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Sample records for metabolic liver disease

  1. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  2. The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease ...

    The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease. Liver cancer is highly fatal, it has very few treatment options, and it is one of the few cancers whose incidence is rising worldwide. One poorly understood risk factor for liver cancer is obesity/metabolic disease (such as diabetes and fatty liver disease).

  3. Transferrin metabolism in alcoholic liver disease

    Potter, B.J.; Chapman, R.W.; Nunes, R.M.; Sorrentino, D.; Sherlock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of transferrin was studied using purified 125 I-labeled transferrin in 11 alcoholic patients; six with fatty liver and five with cirrhosis. Six healthy subjects whose alcohol intake was les than 40 gm daily were studied as a control group. There were no significant differences in the mean fractional catabolic rate and plasma volume in the alcoholic groups when compared with control subjects. A significantly decreased mean serum transferrin concentration was found in the alcoholic cirrhotic patients (1.8 +/- 0.3 gm per liter vs. 2.9 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01), resulting from diminished total body synthesis (0.9 +/- 0.2 mg per kg per hr vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the patients with alcoholic fatty liver, the mean total body transferrin synthesis (2.4 +/- 0.3 mg per kg per hr) was significantly increased when compared with controls (p less than 0.05). For all the alcoholic patients, the serum transferrin correlated with transferrin synthesis (r = +0.70; p less than 0.01) but the serum iron did not. These results suggest that, in alcoholic cirrhosis, transferrin synthesis is decreased, probably reflecting diminished synthetic capacity by the liver. In contrast, in patients with alcoholic fatty liver, transferrin turnover is accelerated

  4. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L.; King, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  5. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L., E-mail: angela_slitt@uri.edu; King, Roberta, E-mail: rking@uri.edu

    2016-02-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  6. Inherited metabolic liver diseases in infants and children: an overview

    Ivo Barić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism, which affect the liver are a large, continuously increasing group of diseases. Their clinical onset can occur at any age, from intrauterine period presenting as liver failure already at birth to late adulthood. Inherited metabolic disorders must be considered in differential diagnosis of every unexplained liver disease. Specific diagnostic work-up for either their confirmation or exclusion should start immediately since any postponing can result in delayed diagnosis and death or irreversible disability. This can be particularly painful while many inherited metabolic liver diseases are relatively easily treatable if diagnosed on time, for instance galactosemia or hereditary fructose intolerance by simple dietary means. Any unexplained liver disease, even one looking initially benign, should be considered as a potential liver failure and therefore should deserve proper attention. Diagnosis in neonates is additionally complicated because of the factors which can mask liver disease, such as physiological neonatal jaundice, normally relatively enlarged liver and increased transaminases at that age. In everyday practice, in order to reveal the etiology, it is useful to classify and distinguish some clinical patterns which, together with a few routine, widely available laboratory tests (aminotransferases, prothrombine time, albumin, gammaGT, total and conjugated bilirubin, ammonia, alkaline phosphatase and glucose make the search for the cause much easier. These patterns are isolated hyperbilirubinemia, syndrome of cholestasis in early infancy, hepatocellular jaundice, Reye syndrome, portal cirrhosis and isolated hepatomegaly. Despite the fact that some diseases can present with more than one pattern (for instance, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as infantile cholestasis, but also as hepatocellular jaundice, and that in some disesases one pattern can evolve into another (for instance, Wilson disease from hepatocellular

  7. Radiorespirometric study of carbohydrate metabolism in childhood liver disease

    DaCosta, H.; Shreeve, W.W.; Merchant, S.

    1976-01-01

    The need for a suitable parameter to evaluate patients with chronic liver disease has been felt for some time, especially in order to judge the response to surgical shunts and the influence of certain drugs and diets on the liver. Since the liver is a major organ for carbohydrate metabolism, it was decided to analyze the in vivo oxidation of such substrates as glucose and galactose labeled with 14 C. Moderately advanced ''Indian childhood cirrhosis'' and idiopathic fatty hepatic infiltration were selected to represent diffuse chronic liver disease. Oral administration of 14 C-U-glucose or 14 C-1-galactose was followed by analyses of 14 CO 2 in breath by liquid scintillation counting. Conversion of 14 C-glucose to 14 CO 2 was accelerated by both diseases. On the other hand, oxidation of 14 C-galactose was slowed in fatty infiltration and was markedly subnormal in Indian childhood cirrhosis

  8. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  9. Fatty Liver Index and Lipid Accumulation Product Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Fatty Liver Disease

    Yuan-Lung Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatty liver index (FLI and lipid accumulation product (LAP are indexes originally designed to assess the risk of fatty liver and cardiovascular disease, respectively. Both indexes have been proven to be reliable markers of subsequent metabolic syndrome; however, their ability to predict metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease has not been clarified. Methods. We enrolled consecutive subjects who received health check-up services at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Fatty liver disease was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. The ability of the FLI and LAP to predict metabolic syndrome was assessed by analyzing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC curve. Results. Male sex was strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, and the LAP and FLI were better than other variables to predict metabolic syndrome among the 29,797 subjects. Both indexes were also better than other variables to detect metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease (AUROC: 0.871 and 0.879, resp., and the predictive power was greater among women. Conclusion. Metabolic syndrome increases the cardiovascular disease risk. The FLI and LAP could be used to recognize the syndrome in both subjects with and without fatty liver disease who require lifestyle modifications and counseling.

  10. Metabolic adaptations in models of fatty liver disease : Of mice and math

    Hijmans, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    The increasing incidence of overweight is accompanied by a plethora of medical symptoms together called the metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by persistent storage of lipids in the liver, is regarded as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome. An imbalance

  11. Relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: which clinical arguments?

    Rosmorduc, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome are growing epidemics associated with an increased risk for many types of cancer. In the liver, inflammatory and angiogenic changes due to insulin resistance and fatty liver disease are associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer. Regardless of underlying liver disease, cirrhosis remains the most important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) although are cases of HCC arising without cirrhosis raise the possibility of a direct carcinogenesis secondary to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Moreover, metabolic syndrome and its different features may also increase the risk of HCC in the setting of chronic liver diseases of other causes such as viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Taking into account all these data, it is necessary to better determine the risk of developing HCC in patients with metabolic syndrome to improve the screening guidelines and develop prophylactic treatments in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations between Zinc Deficiency and Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    Takashi Himoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element which has favorable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic effects. The liver mainly plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic Zn homeostasis. Therefore, the occurrence of chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or fatty liver, results in the impairment of Zn metabolism, and subsequently Zn deficiency. Zn deficiency causes plenty of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Inversely, metabolic abnormalities like hypoalbuminemia in patients with liver cirrhosis often result in Zn deficiency. Recent studies have revealed the putative mechanisms by which Zn deficiency evokes a variety of metabolic abnormalities in chronic liver disease. Zn supplementation has shown beneficial effects on such metabolic abnormalities in experimental models and actual patients with chronic liver disease. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities deriving from Zn deficiency and the favorable effects of Zn administration in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, we also highlight the interactions between Zn and other trace elements, vitamins, amino acids, or hormones in such patients.

  13. Prevalence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Iftikhar, R.; Kamran, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine frequency of Non Alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of medicine, CMH Okara, Jan 2013 to July 2013. Patients and Methods: We included 491 adult males, diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), presenting in outpatient department for routine review. MetS was diagnosed as per the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) proposed criteria of 2004. Detailed history and examination of each individual was done and data entered in pre designed performa. Brightness and posterior attenuation on ultrasound abdomen were considered indices for fatty liver disease in presence of elevated ALT, negative hepatitis serology and absence of alcohol intake. All the data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 491 participants with MetS, 222 (45.2%) had fatty liver disease. Mean BMI in patients with metabolic syndrome was 26.1 (± .89) and mean BMI in fatty liver patients was 27.3 (± 0.67). Out of total 5 components of Mets, patients with fatty liver disease had 3.24 (± 0.25) components, as compared to 2.1 (± 0.34) in whole of study group. Conclusion: A large number of patients with metabolic syndrome have fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is more frequent in patients who are overweight and those having multiple risk factors of metabolic syndrome. (author)

  14. The effectiveness of metformin in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    S A Butrova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of action of metformin is realized through activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, leading to a decrease hepatic glucose production as well as to decrease the synthesis of triglycerides and an increase in fat oxidation. Several studies have demonstrated the positive effect of the drug in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, manifested in reducing the activity of enzymes, reducing the size of the liver and insulin resistance. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of metformin in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The study found that the use Siofor 850 mg 2 times a day in conjunction with a reduced-calorie nutrition in patients with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease leads to a significant reduction in insulin resistance associated with decreased activity of transaminases, improvement of metabolic parameters. The therapy Siofor majority of patients (60% with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease achieved a clinically significant weight loss and improved body composition. Application Siofor improves lifestyle changes in obese patients with non-alcoholic liver disease dirovoy and metabolic disorders.

  15. Liver Diseases

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  16. Liver disease

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  17. The Role of Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Non‐Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Francesco Massimo Perla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the epidemic of obesity across the world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become one of the most prevalent chronic liver disorders in children and adolescents. NAFLD comprises a spectrum of fat-associated liver conditions that can result in end-stage liver disease and the need for liver transplantation. Simple steatosis, or fatty liver, occurs early in NAFLD and may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism of the liver injury in NAFLD is currently thought to be a “multiple-hit process” where the first “hit” is an increase in liver fat, followed by multiple additional factors that trigger the inflammatory activity. At the onset of disease, NAFLD is characterized by hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance. Liver fat accumulation is associated with increased lipotoxicity from high levels of free fatty acids, free cholesterol and other lipid metabolites. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction with oxidative stress and production of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated mechanisms, are activated. The present review focuses on the relationship between intra-cellular lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, as well as on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in NAFLD.

  18. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  19. Disturbed Vitamin A Metabolism in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Ali Saeed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is required for important physiological processes, including embryogenesis, vision, cell proliferation and differentiation, immune regulation, and glucose and lipid metabolism. Many of vitamin A’s functions are executed through retinoic acids that activate transcriptional networks controlled by retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors (RXRs.The liver plays a central role in vitamin A metabolism: (1 it produces bile supporting efficient intestinal absorption of fat-soluble nutrients like vitamin A; (2 it produces retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4 that distributes vitamin A, as retinol, to peripheral tissues; and (3 it harbors the largest body supply of vitamin A, mostly as retinyl esters, in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. In times of inadequate dietary intake, the liver maintains stable circulating retinol levels of approximately 2 μmol/L, sufficient to provide the body with this vitamin for months. Liver diseases, in particular those leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis, are associated with impaired vitamin A homeostasis and may lead to vitamin A deficiency. Liver injury triggers HSCs to transdifferentiate to myofibroblasts that produce excessive amounts of extracellular matrix, leading to fibrosis. HSCs lose the retinyl ester stores in this process, ultimately leading to vitamin A deficiency. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is a spectrum of conditions ranging from benign hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH; it may progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NASH is projected to be the main cause of liver failure in the near future. Retinoic acids are key regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue, but it is unknown whether impaired vitamin A homeostasis contributes to or suppresses the development of NAFLD. A genetic variant of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3-I148M is the most prominent

  20. Diagnosis and management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and related metabolic disorders: Consensus statement from the Study Group of Liver and Metabolism, Chinese Society of Endocrinology

    Gao, Xin; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in Western countries, affecting 20%–33% of the general population. Large population-based surveys in China indicate a prevalence of approximately 15%–30%. Worldwide, including in China, the prevalence of NAFLD has increased rapidly in parallel with regional trends of obesity, type2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In addition, NAFLD has contributed significantly to increased overall, as well as cardiovascular and liver-related, mortality in the general population. In view of rapid advances in research into NAFLD in recent years, this consensus statement provides a brief update on the progress in the field and suggests preferred approaches for the comprehensive management of NAFLD and its related metabolic diseases. PMID:23560695

  1. Metabolic syndrome and risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Mônica Rodrigues de Araújo Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most common liver disease nowadays, which is also the most frequent cause of elevated transaminases and cryptogenic cirrhosis. The greatest input of fatty acids into the liver and consequent increased beta-oxidation contribute to the formation of free radicals, release of inflammatory cytokines and varying degrees of hepatocytic aggression, whose histological expression may vary from steatosis (HS to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The differentiation of these forms is required by the potential risk of progression to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about the major risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome, focusing on underlying mechanisms and prevention. METHOD: PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analysis was performed to identify studies describing the link between risk factors for metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. A combination of descriptors was used, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic syndrome and risk factors. At the end, 96 clinical and experimental studies, cohorts, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of great impact and scientific relevance to the topic, were selected. RESULTS: The final analysis of all these data, pointed out the central obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension as the best risk factors related to NAFLD. However, other factors were highlighted, such as gender differences, ethnicity, genetic factors and the role of innate immunity system. How these additional factors may be involved in the installation, progression and disease prognosis is discussed. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome expands the prospects to 1 recognize patients with metabolic syndrome at high risk for NAFLD, 2 elucidate pathways common to other co-morbidities, 3

  2. [Adiponectin in patients with metabolic syndrome and diseases of the liver, bile ducts and pancreas].

    Vašura, Adam; Blaho, Martin; Dítě, Petr; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    Epidemiological data show that the metabolic syndrome can be diagnosed in up to 30 % of the population. Regarding 5 components of the metabolic syndrome, three of them, in case of positivity (visceral obesity, arterial hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, changes of HDL-cholesterol levels and type 2 diabetes mellitus), are pathogenic factors which are the most frequently related to cardiovascular diseases, but currently they are also the focus of interest for gastroenterologists. The relationship between non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, has been described. Less is known so far about the relation to the pancreas disease, particularly with respect to the status referred to as non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease. The hormone selectively produced by adipose tissue is adiponectin. This protein is studied as a possible biomarker in people with metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Besides that, there is a question studied whether adiponectin can also play a significant role in the pathogenesis of diseases associated with fat building up in parenchymatous organs. Finding a reliable biomarker for patients with metabolic syndrome or diseases of the liver, biliary system and pancreas in relation to metabolic syndrome, presents a big challenge. And adiponectin is one of the promising biomarkers.Key words: adiponectin - biliary disease - metabolic syndrome - pancreatic steatosis - steatohepatitis.

  3. The Metabolic Role of Gut Microbiota in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

    Marco Sanduzzi Zamparelli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which are common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD, has dramatically increased worldwide over the last decades. Although dietary habit is the main etiologic factor, there is an imperfect correlation between dietary habits and the development of metabolic disease. Recently, research has focused on the role of the microbiome in the development of these disorders. Indeed, gut microbiota is implicated in many metabolic functions and an altered gut microbiota is reported in metabolic disorders. Here we provide evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association.

  4. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  5. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of glutathione and methionine metabolism and its relevance for liver disease.

    Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M; Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Lamas, Santiago

    2016-11-01

    The discovery of the microRNA (miRNA) family of small RNAs as fundamental regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression has fostered research on their importance in every area of biology and clinical medicine. In the particular area of liver metabolism and disease, miRNAs are gaining increasing importance. By focusing on two fundamental hepatic biosynthetic pathways, glutathione and methionine, we review recent advances on the comprehension of the role of miRNAs in liver pathophysiology and more specifically of models of hepatic cholestasis/fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Liver Disease

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  7. Nucleic acid metabolism in human chronic liver disease by in vitro autoradiography. I. Altered RNA metabolism

    Yoshida, T [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-06-01

    Biopsy liver specimens from healthy control subjects (N=5) and patients with various liver diseases (N=43) were investigated by the vitro autoradiography. The Leevy technique of adding /sup 3/H-5-uridine (/sup 3/H-U) to the incubation medium was used. In healthy subjects labeling with /sup 3/H-U was observed mostly in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells and the frequency of /sup 3/H-U labeled cells was extremely high. Higher frequencies of labeled fibrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood vessel were found in acute hepatitis than in control subjects. In the active form of chronic hepatitis, significantly higher counts of labeled fibrocytes, ductular cells and lymphocytes were found. In patients with acute hepatitis or the inactive form of chronic hepatitis, only a few labeled lymphocytes were observed. Larger numbers of labeled fibrocytes were found in patients with chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, than in patients with the active form of chronic hepatitis. In cirrhotic livers, marked increases of labeled ductular cells, fibrocytes and bile duct cells were found. No significant labeling differences were observed in the hepatocytes of various liver diseases. In chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, a more significant decrease of labeled Kupffer cells was present than in the inactive form of chronic hepatitis. Labeled ductular cells and fibrocytes increased as the disease progressed from acute hepatitis to liver cirrhosis. The labeling index of rosettes cells was intermediate between the hepatocytes and ductular cells. The ratio of labeled parenchymal to non-parenchymal cells decreased proportionally from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis.

  8. Nor-Ursodeoxycholic Acid as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Cholestatic and Metabolic Liver Diseases.

    Halilbasic, Emina; Steinacher, Daniel; Trauner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) is a side-chain-shortened derivative of ursodeoxycholic acid with relative resistance to amidation, which enables its cholehepatic shunting. Based on its specific pharmacologic properties, norUDCA is a promising drug for a range of cholestatic liver and bile duct disorders. Recently, norUDCA has been successfully tested clinically in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as first application in patients. Moreover, hepatic enrichment of norUDCA facilitates direct therapeutic effects on both parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells, thereby counteracting cholestasis, steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, inhibiting hepatocellular proliferation, and promoting autophagy. This may open its therapeutic use to other non-cholestatic and metabolic liver diseases. This review article is a summary of a lecture given at the XXIV International Bile Acid Meeting (Falk Symposium 203) on "Bile Acids in Health and Disease" held in Düsseldorf, on June 17-18, 2016 and summarizes the recent progress of norUDCA as novel therapeutic approach in cholestatic and metabolic liver disorders with a specific focus on PSC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Severity of Fatty Liver Disease Relating to Metabolic Abnormalities Independently Predicts Coronary Calcification

    Lee, Ying-Hsiang; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Yeh, Hung-I.; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the metabolic disorders presented in liver. The relationship between severity of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerotic burden remains largely unknown. Methods and Materials. We analyzed subjects undergoing coronary calcium score evaluation by computed tomography (MDCT) and fatty liver assessment using abdominal ultrasonography. Framingham risk score (FRS) and metabolic risk score (MRS) were obtained in all subjects. A graded, semiquantitative score was established to quantify the severity of NAFLD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to depict the association between NAFLD and calcium score. Results. Of all, 342 participants (female: 22.5%, mean age: 48.7 ± 7.0 years) met the sufficient information rendering detailed analysis. The severity of NAFLD was positively associated with MRS (X 2 = 6.12, trend P < 0.001) and FRS (X 2 = 5.88, trend P < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment for clinical variables and life styles, the existence of moderate to severe NAFLD was independently associated with abnormal calcium score (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The severity of NAFLD correlated well with metabolic abnormality and was independently predict coronary calcification beyond clinical factors. Our data suggests that NAFLD based on ultrasonogram could positively reflect the burden of coronary calcification

  10. A switch in hepatic cortisol metabolism across the spectrum of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Ahmed, Adeeba; Rabbitt, Elizabeth; Brady, Theresa; Brown, Claire; Guest, Peter; Bujalska, Iwona J; Doig, Craig; Newsome, Philip N; Hubscher, Stefan; Elias, Elwyn; Adams, David H; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Stewart, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease ranging from reversible hepatic steatosis, to non alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. The potential role of glucocorticoids (GC) in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is highlighted in patients with GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, who develop central adiposity, insulin resistance and in 20% of cases, NAFLD. Although in most cases of NAFLD, circulating cortisol levels are normal, hepatic cortisol availability is controlled by enzymes that regenerate cortisol (F) from inactive cortisone (E) (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1), or inactivate cortisol through A-ring metabolism (5α- and 5β-reductase, 5αR and 5βR). In vitro studies defined 11β-HSD1 expression in normal and NASH liver samples. We then characterised hepatic cortisol metabolism in 16 patients with histologically proven NAFLD compared to 32 obese controls using gas chromatographic analysis of 24 hour urine collection and plasma cortisol generation profile following oral cortisone. In patients with steatosis 5αR activity was increased, with a decrease in hepatic 11β-HSD1 activity. Total cortisol metabolites were increased in this group consistent with increased GC production rate. In contrast, in patients with NASH, 11β-HSD1 activity was increased both in comparison to patients with steatosis, and controls. Endorsing these findings, 11β-HSD1 mRNA and immunostaining was markedly increased in NASH patients in peri septal hepatocytes and within CD68 positive macrophages within inflamed cirrhotic septa. Patients with hepatic steatosis have increased clearance and decreased hepatic regeneration of cortisol and we propose that this may represent a protective mechanism to decrease local GC availability to preserve hepatic metabolic phenotype. With progression to NASH, increased 11β-HSD1 activity and consequent cortisol regeneration may serve to

  11. A switch in hepatic cortisol metabolism across the spectrum of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Adeeba Ahmed

    Full Text Available Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease ranging from reversible hepatic steatosis, to non alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH and cirrhosis. The potential role of glucocorticoids (GC in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is highlighted in patients with GC excess, Cushing's syndrome, who develop central adiposity, insulin resistance and in 20% of cases, NAFLD. Although in most cases of NAFLD, circulating cortisol levels are normal, hepatic cortisol availability is controlled by enzymes that regenerate cortisol (F from inactive cortisone (E (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1, or inactivate cortisol through A-ring metabolism (5α- and 5β-reductase, 5αR and 5βR.In vitro studies defined 11β-HSD1 expression in normal and NASH liver samples. We then characterised hepatic cortisol metabolism in 16 patients with histologically proven NAFLD compared to 32 obese controls using gas chromatographic analysis of 24 hour urine collection and plasma cortisol generation profile following oral cortisone.In patients with steatosis 5αR activity was increased, with a decrease in hepatic 11β-HSD1 activity. Total cortisol metabolites were increased in this group consistent with increased GC production rate. In contrast, in patients with NASH, 11β-HSD1 activity was increased both in comparison to patients with steatosis, and controls. Endorsing these findings, 11β-HSD1 mRNA and immunostaining was markedly increased in NASH patients in peri septal hepatocytes and within CD68 positive macrophages within inflamed cirrhotic septa.Patients with hepatic steatosis have increased clearance and decreased hepatic regeneration of cortisol and we propose that this may represent a protective mechanism to decrease local GC availability to preserve hepatic metabolic phenotype. With progression to NASH, increased 11β-HSD1 activity and consequent cortisol regeneration may

  12. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters in hepatocytes, and these complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as VLDL particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source of endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue to release nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in the liver though mitochondrial β oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver metabolic processes are tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal systems. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis, but suppresses gluconeogenesis; glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze the rate-limiting steps of liver metabolic processes, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). PMID:24692138

  13. Alteration of liver parameters in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with metabolic síndrome

    Alicia Sahuquillo Martínez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is growing due to several reasons: high prevalence of the disease in the Western World, its capability to progress towards more aggressive histological forms and its association with diseases that increase cardiovascular risk. Objective: To analyze the alteration of liver parameters in NAFLD in patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods: A transverse, descriptive study of 100 patients with two or more cardiovascular risk factors was conducted. All patients signed informed consent. Patients selected were among those attending our Medical Office of Primary Attention and who had very little or no alcoholic consumption. A complete battery of analysis was performed including total abdominal ultrasound. Steatosis was evaluated and, if determined positive, patients were stratified in three degrees. The following determinations were collected: sex, personal and familial history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, age, weight, BMI, present pharmacological treatment, analytical parameters, blood pressure and abdominal perimeter. Results: 100 patients were included in the study, 56 (56% women and 44 (44% men, with an average age of 61,84 + 9,5 years 23% of all patients did not have NAFLD; 29% had mild NAFLD, 29% had moderate NAFLD and 19% had severe NAFLD. 82% of men presented NAFLD. 29% of women did not nave NAFLD. 22% were overweight and 38% were obese. Blood pressure was altered in 22% of men and 18% of women. 60% had altered fasting blood glucose. 36% had hypertriglyceridemia, 41% hypercholesterolemia with 65% high LDL cholesterol and 16% of low HDL cholesterol. 83% of patients had two or more criteria of metabolic syndrome. Average transaminases were: ALT 24.98 u/i; AST 32.19 u/i; GGT 55,65 u/i; ALT/AST ratio: 0.77. Lactate dehydrogenase 255.30 u/L. Alkaline phosphatase 82.80 u/L and bilirubin 0.78 mg/dL Conclusions: We did not find correlation between liver steatosis and alteration

  14. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-07-26

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease.

  15. Beneficial mechanisms of aerobic exercise on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Guo, Rui; Liong, Emily C; So, Kwok Fai; Fung, Man-Lung; Tipoe, George L

    2015-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to any fatty liver disease that is not due to excessive use of alcohol. NAFLD probably results from abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. Aerobic exercise is shown to improve NAFLD. This review aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on NAFLD. We searched articles in English on the role of aerobic exercise in NAFLD therapy in PubMed. The mechanisms of chronic aerobic exercise in regulating the outcome of NAFLD include: (i) reducing intrahepatic fat content by down-regulating sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and up-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression levels; (ii) decreasing hepatic oxidative stress through modulating the reactive oxygen species, and enhancing antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase; (iii) ameliorating hepatic inflammation via the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta; (iv) attenuating mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by reducing cytochrome C released from the mitochondria to the cytosol; and (v) inducing hepato-protective autophagy. Aerobic exercise, via different mechanisms, significantly decreases the fat content of the liver and improves the outcomes of patients with NAFLD.

  16. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome in Hypopituitary Patients

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Williamson-Baddorf, Sarah; Waters, Bradford; Wan, Jim Y; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased incidence of cardiovascular mortality and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been reported in hypopituitarism; but previous studies did not correct for obesity in these patients. Therefore it remained unclear if endocrine deficiency in hypopituitarism is associated with metabolic consequences independent of obesity. This study was designed to determine the burden of cardiovascular disease and NAFLD in hypopituitarism. Methods We performed a retrospective case-control analysis of hypopituitary patients at Veterans Affair Medical center, Memphis; from January 1997- June 2007. After matching for age, gender, obesity and race, relevant data were abstracted from the subjects' records to determine the presence of hypopituitarism, cardiovascular risk factors and fatty liver disease. Cases and controls were characterized by descriptive statistics, and compared using Chi-square and Student's t- tests. Results Hypopituitary patients exhibited higher prevalence of hypertension- 88% vs 78% (P0.3). Hypopituitary patients had higher elevations in serum aminotransferase levels and hyperbilirubinemia-24% vs 11% (Phypopituitarism. Although hypopituitary patients had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than controls, they were not disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. PMID:19745609

  17. Etiology, clinical spectrum and outcome of metabolic liver diseases in children

    Roy, A.; Samanta, T.; Purkait, R.; Mukherji, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the etiology, clinical spectrum and outcome of metabolic liver diseases (MLD) in children admitted in a tertiary care hospital of Eastern India. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Liver Clinic and Paediatrics Inpatient Department of Nilratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, Eastern India, from April 2009 to March 2011. Methodology: All children aged 0 - 12 years having characteristic clinical features along with diagnostic hallmark of any MLDs were included in this study and data were collected on a pre-designed proforma. After appropriate management and discharge, all patients were followed-up for next 6 months. Results: Fifty one children with mean age 4.34 +- 3.78 years (range 2 days +- 12 years), male: female ratio 1.55:1, were studied. The etiologies were Wilson's disease (33.33%, n = 17); glycogen storage disorder (23.53%, n = 12); galactosemia (19.61%, n = 10); non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (11.76%, n = 6); Gaucher disease (5.88%, n = 3); mucopolysaccharidoses (3.92%, n = 2) and familial hyperlipoproteinemia type-I (1.96%, n = 1). Jaundice (n = 24) and hepatomegaly (n = 47), was the commonest symptom and sign respectively. Of the 17 non-responders, most were Wilson's disease (n = 7) cases. There was statistical difference in outcome with respect to INR > 1.3 at diagnosis (p = 0.026). Conclusion: High index of suspicion, early detection and screening, simple dietary modification and cost effective drugs along with good compliance are sufficient to treat and even prevent evolution of most causes of the MLDs. (author)

  18. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Prevalence, Influence on Age and Sex, and Relationship with Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance

    Hui-Yun Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Fatty liver can be considered as the hepatic consequence of metabolic syndrome, specifically IR. There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and fatty liver among the elderly population. Metabolic disorders are closely related to fatty liver; moreover, fatty liver appears to be a good predictor for the clustering of risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

  19. An observational study on the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome with gall stone disease requiring cholecystectomy.

    Ahmed, Farah; Baloch, Qamaruddin; Memon, Zahid Ali; Ali, Iqra

    2017-05-01

    Recognition of Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome in patients with gallstones undergoing laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy, along with it we will also study the life style of patients with gall stones. Patients with gallstones have associated NAFLD, with concurrent metabolic syndrome and these ailments share similar factors for example obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes mellitus. Factors like body mass index, gender, raised lipid levels, use of contraceptives and alcohol and having diabetes, physical inactiveness, multiparous women, water with excessive iron content, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD are accountable factors for gallstones formation. This was a case series done at Surgical Unit 1 of Civil Hospital Karachi. Selective samples of 88 patients were included. Duration was 3 months. We included both sexes with ultrasound proof of gall stone irrespective of cholecystitis. Excluded patients with history of seropositive viral hepatitis, autoimmune and wilson's disease. As these conditions can act as a confounder to our variables. Nafld was present in 62.5%(n = 55) while 28.4% (n = 25) had metabolic syndrome. 26.94% had BMI less than 18, 32.12 had BMI between 18 and 25 and majority had BMI greater than 25 i.e in 40.93%. Of all 46.6% had a family history of cholelithiasis. Gallstone patients with NAFLD reported about their first degree relative being suffering from cholelithiasis at a significant p-value of 0.034 while this was not significant in cases of metabolic syndrome and the p -value was 0.190. We found association of metabolic syndrome with gallstones and NAFLD. Non alcoholic fatty liver was highly prevalent in our study subjects. Huge percentage of first degree relatives of gall stone patients had gallstones and this relation was more pronounced patients who had associated NAFLD.

  20. Energy metabolism in the liver.

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic function is controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is converted into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is subsequently oxidized in the mitochondria to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and/or cholesterol esters in hepatocytes. These complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as very low-density lipoprotein particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source for endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue, resulting in release of nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in hepatic mitochondria though β-oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver energy metabolism is tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal signals. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis but suppresses gluconeogenesis, and glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze key steps of metabolic pathways, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  1. Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficient pigs are a novel large animal model of metabolic liver disease

    Raymond D. Hickey

    2014-07-01

    FAH-deficiency produced a lethal defect in utero that was corrected by administration of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC throughout pregnancy. Animals on NTBC were phenotypically normal at birth; however, the animals were euthanized approximately four weeks after withdrawal of NTBC due to clinical decline and physical examination findings of severe liver injury and encephalopathy consistent with acute liver failure. Biochemical and histological analyses, characterized by diffuse and severe hepatocellular damage, confirmed the diagnosis of severe liver injury. FAH−/− pigs provide the first genetically engineered large animal model of a metabolic liver disorder. Future applications of FAH−/− pigs include discovery research as a large animal model of HT1 and spontaneous acute liver failure, and preclinical testing of the efficacy of liver cell therapies, including transplantation of hepatocytes, liver stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes.

  2. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size,...

  3. Progression of Liver Disease

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  4. Prevalence of metabolic risk factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Ashraf, N.; Sarfraz, T.; Mumtaz, Z.; Rizwan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factors leading to metabolic syndrome among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian. Study was carried out over a period of six months from Jan 2015 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 110 patients were included in this study. Past history was taken to rule out alcohol intake, viral and drug induced etiology, to determine the presence of co-morbidities like obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia. Physical examination was carried to determine the arterial blood pressure and to determine anthropometric data that is weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity by measuring waist circumference. Results: Mean age of the patients was 49.95 +- 8.86 years. There were 72 male patients (65.5%) while 38 (34.5%) patients were female. Different metabolic factors were central obesity in 82 patients (74.5%), raised high density lipoprotein (HDL) in 19 patients (17.3%), raised cholesterol in 87 patients (79.1%), raised blood pressure in 65 patients (59.1%) and raised fasting plasma glucose in 82 patients (74.5%). Mean BMI was 26.31 kg/m2 +- 2.68, mean waist circumference was 109.82 cm +- 18.41, mean cholesterol was 237.50 +- 48.47mg/dl, mean systolic blood pressure was 148.88mmHg +- 22.10, mean diastolic blood pressure was 90.41mmHg +- 12.25 and mean fasting plasma glucose was 113.28mg/dl +- 22.80. Stratification with regard to age was carried out. Conclusion: A considerable number of patients with NAFLD had metabolic syndrome. There was a close correlation between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome. (author)

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ultrasonography screening for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in metabolic syndrome patients

    Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Supakankunti, Siripen; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Apisarnthanarak, Piyaporn; Charoensak, Aphinya; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can be diagnosed early by noninvasive ultrasonography; however, the cost-effectiveness of ultrasonography screening with intensive weight reduction program in metabolic syndrome patients is not clear. This study aims to estimate economic and clinical outcomes of ultrasonography in Thailand. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis used decision tree and Markov models to estimate lifetime costs and health benefits from societal perspective, based on a cohort of 509 metabolic syndrome patients in Thailand. Data were obtained from published literatures and Thai database. Results were reported as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in 2014 US dollars (USD) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained with discount rate of 3%. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the influence of parameter uncertainty on the results. Results: The ICER of ultrasonography screening of 50-year-old metabolic syndrome patients with intensive weight reduction program was 958 USD/QALY gained when compared with no screening. The probability of being cost-effective was 67% using willingness-to-pay threshold in Thailand (4848 USD/QALY gained). Screening before 45 years was cost saving while screening at 45 to 64 years was cost-effective. Conclusions: For patients with metabolic syndromes, ultrasonography screening for NAFLD with intensive weight reduction program is a cost-effective program in Thailand. Study can be used as part of evidence-informed decision making. Translational Impacts: Findings could contribute to changes of NAFLD diagnosis practice in settings where economic evidence is used as part of decision-making process. Furthermore, study design, model structure, and input parameters could also be used for future research addressing similar questions. PMID:28445256

  6. A nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cirrhosis model in gerbil : the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis

    Li, Wei; Guan, Zheng; Brisset, Jean C.; Shi, Qiaojuan; Lou, Qi; Ma, Yue; Suriguga, Su; Ying, Huazhong; Sa, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhenwen; Quax, Wim J.; Chu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) usually takes decades to develop into cirrhosis, which limits the longitudinal study of NAFLD. This work aims at developing a NAFLD-caused cirrhosis model in gerbil and examining the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis. We fed

  7. Glycogen storage disease type Ia in canines: a model for human metabolic and genetic liver disease.

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y; Byrne, Barry J; Correia, Catherine E; Mah, Cathryn S; Weinstein, David A; Conlon, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including "lactic acidosis", larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  8. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  9. Altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with liver disease and minimal encephalopathy

    Lockwood, A.H.; Yap, E.W.; Rhoades, H.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    We measured CBF and the CMRglc in normal controls and in patients with severe liver disease and evidence for minimal hepatic encephalopathy using positron emission tomography. Regions were defined in frontal, temporal, parietal, and visual cortex; the thalamus; the caudate; the cerebellum; and the white matter along with a whole-slice value obtained at the level of the thalamus. There was no difference in whole-slice CBF and CMRglc values. Individual regional values were normalized to the whole-slice value and subjected to a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. When normalized CBF and CMRglc values for regions were compared between groups, significant differences were demonstrated (F = 5.650, p = 0.00014 and F = 4.58, p = 0.0073, respectively). These pattern differences were due to higher CBF and CMRglc in the cerebellum, thalamus, and caudate in patients and lower values in the cortex. Standardized coefficients extracted from a discriminant function analysis permitted correct group assignment for 95.5% of the CBF studies and for 92.9% of the CMRglc studies. The similarity of the altered pattern of cerebral metabolism and flow in our patients to that seen in rats subjected to portacaval shunts or ammonia infusions suggests that this toxin may alter flow and metabolism and that this, in turn, causes the clinical expression of encephalopathy

  10. Effect of specific amino acids on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Jegatheesan, Prasanthi; Beutheu, Stéphanie; Ventura, Gabrielle; Sarfati, Gilles; Nubret, Esther; Kapel, Nathalie; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Bergheim, Ina; Cynober, Luc; De-Bandt, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Fructose diets have been shown to induce insulin resistance and to alter liver metabolism and gut barrier function, ultimately leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Citrulline, Glutamine and Arginine may improve insulin sensitivity and have beneficial effects on gut trophicity. Our aim was to evaluate their effects on liver and gut functions in a rat model of fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58) received a 4-week fructose (60%) diet or standard chow with or without Citrulline (0.15 g/d) or an isomolar amount of Arginine or Glutamine. All diets were made isonitrogenous by addition of non-essential amino acids. At week 4, nutritional and metabolic status (plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and amino acids, net intestinal absorption) was determined; steatosis (hepatic triglycerides content, histological examination) and hepatic function (plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin) were assessed; and gut barrier integrity (myeloperoxidase activity, portal endotoxemia, tight junction protein expression and localization) and intestinal and hepatic inflammation were evaluated. We also assessed diets effects on caecal microbiota. In these experimental isonitrogenous fructose diet conditions, fructose led to steatosis with dyslipidemia but without altering glucose homeostasis, liver function or gut permeability. Fructose significantly decreased Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and tended to increase endotoxemia. Arginine and Glutamine supplements were ineffective but Citrulline supplementation prevented hypertriglyceridemia and attenuated liver fat accumulation. While nitrogen supply alone can attenuate fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Citrulline appears to act directly on hepatic lipid metabolism by partially preventing hypertriglyceridemia and steatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition

  11. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Childhood: Endocrine-Metabolic “Mal-Programming”

    Manti, Sara; Romano, Claudio; Chirico, Valeria; Filippelli, Martina; Cuppari, Caterina; Loddo, Italia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Arrigo, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the major chronic liver disease in the pediatric population. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of abnormalities (inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis), ranging from accumulation of fat (also known as steatosis) towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The development of NAFLD in children is significantly increased. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for the major studies published from 1998 to today. The databases searched were: PubMed, EMBASE, Orphanet, Midline and Cochrane Library. We used the key words: "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fatty liver". Results: NAFLD/NASH is probably promoted by “multiple parallel hits”: environmental and genetic factors, systemic immunological disorders (oxidative stress, persistent-low grade of inflammation) as well as obesity and metabolic alterations (insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome). However its exact cause still underdiagnosed and unknown. Conclusions: Pediatric NAFLD/NASH is emerging problem. Longitudinal follow-up studies, unfortunately still insufficient, are needed to better understand the natural history and outcome of NAFLD in children. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, environmental, genetic and metabolic factors of disease. The review also highlights the importance of studying the underlying mechanisms of pediatric NAFLD and the need for complete and personalized approach in the management of NAFLD/NASH. PMID:24829591

  12. Serum aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations at the amino acid and Krebs cycle level.

    Sookoian, Silvia; Castaño, Gustavo O; Scian, Romina; Fernández Gianotti, Tomas; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Gaj, Graciela; San Martino, Julio; Sevic, Ina; Flichman, Diego; Pirola, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Extensive epidemiologic studies have shown that cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with serum concentrations of liver enzymes; however, fundamental characteristics of this relation are currently unknown. We aimed to explore the role of liver aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and MetS. Liver gene- and protein-expression changes of aminotransferases, including their corresponding isoforms, were evaluated in a case-control study of patients with NAFLD (n = 42), which was proven through a biopsy (control subjects: n = 10). We also carried out a serum targeted metabolite profiling to the glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and Krebs cycle (n = 48) and an exploration by the next-generation sequencing of aminotransferase genes (n = 96). An in vitro study to provide a biological explanation of changes in the transcriptional level and enzymatic activity of aminotransferases was included. Fatty liver was associated with a deregulated liver expression of aminotransferases, which was unrelated to the disease severity. Metabolite profiling showed that serum aminotransferase concentrations are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations, particularly at the amino acid metabolism and Krebs cycle level. A significant and positive association between systolic hypertension and liver expression levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2) messenger RNA (Spearman R = 0.42, P = 0.03) was observed. The rs6993 located in the 3' untranslated region of the GOT2 locus was significantly associated with features of the MetS, including arterial hypertension [P = 0.028; OR: 2.285 (95% CI: 1.024, 5.09); adjusted by NAFLD severity] and plasma lipid concentrations. In the context of an abnormal hepatic triglyceride accumulation, circulating aminotransferases rise as a consequence of the need for increased reactions of transamination to cope with the liver metabolic derangement that is associated with greater gluconeogenesis and

  13. Review article: coffee consumption, the metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Yesil, A; Yilmaz, Y

    2013-11-01

    Coffee consumption may modulate the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To review the experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies investigating the association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS and NAFLD. A literature search was conducted with the aim of finding original experimental, epidemiological and clinical articles on the association between coffee consumption, MetS and NAFLD. The following databases were used: PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Science Direct. We included articles written in English and published up to July 2013. Three experimental animal studies investigated the effects of coffee in the MetS, whereas five examined whether experimental coffee intake may modulate the risk of fatty liver infiltration. All of the animal studies showed a protective effect of coffee towards the development of MetS and NAFLD. Moreover, we identified eleven epidemiological and clinical studies that met the inclusion criteria. Of them, six were carried out on the risk of the MetS and five on the risk of NAFLD. Four of the six studies reported an inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of MetS. The two studies showing negative results were from the same study cohort consisting of young persons with a low prevalence of the MetS. All of the epidemiological and clinical studies on NAFLD reported a protective effect of coffee intake. Coffee intake can reduce the risk of NAFLD. Whether this effect may be mediated by certain components of the MetS deserves further investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of probiotic yogurt consumption on metabolic factors in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Nabavi, S; Rafraf, M; Somi, M H; Homayouni-Rad, A; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotic yogurt consumption on some metabolic factors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. This double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 72 patients with NAFLD (33 males and 39 females) aged 23 to 63 yr. Subjects in the intervention group (n=36) consumed 300 g/d of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and those in the control group (n=36) consumed 300 g/d of conventional yogurt for 8 wk. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements, and dietary records (24h/d for 3 d) were collected at baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt consumption resulted in reductions of 4.67, 5.42, 4.1, and 6.92% in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively, compared with control group. No significant changes were observed in levels of serum glucose, triglycerides, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in either group. Probiotic yogurt consumption improved hepatic enzymes, serum total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in studied subjects and might be useful in management of NAFLD risk factors. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fatty Liver Disease

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  16. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Lake, A.D.; Novák, Petr; Shipkova, P.; Aranibar, N.; Robertson, D.G.; Reily, M.D.; Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Vaillancourt, R.R.; Cherrington, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2015), s. 603-615 ISSN 0939-4451 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Branched chain amino acid * nonalcoholic fatty liver disease * nonalcoholic steatohepatitis * metabolomics and transcriptomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2015

  17. Bile Acid Metabolism in Liver Pathobiology

    Chiang, John Y. L.; Ferrell, Jessica M.

    2018-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary cholesterol secretion to maintain bile acid homeostasis, which is essential for protecting liver and other tissues and cells from cholesterol and bile acid toxicity. Bile acid metabolism is tightly regulated by bile acid synthesis in the liver and bile acid biotransformation in the intestine. Bile acids are endogenous ligands that activate a complex network of nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor and membrane G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 to regulate hepatic lipid and glucose metabolic homeostasis and energy metabolism. The gut-to-liver axis plays a critical role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, bile acid pool size, and bile acid composition. Bile acids control gut bacteria overgrowth, and gut bacteria metabolize bile acids to regulate host metabolism. Alteration of bile acid metabolism by high-fat diets, sleep disruption, alcohol, and drugs reshapes gut microbiome and causes dysbiosis, obesity, and metabolic disorders. Gender differences in bile acid metabolism, FXR signaling, and gut microbiota have been linked to higher prevalence of fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in males. Alteration of bile acid homeostasis contributes to cholestatic liver diseases, inflammatory diseases in the digestive system, obesity, and diabetes. Bile acid-activated receptors are potential therapeutic targets for developing drugs to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:29325602

  18. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency and High Fructose Intake in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome, Brain Metabolic Abnormalities, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS. Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health.

  19. Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Enriched Phosphatidylcholine Attenuated Hepatic Steatosis Through Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism in Rats with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Liu, Yanjun; Shi, Di; Tian, Yingying; Liu, Yuntao; Zhan, Qiping; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world. Disturbed cholesterol metabolism plays a crucial role in the development of NAFLD. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of EPA-PC extracted from sea cucumber on liver steatosis and cholesterol metabolism in NAFLD. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups (normal control group, model group, lovastatin group, low- and high-dose EPA groups, and low- and high-dose EPA-PC groups). Model rats were established by administering a diet containing 1% orotic acid. To determine the possible cholesterol metabolism promoting mechanism of EPA-PC, we analyzed the transcription of key genes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. EPA-PC dramatically alleviated hepatic lipid accumulation, reduced the serum TC concentration, and elevated HDLC levels in NAFLD rats. Fecal neutral cholesterol excretion was also promoted by EPA-PC administration. Additionally, EPA-PC decreased the mRNA expression of hydroxymethyl glutaric acid acyl (HMGR) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A), and increased the transcription of sterol carrying protein 2 (SCP2). Moreover, EPA-PC stimulated the transcription of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α (PPARα) and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) as well as its modulators, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CAMKK). Based on the results, the promoting effects of EPA-PC on NAFLD may be partly associated with the suppression of cholesterol synthesis via HMGR inhibition and the enhancement of fecal cholesterol excretion through increased SCP2 transcription. The underlying mechanism may involve stimulation of PPARα and AMPK.

  20. An observational study on the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome with gall stone disease requiring cholecystectomy

    Farah Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: We found association of metabolic syndrome with gallstones and NAFLD. Non alcoholic fatty liver was highly prevalent in our study subjects. Huge percentage of first degree relatives of gall stone patients had gallstones and this relation was more pronounced patients who had associated NAFLD.

  1. Alcohol Metabolizing Gene Polymorphisms as Genetic Biomarkers of Alcoholic Liver Disease Susceptibility and Severity: A Northeast India Patient Based Study

    Tarun K. Basumatary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with genetic predisposition to Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD, but there is very limited data on both molecular and genetic aspects of ALD among the Northeast Indian (NEI population. Aim and Objectives: Screening the role of genetic alterations in alcohol metabolizing pathway genes in the pathogenesis of ALD which is prevalent in the ethnically NEI population. Material and Methods: Whole blood was collected from ALD patients (n=150 [alcoholic chronic liver disease (CLD, n=110 and alcoholic cirrhosis (Cirr/cirrhosis, n=40], Alcoholic Without Liver Disease (AWLD, n=93 and healthy controls (HC/controls, n=274 with informed consents along with Fibroscan based liver stiffness measurement (LSM score and clinical data. Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2 and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 genotyping was studied by Polymerase Chain Reaction with Confronting Two Pair Primers (PCR-CTPP; and Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3 by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Results:ADH2*2 genotype was predominant and associated with increased risk of cirrhosis compared to healthy controls, AWLD and CLD cases; and CLD compared to AWLD cases. ADH3*1 genotype was associated with significantly increased risk of cirrhosis compared to healthy controls, AWLD and CLD cases (p<0.001. Variant ALDH2 genotype was rare and analysis of the joint effects of genotypes showed that higher variant genotype resulted increased risk of CLD and cirrhosis compared to AWLD, and cirrhosis compared to CLD; thereby confirming the association of the polymorphisms in key alcohol metabolizing genes in the predisposition to ALD susceptibility and severity. Presence of variant ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 genotypes correlated with higher LSM scores in ALD. Conclusion: Alterations in the alcohol metabolizing genes are critically associated with ALD susceptibility and severity.

  2. Relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the elderly agricultural and fishing population of Taiwan.

    Shen, Hsi-Che; Zhao, Zi-Hao; Hu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yu-Fen; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the elderly agricultural and fishing population of Taipei, Taiwan. The study participants comprised 6,511 (3,971 male and 2,540 female) healthy elderly subjects voluntarily attending a teaching hospital for a physical check-up in 2010. Blood samples and real-time ultrasound-proven fatty liver sonography results were collected. The prevalence of NAFLD in this elderly population was 27.2%, including mild NAFLD (16.0%), moderate NAFLD (10.3%), and severe NAFLD (0.9%). The prevalence of moderate or severe NAFLD for metabolic syndrome proved to be substantially greater (P<0.0001, χ(2) test) for one or two metabolic factors. Using multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, sex, metabolic syndrome, and higher body mass index had a statistically significant association with mild NAFLD. Age, sex, metabolic syndrome, higher body mass index, and higher alanine aminotransferase were significantly related to moderate NAFLD. In addition, higher body mass index, higher uric acid, and higher alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly related to severe NAFLD. The sensitivity and specificity of body mass index and waist circumference as markers of NAFLD were estimated to be 81% and 84%, respectively, and 77% and 69%, respectively. The prevalence of mild or moderate NAFLD was related to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Higher body mass index was also related to severe NAFLD but not to metabolic syndrome. Targeting this population for control of obesity and improved metabolic function is important.

  3. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  4. Effect of vitamin E in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with metabolic syndrome: A propensity score-matched cohort study

    Gi Hyun Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsVitamin E improves the biochemical profiles and liver histology in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but the role of vitamin E is not clearly defined in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD which includes both simple steatosis and steatohepatitis. Co-morbid metabolic syndrome increases the probability of steatohepatitis in NAFLD. In this study, we aimed to determine the short-term effects of vitamin E and off-treatment durability of response in a propensity-score matched cohort of NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome.MethodsA retrospective cohort was constructed by retrieving 526 consecutive NAFLD patients from the electronic medical record data warehouse of a tertiary referral hospital in South Korea. Among them, 335 patients (63.7% had metabolic syndrome and were eligible for vitamin E therapy. In order to assess the effect of vitamin E, propensity score matching was used by matching covariates between control patients (n=250 and patients who received vitamin E (n=85.ResultsThe PS-matched vitamin E group (n=58 and control group (n=58 exhibited similar baseline metabolic profiles. After 6 months of vitamin E therapy, the mean ALT levels decreased significantly compared to PS-matched control (P<0.01. The changes in metabolic profiles (body weight, lipid and glucose levels did not differ between control and vitamin E groups during the study period.ConclusionsShort-term vitamin E treatment significantly reduces ALT levels in NAFLD patients with metabolic syndrome, but metabolic profiles are not affected by vitamin E.

  5. Peroxisomal β-oxidation regulates whole body metabolism, inflammatory vigor, and pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Giles, Daniel A.; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; Sheridan, Rachel; Karns, Rebekah; Cappelletti, Monica; Lampe, Kristin; Mukherjee, Rajib; Sina, Christian; Sallese, Anthony; Bridges, James P.; Hogan, Simon P.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Hoebe, Kasper

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a metabolic predisposition for development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), represents a disease spectrum ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis to cirrhosis. Acox1, a rate-limiting enzyme in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, regulates metabolism, spontaneous hepatic steatosis, and hepatocellular damage over time. However, it is unknown whether Acox1 modulates inflammation relevant to NAFLD pathogenesis or if Acox1-associated metabolic and inflammatory derangements uncover and accelerate potential for NAFLD progression. Here, we show that mice with a point mutation in Acox1 (Acox1Lampe1) exhibited altered cellular metabolism, modified T cell polarization, and exacerbated immune cell inflammatory potential. Further, in context of a brief obesogenic diet stress, NAFLD progression associated with Acox1 mutation resulted in significantly accelerated and exacerbated hepatocellular damage via induction of profound histological changes in hepatocytes, hepatic inflammation, and robust upregulation of gene expression associated with HCC development. Collectively, these data demonstrate that β-oxidation links metabolism and immune responsiveness and that a better understanding of peroxisomal β-oxidation may allow for discovery of mechanisms central for NAFLD progression. PMID:29563328

  6. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepat...

  7. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, p...

  8. Additive Effect of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Metabolic Syndrome-Related Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Patients

    Maria Perticone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is characterized by an increased risk of incident diabetes and cardiovascular (CV events, identifying insulin resistance (IR and endothelial dysfunction as key elements. Moreover, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is bidirectionally linked with MS as a consequence of metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities. We addressed the question if the evolution in NAFLD might worsen endothelium-dependent vasodilating response in MS hypertensives. We recruited 272 Caucasian newly-diagnosed never-treated hypertensive outpatients divided into three groups according to the presence/absence of MS alone or in combination with NAFLD. MS and NAFLD were defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII and non-invasive fatty liver index, respectively. We determined IR by using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA index. Vascular function, as forearm blood flow (FBF, was determined through strain-gauge plethysmography after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside. MS+NAFLD+ group showed worse metabolic, inflammatory and vascular profiles compared with MS−NAFLD− and MS+NAFLD−. HOMA resulted in being the strongest predictor of FBF both in the MS+NAFLD− and in the MS+NAFLD+ groups, accounting for 20.5% and 33.2% of its variation, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MS+NAFLD+ hypertensives show a worse endothelium-dependent vasodilation compared with MS+NAFLD−, allowing for consideration of NAFLD as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction in hypertensives.

  9. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome in Brazilian middle-aged and older adults

    Mauro Karnikowski

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a complex clinicopathological entity characterized by diffuse or focal fat accumulation in the hepatic parenchyma of patients who deny abusive alcohol consumption. This study aimed to assess idiopathic NAFLD in community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults living in the Brazilian Federal District. Associations between NAFLD and components of metabolic syndrome and the whole syndrome were investigated. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: This was a cross-sectional study on 139 subjects aged 55 years or older. METHODS: NAFLD was diagnosed by means of clinical procedures, to exclude subjects with signs of liver disorders, abusive alcohol consumption and influence from hepatotoxic drugs. Phenotypes were graded based on ultrasound examination. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the NCEP ATP III criteria. Laboratory tests were performed to assist clinical examinations and define the syndrome. RESULTS NAFLD was present in 35.2% of the subjects. Taken together, the two most intense phenotypes correlated with increased serum fasting glucose, triglyceride and VLDL cholesterol levels. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 25.9% of the sample. In addition to associating NAFLD with specific traits of metabolic syndrome, non-parametric analysis confirmed the existence of a relationship (p < 0.05 between the steatotic manifestation and the syndromic condition. CONCLUSION: Compared with the literature, this study reveals greater frequency of idiopathic NAFLD among Brazilian middle-aged and older adults than is described elsewhere. The findings also suggest that impaired glycemic metabolism coupled with increased fat delivery and/or sustained endogenous biosynthesis is the most likely physiopathogenic mechanisms underlying the onset of NAFLD in this population.

  10. The Dual Role of Nrf2 in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Regulation of Antioxidant Defenses and Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    Sílvia S. Chambel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a progressive liver disease with ever-growing incidence in the industrialized world. It starts with the simple accumulation of lipids in the hepatocyte and can progress to the more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, which is associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. There is increasing awareness that reactive oxygen species and electrophiles are implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a positive regulator of the expression of a battery of genes involved in the protection against oxidative/electrophilic stress. In rodents, Nrf2 is also known to participate in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, as a negative regulator of genes that promote hepatosteatosis. We review relevant evidence in the literature that these two mechanisms may contribute to the protective role of Nrf2 in the development of hepatic steatosis and in the progression to steatohepatitis, particularly in young animals. We propose that age may be a key to explain contradictory findings in the literature. In summary, Nrf2 mediates the crosstalk between lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense mechanisms in experimental models of NAFLD, and the nutritional or pharmacological induction of Nrf2 represents a promising potential new strategy for its prevention and treatment.

  11. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  12. Muscle metabolism and whole blood amino acid profile in patients with liver disease.

    Dam, Gitte; Sørensen, Michael; Buhl, Mads; Sandahl, Thomas D; Møller, Niels; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in liver cirrhosis to promote protein synthesis, support ammonia detoxification, and treat hepatic encephalopathy. Cirrhosis leads to subnormal BCAA plasma concentrations and studies indicate that levels are decreased due to their role in muscle ammonia removal. Muscle contribution has not been fully elucidated. We studied muscle amino acid metabolism in six healthy subjects, 13 cirrhosis patients and six patients with an episode of alcoholic hepatitis. Subjects had catheters inserted into the femoral artery and vein to obtain arterial (A) and venous (V) concentrations of amino acids (μmol/L blood). BCAA concentrations were lower in patients with cirrhosis compared to healthy subjects (p BCAA uptake was variable and on average higher in patients with alcoholic hepatitis and patients with stable cirrhosis compared to healthy subjects (mean A-V difference 0.5 and 32 vs. - 12 μmol/L blood) (p = 0.22). The release of aromatic amino acids (AAA) was comparable in the three groups (P > 0.30). The BCAA/AAA (Fischer's ratio) was lower in patients with cirrhosis and patients with alcoholic hepatitis compared to healthy subjects (mean 1.65, 1.17 and 2.73, both p BCAA and higher AAA blood concentrations compared to healthy subjects. The trend towards an increased muscle uptake of BCAA may have contributed but this was not significant.

  13. Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ... may be increased in women because their digestive system may be less able to process alcohol, thus increasing the amount of alcohol reaching the liver. Genetic makeup Genetic makeup is thought to be involved because alcoholic liver disease often ...

  14. Coenzyme Q Metabolism Is Disturbed in High Fat Diet-Induced Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats

    Kathleen M Botham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is believed to be a major contributory factor in the development of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the most common liver disorder worldwide. In this study, the effects of high fat diet-induced NAFLD on Coenzyme Q (CoQ metabolism and plasma oxidative stress markers in rats were investigated. Rats were fed a standard low fat diet (control or a high fat diet (57% metabolizable energy as fat for 18 weeks. The concentrations of total (reduced + oxidized CoQ9 were increased by > 2 fold in the plasma of animals fed the high fat diet, while those of total CoQ10 were unchanged. Reduced CoQ levels were raised, but oxidized CoQ levels were not, thus the proportion in the reduced form was increased by about 75%. A higher percentage of plasma CoQ9 as compared to CoQ10 was in the reduced form in both control and high fat fed rats. Plasma protein thiol (SH levels were decreased in the high fat-fed rats as compared to the control group, but concentrations of lipid hydroperoxides and low density lipoprotein (LDL conjugated dienes were unchanged. These results indicate that high fat diet-induced NAFLD in rats is associated with altered CoQ metabolism and increased protein, but not lipid, oxidative stress.

  15. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Cheng, Sulin; Wiklund, Petri; Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. METHODS: Hepatic fat content was

  16. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  17. PREVALENCE OF NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN WOMEN WITH POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME AND ITS CORRELATION WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Mariana Drechmer ROMANOWSKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women at childbearing age. Metabolic syndrome is present from 28% to 46% of patients with PCOS. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is considered the hepatic expression of metabolic syndrome. There are few published studies that correlate PCOS and NAFLD. Objective To determine the prevalence of NAFLD and metabolic syndrome in patients with PCOS, and to verify if there is a correlation between NAFLD and metabolic syndrome in this population. Methods Study developed at Gynecology Department of Clinical Hospital of Federal University of Parana (UFPR. The sessions were conducted from April 2008 to January 2009. One hundred and thirty-one patients joined the analysis; 101 were diagnosed with PCOS and 30 formed the control group. We subdivided the PCOS patients into two subgroups: PCOS+NAFLD and PCOS. All the patients were submitted to hepatic sonography. For hepatoestheatosis screening, hepatic ecotexture was compared do spleen’s. For diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, we adopted the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III criteria, as well as the criteria proposed by International Diabetes Federation. Statistical analysis were performed with t of student and U of Mann-Whitney test for means and chi square for proportions. Results At PCOS group, NAFLD was present in 23.8% of the population. At control group, it represented 3.3%, with statistical significance (P=0.01. Metabolic syndrome, by NCEP/ATP III criteria, was diagnosed in 32.7% of the women with PCOS and in 26.6% of the women at control group (no statistical difference, P=0.5. At PCOS+DHGNA subgroup, age, weight, BMI, abdominal circumference and glucose tolerance test results were higher when compared to PCOS group (P<0.01. Metabolic syndrome by NCEP/ATPIII criteria was present in 75% and by International Diabetes Federation criteria in 95.8% of women with

  18. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural changes in the liver in metabolic syndrome

    D. V. Vasendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientifically proven close relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with development of metabolic syndrome and its individual components involves the conclusion that the target organ in metabolic symptom, even regardless of the severity of obesity, the liver occupies a dominant position, as the body undergoes the first characteristic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease changes, involving violation of metabolism in the body. Dislipoproteinemia plays an important role in the formation of metabolic syndrome in obesity and other obesity-associated diseases. Altered liver function are the root cause of violations of processes of lipid metabolism and, consequently, abnormal functioning of the liver may be a separate, additional and independent risk factor for development of dyslipidemia and obesity as the main component of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  1. A Branched-Chain Amino Acid-Related Metabolic Signature Characterizes Obese Adolescents with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Martina Goffredo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of several metabolite pathways, including branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, are associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD and insulin resistance in adults, while studies in youth reported conflicting results. We explored whether, independently of obesity and insulin resistance, obese adolescents with NAFLD display a metabolomic signature consistent with disturbances in amino acid and lipid metabolism. A total of 180 plasma metabolites were measured by a targeted metabolomic approach in 78 obese adolescents with (n = 30 or without (n = 48 NAFLD assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test and subsets of patients underwent a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and/or a second MRI after a 2.2 ± 0.8-year follow-up. Adolescents with NAFLD had higher plasma levels of valine (p = 0.02, isoleucine (p = 0.03, tryptophan (p = 0.02, and lysine (p = 0.02 after adjustment for confounding factors. Circulating BCAAs were negatively correlated with peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, higher baseline valine levels predicted an increase in hepatic fat content (HFF at follow-up (p = 0.01. These results indicate that a dysregulation of BCAA metabolism characterizes obese adolescents with NAFLD independently of obesity and insulin resistance and predict an increase in hepatic fat content over time.

  2. An update on the use of benzoate, phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate ammonia scavengers for interrogating and modifying liver nitrogen metabolism and its implications in urea cycle disorders and liver disease.

    De Las Heras, Javier; Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Martínez-Chantar, María-Luz; Delgado, Teresa C

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia-scavenging drugs, benzoate and phenylacetate (PA)/phenylbutyrate (PB), modulate hepatic nitrogen metabolism mainly by providing alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. Areas covered: We review the major findings and potential novel applications of ammonia-scavenging drugs, focusing on urea cycle disorders and liver disease. Expert opinion: For over 40 years, ammonia-scavenging drugs have been used in the treatment of urea cycle disorders. Recently, the use of these compounds has been advocated in acute liver failure and cirrhosis for reducing hyperammonemic-induced hepatic encephalopathy. The efficacy and mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects of these ammonia-scavenging drugs in liver cancer are more controversial and are discussed in the review. Overall, as ammonia-scavenging drugs are usually safe and well tolerated among cancer patients, further studies should be instigated to explore the role of these drugs in liver cancer. Considering the relevance of glutamine metabolism to the progression and resolution of liver disease, we propose that ammonia-scavenging drugs might also be used to non-invasively probe liver glutamine metabolism in vivo. Finally, novel derivatives of classical ammonia-scavenging drugs with fewer and less severe adverse effects are currently being developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of acute liver failure and cirrhosis.

  3. Branched-chain amino acids and ammonia metabolism in liver disease: therapeutic implications.

    Holecek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The rationale for recommendation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) in treatment of liver failure is based on their unique pharmacologic properties, stimulatory effect on ammonia detoxification to glutamine (GLN), and decreased concentrations in liver cirrhosis. Multiple lines of evidence have shown that the main cause of the BCAA deficiency in liver cirrhosis is their consumption in skeletal muscle for synthesis of glutamate, which acts as a substrate for ammonia detoxification to GLN and that the BCAA administration to patients with liver failure may exert a number of positive effects that may be more pronounced in patients with marked depression of BCAA levels. On the other hand, due to the stimulatory effect of BCAA on GLN synthesis, BCAA supplementation may lead to enhanced ammonia production from GLN breakdown in the intestine and the kidneys and thus exert harmful effects on the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, to enhance therapeutic effectiveness of the BCAA in patients with liver injury, their detrimental effect on ammonia production, which is negligible in healthy people and/or patients with other disorders, should be avoided. In treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, simultaneous administration of the BCAA (to correct amino acid imbalance and promote ammonia detoxification to GLN) with α-ketoglutarate (to inhibit GLN breakdown to ammonia in enterocytes) and/or phenylbutyrate (to enhance GLN excretion by the kidneys) is suggested. Attention should be given to the type of liver injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, signs of inflammation, and the dose of BCAA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Liver and water metabolism

    Fallot, P.

    1959-01-01

    The causes for the disturbance of hydro-electrolytic equilibrium observed in cirrhosis patients are far from clear. Studies on the static distribution of liquid in the organism and also on anomalies in the distribution of deuterium oxide and tritiated water provide no direct explanation of the nature of the water retaining mechanism. At the period when the illness is established, endocrine factors and electrolytic perturbations contribute to maintaining or increasing oliguresis, but they cannot be held solely responsible in the initial stages of evolution. An explanation of the ascites should therefore be looked for in a non-functioning of the polygonal or Kupffer cells. The hypothesis of an insufficient rejection of water outside the lymph spaces of the liver during cirrhosis is put forward, but the experimental demonstration of such a phenomenon proves very difficult. (author) [fr

  5. Non-alcoholic and alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - two Diseases of Affluence associated with the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes: the FIN-D2D Survey

    Saltevo Juha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is known to be associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS and abnormal glucose tolerance. Whether alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD is associated with similar metabolic abnormalities has not been examined in a population-based study. We aimed at assessing the prevalences of NAFLD and AFLD, and to examine to what extent these conditions are associated with MetS and abnormal glucose tolerance. Methods The cohort included 2766 Finnish subjects (45-74 years from the population-based FIN-D2D survey. Features of insulin resistance, components of the MetS, glucose tolerance status by oral glucose tolerance test, serum liver enzyme concentrations, and daily alcohol consumption were assessed. Results Subjects with NAFLD and AFLD were equally obese and had similar fasting and insulin concentrations. The prevalences of NAFLD and AFLD were 21% (95% CI: 19%-22% and 7% (95% CI: 6%-8%. The MetS was slightly more prevalent in AFLD (73% than in NAFLD (70%, p = 0.028, and type 2 diabetes was similarly prevalent in NAFLD and AFLD (24-25%. The MetS and type 2 diabetes were more prevalent in subjects with NAFLD or AFLD compared to subjects with normal LFTs (53% and 14%, p Discussion and conclusion In Finnish middle-aged population, the prevalence of NAFLD is 3-fold higher than that of AFLD. The prevalences of MetS and type 2 diabetes are, however, significantly increased in both NAFLD and AFLD compared to subjects with normal LFTs. Subjects with AFLD are thus similarly metabolically unhealthy as subjects with NAFLD.

  6. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    ... The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  7. Aerobic interval exercise improves parameters of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other alterations of metabolic syndrome in obese Zucker rats.

    Kapravelou, Garyfallia; Martínez, Rosario; Andrade, Ana M; Nebot, Elena; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aparicio, Virginia A; Lopez-Jurado, Maria; Aranda, Pilar; Arrebola, Francisco; Fernandez-Segura, Eduardo; Bermano, Giovanna; Goua, Marie; Galisteo, Milagros; Porres, Jesus M

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a group of metabolic alterations that increase the susceptibility to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been described as the liver manifestation of MS. We aimed to test the beneficial effects of an aerobic interval training (AIT) protocol on different biochemical, microscopic, and functional liver alterations related to the MS in the experimental model of obese Zucker rat. Two groups of lean and obese animals (6 weeks old) followed a protocol of AIT (4 min at 65%-80% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 3 min at 50%-65% of maximal oxygen uptake for 45-60 min, 5 days/week, 8 weeks of experimental period), whereas 2 control groups remained sedentary. Obese rats had higher food intake and body weight (P metabolism and increased the liver protein expression of PPARγ, as well as the gene expression of glutathione peroxidase 4 (P < 0.001). The training protocol also showed significant effects on the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes, although this action was greatly influenced by rat phenotype. The present data suggest that AIT protocol is a feasible strategy to improve some of the plasma and liver alterations featured by the MS.

  8. Prolactin and liver disease

    A.G.C. Bauer (Alexander)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractCirrhosis of the liver is associated with profound endocrinological disturbances. Until recently it was thought that these disturbances were caused mainly by ineffective elimination of hormones by the diseased liver. It is now known that the pathogenesis of disturbed hormonal function in

  9. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD.

  10. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment.

  11. Alcoholic liver disease

    ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:59-60. Carithers RL, McClain C. Alcoholic ... Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 86. Haines EJ, Oyama LC. ...

  12. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pathomechanism, new diagnostic markers].

    Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Klupa, Tomasz; Dembińska-Kieć, Aldona

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a complex of a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, to cirrhosis and liver cancer. The pathogenic concept of NAFLD covers overnutrition with fatty acids, underactivity. Insulin resistance is believed to play the main role in this process. NAFLD is mostly related to visceral adiposity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes melitus. The presented work is a review of in vitro and in vivo modern studies, as well as clinical observations on molecular mechanisms leading to development and progress of NAFLD. Up till today their is no treatment od NAFLD, and this pathology is not benign--it may lead to patients' death in 10 years. The clinical approach to NAFLD is prevention of it's development. The manuscript is a review of new biochemical markers allowing for early detection of metabolic disorders leading to NAFLD development, thus to sufficient prevention of this pathology in patients.

  13. Cytokines and Liver Diseases

    Herbert Tilg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are pleiotropic peptides produced by virtually every nucleated cell in the body. In most tissues, including the liver, constitutive production of cytokines is absent or minimal. There is increasing evidence that several cytokines mediate hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and necrosis of liver cells, cholestasis and fibrosis. Interestingly, the same mediators also mediate the regeneration of liver tissue after injury. Among the various cytokines, the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a has emerged as a key factor in various aspects of liver disease, such as cachexia and/or cholestasis. Thus, antagonism of TNF-a and other injury-related cytokines in liver diseases merits evaluation as a treatment of these diseases. However, because the same cytokines are also necessary for the regeneration of the tissue after the liver has been injured, inhibition of these mediators might impair hepatic recovery. The near future will bring the exiting clinical challenge of testing new anticytokine strategies in various liver diseases.

  14. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  15. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Sulin Cheng

    Full Text Available Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49 and women (n = 52 with and without NAFLD.Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS. Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot.Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA, aromatic amino acid (AAA and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all. Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all, whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all.Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis.

  16. Deregulation of fatty acid metabolism and cannabinoid receptors in liver of morbidly obese women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Berlanga Bustos, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a histological spectrum from simple steatosis (SS) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with the latter being more frequently progressive. Due to lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the NAFLD pathogenesis, an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to the initial hepatic lipid accumulation could be of great interest for controlling the progression of NAFLD. It has also been repor...

  17. Potential use of metabolic breath tests to assess liver disease and prognosis: has the time arrived for routine use in the clinic?

    Stravitz, R Todd; Ilan, Yaron

    2017-03-01

    The progression of liver disease may be unique among organ system diseases in that progressive fibrosis compromises not only the sufficiency of hepatocyte mass but also impairs blood flow to the liver, resulting in porto-systemic shunting. Although liver biopsy as an assessment of fibrosis has become the key biomarker of and target for new therapies, it is invasive and subject to sampling error, and cannot quantify metabolic function or porto-systemic shunting. Measurement of the hepatic venous pressure gradient accommodates some of the deficiencies of biopsy but requires expertise not widely available and misses minor changes in hepatocellular mass and thereby information about metabolic function. Thus, an unmet need in clinical hepatology remains unfulfilled: a noninvasive biomarker which quantitates both the hepatocellular insufficiency and porto-systemic shunting inherent in progressive hepatic fibrosis. Ideally, such a biomarker should correlate with clinical endpoints including liver-related survival and cirrhotic complications, be performed at the point-of-care, and be affordable and easy to use. This review, an expert opinion, summarizes background and recent data suggesting that metabolic breath tests may now meet these requirements and have a valid place in clinical hepatology to supplant the time-honoured assessment of hepatic fibrosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  20. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the av...

  1. The Influence of Epicardial Fat and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Heart Rate Recovery in Metabolic Syndrome.

    Cho, Kyoung Im; Jo, Eun Ah; Cho, Sang Hoon; Kim, Bo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Epicardial adipose tissues reflecting visceral fat accumulations of the heart are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can be a predictor of other cardiometabolic diseases. It can adversely influence autonomic nervous system (ANS) of heart. Heart rate recovery (HRR) is an easy method for measuring ANS dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether epicardial fat thickness (EFT) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are related to HRR in patients with MetS. We enrolled 772 consecutive patients from a health-screening center who underwent abdominal ultrasonography, treadmill test, and cardiac echocardiography. EFT using echocardiography and HRR by symptom-limited exercise testing was assessed. According to the presence of MetS and NAFLD, patients were classified into the four groups. In NAFLD patients, EFT was higher and HRR was lower, especially in patients with MetS and NAFLD, compared to non-MetS participants without NAFLD (MetS with NAFLD, EFT 7.5 ± 4.4 mm, HRR 31.9 ± 12.7; MetS without NAFLD, EFT 4.9 ± 3.0 mm, HRR 39.5 ± 11.1; non-MetS with NAFLD, EFT 5.9 ± 3.6 mm, HRR 36.6 ± 12.7; and non-MetS without NAFLD, EFT 4.4 ± 3.5 mm, HRR 43.4 ± 14.5, p < 0.001). Patients with severe liver steatosis (LS) showed significantly higher EFT than those with moderate LS (14.2 ± 2.0 vs. 7.5 ± 3.1 mm, P < 0.001), and EFT was positively correlated with severity of LS (r = 0.431, P < 0.001). HRR was significantly correlated with EFT (r = -0.386, P < 0.001) and severity of LS (r = -0.324, P < 0.001). EFT and NAFLD were significantly correlated with HRR in patients with MetS and they may be highly related to increased cardiovascular risk. These results suggest a cross-link among EFT, NAFLD, and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in patients with MetS.

  2. Gene polymorphisms of desaturase enzymes of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and adiponutrin and the increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Manvi Vernekar; Deepak Amarapurkar; Kalpana Joshi; Rekha Singhal

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered to be the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Adiponutrin gene polymorphisms have been associated with NAFLD worldwide. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been studied to have anti-inflammatory effects and plasma lipid lowering properties. PUFAs are endogenously synthesized with the help of delta-6-desaturase and delta-5-desaturase enzymes. They are encoded by FADS2 and FADS1 genes respectively. Polymorphisms in ...

  3. Changes in serum markers of iron metabolism and their clinical significance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OU Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the changes in the serum markers of iron metabolism and their clinical significance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. MethodsA total of 68 NAFLD patients who were admitted to The Eighth People′s Hospital of Shanghai from July 2014 to April 2016 were enrolled as NAFLD group, and 70 healthy persons who underwent physical examination were enrolled as healthy control group. Among the 68 patients in the NAFLD group, 24 had NAFLD alone and 44 were complicated by abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT level. The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, ALT, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and serum markers of iron metabolism [serum iron (SI, serum ferritin (SF, and serum hepcidin (HEPC] were measured for all patients, and the correlations between abnormal ALT level and serum markers of iron metabolism were analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was used to investigate the correlation between two variables. ResultsThe NAFLD group had significantly higher body mass index and serum levels of ALT, AST, TC, and TG than the healthy control group (t=9.8, 8.6, 8.5, 9.2, and 2.7, all P<0.05. Compared with the healthy control group, the NAFLD group had significantly higher levels of SI (21.7±7.1 μmol/L vs 187±6.9 μmol/L, t=2.3, P=0.02 and SF (340.2±257.6 μg/L vs 119.1±81.2 μg/L, t=6.7, P<0.01 and a significantly lower level of HEPC (12.2±5.3 μg/L vs 22.2±6.5 μg/L, t=9.9, P<0.01. Compared with those with NAFLD alone, the patients complicated by abnormal ALT level had significantly higher serum levels of ALT (89±58 U/L vs 26±8 U/L, t=7.1, P<0.01, SI (23.4±6.2 μmol/L vs 19.6±7.9 μmol/L, t=2.2, P=0.03, and SF (406.2±290.0 μg/L vs 219.4±112.0 μg/L, t=3.7, P<0.01, as well as a significantly

  4. Therapeutic role of ursolic acid on ameliorating hepatic steatosis and improving metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease rats.

    Li, Songtao; Liao, Xilu; Meng, Fanyu; Wang, Yemei; Sun, Zongxiang; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Meng, Man; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent liver diseases around the world, and is closely associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance. Ursolic acid (UA), an ubiquitous triterpenoid with multifold biological roles, is distributed in various plants. This study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect and potential mechanisms of UA against hepatic steatosis in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rat model. Obese NAFLD model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by 8-week HFD feeding. Therapeutic role of UA was evaluated using 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% UA-supplemented diet for another 6 weeks. The results from both morphologic and histological detections indicated that UA significantly reversed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury. Besides, hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α was markedly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels by UA. Knocking down PPAR-α significantly inhibited the anti-steatosis role of UA in vitro. HFD-induced adverse changes in the key genes, which participated in hepatic lipid metabolism, were also alleviated by UA treatment. Furthermore, UA significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. These results demonstrated that UA effectively ameliorated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis through a PPAR-α involved pathway, via improving key enzymes in the controlling of lipids metabolism. The metabolic disorders were accordingly improved with the decrease of hepatic steatosis. Thereby, UA could be a promising candidate for the treatment of NAFLD.

  5. Therapeutic role of ursolic acid on ameliorating hepatic steatosis and improving metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease rats.

    Songtao Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most prevalent liver diseases around the world, and is closely associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance. Ursolic acid (UA, an ubiquitous triterpenoid with multifold biological roles, is distributed in various plants. This study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect and potential mechanisms of UA against hepatic steatosis in a high-fat diet (HFD-induced obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD rat model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Obese NAFLD model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by 8-week HFD feeding. Therapeutic role of UA was evaluated using 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% UA-supplemented diet for another 6 weeks. The results from both morphologic and histological detections indicated that UA significantly reversed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury. Besides, hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α was markedly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels by UA. Knocking down PPAR-α significantly inhibited the anti-steatosis role of UA in vitro. HFD-induced adverse changes in the key genes, which participated in hepatic lipid metabolism, were also alleviated by UA treatment. Furthermore, UA significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrated that UA effectively ameliorated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis through a PPAR-α involved pathway, via improving key enzymes in the controlling of lipids metabolism. The metabolic disorders were accordingly improved with the decrease of hepatic steatosis. Thereby, UA could be a promising candidate for the treatment of NAFLD.

  6. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which fat ...

  7. Impact of Time-Restricted Feeding and Dawn-to-Sunset Fasting on Circadian Rhythm, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Ayse L. Mindikoglu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity now affects millions of people and places them at risk of developing metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. This rapidly emerging epidemic has led to a search for cost-effective methods to prevent the metabolic syndrome and NAFLD as well as the progression of NAFLD to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In murine models, time-restricted feeding resets the hepatic circadian clock and enhances transcription of key metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Studies of the effect of dawn-to-sunset Ramadan fasting, which is akin to time-restricted feeding model, have also identified significant improvement in body mass index, serum lipid profiles, and oxidative stress parameters. Based on the findings of studies conducted on human subjects, dawn-to-sunset fasting has the potential to be a cost-effective intervention for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD.

  8. Impact of Time-Restricted Feeding and Dawn-to-Sunset Fasting on Circadian Rhythm, Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Gagan, Sood K.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity now affects millions of people and places them at risk of developing metabolic syndrome, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and even hepatocellular carcinoma. This rapidly emerging epidemic has led to a search for cost-effective methods to prevent the metabolic syndrome and NAFLD as well as the progression of NAFLD to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In murine models, time-restricted feeding resets the hepatic circadian clock and enhances transcription of key metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Studies of the effect of dawn-to-sunset Ramadan fasting, which is akin to time-restricted feeding model, have also identified significant improvement in body mass index, serum lipid profiles, and oxidative stress parameters. Based on the findings of studies conducted on human subjects, dawn-to-sunset fasting has the potential to be a cost-effective intervention for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD. PMID:29348746

  9. An Overview of Novel Dietary Supplements and Food Ingredients in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Priscila Silva Figueiredo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is characterized by interconnected factors related to metabolic disturbances, and is directly related to the occurrence of some diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. MetS is described as one or both of insulin resistance and visceral adiposity, considered the initial causes of abnormalities that include hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure, dyslipidemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and prothrombotic state, as well as polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. Other than in MetS, visceral adiposity and the pro-inflammatory state are also key in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which is the most prevalent chronic liver disease in modern society. Both MetS and NAFLD are related to diet and lifestyle, and their treatment may be influenced by dietary pattern changes and the use of certain dietary supplements. This study aimed to review the role of food ingredients and supplements in the management of MetS and NAFLD specifically in human clinical trials. Moreover, bioactive compounds and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs may be used as strategies for preventing the onset of and treatment of metabolic disorders, such as MetS and NAFLD, improving the inflammatory state and other comorbidities, such as obesity, dyslipidemias, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD.

  10. miR-21 regulates triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by targeting HMGCR.

    Sun, Chuanzheng; Huang, Feizhou; Liu, Xunyang; Xiao, Xuefei; Yang, Mingshi; Hu, Gui; Liu, Huaizheng; Liao, Liangkan

    2015-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health issue with a prevalence of 15-30% in Western populations and 6-25% in Asian populations. Certain studies have revealed the alteration of microRNA (miRNA or miR) profiles in NAFLD and it has been suggested that miR-21 is associated with NAFLD. In the present study, we measured the serum levels of miR-21 in patients with NAFLD and also performed in vitro experiments using a cellular model of NAFLD to further investigate the effects of miR-21 on triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism. Furthermore, a novel target through which miR-21 exerts its effects on NAFLD was identified. The results revealed that the serum levels of miR-21 were lower in patients with NAFLD compared with the healthy controls. In addition, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-co-enzyme A reductase (HMGCR) expression was increased in the serum of patients with NAFLD both at the mRNA and protein level. To mimic the NAFLD condition in vitro, HepG2 cells were treated with palmitic acid (PA) and oleic acid (OA). Consistent with the results obtained in the in vivo experiments, the expression levels of miR-21 were decreased and those of HMGCR were increased in the in vitro model of NAFLD. Luciferase reporter assay revealed that HMGCR was a direct target of miR-21 and that miR-21 exerted an effect on both HMGCR transcript degradation and protein translation. Furthermore, the results from the in vitro experiments revealed that miR-21 decreased the levels of triglycerides (TG), free cholesterol (FC) and total cholesterol (TC) in the PA/OA-treated HepG2 cells and that this effect was attenuated by HMGCR overexpression. Taken together, to the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report that miR-21 regulates triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism in an in vitro model of NAFLD, and that this effect is achieved by the inhibition of HMGCR expression. We speculate that miR-21 may be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and

  11. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy. Aggressive nutritional support is indicated in inpatients with ALD, and patients often need to be fed through an enteral feeding tube to achieve protein and calorie goals. Enteral nutritional support clearly improves nutrition status and may improve clinical outcome. Moreover, late-night snacks in outpatient cirrhotics improve nutritional status and lean body mass. Thus, with no FDA-approved therapy for ALD, careful nutritional intervention should be considered as frontline therapy. PMID:21284673

  12. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. METHODS: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral...

  13. in Human Liver Diseases

    Minoru Fujimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways are strictly coordinated by several mechanisms to regulate adequate innate immune responses. Recent lines of evidence indicate that the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family proteins, originally identified as negative-feedback regulators in cytokine signaling, are involved in the regulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. SOCS1, a member of SOCS family, is strongly induced upon TLR stimulation. Cells lacking SOCS1 are hyperresponsive to TLR stimulation. Thus, SOCS1 is an important regulator for both cytokine and TLR-induced responses. As an immune organ, the liver contains various types of immune cells such as T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and Kupffer cells and is continuously challenged with gut-derived bacterial and dietary antigens. SOCS1 may be implicated in pathophysiology of the liver. The studies using SOCS1-deficient mice revealed that endogenous SOCS1 is critical for the prevention of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancers. Recent studies on humans suggest that SOCS1 is involved in the development of various liver disorders in humans. Thus, SOCS1 and other SOCS proteins are potential targets for the therapy of human liver diseases.

  14. The Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Related Metabolic Comorbidities Was Associated with Age at Onset of Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Xin Xu

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been found to be highly prevalent in psoriatic patients. Adult onset psoriasis could be divided into either early or late onset psoriasis. The associations between NAFLD and related metabolic comorbidities and age at onset of psoriasis have not yet been investigated. Our study was to evaluate the associations between prevalence of NAFLD and related metabolic conditions and early, late, and childhood onset psoriasis. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Data on clinical characteristics of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases (diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic syndrome were collected. The prevalence of NAFLD in 439 patients (mean: 51±14 years, range: 18-85 years was 55.8%. NAFLD was frequently identified in early onset patients (74.2%, and this diagnosis was particularly common in patients currently younger than 40 (85.3%. Diabetes was the least prevalent component of metabolic syndrome in early onset patients with metabolic syndrome but the most often found component in late onset ones. Patients with childhood onset psoriasis had the lowest frequencies of all metabolic comorbidities except hyperuricemia among the three groups. In the multivariate analyses, early onset was independently and positively associated with NAFLD, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperuricemia and independently and negatively associated with diabetes among early and late onset patients. The results suggested prevalence of NAFLD and related metabolic comorbidities was associated with age at onset of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Early onset of psoriasis was independently associated with greater odds of NAFLD, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperuricemia and smaller odds of diabetes compared to late onset. Early onset patients have metabolic syndrome mainly related to lipid disorders and abnormal glucose metabolism was not often involved.

  15. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and subclinical atherosclerosis: A comparison of metabolically- versus genetically-driven excess fat hepatic storage.

    Di Costanzo, Alessia; D'Erasmo, Laura; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Coletta, Paola; Di Martino, Michele; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Perri, Ludovica; Ceci, Fabrizio; Montali, Anna; Girelli, Gabriella; De Masi, Bruna; Angeloni, Antonio; Catalano, Carlo; Maranghi, Marianna; Del Ben, Maria; Angelico, Francesco; Arca, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with atherosclerosis. However, it is unclear whether this association is related to excess fat liver storage per se or to metabolic abnormalities that typically accompany NAFLD. To investigate this, we compared individuals with hepatic steatosis driven by metabolic disturbances to those with hepatic steatosis associated with the rs738409 GG genotype in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 gene (PNPLA3). Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), as a surrogate marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, was measured in 83 blood donors with the mutant GG genotype (group G), 100 patients with features of metabolic syndrome (MetS) but the wildtype CC genotype (group M), and 74 blood donors with the wildtype CC genotype (controls). Fatty liver was evaluated by ultrasonography and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) was measured using magnetic resonance (MRS/MRI) in 157 subjects. Compared with group G and controls, group M subjects were older and had increased adiposity indices, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and elevated transaminase levels (all p hepatic steatosis), the median CIMT in group M (0.84 [0.70-0.95] mm) was significantly greater than that in group G (0.66 [0.55-0.74] mm; p < 0.001), which was similar to that in controls (0.70 [0.64-0.81] mm). Results were similar in the subgroup evaluated using MRS/MRI. Excess liver fat accumulation appeared to increase the burden of subclinical atherosclerosis only when it is associated with metabolic abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  18. Liver scanning in diffuse liver disease

    Aiginger, P.; Atefie, K.; Scherak, O.; Wolf, A.; Hoefer, R.; Seyfried, H.

    1975-01-01

    The results of liver scans performed with sup(99m)Tc-sulphur colloid in 169 patients suffering from diffuse liver diseases and in 48 normal controls were evaluated. The patients with reactive hepatitis, acute hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis, fatty liver and fibrosis of the liver show only minimal deviations from the scintigraphic pattern. On the contrary, highly increased colloid uptake in the spleen is found in cases of chronic aggressive hepatitis, whilst the intrahepatic distribution of the colloid is approximately normal. In cases of liver cirrhosis, increased colloid uptake is found in the left lobe of the liver as well as in the spleen and in the bone marrow. Either normal findings or cirrhosis-like changes of the colloid distribution are observed in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. (orig.) [de

  19. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver. (author)

  20. Investigation on liver fast metabolism with CT

    Huebener, K.H.; Schmitt, W.G.H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pathologisches Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the density of normal and diffusely diseased liver parenchyma show a significant difference only in fatty liver. A linear relationship between the fat content and physical density has been demonstrated. Computed tomographic densitometry of liver tissue correlates well with physical in vitro measurements of fat content and is sufficiently accurate for clinical use. Other types of liver diseases cannot be differentiated by densitometry, Lipolisis in fatty liver in chronic alcoholism alcohol withdrawal has been investigated. It has been found that a rate of decrease of the fatty degeneration of the liver equals to 1 percent/day. Fatty degeneration of the liver in acute pancreatitis and other diseases have been also investigated. CT densitometry of the liver should be considered as a useful routine clinical method to determine the fat content of liver.

  1. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX...... from 1992 to 2005. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study of the journals of 440 patients, who underwent 506 LTXs between 1992 and 2005, showed that 14 patients underwent LTX for PLD. All patients had normal liver function. Three were receiving haemodialysis and thus underwent combined liver...

  3. Fatty liver associated with metabolic derangement in patients with chronic kidney disease: A controlled attenuation parameter study

    Chang-Yun Yoon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatic steatosis measured with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP using transient elastography predicts metabolic syndrome in the general population. We investigated whether CAP predicted metabolic syndrome in chronic kidney disease patients. Methods: CAP was measured with transient elastography in 465 predialysis chronic kidney disease patients (mean age, 57.5 years. Results: The median CAP value was 239 (202–274 dB/m. In 195 (41.9% patients with metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus was more prevalent (105 [53.8%] vs. 71 [26.3%], P < 0.001, with significantly increased urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (184 [38–706] vs. 56 [16–408] mg/g Cr, P = 0.003, high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (5.4 [1.4–28.2] vs. 1.7 [0.6–9.9] mg/L, P < 0.001, and CAP (248 [210–302] vs. 226 [196–259] dB/m, P < 0.001. In multiple linear regression analysis, CAP was independently related to body mass index (β = 0.742, P < 0.001, triglyceride levels (β = 2.034, P < 0.001, estimated glomerular filtration rate (β = 0.316, P = 0.001, serum albumin (β = 1.386, P < 0.001, alanine aminotransferase (β = 0.064, P = 0.029, and total bilirubin (β = −0.881, P = 0.009. In multiple logistic regression analysis, increased CAP was independently associated with increased metabolic syndrome risk (per 10 dB/m increase; odds ratio, 1.093; 95% confidence interval, 1.009–1.183; P = 0.029 even after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. Conclusion: Increased CAP measured with transient elastography significantly correlated with and could predict increased metabolic syndrome risk in chronic kidney disease patients.

  4. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Linda, Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile

  5. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  6. Hypertension and liver disease

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin......Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... hemodynamics in cirrhosis. The most characteristic findings in cirrhotic patients are vasodilatation with low systemic vascular resistance, increased cardiac output, high arterial compliance, secondary activation of counterregulatory systems (sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system...

  7. CORRELATION OF NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AND FEATURES OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MORBIDLY OBESE PATIENTS IN THE PREOPERATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    de BARROS, Fernando; SETÚBAL, Sergio; MARTINHO, José Manoel; FERRAZ, Loraine; GAUDÊNCIO, Andressa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity is an epidemic and chronic disease that can bring other comorbidities to the patient. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is present in up to 90% of these patients and can progress to hepatitis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship of this liver disease and obesity is already well known; however, it is possible that some parameters of the comorbidities are more related than others in the pathophysiology of the disease. Aim: Was analyzed the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the comorbidities of metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese patients. Methods: Was involved ultrasonography and laboratory assessment of obese patients before bariatric surgery. NAFLD was assessed using the same sonography parameters for all patients. Based on the results, the patients were divided into groups with and without NAFLD. Comparisons between them involved clinical and laboratory variables such as fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment - insulin resistance), glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyl transferase, C-reactive protein, albumin and ferritin. Patients who reported alcohol abuse (defined as the consumption of >14 drinks per week) or who had hepatitis were excluded. Results: Eighty-two patients (74 women and 8 men) were studied, of whom 53 (64.6%) had NAFLD and 29 (35.4%) did not. The levels of glycated hemoglobin (p=0.05) and LDL cholesterol (p=0.01) were significantly altered in patients with NAFLD. However, weight, body mass index and excess weight did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.835, p=0.488 and p=0.727, respectively). Conclusions: Altered LDL cholesterol and glycated hemoglobin levels were related to the presence of NAFLD. PMID:28076482

  8. Epidemiology Of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    А.Г. Мартынова

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors of chronic liver disease is alcohol. The level of alcoholic liver disease incidence and cirrhosis mortality has increased considerably in the recent years in many countries. The risk of development and disease progression are determined by the effect of endogenous and exogenous factors: "drinking mode", female gender, heredity and genetic predisposition, obesity, concomitant viral hepatitis

  9. Metabolism and disease

    Grodzicker, Terri; Stewart, David J; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    ...), cellular, organ system (cardiovascular, bone), and organismal (timing and life span) scales. Diseases impacted by metabolic imbalance or dysregulation that were covered in detail included diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer...

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Wu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (~26%-27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n¿=¿880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta......-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ~2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome......Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic...

  11. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    Veigel, Myka Call; Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza; Rodriguez, Michael G.; Shao, Lei; Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H.

    2009-01-01

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  12. Comparison between a pediatric health promotion center and a pediatric obesity clinic in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    Yang, Hye Ran; Yi, Dae Yong; Choi, Hyoung Soo

    2014-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of health check-ups in children in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the pediatric health promotion center with the pediatric obesity clinic. Children who visited a pediatric health promotion center (n=218) or a pediatric obesity clinic (n=178) were included. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were evaluated. Two different criteria were applied to diagnose metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the 2 units was 3.2%-3.7% in a pediatric health promotion center and 23%-33.2% in a pediatric obesity clinic. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence of each component of metabolic syndrome between the 2 units including abdominal adiposity, blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose (Pobesity clinic targeting obese children than that among patients visiting the health promotion center offering routine check-ups. An obesity-oriented approach is required to prevent obesity-related health problems in children.

  13. Gender Differences in Adipocyte Metabolism and Liver Cancer Progression

    Otto Ka-Wing Cheung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the third most common cancer type and the second leading cause of deaths in men. Large population studies have demonstrated remarkable gender disparities in the incidence and the cumulative risk of liver cancer. A number of emerging risk factors regarding metabolic alterations associated with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia have been ascribed to the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD and ultimately liver cancer. The deregulation of fat metabolism derived from excessive insulin, glucose and lipid promotes cancer-causing inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress, which eventually triggers the uncontrolled hepatocellular proliferation. This review presents the current standing on the gender differences in body fat compositions and their mechanistic linkage with the development of NAFLD-related liver cancer, with an emphasis on genetic, epigenetic and microRNA control. The potential roles of sex hormones in instructing adipocyte metabolic programs may help unravel the mechanisms underlying gender dimorphism in liver cancer and identify the metabolic targets for disease management.

  14. Current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    LISBOA, QUELSON COELHO; COSTA, SILVIA MARINHO FEROLLA; COUTO, CLÁUDIA ALVES

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic accumulation of lipid in patients who do not consume alcohol in amounts generally considered harmful to the liver. NAFLD is becoming a major liver disease in Eastern countries and it is related to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Treatment has focused on improving insulin sensitivity, protecting the liver from oxidative stress, decreasing obesity and improving diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic infla...

  15. Diet - liver disease

    Proteins normally help the body repair tissue. They also prevent fatty buildup and damage to the liver cells. In people with badly damaged livers, proteins are not properly processed. Waste products may build up and affect the brain. Dietary ...

  16. Liver Disease in the Alcoholic

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    The problem of liver damage in alcoholic patients is widespread. This review discusses hepatic damage on the basis of a histologic classification of increasing severity. In the early stages, or with compensated cirrhosis, clinical and laboratory findings may not accurately reflect hepatic involvement. Furthermore, there exists a group of alcoholic patients in whom liver disease may be caused by factors other than alcohol. Nevertheless, in most patients with liver disease, certain biochemical ...

  17. Fish oil alleviated high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease via regulating hepatic lipids metabolism and metaflammation: a transcriptomic study.

    Yuan, Fahu; Wang, Hualin; Tian, Yu; Li, Qi; He, Lei; Li, Na; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    Intake of fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is believed to be beneficial against development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study was to gain further understanding of the potential mechanisms of the protective effects of fish oil against NAFLD. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control diet (CON), a Western style high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (WD), or a WD diet containing fish oil (FOH) for 16 weeks respectively. The development of liver steatosis and fibrosis were verified by histological and biochemical examination. Hepatic transcriptome were extracted for RNA-seq analysis, and particular results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The consumption of fish oil significantly ameliorated WD-induced dyslipidemia, transaminase elevation, hepatic steatosis, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis. Hepatic RNA-Seq analysis showed that long-term intake of fish oil restored the expression of circadian clock-related genes per2 and per3, which were reduced in WD fed animals. Fish oil consumption also corrected the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism, such as Srebf1, Fasn, Scd1, Insig2, Cd36, Cyp7a1, Abcg5, Abcg8 and Pcsk9. Moreover, the expression levels of pro-inflammation genes Mcp1, Socs2, Sema4a, and Cd44 in the FOH group were lower than that of WD group, implying that fish oil protects the liver against WD-induced hepatic inflammation. The present study demonstrates fish oil protects against WD-induced NALFD via improving lipid metabolism and ameliorating hepatic inflammation. Our findings add to the current understanding on the benefits of n-3 PUFAs against NAFLD.

  18. Pro-inflammatory and atherogenic circulating factors in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease associated to metabolic syndrome.

    Lucero, Diego; Zago, Valeria; López, Graciela I; Graffigna, Mabel; Fainboim, Hugo; Miksztowicz, Verónica; Meroño, Tomás; Belli, Susana; Levalle, Oscar; Wikinski, Regina; Brites, Fernando; Berg, Gabriela; Schreier, Laura

    2011-01-14

    It is not elucidated if liver fat deposits associated to metabolic syndrome (MS) aggravate the atherogenic state. We evaluated, in MS patients, if the presence of non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis (HS) determines differences in inflammatory markers and VLDL characteristics. Seventy-five patients with MS were divided into 2 groups depending on the presence or absence of HS, assessed by ultrasound. Lipid profile, free fatty acids (FFA), VLDL composition, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1) were measured. HS patients presented increased triglycerides levels, HOMA-IR and FFA. Patients with HS showed a reduction in adiponectin (p = 0.04) and increase in hs-CRP (p = 0.02), independently of insulin-resistance (IR). FFA correlated positively with TNF-α (p = 0.04) and inversely with adiponectin (p = 0.01). hs-CRP correlated with all inflammatory markers, independently of IR: TNF-α (r = 0.34, p = 0.02), sVCAM-1 (r = 0.29 p = 0.03), sICAM-1 (r = 0.56, p = 0.01), adiponectin (r = -0.34, p = 0.04). HS patients presented higher VLDL mass and number of particles. Adiponectin correlated with VLDL cholesterol content (r = -0.47, p = 0.04), independently of IR. VLDL, once secreted, would suffer from changes, becoming more atherogenic. Simple HS would play an important role increasing cardiovascular risk, independently of IR. hs-CRP may represent a useful biomarker of this condition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MR of the liver in Wilson's disease

    Vogl, T.J.; Steiner, S.; Hammerstingl, R.; Schwarz, S.; Kraft, E.; Weinzierl, M.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    To show that Wilson's disease is one likely cause of multiple low-intensity nodules of the liver we obtained MR images in 16 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Wilson's disease. Corresponding to morphological changes MRI enabled the subdivision of the patients into two groups. Using a T 2 -weighted spin-echo sequence (TR/TE=2000/45-90) liver parenchyma showed multiple tiny low-intensity-nodules surrounded by high-intensity septa in 10 out of 16 patients. 5 patients had also low-intensity nodules in T 1 -weighted images (TR/TE=600/20). In patients of this group histopathology revealed liver cirrhosis (n=7) and fibrosis (n=2). Common feature of this patient group was marked inflammatory cell infiltration into fibrous septa, increase of copper concentration in liver parenchyma and distinct pathological changes of laboratory data. In the remaining 6 patients no pathological change of liver morphology was demonstrated by MRI corresponding to slight histopathological changes of parenchyma and normal laboratory data. As low-intensity nodules surrounded by high intensity septa can be demonstrated in patients with marked inflammatory infiltration of liver parenchyma MRI may help to define Wilson patients with poorer prognosis. In patients with low-intensity nodules of the liver and unknown cause of liver cirrhosis laboratory data and histopathology should be checked when searching for disorders of copper metabolism. (orig.) [de

  20. [ALLELES C282Y AND H63D HFE GENE, INSULIN RESISTANCE AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DISTURBANCE OF PORPHYRIN METABOLISM IN NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE].

    Krivosheev, A B; Maximov, V N; Voevoda, M I; Kuimov, A D; Kondratova, M A; Tuguleva, T A; Koval, O N; Bezrukova, A A; Bogorianova, P A; Rybina, O V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the frequency of genotypes and alleles of C282Y and H63D HFE gene that may be associated with impaired porphyrin metabolism, as well as possible reasons for the formation of dysmetabolism porphyrins with NAFLD. The study involved 65 patients (52 men and 13 women) aged 21 to 69 years (mean age 48.5±1.5 years). Excretion uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, 6-aminolevulinic acid of porphobilinogen in urine was determined by chromatography and spectrophotometry calculated total excretion of porphyrins. Allele frequencies C282Y and H63D were determined during the molecular genetic analysis of DNA using the polymerase chain reaction followed by analysis of length polymorphism restraktsionnyh fragments. Condition of carbohydrate metabolism was evaluated by the level of fasting blood glucose and standard glucose tolerance test. Diagnosis of insulin resistance was performed according to the criteria proposed by the European Group for the Study of insulin resistance (EGIR). Skill test for the C282Y mutation carriage and H63D in the HFE gene in 65 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Disturbances in the metabolism of porphyrins were recorded in 43 (66.2%) patients. H63D and C282Y mutations were found in 18 (27.7%) patients, of whom 13 (72.2%) people with different options dismetabolism porphyrins and signs of insulin resistance. In 47 (72.3%) patients without mutations studied porphyrin metabolism disorders were detected in 30 (63.8 %), of which insulin resistance is registered only in 16 (34.0 %). Detection of mutations C282Y and H63D in the HFE gene in combination with disorders of porphyrin metabolism on the background of insulin resistance is likely to allow such patients considered as candidates for inclusion in the higher risk of formation of diabetes.

  1. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  2. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Focus on Lipoprotein and Lipid Deregulation

    Klementina Fon Tacer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity with associated comorbidities is currently a worldwide epidemic and among the most challenging health conditions in the 21st century. A major metabolic consequence of obesity is insulin resistance which underlies the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome. It comprises a disease spectrum ranging from simple steatosis (fatty liver, through nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH to fibrosis, and ultimately liver cirrhosis. Abnormality in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism accompanied by chronic inflammation is the central pathway for the development of metabolic syndrome-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease (CVD, and NAFLD. This paper focuses on pathogenic aspect of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in NAFLD and the relevant mouse models of this complex multifactorial disease.

  3. Metabolism, genomics, and DNA repair in the mouse aging liver

    Lebel, Michel; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions......The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many......, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some...

  4. Clinical epidemiology and disease burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Perumpail, Brandon J; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Eric R; Cholankeril, George; Kim, Donghee; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic fat accumulation after the exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis, including other causes of liver disease, excessive alcohol consumption, and other conditions that may lead to hepatic steatosis. NAFLD encompasses a broad clinical spectrum ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world and NASH may soon become the most common indication for liver transplantation. Ongoing persistence of obesity with increasing rate of diabetes will increase the prevalence of NAFLD, and as this population ages, many will develop cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. There has been a general increase in the prevalence of NAFLD, with Asia leading the rise, yet the United States is following closely behind with a rising prevalence from 15% in 2005 to 25% within 5 years. NAFLD is commonly associated with metabolic comorbidities, including obesity, type II diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of NAFLD is constantly evolving. Based on NAFLD subtypes, it has the potential to progress into advanced fibrosis, end-stage liver disease and HCC. The increasing prevalence of NAFLD with advanced fibrosis, is concerning because patients appear to experience higher liver-related and non-liver-related mortality than the general population. The increased morbidity and mortality, healthcare costs and declining health related quality of life associated with NAFLD makes it a formidable disease, and one that requires more in-depth analysis. PMID:29307986

  5. Evolving insights on metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics in liver myofibroblasts

    Zeribe Chike Nwosu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver myofibroblasts (MFB are crucial mediators of extracellular matrix (ECM deposition in liver fibrosis. They arise mainly from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs upon a process termed activation. To a lesser extent, and depending on the cause of liver damage, portal fibroblasts, mesothelial cells and fibrocytes may also contribute to the MFB population. Targeting MFB to reduce liver fibrosis is currently an area of intense research. Unfortunately, a clog in the wheel of antifibrotic therapies is the fact that although MFB are known to mediate scar formation, and participate in liver inflammatory response, many of their molecular portraits are currently unknown. In this review, we discuss recent understanding of MFB in health and diseases, focusing specifically on three evolving research fields: metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics. We have emphasized on therapeutic prospects where applicable and mentioned techniques for use in MFB studies. Subsequently, we highlighted uncharted territories in MFB research to help direct future efforts aimed at bridging gaps in current knowledge.

  6. Liver Disease and IBD

    ... The gallbladder is a sac attached below the liver to the common bile duct. Gallstones form when bile (the liquid stored in ... a stone may have passed down the common bile duct to the area where it joins the ... of the liver. Chronic (long term) hepatitis can be from inflammation ...

  7. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  8. Estimation of liver glucose metabolism after refeeding

    Rognstad, R.

    1987-01-01

    Refeeding or infusing glucose to rats fasted for 24 hr or more causes rapid liver glycogen synthesis, the carbon source now considered to be largely from gluconeogenesis. While substrate cycling between plasma glucose and liver glucose-6P is known to occur, this cycling has apparently been ignored when calculations are made of % contribution of direct and indirect pathways to liver glycogen synthesis, or when hepatic glucose output is calculated from glucose turnover minus the glucose infusion rate. They show that, isotopically, an estimate of the fluxes of liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase is required to quantitate sources of carbon for liver glycogen synthesis, and to measure hepatic glucose output (or uptake). They propose a method to estimate these fluxes, involving a short infusion of a 14 C labelled gluconeogenic precursor plus (6T)glucose, with determination of isotopic yields in liver glycogen and total glucose. Given also the rate of liver glycogen synthesis, this procedure permits the estimation of net gluconeogenesis and hepatic glucose output or uptake. Also, in vitro evidence against the notion of a drastic zonation of liver carbohydrate metabolism is presented, e.g. raising the glucose concentration from 10 to 25 mM increases the 14 C yield from H 14 CO 3 - in lactate, with the increased pyruvate kinase flux and decreased gluconeogenesis occurring in the same cell type, not opposing pathways in different hepatocyte types (as has been postulated by some to occur in vivo after refeeding

  9. PPAR/RXR Regulation of Fatty Acid Metabolism and Fatty Acid -Hydroxylase (CYP4 Isozymes: Implications for Prevention of Lipotoxicity in Fatty Liver Disease

    James P. Hardwick

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver disease is a common lipid metabolism disorder influenced by the combination of individual genetic makeup, drug exposure, and life-style choices that are frequently associated with metabolic syndrome, which encompasses obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistant diabetes. Common to obesity related dyslipidemia is the excessive storage of hepatic fatty acids (steatosis, due to a decrease in mitochondria -oxidation with an increase in both peroxisomal -oxidation, and microsomal -oxidation of fatty acids through peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. How steatosis increases PPAR activated gene expression of fatty acid transport proteins, peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid -oxidation and -oxidation of fatty acids genes regardless of whether dietary fatty acids are polyunsaturated (PUFA, monounsaturated (MUFA, or saturated (SFA may be determined by the interplay of PPARs and HNF4 with the fatty acid transport proteins L-FABP and ACBP. In hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis, the -oxidation cytochrome P450 CYP4A gene expression is increased even with reduced hepatic levels of PPAR. Although numerous studies have suggested the role ethanol-inducible CYP2E1 in contributing to increased oxidative stress, Cyp2e1-null mice still develop steatohepatitis with a dramatic increase in CYP4A gene expression. This strongly implies that CYP4A fatty acid -hydroxylase P450s may play an important role in the development of steatohepatitis. In this review and tutorial, we briefly describe how fatty acids are partitioned by fatty acid transport proteins to either anabolic or catabolic pathways regulated by PPARs, and we explore how medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA CYP4A and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA CYP4F -hydroxylase genes are regulated in fatty liver. We finally propose a hypothesis that increased CYP4A expression with a decrease in CYP4F genes may promote the progression of steatosis to

  10. Progression of Liver Disease

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now The Progression of Liver ...

  11. Progression of Liver Disease

    ... If cirrhosis is not treated, the liver will fail and will not be able to work well ... Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give ...

  12. Managing the Combination of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome with Chinese Herbal Extracts in High-Fat-Diet Fed Rats

    Yi Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MetS. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of Chinese herbal extracts from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Gardenia jasminoides (SGE on the combination of NAFLD and MetS induced by a high-fat diet (HFD in rats. After 6 weeks of HFD feeding, rats (n=10 each group were treated with saline, rosiglitazone (RSG, and SGE for 4 weeks. HFD rats were obese, hyperinsulinemic, hyperlipidemic and increased hepatic enzymes with the histological images of NAFLD. Treatment with SGE significantly reduced serum triglycerides (TG, nonesterified fatty acids and enhanced insulin sensitivity, and ameliorated the elevated serum hepatic enzymes compared with HFD-saline group. SGE treatment also attenuated hepatic TG by 18.5% (P<0.05. Histological stains showed SGE decreased lipids droplets in hepatocytes (P<0.05 and normalized macrovesicular steatosis in HFD rats. Significant reduction of TNF-α and IL6 in adipose tissue was detected in SGE treated rats. The anti-inflammatory action may be, at least in part, the mechanism of SGE on MetS associated with NAFLD. This study discovered that SGE is capable of managing metabolic and histological abnormalities of NAFLD and MetS. SGE may be an optimal treatment for the combination of NAFLD and MetS.

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Associated Metabolic Risks of Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Community-Based Study

    Xiaoying Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms facilitating hypertension in diabetes still remain to be elucidated. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which is a higher risk factor for insulin resistance, shares many predisposing factors with diabetes. However, little work has been performed on the pathogenesis of hypertension in type 2 diabetes (T2DM with NAFLD. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of hypertension in different glycemic statuses and to analyze relationships between NAFLD, metabolic risks, and hypertension within a large community-based population after informed written consent. A total of 9473 subjects aged over 45 years, including 1648 patients with T2DM, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Clinical and biochemical parameters of all participants were determined. The results suggested that the patients with prediabetes or T2DM were with higher risks to have hypertension. T2DM with NAFLD had significantly higher levels of blood pressure, triglyceride, uric acid, and HOMA-IR than those without NAFLD. Data analyses suggested that hypertriglyceridemia [OR = 1.773 (1.396, 2.251], NAFLD [OR = 2.344 (1.736, 3.165], hyperuricemia [OR = 1.474 (1.079, 2.012], and insulin resistance [OR = 1.948 (1.540, 2.465] were associated with the higher prevalence of hypertension independent of other metabolic risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Further studies are needed to focus on these associations.

  14. Association of the components of the metabolic syndrome with non- alcoholic fatty liver disease among normal-weight, overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Kelishadi Roya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, abnormalities of liver enzymes and sonographic fatty liver, as well as the inter-related associations in normal weight, overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of 1107 students (56.1% girls, aged 6-18 years in Isfahan, Iran. In addition to physical examination, fasting blood glucose, serum lipid profile and liver enzymes were determined. Liver sonography was performed among 931 participants. These variables were compared among participants with different body mass index (BMI categories. Results From lower to higher BMI category, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and systolic blood pressure increased, and HDL-cholesterol decreased significantly. Elevated ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were documented in respectively 4.1%, 6.6% and 9.8% of normal weight group. The corresponding figure was 9.5%, 9.8% and 9.1% in overweight group, and 16.9%, 14.9% and 10.8% in obese group, respectively. In all BMI categories, ALT increased significantly by increasing the number of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Odds ratio for elevated liver enzymes and sonographic fatty liver increased significantly with higher number of the components of the metabolic syndrome and higher BMI categories before and after adjustment for age. Conclusions Because of the interrelationship of biochemical and sonographic indexes of fatty liver with the components of the metabolic syndrome, and with increase in their number, it is suggested to determine the clinical impact of such association in future longitudinal studies.

  15. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    ter Horst, Kasper W.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2017-01-01

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be

  16. Liver fat content in type 2 diabetes: relationship with hepatic perfusion and substrate metabolism

    Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; van der Meer, Rutger W.; Lubberink, Mark; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; de Roos, Albert; Twisk, Jos W.; Heine, Robert J.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in type 2 diabetes. It is causally linked to the features of the metabolic syndrome, liver cirrhosis, and cardiovascular disease. Experimental data have indicated that increased liver fat may impair hepatic perfusion and metabolism. The aim of the current study was to

  17. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the available observational and intervention studies that have investigated the influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat content. Findings from observational studies are conflicting with some reporting that relative to healthy controls, patients with NAFLD consume diets higher in total fat/saturated fatty acids, whilst others find they consume diets higher in carbohydrates/sugars. From the limited number of intervention studies that have been undertaken, a consistent finding is a hypercaloric diet, regardless of whether the excess calories have been provided either as fat, sugar, or both, increases liver fat content. In contrast, a hypocaloric diet decreases liver fat content. Findings from both hyper- and hypo-caloric feeding studies provide some suggestion that macronutrient composition may also play a role in regulating liver fat content and this is supported by data from isocaloric feeding studies; fatty acid composition and/or carbohydrate content/type appear to influence whether there is accrual of liver fat or not. The mechanisms by which specific macronutrients, when consumed as part of an isocaloric diet, cause a change in liver fat remain to be fully elucidated. PMID:28947639

  18. Influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat accumulation and metabolism.

    Parry, Siôn A; Hodson, Leanne

    2017-12-01

    The liver is a principal metabolic organ within the human body and has a major role in regulating carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. With increasing rates of obesity, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is growing. It remains unclear why NAFLD, which is now defined as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, develops but lifestyle factors such as diet (ie, total calorie and specific nutrient intakes), appear to play a key role. Here we review the available observational and intervention studies that have investigated the influence of dietary macronutrients on liver fat content. Findings from observational studies are conflicting with some reporting that relative to healthy controls, patients with NAFLD consume diets higher in total fat/saturated fatty acids, whilst others find they consume diets higher in carbohydrates/sugars. From the limited number of intervention studies that have been undertaken, a consistent finding is a hypercaloric diet, regardless of whether the excess calories have been provided either as fat, sugar, or both, increases liver fat content. In contrast, a hypocaloric diet decreases liver fat content. Findings from both hyper- and hypo-caloric feeding studies provide some suggestion that macronutrient composition may also play a role in regulating liver fat content and this is supported by data from isocaloric feeding studies; fatty acid composition and/or carbohydrate content/type appear to influence whether there is accrual of liver fat or not. The mechanisms by which specific macronutrients, when consumed as part of an isocaloric diet, cause a change in liver fat remain to be fully elucidated. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  20. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    A. F. Minov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Evolving paradigms

    Lonardo, Amedeo; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Maurantonio, Mauro; Marrazzo, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Luca; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio

    2017-01-01

    In the last years new evidence has accumulated on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) challenging the paradigms that had been holding the scene over the previous 30 years. NAFLD has such an epidemic prevalence as to make it impossible to screen general population looking for NAFLD cases. Conversely, focusing on those cohorts of individuals exposed to the highest risk of NAFLD could be a more rational approach. NAFLD, which can be diagnosed with either non-invasive strategies or through liver biopsy, is a pathogenically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. The existence of metabolic as opposed to genetic-associated disease, notably including ”lean NAFLD” has recently been recognized. Moreover, NAFLD is a systemic condition, featuring metabolic, cardiovascular and (hepatic/extra-hepatic) cancer risk. Among the clinico-laboratory features of NAFLD we discuss hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, gallstones, psoriasis and selected endocrine derangements. NAFLD is a precursor of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome and progressive liver disease develops in T2D patients in whom the course of disease is worsened by NAFLD. Finally, lifestyle changes and drug treatment options to be implemented in the individual patient are also critically discussed. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the new concepts on clinical and pathogenic heterogeneity of NAFLD, a systemic disorder with a multifactorial pathogenesis and protean clinical manifestations. It is highly prevalent in certain cohorts of individuals who are thus potentially amenable to selective screening strategies, intensive follow-up schedules for early identification of liver-related and extrahepatic complications and in whom earlier and more aggressive treatment schedules should be carried out whenever possible. PMID:29085206

  2. Bone histomorphometric changes after liver transplantation for chronic cholestatic liver disease

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, JD; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with advanced liver disease, especially chronic cholestasis, often have osteopenia, which worsens early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) before starting to recover. The changes in bone metabolism leading to this rapid loss of bone after OLT, and to its recovery,

  3. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  4. Metabonomics Research Progress on Liver Diseases.

    Yu, Mengqian; Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qingwei; Wu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics as the new omics technique develops after genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and has rapid development at present. Liver diseases are worldwide public health problems. In China, chronic hepatitis B and its secondary diseases are the common liver diseases. They can be diagnosed by the combination of history, virology, liver function, and medical imaging. However, some patients seldom have relevant physical examination, so the diagnosis may be delayed. Many other liver diseases, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and autoimmune liver diseases, still do not have definite diagnostic markers; the diagnosis consists of history, medical imaging, and the relevant score. As a result, the clinical work becomes very complex. So it has broad prospects to explore the specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver diseases with metabolomics. In this paper, there are several summaries which are related to the current research progress and application of metabolomics on biomarkers of liver diseases.

  5. Application of localized 31P MRS saturation transfer at 7 T for measurement of ATP metabolism in the liver: reproducibility and initial clinical application in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Valkovic, Ladislav; Gajdosik, Martin; Chmelik, Marek; Trattnig, Siegfried; Traussnigg, Stefan; Kienbacher, Christian; Trauner, Michael; Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael; Bogner, Wolfgang; Krssak, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Saturation transfer (ST) phosphorus MR spectroscopy ( 31 P MRS) enables in vivo insight into energy metabolism and thus could identify liver conditions currently diagnosed only by biopsy. This study assesses the reproducibility of the localized 31 P MRS ST in liver at 7 T and tests its potential for noninvasive differentiation of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and steatohepatitis (NASH). After the ethics committee approval, reproducibility of the localized 31 P MRS ST at 7 T and the biological variation of acquired hepato-metabolic parameters were assessed in healthy volunteers. Subsequently, 16 suspected NAFL/NASH patients underwent MRS measurements and diagnostic liver biopsy. The Pi-to-ATP exchange parameters were compared between the groups by a Mann-Whitney U test and related to the liver fat content estimated by a single-voxel proton ( 1 H) MRS, measured at 3 T. The mean exchange rate constant (k) in healthy volunteers was 0.31 ± 0.03 s -1 with a coefficient of variation of 9.0 %. Significantly lower exchange rates (p -1 ) when compared to healthy volunteers, and NAFL patients (k = 0.30 ± 0.05 s -1 ). Significant correlation was found between the k value and the liver fat content (r = 0.824, p 31 P MRS ST technique provides a tool for gaining insight into hepatic ATP metabolism and could contribute to the differentiation of NAFL and NASH. (orig.)

  6. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Simple Glucose Metabolism Parameters may Reliably Predict Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Features.

    Cazzo, Everton; Jimenez, Laísa Simakawa; Gestic, Martinho Antonio; Utrini, Murillo Pimentel; Chaim, Fábio Henrique Mendonça; Chaim, Felipe David Mendonça; Pareja, José Carlos; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the correlation between features of NAFLD among individuals with morbid obesity and the surrogate IR markers homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), product of triglycerides and glucose (TyG), and triglyceride-to-high-density-lipoprotein ratio (TG/HDL-c). A cross-sectional study, which enrolled 89 individuals who consecutively underwent bariatric surgery from February through December 2015, was conducted. NAFLD was assessed through histological examination of liver biopsies and correlated with the values of HOMA, TyG, and TG/HDL-c and their respective cutoff points for insulin resistance (IR). xThe prevalence of liver steatosis was 68.5%; the affected individuals presented significantly higher fasting glucose levels (p diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (p < 0.001). Fibrosis occurred in 66.3% of the individuals and was significantly associated with higher levels of HbA1c (p < 0.05) and a higher prevalence of T2DM (p < 0.05). Steatohepatitis was present in 64% of the individuals and was significantly associated with older age (p < 0.05), higher levels of fasting glucose (p < 0.05), and a higher prevalence of T2DM (p < 0.001). After Bonferroni's adjustment, T2DM was significantly correlated with fibrosis (p < 0.01) and steatohepatitis (p < 0.001) and older age was significantly correlated with fibrosis (p < 0.05). T2DM was the only variable independently associated with fibrosis and steatohepatitis (p < 0.05 in both cases). T2DM was a significant predictor of NAFLD features among individuals undergoing bariatric surgery; higher Hb A1c was correlated with fibrosis. T2DM was independently associated with fibrosis and steatohepatitis. HOMA, TyG, and TG/HDL-c ratio did not present significant associations with NAFLD.

  7. Osteopontin regulates the cross-talk between phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol metabolism in mouse liver.

    Nuñez-Garcia, Maitane; Gomez-Santos, Beatriz; Buqué, Xabier; García-Rodriguez, Juan L; Romero, Marta R; Marin, Jose J G; Arteta, Beatriz; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Castaño, Luis; Syn, Wing-Kin; Fresnedo, Olatz; Aspichueta, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in different liver pathologies in which metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark. Here, we investigated whether OPN could alter liver, and more specifically hepatocyte, lipid metabolism and the mechanism involved. In mice, lack of OPN enhanced cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) levels and promoted loss of phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in liver; in vivo treatment with recombinant (r)OPN caused opposite effects. rOPN directly decreased CYP7A1 levels through activation of focal adhesion kinase-AKT signaling in hepatocytes. PC content was also decreased in OPN-deficient (OPN-KO) hepatocytes in which de novo FA and PC synthesis was lower, whereas cholesterol (CHOL) synthesis was higher, than in WT hepatocytes. In vivo inhibition of cholesterogenesis normalized liver PC content in OPN-KO mice, demonstrating that OPN regulates the cross-talk between liver CHOL and PC metabolism. Matched liver and serum samples showed a positive correlation between serum OPN levels and liver PC and CHOL concentration in nonobese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver. In conclusion, OPN regulates CYP7A1 levels and the metabolic fate of liver acetyl-CoA as a result of CHOL and PC metabolism interplay. The results suggest that CYP7A1 is a main axis and that serum OPN could disrupt liver PC and CHOL metabolism, contributing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression in nonobese patients.

  8. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    L.V. Chistova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome that represents a totality of interrelated carbohydrate metabolism and lipid disorders, as well as a mechanism regulating arterial tension and endothelium function is one of the critical issues in pediatrics. In recent years, children with metabolic syndrome are increasingly diagnosed with liver injuries symptoms that are associated with a fatty transformation of the liver [1–3]. In this case, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome is diagnosed. The diagnosis is confirmed in the absence of alcohol abuse in the past medical history, virus and autoimmune liver disease markers, elimination of toxic and drug influence, as wells as disorders of copper and iron exchange in the patient’s system. One of the key risk factors for developing NAFLD in children is overeating and reduced physical activities. It was believed in the past that NAFLD is relatively benign, however, there is evidence in current literature that this is a pathological condition that may develop and result in extreme fibrotic alterations in the liver parenchymatous tissue all the way to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [4]. Early-stage identification and timely launch of therapy for NAFLD in children represents one of the most important objectives in modern healthcare. Key words: metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, steatohepatosis. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(6:68-72

  9. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Xu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients.

  10. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  11. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression.

  12. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    ... here and still get the great care and treatment I received in Michigan.” MDA Is Here to Help You T he Muscular Dystrophy Association offers a vast array of services to help you and your family deal with metabolic diseases of muscle. The staff at your local MDA office is ...

  13. Autoimmune liver disease and therapy in childhood

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver. In childhood, autoimmune liver disorders include autoimmune hepatitis type I and II, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, Coombs-positive giant cell hepatitis, and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation. Autoimmune liver disease has a more aggressive course in children, especially autoimmune hepatitis type II. Standard therapy is a combination of corticosteroids and azathioprine. Around 80 % of children with autoimmune liver disease show a rapid response to combination therapy. The non-responders are treated with more potent drugs, otherwise autoimmune disease progresses to cirrhosis of the liver and the child needs liver transplantation as rescue therapy.

  14. Epicardial adipose tissue relating to anthropometrics, metabolic derangements and fatty liver disease independently contributes to serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein beyond body fat composition: a study validated with computed tomography.

    Lai, Yau-Huei; Yun, Chun-Ho; Yang, Fei-Shih; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Wu, Yih-Jer; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Tin-Yu; Bezerra, Hiram G; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2012-02-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) measured by echocardiography has been proposed to be associated with metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular risks. However, its independent association with fatty liver disease and systemic inflammation beyond clinical variables and body fat remains less well known. The relationships between EAT and various factors of metabolic derangement were retrospectively examined in consecutive 359 asymptomatic subjects (mean age, 51.6 years; 31% women) who participated in a cardiovascular health survey. Echocardiography-derived regional EAT thickness from parasternal long-axis and short-axis views was quantified. A subset of data from 178 randomly chosen participants were validated using 16-slice multidetector computed tomography. Body fat composition was evaluated using bioelectrical impedance from foot-to-foot measurements. Increased EAT was associated with increased waist circumference, body weight, and body mass index (all P values for trend = .005). Graded increases in serum fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and alanine transaminase levels were observed across higher EAT tertiles as well as a graded decrease of high-density lipoprotein (all P values for trend <.05). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for identifying metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease were 0.8 and 0.77, with odds ratio estimated at 3.65 and 2.63, respectively. In a multivariate model, EAT remained independently associated with higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fatty liver disease. These data suggested that echocardiography-based epicardial fat measurement can be clinically feasible and was related to several metabolic abnormalities and independently associated fatty liver disease. In addition, EAT amount may contribute to systemic inflammation beyond traditional cardiovascular risks and body fat composition. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Liver involvement in coeliac disease].

    Riestra, S; Fernández, E; Rodrigo, L

    1999-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy in which, genetic, immunologic and environmental factors are implied. Several extradigestive diseases have been described in association with coeliac disease, which share most of the times an immunologic mechanism. The liver is damaged in coeliac disease, and it has been considered by some authors as an extraintestinal manifestation of the disease. In the present revision we discuss the different hepatic diseases related with the coeliac disease, as well as the best approach to diagnosis and therapy of choice. At diagnosis, it is very frequent to find an asymptomatic hipertransaminasemia, which frequently disappears after gluten suppression; the morphological substratum found in this alteration is a non-specific reactive hepatitis in the majority of cases. Coeliac disease is a demonstrated cause of cryptogenic hipertransaminasemia. In a small percentage of patient with coeliac disease an association has been found with other immunological liver diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. Few studies exist that include a large number of patient, and the results on occasions are discordant. Nevertheless, the strongest association is with autoimmune hepatitis and with primary biliary cirrhosis. Several communications of isolated cases of rare hepatic diseases, which probably, only reflect a fortuitous association, have been cited in the literature.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, to struggle with the strangle: Oxygen availability in fatty livers.

    Anavi, Sarit; Madar, Zecharia; Tirosh, Oren

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Oxygen is a central component of the cellular microenvironment, which participate in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation, functions and energy metabolism. Accordingly, sufficient oxygen supply is an important factor for tissue durability, mainly in highly metabolic tissues, such as the liver. Accumulating evidence from the past few decades provides strong support for the existence of interruptions in oxygen availability in fatty livers. This outcome may be the consequence of both, impaired systemic microcirculation and cellular membrane modifications which occur under steatotic conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the main factors which can affect oxygen supply in fatty liver. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    syndrome after liver transplantation. METHODS: The databases Medline and Scopus were searched for observational studies evaluating prevalence and risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. Meta-analyses were performed based on odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable analyses...

  18. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    M Khalili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The liver is involved in the synthesis and metabolism of many kinds of hormones, various abnormalities hormone levels are found in advanced liver disease. For example the liver is, extremely sensitive to changes in insulin or glucagon levels. The liver is the primary organ of iron storage is frequently involved, diabetes is common in patients with iron overload and may be seen in cirrhosis. Chronic infection with HCV is associated with insulin resistance. Thyroid disease often accompanies chronic hepatitis C infection .Anti thyroid autoantibodies are also found in chronic HCV infection. Nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLDas a most common cause of chronic liver disease in western world ,as well accompanied by Type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism also have been in NAFLD.The patients with NAFLD and Hypopituitarism may be susceptible to central obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance leading to disease progression. Hepatic cirrhosis as the end stage of chronic liver disease is also associated with hypogonadism and signs of feminization. The peripheral metabolism of steroids is altered in many of hypogonadism, low testosterone level decreased libido, infertility, reduced secondary sex hair and gynecomastia, reduced spermatogenesis and peritubular fibrosis are found in men with cirrhosis .The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis is affected in liver disease. In cirrhotic patients the estrogen/androgen ratio is usually increased, the level of testosterone and dihydroepiandosteron are reduced while the estradiol level are normal or slightly elevated, these alterations are dependent on the severity of the liver disease.Succsesfull orthotropic liver transplantation  leads to improvement of the sex hormone disturbances. The pathogenesis of gynecomastia is due to the loss of equilibrium between estrogen and androgen caused by a feminizing state but it is due to increased estrogen precursor in

  19. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension...

  20. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  1. Application of localized {sup 31}P MRS saturation transfer at 7 T for measurement of ATP metabolism in the liver: reproducibility and initial clinical application in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Gajdosik, Martin; Chmelik, Marek; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Traussnigg, Stefan; Kienbacher, Christian; Trauner, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Bogner, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Krssak, Martin [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Saturation transfer (ST) phosphorus MR spectroscopy ({sup 31}P MRS) enables in vivo insight into energy metabolism and thus could identify liver conditions currently diagnosed only by biopsy. This study assesses the reproducibility of the localized {sup 31}P MRS ST in liver at 7 T and tests its potential for noninvasive differentiation of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and steatohepatitis (NASH). After the ethics committee approval, reproducibility of the localized {sup 31}P MRS ST at 7 T and the biological variation of acquired hepato-metabolic parameters were assessed in healthy volunteers. Subsequently, 16 suspected NAFL/NASH patients underwent MRS measurements and diagnostic liver biopsy. The Pi-to-ATP exchange parameters were compared between the groups by a Mann-Whitney U test and related to the liver fat content estimated by a single-voxel proton ({sup 1}H) MRS, measured at 3 T. The mean exchange rate constant (k) in healthy volunteers was 0.31 ± 0.03 s{sup -1} with a coefficient of variation of 9.0 %. Significantly lower exchange rates (p < 0.01) were found in NASH patients (k = 0.17 ± 0.04 s{sup -1}) when compared to healthy volunteers, and NAFL patients (k = 0.30 ± 0.05 s{sup -1}). Significant correlation was found between the k value and the liver fat content (r = 0.824, p < 0.01). Our data suggest that the {sup 31}P MRS ST technique provides a tool for gaining insight into hepatic ATP metabolism and could contribute to the differentiation of NAFL and NASH. (orig.)

  2. Psoriasis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Carrascosa, J M; Bonanad, C; Dauden, E; Botella, R; Olveira-Martín, A

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver condition in the West. The prevalence and severity of NAFLD is higher and the prognosis worse in patients with psoriasis. The pathogenic link between psoriasis and NAFLD is chronic inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance, a common finding in diseases associated with psoriasis. NAFLD should therefore be ruled out during the initial evaluation of patients with psoriasis, in particular if they show signs of metabolic syndrome and require systemic treatment. Concomitant psoriasis and NAFLD and the likelihood of synergy between them place limitations on general recommendations and treatment for these patients given the potential for liver toxicity. As hepatotoxic risk is associated with some of the conventional drugs used in this setting (e.g., acitretin, methotrexate, and ciclosporin), patients prescribed these treatments should be monitored as appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents hold the promise of potential benefits based on their effects on the inflammatory process and improving peripheral insulin resistance. However, cases of liver toxicity have also been reported in relation to these biologics. No evidence has emerged to suggest that anti-p40 or anti-interleukin 17 agents provide benefits or have adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatty liver disease--a practical guide for GPs.

    Iser, David; Ryan, Marno

    2013-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), encompassing both simple steatosis and non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), is the most common cause of liver disease in Australia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease needs to be considered in the context of the metabolic syndrome, as cardiovascular disease will account for much of the mortality associated with NAFLD. To provide an approach to the identification of NAFLD in general practice, the distinction between simple steatosis and NASH, and the management of these two conditions. Non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis is more common in the presence of diabetes, obesity, older age and increased inflammation, and is more likely to progress to cirrhosis. Cirrhosis may be complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma or liver failure. Hepatocellular carcinoma has also been described in NASH without cirrhosis. Assessment and treatment of features of the metabolic syndrome may reduce associated cardiovascular mortality. Numerous agents have been evaluated, but weight loss remains the only effective treatment for NAFLD.

  4. Optimal cutoff points for HOMA-IR and QUICKI in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A population based study.

    Motamed, Nima; Miresmail, Seyed Javad Haji; Rabiee, Behnam; Keyvani, Hossein; Farahani, Behzad; Maadi, Mansooreh; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the optimal cutoff points for homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The baseline data of 5511 subjects aged ≥18years of a cohort study in northern Iran were utilized to analyze. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to determine the discriminatory capability of HOMA-IR and QUICKI in the diagnosis of MetS and NAFLD. Youden index was utilized to determine the optimal cutoff points of HOMA-IR and QUICKI in the diagnosis of MetS and NAFLD. The optimal cutoff points for HOMA-IR in the diagnosis of MetS and NAFLD were 2.0 [sensitivity=64.4%, specificity=66.8%] and 1.79 [sensitivity=66.2%, specificity=62.2%] in men and were 2.5 [sensitivity=57.6%, specificity=67.9%] and 1.95 [sensitivity=65.1%, specificity=54.7%] in women respectively. Furthermore, the optimal cutoff points for QUICKI in the diagnosis of MetS and NAFLD were 0.343 [sensitivity=63.7%, specificity=67.8%] and 0.347 [sensitivity=62.9%, specificity=65.0%] in men and were 0.331 [sensitivity=55.7%, specificity=70.7%] and 0.333 [sensitivity=53.2%, specificity=67.7%] in women respectively. Not only the optimal cutoff points of HOMA-IR and QUICKI were different for MetS and NAFLD, but also different cutoff points were obtained for men and women for each of these two conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Global and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Elimination Gene Expression in the Progressive Stages of Human Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Lake, A.D.; Novák, Petr; Fisher, C.D.; Jackson, J.P.; Hardwick, R.N.; Billheimer, D.D.; Klimecki, W.T.; Cherrington, N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 10 (2011), s. 1954-1960 ISSN 0090-9556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Steatosis * Steatohepatitis * Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.733, year: 2011

  6. Role of folate in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Sid, Victoria; Siow, Yaw L; O, Karmin

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of chronic liver conditions that are characterized by steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and liver injury. The global prevalence of NAFLD is rapidly increasing in proportion to the rising incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because NAFLD is a multifaceted disorder with many underlying metabolic abnormalities, currently, there is no pharmacological agent that is therapeutically approved for the treatment of this disease. Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays an essential role in one-carbon transfer reactions involved in nucleic acid biosynthesis, methylation reactions, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The liver is the primary organ responsible for storage and metabolism of folates. Low serum folate levels have been observed in patients with obesity and diabetes. It has been reported that a low level of endogenous folates in rodents perturbs folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism, and may be associated with development of metabolic diseases such as NAFLD. This review highlights the biological role of folate in the progression of NAFLD and its associated metabolic complications including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Understanding the role of folate in metabolic disease may position this vitamin as a potential therapeutic for NAFLD.

  7. Liver diseases and aging : friends or foes?

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Di Biase, Stefano; Koonen, Debby; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the only internal human organ capable of natural regeneration of lost tissue, as little as 25% of a liver can regenerate into a whole liver. The process of aging predisposes to hepatic functional and structural impairment and metabolic risk. Therefore, understanding how aging could

  8. Systematic review with meta-analysis: risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease suggest a shared altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile between lean and obese patients.

    Sookoian, S; Pirola, C J

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with the co-occurrence of multiple pathological conditions characterising the metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity in particular. However, NAFLD also develops in lean subjects, whose risk factors remain poorly defined. We performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies, along with the data pertaining to our own population (n=336 patients). Data from lean (n=1966) and obese (n=5938) patients with NAFLD were analysed; lean (n=9946) and obese (n=6027) subjects without NAFLD served as controls. Relative to the lean non-NAFLD controls, lean patients with NAFLD were older (3.79±0.72 years, P=1.36×10 -6 ) and exhibited the entire spectrum of the MetS risk factors. Specifically, they had a significant (P=10 -10 ) increase in plasma glucose levels (6.44±1.12 mg/dL) and HOMA-IR (0.52±0.094-unit increment), blood lipids (triglycerides: 48.37±3.6, P=10 -10 and total cholesterol: 7.04±3.8, mg/dL, P=4.2×10 -7 ), systolic (5.64±0.7) and diastolic (3.37±0.9) blood pressure (mm Hg), P=10 -10 , and waist circumference (5.88±0.4 cm, P=10 -10 ); values denote difference in means±SE. Nevertheless, the overall alterations in the obese group were much more severe when compared to lean subjects, regardless of the presence of NAFLD. Meta-regression suggested that NAFLD is a modifier of the level of blood lipids. Lean and obese patients with NAFLD share a common altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile. The former, while having normal body weight, showed excess of abdominal adipose tissue as well as other MetS features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  10. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  11. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    Until the 1960s, liver disease of the alcoholic patient was attributed exclusively to dietary deficiencies. Since then, however, our understanding of the impact of alcoholism on nutritional status has undergone a progressive evolution. Alcohol, because of its high energy content, was at first perceived to act exclusively as 'empty calories' displacing other nutrients in the diet, and causing primary malnutrition through decreased intake of essential nutrients. With improvement in the overall nutrition of the population, the role of primary malnutrition waned and secondary malnutrition was emphasized as a result of a better understanding of maldigestion and malabsorption caused by chronic alcohol consumption and various diseases associated with chronic alcoholism. At the same time, the concept of the direct toxicity of alcohol came to the forefront as an explanation for the widespread cellular injury. Some of the hepatotoxicity was found to result from the metabolic disturbances associated with the oxidation of ethanol via the liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) pathway and the redox changes produced by the generated NADH, which in turn affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and purines. Exaggeration of the redox change by the relative hypoxia which prevails physiologically in the perivenular zone contributes to the exacerbation of the ethanol-induced lesions in zone 3. In addition to ADH, ethanol can be oxidized by liver microsomes: studies over the last twenty years have culminated in the molecular elucidation of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450IIE1 (CYP2E1) which contributes not only to ethanol metabolism and tolerance, but also to the selective hepatic perivenular toxicity of various xenobiotics. Their activation by CYP2E1 now provides an understanding for the increased susceptibility of the heavy drinker to the toxicity of industrial solvents, anaesthetic agents, commonly prescribed drugs, 'over the counter' analgesics, chemical

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis.

    Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-09-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  13. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    Betrosian, Alex P; Agarwal, Banwari; Douzinas, Emmanuel E

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver dise...

  14. Diagnostic methods of fatty liver disease

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is defined as an abnormal accumulation of lipids into the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Different kinds of fatty liver diseases are becoming the most important etiologies of end-stage liver disease in the western world. Because fatty liver is a theoretically reversible process, timely and accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for potential therapeutic options. This work describes major diagnostic methods and discusses particular advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.

  15. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestatic liver diseases: pathogenesis and therapy

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue, and metabolic bone disease are frequent complications of cholestatic liver diseases, which can be quite distressing for the patient and can considerably reduce the quality of life. The molecular pathogenesis of these extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis is poorly understood,

  16. Vitamin D in chronic liver disease.

    Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) and several related extrahepatic manifestations such as hepatic osteodystrophy are associated with deficiency of vitamin D, which has therefore been suggested as therapeutic target. Vitamin D undergoes hepatic 25-hydroxylation, rendering the liver critical to the metabolic activation of this vitamin. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in CLD patients, and vitamin D levels are inversely related to the severity of CLD. Declining levels of carrier proteins such as albumin and vitamin D-binding protein might also be critical in CLD. Intervention studies report improvements of CLD following supplementation, and benefits to health outcomes in particular with respect to hepatitis C virus infection have recently been documented. We discuss vitamin D sources, functions and metabolism with a focus on the inherent complications of analytical measurements, such as the interference of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D C-3 epimers. Global discrepancies in the definition of optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are covered, and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in CLD is reviewed. We also address the functional mechanisms underlying this deficiency, and refer to associations between genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism and CLD. Lastly, we consider the health implications of a vitamin D deficiency in CLD and consider therapeutic options. Herein, we focus on the epidemiological and functional relationships between vitamin D deficiency and CLD, followed by a discussion of the potential implications for therapeutic interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Toussaint, Mathilda J. M.; Youssef, Sameh A.; Tooten, Peter C. J.; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver

  18. CORRELATION OF NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AND FEATURES OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MORBIDLY OBESE PATIENTS IN THE PREOPERATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Barros, Fernando de; Setúbal, Sergio; Martinho, José Manoel; Ferraz, Loraine; Gaudêncio, Andressa

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic and chronic disease that can bring other comorbidities to the patient. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is present in up to 90% of these patients and can progress to hepatitis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship of this liver disease and obesity is already well known; however, it is possible that some parameters of the comorbidities are more related than others in the pathophysiology of the disease. Was analyzed the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the comorbidities of metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese patients. Was involved ultrasonography and laboratory assessment of obese patients before bariatric surgery. NAFLD was assessed using the same sonography parameters for all patients. Based on the results, the patients were divided into groups with and without NAFLD. Comparisons between them involved clinical and laboratory variables such as fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment - insulin resistance), glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyl transferase, C-reactive protein, albumin and ferritin. Patients who reported alcohol abuse (defined as the consumption of >14 drinks per week) or who had hepatitis were excluded. Eighty-two patients (74 women and 8 men) were studied, of whom 53 (64.6%) had NAFLD and 29 (35.4%) did not. The levels of glycated hemoglobin (p=0.05) and LDL cholesterol (p=0.01) were significantly altered in patients with NAFLD. However, weight, body mass index and excess weight did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.835, p=0.488 and p=0.727, respectively). Altered LDL cholesterol and glycated hemoglobin levels were related to the presence of NAFLD. A obesidade é doença epidêmica e crônica que pode trazer outras comorbidades ao paciente. A doença hepática gordurosa não alcoólica está presente em até 90% desses pacientes e pode evoluir para

  19. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  20. Genetic networks of liver metabolism revealed by integration of metabolic and transcriptional profiling.

    Christine T Ferrara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL influencing disease-related phenotypes have been detected through gene mapping and positional cloning, identification of the individual gene(s and molecular pathways leading to those phenotypes is often elusive. One way to improve understanding of genetic architecture is to classify phenotypes in greater depth by including transcriptional and metabolic profiling. In the current study, we have generated and analyzed mRNA expression and metabolic profiles in liver samples obtained in an F2 intercross between the diabetes-resistant C57BL/6 leptin(ob/ob and the diabetes-susceptible BTBR leptin(ob/ob mouse strains. This cross, which segregates for genotype and physiological traits, was previously used to identify several diabetes-related QTL. Our current investigation includes microarray analysis of over 40,000 probe sets, plus quantitative mass spectrometry-based measurements of sixty-seven intermediary metabolites in three different classes (amino acids, organic acids, and acyl-carnitines. We show that liver metabolites map to distinct genetic regions, thereby indicating that tissue metabolites are heritable. We also demonstrate that genomic analysis can be integrated with liver mRNA expression and metabolite profiling data to construct causal networks for control of specific metabolic processes in liver. As a proof of principle of the practical significance of this integrative approach, we illustrate the construction of a specific causal network that links gene expression and metabolic changes in the context of glutamate metabolism, and demonstrate its validity by showing that genes in the network respond to changes in glutamine and glutamate availability. Thus, the methods described here have the potential to reveal regulatory networks that contribute to chronic, complex, and highly prevalent diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes.

  1. COMPLICATIONS OF ALCOHOLIC LIVER DISEASE AND DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS

    Milena Ilić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is one of the leading diseases affecting people’s health and immunity worldwide. Nearly 30 thousand people in the USA die from chronic liver damage. The liver is the central organ in the metabolism of alcohol. Alcohol is primarily a hepatotoxic agent. Hepatotoxicity of alcohol is clinically manifested by the development of alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis. It is characterized by appropriate symptomatology, depending on the degree of liver damage. Excessive use of alcohol for a long period of time, along with malnutrition, genetic and ethnic predisposition, leads to alcoholic cirrhosis and the development of its complications. Portal hypertension damages other organs and organ systems, causing hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc. For these reasons, alcoholism reduction is given priority, as well as reduction of morbidity and mortality of people with alcoholic chronic liver damage. Therefore, early diagnosis of alcohol abuse is necessary, as well as timely diagnosis of different degrees of alcoholic liver damage. The diagnosis of chronic alcoholic liver damage is set on the basis of confirmed data of alcohol consumption; liver function test (serum markers aminotransferase, gammaglutamyl transferase, prothrombin time, serum bilirubin and albumin level; serum markers of liver fibrosis. Fibrosis markers are directly involved in sedimentation and dissolution of extracellular matrix, i.e. in the process of fibrogenesis and fibrinolysis of liver tissues. They include markers and enzymes of metabolism, as well as cytokines and chemokines.

  2. 'Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease' bij kinderen : een nieuwe complicatie van obesitas

    Bocca, Gianni; Stolk, R.P.; Scheenstra, R.; Sauer, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a range of chronic liver diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis with liver failure. In children, NAFLD is mainly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, the results of an unhealthy lifestyle. Insulin resistance and

  3. Gaucher disease of the liver: CT appearance

    Glass, R.B.J.; Poznanski, A.K.; Young, S.; Urban, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a child with Gaucher disease with hepatic involvement that caused portal hypertension. Computerized tomography (CT) showed distortion of liver parenchyma and central necrosis of the liver. (orig.)

  4. Skeletal Muscle Derived IL-6 in Liver and Adipose Tissue Metabolism

    Knudsen, Jakob Grunnet

    Summary Physical activity can lead to metabolic disease and treatment of several metabolic diseases include exercise training. Skeletal muscle has, due to its central role in glucose and fat metabolism at rest and during exercise been studied in detail with regard to exercise training. The role...... of both liver and adipose tissue regulation in whole body metabolism has come in to focus and it has been shown that both tissues are subject to exercise training-induced adaptations. However, the contribution of endocrine factors to the regulation of exercise training-induced adaptations in liver...... and adipose tissue metabolism is unknown. It has been suggested that myokines, such as IL-6, released from skeletal muscle affects liver and adipose tissue and are involved in the regulation of exercise training adaptations. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of skeletal muscle derived...

  5. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases.

  6. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Márcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2011-01-01

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 μM, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 μM, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of α-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: ► We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. ► The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. ► Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and inhibits gluconeogenesis. ► The cellular ATP content is diminished. ► Juglone can

  7. Influence of nutrition on liver oxidative metabolism.

    Jorquera, F; Culebras, J M; González-Gallego, J

    1996-06-01

    The liver plays a major role in the disposition of the majority of drugs. This is due to the presence of several drug-metabolizing enzyme systems, including a group of membrane-bound mixed-function oxidative enzymes, mainly the cytochrome P450 system. Hepatic oxidative capacity can be assessed by changes in antipyrine metabolism. Different drugs and other factors may induce or inhibit the cytochrome P450-dependent system. This effect is important in terms of the efficacy or toxicity of drugs that are substrates for the system. Microsomal oxidation in animals fed with protein-deficient diets is depressed. The mixed-function oxidase activity recovers after a hyperproteic diet or the addition of lipids. Similar findings have been reported in patients with protein-calorie malnutrition, although results in the elderly are conflicting. Different studies have revealed that microsomal oxidation is impaired by total parenteral nutrition and that this effect is absent when changing the caloric source from carbohydrates to a conventional amino acid solution or after lipid addition, especially when administered as medium-chain/long-chain triglyceride mixtures. Peripheral parenteral nutrition appears to increase antipyrine clearance.

  8. Perioperative management of liver surgery-review on pathophysiology of liver disease and liver failure.

    Gasteiger, Lukas; Eschertzhuber, Stephan; Tiefenthaler, Werner

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of patients present for liver surgery. Given the complex pathophysiological changes in chronic liver disease (CLD), it is pivotal to understand the fundamentals of chronic and acute liver failure. This review will give an overview on related organ dysfunction as well as recommendations for perioperative management and treatment of liver failure-related symptoms.

  9. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR)

  10. Sphingolipid metabolism diseases.

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2006-12-01

    Human diseases caused by alterations in the metabolism of sphingolipids or glycosphingolipids are mainly disorders of the degradation of these compounds. The sphingolipidoses are a group of monogenic inherited diseases caused by defects in the system of lysosomal sphingolipid degradation, with subsequent accumulation of non-degradable storage material in one or more organs. Most sphingolipidoses are associated with high mortality. Both, the ratio of substrate influx into the lysosomes and the reduced degradative capacity can be addressed by therapeutic approaches. In addition to symptomatic treatments, the current strategies for restoration of the reduced substrate degradation within the lysosome are enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), cell-mediated therapy (CMT) including bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and cell-mediated "cross correction", gene therapy, and enzyme-enhancement therapy with chemical chaperones. The reduction of substrate influx into the lysosomes can be achieved by substrate reduction therapy. Patients suffering from the attenuated form (type 1) of Gaucher disease and from Fabry disease have been successfully treated with ERT.

  11. Hepatic diseases related to triglyceride metabolism.

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Álvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Hernández-Godinez, Daniel; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplastic cells. One of the main medical concerns vis-a-vis hepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis.

  12. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  13. Fatty liver as a risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy to metabolically abnormal in non-overweight individuals.

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Fukuda, Takuya; Ohbora, Akihiro; Kojima, Takao; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies identified that metabolically abnormal non-obese phenotype is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about risk factor for progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that fatty liver had a clinical impact on progression from metabolically healthy non-overweight to metabolically abnormal phenotype. In this retrospective cohort study, 14,093 Japanese (7557 men and 6736 women), who received the health-checkup program from 2004 to 2012, were enrolled. Overweight and obesity were defined as body mass index 23.0-25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m 2 . Four metabolic factors (impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and low high density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration) were used for definition of metabolically healthy (less than two factors) or metabolically abnormal (two or more). We divided the participants into three groups: metabolically healthy non-overweight (9755 individuals, men/women = 4290/5465), metabolically healthy overweight (2547 individuals, 1800/747) and metabolically healthy obesity (1791 individuals, 1267/524). Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasonography. Over the median follow-up period of 5.3 years, 873 metabolically healthy non-overweight, 512 metabolically healthy overweight and 536 metabolically healthy obesity individuals progressed to metabolically abnormal. The adjusted hazard risks of fatty liver on progression were 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.83, p = 0.005) in metabolically healthy non-overweight, 1.37 (1.12-1.66, p = 0.002) in metabolically healthy overweight and 1.38 (1.15-1.66, p overweight individuals.

  14. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  15. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  16. Vitamin A metabolic aspects and alcoholic liver disease Aspectos metabólicos da vitamina A e doença hepática alcoólica

    Tatiana Pereira de Paula

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The liver is a strategic organ in the metabolism of macro and micronutrients; when its functioning is compromised, it may cause some change in the nutritional status of vitamin A. The purpose of this article is to review scientific evidence in literature on the liver metabolism of vitamin A, the role of ethanol and retinol interactions on hepatic morphology, besides the alterations in the metabolism of this vitamin in alcoholic liver disease. Data were collected from Medline database. The liver is the main organ responsible for the storage, metabolism and distribution of vitamin A to peripheral tissues. This organ uses retinol for its normal functioning such as cell proliferation and differentiation. This way, vitamin A deficiency seems to alter liver morphology. Patients with alcoholic liver disease have been found to have low hepatic levels of retinol in all stages of their disease. In alcoholic liver disease, vitamin A deficiency may result from decreased ingestion or absorption, reduction in retinoic acid synthesis or increased degradation. Long-term alcohol intake results in reduced levels of retinoic acid, which may promote the development of liver tumor. So, in chronic alcoholic subjects, vitamin A status needs to be closely monitored to avoid its deficiency and clinical effects, however its supplementation must be done with caution since the usual dose may be toxic for those who consume ethanol.O fígado é um órgão estratégico no metabolismo de macro e de micronutrientes e, portanto, é de esperar que o comprometimento de sua função seja acompanhado de alterações no estado nutricional de vitamina A. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar na literatura evidências científicas sobre o metabolismo hepático da vitamina A, o efeito das interações entre a vitamina A e o etanol sobre a morfologia hepática, além das alterações do metabolismo dessa vitamina na doença hepática alcoólica. Os dados foram selecionados na base de dados

  17. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice[S

    Palmisano, Brian T.; Le, Thao D.; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. PMID:27354419

  18. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice.

    Palmisano, Brian T; Le, Thao D; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. S-Allyl cysteine improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats via regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and glucose metabolism

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Kodai, Shintaro; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Tsukioka, Takuma; Okada, Shigeru; Azuma, Hideki; Kubo, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    It is important to prevent and improve diabetes mellitus and its complications in a safe and low-cost manner. S-Allyl cysteine, an aged garlic extract with antioxidant activity, was investigated to determine whether S-allyl cysteine can improve type 2 diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats were used and were divided into two groups at 29 weeks of age....

  20. Coordinated and interactive expression of genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation in adipose tissue and liver during metabolic overload.

    Wen Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic metabolic overload results in lipid accumulation and subsequent inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT, often accompanied by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. In response to metabolic overload, the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory processes is adapted. However, it still remains unknown how these adaptations in gene expression in expanding WAT and liver are orchestrated and whether they are interrelated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ApoE*3Leiden mice were fed HFD or chow for different periods up to 12 weeks. Gene expression in WAT and liver over time was evaluated by micro-array analysis. WAT hypertrophy and inflammation were analyzed histologically. Bayesian hierarchical cluster analysis of dynamic WAT gene expression identified groups of genes ('clusters' with comparable expression patterns over time. HFD evoked an immediate response of five clusters of 'lipid metabolism' genes in WAT, which did not further change thereafter. At a later time point (>6 weeks, inflammatory clusters were induced. Promoter analysis of clustered genes resulted in specific key regulators which may orchestrate the metabolic and inflammatory responses in WAT. Some master regulators played a dual role in control of metabolism and inflammation. When WAT inflammation developed (>6 weeks, genes of lipid metabolism and inflammation were also affected in corresponding livers. These hepatic gene expression changes and the underlying transcriptional responses in particular, were remarkably similar to those detected in WAT. CONCLUSION: In WAT, metabolic overload induced an immediate, stable response on clusters of lipid metabolism genes and induced inflammatory genes later in time. Both processes may be controlled and interlinked by specific transcriptional regulators. When WAT inflammation began, the hepatic response to HFD resembled that in WAT. In all, WAT and liver respond to metabolic overload by

  1. Recovery of nutritional metabolism after liver transplantation.

    Sugihara, Kohei; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Teramoto, Arisa; Urano, Eri; Katayama, Takafumi; Morine, Yuji; Imura, Satoru; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative nutritional assessment is critically important to reflect nutritional management because liver transplantation (LTx) often is undertaken in patients with poor nutritional status. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status, including the non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ), resting energy expenditure (REE), nitrogen balance, and blood biochemical parameters in patients before and after LTx. Fourteen patients undergoing LTx and 10 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The npRQ and REE were measured using indirect calorimetry before LTx and at 2, 3, and 4 wk after the procedure. Blood biochemistry and nitrogen balance calculated by 24-h urine collection were performed concurrently with indirect calorimetric measurement; the results were compared between the two groups. Before LTx, npRQ was significantly lower and serum non-esterified fatty acid levels were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. Furthermore, a negative nitrogen balance was observed in the patients. These, however, improved significantly at 4 wk after LTx. REE did not significantly increase compared with the preoperative values in recipients. Blood biochemistry showed gradually increasing levels of serum cholinesterase and albumin. These failed to reach to normal levels by 4 wk post-transplant. The findings revealed that improvement of nutritional metabolism after LTx may require 4 wk. Additional nutritional strategies, therefore, may be needed to minimize catabolic state during the early post-transplant period. Adequate, individualized nutritional guidance before and after LTx should be performed in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  3. HEPATOKIN1 is a biochemistry-based model of liver metabolism for applications in medicine and pharmacology.

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Wallach, Iwona; Wünsch, Tilo; König, Matthias; Stockmann, Martin; Meierhofer, David; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2018-06-19

    The epidemic increase of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) requires a deeper understanding of the regulatory circuits controlling the response of liver metabolism to nutritional challenges, medical drugs, and genetic enzyme variants. As in vivo studies of human liver metabolism are encumbered with serious ethical and technical issues, we developed a comprehensive biochemistry-based kinetic model of the central liver metabolism including the regulation of enzyme activities by their reactants, allosteric effectors, and hormone-dependent phosphorylation. The utility of the model for basic research and applications in medicine and pharmacology is illustrated by simulating diurnal variations of the metabolic state of the liver at various perturbations caused by nutritional challenges (alcohol), drugs (valproate), and inherited enzyme disorders (galactosemia). Using proteomics data to scale maximal enzyme activities, the model is used to highlight differences in the metabolic functions of normal hepatocytes and malignant liver cells (adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma).

  4. [Endocrinological diseases, metabolic diseases, sexuality].

    Lemaire, Antoine

    2014-10-01

    Sexuality is regularly evaluated in media surveys. Relations between sexual problems and some chronic pathologies as diabetes or metabolic syndrome have been brought to light. Androgen deficiency in the aging male has become a topic of increasing interest. Hormones play an important role in sexual function and relation between hormonal status and metabolic data are now well established. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. A etiological factors of chronic liver disease in children

    Tahir, A.; Malik, F.R.; Akhtar, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronicity of liver disease is determined either by duration of liver disease or by evidence of either severe liver disease or physical stigmata of chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease may be caused commonly by persistent viral infections, metabolic diseases, drugs, autoimmune hepatitis, or unknown factors. The objective of this study was to find out the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in children. Methodology: It was a descriptive, prospective study which used a structured proforma designed to collect data of cases of CLD from both indoor and outdoor Paediatrics units of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, and Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. All children under 12 years having either clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease and/or elevated liver enzymes for more than 3 months were included in this study. Results: Sixty cases of CLD were enrolled from indoor and outdoor units from January 2010 to July 201. Thirty nine (65%) cases were male and 21 (35%) were female. Eleven children were less than 1 year, 18 were 1-5 years old and 31 were 5-12 years of age. Viral hepatitis was the most common cause found in 22 (36.7%) cases. Out of these 22 patients with viral aetiology 19 (31.66%) patients had Hepatitis C and 3 (5%) had Hepatitis B. Glycogen storage disease was seen in 8.3% cases, and biliary atresia and Wilson disease in 6.7% each. Other less commonly found cases were autoimmune hepatitis, TORCH infections, hepatoma and drug induced hepatitis (1.7% each). Cause couldn't be established in 35% cases which remained idiopathic. Conclusion: Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children, with the highest incidence of chronic Hepatitis C followed by metabolic disorders (glycogen storage disease and Wilson disease) and biliary atresia. Chronic viral hepatitis was most prevalent between 11 months to 12 years of age. Wilson disease was common in 3-7 years age group, and

  6. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by Liver Lipidomics

    Zhao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to characterize the disorder of lipid metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. HCC is a worldwide disease. The research into the disorder of lipid metabolism in HCC is very limited. Study of lipid metabolism in liver cancer tissue may have the potential to provide new insight into HCC mechanisms. Methods: A lipidomics study of HCC based on Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-electronic spray ionization-QTOF mass spectrometer (UPLC-ESI-QTOF MS and Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (MALDI-FTICR MS was performed. Results: Triacylglycerols (TAGs with the number of double bond (DB > 2 (except 56:5 and 56:4 TAG were significantly down-regulated; conversely, others (except 52:2 TAG were greatly up-regulated in HCC tissues. Moreover, the more serious the disease was, the higher the saturated TAG concentration and the lower the polyunsaturated TAG concentration were in HCC tissues. The phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylinositol (PI were altered in a certain way. Sphingomyelin (SM was up-regulated and ceramide (Cer were down-regulated in HCC tissues. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first such report showing a unique trend of TAG, PC, PE and PI. The use of polyunsaturated fatty acids, like eicosapentanoic and docosahexanoic acid, as supplementation, proposed for the treatment of Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, may also be effective for the treatment of HCC.

  7. New Insights from Rodent Models of Fatty Liver Disease

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Rodent models of fatty liver disease are essential research tools that provide a window into disease pathogenesis and a testing ground for prevention and treatment. Models come in many varieties involving dietary and genetic manipulations, and sometimes both. High-energy diets that induce obesity do not uniformly cause fatty liver disease; this has prompted close scrutiny of specific macronutrients and nutrient combinations to determine which have the greatest potential for hepatotoxicity. At the same time, diets that do not cause obesity or the metabolic syndrome but do cause severe steatohepatitis have been exploited to study factors important to progressive liver injury, including cell death, oxidative stress, and immune activation. Rodents with a genetic predisposition to overeating offer yet another model in which to explore the evolution of fatty liver disease. In some animals that overeat, steatohepatitis can develop even without resorting to a high-energy diet. Importantly, these models and others have been used to document that aerobic exercise can prevent or reduce fatty liver disease. This review focuses primarily on lessons learned about steatohepatitis from manipulations of diet and eating behavior. Numerous additional insights about hepatic lipid metabolism, which have been gained from genetically engineered mice, are also mentioned. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 535–550. PMID:21126212

  8. [Effect of acute biliary pancreatitis on liver metabolism of phenazone].

    Hartleb, M; Nowak, A; Nowakowska-Duława, E; Mańczyk, I; Becker, A; Kacperek, T

    1990-03-01

    In 22 patients with acute pancreatitis caused by biliary calculi and 9 healthy controls the rate of hepatic elimination of phenazone was measured. The aim of the study was evaluation of the oxidative-detoxicating action of the liver in this disease in relation to its severity. In pancreatitis patients the half-time (T2) of phenazone was significantly (p less than 0.01 longer than in healthy subjects (23.6 +/- 10.5 vs 13.2 +/- 7.2 hrs). The T2 of phenazone was not correlated with the concentrations of transaminases, bilirubin and prothrombin, but was correlated positively with the concentration of hepatic lactic dehydrogenase (p less than 0.001). In the initial stage of pancreatitis the T2 of phenazone was without prognostic significance and showed no agreement with Ranson's clinical-laboratory classification of the severity of the disease. The degree of impairment of the hepatic metabolism of phenazone measured with the percent difference between T2 of phenazone in both tests was significantly (p less than 0.05) greater in the group of patients with complications than in those without pancreatitis complications (70.7 +/- 64.4% vs 21.4 +/- 16.2%). Biliary pancreatitis impairs the oxidative-reductive function of the liver proportionally to the degree of hepatic lactic dehydrogenase in the serum. Evaluation of the rate of hepatic elimination of phenazone in the initial stage of this pancreatitis was without prognostic importance for the severity of the disease.

  9. Fasting-induced liver GADD45β restrains hepatic fatty acid uptake and improves metabolic health.

    Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Zota, Annika; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P; Seibert, Oksana; Cıngır, Şahika; Schmidt, Kathrin; Vallon, Nicola; de Guia, Roldan M; Niopek, Katharina; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Maida, Adriano; Blüher, Matthias; Okun, Jürgen G; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that repeated short-term nutrient withdrawal (i.e. fasting) has pleiotropic actions to promote organismal health and longevity. Despite this, the molecular physiological mechanisms by which fasting is protective against metabolic disease are largely unknown. Here, we show that, metabolic control, particularly systemic and liver lipid metabolism, is aberrantly regulated in the fasted state in mouse models of metabolic dysfunction. Liver transcript assays between lean/healthy and obese/diabetic mice in fasted and fed states uncovered "growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible" GADD45β as a dysregulated gene transcript during fasting in several models of metabolic dysfunction including ageing, obesity/pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, in both mice and humans. Using whole-body knockout mice as well as liver/hepatocyte-specific gain- and loss-of-function strategies, we revealed a role for liver GADD45β in the coordination of liver fatty acid uptake, through cytoplasmic retention of FABP1, ultimately impacting obesity-driven hyperglycaemia. In summary, fasting stress-induced GADD45β represents a liver-specific molecular event promoting adaptive metabolic function. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  10. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment of liver diseases

    WANG Rongbing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM treatment of liver diseases is derived from the regulation of liver function including storing blood and governing the free flow of qi, in which functional systems such as modern digestion, endocrine, and the gut-liver axis are involved, and is established on modern hepatic physiology, pathology, and etiology. To objectively reveal the characteristics and advantages of modern TCM treatment of liver diseases, we analyzed the clinical and research situation of TCM therapy for liver diseases in the last decade and collected major achievements that have been applied in clinical treatment of diseases, published in core journals, and confirmed by major scientific research programs. The results showed TCM combined with antiviral therapy can improve the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis B. TCM can help HBV carriers prevent disease progression. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy for acute-on-chronic liver failure can block the deterioration induced by endotoxin. TCM has been widely applied in protecting the liver through nonspecific anti-inflammation, alleviating hepatic fibrosis, and preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver. TCM plays an important role in treating some currently untreatable liver diseases. Therefore, it is our common responsibility to inherit and develop effective principle-method-recipe-medicines and create a better medical care system.

  11. Nutritional support for liver disease.

    Koretz, Ronald L; Avenell, Alison; Lipman, Timothy O

    2012-05-16

    Weight loss and muscle wasting are commonly found in patients with end-stage liver disease. Since there is an association between malnutrition and poor clinical outcome, such patients (or those at risk of becoming malnourished) are often given parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or oral nutritional supplements. These interventions have costs and adverse effects, so it is important to prove that their use results in improved morbidity or mortality, or both. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, and oral nutritional supplements on the mortality and morbidity of patients with underlying liver disease. The following computerised databases were searched: the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded (January 2012). In addition, reference lists of identified trials and review articles and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Trials identified in a previous systematic handsearch of Index Medicus were also considered. Handsearches of a number of medical journals, including abstracts from annual meetings, were done. Experts in the field and manufacturers of nutrient formulations were contacted for potential references. Randomised clinical trials (parallel or cross-over design) comparing groups of patients with any underlying liver disease who received, or did not receive, enteral or parenteral nutrition or oral nutritional supplements were identified without restriction on date, language, or publication status. Six categories of trials were separately considered: medical or surgical patients receiving parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, or supplements. The following data were sought in each report: date of publication; geographical location; inclusion and exclusion criteria; the type of nutritional support and constitution of the nutrient formulation; duration of

  12. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Burra, Patrizia; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients' survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Scaffold-free 3D bio-printed human liver tissue stably maintains metabolic functions useful for drug discovery.

    Kizawa, Hideki; Nagao, Eri; Shimamura, Mitsuru; Zhang, Guangyuan; Torii, Hitoshi

    2017-07-01

    The liver plays a central role in metabolism. Although many studies have described in vitro liver models for drug discovery, to date, no model has been described that can stably maintain liver function. Here, we used a unique, scaffold-free 3D bio-printing technology to construct a small portion of liver tissue that could stably maintain drug, glucose, and lipid metabolism, in addition to bile acid secretion. This bio-printed normal human liver tissue maintained expression of several kinds of hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes that functioned for several weeks. The bio-printed liver tissue displayed glucose production via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, which could be suppressed with insulin. Bile acid secretion was also observed from the printed liver tissue, and it accumulated in the culture medium over time. We observed both bile duct and sinusoid-like structures in the bio-printed liver tissue, which suggested that bile acid secretion occurred via a sinusoid-hepatocyte-bile duct route. These results demonstrated that our bio-printed liver tissue was unique, because it exerted diverse liver metabolic functions for several weeks. In future, we expect our bio-printed liver tissue to be applied to developing new models that can be used to improve preclinical predictions of long-term toxicity in humans, generate novel targets for metabolic liver disease, and evaluate biliary excretion in drug development.

  14. Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greenberger, Norton J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2018-05-15

    Patients with liver disease are at increased risks of both thrombotic and bleeding complications. Many have atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) necessitating oral anticoagulant agents (OACs). Recent evidence has contradicted the assumption that patients with liver disease are "auto-anticoagulated" and thus protected from thrombotic events. Warfarin and non-vitamin K-antagonist OACs have been shown to reduce thrombotic events safely in patients with either AF or VTE. However, patients with liver disease have largely been excluded from trials of OACs. Because all currently approved OACs undergo metabolism in the liver, hepatic dysfunction may cause increased bleeding. Thus, the optimal anticoagulation strategy for patients with AF or VTE who have liver disease remains unclear. This review discusses pharmacokinetic and clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of OACs in patients with liver disease and provides a practical, clinically oriented approach to the management of OAC therapy in this population. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Liver Disease

    Choi, Kyoo Ok; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1978-09-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen was initially known as tumor specific antigen and had a potential diagnostic value in the detection of digestive tract malignancies. However, subsequent studies showed CEA and CEA-like antigen present in benign disease, particularly in liver. We had collected sera from 58 patients who had liver scan and later were diagnosed clinically and histologically as liver disease. We estimated CEA values and correlations were made with liver function tests in liver cirrhosis cases. The results: 1) The raised plasma carcinoembryonic antigen level were found in 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients cirrhosis, 5 (27.8%) of 18 patients in hepatoma, 5 (71%) of 7 patients in chronic active hepatitis, all 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in obstructive biliary disease and none in each one patient of traumatic liver hematoma, subphrenic abscess and clonorchiasis. 2) There is no linear correlation between carcinoembryonic antigen level and liver function tests including serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT and prothrombin time in liver patients.

  16. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Liver Disease

    Choi, Kyoo Ok; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun

    1978-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen was initially known as tumor specific antigen and had a potential diagnostic value in the detection of digestive tract malignancies. However, subsequent studies showed CEA and CEA-like antigen present in benign disease, particularly in liver. We had collected sera from 58 patients who had liver scan and later were diagnosed clinically and histologically as liver disease. We estimated CEA values and correlations were made with liver function tests in liver cirrhosis cases. The results: 1) The raised plasma carcinoembryonic antigen level were found in 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients cirrhosis, 5 (27.8%) of 18 patients in hepatoma, 5 (71%) of 7 patients in chronic active hepatitis, all 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in obstructive biliary disease and none in each one patient of traumatic liver hematoma, subphrenic abscess and clonorchiasis. 2) There is no linear correlation between carcinoembryonic antigen level and liver function tests including serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT and prothrombin time in liver patients.

  17. Recellularization of rat liver: An in vitro model for assessing human drug metabolism and liver biology.

    Matthew J Robertson

    Full Text Available Liver-like organoids that recapitulate the complex functions of the whole liver by combining cells, scaffolds, and mechanical or chemical cues are becoming important models for studying liver biology and drug metabolism. The advantages of growing cells in three-dimensional constructs include enhanced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and preserved cellular phenotype including, prevention of de-differentiation. In the current study, biomimetic liver constructs were made via perfusion decellularization of rat liver, with the goal of maintaining the native composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. We optimized our decellularization process to produce liver scaffolds in which immunogenic residual DNA was removed but glycosaminoglycans were maintained. When the constructs were recellularized with rat or human liver cells, the cells remained viable, capable of proliferation, and functional for 28 days. Specifically, the cells continued to express cytochrome P450 genes and maintained their ability to metabolize a model drug, midazolam. Microarray analysis showed an upregulation of genes involved in liver regeneration and fibrosis. In conclusion, these liver constructs have the potential to be used as test beds for studying liver biology and drug metabolism.

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is the Liver Another Target?

    Aibek eMirrakhimov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH. OSA has been associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome as well as with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. NAFLD is a common condition ranging in severity from uncomplicated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD is liver biopsy. Obesity and insulin resistance lead to liver steatosis, but the causes of the progression to NASH are not known. Emerging evidence suggests that OSA may play a role in the progression of hepatic steatosis and the development of NASH. Several cross-sectional studies showed that the severity of IH in patients with OSA predicted the severity of NAFLD on liver biopsy. However, neither prospective nor interventional studies with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment have been performed. Studies in a mouse model showed that IH causes triglyceride accumulation in the liver and liver injury as well as hepatic inflammation. The mouse model provided insight in the pathogenesis of liver injury showing that (1 IH accelerates the progression of hepatic steatosis by inducing adipose tissue lipolysis and increasing free fatty acids (FFA flux into the liver; (2 IH up-regulates lipid biosynthetic pathways in the liver; (3 IH induces oxidative stress in the liver; (4 IH up-regulates hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha and possibly HIF-2 alpha, which may increase hepatic steatosis and induce liver inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of FFA and different transcription factors in the pathogenesis of IH-induced NAFLD is yet to be established. Thus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that IH of OSA may contribute to the progression of NAFLD but definitive clinical studies and experiments in the mouse model have yet to be done.

  19. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Marcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar, E-mail: adebracht@uol.com.br

    2011-12-15

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 {mu}M, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 {mu}M, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and

  20. Circadian Reprogramming in the Liver Identifies Metabolic Pathways of Aging.

    Sato, Shogo; Solanas, Guiomar; Peixoto, Francisca Oliveira; Bee, Leonardo; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Schmidt, Mark S; Brenner, Charles; Masri, Selma; Benitah, Salvador Aznar; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2017-08-10

    The process of aging and circadian rhythms are intimately intertwined, but how peripheral clocks involved in metabolic homeostasis contribute to aging remains unknown. Importantly, caloric restriction (CR) extends lifespan in several organisms and rewires circadian metabolism. Using young versus old mice, fed ad libitum or under CR, we reveal reprogramming of the circadian transcriptome in the liver. These age-dependent changes occur in a highly tissue-specific manner, as demonstrated by comparing circadian gene expression in the liver versus epidermal and skeletal muscle stem cells. Moreover, de novo oscillating genes under CR show an enrichment in SIRT1 targets in the liver. This is accompanied by distinct circadian hepatic signatures in NAD + -related metabolites and cyclic global protein acetylation. Strikingly, this oscillation in acetylation is absent in old mice while CR robustly rescues global protein acetylation. Our findings indicate that the clock operates at the crossroad between protein acetylation, liver metabolism, and aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alanine metabolism in pyridoxine-depleted rat liver

    Okada, Mitsuko; Abe, Midori

    1976-01-01

    Alanine metabolism in normal and pyridoxine-deficient rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. Incorporation of 14 C-alanine into various liver components was determined and no difference was shown between normal and deficient animals in the incorporation into liver homogenates, lipid, protein and plasma glucose. Using the liver slice system, gluconeogenic activity from alanine or pyruvate was 40% lower in deficient rats compared with the activity of normal rats. However, inhibition was completely removed by the addition of 2-oxoglutarate to alanine. Penicillamine did not affect glucose formation from alanine in the liver slice. (auth.)

  2. Assessment of adrenal function in liver diseases

    Sandeep Kharb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent times, there are reports of adrenal dysfunction in whole spectrum of liver disease. Adrenal insufficiency (AI has been shown to correlate with progression of liver disease. Hence this study was conducted to assess adrenal function in subjects with acute liver disease (ALD, chronic liver disease (CLD and post liver transplantation (LT. Material and Methods: This study included 25 healthy controls, 25 patients of ALD, 20 subjects of CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1 and 30 with Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2, and 10 subjects with LT. All subjects were assessed clinically, biochemically and for adrenal functions. Results: AI was present in 9 (34.6% patients with ALD, 20 (40% patients with CLD and 4 (40% in subjects with LT. AI was more common in CLD-2 (18 patients - 60% than CLD-1 (2 patients - 10%. All patients with chronic liver disease had significantly lower basal cortisol (8.8±4.8, P=0.01, stimulated cortisol (18.2±6.3, P <0.00001 and incremental cortisol (9.4±4.6, P <0.00001 as compared to controls. There was increase in percentage of subjects with adrenal dysfunction with progression of liver disease as assessed by Child-Pugh staging. AI was predicted by lower levels of serum protein, serum albumin, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of serum bilirubin and INR. Adrenal functions showed recovery following liver transplantation. Conclusions: AI forms important part of spectrum of acute and chronic liver disease. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of AI, and these patients should be evaluated for adrenal dysfunction periodically.

  3. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  4. Coffee: The magical bean for liver diseases

    Heath, Ryan D; Brahmbhatt, Mihir; Tahan, Asli C; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Coffee has long been recognized as having hepatoprotective properties, however, the extent of any beneficial effect is still being elucidated. Coffee appears to reduce risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, reduce advancement of fibrotic disease in a variety of chronic liver diseases, and perhaps reduce ability of hepatitis C virus to replicate. This review aims to catalog the evidence for coffee as universally beneficial across a spectrum of chronic liver diseases, as well as spotlight opportunit...

  5. Risk assessment of silica nanoparticles on liver injury in metabolic syndrome mice induced by fructose.

    Li, Jianmei; He, Xiwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Mei; Xu, Chenke; Yu, Rong

    2018-07-01

    This study aims to assess the effects and the mechanisms of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on hepatotoxicity in both normal and metabolic syndrome mouse models induced by fructose. Here, we found that SiNPs exposure lead to improved insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome mice, but markedly worsened hepatic ballooning, inflammation infiltration, and fibrosis. Moreover, SiNPs exposure aggravated liver injury in metabolic syndrome mice by causing serious DNA damage. Following SiNPs exposure, liver superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in metabolic syndrome mice were stimulated, which is accompanied by significantly increased malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels as compared to normal mice. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that SiNPs were more readily deposited in the liver mitochondria of metabolic syndrome mice, resulting in more severe mitochondrial injury as compared to normal mice. We speculated that SiNPs-induced mitochondrial injury might be the cause of hepatic oxidative stress, which further lead to a series of liver lesions as observed in mice following SiNPs exposure. Based on these results, it is likely that SiNPs will increase the risk and severity of liver disease in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Therefore, SiNPs should be used cautiously in food additives and clinical settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gut Microbiota and Host Reaction in Liver Diseases

    Hiroshi Fukui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although alcohol feeding produces evident intestinal microbial changes in animals, only some alcoholics show evident intestinal dysbiosis, a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Gut dysbiosis is related to intestinal hyperpermeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic patients. Alcoholics further exhibit reduced numbers of the beneficial Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Large amounts of endotoxins translocated from the gut strongly activate Toll-like receptor 4 in the liver and play an important role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD, especially in severe alcoholic liver injury. Gut microbiota and bacterial endotoxins are further involved in some of the mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. There is experimental evidence that a high-fat diet causes characteristic dysbiosis of NAFLD, with a decrease in Bacteroidetes and increases in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and gut dysbiosis itself can induce hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome. Clinical data support the above dysbiosis, but the details are variable. Intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia greatly affect the cirrhotics in relation to major complications and prognosis. Metagenomic approaches to dysbiosis may be promising for the analysis of deranged host metabolism in NASH and cirrhosis. Management of dysbiosis may become a cornerstone for the future treatment of liver diseases.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    ... individual is considered to have a fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) if the liver contains more than 5 to ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver ...

  8. Lipocalin-2 in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Disease

    Jessica Lambertz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The intake of excess dietary fructose most often leads to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Fructose is metabolized mainly in the liver and its chronic consumption results in lipogenic gene expression in this organ. However, precisely how fructose is involved in NAFLD progression is still not fully understood, limiting therapy. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2 is a small secreted transport protein that binds to fatty acids, phospholipids, steroids, retinol, and pheromones. LCN2 regulates lipid and energy metabolism in obesity and is upregulated in response to insulin. We previously discovered that LCN2 has a hepatoprotective effect during hepatic insult, and that its upregulation is a marker of liver damage and inflammation. To investigate if LCN2 has impact on the metabolism of fructose and thereby arising liver damage, we fed wild type and Lcn2−/− mice for 4 or 8 weeks on diets that were enriched in fructose either by adding this sugar to the drinking water (30% w/v, or by feeding a chow containing 60% (w/w fructose. Body weight and daily intake of food and water of these mice was then measured. Fat content in liver sections was visualized using Oil Red O stain, and expression levels of genes involved in fat and sugar metabolism were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that fructose-induced steatosis and liver damage was more prominent in female than in male mice, but that the most severe hepatic damage occurred in female mice lacking LCN2. Unexpectedly, consumption of elevated fructose did not induce de novo lipogenesis or fat accumulation. We conclude that LCN2 acts in a lipid-independent manner to protect the liver against fructose-induced damage.

  9. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology.

    Dhole, Sachin Devidas; Kher, Archana S; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambse, Manjusha P

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson's disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, α1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage

  12. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part

  13. Angiosarcoma of the liver and other occupational diseases in vinyl chloride workers

    Halama, J.; Becker-Stone, S.; Halama, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Occupational diseases resulting from exposure to vinyl chloride (VC) include angiosarcoma of the liver and other neoplasms. Among workers exposed to VC we have found capillary abnormalities in the extremities, with scleroderma and Raynaud syndrome, acro-osteolysis, neurological and psychiatric diseases and chromosome abnormalities, as well as abnormal liver metabolism and haematological findings.(orig.)

  14. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR......) database to extract demographics and outcomes of 58 PCLD patients. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for survival rates. Severe abdominal pain (75%) was the most prominent symptom, while portal hypertension (35%) was the most common complication in PCLD. The explantation of the polycystic liver...

  15. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  16. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  17. The Combined Intervention with Germinated Vigna radiata and Aerobic Interval Training Protocol Is an Effective Strategy for the Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD and Other Alterations Related to the Metabolic Syndrome in Zucker Rats

    Garyfallia Kapravelou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a group of related metabolic alterations that increase the risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Several lifestyle interventions based on dietary treatment with functional ingredients and physical activity are being studied as alternative or reinforcement treatments to the pharmacological ones actually in use. In the present experiment, the combined treatment with mung bean (Vigna radiata, a widely used legume with promising nutritional and health benefits that was included in the experimental diet as raw or 4 day-germinated seed flour, and aerobic interval training protocol (65–85% VO2 max has been tested in lean and obese Zucker rats following a 2 × 2 × 2 (2 phenotypes, 2 dietary interventions, 2 lifestyles factorial ANOVA (Analysis of Variance statistical analysis. Germination of V. radiata over a period of four days originated a significant protein hydrolysis leading to the appearance of low molecular weight peptides. The combination of 4 day-germinated V. radiata and aerobic interval training was more efficient compared to raw V. radiata at improving the aerobic capacity and physical performance, hepatic histology and functionality, and plasma lipid parameters as well as reverting the insulin resistance characteristic of the obese Zucker rat model. In conclusion, the joint intervention with legume sprouts and aerobic interval training protocol is an efficient treatment to improve the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as hepatic histology and functionality related to the development of NAFLD and the MetS.

  18. The Combined Intervention with Germinated Vigna radiata and Aerobic Interval Training Protocol Is an Effective Strategy for the Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Other Alterations Related to the Metabolic Syndrome in Zucker Rats.

    Kapravelou, Garyfallia; Martínez, Rosario; Nebot, Elena; López-Jurado, María; Aranda, Pilar; Arrebola, Francisco; Cantarero, Samuel; Galisteo, Milagros; Porres, Jesus M

    2017-07-19

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of related metabolic alterations that increase the risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Several lifestyle interventions based on dietary treatment with functional ingredients and physical activity are being studied as alternative or reinforcement treatments to the pharmacological ones actually in use. In the present experiment, the combined treatment with mung bean ( Vigna radiata ), a widely used legume with promising nutritional and health benefits that was included in the experimental diet as raw or 4 day-germinated seed flour, and aerobic interval training protocol (65-85% VO₂ max) has been tested in lean and obese Zucker rats following a 2 × 2 × 2 (2 phenotypes, 2 dietary interventions, 2 lifestyles) factorial ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) statistical analysis. Germination of V. radiata over a period of four days originated a significant protein hydrolysis leading to the appearance of low molecular weight peptides. The combination of 4 day-germinated V. radiata and aerobic interval training was more efficient compared to raw V. radiata at improving the aerobic capacity and physical performance, hepatic histology and functionality, and plasma lipid parameters as well as reverting the insulin resistance characteristic of the obese Zucker rat model. In conclusion, the joint intervention with legume sprouts and aerobic interval training protocol is an efficient treatment to improve the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as hepatic histology and functionality related to the development of NAFLD and the MetS.

  19. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  20. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  1. Loss of brain function - liver disease

    Hepatic coma; Encephalopathy - hepatic; Hepatic encephalopathy; Portasystemic encephalopathy ... 2017:417-421. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal ... of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  2. Polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion

    Anggreini, A. Y.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a condition in which multiple cysts form in the hepatic parenchyma. The polycystic liver disease is also an autosomal dominant disorder (ADPLD) caused by a mutation in a gene that encodes a protein hepatocystin. PCLD has a prevalence count of 1:200,000 people in the people of America. PCLD occurs ± 24% of patients in the third decade of age to 80% by the sixth decade. Women tend to get larger cysts and more and correlated with the number of pregnancies. The following case report of a woman, 51-years-old who was treated at Haji Adam Malik hospital Medan with a diagnosis of polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion. Some literature has reported complications of the polycystic liver disease but rarely reported with pleural effusion presentation. The patient had already undergone a puncture of pleural fluid and after three weeks of treatment condition of the patient improved and permitted to be outgoing patient.

  3. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Emerging Burden in Cardiometabolic and Renal Diseases.

    Han, Eugene; Lee, Yong Ho

    2017-12-01

    As the number of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased, the influence of NAFLD on other metabolic diseases has been highlighted. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence indicates that NAFLD not only affects the liver but also increases the risk of extra-hepatic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, an advanced type of NAFLD, can aggravate these inter-organ relationships and lead to poorer outcomes. NAFLD induces insulin resistance and exacerbates systemic chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which leads to organ dysfunction in extra-hepatic tissues. Although more research is needed to identify the pathophysiological mechanisms and causal relationship between NAFLD and cardiometabolic and renal diseases, screening for heart, brain, and kidney diseases, risk assessment for diabetes, and a multidisciplinary approach for managing these patients should be highly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome: Systems Thinking in Heart Disease.

    Dommermuth, Ron; Ewing, Kristine

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. MetS is associated with approximately 4-fold increase in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and a 2-fold increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease complications. MetS is a progressive, proinflammatory, prothrombotic condition that manifests itself along a broad spectrum of disease. It is associated with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, gout, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Intervening in and reversing the pathologic process become more difficult as the disease progresses, highlighting the needs for increased individual and community surveillance and primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prioritizing Popular Proteins in Liver Cancer: Remodelling One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Mora, María Isabel; Molina, Manuela; Odriozola, Leticia; Elortza, Félix; Mato, José María; Sitek, Barbara; Zhang, Pumin; He, Fuchu; Latasa, María Uxue; Ávila, Matías Antonio; Corrales, Fernando José

    2017-12-01

    Primary liver cancer (HCC) is recognized as the fifth most common neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Most risk factors are known, and the molecular pathogenesis has been widely studied in the past decade; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be unveiled, as they will facilitate the definition of novel biomarkers and clinical targets for more effective patient management. We utilize the B/D-HPP popular protein strategy. We report a list of popular proteins that have been highly cocited with the expression "liver cancer". Several enzymes highlight the known metabolic remodeling of liver cancer cells, four of which participate in one-carbon metabolism. This pathway is central to the maintenance of differentiated hepatocytes, as it is considered the connection between intermediate metabolism and epigenetic regulation. We designed a targeted selective reaction monitoring (SRM) method to follow up one-carbon metabolism adaptation in mouse HCC and in regenerating liver following exposure to CCl 4 . This method allows systematic monitoring of one-carbon metabolism and could prove useful in the follow-up of HCC and of chronically liver-diseased patients (cirrhosis) at risk of HCC. The SRM data are available via ProteomeXchange in PASSEL (PASS01060).

  6. When can nutritional therapy impact liver disease?

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Benns, Matthew V; McClave, Stephen A; Miller, Keith R; Jones, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the current literature regarding nutritional therapy in liver disease, with an emphasis on patients progressing to liver failure as well as surgical patients. Mechanisms of malnutrition and sarcopenia in liver failure patients as well as nutritional assessment, nutritional requirements of this patient population, and goals and methods of therapy are discussed. Additionally, recommendations for feeding, micronutrient, branched chain amino acid supplementation, and the use of pre- and probiotics are included. The impact of these methods can have on patients with advanced disease and those undergoing surgical procedures will be emphasized.

  7. Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in Japanese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Kato, Ken-Ichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Misu, Hirofumi; Zen, Yoh; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between liver histological features and organ-specific insulin resistance indices calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from 72 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and were scored for steatosis, grade and stage. Hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance indices (hepatic insulin resistance index and Matsuda index, respectively) were calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data, and metabolic clearance rate was measured using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method. The degree of hepatic steatosis, and grade and stage of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were significantly correlated with Matsuda index (steatosis r = -0.45, P hepatic insulin resistance index. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and each histological score showed that the degree of hepatic steatosis (coefficient = -0.22, P steatosis and metabolic clearance rate (coefficient = -0.62, P = 0.059). Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, suggesting a central role of fatty liver in the development of peripheral insulin resistance and the existence of a network between the liver and skeletal muscle.

  8. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--new view].

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Marlicz, Wojciech; Miezyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, through the necroinflammatory disorder of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NAFLD/NASH is mostly related with visceral adiposity, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus (DM t.2) and metabolic syndrome. Pathogenetic concepts of NAFLD include overnutrition and underactivity, insulin resistance (IR) and genetic factor. The prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be 17-33% in some countries, NASH may be present in about 1/3 of such cases, while 20-25% of NASH cases could progress to cirrhosis. NAFLD is now recognized as one of the most frequent reason of liver tests elevation without clinical symptoms. Insulin resistance is considering as having a central role in NAFLD pathogenesis. In hepatocytes, IR is related to hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, formation of advanced glycation end-products, increased free fatty acids and their metabolites, oxidative stress and altered profiles of adipocytokines. Early stages of fatty liver are clinically silent and include elevation of ALT and GGTP, hyperechogenic liver in USG and/or hepatomegaly. Among clinical symptoms, abdominal discomfort is relatively common as well as chronic fatigue. NAFLD/NASH is not a benign disease, progressive liver biopsy have shown histological progression of fibrosis in 32%, the estimated rate of cirrhosis development is 20% and a liver--related death is 12% over 10 years. No treatment has scientifically proved to ameliorate NAFLD or to avoid its progression. The various therapeutic alternatives are aimed at interfering with the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder in order to prevent the progression to end-stage liver disease. The most important therapeutic measure is increasing insulin sensitivity by an attempt to change a lifestyle mostly by dieting and physical activity in order to loose weight. The most used agent is metformin, the others

  9. Liver and muscle protein metabolism in cachexia

    Peters, J.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Up to 50% of cancer patients suffer from progressive weight loss (cachexia). Cachexia is induced by proinflammatory mediators (cytokines), induced by the tumor’s presence. These cytokines induce so-called acute phase protein synthesis by the liver, followed by skeletal muscle protein breakdown.

  10. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Guanliang Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin.

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD. PMID:25024594

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD.

  13. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  14. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-09-06

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be used for gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Fructose-derived precursors also act as nutritional regulators of the transcription factors, including ChREBP and SREBP1c, that regulate the expression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL genes. In support of these mechanisms, fructose intake increases hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL and raises plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in humans. However, epidemiological and fructose-intervention studies have had inconclusive results with respect to liver fat, and there is currently no good human evidence that fructose, when consumed in isocaloric amounts, causes more liver fat accumulation than other energy-dense nutrients. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the seemingly contradicting literature on fructose and NAFLD. We outline fructose physiology, the mechanisms that link fructose to NAFLD, and the available evidence from human studies. From this framework, we conclude that the cellular mechanisms underlying hepatic fructose metabolism will likely reveal novel targets for the treatment of NAFLD, dyslipidemia, and hepatic insulin resistance. Finally, fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, suggesting that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of NAFLD and other obesity-related diseases.

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Autoimmune liver disease in children.

    Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune liver disorders are characterised by an inflammatory liver histology, circulating non-organ specific autoantibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the absence of a known aetiology. They respond to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted as soon as diagnosis is made. Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). Two types of AIH are recognised according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalisation of biochemical parameters and decreased inflammatory activity on follow-up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress and there may be an evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. Whether the juvenile autoimmune form of sclerosing cholangitis and AIH are 2 distinct entities, or different aspects of the same condition, remains to be elucidated.

  17. Coenzyme metabolism in rat liver transketolase

    Gorbach, Z.V.; Kubyshin, V.L.; Maglysh, S.S.; Zabrodskaya, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the results of kinetic investigations, two binding sites for hydroxythiamine diphosphate were determined in apotransketolase, with sharply differing values of K/sub i/: (7-22) x 10 -9 and (13.0-19.7) x 10 -8 M. A study was made of the turnover rate of thiamine diphosphate in holotransketolase in rat liver tissue by a radioisotope method, using [ 14 C] thiamine as the labeled precursor. The half-substitution time and rate constant of degradation of the coenzyme in transketolase are close in absolute values to the analogous indices for the protein portion of the enzyme and constitute 153 h and 0.108 day -1 , respectively. Rat liver transketolase exists in vivo in the form of a substituted α-carbanion. Replacement of thiamine diphosphate by hydroxythiamine diphosphate in the holoenzyme has no effect on the formation of the intermediate α-carbanion form of the enzyme

  18. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Yang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR, an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD.

  19. Comparison of Calorie-Restricted Diet and Resveratrol Supplementation on Anthropometric Indices, Metabolic Parameters, and Serum Sirtuin-1 Levels in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Asghari, Somayyeh; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Somi, Mohammad-Hossein; Ghavami, Seyed-Mostafa; Rafraf, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    There is a promising perspective regarding the potential effect of resveratrol in preventing and treating metabolic disturbances similar to that of calorie restriction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of calorie-restricted (CR) diet on metabolic parameters and then to investigate whether resveratrol supplementation has beneficial effects similar to CR diet in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in 90 patients with NAFLD (males and females) aged 20 to 60 years with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 25 to 35 kg/m 2 . Participants were assigned to one of three intervention groups as follows: The CR diet group (n = 30) received a prescribed low-calorie diet, the resveratrol group (n = 30) received 600 mg pure trans-resveratrol (2 × 300 mg) daily, and the placebo group (n = 30) received placebo capsules (2 × 300 mg) daily for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements, and dietary intake and physical activity data were collected for all participants at baseline and at the end of the trial. CR diet significantly reduced weight (by 4.5%); BMI; waist circumference; waist-to-hip ratio; and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lipid profiles in participants compared to resveratrol and placebo (all p 0.05). No significant changes were seen in hepatic steatosis grade, serum glycemic parameters, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and sirtuin-1 levels in any group (all p > 0.05). CR diet with moderate weight loss has favorable effects on NAFLD, and resveratrol supplementation induced weight loss but failed to mimic other aspects of CR diet. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the long-term and dose-dependent effects of resveratrol on metabolic diseases.

  20. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Kathryn Bambino

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin, suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  1. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish.

    Bambino, Kathryn; Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish; Chu, Jaime; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2018-02-26

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt , which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361514

  3. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  4. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  5. Pharmacological Approaches for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Ionică Floriana Elvira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFDL is a multifactorial condition with a wide spectrum of histological severities, from asymptomatic hepatic steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with or without fibrosis. NAFLD is highly common and potentially serious in children and adolescents and affects approximately one third of the general population. It is closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. NASH is a histological diagnosis and has a great significance because it can progress to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and is associated with both increased cardiovascular and liver related mortality. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for current potential therapies of NAFLD.

  6. Liver fat content, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and ischaemic heart disease

    Lauridsen, Bo Kobberø; Stender, Stefan; Kristensen, Thomas Skårup

    2018-01-01

    Aims: In observational studies, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with high risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that a high liver fat content or a diagnosis of NAFLD is a causal risk factor for IHD. Methods and results: In a cohort study...

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: State-of-the-art

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular

  8. Pediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Haley Bush

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: With the increase in the prevalence of obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become among the leading causes of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group. Once believed to be a “two-hit process”, it is now clear that the actual pathophysiology of NAFLD is complex and involves multiple pathways. Moreover, NAFLD is not always benign, and patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are at increased risk of developing advanced stages of liver disease. It has also been shown that NAFLD is not only a liver disease, but is also associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations, including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and low bone mineral density. Although the data is scarce in the pediatric population, some studies have suggested that long-term mortality and the requirement of liver transplantation will continue to increase in patients with NAFLD. More studies are needed to better understand the natural history of NAFLD, especially in the pediatric age group.

  9. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  10. Antifibrotic and molecular aspects of rifaximin in alcoholic liver disease

    Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Trebicka, Jonel; Thiele, Maja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Alcoholic liver disease is the leading cause of cirrhosis worldwide. Due to an increase in alcohol overuse, alcoholic liver disease has become an increased burden on health care systems. Abstinence from alcohol remains the cornerstone of alcoholic liver disease treatment; however......, this approach is hampered by frequent relapse and lack of specific therapy for treating advanced cases of liver disease. In the present study, we hypothesized that gut microbiota drive the development of liver fibrosis and that modulation of gut microbiota with the gut-selective, nonabsorbable antibiotic...... promoter of alcoholic liver disease, current results may open new therapeutic avenues and revolutionize the current understanding of chronic liver diseases....

  11. Insulin resistance and postreceptor changes of liver metabolism in fat-fed mice

    Hedeskov, Carl Jørgen; Capito, Kirsten; Hansen, Svend Erik

    1992-01-01

    Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet......Medicinsk biokemi, animal diabetes, insulin resistance, postreceptor defects, liver metabolism, high-fat diet...

  12. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Claudia P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  13. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  15. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  16. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An expanded review

    Benedict, Mark; Zhang, Xuchen

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses the simple steatosis to more progressive steatosis with associated hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a growing epidemic, not only in the United States, but worldwide in part due to obesity and insulin resistance leading to liver accumulation of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Numerous risk factors for the development of NAFLD have been espoused with most having some form of metabolic derangement or insulin resistance at the core of its pathophysiology. NAFLD patients are at increased risk of liver-related as well as cardiovascular mortality, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis, but the development of noninvasive advanced imaging, biochemical and genetic tests will no doubt provide future clinicians with a great deal of information and opportunity for enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis and targeted treatment. As it currently stands several medications/supplements are being used in the treatment of NAFLD; however, none seem to be the “magic bullet” in curtailing this growing problem yet. In this review we summarized the current knowledge of NAFLD epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathologic changes, natural history, and treatment in order to aid in further understanding this disease and better managing NAFLD patients. PMID:28652891

  18. Association of serum retinoic acid with hepatic steatosis and liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Hongen; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Wenjing; Sun, Ruifang; Xia, Min

    2015-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (retinol), has been implicated in the regulation of lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis in animal models. However, the relation between RA and liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unknown. This study aimed at examining the association of RA with NAFLD and NASH in Chinese subjects. Serum RA concentration was determined by ELISA in 41 control subjects, 45 patients with NAFLD, and 38 patients with NASH. The associations of RA with adiposity, serum glucose, lipid profiles, and markers of liver damage were studied. Moreover, both mRNA and protein levels of retinoic X receptor α (RXRα) in the liver were analyzed in subjects with different degrees of hepatic steatosis. Serum RA concentrations in patients with NAFLD (1.42 ± 0.47 ng/mL) and NASH (1.14 ± 0.26 ng/mL) were significantly lower than those in control subjects (2.70 ± 0.52 ng/mL) (P hepatic steatosis. Both serum RA concentrations and RXRα mRNA levels were inversely correlated with intrahepatic triglyceride content (r = -0.700, P hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01940263. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  20. In vitro metabolism of [14C]-toluene by human and rat liver microsomes and liver slices

    Chapman, D.E.; Moore, T.J.; Michener, S.R.; Powis, G.

    1990-01-01

    Toluene metabolites produced by liver microsomes from six human donors included benzylalcohol (Balc), benzaldehyde (Bald) and benzoic acid (Bacid). Microsomes from only one human donor metabolized toluene to p-cresol and o-cresol. Human liver microsomes also metabolized Balc to Bald. Balc metabolism required NADPH, was inhibited by carbon monoxide, and was decreased at a buffer pH of 10. Balc metabolism was not inhibited by ADP-ribose or sodium azide. These results suggest that cytochrome P450 is responsible for the in vitro metabolism of Balc by human liver microsomes. Toluene metabolites formed by human liver slices and released into the incubation media included hippuric acid, and Bacid. Cresols or cresol-conjugates were not detected in liver slice incubation media from any human donor. Toluene metabolism by human liver was compared to metabolism by comparable liver preparations from male Fischer F344 rats. Rates of toluene metabolism by human liver microsomes and liver slices were 9-fold and 1.3-fold greater than for rat liver, respectively. Covalent binding of toluene to human liver microsomes and liver slices was 21-fold and 4-fold greater than for comparable rat liver preparations. Covalent binding of toluene to human microsomes required NADPH, was significantly decreased by coincubation with 4 mM cysteine or 4 mM glutathione, and radioactivity associated with microsomes was decreased by subsequent digestion of microsomes with protease. These results suggest that toluene metabolism and covalent binding of toluene are underestimated if the male Fischer 344 rat is used as a model for human toluene metabolism

  1. New therapeutic strategies for canine liver disease; Growth factors and liver progenitor cells

    Arends, B.

    2008-01-01

    The liver has the unique capacity to regulate its mass after loss of functional liver cells due to liver disease, injury, and/or toxicity. Unfortunately, in the course of chronic liver disease this meticulously regulated regeneration process is imbalanced resulting in a decreased regenerative

  2. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Samuel Rommelaere

    Full Text Available Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  3. Abdominal ultrasonography in inheredited diseases of carbohydrate metabolism

    Pozzato, Carlo; Curti, Alessandra; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Radaelli, Giovanni; Fiori, Laura; Rossi, Samantha; Riva, Enrica

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of abdominal sonography in inherited diseases of carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods: Thirty patients (age range, 4 months to 27 years) with glycogen storage diseases, galactosemia, disorders of fructose metabolism were studied with sonography. Echogenicity of the liver, sonographic dimensions of liver, kidneys and spleen were evaluated. Plasma blood parameters (ALT, AST, total cholesterol, triglycerides) were determined. Results: Liver was enlarged in 21/22 patients (95.4%) with glycogen storage diseases, in both subjects with disorders of fructose metabolism, and in 2/6 patients (33.3%) with galactosemia. Hepatic echogenicity was increased in 20/22 patients (90.9%) with glycogen storage diseases, and in the subject with hereditary fructose intolerance. Patients with galactosemia did not show increased liver echogenicity. Both kidney were enlarged in 8/17 patients (47.0%) with glycogen storage disease type I. Subjects with increased hepatic echogenicity exhibited higher plasma concentrations of any blood parameter than the others with normal echogenicity (p [it

  4. The Role of Liver Biopsy in the Management of Patients with Liver Disease

    Florence Wong

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of liver biopsy in the diagnosis and management of liver disease is a controversial issue even among hepatologists. Although most causes of elevated liver enzymes can be determined, or at least suspected, on the basis of a careful history and laboratory tests, histological assessment remains the gold standard for most liver diseases. Histological evaluation can either confirm or refute clinical diagnoses and can provide information about the severity and stage of disease. Occasionally, the liver biopsy also provides an additional diagnosis. The spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease accounts for a substantial proportion of cases of chronically elevated liver enzymes and can be reliably diagnosed only by liver biopsy. Prognostic information can be obtained in patients with this disorder, as well as in those with alcoholic liver disease and viral hepatitis, and liver biopsy can be used as a guide to their management.

  5. Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Targeting Liver Disease: TTR Amyloidosis

    Christoph Niemietz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The liver has become an increasingly interesting target for oligonucleotide therapy. Mutations of the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR, expressed in vast amounts by the liver, result in a complex degenerative disease, termed familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP. Misfolded variants of TTR are linked to the establishment of extracellular protein deposition in various tissues, including the heart and the peripheral nervous system. Recent progress in the chemistry and formulation of antisense (ASO and small interfering RNA (siRNA designed for a knockdown of TTR mRNA in the liver has allowed to address the issue of gene-specific molecular therapy in a clinical setting of FAP. The two therapeutic oligonucleotides bind to RNA in a sequence specific manner but exploit different mechanisms. Here we describe major developments that have led to the advent of therapeutic oligonucleotides for treatment of TTR-related disease.

  6. Radiofrequency-thermoablation in malignant liver disease

    Pichler, L.; Anzboeck, W.; Paertan, G.; Hruby, W.

    2002-01-01

    The clinical application of radiofrequency tumor ablation in primary liver tumors and metastatic liver disease is rapidly growing because this technique has proven to be simple, safe, and effective in first clinical studies. Most of the patients with malignant liver disease are not candidates for surgical resection due localisation or comorbidity, so radiofrequency therapy offers a good alternative for inoperable patients. With this method, high frequency alternating current is delivered to tissue via a needle electrode, the produced heat leads to coagulation necrosis. The largest focus of necrosis that can be induced with the currently available systems is approximately 4-5 cm with a single application. The radiofrequency needle is usually placed with US or CT guidance. For follow up examinations CT and MRI can be used, they proved to be equally accurate in the assessment of treatment response. (orig.) [de

  7. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  8. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  9. Adipokines and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Multiple Interactions

    Timon E. Adolph

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence links obesity with low-grade inflammation which may originate from adipose tissue that secretes a plethora of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines termed adipokines. Adiponectin and leptin have evolved as crucial signals in many obesity-related pathologies including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Whereas adiponectin deficiency might be critically involved in the pro-inflammatory state associated with obesity and related disorders, overproduction of leptin, a rather pro-inflammatory mediator, is considered of equal relevance. An imbalanced adipokine profile in obesity consecutively contributes to metabolic inflammation in NAFLD, which is associated with a substantial risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC also in the non-cirrhotic stage of disease. Both adiponectin and leptin have been related to liver tumorigenesis especially in preclinical models. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of some adipokines in NAFLD and associated HCC.

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and fatigue in long-term survivors of childhood-onset craniopharyngioma

    Hoffmann, Anika; Bootsveld, Klaus; Gebhardt, Ursel; Daubenbuchel, Anna M. M.; Sterkenburg, Anthe S.; Muller, Hermann L.

    Objective: Hypothalamic obesity in childhood craniopharyngioma (CP) patients carries a high risk for development of metabolic syndrome. In metabolic syndrome, the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is known. The aim of this study is to detect the risk for NAFLD in

  11. The metabolic effects of diuron in the rat liver.

    da Silva Simões, Mellina; Bracht, Lívia; Parizotto, Angela Valderrama; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2017-09-01

    A systematic study on the effects of diuron on the hepatic metabolism was conducted with emphasis on parameters linked to energy metabolism. The experimental system was the isolated perfused rat liver. The results demonstrate that diuron inhibited biosynthesis (gluconeogenesis) and ammonia detoxification, which are dependent of ATP generated within the mitochondria. Conversely, it stimulated glycolysis and fructolysis, which are compensatory phenomena for an inhibited mitochondrial ATP generation. Furthermore, diuron diminished the cellular ATP content under conditions where the mitochondrial respiratory chain was the only source of this compound. Besides the lack of circulating glucose due to gluconeogenesis inhibition, one can expect metabolic acidosis due to excess lactate production, impairment of ammonia detoxification and cell damage due to a deficient maintenance of its homeostasis. Some of the general signs of toxicity that were observed in diuron-treated rats can be attributed, partly at least, to the effects of the herbicide on energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  13. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  14. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  15. Radiologic evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Lee, Seung Soo; Park, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent cause of chronic liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver cirrhosis. Although liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD, especially for the diagnosis of NASH, imaging methods have been increasingly accepted as noninvasive alternatives to liver biopsy. Ultrasonography is a well-established and cost-effective imaging technique for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, especially for screening a large population at risk of NAFLD. Ultrasonography has a reasonable accuracy in detecting moderate-to-severe hepatic steatosis although it is less accurate for detecting mild hepatic steatosis, operator-dependent, and rather qualitative. Computed tomography is not appropriate for general population assessment of hepatic steatosis given its inaccuracy in detecting mild hepatic steatosis and potential radiation hazard. However, computed tomography may be effective in specific clinical situations, such as evaluation of donor candidates for hepatic transplantation. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging are now regarded as the most accurate practical methods of measuring liver fat in clinical practice, especially for longitudinal follow-up of patients with NAFLD. Ultrasound elastography and magnetic resonance elastography are increasingly used to evaluate the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD and to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. This article will review current imaging methods used to evaluate hepatic steatosis, including the diagnostic accuracy, limitations, and practical applicability of each method. It will also briefly describe the potential role of elastography techniques in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD. PMID:24966609

  16. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  17. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  18. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na + /H + exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors

  19. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Gemma Aragonès

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3 in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18, simple steatosis (SS, n = 20, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17. Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis.

  20. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-04-27

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis.

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  2. Metabolic Imaging in Parkinson Disease.

    Meles, Sanne K; Teune, Laura K; de Jong, Bauke M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on recent human 18 F-FDG PET studies in Parkinson disease. First, an overview is given of the current analytic approaches to metabolic brain imaging data. Next, we discuss how 18 F-FDG PET studies have advanced understanding of the relation between distinct brain regions and associated symptoms in Parkinson disease, including cognitive decline. In addition, the value of 18 F-FDG PET studies in differential diagnosis, identifying prodromal patients, and the evaluation of treatment effects are reviewed. Finally, anticipated developments in the field are addressed. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Beneficial Effects of Flavonoids.

    Akhlaghi, Masoumeh

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been known as the hepatic feature of metabolic syndrome. Extra fat depots, especially in visceral areas, develop insulin resistance as a result of mild oxidation and inflammation. Insulin resistance induces lipolysis and releases free fatty acids into the circulation, where they are transported to the liver. In the liver, free fatty acids are converted to triglycerides and accumulate, causing simple steatosis that, if left untreated, can lead to steatohepatitis, and subsequently liver necrosis and cirrhosis.Flavonoids, a group of plant compounds with incredible biological characteristics, have shown advantages in pathological conditions. Beneficial effects of flavonoids against NAFLD and its related disorders have been observed in both animal and human studies. Various mechanisms have been found for their protection. Flavonoids prevent hepatosteatosis by increasing fatty acid oxidation in the liver. They can also reduce caloric intake and decrease body weight and fat deposition in visceral tissues. Flavonoids are unique antioxidants that exert their beneficial effects through inhibition of nuclear factor κB, thereby attenuating release of inflammatory cytokines, which are triggers of insulin resistance. Finally, flavonoids have shown to increase adiponectin, improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, correct dyslipidemia, and reduce blood pressure in patients with NAFLD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multidisciplinary Pharmacotherapeutic Options for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Kei Nakajima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are multidisciplinary liver diseases that often accompany type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome, which are characterized by insulin resistance. Therefore, effective treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome should target not only the cardiometabolic abnormalities, but also the associated liver disorders. In the last decade, it has been shown that metformin, thiazolidinediones, vitamin E, ezetimibe, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, renin-angiotensin system (RAS blockers, and antiobesity drugs may improve hepatic pathophysiological disorders as well as clinical parameters. Accordingly, insulin sensitizers, antioxidative agents, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1 inhibitors, RAS blockers, and drugs that target the central nervous system may represent candidate pharmacotherapies for NAFLD and possibly NASH. However, the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of long-term treatment (potentially for many years with these drugs have not been fully established. Furthermore, clinical trials have not comprehensively examined the efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins, fibrates, and NPC1L1 inhibitors for the treatment of NAFLD. Although clinical evidence for RAS blockers and incretin-based agents (GLP-1 analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors is also lacking, these agents are promising in terms of their insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory effects without causing weight gain.

  6. Dynamic isotope studies in liver disease

    Weits, J

    1978-01-01

    Much information in the field of liver research has been gained by dynamic isotope studies. Clinically, these studies can help to settle selection criteria for different types of surgical shunt, which relieve the complications of portal hypertension. By performing splenoportoscintigraphy, splenic and portal vein thrombosis can be easily and safely excluded. So-called hypoxaemia of cirrhosis can most easily be diagnosed. Suprahepatic caval vein obstruction in a patient with cryptogenic liver disease is easily excluded by a radionuclide cavogram after injection of pertechnetate into a foot vein.

  7. Adrenergic Metabolic and Hemodynamic Effects of Octopamine in the Liver

    Adelar Bracht

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite suppressants. A component of these extracts is octopamine, which is an adrenergic agent. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of octopamine on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways and hemodynamics. Octopamine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake, gluconeogenesis and the portal perfusion pressure. Octopamine also accelerated the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids (octanoate and oleate, as revealed by the increase in 14CO2 production derived from 14C labeled precursors. The changes in glycogenolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure were almost completely abolished by α1-adrenergic antagonists. The same changes were partly sensitive to the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. It can be concluded that octopamine accelerates both catabolic and anabolic processes in the liver via adrenergic stimulation. Acceleration of oxygen uptake under substrate-free perfusion conditions also means acceleration of the oxidation of endogenous fatty acids, which are derived from lipolysis. All these effects are compatible with an overall stimulating effect of octopamine on metabolism, which is compatible with its reported weight-loss effects in experimental animals.

  8. The role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in development and progression of liver diseases

    YANG Jinlian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has a high expression level in mature hepatocytes. HNF4α can regulate hepatocyte-specific gene expression at a transcriptional level, promote hepatocyte development and differentiation, participate in establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity, and enhance the synthetic, metabolic, and detoxifying functions of the liver. Through inhibiting the activation of hepatic stellate cells, reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inhibiting the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of hepatoma cells, HNF4α may be involved in the development and progression of various liver diseases including liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. This paper elaborates on the biological functions of HNF4α, and summarizes and analyzes the research advances in the mechanisms of action of HNF4α in the pathological process of liver diseases, in order to provide references for further investigation of the potential targeted therapies for liver diseases.

  9. Herbal medicines for liver diseases in India.

    Thyagarajan, S P; Jayaram, S; Gopalakrishnan, V; Hari, R; Jeyakumar, P; Sripathi, M S

    2002-12-01

    The use of natural remedies for the treatment of liver diseases has a long history, starting with the Ayurvedhic treatment, and extending to the Chinese, European and other systems of traditional medicines. The 21st century has seen a paradigm shift towards therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in liver diseases by carefully synergizing the strengths of the traditional systems of medicine with that of the modern concept of evidence-based medicinal evaluation, standardization of herbal products and randomized placebo controlled clinical trials to support clinical efficacy. The present review provides the status report on the scientific approaches made to herbal preparations used in Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of liver diseases. In spite of the availability of more than 300 preparations for the treatment of jaundice and chronic liver diseases in Indian systems of medicine using more than 87 Indian medicinal plants, only four terrestrial plants have been scientifically elucidated while adhering to the internationally acceptable scientific protocols. In-depth studies have proved Sylibum marianum to be anti-oxidative, antilipidperoxidative, antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and liver regenerative. Glycyrrhiza glabra has been shown to be hepatoprotective and capable of inducing an indigenous interferon. Picrorhiza kurroa is proved to be anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory. Extensive studies on Phyllanthus amarus have confirmed this plant preparation as being anti-viral against hepatitis B and C viruses, hepatoprotective and immunomodulating, as well as possessing anti-inflammatory properties. For the first time in the Indian systems of medicine, a chemo-biological fingerprinting methodology for standardization of P. amarus preparation has been patented. Copyright 2002 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  10. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease

    The effect that chronic liver disease has on a child's nutritional status and ... even children with less severe liver disease require nutritional .... Reduced muscle bulk .... pain and fractures, palpation of the spine and assessment of pubertal stage.

  11. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  12. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease

    Rabah M. Shawky

    chondrial function and structure in livers from humans with chronic liver disease ... ease, 2 with lipid storage disease, one with type I autoimmune hepatitis, one ..... a classification scheme for mitochondrial hepatopathies into primary and ...

  13. The significance of liver in metabolism of plutonium 239

    Netchev, Christo.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium 239 has an important toxicological significance and is widely used in the nuclear industry which makes the study of its metabolism in the organism appear of substantial interest. The role of the liver in the distribution of radionuclide and its barrier capabilities, determining to a certain extent the back transport of the isotope from the blood plasma into the gut is studied. The storage of Plutonium 239 in the organ and its reexcretion by way of the gull is quantitatively demonstrated. This question is related to the exact determination of the coefficient of absorption of the radioisotope in the digestive tract. The radionuclide is inserted into organism as PuCl 3 directly into vein jugularis and vein portae. The peculiarities of its distribution in the liver by the two ways of introduction as well as the essential differences in the radioactivity of the products of excretion by portal application are described. The mechanism of the storage of the radioisotope in the organ is explained to a great extent with its physical and chemical condition in the liver tissue. Plutonium 239 is found in the liver completely as a complex compound with the tissue proteins, the combining with globulines predominating. The dynamics of exchange of the radionuclide in the organ is determined mainly by its complex combination with the globulins. The part of nuclide connected with the other protein fractions of liver is not significant and hence they do not much influence kinetics in the organ

  14. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Gallstone disease is associated with more severe liver damage in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Anna Ludovica Fracanzani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and gallstone disease (GD are both highly prevalent in the general population and associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GD in a cross sectional study of NAFLD patients and to define whether the presence of GD is associated with diabetes and predicts more severe liver disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We merged databases of four Liver Units, comprising 524 consecutive biopsy-proven NAFLD (373 males observed between January 2003 and June 2010. GD was diagnosed in 108 (20%, and 313 cases (60% were classified by liver biopsy as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The GD subgroup was characterized by a significantly higher prevalence of females, prediabetes/diabetes, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome, older age, higher BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and lower ALT. The prevalence of GD progressively increased with advancing fibrosis and with the severity of necroinflammatory activity (p for trend  = 0.0001 and  = 0.01, respectively, without differences in the severity of steatosis. At multivariate analysis GD was associated with female gender (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.04-1.8, age (OR 1.027, 95% CI1.003-1.05, fasting glucose (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.33 and NASH (OR 1.40,95% CI 1.06-1.89, whereas ALT levels were associated with a lower GD risk (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99. When subjects with cirrhosis were excluded from analysis, the association between GD and fasting glucose, female gender, and NASH was maintained. CONCLUSION: Patients with NAFLD have a high prevalence of GD, which characterizes subjects with altered glucose regulation and more advanced liver disease.

  17. Does vitamin C deficiency promote fatty liver disease development?

    Ipsen, David Højland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further...... exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC) status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per...

  18. A proteomic-based characterization of liver metabolism in dairy cows and young pigs

    Sejersen, Henrik

    This thesis deals with studies on liver metabolism in cows and pigs. Proteome analysis was used to quantify a large number of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. In cows, the objective was to characterize differences in the liver proteome between early lactation dairy cows with low or high...... liver fat content and suggest potential blood-based biomarkers for early detection of fatty liver to substantiate prevention strategies. Our results show that several proteins in liver metabolic pathways are affected by liver fat content and that blood aspartate aminotransferase, ß...

  19. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease. PMID:26494964

  1. Free triiodothyronine as determinant of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in euthyroid subjects: The lifelines cohort study

    Van Den Berg, Eline; van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Amini, Marzyeh; Schreuder, Tim C.M.A.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Blokzijl, H.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty live disease (NAFLD) is becoming the leading cause of chronic liver disease in de Western world. The liver plays a crucial role in the metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides and thyroid hormones interact on hepatic lipid homeostasis. Given the importance of

  2. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  3. Mineral Requirements in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decreased oral intake or impaired function / structure in the gut, such as hypertension port associated with atrophic changes in the protein nutrition - calories can lead to micronutrient deficiencies.This paper examines the status of micronutrients in chronic liver disease in children.   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"” minerals””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 3 related articles have been found.   Results: In chronic liver disease changes in micronutrient metabolism lead to changes in the daily requirements, such that in certain circumstances intake increasing or decreasing  is needed. Low serum calcium and phosphate concentrations are often the reflection of malabsorption-induced bone disease that is unresponsive to vitamin D store normalization. Iron is usually deficient in children with CLD and supplementation frequently needed. The origin of iron deficiency is multifactorial and includes ongoing losses, inadequate intakes, serial blood draws and malabsorption secondary to hypertensive enteropathy. Zinc plays an important role in cognitive function, appetite and taste, immune function, wound healing, and protein metabolism. Low plasma zinc levels are frequent in children with chronic cholestasis, but unfortunately plasma concentrations are not reflective of total body zinc status. Copper and manganese, unlike other minerals, are increased in CLD, because they are normally excreted through bile. Parenteral nutrition in cholestatic patients can induce manganese intoxication and accumulation in basal ganglia.   Conclusion:  In fants with CLD are prone to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Mineral state should be evaluated, treated and reevaluated, until sufficient daily requirement achieved. Poster  Presentation, N 33  

  4. Diagnostic methods of fatty liver disease; Diagnostik der Fettleber

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). FE MRT

    2017-09-15

    Fatty liver disease is defined as an abnormal accumulation of lipids into the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Different kinds of fatty liver diseases are becoming the most important etiologies of end-stage liver disease in the western world. Because fatty liver is a theoretically reversible process, timely and accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for potential therapeutic options. This work describes major diagnostic methods and discusses particular advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.

  5. Diet and liver apoptosis in rats: a particular metabolic pathway.

    Monteiro, Maria Emilia Lopes; Xavier, Analucia Rampazzo; Azeredo, Vilma Blondet

    2017-03-30

    Various studies have indicated an association between modifi cation in dietary macronutrient composition and liver apoptosis. To explain how changes in metabolic pathways associated with a high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate diet causes liver apoptosis. Two groups of rats were compared. An experimental diet group (n = 8) using a high-protein (59.46%), high-fat (31.77%), and low-carbohydrate (8.77%) diet versus a control one (n = 9) with American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93-M diet. Animals were sacrificed after eight weeks, the adipose tissue weighed, the liver removed for flow cytometry analysis, and blood collected to measure glucose, insulin, glucagon, IL-6, TNF, triglycerides, malondialdehyde, and β-hydroxybutyrate. Statistical analysis was carried out using the unpaired and parametric Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coeffi ents. Significance was set at p triglycerides lower levels compared with the control group. The results show a positive and significant correlation between the percentage of nonviable hepatocytes and malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.0217) and a statistically significant negative correlation with triglycerides levels (p = 0.006). Results suggest that plasmatic malondialdehyde and triglyceride levels are probably good predictors of liver damage associated with an experimental low-carbohydrate diet in rats.

  6. Gender and racial differences in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Fallon, Michael B

    2014-05-27

    Due to the worldwide epidemic of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver injury ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may progress to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Individuals with NAFLD, especially those with metabolic syndrome, have higher overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and liver-related mortality compared with the general population. According to the population-based studies, NAFLD and NASH are more prevalent in males and in Hispanics. Both the gender and racial ethnic differences in NAFLD and NASH are likely attributed to interaction between environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors. Using genome-wide association studies, several genetic variants have been identified to be associated with NAFLD/NASH. However, these variants account for only a small amount of variation in hepatic steatosis among ethnic groups and may serve as modifiers of the natural history of NAFLD. Alternatively, these variants may not be the causative variants but simply markers representing a larger body of genetic variations. In this article, we provide a concise review of the gender and racial differences in the prevalence of NAFLD and NASH in adults. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for these disparities.

  7. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L'Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-03-02

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development.

  8. Association between noninvasive fibrosis markers and chronic kidney disease among adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Giorgio Sesti

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index, diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001. Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13-23.28; P = 0.03 as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11-14.05; P = 0.03 as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors.

  9. Celastrol ameliorates liver metabolic damage caused by a high-fat diet through Sirt1

    Yinliang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Celastrol ameliorates NAFLD by decreasing lipid synthesis and improving the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory status. And Sirt1 has an important role in Celastrol-ameliorating liver metabolic damage caused by HFD. Keywords: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Celastrol, Sirt1, Lipid metabolism, Chronic inflammation, Oxidative stress

  10. Liver involvement in Gaucher disease - Review and clinical approach.

    Adar, Tomer; Ilan, Yaron; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari

    2018-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), one of the most prevalent lysosomal storage diseases, is associated with glucocerebroside accumulation in cells of the monocyte-macrophage system in various organs, including the liver. Evaluating and managing liver disease in patients with Gaucher disease may be challenging. While hepatic involvement is common in Gaucher disease, its severity, and clinical significance span a wide spectrum, ranging from sub-clinical involvement to liver cirrhosis with its associated complications including portal hypertension. Apart from liver involvement in Gaucher disease, patients with may also suffer from other comorbidities involving the liver. That Gaucher disease itself can mimic hepatic lesions, affect laboratory tests used to characterize liver disease, and may be associated with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, complicates the diagnostic approach even more. Better understanding of liver involvement in Gaucher disease can spare patients unnecessary invasive testing, and assist physicians in decision making when evaluating patients with Gaucher disease suspected for significant liver disease. This review describes the various clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging abnormalities that may be encountered when following patients with Gaucher disease for liver involvement. The mechanism for liver disease are discussed, as well as the possible hepato-protective effect of glucocerebroside, and the a diagnostic and treatment approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Two consecutive partial liver transplants in a patient with Classic Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    H.L. Chin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease is caused by a deficiency in the branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKAD complex. This results in the accumulation of branched chain amino acids (BCAA and branched chain ketoacids in the body. Even when aggressively treated with dietary restriction of BCAA, patients experience long term cognitive, neurological and psychosocial problems. Liver transplantation from deceased donors has been shown to be an effective modality in introducing adequate BCKAD activity, attaining a metabolic cure for patients. Here, we report the clinical course of the first known patient with classic MSUD who received two consecutive partial liver grafts from two different living non-carrier donors and his five year outcome posttransplant. We also show that despite the failure of the first liver graft, and initial acute cellular rejection of the second liver graft in our patient, his metabolic control remained good without metabolic decompensation.

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Creatine and the Liver: Metabolism and Possible Interactions.

    Barcelos, R P; Stefanello, S T; Mauriz, J L; Gonzalez-Gallego, J; Soares, F A A

    2016-01-01

    The process of creatine synthesis occurs in two steps, catalyzed by L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT), which take place mainly in kidney and liver, respectively. This molecule plays an important energy/pH buffer function in tissues, and to guarantee the maintenance of its total body pool, the lost creatine must be replaced from diet or de novo synthesis. Creatine administration is known to decrease the consumption of Sadenosyl methionine and also reduce the homocysteine production in liver, diminishing fat accumulation and resulting in beneficial effects in fatty liver and non-alcoholic liver disease. Different studies have shown that creatine supplementation could supply brain energy, presenting neuroprotective effects against the encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in acute liver failure. Creatine is also taken by many athletes for its ergogenic properties. However, little is known about the adverse effects of creatine supplementation, which are barely described in the literature, with reports of mainly hypothetical effects arising from a small number of scientific publications. Antioxidant effects have been found in several studies, although one of the theories regarding the potential for toxicity from creatine supplementation is that it can increase oxidative stress and potentially form carcinogenic compounds.

  14. Pruritus in chronic cholestatic liver diseases

    E. V. Vinnitskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pruritus can be a prominent symptom  in patients with chronic liver disorders, especially those  with cholestasis,  and  substantially  affects  quality  of life. Management of pruritus  in cholestatic  liver diseases  remains  a  complicated   medical  problem. The review article deals with pathophysiological mechanisms of pruritus in cholestatic liver diseases, in particular, with the role of bile acids, endogenous opioids, serotonin, and histamine. There is new data on the key pathophysiological elements, such as neuronal activation lysophosphatidic acid and autotaxin, an enzyme that produces lysophosphatidic acid and whose serum activity is associated with the intensity of pruritus. Pathophysiology-based management approaches include administration of anionic exchange resin cholestyramine, ursodeoxycholic acid, rifampicin agonists, an opioid antagonist naltrexone and a  serotonin-reuptake inhibitor sertraline. These agents are recommended for the use as a stepped treatment algorithm. Patients who do not respond to these therapies can become candidates for albumin dialysis, plasmapheresis, ultraviolet B phototherapy, or need some other individualized approaches. New knowledge on the pathophysiology of pruritus may potentially result in the development of new agents for cholestatic pruritus.

  15. Caput medusae in alcoholic liver disease | Hari Kumar | Nigerian ...

    Caput medusae and palmar erythema are cardinal signs in cirrhosis of liver with portal hypertension. Palmar erythema is described more often as a marker for alcoholic etiology of chronic liver disease. The peripheral stigmata of chronic liver disease are not routinely seen now a days due to early diagnosis and better ...

  16. Serum γ-glutamyl transferase levels, insulin resistance and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Salvatore Petta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Serum levels of γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase(γ-GT were associated with liver disease severity and metabolic alterations, which in turn are able to affect hepatic damage. In patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (G1CHC and chronic hepatitis B (CHB, we assessed the link between liver fibrosis and γ-GT serum levels, and we evaluated if normal or high γ-GT serum levels affect the association between insulin resistance (IR and severity of liver fibrosis. METHODS: 843 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease (CLD(193 NAFLD, 481 G1CHC, 169 CHB were evaluated by liver biopsy (Kleiner and Scheuer scores and clinical and metabolic measurements. IR was diagnosed if HOMA>3. A serum γ-GT concentration of >36 IU/L in females and >61 IU/L in males was considered the threshold value for identifying high levels of γ-GT. RESULTS: By multivariate logistic regression analysis, abnormal γ-GT serum levels were independently linked to severe liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD (OR2.711,CI1.120-6.564,p = 0.02, G1CHC (OR3.461,CI2.138-5.603,p80%. Interestingly, among patients with high or normal γ-GT values, even if IR prevalence was significantly higher in patients with severe fibrosis compared to those without, IR remained significantly associated with severe fibrosis in patients with abnormal γ-GT values only (OR4.150,CI1.079-15.970,p = 0.03 for NAFLD; OR2.250,CI1.211-4.181,p = 0.01 for G1CHC; OR3.096,CI2.050-34.220,p = 0.01 for CHB. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CLD, IR is independently linked to liver fibrosis only in patients with abnormal γ-GT values, without differences according to liver disease etiology, and suggesting a role of γ-GT as a marker of metabolic-induced liver damage. These data could be useful for the clinical and pharmacologic management of patients with CLD.

  17. Potential and Challenges of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Liver Diseases Treatment

    Yue Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tens of millions of patients are affected by liver disease worldwide. Many of these patients can benefit from cell therapy involving living metabolically active cells, either by treatment of their liver disease, or by prevention of their disease phenotype. Cell therapies, including hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver (BAL devices, have been proposed as therapeutic alternatives to the shortage of transplantable livers. Both BAL and hepatocyte transplantation are cellular therapies that avoid use of a whole liver. Hepatocytes are also widely used in drug screening and liver disease modelling. However, the demand for human hepatocytes, heavily outweighs their availability by conventional means. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs technology brings together the potential benefits of embryonic stem cells (ESCs (i.e., self-renewal, pluripotency and addresses the major ethical and scientific concerns of ESCs: embryo destruction and immune-incompatibility. It has been shown that hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs can be generated from iPSCs. Furthermore, human iPSCs (hiPSCs can provide an unlimited source of human hepatocytes and hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine, drug screening and liver diseases modelling. Despite steady progress, there are still several major obstacles that need to be overcome before iPSCs will reach the bedside. This review will focus on the current state of efforts to derive hiPSCs for potential use in modelling and treatment of liver disease.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Metabolic Syndrome

    Olinichenko, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the research is to study the features of gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The study involved 490 patients (250 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome and 240 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease without the metabolic syndrome). The patients besides general clinical examination were carried out video-fibro-gastro-duodeno-skopy, pH-monitoring in the esophagus, anthropometry, deter...

  19. Accuracy of liver scintigraphy in focal liver disease - a comparison with postmortem studies in 159 cases

    Biersack, H.J.; Helpap, B.; Bell, E.; Vogt, R.; Breuel, H.P.; Bonn Univ.

    1979-01-01

    Our investigations were carried out in 139 patients with various types of malignancy. Included in the investigations were 20 patients with primary liver tumor. The interval between scintigraphic examination and the histological verification ranged from 3 days to 1 year. In 62 of the patients histopathology revealed liver metastases, while 77 patients showed no liver involvement. We arrived at the correct diagnosis 'liver metastasis' in 50 out of 2 patientes. Fifty six out of 77 patients without histopathological evidence of liver metastases revealed negative scintigrams. In 18 of 20(90%) patients with focal liver disease correct diagnosis was established. Considering the fact that liver scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure, it can be recommended as screening method. In connection with sonography and computer tomography liver scintigraphy can undoubtedly improve the diagnostic accuracy in detecting liver metastases and primary liver tumors. (orig./MG) [de

  20. A tryptophan derivative, ITE, enhances liver cell metabolic functions in vitro.

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Lu, Juan; He, Bin; Tang, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Danhua; Cao, Hongcui; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Cell encapsulation provides a three-dimensional support by incorporating isolated cells into microcapsules with the goal of simultaneously maintaining cell survival and function, as well as providing active transport for a bioreactor in vitro similarly to that observed in vivo. However, the biotra-nsformation and metabolic functions of the encapsulated cells are not satisfactory for clinical applications. For this purpose, in this study, hepatoma-derived Huh7 cells/C3A cells were treated with 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), an endogenous non-toxic ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, in monolayer cultures and on microspheres. The mRNA and protein levels, as well as the metabolic activities of drug metabolizing enzymes, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were determined. When the Huh7 and C3A cells cultured in a monolayer on two‑dimensional surfaces, ITE enhanced the protein levels and the metabolic activities of the major cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1, and slightly increased albumin secretion and urea synthesis. Moreover, when cultured on microspheres, ITE also substantially increased the protein levels and metabolic activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1 in both liver cell lines. On the whole, our findings indicate that ITE enhances the enzymatic activities of major CYP450 enzymes and the metabolic functions of liver cells cultured in monolayer or on microspheres, indicating that it may be utilized to improve the functions of hepatocytes. Thus, it may be used in the future for the treatment of liver diseases.

  1. A tryptophan derivative, ITE, enhances liver cell metabolic functions in vitro

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Lu, Juan; He, Bin; Tang, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Danhua; Cao, Hongcui; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Cell encapsulation provides a three-dimensional support by incorporating isolated cells into microcapsules with the goal of simultaneously maintaining cell survival and function, as well as providing active transport for a bioreactor in vitro similarly to that observed in vivo. However, the biotransformation and metabolic functions of the encapsulated cells are not satisfactory for clinical applications. For this purpose, in this study, hepatoma-derived Huh7 cells/C3A cells were treated with 2-(1′H-indole-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), an endogenous non-toxic ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, in monolayer cultures and on microspheres. The mRNA and protein levels, as well as the metabolic activities of drug metabolizing enzymes, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were determined. When the Huh7 and C3A cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional surfaces, ITE enhanced the protein levels and the metabolic activities of the major cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1, and slightly increased albumin secretion and urea synthesis. Moreover, when cultured on microspheres, ITE also substantially increased the protein levels and metabolic activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP1B1 in both liver cell lines. On the whole, our findings indicate that ITE enhances the enzymatic activities of major CYP450 enzymes and the metabolic functions of liver cells cultured in monolayer or on microspheres, indicating that it may be utilized to improve the functions of hepatocytes. Thus, it may be used in the future for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27959388

  2. Defining normal liver stiffness range in a normal healthy Chinese population without liver disease.

    James Fung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic liver disease, different optimal liver stiffness cut-off values correspond to different stages of fibrosis, which are specific for the underlying liver disease and population. AIMS: To establish the normal ranges of liver stiffness in the healthy Chinese population without underlying liver disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross sectional study of 2,528 healthy volunteers recruited from the general population and the Red Cross Transfusion Center in Hong Kong. All participants underwent a comprehensive questionnaire survey, measurement of weight, height, and blood pressure. Fasting liver function tests, glucose and cholesterol was performed. Abdominal ultrasound and transient elastography were performed on all participants. RESULTS: Of the 2,528 subjects, 1,998 were excluded with either abnormal liver parenchyma on ultrasound, chronic medical condition, abnormal blood tests including liver enzymes, fasting glucose, fasting cholesterol, high body mass index, high blood pressure, or invalid liver stiffness scan. The reference range for the 530 subjects without known liver disease was 2.3 to 5.9 kPa (mean 4.1, SD 0.89. The median liver stiffness was higher in males compared with females (4.3 vs 4.0 kPa respectively, p55 years (p=0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The healthy reference range for liver stiffness in the Chinese population is 2.3 to 5.9 kPa. Female gender and older age group was associated with a lower median liver stiffness.

  3. Isocaloric high-fat feeding directs hepatic metabolism to handling of nutrient imbalance promoting liver fat deposition

    Diaz Rua, Ruben; Van Schothorst, E. M.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.; Oliver, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Consumption of fat-rich foods is associated with obesity and related alterations. However, there is a group of individuals, the metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) subjects, who present normal body weight but have metabolic features characteristic of the obese status, including fat deposition in critical tissues such as liver, recognized as a major cause for the promotion of metabolic diseases. Our aim was to better understand metabolic alterations present in liver of MONW rats applying whole genome transcriptome analysis. Methods: Wistar rats were chronically fed a high-fat diet isocaloric relative to Control animals to avoid the hyperphagia and overweight and to mimic MONW features. Liver transcriptome analysis of both groups was performed. Results: Sustained intake of an isocaloric high-fat diet had a deep impact on the liver transcriptome, mainly affecting lipid metabolism. Although serum cholesterol levels were not affected, circulating triacylglycerols were lower, and metabolic adaptations at gene expression level indicated adaptation toward handling the increased fat content of the diet, an increased triacylglycerol and cholesterol deposition in liver of MONW rats was observed. Moreover, gene expression pointed to increased risk of liver injury. One of the top upregulated genes in this tissue was Krt23, a marker of hepatic disease in humans that was also increased at the protein level.Conclusion:Long-term intake of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overweight/obesity or increase in classical blood risk biomarkers, promotes a molecular environment leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and increasing the risk of suffering from hepatic diseases.

  4. Isocaloric high-fat feeding directs hepatic metabolism to handling of nutrient imbalance promoting liver fat deposition

    Diaz Rua, Ruben

    2016-03-22

    Background/Objectives: Consumption of fat-rich foods is associated with obesity and related alterations. However, there is a group of individuals, the metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) subjects, who present normal body weight but have metabolic features characteristic of the obese status, including fat deposition in critical tissues such as liver, recognized as a major cause for the promotion of metabolic diseases. Our aim was to better understand metabolic alterations present in liver of MONW rats applying whole genome transcriptome analysis. Methods: Wistar rats were chronically fed a high-fat diet isocaloric relative to Control animals to avoid the hyperphagia and overweight and to mimic MONW features. Liver transcriptome analysis of both groups was performed. Results: Sustained intake of an isocaloric high-fat diet had a deep impact on the liver transcriptome, mainly affecting lipid metabolism. Although serum cholesterol levels were not affected, circulating triacylglycerols were lower, and metabolic adaptations at gene expression level indicated adaptation toward handling the increased fat content of the diet, an increased triacylglycerol and cholesterol deposition in liver of MONW rats was observed. Moreover, gene expression pointed to increased risk of liver injury. One of the top upregulated genes in this tissue was Krt23, a marker of hepatic disease in humans that was also increased at the protein level.Conclusion:Long-term intake of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overweight/obesity or increase in classical blood risk biomarkers, promotes a molecular environment leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and increasing the risk of suffering from hepatic diseases.

  5. Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Normal-weight and Overweight Preadolescent Children in Haryana, India.

    Das, Manoja Kumar; Bhatia, Vidyut; Sibal, Anupam; Gupta, Abha; Gopalan, Sarath; Sardana, Raman; Sahni, Reeti; Roy, Ankur; Arora, Narendra K

    2017-12-15

    To document the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic parameters among normal-weight and overweight schoolchildren. Cross-sectional study. Thirteen private schools in urban Faridabad, Haryana. 961 school children aged 5-10 years. Ultrasound testing was done, and 215 with fatty liver on ultrasound underwent further clinical, biochemical and virological testing. Prevalence of fatty liver on ultrasound, and NAFLD and its association with biochemical abnormalities and demographic risk factors. On ultrasound, 215 (22.4%) children had fatty liver; 18.9% in normal-weight and 45.6% in overweight category. Presence and severity of fatty liver disease increased with body mass index (BMI) and age. Among the children with NAFLD, elevated SGOT and SGPT was observed in 21.5% and 10.4% children, respectively. Liver enzyme derangement was significantly higher in overweight children (27% vs 19.4% in normal-weight) and severity of fatty liver (28% vs 20% in mild fatty liver cases). Eleven (8.1%) children with NAFLD had metabolic syndrome. Higher BMI (OR 35.9), severe fatty liver disease (OR 1.7) and female sex (OR 1.9) had strong association with metabolic syndrome. 22.4% of normal-weight and overweight children aged 5-10 years had fatty liver. A high proportion (18.9%) of normal-weight children with fatty liver on ultrasound indicates the silent burden in the population.

  6. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    David Højland Ipsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH.

  7. Methods of measuring metabolism during surgery in humans: focus on the liver-brain relationship.

    Battezzati, Alberto; Bertoli, Simona

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to review recent advances in setting methods and models for measuring metabolism during surgery in humans. Surgery, especially solid organ transplantation, may offer unique experimental models in which it is ethically acceptable to gain information on difficult problems of amino acid and protein metabolism. Two areas are reviewed: the metabolic study of the anhepatic phase during liver transplantation and brain microdialysis during cerebral surgery. The first model offers an innovative approach to understand the relative role of liver and extrahepatic organs in gluconeogenesis, and to evaluate whether other organs can perform functions believed to be exclusively or almost exclusively performed by the liver. The second model offers an insight to intracerebral metabolism that is closely bound to that of the liver. The recent advances in metabolic research during surgery provide knowledge immediately useful for perioperative patient management and for a better control of surgical stress. The studies during the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation have showed that gluconeogenesis and glutamine metabolism are very active processes outside the liver. One of the critical organs for extrahepatic glutamine metabolism is the brain. Microdialysis studies helped to prove that in humans there is an intense trafficking of glutamine, glutamate and alanine among neurons and astrocytes. This delicate network is influenced by systemic amino acid metabolism. The metabolic dialogue between the liver and the brain is beginning to be understood in this light in order to explain the metabolic events of brain damage during liver failure.

  8. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Metabolic Activation Pathways Leading to Liver Tumor Initiation.

    Fu, Peter P

    2017-01-17

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides are a class of phytochemical carcinogens contained in over 6000 plant species spread around the world. It has been estimated that approximately half of the 660 PAs and PA N-oxides that have been characterized are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and tumorigenic. It was recently determined that a genotoxic mechanism of liver tumor initiation mediated by PA-derived DNA adducts is a common metabolic activation pathway of a number of PAs. We proposed this set of PA-derived DNA adducts could be a common biological biomarker of PA exposure and a potential biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. We have also found that several reactive secondary pyrrolic metabolites can dissociate and interconvert to other secondary pyrrolic metabolites, resulting in the formation of the same exogenous DNA adducts. This present perspective reports the current progress on these new findings and proposes future research needed for obtaining a greater understanding of the role of this activation pathway and validating the use of this set of PA-derived DNA adducts as a biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor initiation.

  9. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation.

    Zhang, Qi-Kun; Wang, Meng-Long

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT.

  10. Mitochondrial-nuclear genome interactions in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice

    Betancourt, Angela M.; King, Adrienne L.; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Finley, Rachel D.; Oliva, Claudia R.; Crowe, David Ralph; Ballinger, Scott W.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) involves significant changes in liver metabolism characterized by oxidative stress, lipid accumulation, and fibrogenesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction and bioenergetic defects also contribute to NAFLD. Herein, we examined whether differences in mtDNA influence NAFLD. To determine the role of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in NAFLD, Mitochondrial-Nuclear eXchange (MNX) mice were fed an atherogenic diet. MNX mice have mtDNA from C57BL/6...

  11. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review of a growing epidemic

    Hassan, Kareem; Bhalla, Varun; Ezz El Regal, Mohammed; A-Kader, H Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is quickly becoming one of the most prominent causes of liver disease worldwide. The increasing incidence of NAFLD is tied to the obesity epidemic and the subsequent metabolic derangements brought along with it. Current efforts to elucidate the mechanism and causes of the disease have answered some questions, but much remains unknown about NAFLD. The aim of this article is to discuss the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as the current and future diagnostic, preventative, and therapeutic options available to clinicians for the management of NAFLD. PMID:25232245

  12. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1998-01-01

    oxide and vasodilating peptides seem to play an important role. The development of central hypovolaemia and activation of potent vasoconstricting systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic nervous system lead to a hyperdynamic circulation with increased heart rate...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  13. Metabolic profiling of fatty liver in young and middle‐aged adults: Cross‐sectional and prospective analyses of the Young Finns Study

    Würtz, Peter; Suomela, Emmi; Lehtovirta, Miia; Kangas, Antti J.; Jula, Antti; Mikkilä, Vera; Viikari, Jorma S.A.; Juonala, Markus; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Hutri‐Kähönen, Nina; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Soininen, Pasi; Ala‐Korpela, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver is associated with obesity‐related metabolic disturbances, but little is known about the metabolic perturbations preceding fatty liver disease. We performed comprehensive metabolic profiling to assess how circulating metabolites, such as lipoprotein lipids, fatty acids, amino acids, and glycolysis‐related metabolites, reflect the presence of and future risk for fatty liver in young adults. Sixty‐eight lipids and metabolites were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics in the population‐based Young Finns Study from serum collected in 2001 (n = 1,575), 2007 (n = 1,509), and 2011 (n = 2,002). Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasound in 2011 when participants were aged 34‐49 years (19% prevalence). Cross‐sectional associations as well as 4‐year and 10‐year risks for fatty liver were assessed by logistic regression. Metabolites across multiple pathways were strongly associated with the presence of fatty liver (P fatty acids including omega‐6 (OR = 0.37, 0.32‐0.42). The metabolic associations were attenuated but remained significant after adjusting for waist, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking (P fatty liver diagnosis. Conclusion: Circulating lipids, fatty acids, and amino acids reflect fatty liver independently of routine metabolic risk factors; these metabolic aberrations appear to precede the development of fatty liver in young adults. (Hepatology 2017;65:491‐500). PMID:27775848

  14. Evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease using magnetic resonance in obese children and adolescents.

    Benetolo, Patrícia O; Fernandes, Maria I M; Ciampo, Ieda R L Del; Elias-Junior, Jorge; Sawamura, Regina

    2018-02-10

    To determine the frequency of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease using nuclear magnetic resonance as a noninvasive method. This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 50 children and adolescents followed up at an outpatient obesity clinic. The subjects were submitted to physical examination, laboratory tests (transaminases, liver function tests, lipid profile, glycemia, and basal insulin) and abdominal nuclear magnetic resonance (calculation of hepatic, visceral, and subcutaneous fat). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed in 14 (28%) participants, as a severe condition in eight (percent fat >18%), and as non-severe in four (percent fat from 9% to 18%). Fatty liver was associated with male gender, triglycerides, AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio, and acanthosis nigricans. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome did not show an association with fatty liver. The frequency of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the present population of children and adolescents was lower than that reported in the international literature. It is suggested that nuclear magnetic resonance is an imaging exam that can be applied to children and adolescents, thus representing an effective noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in this age range. However, further national multicenter studies with longitudinal design are needed for a better analysis of the correlation between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its risk factors, as well as its consequences. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone metabolism dynamics in the early post-transplant period following kidney and liver transplantation.

    Schreiber, Peter W; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Boggian, Katia; Bonani, Marco; van Delden, Christian; Enriquez, Natalia; Fehr, Thomas; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Hirzel, Cédric; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Saleh, Lanja; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J

    2018-01-01

    Bone disease contributes to relevant morbidity after solid organ transplantation. Vitamin D has a crucial role for bone metabolism. Activation of vitamin D depends on the endocrine function of both, liver and kidney. Our study assessed key markers of bone metabolism at time of transplantation and 6 months after transplantation among 70 kidney and 70 liver recipients. In 70 kidney recipients 25-OH vitamin D levels did not differ significantly between peri-transplant (median 32.5nmol/l) and 6 months post-transplant (median 41.9nmol/l; P = 0.272). Six months post-transplant median 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D levels increased by >300% (from 9.1 to 36.5ng/l; Ptransplantation and of intact parathyroid hormone 6 months post-transplant. Among 70 liver recipients, 25-OH vitamin D, 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone levels were not significantly altered between peri-transplant and 6 months post-transplant. Contrary to kidney recipients, median CTx increased by 60.0% (from 0.45 to 0.72 ng/ml; P = 0.002) and P1NP by 49.3% (from 84.0 to 125.4ng/ml; P = 0.001) in the longitudinal course. Assessed biomarkers didn't differ between liver recipients with and without fractures. To conclude, the assessed panel of biomarkers proved highly dynamic after liver as well as kidney transplantation in the early post-transplant period. After kidney transplantation a significant gain in 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D combined with a decline in iPTH, CTx and P1NP, whereas after liver transplantation an increase in CTx and P1NP were characteristic.

  16. Nutritional Modulation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    Hannele Yki-Järvinen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD covers a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and cirrhosis. NAFL increases the risk of liver fibrosis. If the liver is fatty due to causes of insulin resistance such as obesity and physical inactivity, it overproduces glucose and triglycerides leading to hyperinsulinemia and a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentration. The latter features predispose to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Understanding the impact of nutritional modulation of liver fat content and insulin resistance is therefore of interest for prevention and treatment of NAFLD. Hypocaloric, especially low carbohydrate ketogenic diets rapidly decrease liver fat content and associated metabolic abnormalities. However, any type of caloric restriction seems effective long-term. Isocaloric diets containing 16%–23% fat and 57%–65% carbohydrate lower liver fat compared to diets with 43%–55% fat and 27%–38% carbohydrate. Diets rich in saturated (SFA as compared to monounsaturated (MUFA or polyunsaturated (PUFA fatty acids appear particularly harmful as they increase both liver fat and insulin resistance. Overfeeding either saturated fat or carbohydrate increases liver fat content. Vitamin E supplementation decreases liver fat content as well as fibrosis but has no effect on features of insulin resistance.

  17. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease : A multicenter experience

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Bozic, M. A.; Fridell, J. A.; Crull, M. H.; Molleston, J.; Avitzur, Y.; Mozer-Glassberg, Y.; Gonzalez-Peralta, R. P.; Hodik, M.; Fecteau, A.; de Angelis, M.; Durie, P.; Ng, V. L.

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While liver transplantation is well established for CF-related liver disease (CFLD), the role of simultaneous liver pancreas transplantation is less understood. Methods: We polled 81

  18. Molecular pathways in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Berlanga A

    2014-07-01

    synthesis is increased, but FAs are also taken up from the serum. Furthermore, a decrease in mitochondrial FA oxidation and secretion of very-low-density lipoproteins has been reported. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiological changes of hepatic lipid metabolism that contribute to NAFLD.Keywords: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, molecular pathways, insulin resistance, fatty acid metabolism

  19. Liver transplant in ethylmalonic encephalopathy: a new treatment for an otherwise fatal disease.

    Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Diodato, Daria; Torre, Giuliano; Picca, Stefano; Pariante, Rosanna; Giuseppe Picardo, Sergio; Di Meo, Ivano; Rizzo, Cristiano; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; De Ville De Goyet, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a fatal, rapidly progressive mitochondrial disorder caused by ETHE1 mutations, whose peculiar clinical and biochemical features are due to the toxic accumulation of hydrogen sulphide and of its metabolites, including thiosulphate. In mice with ethylmalonic encephalopathy, liver-targeted adeno-associated virus-mediated ETHE1 gene transfer dramatically improved both clinical course and metabolic abnormalities. Reasoning that the same achievement could be accomplished by liver transplantation, we performed living donor-liver transplantation in an infant with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Unlike the invariably progressive deterioration of the disease, 8 months after liver transplantation, we observed striking neurological improvement with remarkable achievements in psychomotor development, along with dramatic reversion of biochemical abnormalities. These results clearly indicate that liver transplantation is a viable therapeutic option for ETHE1 disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Sorafenib metabolism is significantly altered in the liver tumor tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma patient.

    Ling Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sorafenib, the drug used as first line treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4-mediated oxidation and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT 1A9-mediated glucuronidation. Liver diseases are associated with reduced CYP and UGT activities, which can considerably affect drug metabolism, leading to drug toxicity. Thus, understanding the metabolism of therapeutic compounds in patients with liver diseases is necessary. However, the metabolism characteristic of sorafenib has not been systematically determined in HCC patients. METHODS: Sorafenib metabolism was tested in the pooled and individual tumor hepatic microsomes (THLMs and adjacent normal hepatic microsomes (NHLMs of HCC patients (n = 18. Commercial hepatic microsomes (CHLMs were used as a control. In addition, CYP3A4 and UGT1A9 protein expression in different tissues were measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The mean rates of oxidation and glucuronidation of sorafenib were significantly decreased in the pooled THLMs compared with those in NHLMs and CHLMs. The maximal velocity (Vmax of sorafenib oxidation and glucuronidation were approximately 25-fold and 2-fold decreased in the pooled THLMs, respectively, with unchanged Km values. The oxidation of sorafenib in individual THLMs sample was significantly decreased (ranging from 7 to 67-fold than that in corresponding NHLMs sample. The reduction of glucuronidation in THLMs was observed in 15 out of 18 patients' samples. Additionally, the level of CYP3A4 and UGT1A9 expression were both notably decreased in the pooled THLMs. CONCLUSIONS: Sorafenib metabolism was remarkably decreased in THLMs. This result was associated with the down regulation of the protein expression of CYP3A4 and UGT1A9.

  1. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  2. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (Pglycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (PGlycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (Pglycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (Pglycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (Pglycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (Pglycogen (Pglycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; Pglycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  3. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Irina V. Kholodenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable.

  4. Dietary modification dampens liver inflammation and fibrosis in obesity-related fatty liver disease.

    Larter, Claire Z; Yeh, Matthew M; Haigh, W Geoffrey; Van Rooyen, Derrick M; Brooling, John; Heydet, Deborah; Nolan, Christopher J; Teoh, Narci C; Farrell, Geoffrey C

    2013-06-01

    Alms1 mutant (foz/foz) mice develop hyperphagic obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver (steatosis). High-fat (HF) feeding converts pathology from bland steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis, which leads to cirrhosis in humans. We sought to establish how dietary composition contributes to NASH pathogenesis. foz/foz mice were fed HF diet or chow 24 weeks, or switched HF to chow after 12 weeks. Serum ALT, NAFLD activity score (NAS), fibrosis severity, neutrophil, macrophage and apoptosis immunohistochemistry, uncoupling protein (UCP)2, ATP, NF-κB activation/expression of chemokines/adhesion molecules/fibrogenic pathways were determined. HF intake upregulated liver fatty acid and cholesterol transporter, CD36. Dietary switch expanded adipose tissue and decreased hepatomegaly by lowering triglyceride, cholesterol ester, free cholesterol and diacylglyceride content of liver. There was no change in lipogenesis or fatty acid oxidation pathways; instead, CD36 was suppressed. These diet-induced changes in hepatic lipids improved NAS, reduced neutrophil infiltration, normalized UCP2 and increased ATP; this facilitated apoptosis with a change in macrophage phenotype favoring M2 cells. Dietary switch also abrogated NF-κB activation and chemokine/adhesion molecule expression, and arrested fibrosis by dampening stellate cell activation. Reversion to a physiological dietary composition after HF feeding in foz/foz mice alters body weight distribution but not obesity. This attenuates NASH severity and fibrotic progression by suppressing NF-κB activation and reducing neutrophil and macrophage activation. However, adipose inflammation persists and is associated with continuing apoptosis in the residual fatty liver disease. Taken together, these findings indicate that other measures, such as weight reduction, may be required to fully reverse obesity-related NASH. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Progress and challenges in the prevention and control of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Cai, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hongliang

    2018-05-30

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide. Individuals with NAFLD have a high frequency of developing progressive liver disease and metabolism-related comorbidities, which result from of a lack of awareness and poor surveillance of the disease and a paucity of approved and effective therapies. Managing the complications of NAFLD has already begun to place a tremendous burden on health-care systems. Although efforts to identify effective therapies are underway, the lack of validated preclinical NAFLD models that represent the biology and outcomes of human disease remains a major barrier. This review summarizes the characteristics and prevalence of the disease and the status of our understanding of its mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Higher free triiodothyronine is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in euthyroid subjects : The Lifelines Cohort Study

    van den Berg, Eline H.; van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda J. N.; Amini, Marzyeh; Schreuder, Tim C.M.A.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Blokzijl, Hans; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Objective. Overt hypothyroidism confers an increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The liver plays a crucial role in the metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides; thyroid hormones interact on hepatic lipid homeostasis. Thyroid function within the euthyroid range affects a

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications.

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-07

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an "omics" technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical "routine".

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  9. Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound for Non-tumor Liver Diseases

    H Maruyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is a simple, safe and reliable technique for the clinical management of patients with various liver diseases. Although the major target of the technique may be focal hepatic lesions, it is also effective for the diagnosis of non-tumor liver diseases, such as grading hepatic fibrosis, characterization of chronic liver diseases and diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis. This review article aimed to overview the recent application of CEUS in the assessment of non-tumor liver diseases. Keywords: Cirrhosis, contrast agent, fibrosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, microbubble, portal vein thrombosis, ultrasound.

  10. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  11. Article Commentary: Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Liver Disease. A Deadly Trio

    Amedeo Lonardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this commentary to the paper by Donadon V. et al (Clinical Medicine: Endocrinology and Diabetes. 2009;2:25–33. the association and significance of insulin resistance with chronic liver disease are shortly reviewed and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetogenic and oncogenic potentials of advanced liver disease are summarized. Literature studies demonstrate that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can be part of the natural history of NASH. HCCs in patients with features of metabolic syndrome as the only risk factor for liver disease have distinct morphological characteristics and mainly occur in the absence of significant fibrosis in the background liver. Moreover, data indicate that the presence of diabetes carries an approximately three to four-fold increased risk of HCC and such a risk is strongly increased by concurrent viral infections. Finally, the relationship between insulin resistance, steatosis and diabetes in NAFLD and HCV infection will be commented, along with the directions for future studies.

  12. Hotspots in clinical management of severe liver diseases

    LYU Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe liver diseases such as liver failure and acute decompensated cirrhosis have critical conditions and high mortality rates, and the prognosis of such patients is closely associated with early warning, timely dynamic assessment, and comprehensive and effective therapy. The patients require a series of effective clinical management measures for elimination of causative factors, organ support, and prevention and treatment of complications. Medical treatment-artificial liver-liver transplantation is an important modality for severe liver diseases. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, stem cell therapy, and bioartificial liver have a promising future, while there are still controversies over non-selective β-blocker. This article reviews the hotspots in the clinical management of severe liver diseases.

  13. Liver, but not muscle, has an entrainable metabolic memory.

    Sheng-Song Chen

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia in the hospitalized setting is common, especially in patients that receive nutritional support either continuously or intermittently. As the liver and muscle are the major sites of glucose disposal, we hypothesized their metabolic adaptations are sensitive to the pattern of nutrient delivery. Chronically catheterized, well-controlled depancreatized dogs were placed on one of three isocaloric diets: regular chow diet once daily (Chow or a simple nutrient diet (ND that was given either once daily (ND-4 or infused continuously (ND-C. Intraportal insulin was infused to maintain euglycemia. After 5 days net hepatic (NHGU and muscle (MGU glucose uptake and oxidation were assessed at euglycemia (120 mg/dl and hyperglycemia (200 mg/dl in the presence of basal insulin. While hyperglycemia increased both NHGU and MGU in Chow, NHGU was amplified in both groups receiving ND. The increase was associated with enhanced activation of glycogen synthase, glucose oxidation and suppression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK-4. Accelerated glucose-dependent muscle glucose uptake was only evident with ND-C. This was associated with a decrease in PDK-4 expression and an increase in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Interestingly, ND-C markedly increased hepatic FGF-21 expression. Thus, augmentation of carbohydrate disposal in the liver, as opposed to the muscle, is not dependent on the pattern of nutrient delivery.

  14. Metabolic, endocrine, and related bone diseases

    Rogers, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Bone is living tissue, and old bone is constantly removed and replaced with new bone. Normally this exchange is in balance, and the mineral content remains relatively constant. This balance may be disturbed as a result of certain metabolic and endocrinologic disorders. The term dystrophy, referring to a disturbance of nutrition, is applied to metabolic and endocrine bone diseases and should be distinguished from the term dysplasia, referring to a disturbance of bone growth. The two terms are easily confused but are not interchangeable. Metabolic bone disease is caused by endocrine imbalance, vitamin deficiency or excess, and other disturbances in bone metabolism leading to osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma

    LI Liangping

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been changing, the incidence of HCC related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is gradually increasing in developed countries in Europe and America and some countries in Asia. This article introduces the close association between NAFLD and HCC, risk factors, clinicopathological features, and prevention and screening, and points out that although the incidence of NAFLD is not as high as that of hepatitis B- or hepatitis C-related HCC, there are a large absolute number of NAFLD patients, especially the high-risk patients with diabetes and obesity, or liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, due to a huge base number of NAFLD patients. NAFLD-related HCC is commonly seen in the elderly with various comorbidities and a poor prognosis. This article also points out that the prevention should focus on the effective treatment of NAFLD. The strict screening of high-risk population is the strategy for the diagnosis of early-stage HCC. At present, the sensitivity of alpha-fetoprotein is relatively low, and imaging examinations including computed tomography are the main screening methods; however, there are no measures for early warning of NAFLD-related HCC.

  16. Echocardiography in chronic liver disease: systematic review.

    Mota, Vitor Gomes; Markman Filho, Brivaldo

    2013-04-01

    Doppler echocardiography (Echo) is a non-invasive method of excellent accuracy to screen portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and to assess intrapulmonary shunts (IPS) in chronic liver disease (CLD). In the past decade, Echo proved to play a fundamental role in the diagnosis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM). To perform a systematic review of relevant articles on the subject 'Echo in CLD'. In November 2011, a systematic review was performed in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases, and the characteristics of the studies selected were reported. The search based on descriptors and free terms obtained 204 articles (179 in Pubmed, 21 in LILACS, and 1 in SciELO). Of those 204 articles, 22 were selected for systematic review. A meta-analysis could not be performed because of the heterogeneity of the articles. Echo should be part of CLD stratification for screening PPH, IPS and CCM, because, most of the time, such complications are diagnosed only when patients are already waiting for a liver transplant.

  17. Importance and significance of liver echotomography in Wilson disease childhood

    Corda, R; Nurchi, A M; Corrias, A; Corda, A; Giagheddu, M; Campisi, G

    1987-01-01

    We studed the hepatic echography patterns of young patients suffering from Wilson's Disease and compared these with results obtained from laboratory tests and parenchymal biopsy. Eight children, aged between 5 and 12 years (4 males and 4 females), were examined. The symptomatological pattern showed hepatomegaly and liver dysfunction with undetectable or very low serum ceruloplasmine levels and typical aspects of organic copper metabolism. In 50% of cases echography revealed a variable hyperreflection of the whole parenchyma, in connection with the presence of steatosis and aspects of intralobular inflammation. Fine and linear echoes were present, in 50% of the cases, with varying degrees of brightness, which was associated with the presence of fibrotic component or copper granules. Further echographic modifications were less frequent. Echography in close relatives of our patients was observed hepatomegaly and alteration of hepatic reflection associated with fibrotic component. In the evaluation of liver involvement in Wilson's Disease, these findings show that echotomography, when compared to hepatic biopsy, is less efficient in detecting different types of hepatic lesion but on a clinical basis it offers the possibility of evaluating their presence and gravity during the evolutive phase of the illness. This examination, unlike other methods, is completely non invasive; it may easily be repeated and may, in the future, come to be used as more precise diagnostic complement. 30 refs.

  18. Adrenal disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Papanastasiou, Labrini; Fountoulakis, Stelios; Vatalas, Ioannis-Anastasios

    2017-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the developed world and its pathogenesis is complex and multifactorial. It is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and is the leading cause of hepatic cirrhosis. This review aims to present current knowledge on the involvement of the adrenal glands in the development of NAFLD. Clinical and animal studies have shown that excess glucocorticoids (GC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Patients with NAFLD seem to have a subtle chronic activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis leading to a state of subclinical hypercortisolism. Regulators of GC such as 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), an enzyme that regenerates cortisol from inactive cortisone, and 5α/5β-reductases, enzymes that increase cortisol clearance, are implicated in the development of NAFLD by amplifying local GC action. Adrenal androgen (dehydroepiandrosterone) abnormalities and increased aldosterone levels may also have a role in the development of NAFLD whereas the contribution of adrenergic signaling in NAFLD pathogenesis remains unclear.

  19. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-07

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway.

  20. Analytical study of cell liver proliferation and serum AFP in various liver diseases other than hepatomas

    Takino, T; Okuda, K; Kitamura, O; Takahashi, T; Ashihara, T [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1974-12-01

    Cell proliferative activity in the liver tissue obtained in 50 cases by liver biopsy, was analyzed using in vitro labeling of /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography. The proliferating cells were found to be located mainly in the periportal areas of the lobules. The mean labeling indices of the liver cells were 0.06 % in chronic hepatitis in its active form, 0.05 % in pre-cirrhosis of the liver, 0.03 % in liver cirrhosis, 0.02 % in chronic hepatitis in an inactive form and 0.018 % in acute hepatitis at the restoractive stage. The labeling indices of the liver parenchymal cells of each specimen studied were very low being at most 0.2 %. On the other hand, when the serum AFP was analyzed by radioimmunoassay technique in 185 patients with various liver diseases, level of the mean serum AFP in each group of the liver diseases was found to correspond to that of the proliferative activity of the liver cells in its respective group. From these data it was suggested that the proliferative activity of the liver cells in various liver diseases, with the exception of hepatomas, was closely related to release of AFP into the serum.

  1. The association between donor genetic variations in one-carbon metabolism pathway genes and hepatitis B recurrence after liver transplantation.

    Lu, Di; Zhuo, Jianyong; Yang, Modan; Wang, Chao; Linhui, Pan; Xie, Haiyang; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2018-04-05

    Hepatitis B recurrence adversely affects patients' survival after liver transplantation. This study aims to find association between donor gene variations of one carbon metabolism and post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence. This study enrolled 196 patients undergoing liver transplantation for HBV related end-stage liver diseases. We detected 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 7 one-carbon metabolism pathway genes (including MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, ALDH1L1, GART, SHMT1 and CBS) in donor livers and analyzed their association with HBV reinfection after liver transplantation. Hepatitis B recurrence was observed in 19 of the 196 patients (9.7%) undergoing liver transplantation. Hepatitis B recurrence significantly affected post-transplant survival in the 196 patients (p = 0.018), and correlate with tumor recurrence in the subgroup of HCC patients (n = 99, p = 0.006). Among the 11 SNPs, donor liver mutation in rs1979277 (G > A) was adversely associated with post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence (p = 0.042). In the subgroup of HCC patients, survival analysis showed donor liver mutations in rs1801133 (G > A) and rs1979277 (G > A) were risk factors for hepatitis B recurrence (p B recurrence in non-HCC patients (n = 97, p > 0.05). Hepatitis B recurrence impaired post-transplant survival. Donor liver genetic variations in one-carbon metabolism pathway genes were significantly associated with post-transplant hepatitis B recurrence. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    , calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during......This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...... vascular resistance, high arterial compliance, increased cardiac output, secondary activation of counterregulatory systems (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, release of vasopressin), and resistance to vasopressors. The vasodilatory state is mediated through adrenomedullin...

  3. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  4. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Extra-Hepatic Cancers

    Claudia Sanna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a leading cause of chronic liver disease but the second cause of death among NAFLD patients are attributed to malignancies at both gastrointestinal (liver, colon, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas and extra-intestinal sites (kidney in men, and breast in women. Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities are associated with increased incidence or mortality for a number of cancers. NAFLD has an intertwined relationship with metabolic syndrome and significantly contributes to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but recent evidence have fuelled concerns that NAFLD may be a new, and added, risk factor for extra-hepatic cancers, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. In this review we critically appraise key studies on NAFLD-associated extra-hepatic cancers and speculate on how NAFLD may influence carcinogenesis at these sites.

  5. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: the link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-10-28

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of patients with Cushing's syndrome have hepatic steatosis. Aiming at clarifying the reasons whereby patients suffering from Cushing's syndrome - a condition characterized by profound metabolic changes - present low prevalence of hepatic steatosis, the Authors reviewed the current concepts on the link between hypercortisolism and obesity/metabolic syndrome. They hypothesize that this low prevalence of fat accumulation in the liver of patients with Cushing's syndrome could result from the inhibition of the so-called low-grade chronic-inflammation, mainly mediated by Interleukin 6, due to an excess of cortisol, a hormone characterized by an anti-inflammatory effect. The Cushing's syndrome, speculatively considered as an in vivo model of the hepatic steatosis, could also help clarify the mechanisms of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  6. Developmental Programming of Obesity and Liver Metabolism by Maternal Perinatal Nutrition Involves the Melanocortin System

    Paul Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to metabolic dysfunction and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD. Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r-deficient mouse models exhibit obesity during adulthood. Here, we aim to determine the influence of the Mc4r gene on the liver of mice subjected to perinatal diet-induced obesity. Female mice heterozygous for Mc4r fed an obesogenic or a control diet for 5 weeks were mated with heterozygous males, with the same diet continued throughout pregnancy and lactation, generating four offspring groups: control wild type (C_wt, control knockout (C_KO, obese wild type (Ob_wt, and obese knockout (Ob_KO. At 21 days, offspring were genotyped, weaned onto a control diet, and sacrificed at 6 months old. Offspring phenotypic characteristics, plasma biochemical profile, liver histology, and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Mc4r_ko offspring showed higher body, liver and adipose tissue weights respect to the wild type animals. Histological examination showed mild hepatic steatosis in offspring group C_KO. The expression of hepatic genes involved in regulating inflammation, fibrosis, and immune cell infiltration were upregulated by the absence of the Mc4r gene. These results demonstrate that maternal obesogenic feeding during the perinatal period programs offspring obesity development with involvement of the Mc4r system.

  7. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease and disrupts methionine and oxidative balances. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular antioxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe may benefit patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  8. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease in the Western world today. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for all known biological methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular anti-oxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  9. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: From patient to population

    E.M. Koehler (Edith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, in parallel with epidemics in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD comprises a wide range of histological findings, extending from simple steatosis to

  10. Depression and Chronic Liver Diseases: Are There Shared Underlying Mechanisms?

    Xiaoqin Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of depression is higher in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD than that in the general population. The mechanism described in previous studies mainly focused on inflammation and stress, which not only exists in CLD, but also emerges in common chronic diseases, leaving the specific mechanism unknown. This review was to summarize the prevalence and risk factors of depression in CLD including chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to point out the possible underlying mechanism of this potential link. Clarifying the origins of this common comorbidity (depression and CLD may provide more information to understand both diseases.

  11. Usefulness of ECT in liver diseases

    Nishikawa, Jun-ichi

    1981-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of single photon emission tomography using rotating chair (ECT), comparing with liver scintigrams was examined with ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis. The ROC curve of ECT drew higher curved line than that of liver scintigram, i.e. true positive ratio of ECT was slightly inferior to that of liver scintigram, but false positive ratio of ECT was superior to that of liver scintigram. ECT adds useful clinical information to liver scintigram which shows questionable or suspected uptake defects. (author)

  12. Studies of liver-specific metabolic reactions with 15N. 1

    Hirschberg, K.; Jung, K.; Faust, H.; Matkowitz, R.

    1987-01-01

    The 15 N tracer technique was used to investigate liver-specific reactions (urea and hippurate synthesis) for studying the metabolism in the healthy and damaged pig liver. After [ 15 N]ammonium chloride administration the tracer distribution on non-protein compounds of serum and urine was followed. Blood samplings before and after liver passage rendered possible a direct analysis of the [ 15 N]ammonium metabolism. The thioacetamide-induced liver damage was used as model for an acute liver intoxication. The capacity for urea synthesis was not influenced by means of this noxious substance, but the metabolism of amino acids and hippuric acid. The considerably depressed excretion of [ 15 N]hippurate seems to be a suitable indicator of liver disfunction. (author)

  13. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  14. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review.

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral health', 'periodontal disease', 'mouth disease', 'gingivitis', and 'periodontitis'. Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed.

  15. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Chronic pancreatitis, metabolic bone disease, osteomalacia, osteopenia ... with malabsorption, and endocrine dysfunction results in diabetes .... of insufficiency and deficiency were not assessed separately due ...

  16. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Fibrosis Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Paloma Almeda-Valdes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of pathologies, from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation to fibrosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD progression has not been completely elucidated, and different liver cells could be implicated. This review focuses on the current evidence of the role of liver dendritic cells (DCs in the progression from NAFLD to fibrosis. Liver DCs are a heterogeneous population of hepatic antigen-presenting cells; their main function is to induce T-cell mediated immunity by antigen processing and presentation to T cells. During the steady state liver DCs are immature and tolerogenic. However, in an environment of chronic inflammation, DCs are transformed to potent inducers of immune responses. There is evidence about the role of DC in liver fibrosis, but it is not clearly understood. Interestingly, there might be a link between lipid metabolism and DC function, suggesting that immunogenic DCs are associated with liver lipid storage, representing a possible pathophysiological mechanism in NAFLD development. A better understanding of the interaction between inflammatory pathways and the different cell types and the effect on the progression of NAFLD is of great relevance.

  19. Effects of Castration on Expression of Lipid Metabolism Genes in the Liver of Korean Cattle

    Baik, Myunggi; Nguyen, Trang Hoa; Jeong, Jin Young; Piao, Min Yu; Kang, Hyeok Joong

    2015-01-01

    Castration induces the accumulation of body fat and deposition of intramuscular fat in Korean cattle, resulting in improved beef quality. However, little is known about the metabolic adaptations in the liver following castration. To understand changes in lipid metabolism following castration, hepatic expression levels of lipid metabolism genes were compared between Korean bulls and steers. Steers had higher (p

  20. Effect of Weight Loss, Diet, Exercise, and Bariatric Surgery on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Hannah, William N; Harrison, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is the most common liver disease in developed countries. Weight reduction of 3% to 5% is associated with improved steatosis; reductions of 5% to 7% are necessary for decreased inflammation; with 7% to 10%, individuals may experience NAFLD/NASH remission and regression of fibrosis. No specific dietary intervention has proven beneficial beyond calorie restriction. Physical activity without weight loss seems to decrease hepatic steatosis. Bariatric surgery is associated with decreased cardiovascular risk and improved overall mortality in addition to reduction in hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  2. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  3. Determination of Selected Amino Acids in Serum of Patients with Liver Disease.

    Kanďár, Roman; Drábková, Petra; Toiflová, Tereza; Čegan, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The determination of amino acids can be a reliable approach for extended diagnosis of liver diseases. This is because liver disease can be a cause of impaired amino acid metabolism. Therefore, a method for the determination of serum amino acids, applicable for clinical purposes, is necessary. The aim of this study was to find differences in the levels of selected amino acids between patients with liver disease and a control group. Samples of peripheral venous blood were obtained from a group of patients with liver disease (n = 131, 59 women at an average age of 60 years and 72 men at an average age of 52 years) and a control group (n = 105, 47 women at an average age of 62 years and 58 men at an average age of 58 years). Before the separation, the amino acids were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde. For the separation, reverse phase column was used. The effluent was monitored with a fluorescence detector. There were significant differences in the concentrations of some amino acids between the patients and the control group, but also between women and men. Correlations between some amino acids and markers of liver blood tests and lipid metabolism were observed. A simple, relatively rapid and selective HPLC method with fluorescence detection for the determination of selected amino acids in serum has been developed.

  4. A Guide to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    Temple, Jonathan L.; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Oben, Jude A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease, affecting 10%–20% of the general paediatric population. Within the next 10 years it is expected to become the leading cause of liver pathology, liver failure and indication for liver transplantation in childhood and adolescence in the Western world. While our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease remains limited, it is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of more widespread metabolic dysfunction and is strongly associated with a number of metabolic risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease and, most significantly, obesity. Despite this, ”paediatric” NAFLD remains under-studied, under-recognised and, potentially, undermanaged. This article will explore and evaluate our current understanding of NAFLD in childhood and adolescence and how it differs from adult NAFLD, in terms of its epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, diagnosis and clinical management. Given the current absence of definitive radiological and histopathological diagnostic tests, maintenance of a high clinical suspicion by all members of the multidisciplinary team in primary and specialist care settings remains the most potent of diagnostic tools, enabling early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic intervention. PMID:27314342

  5. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  6. High coffee intake is associated with lower grade nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the role of peripheral antioxidant activity.

    Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Sánchez-Valle, Vicente; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan Gabriel; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Some phytochemicals present in coffee have a potential antioxidant role which seems to protect the human body against cardiovascular diseases, liver disease and malignancies. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common disease with limited therapeutic options. This study investigated the antioxidant effect of coffee by measuring antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation markers in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We performed a case-control study at the University Hospital, Mexico City. Anthropometric, metabolic, dietary and biochemical variables of all patients were determined and compared. The presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was established by ultrasonography. All patients completed a dietary questionnaire in order to determine their of coffee consumption. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were measured in all of the patients. Seventy-three subjects with and 57 without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were included. Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease had significantly higher body mass index, blood glucose, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance and insulin values in comparison to patients without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the one hand, there was a significant difference in coffee intake between the groups (p coffee has a protective effect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease however there was no significant difference in the antioxidant variables analyzed.

  7. Isolation of primary human hepatocytes from normal and diseased liver tissue: a one hundred liver experience.

    Ricky H Bhogal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful and consistent isolation of primary human hepatocytes remains a challenge for both cell-based therapeutics/transplantation and laboratory research. Several centres around the world have extensive experience in the isolation of human hepatocytes from non-diseased livers obtained from donor liver surplus to surgical requirement or at hepatic resection for tumours. These livers are an important but limited source of cells for therapy or research. The capacity to isolate cells from diseased liver tissue removed at transplantation would substantially increase availability of cells for research. However no studies comparing the outcome of human hepatocytes isolation from diseased and non-diseased livers presently exist. Here we report our experience isolating human hepatocytes from organ donors, non-diseased resected liver and cirrhotic tissue. We report the cell yields and functional qualities of cells isolated from the different types of liver and demonstrate that a single rigorous protocol allows the routine harvest of good quality primary hepatocytes from the most commonly accessible human liver tissue samples.

  8. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Kathryn Bambino; Chi Zhang; Christine Austin; Chitra Amarasiriwardena; Manish Arora; Jaime Chu; Kirsten C. Sadler

    2018-01-01

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined...

  9. Lipid biomarkers and metabolic effects of lycopene from tomato juice on liver of rats with induced hepatic steatosis.

    Bernal, Cristina; Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; Lozano, Ana B; Sevilla, Angel; García-Alonso, Javier; Canovas, Manuel; Periago, María J

    2013-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver disorders, covering steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Dietary factors may modulate its evolution, and antioxidants have been proposed as therapeutic agents. Among them, lycopene has been demonstrated to prevent the development of steatohepatitis and even to inhibit NASH-promoted early hepatocarcinogenesis induced by a high-fat diet in rats. These conclusions have been related to its antioxidant activity; however, NAFLD is more complex than a simple redox imbalance state since it disturbs several metabolic systems in the liver. In consequence, there is a lack of information related to the action of lycopene beyond antioxidant biomarkers. In this work, NAFLD was induced in rats using a hypercholesterolemic and high-fat diet to evaluate the effect of lycopene consumption from tomato juice on liver metabolism. Several classical antioxidant biomarkers related to NAFLD were measured to check the state of this disease after 7 weeks of the controlled diet. Moreover, a metabolomics platform was applied to measure more than 70 metabolites. Results showed clear differences in the classical antioxidant biomarkers as well as in the metabolic pattern, attending not only to the diet but also to the intake of lycopene from tomato juice. Interestingly, tomato juice administration partially reverted the metabolic pattern from a high-fat diet to a normal diet even in metabolites not related to the redox state, which could lead to new targets for therapeutic agents against NAFLD and to achieving a better understanding of the role of lycopene in liver metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical efficacy of computed tomography in liver diseases

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Sachiko; Hino, Kazunari; Ohashi, Katsuhiko; Hirano, Yutaka

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomographic studies were performed with special reference to attenuation values (CT number) in 207 cases including 30 of normal controls and 177 of liver diseases. in addition to fatty liver (CT no. 12.2), attenuation values of liver cirrhosis (25.4) was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than normal controls (29.7). In localized hepatic lesions, attenuation values were low in order of primary liver cancer (15.9), metastatic liver cancer (13.5), gallbladder cancer (13.4), liver abscess (10.2) and liver cyst (1.4). Although statistical differences were present among attenuation values, CT had often limited diagnostic value in the differentiation of hepatic mass lesions except liver cyst. In primary liver cancer hepatic lesions were mostly single (89.7%) and specific patterns of CT images (Type III or IV by Moriyama's classification) were present, while in metastatic liver cancer hepatic lesions were multiple (75.9%) and type I or II was predominant. The majority of lesions (66.7%) were equally visualized before and after contrast enhancement (C.E.) in metastatic liver cancer, while they were better defined following C.E. in 81.2% in primary liver cancer. (author)

  11. The Use of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    Hansel, Marc C; Davila, Julio C; Vosough, Massoud; Gramignoli, Roberto; Skvorak, Kristen J; Dorko, Kenneth; Marongiu, Fabio; Blake, William; Strom, Stephen C

    2016-02-01

    Liver disease is a major global health concern. Liver cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death in the world and currently the only therapeutic option for end-stage liver disease (e.g., acute liver failure, cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, cholestatic diseases, metabolic diseases, and malignant neoplasms) is orthotropic liver transplantation. Transplantation of hepatocytes has been proposed and used as an alternative to whole organ transplant to stabilize and prolong the lives of patients in some clinical cases. Although these experimental therapies have demonstrated promising and beneficial results, their routine use remains a challenge due to the shortage of donor livers available for cell isolation, variable quality of those tissues, the potential need for lifelong immunosuppression in the transplant recipient, and high costs. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies and more reliable clinical treatments are urgently needed. Recent and continuous technological advances in the development of stem cells suggest they may be beneficial in this respect. In this review, we summarize the history of stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology in the context of hepatic differentiation and discuss the potential applications the technology may offer for human liver disease modeling and treatment. This includes developing safer drugs and cell-based therapies to improve the outcomes of patients with currently incurable health illnesses. We also review promising advances in other disease areas to highlight how the stem cell technology could be applied to liver diseases in the future. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. How predictive quantitative modelling of tissue organisation can inform liver disease pathogenesis.

    Drasdo, Dirk; Hoehme, Stefan; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-10-01

    From the more than 100 liver diseases described, many of those with high incidence rates manifest themselves by histopathological changes, such as hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, fatty liver disease, fibrosis, and, in its later stages, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, primary biliary cirrhosis and other disorders. Studies of disease pathogeneses are largely based on integrating -omics data pooled from cells at different locations with spatial information from stained liver structures in animal models. Even though this has led to significant insights, the complexity of interactions as well as the involvement of processes at many different time and length scales constrains the possibility to condense disease processes in illustrations, schemes and tables. The combination of modern imaging modalities with image processing and analysis, and mathematical models opens up a promising new approach towards a quantitative understanding of pathologies and of disease processes. This strategy is discussed for two examples, ammonia metabolism after drug-induced acute liver damage, and the recovery of liver mass as well as architecture during the subsequent regeneration process. This interdisciplinary approach permits integration of biological mechanisms and models of processes contributing to disease progression at various scales into mathematical models. These can be used to perform in silico simulations to promote unravelling the relation between architecture and function as below illustrated for liver regeneration, and bridging from the in vitro situation and animal models to humans. In the near future novel mechanisms will usually not be directly elucidated by modelling. However, models will falsify hypotheses and guide towards the most informative experimental design. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Implicações do alcoolismo e da doença hepática crônica sobre o metabolismo de micronutrientes The impact of alcohol and chronic liver disease of micronutrients metabolism

    Regiane MAIO

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A doença hepática, alcoolismo e desnutrição são condições comumente associadas que interferem no metabolismo de micronutrientes. Como resultado da doença hepática pode ocorrer menor estocagem e conversão de vitaminas nas suas formas ativas, e má digestão e/ou má absorção. Há ainda o agravante do álcool diminuindo a ingestão e absorção de micronutrientes em virtude da redução da ingestão dietética e de sua associação com doença do intestino delgado ou pancreática. Outras causas de deficiências seriam: tratamento com drogas, peroxidação lipídica, déficit protéico, maior excreção urinária e aumento da necessidade e degradação de nutrientes. Como conseqüências dessas deficiências, esses pacientes apresentam usualmente anemia, esteatose hepática, estresse oxidativo e imunossupressão.Liver disease, alcohol and malnutrition are combinations usually associated with micronutrient impairment. Chronic liver disease courses with lower storage and activation of vitamin-coenzymes related to their malabsorption. Alcohol worsens the picture by reducing food intake, increasing micronutrients utilization and decreasing their absorption secondary to either intestinal or pancreatic injuries. Other concurrent causes would be drug treatments, urinary losses, protein deficiency and oxidative stress. As consequences the clinical signs are anemia, liver steatosis, oxidative stress and immunosuppression.

  14. Risk of seizures and status epilepticus in older patients with liver disease.

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Rubinos, Clio; Kummer, Benjamin R; Parikh, Neal S; Chen, Monica; Chatterjee, Abhinaba; Reynolds, Alexandra; Merkler, Alexander E; Claassen, Jan; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-06-06

    Seizures can be provoked by systemic diseases associated with metabolic derangements, but the association between liver disease and seizures remains unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study using inpatient and outpatient claims between 2008 and 2015 from a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. The primary exposure variable was cirrhosis, and the secondary exposure was mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. The primary outcome was seizure, and the secondary outcome was status epilepticus. Diagnoses were ascertained using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification codes. Survival statistics were used to calculate incidence rates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between exposures and outcomes while adjusting for seizure risk factors. Among 1 782 402 beneficiaries, we identified 10 393 (0.6%) beneficiaries with cirrhosis and 19 557 (1.1%) with mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. Individuals with liver disease were older and had more seizure risk factors than those without liver disease. Over 4.6 ± 2.2 years of follow-up, 49 843 (2.8%) individuals were diagnosed with seizures and 25 patients (0.001%) were diagnosed with status epilepticus. Cirrhosis was not associated with seizures (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.3), but there was an association with status epilepticus (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.8). Mild liver disease was not associated with a higher risk of seizures (HR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.6-0.9) or status epilepticus (HR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.7-1.5). In a large, population-based cohort, we found an association between cirrhosis and status epilepticus, but no overall association between liver disease and seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT Thickness Is Associated with Cardiovascular and Liver Damage in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Anna Ludovica Fracanzani

    Full Text Available Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT has been proposed as a cardiometabolic and hepatic fibrosis risk factor in patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EAT in NAFLD by analyzing 1 the association between EAT, the other metabolic parameters and the severity of steatosis 2 the relationship between cardiovascular (cIMT, cplaques, E/A, liver (presence of NASH and significant fibrosis damage and metabolic risk factors including EAT 3 the relationship between EAT and genetic factors strongly influencing liver steatosis.In a cross-sectional study, we considered 512 consecutive patients with NAFLD (confirmed by biopsy in 100. EAT, severity of steatosis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT and plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography and results analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression models. Variables independently associated with EAT (mm were female gender (p = 0.003, age (p = 0.001, BMI (p = 0.01, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009, steatosis grade 2 (p = 0.01 and 3 (p = 0.04, fatty liver index (p = 0.001 and statin use (p = 0.03. Variables independently associated with carotid IMT were age (p = 0.0001, hypertension (p = 0.009, diabetes (p = 0.04, smoking habits (p = 0.04 and fatty liver index (p = 0.02, with carotid plaques age (p = 0.0001, BMI (p = 0.03, EAT (p = 0.02, and hypertension (p = 0.02, and with E/A age (p = 0.0001, diabetes (p = 0.005, hypertension (p = 0.04 and fatty liver index (p = 0.004. In the 100 patients with available liver histology non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH was independently associated with EAT (p = 0.04 and diabetes (p = 0.054 while significant fibrosis with EAT (p = 0.02, diabetes (p = 0.01 and waist circumference (p = 0.05. No association between EAT and PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 polymorphisms was found.In patients with NAFLD, EAT is associated with the severity of liver and vascular damage besides with the known metabolic risk factors.

  16. Schistosoma liver disease; a clinico- pathological study

    Ali, Suzan Ibrahim

    1996-05-01

    Schistomiasis mansoni infection is a leading cause of severe morbidity in the Sudan. Most of the morbidity and mortality are due to the development of hepatic periportal fibrosis and consequent portal hypertension and bleeding varices. This is a hospital-based, retro-prospective study in the period from 1980-1995. Liver disease (i.e. periportal fibrosis) and its clinical presentation were studied in relation to the degree of fibrosis and other pathological, haematological, and biochemical parameters. The study identified the common hospital presenting symptoms, assessed factors that influence pathogenesis of periportal fibrosis and its severity, as well as, defined criteria which predict those patients who are at risk of bleeding. 898 patients were included. The common presenting symptoms were left hypochondrial pain, haematemesis and enlarged spleen (Towal). Males were found to have an increase prevalence of periportal fibrosis. Splenomegaly was found in almost all patients of the study of different age groups, but spleen size didn't show any significant difference between bleeders and non-bleeders (p=0.28). A sharp rise in the prevalence of bleeding was noted after the age of 16 years. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was found to be more common

  17. Chylomicrons metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease

    Brandizzi, Laura Ines Ventura

    2002-01-01

    Chylomicrons are the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that carry dietary lipids absorbed in the intestine. In the bloodstream , chylomicron triglycerides are broken-down by lipoprotein lipase using apoliprotein (apo) CII as co factor. Fatty acids and glycerol resulting from the enzymatic action are absorbed and stored in the body tissues mainly adipose and muscle for subsequent utilizations energy source. The resulting triglycerides depleted remnants are taken-up by liver receptor such as the LDL receptor using mainly apo E as ligand. For methodological reasons, chylomicron metabolism has been unfrequently studied in subjects despite its pathophysiological importance, and this metabolism was not evaluated in the great clinical trials that established the link between atherosclerosis and lipids. In studies using oral fat load tests, it has been shown that in patients with coronary artery disease there is a trend to accumulation of post-prandial triglycerides, vitamin A or apo B-48 , suggesting that in those patients chylomicrons and their remnants are slowly removed from the circulation. A triglyceride-rich emulsion marked radioisotopic which mimics chylomicron metabolism when injected into the bloodstream has been described that can offer a more straight forward approach to evaluate chylomicrons. In coronary artery disease patients both lipolysis and remnant removal from the plasma of the chylomicron-like emulsions were found slowed-down compared with control subjects without the disease. The introduction of more practical techniques to assess chylomicron metabolism may be new mechanisms underlying atherogenesis. (author)

  18. The Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor- alpha and Resistin in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Alkady, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents one of the most common liver diseases. It is strongly associated with obesity and insulin resistance and is thought to be a part of the metabolic syndrome. It can progress from simple fatty liver to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver failure. Adipocytokines, synthesized in adipose tissue, are involved in the pathophysiology of many acute and chronic liver diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and resistin in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and their correlation to the severity of the disease. Serum concentration of TNF-alpha and resistin were measured in 20 patients with NAFLD and 20 healthy controls with ELISA method. The results of this study revealed that serum levels of both adipokines were significantly elevated in NAFLD patients than controls (P<0.01). Moreover, they were significantly higher in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis than in patients with simple fatty liver. There was a significant positive correlation between TNF-alpha, resistin and each of AST, ALT and HOMA. Similarly, the results showed a significant positive correlation between the two studied adipokines, TNF-alpha and resistin (P<0.001). We conclude that TNF-alpha and resistin have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and they may be promising markers for the progressin to steatohepatitis and inhibition of their activities by drugs may be a new approach for the treatment of NAFLD

  19. Ablation of systemic SIRT1 activity promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by affecting liver-mesenteric adipose tissue fatty acid mobilization

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is escalating paralleled with obesity rates in both adults and children. Mammalian sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a highly conserved NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, has been identified as a metabolic regulator of lipid homeostasis and a potential tar...

  20. Clinical availability of cholescintigraphy in evaluating diffuse liver parenchymal diseases

    Itoh, Hisao; Shimono, Reiko; Hamamoto, Ken; Ohshima, Kanji; Akamatsu, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    Technetium-99m N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT) cholescintigraphy has been performed in 46 consecutive patients with diffuse liver parenchymal diseases, including acute hepatitis (9), chronic hepatitis (17), and liver cirrhosis (20), and 18 controls. Blood clearance rate, liver uptake rate, liver excretion rate, and half time (T1/2) were determined from cardiac and hepatic time-activity curves. Regarding the four parameters, there were statistically significant differences between the control group and the groups of acute hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Both blood clearance rate and liver uptake rate were well correlated with ICG-k values (r = 0.874 and r = 0.791, respectively). Liver excretion rate was most highly correlated with total serum bilirubin levels (r = 0.763), followed by ICG-k values. T1/2 was well correlated as well with total serum bilirubin levels. During the process where liver excretory ability was lowered in association with elevated serum bilirubin levels, threshold values for liver excretion rate appeared to be established. Cholescintigraphy may be of value in evaluating the pathophysiology of diffuse liver parenchymal diseases in that it is capable of quantitatively determining excretory function of hepatic cells. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. Methods: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including ‘liver cirrhosis’, ‘end-stage liver disease’, ‘liver diseases’, ‘oral health’, ‘periodontal disease’, ‘mouth disease’, ‘gingivitis’, and ‘periodontitis’. Results: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%–79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Conclusion: Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed. PMID:26770799

  2. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. The cradle of metabolic disease

    Galjaard, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Summary -Vascular development and FETAL body composition during pregnancy- The effects of maternal adiposity (high body mass index - high BMI -), nutrient intake and storage (gestational weight gain - GWG -) and (abnormal) glucose tolerance (gestational diabetes - GDM - ) are regarded important cornerstones in metabolic research in pregnancy. In Chapter 1, I explained, that they play an important role in the development of complications in the mother and the fetus, both short- and long-ter...

  4. Transient elastography for diagnosis of stages of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in people with alcoholic liver disease

    Pavlov, Chavdar S; Casazza, Giovanni; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence and progression of hepatic (liver) fibrosis into cirrhosis is a prognostic variable having impact on survival in people with alcoholic liver disease. Liver biopsy, although an invasive method, is the recommended 'reference standard' for diagnosis and staging of hepatic...... fibrosis in people with liver diseases. Transient elastography is a non-invasive method for assessing and staging hepatic fibrosis. OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of transient elastography for diagnosis and staging hepatic fibrosis in people with alcoholic liver disease when compared...... participants could be of any sex and ethnic origin, above 16 years old, hospitalised or managed as outpatients. We excluded participants with viral hepatitis, autoimmunity, metabolic diseases, and toxins. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed the guidelines in the draft Cochrane Handbook for Systematic...

  5. Systems biology elucidates common pathogenic mechanisms between nonalcoholic and alcoholic-fatty liver disease.

    Silvia Sookoian

    Full Text Available The abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver is often related either to metabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in the absence of alcohol consumption (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD or to chronic alcohol consumption (alcoholic fatty liver disease, AFLD. Clinical and histological studies suggest that NAFLD and AFLD share pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, current data are still inconclusive as to whether the underlying biological process and disease pathways of NAFLD and AFLD are alike. Our primary aim was to integrate omics and physiological data to answer the question of whether NAFLD and AFLD share molecular processes that lead to disease development. We also explored the extent to which insulin resistance (IR is a distinctive feature of NAFLD. To answer these questions, we used systems biology approaches, such as gene enrichment analysis, protein-protein interaction networks, and gene prioritization, based on multi-level data extracted by computational data mining. We observed that the leading disease pathways associated with NAFLD did not significantly differ from those of AFLD. However, systems biology revealed the importance of each molecular process behind each of the two diseases, and dissected distinctive molecular NAFLD and AFLD-signatures. Comparative co-analysis of NAFLD and AFLD clarified the participation of NAFLD, but not AFLD, in cardiovascular disease, and showed that insulin signaling is impaired in fatty liver regardless of the noxa, but the putative regulatory mechanisms associated with NAFLD seem to encompass a complex network of genes and proteins, plausible of epigenetic modifications. Gene prioritization showed a cancer-related functional map that suggests that the fatty transformation of the liver tissue is regardless of the cause, an emerging mechanism of ubiquitous oncogenic activation. In conclusion, similar underlying disease mechanisms lead to NAFLD and AFLD, but specific ones depict a

  6. [Coffee can be beneficial for patients with liver diseases].

    Kjærgaard, Maria; Thiele, Maja; Krag, Aleksander

    2014-10-20

    Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Consequently, it is important to consider the impact of coffee on health and disease. A daily intake of at least three cups of coffee is likely to have beneficial health effects, especially in patients at risk of liver diseases. Coffee has been associated with decreased liver inflammation, prevention of cirrhosis, reduced steatosis and lower incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. It is not yet possible to make clear recommendations, but coffee can likely be included as part of a healthy diet for patients with liver diseases.

  7. Laparoscopic management of cystic disease of the liver.

    Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W; Rosemurgy, A S; Karl, R C; Carey, L C

    1994-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgical procedures are increasing in scope and in variety. The benefits of decreased wound morbidity and pain have been well documented for multiple procedures that have traditionally required laparotomy. Although there are few controlled studies to document them, these benefits may be evident from simple clinical observation. Cystic disease of the liver is a condition that is treated largely for symptomatic reasons. The so-called noninvasive or radiographic guided methods of treatment for cystic disease of the liver are fraught with high recurrence rates. We present four cases of cystic disease of the liver treated laparoscopically, followed with pertinent discussion.

  8. Meta-analysis: antioxidant supplements for liver diseases - the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, L L; Nikolova, D

    2010-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  9. Increase of infiltrating monocytes in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Pan, Zhiyun; Xia, Juan; Xiong, Yali; Wang, Guiyang; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Jun; Yan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhaoping; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes have been demonstrated to contribute to tissue damage in experimental models of liver injury and fibrosis. However, less is known about monocyte infiltration in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In the present study, we demonstrated that CD68+ hepatic macrophages and MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies as compared with normal liver tissue. In addition, CLD patients with higher inflammatory grading scores had more CD68+ macrophages and MAC387+ monocytes infiltration in their livers compared to those with lower scores. Significantly more MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were found in the liver tissue of CLD patients with higher fibrotic staging scores compared to those with lower scores. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression was significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies. MCP-1 staining scores were significantly positively associated with the numbers of MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes in CLD patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that infiltrating monocytes may play a pathological role in exacerbating chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. MCP-1 may be involved in the monocyte infiltration and progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD.

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLES The spectrum of liver diseases in HIV ...

    Harriet

    Conclusion:Drug history, liver enzyme studies, ultrasound, and hepatitis B and C investigations identified the probable etiology in 60. (78%) of 77 patients with HIV infection presenting with symptoms and/or signs of liver disease. African Health Sciences 2008; 8(1): 8-12. Corresponding author: Ponsiano Ocama. Infectious ...

  11. Diagnosis of alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease among ...

    Alcohol related hepatocellular liver injury was assessed using aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase levels. A combination of CAGE score ≥2 and De Ritis ratio ≥2 defined alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and viral hepatitis B and C serologies were evaluated in all ...

  12. Surgical treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese patients

    Vander Naalt SJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Steven J Vander Naalt, Juan P Gurria, AiXuan L HoltermanUniversity of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Children's Hospital of Illinois, Department of Surgery/Pediatric Surgery, Peoria, IL, USAAbstract: Obesity is a multi-organ system disease with underlying metabolic abnormalities and chronic systemic inflammation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of obesity metabolic dysfunction and its associated cardiovascular- and liver-related morbidities and mortality. Our current understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis, disease characteristics, the role of insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, gut–liver and gut–brain crosstalk and the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy is still evolving. Bariatric surgery significantly improves metabolic and NAFLD histology in severely obese patients, although its positive effects on fibrosis are not universal. Bariatric surgery benefits NAFLD through its metabolic effect on insulin resistance, inflammation, and insulinotropic and anorexinogenic gastrointestinal hormones. Further studies are needed to understand the natural course of NAFLD in severely obese patients and the role of weight loss surgery as a primary treatment for NAFLD.Keywords: NAFLD, severe obesity, bariatric surgery

  13. Hemangiosarcoma of the liver in workers of the PVC industry and other VC-induced diseases with angiologic-dermatologic, hepatologic, radiologic and neurologic symptoms

    Halama, J.; Becker-Stone, S.; Halama, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Occupational diseases resulting from exposure to vinyl chloride (VC) include angiosarcoma of the liver and other neoplasms. Among workers exposed to VC the authors have found capillary abnormalities in the extremities, with scleroderma and Raynaud syndrome, acro-osteolysis, neurological and psychiatric diseases and chromosome abnormalities, as well as abnormal liver metabolism and haematological findings.

  14. Metabolic profiles are principally different between cancers of the liver, pancreas and breast.

    Budhu, Anuradha; Terunuma, Atsushi; Zhang, Geng; Hussain, S Perwez; Ambs, Stefan; Wang, Xin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Molecular profiling of primary tumors may facilitate the classification of patients with cancer into more homogenous biological groups to aid clinical management. Metabolomic profiling has been shown to be a powerful tool in characterizing the biological mechanisms underlying a disease but has not been evaluated for its ability to classify cancers by their tissue of origin. Thus, we assessed metabolomic profiling as a novel tool for multiclass cancer characterization. Global metabolic profiling was employed to identify metabolites in paired tumor and non-tumor liver (n=60), breast (n=130) and pancreatic (n=76) tissue specimens. Unsupervised principal component analysis showed that metabolites are principally unique to each tissue and cancer type. Such a difference can also be observed even among early stage cancers, suggesting a significant and unique alteration of global metabolic pathways associated with each cancer type. Our global high-throughput metabolomic profiling study shows that specific biochemical alterations distinguish liver, pancreatic and breast cancer and could be applied as cancer classification tools to differentiate tumors based on tissue of origin.

  15. Vitex agnus-castus L. (Verbenaceae) Improves the Liver Lipid Metabolism and Redox State of Ovariectomized Rats

    Moreno, Franciele Neves; Campos-Shimada, Lilian Brites; da Costa, Silvio Claudio; Garcia, Ros?ngela Fernandes; Cecchini, Alessandra Louren?o; Natali, Maria Raquel Mar?al; Vitoriano, Adriana de Souza; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Salgueiro-Pagadigorria, Clairce Luzia

    2015-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) is a plant that has recently been used to treat the symptoms of menopause, by its actions on the central nervous system. However, little is known about its actions on disturbances in lipid metabolism and nonalcoholic fat liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with menopause. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats exhibit increased adiposity and NAFLD 13 weeks after ovary removal and were used as animal models of estrogen deficiency. The rats were treated with crude extract (...

  16. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage

  17. Interplay between FGF21 and insulin action in the liver regulates metabolism

    Emanuelli, Brice; Vienberg, Sara G; Smyth, Graham

    2014-01-01

    gluconeogenesis in these animals. Improvements in blood sugar were due in part to increased glucose uptake in brown fat, browning of white fat, and overall increased energy expenditure. These effects were preserved even after removal of the main interscapular brown fat pad. In contrast to its retained effects...... of insulin action in the liver by increasing energy metabolism via activation of brown fat and browning of white fat, but intact liver insulin action is required for FGF21 to control hepatic lipid metabolism....

  18. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  19. Cardiometabolic effects of antidiabetic drugs in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Rix, Iben; Steen Pedersen, Julie; Storgaard, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects about 25% of the population worldwide. NAFLD may be viewed as the hepatological manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome due to diabetes or obesity have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease....... This narrative review describes cardiometabolic effects of antidiabetic drugs in NAFLD. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and manually scanned bibliographies in trial databases and reference lists in relevant articles. RESULTS: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in NAFLD. Conversely......, NAFLD is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is associated with markers of atherosclerosis, and patients have increased risk of ischaemic heart disease. Additionally, patients with NAFLD have increased risk of cardiac dysfunction and heart...

  20. Connection Between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Oprea-Călin Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the commonest liver condition in the world, accounting for 20-30% of the adult population, and encompasses a spectrum of liver disorders characterized by fat accumulation within the liver, associated or not with varying degrees of hepatic inflammation and liver fibrosis through to cirrhosis. The prevalence of NAFLD increases significantly in the presence of obesity (60-80% and type 2 diabetes (60%. NAFLD is associated with metabolic disorders (type 2 diabetes, obesity and hyperlipidemia grouped together as the metabolic syndrome (MetS. It is now regarded as the hepatic manifestation of this syndrome and is closely linked to insulin resistance (IR.The presence of NAFLD predicts the development of type 2 diabetes independent of established risk factors. NAFLD patients should therefore be screened for diabetes, including by the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT if there any abnormalities of fasting blood glucose (FBG and given appropriate lifestyle advice. Early diagnosis with the institution of lifestyle measures could help prevent or retard the onset of these metabolic disorders. Type 2 diabetes causes more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients with diabetes have an increased risk for cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC

  1. Immunosuppressive and postoperative effects of orthotopic liver transplantation on bone metabolism

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, J; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    Bone loss occurs early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in all liver transplant recipients and leads to postoperative fractures, especially in cholestatic patients with the lowest bone mass. Little is known about the underlying changes in bone metabolism after OLT or about the etiology

  2. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Obesity is often associated with a cluster of increased health risks collectively known as "Metabolic Syndrome" (MS). MS is often accompanied by development of fatty liver. Sometimes fatty liver results in damage leading to reduced liver function, and need for a transplant. This condition is known...

  3. Study on the changes of serum HA and CG levels in several diseases besides liver disorders

    Lu Zhiping; Ma Yunbao; Zhang Xiaoyi; Lv Weihua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and cholyglycine (CG) in several diseases besides liver disorders. Methods: Serum HA and CG levels were measured with RIA in 78 patients with chronic liver diseases (with 70 controls), (84 patients with primary hepatic carcinoma ), 70 pediatric patients with various infections diseases (with 40 controls), 50 pediatric patients with recurrent respiratory infection (RRI, with 30 controls) and 428 pregnant women ( with 60 controls). In addition, RBC C 3 b receptor ratio (RBCC 3 bRR) and RBC immune-complex ratio (RBCICR) (both with yeast rosette method) as well as serum IgG,IgM,IgA,C 3 levels (with immunoturbidity test) were examined in the 50 RRI pediatric patients, ALT levels were examined in the 70 pediatric patients with infectious diseases and SF examined in the 78 patients with chronic liver diseases. Results: The serum CG, HA and SF levels in the three groups of patients with chronic liver diseases ( CPH, CAH, Cirrhosis) were significantly higher than those in the controls (all P 0.05). In patients with hepatic carcinoma, the CG and HA levels were positively correlated with the mortality at 4 months (P 0.05). For ALT, levels only increased in patients with hepatitis and typhoid fever with none in bacillary dysentery and mumps. In pediatric patients with RRI, RBCC 3 bRR (%), CG, C 3 , IgG levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Various infectious diseases in pediatric patients could induce mild liver damage, which was closely related to the depressed immune status. High CG and HA levels in liver cancer patients suggested high mortality at 4 months. Women in late pregnancy might harbour disturbances in CG metabolism and mild liver injury though without overt symptoms. (authors)

  4. The treatment of diabetes mellitus of patients with chronic liver disease.

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; González-Moreno, Emmanuel I; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías

    2015-01-01

    About 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis may have glucose metabolism disorders, 30% show overt diabetes mellitus (DM). Prospective studies have demonstrated that DM is associated with an increased risk of hepatic complications and death in patients with liver cirrhosis. DM might contribute to liver damage by promoting inflammation and fibrosis through an increase in mitochondrial oxidative stress mediated by adipokines. Based on the above mentioned the effective control of hyperglycemia may have a favorable impact on the evolution of these patients. However, only few therapeutic studies have evaluated the effectiveness and safety of antidiabetic drugs and the impact of the treatment of DM on morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin may produce hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis, as most of these agents are metabolized by the liver. This review discusses the clinical implications of DM in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition the effectiveness and safety of old, but particularly the new antidiabetic drugs will be described based on pharmacokinetic studies and chronic administration to patients. Recent reports regarding the use of the SGLT2 inhibitors as well as the new incretin-based therapies such as injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and oral inhibitors of dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) will be discussed. The establishment of clear guidelines for the management of diabetes in patients with CLD is strongly required.

  5. Disease assessment and prognosis of liver failure

    ZHANG Jing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure has a high fatality rate and greatly threatens human health. Liver transplantation can effectively reduce the fatality rate. However, the problems such as donor shortage and allograft rejection limit the wide application of liver transplantation. An accurate early assessment helps to evaluate patients′ condition and optimize therapeutic strategies. At present, commonly used systems for prognostic evaluation include the King′s College Hospital, MELD, integrated MELD, Child-Pugh score, CLIF-SOFA, CLIF-C ACLFS, and D-MELD, and each system has its own advantages and disadvantages. Among these systems, the MELD scoring system is the most commonly used one, and the D-MELD scoring system is the most innovative one, which can be used for patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. This article elaborates on the characteristics and predictive value of each scoring system in clinical practice.

  6. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  7. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with alcoholic liver disease without cirrhosis.

    Varju, T; Lesch, M; Adorján, A

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with alcoholic liver disease without cirrhosis are reported. Conditions which can be associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and theoretical factors which can play a role in its pathomechanism are briefly discussed.

  8. Vitamin D supplementation for chronic liver diseases in adults

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Bjelakovic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is often reported in people with chronic liver diseases. Therefore, improving vitamin D status could have a beneficial effect on people with chronic liver diseases. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation in people...... with chronic liver diseases. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. We also searched databases...... that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α...

  9. Current Concepts in Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Liver Disease: Clinical Outcomes, Hepatitis C Virus Association, and Therapy.

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José Alberto; Lavalle-González, Fernando Javier; González-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for chronic liver disease, and ~30 % of patients with liver cirrhosis develop diabetes. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic hepatitis C virus liver infection, can aggravate the course the liver infection, and can induce a lower sustained response to antiviral treatment. Evidences that HCV may induce metabolic and autoimmune disturbances leading to hypobetalipoproteinemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, thyroid disease, and gonadal dysfunction have been found. Prospective studies have demonstrated that diabetes increases the risk of liver complications and death in patients with cirrhosis. However, treatment of diabetes in these patients is complex, as antidiabetic drugs can promote hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis. There have been few therapeutic studies evaluating antidiabetic treatments in patients with liver cirrhosis published to date; thus, the optimal treatment for diabetes and the impact of treatment on morbidity and mortality are not clearly known. As numbers of patients with chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus are increasing, largely because of the global epidemics of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, evaluation of treatment options is becoming more important. This review discusses new concepts on hepatogenous diabetes, the diabetes mellitus–hepatitis C virus association, and clinical implications of diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, the effectiveness and safety of old and new antidiabetic drugs, including incretin-based therapies, will be described.

  10. Fimasartan Ameliorates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease through PPARδ Regulation in Hyperlipidemic and Hypertensive Conditions

    Yong-Jik Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of fimasartan on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperlipidemic and hypertensive conditions, the levels of biomarkers related to fatty acid metabolism were determined in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells treated by high fatty acid and liver and visceral fat tissue samples of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs given high-fat diet. In HepG2 cells and liver tissues, fimasartan was shown to increase the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ, phosphorylated 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK, phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (p-ACC, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD, medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α, and it led to a decrease in the protein levels of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSDH1, fatty acid synthase (FAS, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Fimasartan decreased lipid contents in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells and liver tissues. In addition, fimasartan increased the adiponectin level in visceral fat tissues. The antiadipogenic effects of fimasartan were offset by PPARδ antagonist (GSK0660. Consequently, fimasartan ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease mainly through the activation of oxidative metabolism represented by PPARδ-AMPK-PGC-1α pathway.

  11. /sup 14/C-D-galactose breath test for evaluation of liver function in patients with chronic liver disease

    Caspary, W F; Schaffer, J

    1978-01-01

    D-galactose metabolism and demethylation of aminopyrine by healthy controls and patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and cirrhosis (Ci), were assessed by a breath analysis technique measuring /sup 14/CO2 exhalation after oral ingestion of /sup 14/C-D-galactose or /sup 14/C-aminopyrine. Patients with CAH and Ci exhibited decreased /sup 14/CO2-exhalation rates following /sup 14/-D-galactose or /sup 14/C-aminopyrine. D-galactose oxidation capacity of the liver can be assessed by a breath analysis technique in analogy to the demethylating function for aminopyrine. The ordinary oral D-galactose tolerance test seems, however, superior in comparison to the /sup 14/C-D-galactose tolerance test, in discriminating between healthy controls and patients with chronic liver disease.

  12. Ananas comosus L. Leaf Phenols and p-Coumaric Acid Regulate Liver Fat Metabolism by Upregulating CPT-1 Expression

    Weidong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect and action mechanisms of pineapple leaf phenols (PLPs on liver fat metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice. Results show that PLP significantly reduced abdominal fat and liver lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The effects of PLP were comparable with those of FB. Furthermore, at the protein level, PLP upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1, whereas FB had no effects on CPT-1 compared with the HFD controls. Regarding mRNA expression, PLP mainly promoted the expression of CPT-1, PGC1a, UCP-1, and AMPK in the mitochondria, whereas FB mostly enhanced the expression of Ech1, Acox1, Acaa1, and Ehhadh in peroxisomes. PLP seemed to enhance fat metabolism in the mitochondria, whereas FB mainly exerted the effect in peroxisomes. In addition, p-coumaric acid (CA, one of the main components from PLP, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in oleic acid-induced HepG2 cells. CA also significantly upregulated CPT-1 mRNA and protein expressions in HepG2 cells. We, firstly, found that PLP enhanced liver fat metabolism by upregulating CPT-1 expression in the mitochondria and might be promising in treatment of fatty liver diseases as alternative natural products. CA may be one of the active components of PLP.

  13. Outline of metabolic diseases in adult neurology.

    Mochel, F

    2015-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are traditionally defined by enzymatic deficiencies or defects in proteins involved in cellular metabolism. Historically discovered and characterized in children, a growing number of IEM are described in adults, and especially in the field of neurology. In daily practice, it is important to recognize emergency situations as well as neurodegenerative diseases for which a metabolic disease is likely, especially when therapeutic interventions are available. Here, the goal is to provide simple clinical, imaging and biochemical tools that can first orientate towards and then confirm the diagnosis of IEM. General guidelines are presented to treat the most common IEM during metabolic crises - acute encephalopathies with increased plasma ammonia, lactate or homocystein, as well as rhabdomyolysis. Examples of therapeutic strategies currently applied to chronic neurometabolic diseases are also provided - GLUT1 deficiency, adrenoleukodystrophy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick type C and Wilson disease. Genetic counseling is mandatory in some X-linked diseases - ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and adrenoleukodystrophy - and recommended in maternally inherited mitochondrial diseases - mutations of mitochondrial DNA. Besides these practical considerations, the contribution of metabolism to the field of adult neurology and neurosciences is much greater: first, with the identification of blood biomarkers that are progressively changing our diagnostic strategies thanks to lipidomic approaches, as illustrated in the field of spastic paraplegia and atypical psychiatric presentations; and second, through the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in common neurological diseases thanks to the study of these rare diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease ...

    Background: Over recent years it has become apparent that the hepatocyte mitochondrion functions both as a cause and as a target of liver injury. Resultant dysfunction of mitochondria yields deficient oxidative phosphorylation, increased generation of reactive oxygen species, impairment of other metabolic pathways and ...

  15. The Interleukin-20 Cytokine Family in Liver Disease

    Esther Caparrós

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The three main causes of inflammation and chronic injury in the liver are viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, all of which can lead to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which in turn may prompt the need for liver transplant. The interleukin (IL-20 is a subfamily part of the IL-10 family of cytokines that helps the liver respond to damage and disease, they participate in the control of tissue homeostasis, and in the immunological responses developed in this organ. The best-studied member of the family in inflammatory balance of the liver is the IL-22 cytokine, which on the one hand may have a protective role in fibrosis progression but on the other may induce liver tissue susceptibility in hepatocellular carcinoma development. Other members of the family might also carry out this dual function, as some of them share IL receptor subunits and signal through common intracellular pathways. Investigators are starting to consider the potential for targeting IL-20 subfamily members in liver disease. The recently explored role of miRNA in the transcriptional regulation of IL-22 and IL-24 opens the door to promising new approaches for controlling the local immune response and limiting organ injury. The IL-20RA cytokine receptor has also been classified as being under miRNA control in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Moreover, researchers have proposed combining anti-inflammatory drugs with IL-22 as a hepatoprotective IL for alcoholic liver disease (ALD treatment, and clinical trials of ILs for managing severe alcoholic-derived liver degeneration are ongoing. In this review, we focus on exploring the role of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines in viral hepatitis, ALD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as delineating the main strategies explored so far in terms of therapeutic possibilities of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines in liver disease.

  16. Strong association between non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and low 25(OH vitamin D levels in an adult population with normal serum liver enzymes

    Pozzilli Paolo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypovitaminosis D has been recently recognized as a worldwide epidemic. Since vitamin D exerts significant metabolic activities, comprising free fatty acids (FFA flux regulation from the periphery to the liver, its deficiency may promote fat deposition into the hepatocytes. Aim of our study was to test the hypothesis of a direct association between hypovitaminosis D and the presence of NAFLD in subjects with various degree of insulin-resistance and related metabolic disorders. Methods We studied 262 consecutive subjects referred to the Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases clinics for metabolic evaluation. NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed by upper abdomen ultrasonography, metabolic syndrome was identified according to the Third Report of National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP/ATPIII modified criteria. Insulin-resistance was evaluated by means of HOMA-IR. Fatty-Liver-Index, a recently identified correlate of NAFLD, was also estimated. Serum 25(OHvitamin D was measured by colorimetric method. Results Patients with NAFLD (n = 162,61.8% had reduced serum 25(OH vitamin D levels compared to subjects without NAFLD (14.8 ± 9.2 vs 20.5 ± 9.7 ng/ml, p Conclusions Low 25(OHvitamin D levels are associated with the presence of NAFLD independently from metabolic syndrome, diabetes and insulin-resistance profile.

  17. Chronic liver disease related mortality pattern in northern Pakistan

    Khokhar, N.; Niazi, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the mortality pattern pertaining to chronic liver disease (CLD) in Northern Pakistan. Results: There were a total of 8529 admissions in twelve months period from August 2001 to July 2002. There were 283 (3.31%) total deaths. Out of these, 160 deaths were pertaining to medical causes. Out of these medical cases, 33 (20.6%) patients had died of chronic liver disease. Other major causes of death were cerebro-vascular accident (18.7%), malignancy (18.1%) and acute myocardial infarction (10.6%). Out of 33 patients of CLD, 12 (36%) presented with acute gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding, 9(27%) presented with Ascites and 6(18%) presented with altered mental status due to hepatic encephalopathy. Rest of them had jaundice and fever as their initial presentation. Out of these 33 patients with CLD, 23 (70%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) as cause of their liver disease, 4 (12%) had hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, 3(9%) had both hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and 3 (9%) had no known cause of their chronic liver disease. Conclusion: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of mortality in this part of Pakistan at a tertiary care hospital. HCV infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease followed by either HBV or a combination of these viruses. Major manifestations of CLD have been gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic failure and portal hypertension.(author)

  18. Characterization of liver changes in ZSF1 rats, an animal model of metabolic syndrome

    Marta Borges-Canha

    Full Text Available Background: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic counterpart of the metabolic syndrome. ZSF1 rats are a metabolic syndrome animal model in which liver changes have not been described yet. Aim: The characterization of liver histological and innate immunity changes in ZSF1 rats. Methods: Five groups of rats were included (n = 7 each group: healthy Wistar-Kyoto control rats (Ctrl, hypertensive ZSF1 lean (Ln, ZSF1 obese rats with a normal diet (Ob, ZSF1 obese rates with a high-fat diet (Ob-HFD, and ZSF1 obese rats with low-intensity exercise training (Ob-Ex. The animals were sacrificed at 20 weeks of age, their livers were collected for: a measurements of the area of steatosis, fibrosis and inflammation (histomorphological analysis; and b innate immunity (toll-like receptor [TLR] 2, TLR4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ [PPARγ], toll interacting protein [TOLLIP] and inflammatory marker (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNFvs], interleukin 1 [IL-1] expression analysis by real-time PCR. Results: Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex were significantly heavier than Ln and Ctrl animals. Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex animals had impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. ZSF1 Ob, Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex presented a higher degree of steatosis (3,5x; p < 0.05 than Ctrl or ZSF1 Ln rats. Steatohepatitis and fibrosis were not observed in any of the groups. No differences in expression were observed between Ctrl, Ln and Ob animals (except for the significantly higher expression of TOLLIP observed in the Ob vs Ln comparison. Ob-HFD and Ob-Ex rats showed increased expression of PPARγ and TOLLIP as compared to other groups. However, both groups also showed increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Nevertheless, this did not translate into a differential expression of TNFα or IL-1 in any of the groups. Conclusion: The ZSF1 model is associated with liver steatosis but not with steatohepatitis or a significantly increased expression of innate immunity or

  19. OBESITY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    O. A. Pavlenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a highly prevalent disorder associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The main pathophysiological factor of liver steatosis is insulin resistance that may lead to development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Overcoming of insulin resistance by means of body weight reduction and administration of insulin sensitizers is considered to be a promising approach to NAFLD treatment. In accordance with the Russian guidelines on diagnostics and treatment of NAFLD, sibutramine is the drug of choice for medical treatment of obesity. As for insulin sensitizers, metformin (biguanide class is widely used for treatment of NAFLD in everyday clinical practice. Treatment of NAFLD as a component of metabolic syndrome should be multifactorial and aimed at different aspects of the disease pathophysiology. 

  20. Host homeostatic responses to alcohol-induced cellular stress in animal models of alcoholic liver disease.

    Wang, He Joe; Murray, Gary J; Jung, Mary Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Humans develop various clinical phenotypes of severe alcoholic liver disease, including alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis, generally after decades of heavy drinking. In such individuals, following each episode of drinking, their livers experience heightened intracellular and extracellular stresses that are closely associated with alcohol consumption and alcohol metabolism. This article focuses on the latest advances made in animal models on evolutionarily conserved homeostatic mechanisms for coping with and resolving these stress conditions. The mechanisms discussed include the stress-activated protein kinase JNK, energy regulator AMPK, autophagy and the inflammatory response. Over time, the host may respond variably to stress with protective mechanisms that are critical in determining an individual's vulnerability to developing severe alcoholic liver disease. A systematic review of these mechanisms and their temporal changes in animal models provides the basis for general conclusions, and raises questions for future studies. The relevance of these data to human conditions is also discussed.

  1. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  2. Proteomic Profiles of Adipose and Liver Tissues from an Animal Model of Metabolic Syndrome Fed Purple Vegetables

    Hala M Ayoub

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is a complex disorder that predisposes an individual to Cardiovascular Diseases and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Proteomics and bioinformatics have proven to be an effective tool to study complex diseases and mechanisms of action of nutrients. We previously showed that substitution of the majority of carbohydrate in a high fat diet by purple potatoes (PP or purple carrots (PC improved insulin sensitivity and hypertension in an animal model of MetS (obese Zucker rats compared to a control sucrose-rich diet. In the current study, we used TMT 10plex mass tag combined with LC-MS/MS technique to study proteomic modulation in the liver (n = 3 samples/diet and adipose tissue (n = 3 samples/diet of high fat diet-fed rats with or without substituting sucrose for purple vegetables, followed by functional enrichment analysis, in an attempt to elucidate potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the phenotypic changes seen with purple vegetable feeding. Protein folding, lipid metabolism and cholesterol efflux were identified as the main modulated biological themes in adipose tissue, whereas lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative stress were the main modulated themes in liver. We propose that enhanced protein folding, increased cholesterol efflux and higher free fatty acid (FFA re-esterification are mechanisms by which PP and PC positively modulate MetS pathologies in adipose tissue, whereas, decreased de novo lipogenesis, oxidative stress and FFA uptake, are responsible for the beneficial effects in liver. In conclusion, we provide molecular evidence for the reported metabolic health benefits of purple carrots and potatoes and validate that these vegetables are good choices to replace other simple carbohydrate sources for better metabolic health.

  3. Well Preserved Renal Function in Children With Untreated Chronic Liver Disease.

    Berg, Ulla B; Németh, Antal

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of studies with hepatorenal syndrome, it is widely regarded that renal function is impacted in chronic liver disease (CLD). Therefore, we investigated renal function in children with CLD. In a retrospective study of 277 children with CLD, renal function was investigated as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), measured as clearance of inulin and para-amino hippuric acid or clearance of iohexol. The data were analyzed with regard to different subgroups of liver disease and to the grade of damage. Hyperfiltration (>+2 SD of controls) was found in the subgroups of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (44%), glycogenosis (75%), and acute fulminant liver failure (60%). Patients with biliary atresia, most other patients with metabolic disease and intrahepatic cholestasis, and those with vascular anomalies and cryptogenic cirrhosis had normal renal function. Decreased renal function was found in patients with Alagille's syndrome (64% < -2 SD). Increased GFR and ERPF was found in patients with elevated transaminases, low prothrombin level, high bile acid concentration, and high aspartate-aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio. Most children with CLD had surprisingly well preserved renal function and certain groups had even hyperfiltration. The finding that children with decompensated liver disease and ongoing liver failure had stable kidney function suggests that no prognostic markers of threatening hepatorenal syndrome were at hand. Moreover, estimation of GFR based on serum creatinine fails to reveal hyperfiltration.

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Any Role in Disease Susceptibility?

    Paola Dongiovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extend from simple steatosis, that is, increased hepatic lipid content, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, a condition that may progress to cirrhosis with its associated complications. Nuclear hormone receptors act as intracellular lipid sensors that coordinate genetic networks regulating lipid metabolism and energy utilization. This family of transcription factors, in particular peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, represents attractive drug targets for the management of NAFLD and NASH, as well as related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The impact on the regulation of lipid metabolism observed for PPARs has led to the hypothesis that genetic variants within the human PPARs genes may be associated with human disease such as NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome, and/or coronary heart disease. Here we review the available evidence on the association between PPARs genetic polymorphism and the susceptibility to NAFLD and NASH, and we provide a meta-analysis of the available evidence. The impact of PPAR variants on the susceptibility to NASH in specific subgroup of patients, and in particular on the response to therapies, especially those targeting PPARs, represents promising new areas of investigation.

  5. Central melanin-concentrating hormone influences liver and adipose metabolism via specific hypothalamic nuclei and efferent autonomic/JNK1 pathways.

    Imbernon, Monica; Beiroa, Daniel; Vázquez, María J; Morgan, Donald A; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Porteiro, Begoña; Díaz-Arteaga, Adenis; Senra, Ana; Busquets, Silvia; Velásquez, Douglas A; Al-Massadi, Omar; Varela, Luis; Gándara, Marina; López-Soriano, Francisco-Javier; Gallego, Rosalía; Seoane, Luisa M; Argiles, Josep M; López, Miguel; Davis, Roger J; Sabio, Guadalupe; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Rahmouni, Kamal; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2013-03-01

    Specific neuronal circuits modulate autonomic outflow to liver and white adipose tissue. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-deficient mice are hypophagic, lean, and do not develop hepatosteatosis when fed a high-fat diet. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of MCH, an orexigenic neuropeptide specifically expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area, on hepatic and adipocyte metabolism. Chronic central administration of MCH and adenoviral vectors increasing MCH signaling were performed in rats and mice. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. We showed that the activation of MCH receptors promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas it increases fat deposition in white adipose tissue via the suppression of sympathetic traffic. These metabolic actions are independent of parallel changes in food intake and energy expenditure. In the liver, MCH triggers lipid accumulation and lipid uptake, with c-Jun N-terminal kinase being an essential player, whereas in adipocytes MCH induces metabolic pathways that promote lipid storage and decreases lipid mobilization. Genetic activation of MCH receptors or infusion of MCH specifically in the lateral hypothalamic area modulated hepatic lipid metabolism, whereas the specific activation of this receptor in the arcuate nucleus affected adipocyte metabolism. Our findings show that central MCH directly controls hepatic and adipocyte metabolism through different pathways. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: The sexually dimorphic role of androgens in human metabolic disease.

    Schiffer, Lina; Kempegowda, Punith; Arlt, Wiebke; O'Reilly, Michael W

    2017-09-01

    Female androgen excess and male androgen deficiency manifest with an overlapping adverse metabolic phenotype, including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the impact of androgens on metabolic target tissues in an attempt to unravel the complex mechanistic links with metabolic dysfunction; we also evaluate clinical studies examining the associations between metabolic disease and disorders of androgen metabolism in men and women. We conceptualise that an equilibrium between androgen effects on adipose tissue and skeletal muscle underpins the metabolic phenotype observed in female androgen excess and male androgen deficiency. Androgens induce adipose tissue dysfunction, with effects on lipid metabolism, insulin resistance and fat mass expansion, while anabolic effects on skeletal muscle may confer metabolic benefits. We hypothesise that serum androgen concentrations observed in female androgen excess and male hypogonadism are metabolically disadvantageous, promoting adipose and liver lipid accumulation, central fat mass expansion and insulin resistance. © 2017 The authors.

  7. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  8. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in University Rugby Football Players

    Shinsuke Nirengi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity improves various metabolic disturbances. The effect of physical activity on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has not been defined, particularly in athletes who are able to consume a diet to increase body mass. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of NAFLD and associated factors of NAFLD among male university rugby football players [n = 69, 37 forwards (FW and 32 backs (BK], relative to age-matched controls (CON; n = 29. For FW players exe