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were used to define metabolic syndrome influencing factors and prevalence, which were evaluated in a representative sample from the 2013 Korean National Health Insurance Service–National Sample Cohort database. Characteristics were compared based on frequency using the χ2 test. The associations between metabolic syndrome and its risk factors were estimated using logistic multivariable regression analysis. Results: Metabolic syndrome was detected in 31.5% of the surveyed persons with physical disabilities. Female sex, age of ≥65 years, smoking, greater alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, higher body mass index, and a family history of diabetes were associated with increased risks of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The major risk factors for metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities were obesity and older age. Performing physical activity was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we recommend using a continuous obesity management program and physical activity to prevent metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities. Keywords: disabled persons, metabolic syndrome X, physical activity, obesity

  2. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  3. Metabolically Healthy Obesity and Risk of Kidney Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alex R; Surapaneni, Aditya; Kirchner, H Lester; Young, Amanda; Kramer, Holly J; Carey, David J; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between BMI categories, stratified by metabolic health status, and the risk of kidney function decline (KFD). In this study, 42,128 adult patients with a stable BMI were classified over a 3-year baseline window by BMI and metabolic health status (assessed by Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria). KFD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline ≥ 30%, eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , or receipt of dialysis and/or transplant. Over a median of 5.1 years (interquartile range 2.1-8.9), 6,533 (15.5%) individuals developed KFD. Compared with the normal weight, metabolically healthy category, metabolically healthy obesity was associated with a higher risk of KFD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.52; 95% CI: 1.22-1.89). aHRs for KFD were 1.17 (95% CI: 0.89-1.53), 2.21 (95% CI: 1.59-3.08), and 2.20 (95% CI: 1.55-3.11) for metabolically healthy obesity with BMI 30 to 34.9, BMI 35 to 39.9, and BMI ≥ 40 kg/m 2 . These associations were consistent among men and women, patients with eGFR ≥ or < 90 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , and age ≥ or < 55 years. The risk of KFD was highest among metabolically unhealthy individuals with BMI ≥ 40 (aHR 4.02; 95% CI: 3.40-4.75 vs. metabolically healthy individuals with normal weight). Obesity, whether in the presence or absence of metabolic health, is a risk factor for KFD. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  4. Os efeitos do treinamento de força sobre os fatores de risco da síndrome metabólica Effects of resistance training over metabolic syndrome risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Muniz Guttierres

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Medidas não-farmacológicas, como a atividade física, vêm sendo recomendadas para prevenção e tratamento de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. OBJETIVO: Realizar revisão da literatura para verificar os mecanismos por meio dos quais o treinamento de força provoca alterações metabólicas e celulares, agindo positivamente sobre os fatores de risco da síndrome metabólica. METODODOLOGIA: Foram utilizadas as bases de dados Medline, Scielo, Science Direct e Capes. A busca foi restrita aos últimos 10 anos. Os termos utilizados para pesquisa foram: obesity, dislipidemy,hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, resistance training, weight lifting, exercise. RESULTADOS: O treinamento de força atua sobre parâmetros metabólicos e celulares promovendo efeitos positivos no controle e na prevenção dos fatores de risco relacionados à síndrome metabólica, tais como diminuição do peso corporal, aumento da sensibilidade à insulina, aumento da tolerância à glicose, diminuição dos níveis pressóricos de repouso e melhoria do perfil lipídico. CONCLUSÃO: A revisão dos artigos científicos apresentados fornece dados que permitem concluir que o treinamento de força pode contribuir de forma efetiva na diminuição dos fatores de risco relacionados à síndrome metabólica.INTRODUCTION: Non-pharmacological measures, such as practicing physical activity, have been recommended for prevention and treatment of non-transmissible chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: To review the mechanisms by which resistance training results in metabolic and cellular alterations that act positively on metabolic syndrome risk factors. METHOD: The search was limited to the past 10 years, using the Medline, Scielo, Science direct and Capes databases. The terms used in the search were: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, resistance training, weight lifting, and exercise. RESULTS: Resistance training

  5. Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact o.f air pollution on human health.Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximi...

  6. The association of alcohol and alcohol metabolizing gene variants with diabetes and coronary heart disease risk factors in a white population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Jørgensen, Torben; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a J- or U-shaped relation between alcohol and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim was to examine the association between alcohol intake and diabetes and intermediate CHD risk factors in relation...

  7. Association of treatment response with obesity and other metabolic risk factors in adults with depressive disorders: Results from a National Depression Cohort study in Korea (the CRESCEND study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; McIntyre, Roger S; Kim, Jung-Bum; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Jun, Tae-Youn

    2016-10-01

    Available studies indicate that obesity may exert a moderational effect on antidepressant treatment response. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between treatment response and metabolic abnormalities amongst patients with depressive disorders in a large naturalistic clinical setting. A nationwide prospective study was conducted in 18 hospitals in South Korea; 541 depressive patients meeting DSM-IV criteria were recruited. After baseline evaluation, subjects received naturalistic clinician-determined antidepressant interventions. Assessment was performed at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 52. Treatment response was defined as a ≥50% reduction from baseline on at least one evaluation point. In univariate comparison, the patients who showed insufficient response to antidepressant therapy were more likely to be male, unmarried, unemployed, and obese. After adjusting for baseline variables, male sex (OR=1.82) and obesity (OR=1.55) remained as were significant variables. Stratification of the subjects into one of three groups, i.e. male, pre-menopausal female and post-menopausal female, revealed that males with concurrent metabolic problems, (i.e. the presence of one or more of hypertension, hyperglycemia, or hypercholesterolemia) had significantly higher risk for insufficient response (OR=2.32) and, after adjusting for baseline variables, obesity predicted insufficient response in post-menopausal female (OR=2.41). The presence of metabolic abnormalities in patients with depressive disorders was associated with decreased treatment response to antidepressants. These results underscore the neurobiological relationship between obesity and the central nervous system, and provide empiric evidence supporting stratification of treatment response in depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fat Intake, Blood Pressure and Randomed Blood Glucose Levels as Risk Factor of Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescent of Junior School in Denpasar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Suiraoka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome in children is defined when 3 of the 5 components are classified: hypertension, low HDL cholesterol, high serum triglyceride, high blood glucose levels, and central obesity. This study was a retrospective study with case-control design. Data collection was conducted from August to October 2014. The population of this study were all students in 8 selected junior high schools. Based on the calculation result, it was known that the sample size for case and control group are 128 people. Case and control determination began with screening of waist circumference using a tape measure, measured from the diameter between the lower ribs 10 with the iliac crest at the end of normal expiration. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured using a digital blood pressure gauge under the Omron brand. Blood glucose levels were measured using a multicheck parameter tool under the Nesco brand. BMI based on weight and height were measured using body scales and Microtoise. Fat intake data were collected using semi-quantitative food frequency method. Data were analyzed descriptively in the range and mean for waist circumference variable, blood pressure, randomed blood glucose levels, and fat intake. Furthermore, the calculation of Odd Ratio. Based on the results be concluded that adolescents who consume fat above 25% risk 3.3 times greater to experience metabolic syndrome. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI and blood glucose levels as the case group was higher than the control group.

  9. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism.

  10. [Biomarkers of gentotoxic risk and metabolic polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanello, S; Clonfero, E

    2000-01-01

    NAT2 on exposure indicators (levels of acetylated and non-acetylated metabolites) was confirmed. Exposure to benzene led to an increase in t-t-MA in some genotypes, although experimental verification is still necessary. As regards urinary mutagenicity, the effect of genotype GSTM1 null is reported, and of the same genotype combined with NAT2 slow, in non-smoking individuals subjected to high exposure to PAH and in cigarette-smoking/coke-oven workers. Lastly, the determination of urinary metabolites in monitoring exposure to genotoxic substances, provides sufficient evidence that genetically based metabolic polymorphisms must be taken into account in the future. There is still little evidence regarding the importance of genotype on the level of protein adducts in environmental and occupational exposure. A relatively large number of publications (22) dealt with DNA adduct levels in PAH exposure. In 18 studies, the biological indicator clearly increases with respect to values in control subjects. Of these studies, seven reported the influence of GSTM1 null on DNA adducts and, of the five studies which also examined genotype CYP1A1, four reported the influence on DNA adduct level of genotype CYP1A1, alone or in combination with GSTM1 null. It therefore seems as if the unfavourable association for the activating/detoxifying metabolism of PAH is a risk factor for the formation of PAH-DNA adducts. Most publications (25 out of 41; 61%) dealing with metabolic polymorphisms in effect indicators (cytogenetic markers, COMET assay, HPRT mutants) did not report any increase in the indicator due to exposure to the genotoxic agents studied. These indicators of genotoxic damage, including mainly the frequency of HPRT mutants (100%), Mn (90%) and the COMET assay (67%), are not sufficiently sensitive in revealing exposure, confirming that they are not particularly suitable for measuring exposure to genotoxic substances in occupational or environmental exposures. It is therefore

  11. What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stay Informed Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... your cell phone Research has found several risk factors that may increase your chances of getting lung ...

  12. Risk factors for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    It is no longer reasonable to divide cancers into those that are genetic in origin and those that are environmental in origin. With rare exception, carcinogenesis involves environmental factors that directly or indirectly exert a change in the cell's genome. Virtually all causes of cancer are multifactorial, sometimes involving an inherited predisposition to the carcinogenic effects of environmental factors, which include chemicals, ionizing radiation, and oncogenic virus. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process including induction, promotion, and progression. Initiation requires an irreversible change in the cellular genome, whereas promotion is commonly associated with prolonged and reversible exposure. Tumor progression results in genotypic and phenotypic changes associated with tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Most information on human cancer risk is based on epidemiologic studies involving both exposed and unexposed individuals. The quality of such studies depends on their ability to assess the strength of any association of exposure and disease and careful attention to any potential bias. Few cancers are inherited in a Mendelian fashion. Several preneoplastic conditions, however, are clearly inherited and several malignancies demonstrate weak familial patterns. Environmental factors may exert their effect on DNA in a random fashion, but certain consistent changes, including specific translocations of genetic information, are often found. Currently, there is great interest in the close proximity of certain oncogenes governing growth control to the consistent chromosomal changes observed. Such changes may represent a final common pathway of action for environmental carcinogens. Sufficient laboratory and epidemiologic evidence exists to establish a causal association of several chemical agents with cancer

  13. Enhancement of a modified Mediterranean-style, low glycemic load diet with specific phytochemicals improves cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with metabolic syndrome and hypercholesterolemia in a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babish John G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the worldwide dietary pattern becomes more westernized, the metabolic syndrome is reaching epidemic proportions. Lifestyle modifications including diet and exercise are recommended as first-line intervention for treating metabolic syndrome. Previously, we reported that a modified Mediterranean-style, low glycemic load diet with soy protein and phytosterols had a more favorable impact than the American Heart Association Step 1 diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors. Subsequently, we screened for phytochemicals with a history of safe use that were capable of increasing insulin sensitivity through modulation of protein kinases, and identified hops rho iso-alpha acid and acacia proanthocyanidins. The objective of this study was to investigate whether enhancement of a modified Mediterranean-style, low glycemic load diet (MED with specific phytochemicals (soy protein, phytosterols, rho iso-alpha acids and proanthocyanidins; PED could improve cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with metabolic syndrome and hypercholesterolemia. Methods Forty-nine subjects with metabolic syndrome and hypercholesterolemia, aged 25–80, entered a randomized, 2-arm, 12-week intervention trial; 23 randomized to the MED arm; 26 to the PED arm. Forty-four subjects completed at least 8 weeks [MED (n = 19; PED (n = 25]. All subjects were instructed to follow the same aerobic exercise program. Three-day diet diaries and 7-day exercise diaries were assessed at each visit. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline, 8 and 12 weeks for analysis. Results Both arms experienced equal weight loss (MED: -5.7 kg; PED: -5.9 kg. However, at 12 weeks, the PED arm experienced greater reductions (P P P P P Conclusion These results demonstrate that specific phytochemical supplementation increased the effectiveness of the modified Mediterranean-style low glycemic load dietary program on variables associated with metabolic syndrome and CVD.

  14. Optimal cut-off of obesity indices to predict cardiovascular disease risk factors and metabolic syndrome among adults in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxing; Tao, Yuchun; Tao, Yuhui; Yang, Sen; Yu, Yaqin; Li, Bo; Jin, Lina

    2016-10-13

    CVD risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes) and MetS are closely related to obesity. The selection of an optimal cut-off for various obesity indices is particularly important to predict CVD risk factors and MetS. Sixteen thousand seven hundred sixty-six participants aged 18-79 were recruited in Jilin Province in 2012. Five obesity indices, including BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR and BAI were investigated. ROC analyses were used to evaluate the predictive ability and determine the optimal cut-off values of the obesity indices for CVD risk factors and MetS. BMI had the highest adjusted ORs, and the adjusted ORs for hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and MetS were 1.19 (95 % CI, 1.17 to 1.20), 1.20 (95 % CI, 1.19 to 1.22), 1.12 (95 % CI, 1.10 to 1.13), and 1.40 (95 % CI, 1.38 to 1.41), respectively. However, BMI did not always have the largest adjusted AUROC. In general, the young age group (18 ~ 44) had higher ORs and AUROCs for CVD risk factors and MetS than those of the other age groups. In addition, the optimal cut-off values for WC and WHR in males were relatively higher than those in females, whereas the BAI in males was comparatively lower than that in females. The appropriate obesity index, with the corresponding optimal cut-off values, should be selected in different research studies and populations. Generally, the obesity indices and their optimal cut-off values are: BMI (24 kg/m 2 ), WC (male: 85 cm; female: 80 cm), WHR (male: 0.88; female: 0.85), WHtR (0.50), and BAI (male: 25 cm; female: 30 cm). Moreover, WC is superior to other obesity indices in predicting CVD risk factors and MetS in males, whereas, WHtR is superior to other obesity indices in predicting CVD risk factors and MetS in females.

  15. Prevalence and Influencing Factors of Metabolic Syndrome Among Persons with Physical Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeonghee; Yu, Jungok

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an important cluster of coronary heart disease risk factors. However, it remains unclear to what extent metabolic syndrome is associated with demographic and potentially modifiable lifestyle factors among Korean persons with physical disabilities. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and influencing factors of metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities using the Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were used to define metabolic syndrome influencing factors and prevalence, which were evaluated in a representative sample from the 2013 Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort database. Characteristics were compared based on frequency using the χ 2 test. The associations between metabolic syndrome and its risk factors were estimated using logistic multivariable regression analysis. Metabolic syndrome was detected in 31.5% of the surveyed persons with physical disabilities. Female sex, age of ≥65 years, smoking, greater alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, higher body mass index, and a family history of diabetes were associated with increased risks of metabolic syndrome. The major risk factors for metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities were obesity and older age. Performing physical activity was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we recommend using a continuous obesity management program and physical activity to prevent metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Risk factor based investing:case: MSCI risk factor indices

    OpenAIRE

    Pieskä, J. (Jukka)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this thesis is to study risk factor based investing and test how well MSCI constructs their risk factor based indices. Risk factor based investing has gained a lot of media exposure in the recent years and “Smart Beta” products are becoming more popular. Blackrock estimated that there are more than 700 exchange traded products available and they have over $ 529 billion in assets under management. Risk fa...

  17. High-dose vitamin D supplementation is associated with an improvement in several cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescent girls: a nine-week follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyatzadeh, Sayyed Saeed; Mirmoosavi, Seyed Jamal; Fazeli, Mostafa; Abasalti, Zahra; Avan, Amir; Javandoost, Ali; Rahmani, Farzad; Tayefi, Maryam; Hanachi, Parichehr; Ferns, Gordon A; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is a prevalent and important global health problem. Because of its role in growth and development, vitamin D status is likely to be particularly important in adolescent girls. Here, we explored the effects of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods We have examined the effects of vitamin D supplementation on cardio-metabolic risk factors in 988 healthy adolescent girls in Iran. Fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements were obtained at baseline and after supplementation with high-dose vitamin D. All individuals took a capsule of 50,000 IU vitamin D/week for nine weeks. The study was completed by 940 participants. Results The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 90% at baseline, reducing to 16.3% after vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin supplementation was associated with a significant increase in serum concentrations of 25 (OH) vitamin D and calcium. There were significant reductions in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist circumference and serum fasting blood glucose, total- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol after the nine-week period on vitamin D treatment, but no significant effects were observed on body mass index, systolic blood pressure or serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride. Conclusion Vitamin D supplementation had beneficial effects on cardio-metabolic profile in adolescent girls.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescent students from Buenos Aires Síndrome metabólico y riesgo cardiovascular en estudiantes adolescentes de la ciudad de Buenos Aires

    OpenAIRE

    M.N Graffigna; M Honfi; J Soutelo; M Migliano; L Ledesma; A Proietti; M Aranguren; M Pazos; C Musso; G Berg

    2010-01-01

    Obesity in the infancy is associated with dyslipidemia, hypertension, glucose intolerance and early development of cardiovascular risk. Abdominal obesity associated with metabolic syndrome predisposes to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Insulin resistance is present in this syndrome and should be evaluated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular risk (dyslipidemia, hypertensión and obesity) and metabolic risk m...

  19. Risk Factors in Pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşen Tükenmez Demirc

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: There have been reports suggesting the involvement of environmental factors in the disease process of pemphigus. In this study, we aimed to find out the risk factors which could play role in the etiopathogenesis in our pemphigus patients.Material and method: A total of 42 patients (15 male and 27 female who were diagnosed as pemphigus with histopathological and direct immunoflurosence examinations in our clinic between the years 1998-2004, were interviewed for assessment of regarding with the subjects of the demographic properties, occupational groups, educational level, the number of pregnancies, stressfull life events, diet habits, smoking and alcohol consumption before the onset of the disease and the results were compared to 42 age and gender-matched controls with similar socioeconomic circumstances. Results: Working in agriculture and livestock, multi-parity, absence of smoking and stressfull life events were found to be statistically significant in pemphigus patients than in controls. Conclusion: Working in agriculture and livestock, multi-parity, absence of smoking and stressfull life events were assumed to play role in the etiopathogenesis and course of pemphigus.

  20. Breast cancer risk in metabolically healthy but overweight postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Marc J; Xie, Xianhong; Xue, Xiaonan; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Rohan, Thomas E; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Ho, Gloria Y F; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Greco, Theresa; Yu, Herbert; Beasley, Jeannette; Strickler, Howard D

    2015-01-15

    Adiposity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. Recent data suggest that high insulin levels in overweight women may play a major role in this relationship, due to insulin's mitogenic/antiapoptotic activity. However, whether overweight women who are metabolically healthy (i.e., normal insulin sensitivity) have elevated risk of breast cancer is unknown. We investigated whether overweight women with normal insulin sensitivity [i.e., homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, or fasting insulin level, within the lowest quartile (q1)] have increased breast cancer risk. Subjects were incident breast cancer cases (N = 497) and a subcohort (N = 2,830) of Women's Health Initiative (WHI) participants with available fasting insulin and glucose levels. In multivariate Cox models, metabolically healthy overweight women, defined using HOMA-IR, were not at elevated risk of breast cancer compared with metabolically healthy normal weight women [HRHOMA-IR, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-1.42]. In contrast, the risk among women with high (q3-4) HOMA-IRs was elevated whether they were overweight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.19-2.60) or normal weight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.88-3.70). Similarly, using fasting insulin to define metabolic health, metabolically unhealthy women (insulin q3-4) were at higher risk of breast cancer regardless of whether they were normal weight (HRinsulin, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.01-4.22) or overweight (HRinsulin, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35-2.99), whereas metabolically healthy overweight women did not have significantly increased risk of breast cancer (HRinsulin, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.42) relative to metabolically healthy normal weight women. Metabolic health (e.g., HOMA-IR or fasting insulin) may be more biologically relevant and more useful for breast cancer risk stratification than adiposity per se. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Perinatal risk factors for strabismus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Tobias; Boyd, Heather A; Poulsen, Gry

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype.......Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype....

  2. EFFECT OF MODERATE RED WINE CONSUMPTION ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF METABOLIC SYNDROME AS A COMPLEX RISK FACTOR FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIABETES MELLITUS II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kopčeková

    2010-11-01

    consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome.   doi:10.5219/91

  3. Risk factors in school shootings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  4. Placental peptides metabolism and maternal factors as predictors of risk of gestational diabetes in pregnant women. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngala, Robert Amadu; Fondjo, Linda Ahenkorah; Gmagna, Peter; Ghartey, Frank Naku; Awe, Martin Akilla

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is a risk factor for perinatal complications; include shoulder dystocia, birth injuries such as bone fractures and nerve palsies. It is associated with later development of type 2 diabetes, the risk of macrosomia and other long-term health effects of infants born to diabetic mothers. The study assesses placental peptides and maternal factors as potential predictors of gestational diabetes among pregnant women. A total of 200 pregnant women were recruited for the study, 150 pregnant women without pre gestational diabetes including 50 women with low risk factors of diabetes as controls and 50 other pregnant women with pregestational diabetes as control. Fasting blood glucose and the lipid profile were determined by enzymatic methods using Envoy® 500 reagents (Vital Diagnostics, USA). Glycated haemoglobin was assessed using the Cation Exchange resin method. Leptin and the Human Placenta Lactogen were assayed using the Sandwich-ELISA technique. Beta chorionic gonadotrophin, insulin, progesterone and estradiol were determined using chemilumiscence imunoassay technique on MAGLUMI 600 analyzer. Anthropometry, including BMI and blood pressure were also measured. Fasting plasma glucose (FBG), insulin, insulin resistance, glycated haemoglobin and Human Placenta Lactogen(HPL)were significantly (p0.05) in estradiol, insulin, insulin resistance and HPL between the pregnant women who developed gestational diabetes and those who did not. Leptin, progesterone and FBG were significantly increased in those who developed GDM. The risk of developing gestational diabetes increased with overweight (OR = 1.76, P = 0.370) and family history of diabetes (OR = 2.18, P = 0.282). Leptin, progesterone, estradiol estimated in this study were increased in the gestational diabetes mellitus women and fairly predicted gestational diabetes in the non-diabetics pregnant women. Obesity, aging and family history of diabetes were strongly predictive of gestational diabetes.

  5. At the intersection of place, race, and health in Brazil: Residential segregation and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sharrelle; Diez Roux, Ana V; Cardoso, Letícia; Santos, Simone; Toste, Veronica; James, Sherman; Barreto, Sandhi; Schmidt, Maria; Giatti, Luana; Chor, Dora

    2018-02-01

    Residential segregation is the spatial manifestation of entrenched socioeconomic and racial inequities and is considered a fundamental cause of racial inequalities in health. Despite the well-documented racialized spatial inequalities that exist in urban areas throughout Brazil, few empirical investigations have examined the link between residential segregation and health and considered its implications for racial health inequalities in this setting. In the present study, we used data from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (2008-2010) to examine the association between economic residential segregation and two major cardio-metabolic risk factors-hypertension and diabetes. We also examined whether associations were stronger for historically marginalized racial groups in Brazil. Residential segregation was calculated for study-defined neighborhoods using the Getis-Ord Local G i * statistic and was based on household income data from the 2010 IBGE demographic census. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations. In our sample, Blacks and Browns were more likely to live in economically segregated neighborhoods. After taking into account income, education, and other demographic characteristics we found that individuals living in the most economically segregated neighborhoods were 26% more likely to have hypertension and 50% more likely to have diabetes than individuals living in more affluent areas. Although Blacks and Browns living in highly segregated neighborhoods had higher prevalence of hypertension and diabetes compared to Whites, we observed no statistically significant racial differences in the associations with residential segregation. Our findings suggest that residential segregation may be an important structural determinant of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Brazil. Moreover, the systematic and disproportionate exposure of Blacks and Browns to highly segregated neighborhoods may implicate these settings as

  6. Self-Rated Health in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: distribution, determinants and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhijie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-rated health (SRH has been demonstrated to be an accurate reflection of a person's health and a valid predictor of incident mortality and chronic morbidity. We aimed to evaluate the distribution and factors associated with SRH and its association with biomarkers of cardio-metabolic diseases among middle-aged and elderly Chinese. Methods Survey of 1,458 men and 1,831 women aged 50 to 70 years, conducted in one urban and two rural areas of Beijing and Shanghai in 2005. SRH status was measured and categorized as good (very good and good vs. not good (fair, poor and very poor. Determinants of SRH and associations with biomarkers of cardio-metabolic diseases were evaluated using logistic regression. Results Thirty two percent of participants reported good SRH. Males and rural residents tended to report good SRH. After adjusting for potential confounders, residence, physical activity, employment status, sleep quality and presence of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and depression were the main determinants of SRH. Those free from cardiovascular disease (OR 3.68; 95%CI 2.39; 5.66, rural residents (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.47; 2.43, non-depressed participants (OR 2.50; 95% CI 1.67; 3.73 and those with good sleep quality (OR 2.95; 95% CI 2.22; 3.91 had almost twice or over the chance of reporting good SRH compared to their counterparts. There were significant associations -and trend- between SRH and levels of inflammatory markers, insulin levels and insulin resistance. Conclusion Only one third of middle-aged and elderly Chinese assessed their health status as good or very good. Although further longitudinal studies are required to confirm our findings, interventions targeting social inequalities, lifestyle patterns might not only contribute to prevent chronic morbidity but as well to improve populations' perceived health.

  7. Metabolic correlates of temperament factors of personality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Bang, Seong Ae; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Gender differences in personality are considered to have biological bases. In an attempt to understand the gender differences of personality on neurobiological bases, we conducted correlation analyses between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factors of personality in males and females. Thirty-six healthy right-handed volunteers (18 males, 33.8 ± 17.6 y;18 females, 36.2 ± 20.4 y) underwent FDG PET at resting state. Three temperament factors of personality (novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD)) were assessed using Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) within 10 days of FDG PET scan. Correlation between regional glucose metabolism and each temperament factor was tested using SPM2. In males, a significant negative correlation between NS score and glucose metabolism was observed in the bilateral superior temporal gyri, the hippocampus and the insula, while it was found in the bilateral middle frontal gyri, the right superior temporal gyrus and the left cingulate cortex and the putamen in females. A positive HA correlation was found in the right midbrain and the left cingulate gyrus in males, but in the bilateral basal ganglia in females. A negative RD correlation was observed in the right middle frontal and the left middle temporal gyri in males, while the correlation was found in the bilateral middle frontal gyri and the right basal ganglia and the superior temporal gyrus in females. These data demonstrate different cortical and subcortical metabolic correlates of temperament factors of personality between males and females. These results may help understand biological substrate of gender differences in personality and susceptibility to neuropsychiatric illnesses

  8. Metabolic correlates of temperament factors of personality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Bang, Seong Ae; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Gender differences in personality are considered to have biological bases. In an attempt to understand the gender differences of personality on neurobiological bases, we conducted correlation analyses between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factors of personality in males and females. Thirty-six healthy right-handed volunteers (18 males, 33.8 {+-} 17.6 y;18 females, 36.2 {+-} 20.4 y) underwent FDG PET at resting state. Three temperament factors of personality (novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD)) were assessed using Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) within 10 days of FDG PET scan. Correlation between regional glucose metabolism and each temperament factor was tested using SPM2. In males, a significant negative correlation between NS score and glucose metabolism was observed in the bilateral superior temporal gyri, the hippocampus and the insula, while it was found in the bilateral middle frontal gyri, the right superior temporal gyrus and the left cingulate cortex and the putamen in females. A positive HA correlation was found in the right midbrain and the left cingulate gyrus in males, but in the bilateral basal ganglia in females. A negative RD correlation was observed in the right middle frontal and the left middle temporal gyri in males, while the correlation was found in the bilateral middle frontal gyri and the right basal ganglia and the superior temporal gyrus in females. These data demonstrate different cortical and subcortical metabolic correlates of temperament factors of personality between males and females. These results may help understand biological substrate of gender differences in personality and susceptibility to neuropsychiatric illnesses.

  9. The 482Ser of PPARGC1A and 12Pro of PPARG2 Alleles Are Associated with Reduction of Metabolic Risk Factors Even Obesity in a Mexican-Mestizo Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between functional polymorphisms Gly482Ser in PPARGC1A and Pro12Ala in PPARG2 with the presence of obesity and metabolic risk factors. We included 375 individuals characterized as Mexican-Mestizos and classified by the body mass index (BMI. Body dimensions and distribution of body fat were measured. The HOMA-IR and adiposity indexes were calculated. Adipokines and metabolic profile quantification were performed by ELISA and routine methods. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. A difference between obese and nonobese subjects in polymorphism PPARGC1A distribution was observed. Among obese individuals, carriers of genotype 482Gly/Gly were observed to have decreased body fat, BMI, and body fat ratio versus 482Ser/Ser carriers and increased resistin and leptin levels in carriers Gly+ phenotype versus Gly− phenotype. Subjects with PPARG2 Ala− phenotype (genotype 12Pro/Pro showed a decreased HOMA-IR index versus individuals with Ala+ phenotype (genotypes 12Pro/Ala plus 12Ala/Ala. We propose that, in obese Mexican-Mestizos, the combination of alleles 482Ser in PPARGC1A and 12Pro in PPARG2 represents a reduced metabolic risk profile, even when the adiposity indexes are increased.

  10. Cardiometabolic disease risk in metabolically healthy and unhealthy obesity: Stability of metabolic health status in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fangjian; Garvey, W Timothy

    2016-02-01

    To assess the stability of metabolic status and body mass index (BMI) status and their relative contribution to risk of diabetes, cardiovascular events, and mortality. A total of 14,685 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and 4,990 from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study were included. People with healthy obesity (HO) are defined as those meeting all three indices of blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood lipids. People with unhealthy obesity crossed the risk threshold for all three criteria. In both healthy and unhealthy subgroups, risks for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and mortality were comparable among BMI status during a mean 18.7-year follow-up. When compared with HO, hazard ratios were increased for diabetes (5.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.12-7.48), CHD (5.60, 95% CI 3.14-9.98), stroke (4.84, 95% CI 2.13-10.97), and mortality (2.6, 95% CI 1.88-3.61) in people with unhealthy obesity. BMI only moderately increased the risks for diabetes among healthy subjects. In the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study over 20 years, 17.5% of lean subjects and 67.3% of overweight subjects at baseline developed obesity during follow-up. Despite rising BMI, metabolic status remained relatively stable. Metabolic status is relatively stable despite rising BMI. HO had lower risks for diabetes, CHD, stroke, and mortality than unhealthy subjects but increased diabetes risks than healthy lean people. Cardiometabolic risk factors confer much higher risk than obesity per se. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  11. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shi-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body’s total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body’s antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body’s total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin’s antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn and metabolic syndrome are also discussed.

  12. [Recurrent diverticulitis - risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamová, Z; Slováček, R; Sankot, J

    2013-10-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a common illness, especially in the elderly population. It may be asymptomatic and cause chronic intestinal problems, colonic diverticular bleeding or inflammatory complications with considerable morbidity and mortality. We have attempted at finding factors that would help us identify patients with a higher risk of diverticulitis recurrence as well as patients with a higher likelihood of perforated diverticulitis. This retrospective study included all patients admitted to our surgical ward for inflammatory complications of diverticular disease between 2000 and 2012: 278 patients, 88 men and 190 women. We looked up the first attack of diverticulitis in our documentation as well as the relapses, if any, their number and course, and the time from the first attack to the relapse. We analyzed the influence of age, gender, comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, overweight, ischemic heart disease, chronic renal failure, gastroduodenal disease), nicotine abuse and medication (glucocorticoids and other immunosuppressive drugs, acetylsalicylic acid) on diverticulitis recurrence and its complicated course. We compared the results of conservative and surgical therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using Fishers exact test and Man-Whitney U tests. We did not demonstrate any statistically significant dependence of diverticulitis recurrence on age or gender. Colectomy (both acute and elective surgery) clearly decreases the likelihood of recurrence (p=0.00007). Comorbidities, nicotine abuse and medication were not associated with an increased risk of recurrence. Steroid and immunosuppressive drugs use was significantly associated with higher perforation rates, without impacting on the likelihood of recurrence. Regular smoking of cigarettes had no impact on recurrence or on its severity. We did not find any reliable indicator of recurrent diverticulitis. Age, gender, comorbidities, smoking and medication are not significant. Immunocompromised

  13. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of sudden cardiac death in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurl, Sudhir; Laaksonen, David E; Jae, Sae Young; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Zaccardi, Francesco; Kauhanen, Jussi; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2016-01-15

    Little is known about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and sudden cardiac death (SCD). We examined the association of metabolic syndrome, as defined by World Health Organization (WHO), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and American Heart Association (AHA)--IDF interim criteria, with incident SCD. We also assessed the association of a continuous metabolic risk score with SCD. A total of 1466 middle-aged men participating in a prospective population-based cohort study from eastern Finland with no history of coronary heart disease or diabetes at baseline were included. During the average follow-up of 21 years 85 SCDs occurred. Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the WHO, NCEP, IDF and interim criteria had a 2.2-2.6 fold, increased risk for SCD, after adjusting for lifestyle and traditional cardiovascular risk factors not included in the metabolic syndrome definition (Pmetabolic risk score (composed of the sum of Z-scores for waist circumference, insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure) was associated with a 1.68-fold higher (95% CI 1.33-2.11) risk of SCD. Even when adjusting further for systolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol and body mass index, the association remained significant for the interim criteria and the metabolic risk score, but not for WHO, NCEP, or IDF definitions. Men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for SCD. Incident SCD associated with the IDF/AHA interim criteria and metabolic risk clustering estimated by a score is not explained by obesity or traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for sudden cardiac death. Incident sudden cardiac death associated with metabolic risk clustering estimated by a score in not explained by obesity or traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Prevention of the metabolic syndrome may help reduce the health burden of SCD. Copyright

  14. The search for putative unifying genetic factors for components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, M; Lyssenko, V; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of factors contributing to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes but unifying mechanisms have not been identified. Our aim was to study whether common variations in 17 genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes or components...... of the metabolic syndrome and variants in nine genes with inconsistent association with at least two components of the metabolic syndrome would also predict future development of components of the metabolic syndrome, individually or in combination....

  15. Gut microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, John R; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Arduini, Arduino

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have alluded to the importance of the intestinal microflora in controlling whole-body metabolic homeostasis and organ physiology. In particular, it has been suggested that the hepatic production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) from gut microbiota-derived trimethylamine (TMA) may enhance cardiovascular risk via promoting atherosclerotic lesion development. The source of TMA production via the gut microbiota appears to originate from 2 principle sources, either phosphatidylcholine/choline and/or L-carnitine. Therefore, it has been postulated that consumption of these dietary sources, which are often found in large quantities in red meats, may be critical factors promoting cardiovascular risk. In contrast, a number of studies demonstrate beneficial properties for l-carnitine consumption against metabolic diseases including skeletal muscle insulin resistance and ischemic heart disease. Furthermore, fish are a significant source of TMAO, but dietary fish consumption and fish oil supplementation may exhibit positive effects on cardiovascular health. In this mini-review we will discuss the discrepancies regarding L-carnitine supplementation and its possible negative effects on cardiovascular risk through potential increases in TMAO production, as well as its positive effects on metabolic health via increasing glucose metabolism in the muscle and heart. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The relationships of leptin, adiponectin levels and paraoxonase activity with metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in females treated with psychiatric drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Ozenoglu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate serum leptin, adiponectin and paraoxonase1 levels in adult females receiving pharmacotherapy for various psychiatric disorders. METHODS: The study group consisted of 32 obese females (mean age 40.53 ± 11.00 years, mean body mass index 35.44 ± 5.33 kg/m² who were receiving treatment for psychiatric disorders, and the control group included 22 obese females (mean age 35.95 ± 9.16 years, mean body mass index 30.78 ± 3.33 kg/m² who were free of psychiatric disorders. Analyses were performed using a bioelectrical impedance device. Fasting blood samples were obtained for complete blood count and various biochemical tests, including determination of leptin, adiponectin and paraoxonase1 activity. RESULTS: Body mass index, waist and hip circumference, body fat percentage, fasting blood glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, homeostasis model assesment of insulin resistance, alanine transaminase, aspartate tarnsaminase, and leptin levels were significantly higher in the study group than in controls. Although body weight was positively correlated with leptin levels in both groups, body weight was negatively correlated with adiponectin levels in the control group and positively correlated with adiponectin levels in the study group. In the study group, body mass index and hip circumference correlated positively with leptin levels, hip circumference correlated positively with adiponectin levels, and waist to hip ratio correlated positively with paraoxonase levels. In the control group, body mass index as well as waist and hip circumferences were positively correlated with leptin levels. Weight, body mass index, and hip circumference were also negatively correlated with the adiponectin/leptin ratio in the control group. CONCLUSION: This study indicates a higher risk for obesity-related disorders, particularly metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, in patients treated with

  17. Trenbolone Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Myocardial Tolerance to Ischemia-Reperfusion in Male Rats With Testosterone-Deficient Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Daniel G; Elliott, Grace E; Beck, Belinda R; Bulmer, Andrew C; Lam, Alfred K; Headrick, John P; Du Toit, Eugene F

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity adds another dimension to the pathophysiology of testosterone (TEST) deficiency (TD) and potentially impairs the therapeutic efficacy of classical TEST replacement therapy. We investigated the therapeutic effects of selective androgen receptor modulation with trenbolone (TREN) in a model of TD with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Male Wistar rats (n=50) were fed either a control standard rat chow (CTRL) or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet. After 8 weeks of feeding, rats underwent sham surgery or an orchiectomy (ORX). Alzet miniosmotic pumps containing either vehicle, 2-mg/kg·d TEST or 2-mg/kg·d TREN were implanted in HF/HS+ORX rats. Body composition, fat distribution, lipid profile, and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Infarct size was quantified to assess myocardial damage after in vivo ischaemia reperfusion, before cardiac and prostate histology was performed. The HF/HS+ORX animals had increased sc and visceral adiposity; circulating triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin; and myocardial damage, with low circulating TEST compared with CTRLs. Both TEST and TREN protected HF/HS+ORX animals against sc fat accumulation, hypercholesterolaemia, and myocardial damage. However, only TREN protected against visceral fat accumulation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and hyperinsulinaemia and reduced myocardial damage relative to CTRLs. TEST caused widespread cardiac fibrosis and prostate hyperplasia, which were less pronounced with TREN. We propose that TEST replacement therapy may have contraindications for males with TD and obesity-related MetS. TREN treatment may be more effective in restoring androgen status and reducing cardiovascular risk in males with TD and MetS.

  18. Comparison of high protein and high fiber weight-loss diets in women with risk factors for the metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Morenga, Lisa A; Levers, Megan T; Williams, Sheila M; Brown, Rachel C; Mann, Jim

    2011-04-28

    Studies have suggested that moderately high protein diets may be more appropriate than conventional low-fat high carbohydrate diets for individuals at risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. However in most such studies sources of dietary carbohydrate may not have been appropriate and protein intakes may have been excessively high. Thus, in a proof-of-concept study we compared two relatively low-fat weight loss diets - one high in protein and the other high in fiber-rich, minimally processed cereals and legumes - to determine whether a relatively high protein diet has the potential to confer greater benefits. Eighty-three overweight or obese women, 18-65 years, were randomized to either a moderately high protein (30% protein, 40% carbohydrate) diet (HP) or to a high fiber, relatively high carbohydrate (50% carbohydrate, > 35 g total dietary fiber, 20% protein) diet (HFib) for 8 weeks. Energy intakes were reduced by 2000 - 4000 kJ per day in order to achieve weight loss of between 0.5 and 1 kg per week. Participants on both diets lost weight (HP: -4.5 kg [95% confidence interval (CI):-3.7, -5.4 kg] and HFib: -3.3 kg [95% CI: -4.2, -2.4 kg]), and reduced total body fat (HP: -4.0 kg [5% CI:-4.6, -3.4 kg] and HFib: -2.5 kg [95% CI: -3.5, -1.6 kg]), and waist circumference (HP: -5.4 cm [95% CI: -6.3, -4.5 cm] and HFib: -4.7 cm [95% CI: -5.8, -3.6 cm]), as well as total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose and blood pressure. However participants on HP lost more body weight (-1.3 kg [95% CI: -2.5, -0.1 kg; p = 0.039]) and total body fat (-1.3 kg [95% CI: -2.4, -0.1; p = 0.029]). Diastolic blood pressure decreased more on HP (-3.7 mm Hg [95% CI: -6.2, -1.1; p = 0.005]). A realistic high protein weight-reducing diet was associated with greater fat loss and lower blood pressure when compared with a high carbohydrate, high fiber diet in high risk overweight and obese women.

  19. Comparison of high protein and high fiber weight-loss diets in women with risk factors for the metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Sheila M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have suggested that moderately high protein diets may be more appropriate than conventional low-fat high carbohydrate diets for individuals at risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. However in most such studies sources of dietary carbohydrate may not have been appropriate and protein intakes may have been excessively high. Thus, in a proof-of-concept study we compared two relatively low-fat weight loss diets - one high in protein and the other high in fiber-rich, minimally processed cereals and legumes - to determine whether a relatively high protein diet has the potential to confer greater benefits. Methods Eighty-three overweight or obese women, 18-65 years, were randomized to either a moderately high protein (30% protein, 40% carbohydrate diet (HP or to a high fiber, relatively high carbohydrate (50% carbohydrate, > 35 g total dietary fiber, 20% protein diet (HFib for 8 weeks. Energy intakes were reduced by 2000 - 4000 kJ per day in order to achieve weight loss of between 0.5 and 1 kg per week. Results Participants on both diets lost weight (HP: -4.5 kg [95% confidence interval (CI:-3.7, -5.4 kg] and HFib: -3.3 kg [95% CI: -4.2, -2.4 kg], and reduced total body fat (HP: -4.0 kg [5% CI:-4.6, -3.4 kg] and HFib: -2.5 kg [95% CI: -3.5, -1.6 kg], and waist circumference (HP: -5.4 cm [95% CI: -6.3, -4.5 cm] and HFib: -4.7 cm [95% CI: -5.8, -3.6 cm], as well as total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose and blood pressure. However participants on HP lost more body weight (-1.3 kg [95% CI: -2.5, -0.1 kg; p = 0.039] and total body fat (-1.3 kg [95% CI: -2.4, -0.1; p = 0.029]. Diastolic blood pressure decreased more on HP (-3.7 mm Hg [95% CI: -6.2, -1.1; p = 0.005]. Conclusions A realistic high protein weight-reducing diet was associated with greater fat loss and lower blood pressure when compared with a high carbohydrate, high fiber diet in high risk overweight and obese women.

  20. Diabetes risk among overweight and obese metabolically healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twig, Gilad; Afek, Arnon; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Tirosh, Amir

    2014-11-01

    To determine diabetes incidence over time among obese young adults without metabolic risk factors. Incident diabetes during a median follow-up of 6.1 years was assessed among 33,939 young men (mean age 30.9 ± 5.2 years) of the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults cohort who were stratified for BMI and the number of metabolic abnormalities (based on the Adult Treatment Panel-III). Metabolically healthy (MH) obesity was defined as BMI ≥30 kg/m2 in the presence of normoglycemia, normal blood pressure, and normal levels of fasting triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels (n = 631). A total of 734 new cases of diabetes were diagnosed during 210,282 person-years of follow-up. The incidence rate of diabetes among participants with no metabolic risk factors was 1.15, 2.10, and 4.34 cases per 1,000 person-years among lean, overweight, and obese participants, respectively. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, region of origin, family history of diabetes, physical activity, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride level, HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and white blood cell count, a higher diabetes risk was observed among MH-overweight (hazard ratio [HR] 1.89 [95% CI 1.25-2.86]; P young adults from incident diabetes associated with overweight and obesity. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Age- and sex-specific prevalence and ten-year risk for cardiovascular disease of all 16 risk factor combinations of the metabolic syndrome - A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moebus Susanne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the AHA/NHLBI-definition three out of five cardiometabolic traits must be present for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, resulting in 16 different combination types. The associated cardiovascular risk may however be different and specific combination may be indicative of an increased risk, furthermore little is known to which extent these 16 combinations contribute to the overall prevalence of MetS. Here we assessed the prevalence of all 16 combination types of MetS, analyzed the impact of age and gender on prevalence rates, and estimated the 10-year risk of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI of each MetS combination type. Methods We used data of the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Project (GEMCAS, a cross-sectional study, performed during October 2005, including 35,869 participants (aged 18-99 years, 61% women. Age-standardized prevalence and 10-year PROCAM and ESC risk scores for MI were calculated. Results In both men and women the combination with elevated waist-circumference, blood pressure and glucose (WC-BP-GL was the most frequent combination (28%, however a distinct unequal distribution was observed regarding age and sex. Any combination with GL was common in the elderly, whereas any combination with dyslipidemia and without GL was frequent in the younger. Men without MetS had an estimated mean 10-year risk of 4.7% (95%-CI: 4.5%-4.8% for MI (PROCAM, whereas the mean 10-year risk of men with MetS was clearly higher (age-standardized 7.9%; 7.8-8.0%. In women without MetS the mean 10-year risk for MI was 1.1%, in those with MetS 2.3%. The highest impact on an estimated 10-year risk for MI (PROCAM was observed with TG-HDL-GL-BP in both sexes (men 14.7%, women 3.9%. However, we could identify combinations with equal risks of non-fatal and fatal MI compared to participants without MetS. Conclusions We observed large variations in the prevalence of all 16 combination types and their

  2. Managing Multiple Risk Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lollis, Charlie

    1998-01-01

    ...) contribute to the racial differences in cardiovascular risk and events among women. High levels of socioeconomic stress, higher dietary fat intake and sedentary lifestyle are more prevalent among black than white women...

  3. Self-Management Training for Chinese Obese Children at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome: Effectiveness and Implications for School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Anderson, Laura M.; Ji, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a school-based self-management intervention for Chinese obese children at risk for metabolic syndrome. Twenty-eight Chinese obese children (M age?=?10 years) and their parents participated in the study. Metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. The risk factors included Body Mass…

  4. Prevalence and obstetric risk factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    suggest that obstetric factors increase the risk of damage to the anal sphincter and subsequent development of AI.[4-6] These ... variations may impact on obstetric risk factors and AI prevalence. We therefore performed a study in our population, which .... Regulatory approvals. Institutional and hospital ethical approval were ...

  5. Bone metastasis risk factors in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Catarina; Vendrell, Inês; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Casimiro, Sandra; Mansinho, André; Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Bone is the single most frequent site for bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. Patients with bone-only metastasis have a fairly good prognosis when compared with patients with visceral disease. Nevertheless, cancer-induced bone disease carries an important risk of developing skeletal related events that impact quality of life (QoL). It is therefore particularly important to stratify patients according to their risk of developing bone metastasis. In this context, several risk factors have been studied, including demographic, clinicopathological, genetic, and metabolic factors. Most of them show conflicting or non-definitive associations and are not validated for clinical use. Nonetheless, tumour intrinsic subtype is widely accepted as a major risk factor for bone metastasis development and luminal breast cancer carries an increased risk for bone disease. Other factors such as gene signatures, expression of specific cytokines (such as bone sialoprotein and bone morphogenetic protein 7) or components of the extracellular matrix (like bone crosslinked C-telopeptide) might also influence the development of bone metastasis. Knowledge of risk factors related with bone disease is of paramount importance as it might be a prediction tool for triggering the use of targeted agents and allow for better patient selection for future clinical trials. PMID:28194227

  6. Environmental risk factors and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter the physical risk factors (as radiation [air contamination, contamination of the environment components and food contamination], radon and its radioactive decay products, radioactive wastes, noise), chemical risk factors [chemical substances, xenobiotics in the food chain the ozone depletion], wastes (waste generation, waste management, municipal waste management, import, export and transit of waste) and natural an technological hazards (water quality deterioration as a result of various accidents and fire risk) in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed

  7. Genetic risk factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaïti-Pellié, C

    1999-12-01

    Familial risk factors are known to play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, particularly when the relatives are affected by early-onset cancer. Part of this familial aggregation can be accounted for by inherited forms of colorectal cancer, i.e. familial adenomatous polyposis (less than 1% of all CRC) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (about 3%). Other genetic factors may be involved in the development of adenoma or in the transformation of adenoma into carcinoma. That the existence of polymorphisms of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene increase susceptibility to both adenomas and cancer favours this hypothesis. Interactions between environmental factors, and most of all dietary factors, and polymorphisms of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes may also be involved. Better knowledge of these mechanisms will substantially widen the scope of colorectal cancer prevention.

  8. METABOLICALLY HEALTHY OBESITY: DEFINITIONS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Romantsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes; nevertheless, in many obese patients no cardiometabolic complications are present. For this group of patients the term “metabolically healthy obesity” (MHO has been established in 1982. Currently, there is no standardized definition of MHO, and there are large variations in its prevalence rate. The underlying mechanisms of this phenotype are not clear. It has been suggested that preserved insulin sensitivity, as well as high levels of physical activity and genetic predisposition may differentiate metabolically healthy from unhealthy obese adults. Low grade inflammation in the adipose tissue is considered to be a crucial factor for the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Compared to the metabolically unhealthy obese phenotype, MHO is characterized by a more favorable inflammatory profile in adipose tissue, less visceral fat, less macrophagal infiltration of adipose tissue, smaller adipocyte cell size. The question remains of stability of the MHO phenotype. The aim of this review is to discuss the current literature data concerning characteristics of MHO phenotype, definitions, prevalence and potential protective mechanisms underlying MHO. We also discuss clinical implications of MHO phenotype.

  9. Obesidad y factores de riesgo del síndrome metabólico en jóvenes con diabetes tipo 1 Obesity and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in young people with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Prieto

    2012-08-01

    overlap of the two most common types of diabetes with a greater clinical heterogeneity. In order to characterize the type of diabetes at onset and assess the effect of obesity, 50 children with diabetes were studied. The patients were divided into two groups according to their nutritional status at diagnosis (overweight/obese vs. normal weight. Insulin reserve was evaluated by measuring basal C-peptide and stimulated C-peptide in response to a mixed meal (MMTT as well as HLA-DQB1 genotype, antibodies, and family history of risk factors for metabolic disease. Of all 50 patients, 38% was overweight /obese, 84% had a positive family history of metabolic syndrome, 82% had positive antibodies, and 100% were positive for the high-risk HLA-DQB1 genotype. No significant differences were found in fasting C-peptide or glycemic index/C-peptide levels between the two groups. In the overweight/obese group C-peptide response to MMTT showed higher levels at 60 and 120 minutes (p = 0.02 and 0.03 and the area under the curve for C-peptide was also higher (1.77 ng / ml vs. 5.5 ng/ml, p = 0.0007 than in the normal-weight group. In conclusion, overweight/obese patients with type 1A diabetes had a greater pancreatic reserve, suggesting that nutritional status may accelerate disease onset.

  10. Fatores de risco para síndrome metabólica em cadeirantes: jogadores de basquetebol e não praticantes Risk factors for the metabolic syndrome in wheelchair users: basketball players and non-practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Quintana

    2008-06-01

    disabled individuals, through the determination of the anthropometric and blood biochemical profile. Moreover, the prevalence of risk factors for the metabolic syndrome has been determined. 27 men with paraplegia (T2-L1, presenting polio sequelas or amputation, were divided in two groups: wheelchair basketball players and (WBP and wheelchair non-basketball players (WNBP. The WBP presented waist circumference smaller than the WNBP, 76.40+8.44 and 89.25+9.73 cm respectively (p<0.05. The systolic arterial pressure was significant bigger in WNBP 123.33+13.70 and 144.00+9.85 mmHg for WBP (p<0.05, and no difference for PAD was verified. WNBP presented higher numbers than WBP for blood glycemic biochemistry, TG, CT and fractions, except for HDL-C (p<0.05. WNBP individuals presented high prevalence for risk factors of metabolic syndrome, being arterial hypertension prevalent in 58.33% of the individuals; HDL-C dyslipidemia present in 50%, and waist circumference above normality in 41.66%. The findings of the present study corroborate others described in the literature on high prevalence of risk factors for metabolic syndrome among individuals with physical disabilities with low levels of regular physical activity. The evidence raised suggests an important role of regular physical exercise as suitable prevention device for metabolic syndrome.

  11. A 13-week low glycemic load diet and lifestyle modification program combining low glycemic load protein shakes and targeted nutraceuticals improved weight loss and cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Clinton J; Ou, Joseph J; Babish, John G; Lamb, Joseph J; Eliason, Sarah; Brabazon, Holly; Gao, Wei; Kaadige, Mohan R; Tripp, Matthew L

    2017-12-01

    An open-label, randomized, exploratory study of 44 healthy overweight subjects with cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) risk factors was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a proprietary lifestyle modification program without (DIET) and with (PROG) targeted nutraceutical supplementation, including phytosterols, antioxidants, probiotics, fish oil, berberine, and soy, pea, and whey proteins over 13 weeks. Key metrics were recorded at baseline and weeks 9 and 13. For the DIET and PROG groups, compliance was 85% and 86%, respectively, with no adverse events related to the diet or supplements. Twelve subjects discontinued participation before week 9 for reasons unrelated to the study. PROG subjects experienced greater decreases (p < 0.05) than DIET in body mass, fat mass, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, TG, cholesterol / HDL ratio, TG/HDL ratio, apolipoprotein B / apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and hs-CRP. The Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk score decreased by 40% (p < 0.01) in the PROG arm versus no change for the DIET arm. As a pilot study, it was not possible to state whether the observed effects were the result of nutraceutical supplementation alone or the result of additive or synergistic interactions among diet, lifestyle modifications, and nutraceutical supplementation. Moreover, individuals with CMS risk factors following a lifestyle modification program received additional health benefits from targeted nutraceutical supplementation.

  12. Project PANK: Rationale, study protocol and baseline results of a multidisciplinary school based intervention in children with cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Batalau

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Cardiovascular disease risk factors occur more frequently in children with obesity. Project PANK is a multidisciplinary school-based intervention lasting 6 months to improve BMI z-score, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, blood pressure (BP, nutrition, physical activity (PA, sedentary behaviour (SB, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides (TG. Methods/DesignA total of 77 children (7-10 years were recruited from an urban school. The protocol includes PA and SB individual meetings for children/parents; increasing school exercise; PA and SB lessons for children; A goal in the number of steps/day to accomplish in and after school. In nutrition, the protocol includes three individual meetings for children/parents and six lessons for children. ResultsPositive associations were found between the BMI Z-score, WC, and WHtR with TG; the BMI Z-score and WHtR with glucose; the light PA time and HDL-C; the vigorous and moderate-to-vigorous PA with CRF; the caloric intake and lipids with LDL-C, BMI z-score, WC, and WHtR. A negative association was found between CRF and TG. ConclusionBaseline results stress the importance of multidisciplinary school-based interventions. We hypothesized that PANK will improve blood variables, anthropometric measures, and BP, by changing food intake, enhancing PA and CRF, and decreasing SB.

  13. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Moon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed.

  14. Effects of an eight-week supervised, structured lifestyle modification programme on anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowe, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modification is fundamental to obesity treatment, but few studies have described the effects of structured lifestyle programmes specifically in bariatric patients. We sought to describe changes in anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of bariatric patients after participation in a nurse-led, structured lifestyle programme.

  15. Associations between Objectively Measured Physical Activity, Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome in 12- to 15-Year-Old Tianjin City Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sijie; Wang, Jianxiong; Zhang, Yibing; Zhang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study aim was to explore associations between daily physical activity level, cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic syndrome among Chinese children. Design: We conducted a school-based, cross-sectional study. Setting: Participants including 112 boys and 121 girls were recruited from three schools in the urban suburbs of Tianjin…

  16. Body mass index is associated with microvascular endothelial dysfunction in patients with treated metabolic risk factors and suspected coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Van Der Heijden (Dirk J.); M.A.H. van Leeuwen (Maarten); G.N. Janssens (Gladys N.); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); P.M. van de Ven (Peter); E.C. Eringa (Etto ); N. van Royen (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground--Obesity is key feature of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, a determinant of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Here, we compared the

  17. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues AN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anabel N Rodrigues,1 Glaucia R Abreu,2 Rogério S Resende,1 Washington LS Goncalves,1 Sonia Alves Gouvea21School of Medicine, University Center of Espírito Santo, Colatina, Brazil; 2Postgraduate Program in Physiological Sciences, Center for Health Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, BrazilObjectives: To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease.Sources: A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012.Summary of findings: Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents.Conclusions: Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century.Keywords: cardiovascular risk, children, hypertension, obesity

  18. Evaluation of the incremental prognostic value of the combination of CYP2C19 poor metabolizer status and ABCB1 3435 TT polymorphism over conventional risk factors for cardiovascular events after drug-eluting stent implantation in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho; Kim, Chan Joon; SunCho, Jung; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Tae-Seok; Choi, Yun-Seok; Park, Chul-Soo; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Pum-Joon; Chung, Wook-Sung; Seung, Ki-Bae; Kim, Ho-Sook; Shin, Jae-Gook; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the incremental prognostic value of combining the CYP2C19 poor metabolizer (PM) and ABCB1 3435 TT for adverse clinical outcomes over conventional risk factors in a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) cohort. We enrolled 2,188 patients. The primary end point was a composite of death from any cause, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke during 1-year follow-up. The population was stratified into the following four groups: CYP2C19 EM/IM+ABCB1 3435 CC/CT, CYP2C19 EM/IM+ABCB1 3435 TT, CYP2C19 PM+ABCB1 3435 CC/CT, and CYP2C19 PM+ABCB1 3435 TT. A total of 87 (3.97%) primary end-point events occurred (64 deaths, 8 non-fatal MIs and 15 strokes). Multivariate Cox analysis indicated that CYP2C19 PM+ABCB1 3435 TT status was a significant predictor of the primary end point (hazard ratio = 4.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.92-10.58). However, addition of combined genetic status to the clinical risk model did not improve the model discrimination (C-statistic = 0.786 (95% CI = 0.734-0.837) to 0.785 (95% CI = 0.733-0.838)) or risk reclassification (categorical net reclassification improvement (0.040, P = 0.32), integrated discrimination improvement (0.021, P = 0.026)). In a real-world East Asian PCI population taking clopidogrel, although the concurrent presence of CYP2C19 PM and ABCB1 TT is a strong independent predictor of adverse outcomes, the combined status of two at-risk variants does not have an incremental prognostic value beyond that of the conventional clinical risk factors.Genet Med 18 8, 833-841.

  19. Effects of Pomegranate Juice on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: a Double-Blinded, Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzen, Hossein; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the simultaneous effect of pomegranate juice on components of the metabolic syndrome, including high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as an inflammatory index and glycemic and lipid profile indices in patients with metabolic syndrome. In a double- blind 2*2 crossover study, 30 individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome received a daily dose of 500 mL pomegranate juice for a period of one week. After one week of wash out period, they received a placebo for one week. Lipid profile, blood glucose control indices including fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and hs-CRP were measured at the beginning and end of the study. To analyze the data, a repeated measure analysis of variance and a t-test were performed. The results indicated that in comparison to the placebo, pomegranate juice was more effective in reducing the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.00) and hs-CRP (p = 0.018). The level of triglyceride (p = 0.030) and very low-density lipoproteins cholesterol (VLDL-C) (p = 0.014) were increased after the consumption of pomegranate juice, as opposed to the baseline condition. The rest of lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBS), insulin, and HOMA-IR of the participants did not show any significant difference. Natural pomegranate juice supplementation lowered the level of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with metabolic syndrome as well as their blood hs-CRP. However, it also increased their triglyceride and VLDL-C.

  20. Gene polymorphisms as risk factors for predicting the cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome. Role of folic acid metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Mátyás, Gábor; Szokolai, Viola; Harsányi, Gergely; Szilveszter, Bálint; Odler, Balázs; Pólos, Miklós; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Radovits, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid metabolism enzyme polymorphisms are believed to be responsible for the elevation of homocysteine (HCY) concentration in the blood plasma, correlating with the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. We studied 71 Marfan patients divided into groups based on the severity of cardiovascular involvement: no intervention required (n=27, Group A); mild involvement requiring intervention (n=17, Group B); severe involvement (n=27, Group C) subdivided into aortic dilatation (n=14, Group C1) and aortic dissection (n=13, Group C2), as well as 117 control subjects. We evaluated HCY, folate, vitamin B12 and the polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR;c.665C>T and c.1286A>C), methionine synthase (MTR;c.2756A>G) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR;c.66A>G). Multiple comparisons showed significantly higher levels of HCY in Group C2 compared to Groups A, B, C1 and control group (pMarfan patients, and especially aortic dissection, is associated with higher HCY plasma levels and prevalence of homozygous genotypes of folic acid metabolism enzymes than mild or no cardiovascular involvement. These results suggest that impaired folic acid metabolism has an important role in the development and remodelling of the extracellular matrix of the aorta.

  1. Metabolic endotoxemia: a molecular link between obesity and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ana Luísa; Coelho, João; Couto, Luciana; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Roncon-Albuquerque, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality. Several molecular mechanisms underlying this association have been implied, among which the intestinal barrier has gained a growing interest. In experimental models of obesity, significant alterations in the intestinal barrier lead to increased intestinal permeability, favoring translocation of microbiome-derived lipopolysaccharide to the bloodstream. This has been shown to result in a two- to threefold increase in its serum concentrations, a threshold named 'metabolic endotoxemia' (ME). ME may trigger toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammatory activation, eliciting a chronic low-grade proinflammatory and pro-oxidative stress status, which may result in high CV risk and target-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the potential molecular implications of ME on several CV risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress, as well as its potential impact on the development of CV target-organ disease.

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, J; Rasmussen, S L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2001-01-01

    Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross...

  3. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Freire da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major cause of morbidity and mortality in the context of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is the occurrence of thrombotic events. Besides the pathogenic roles of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, other risk factors and medical conditions, which are conditions for traditional risk of an individual without the APS, can coexist in this patient, raising their risk of developing thrombosis. Therefore, the clinical and laboratory investigation of comorbidities known to increase cardiovascular risk in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is crucial for the adoption of a more complete and effective treatment. Experimental models and clinical studies show evidence of association between APS and premature formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Atherosclerosis has major traditional risk factors: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle that may be implicated in vascular involvement