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Sample records for meta-analysis identifies metastatic

  1. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben A

    2008-01-01

    Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. We have analyzed 8 publicly available gene expression data sets. A global approach, 'gene set enrichment analysis' as well as an approach focusing on a subset of significantly differently regulated genes, GenMAPP, has been applied to rank pathway gene sets according to differential regulation in metastasizing tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. The major findings are up-regulation of cell cycle pathways and a metabolic shift towards glucose metabolism reflected in several pathways in metastasizing tumors. Growth factor pathways seem to play dual roles; EGF and PDGF pathways are decreased, while VEGF and sex-hormone pathways are increased in tumors that metastasize. Furthermore, migration, proteasome, immune system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major characteristics such as proliferation are identified. Transcription factor analysis identifies a number of key factors that support central pathways. Several previously proposed treatment targets are identified and several new pathways that may

  2. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent...... tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways...

  3. Targeted agents for patients with advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer: A protocol for systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Baoshan; Pan, Bei; Ge, Long; Ma, Jichun; Wu, Yiting; Guo, Tiankang

    2018-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a devastating malignant tumor. Although surgical resection may offer a good prognosis and prolong survival, approximately 80% patients with PC are always diagnosed as unresectable tumor. National Comprehensive Cancer Network's (NCCN) recommended gemcitabine-based chemotherapy as efficient treatment. While, according to recent studies, targeted agents might be a better available option for advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis will be to examine the differences of different targeted interventions for advanced/metastatic PC patients. We will conduct this systematic review and network meta-analysis using Bayesian method and according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) statement. To identify relevant studies, 6 electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of science, CNKI (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure), and CBM (Chinese Biological Medical Database) will be searched. The risk of bias in included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed using the Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0. And we will use GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence from network meta-analysis. Data will be analyzed using R 3.4.1 software. To the best of our knowledge, this systematic review and network meta-analysis will firstly use both direct and indirect evidence to compare the differences of different targeted agents and targeted agents plus chemotherapy for advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. This is a protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis, so the ethical approval and patient consent are not required. We will disseminate the results of this review by submitting to a peer-reviewed journal.

  4. The efficacy and toxicity profile of metronomic chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Liu

    Full Text Available The current meta-analysis aimed to summarize the available evidence for the efficacy and serious adverse events (AEs associated with use of metronomic chemotherapy (MCT in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC.Electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE database, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane database were systematically searched for articles related to the use of MCT in MBC patients. Eligible studies included clinical trials of MBC patients treated with MCT that presented sufficient data related to tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and grade 3/4 AEs. A meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model.This meta-analysis consists of 22 clinical trials with 1360 patients. The pooled objective response rate and clinical benefit rate of MCT were 34.1% (95% CI 27.4-41.5 and 55.6% (95% CI 49.2-61.9, respectively. The overall 6-month PFS, 12-month OS, and 24-month OS rates were 56.8% (95% CI 48.3-64.9, 70.3% (95% CI 62.6-76.9, and 40.0% (95% CI 30.6-50.2, respectively. The pooled incidence of grade 3/4 AEs was 29.5% (95% CI 21.1-39.5. There was no statistically significant difference observed in any endpoint between subgroups defined by concomitant anti-cancer therapies or chemotherapy regimens. After excluding one controversial study, we observed a trend showing lower toxicity rates with the use of MCT alone compared to use of MCT with other anti-cancer therapies (P = 0.070.Metronomic chemotherapy may be effective for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. MCT used alone is possibly equally effective and less toxic than combination therapies. Well-designed RCTs are needed to obtain more evidence.

  5. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Retrospective Series of Regorafenib for Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Joey; Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-11-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer is a common disease encountered in oncology practice and treatment options beyond fluoropyrimidines, irinotecan, oxaliplatin and monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) are limited. Regorafenib, a new drug that targets tyrosine kinases such as VEGF receptor as well as others, has been added recently to the armamentarium for metastatic colorectal cancer. This report analyzes the published experience with this drug in clinical practice outside of clinical trials. A literature search of major databases was performed for the identification of studies of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer. Studies retained for further analysis were in English or French, describing 20 or more patients treated with regorafenib monotherapy and not part of a phase I, II or III trial. Results of the pooled analysis of retrospective studies were compared with results of the published phase III trials and a phase IIIb prospective study. Twelve publications including a total of 702 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Summary response rate was 2% [95% confidence interval (CI) =0.8-3.2%] and the disease control rate 38.14% (95% CI=32.35-43.93%). Summary survival rates were 3.34 months (95% CI=2.71-3.97 months) for progression-free and 7.27 months (95% CI=6.23-8.3 months) for overall survival. These were similar to the phase III and IIIb studies. Most common adverse effects were also consistent with those of the published phase III experience. This systematic review and meta-analysis confirmed a moderate efficacy of regorafenib in later-stage metastatic colorectal cancer in the everyday clinical practice setting outside of clinical trials. Future identification of biomarkers may aid in further tailoring of this treatment in order to obtain maximum clinical benefit. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing chemotherapy plus bevacizumab with chemotherapy alone in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yunfei; Tan, Aihua; Gao, Feng; Liu, Lidan; Liao, Cun; Mo, Zengnan

    2009-06-01

    Bevacizumab has demonstrated survival benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients when combined with chemotherapy. Several randomized clinical studies have evaluated bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Meta-analysis was performed to better assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab with chemotherapy for mCRC. Five clinical trials randomizing a total of 3,103 mCRC patients to chemotherapy alone or to the combined treatment of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were identified. The efficacy data included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and overall response rate (ORR), and the safety data contained the 60-day all-cause mortality rate, adverse events (AEs), and specific toxicity such as hypertension, thrombosis, bleeding, proteinuria, gastrointestinal perforation, diarrhea, and leucopenia. There was a significant PFS benefit (P = 0.00; hazards ratio [HR] = 0.66) and OS benefit (P = 0.00; HR = 0.77) in favor of the combined treatment. The ORR was significantly higher on the bevacizumab-containing arm (P = 0.021; relative risk [RR] = 1.5), while CR was comparable between the two arms (P = 0.09). A higher incidence of grade 3/4 AEs, grade 3/4 hypertension, grade 3/4 thromboembolic/thrombotic events, grade 3/4 bleeding, and gastrointestinal perforation was associated with the bevacizumab group. The two treatment groups were similar in terms of grade 3/4 proteinuria, grade 3/4 leukopenia, grade 3/4 diarrhea, and the 60-day all-cause mortality rate. The addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy confers a clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement in OS, PFS, and ORR. Its side effects are predictable and manageable and do not compound the incidence or severity of toxicities from chemotherapy.

  7. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the

  8. Structural brain change in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder identified by meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison-Wright, Ian; Ellison-Wright, Zoë; Bullmore, Ed

    2008-06-30

    The authors sought to map gray matter changes in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) using a novel technique incorporating neuro-imaging and genetic meta-analysis methods. A systematic search was conducted for voxel-based structural magnetic resonance imaging studies of patients with ADHD (or with related disorders) in relation to comparison groups. The authors carried out meta-analyses of the co-ordinates of gray matter differences. For the meta-analyses they hybridised the standard method of Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) with the rank approach used in Genome Scan Meta-Analysis (GSMA). This system detects three-dimensional conjunctions of co-ordinates from multiple studies and permits the weighting of studies in relation to sample size. For gray matter decreases, there were 7 studies including a total of 114 patients with ADHD (or related disorders) and 143 comparison subjects. Meta-analysis of these studies identified a significant regional gray matter reduction in ADHD in the right putamen/globus pallidus region. Four studies reported gray matter increases in ADHD but no regional increase was identified by meta-analysis. In ADHD there is gray matter reduction in the right putamen/globus pallidus region. This may be an anatomical marker for dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits mediating cognitive control. Right putamen lesions have been specifically associated with ADHD symptoms after closed head injuries in children.

  9. Structural brain change in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder identified by meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellison-Wright Zoë

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The authors sought to map gray matter changes in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD using a novel technique incorporating neuro-imaging and genetic meta-analysis methods. Methods A systematic search was conducted for voxel-based structural magnetic resonance imaging studies of patients with ADHD (or with related disorders in relation to comparison groups. The authors carried out meta-analyses of the co-ordinates of gray matter differences. For the meta-analyses they hybridised the standard method of Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE with the rank approach used in Genome Scan Meta-Analysis (GSMA. This system detects three-dimensional conjunctions of co-ordinates from multiple studies and permits the weighting of studies in relation to sample size. Results For gray matter decreases, there were 7 studies including a total of 114 patients with ADHD (or related disorders and 143 comparison subjects. Meta-analysis of these studies identified a significant regional gray matter reduction in ADHD in the right putamen/globus pallidus region. Four studies reported gray matter increases in ADHD but no regional increase was identified by meta-analysis. Conclusion In ADHD there is gray matter reduction in the right putamen/globus pallidus region. This may be an anatomical marker for dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits mediating cognitive control. Right putamen lesions have been specifically associated with ADHD symptoms after closed head injuries in children.

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of combined BRAF and MEK inhibition in metastatic melanoma: a comprehensive network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ruiqin; Zhou, Songxia; Zhong, Weixiang; Rong, Siming; Cong, Zhichao; Li, Yunxian; Xie, Qizhi; Chen, Huanming; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Shuhui; Cheng, Yabin; Huang, Yuanshen; Zhou, Youwen; Zhang, Guohong

    2015-09-29

    Several recent randomized clinical trials have preliminarily demonstrated that initial targeted therapy with combined BRAF and MEK inhibition is more effective in metastatic melanoma (MM) than single agent. To guide therapeutic decisions, we did a comprehensive network meta-analysis to identify evidence to robustly support whether combined BRAF and MEK inhibition is the best initial targeted therapeutic strategy for patients with MM. The databases of PubMed and trial registries were researched for randomized clinical trials of targeted therapy. Data of outcome were extracted on progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and overall survival (OS). Network meta-analysis using a Bayesian statistical model was performed to evaluate relative hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS, odds ratio (OR) for ORR. Finally, 16 eligible trials comprising 5976 participants were included in this meta-analysis. PFS were significantly prolonged in patients who received combined BRAF-MEK inhibition compared with those who received BRAF inhibition (HR: 0.58, 95%CI: 0.51-0.67, P MEK inhibition alone (HR: 0.29, 95%CI: 0.22-0.37, P MEK inhibition also improved the OS over BRAF inhibition (HR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.56-0.81, P MEK inhibition alone (HR: 0.48, 95%CI: 0.36-0.65, P MEK inhibition comparing with BRAF inhibition (OR: 2.00, 95%CI: 1.66-2.44, P MEK inhibition alone (OR: 20.66, 95%CI: 12.22-35.47, P MEK improved the most effective therapeutic modality as compared as single BRAF or MEK inhibition for patients with MM.

  11. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-D. Hofheinz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i in subgroups, (ii in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and (iii on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75 and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89. PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58. Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs.

  12. Surgical treatment of the primary tumour improves the overall survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headon, Hannah; Wazir, Umar; Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, stage IV metastatic breast cancer has been treated with systemic therapy and/or radiotherapy in order to decrease cancer-associated symptoms, maintain quality of life and control disease burden. Previous research suggests that surgical treatment of the primary tumour may prolong survival, as well achieve local control of disease. Using the PubMed and Ovid SP databases, a literature review and meta-analysis was performed in order to assess whether surgical resection of the primary tumour in metastatic breast cancer prolongs survival. In this meta-analysis, a pooled hazard ratio of 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.7; P<0.0001) was revealed, equating to a 37% reduction in risk of mortality in patients that underwent surgical resection of the primary tumour. Therefore, it was concluded that surgery of the primary tumour in stage IV breast cancer appears to offer a survival benefit in metastatic patients.

  13. Enhanced meta-analysis and replication studies identify five new psoriasis susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Lam C; Spain, Sarah L; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stuart, Philip E; Capon, Francesca; Knight, Jo; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Kang, Hyun M; Allen, Michael H; Lambert, Sylviane; Stoll, Stefan; Weidinger, Stephan; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Koks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tonu; Das, Sayantan; Metspalu, Andres; Weichenthal, Michael; Enerback, Charlotta; Krueger, Gerald G.; Voorhees, John J; Chandran, Vinod; Rosen, Cheryl F; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Reis, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Franke, Andre; Barker, Jonathan NWN; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Trembath, Richard C; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease with complex genetic architecture. Previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) and a recent meta-analysis using Immunochip data have uncovered 36 susceptibility loci. Here, we extend our previous meta-analysis of European ancestry by refined genotype calling and imputation and by the addition of 5,033 cases and 5,707 controls. The combined analysis, consisting of over 15,000 cases and 27,000 controls, identifies five new psoriasis susceptibility loci at genomewide significance (p < 5 × 10−8). The newly identified signals include two that reside in intergenic regions (1q31.1 and 5p13.1) and three residing near PLCL2 (3p24.3), NFKBIZ (3q12.3), and CAMK2G (10q22.2). We further demonstrate that NFKBIZ is a TRAF3IP2–dependent target of IL-17 signaling in human skin keratinocytes, thereby functionally linking two strong candidate genes. These results further integrate the genetics and immunology of psoriasis, suggesting new avenues for functional analysis and improved therapies. PMID:25939698

  14. A meta-analysis of 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography for assessment of metastatic bone tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Morita, Satoshi; Taguri, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of 18 F-Fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) compared with bone scintigraphy (BS) planar or BS planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in evaluating patients with metastatic bone tumor. We performed a meta-analysis of all available studies addressing the diagnostic accuracy of 18 F-Fluoride PET, 18 F-Fluoride PET/CT, BS planar, and BS planar and SPECT for detecting the metastatic bone tumor. We determined sensitivities and specificities across studies, calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios, and drew summary receiver operating characteristic curves using hierarchical regression models. We also compared the effective dose and cost-effectiveness estimated by data from the enrolled studies between 18 F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT and BS planar or BS planar and SPECT. When comparing all studies with data on 18 F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT, sensitivity and specificity were 96.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 93.5-98.9%] and 98.5% (95% CI 97.0-100%), respectively, on a patient basis and 96.9% (95% CI 95.9-98.0%) and 98.0% (95% CI 97.1-98.9%), respectively, on a lesion basis. The Az values of 18 F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT were 0.986 for the patient basis and 0.905 for the lesion basis, whereas those of BS or BS and SPECT were 0.866 for the patient basis and 0.854 for the lesion basis. However, the estimated effective dose and average cost-effective ratio were poorer for 18 F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT than those of BS planar or BS planar and SPECT. 18 F-Fluoride PET or PET/CT has excellent diagnostic performance for the detection of metastatic bone tumor, but the estimated effective dose and average cost-effective ratio are at a disadvantage compared with BS planar or BS planar and SPECT. (author)

  15. Comparison of palbociclib in combination with letrozole or fulvestrant with endocrine therapies for advanced/metastatic breast cancer: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirila, Costel; Mitra, Debanjali; Colosia, Ann; Ling, Caroline; Odom, Dawn; Iyer, Shrividya; Kaye, James A

    2017-08-01

    Palbociclib is the first cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor approved in the United States for HR+/HER2- advanced/metastatic breast cancer, in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy in postmenopausal women or with fulvestrant in women with disease progression following endocrine therapy. We compared progression-free survival (PFS) and discontinuations due to adverse events for palbociclib combinations against other endocrine therapies using a mixed-treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. A systematic literature review identified relevant trials. Separate analyses were conducted for each palbociclib combination using a Bayesian approach. Treatment rankings were established using the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA). Sixty-five unique studies met inclusion criteria. Palbociclib plus letrozole had the highest SUCRA value (99.9%) and was associated with significantly longer PFS than all comparators in treatment-naïve patients (hazard ratios [HRs] ranged from 0.41 to 0.58). Palbociclib plus fulvestrant had the second highest SUCRA value (93.9%) and, in previously treated patients, yielded significantly longer PFS than most comparators (HRs ranged from 0.26 to 0.46); the exception was everolimus plus exemestane, with similar PFS (HR, 1.04; 95% credible interval [CrI], 0.58-1.76). Palbociclib plus fulvestrant was associated with significantly lower odds of discontinuation due to adverse events than everolimus plus exemestane (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% CrI, 0.05-0.39). The results suggest that the two palbociclib combinations yielded significantly greater PFS than endocrine therapy in treatment-naïve and previously treated patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer. Palbociclib plus fulvestrant was associated with significantly less toxicity than everolimus plus exemestane.

  16. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Amit D; Andersson, Charlotte; Buch, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale, meta-analysis o...

  17. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C. (Chunyu); A. Kraja (Aldi); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J. Brody (Jennifer); N. Franceschini (Nora); J.C. Bis (Joshua); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); Y. Lu (Yingchang); Weiss, S. (Stefan); X. Guo (Xiuqing); W. Palmas (Walter); L.W. Martin (Lisa); Y.D. Chen (Y.); Surendran, P. (Praveen); F. Drenos (Fotios); Cook, J.P. (James P.); P. Auer (Paul); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); Giri, A. (Ayush); Zhao, W. (Wei); M. Jakobsdottir (Margret); Lin, L.-A. (Li-An); J.M. Stafford (Jeanette M.); N. Amin (Najaf); Mei, H. (Hao); J. Yao (Jiefen); J.M. Voorman (Jeanine); M.G. Larson (Martin); M.L. Grove (Megan); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); S.J. Hwang; H. Chen (Han); T. Huan (Tianxiao); Kosova, G. (Gulum); N.O. Stitziel (Nathan); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Schunkert (Heribert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Li (Man); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); C. Pattaro (Cristian); M. Gorski (Mathias); C. Kooperberg (Charles); G. Papanicolaou (George); Rossouw, J.E. (Jacques E.); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); C. Bouchard (Claude); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); Uitterlinden, A.G. (André G.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); R. Vasan (Ramachandran); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); K.D. Taylor (Kent); K.Y. Liu; E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); E.W. Daw (E. Warwick); F. Giulianini (Franco); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); E. Salfati (Elias); T.B. Harris (Tamara); Launer, L.J. (Lenore J.); M. Dörr (Marcus); S.B. Felix (Stephan); R. Rettig (Rainer); H. Völzke (Henry); E. Kim (Eric); W.-J. Lee (Wen-Jane); I.T. Lee; Sheu, W.H.-H. (Wayne H.-H.); Tsosie, K.S. (Krystal S.); Edwards, D.R.V. (Digna R. Velez); Y. Liu (YongMei); Correa, A. (Adolfo); D.R. Weir (David); U. Völker (Uwe); P.M. Ridker (Paul); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Reiner (Alexander); Van Duijn, C.M. (Cornelia M.); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M. Fornage (Myriam); G.B. Ehret (Georg); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); D. Levy (Daniel); D.I. Chasman (Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMeta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood

  18. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Carl A; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association s...

  19. Identifying Effective Education Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Meta-Analysis of Rigorous Impact Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to identify effective educational interventions in Sub-Saharan African with an impact on student learning. This is the first meta-analysis in the field of education conducted for Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper takes an in-depth look at twelve different types of education interventions or programs and attempts to not…

  20. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, Mike A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M.; Do, Chuong B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L.; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F.; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W.; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K.; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B.; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Hardy, John; Factor, S.; Higgins, D.; Evans, S.; Shill, H.; Stacy, M.; Danielson, J.; Marlor, L.; Williamson, K.; Jankovic, J.; Hunter, C.; Simon, D.; Ryan, P.; Scollins, L.; Saunders-Pullman, R.; Boyar, K.; Costan-Toth, C.; Ohmann, E.; Sudarsky, L.; Joubert, C.; Friedman, J.; Chou, K.; Fernandez, H.; Lannon, M.; Galvez-Jimenez, N.; Podichetty, A.; Thompson, K.; Lewitt, P.; Deangelis, M.; O'Brien, C.; Seeberger, L.; Dingmann, C.; Judd, D.; Marder, K.; Fraser, J.; Harris, J.; Bertoni, J.; Peterson, C.; Rezak, M.; Medalle, G.; Chouinard, S.; Panisset, M.; Hall, J.; Poiffaut, H.; Calabrese, V.; Roberge, P.; Wojcieszek, J.; Belden, J.; Jennings, D.; Marek, K.; Mendick, S.; Reich, S.; Dunlop, B.; Jog, M.; Horn, C.; Uitti, R.; Turk, M.; Ajax, T.; Mannetter, J.; Sethi, K.; Carpenter, J.; Dill, B.; Hatch, L.; Ligon, K.; Narayan, S.; Blindauer, K.; Abou-Samra, K.; Petit, J.; Elmer, L.; Aiken, E.; Davis, K.; Schell, C.; Wilson, S.; Velickovic, M.; Koller, W.; Phipps, S.; Feigin, A.; Gordon, M.; Hamann, J.; Licari, E.; Marotta-Kollarus, M.; Shannon, B.; Winnick, R.; Simuni, T.; Videnovic, A.; Kaczmarek, A.; Williams, K.; Wolff, M.; Rao, J.; Cook, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kostyk, S.; Hubble, J.; Campbell, A.; Reider, C.; Seward, A.; Camicioli, R.; Carter, J.; Nutt, J.; Andrews, P.; Morehouse, S.; Stone, C.; Mendis, T.; Grimes, D.; Alcorn-Costa, C.; Gray, P.; Haas, K.; Vendette, J.; Sutton, J.; Hutchinson, B.; Young, J.; Rajput, A.; Klassen, L.; Shirley, T.; Manyam, B.; Simpson, P.; Whetteckey, J.; Wulbrecht, B.; Truong, D.; Pathak, M.; Frei, K.; Luong, N.; Tra, T.; Tran, A.; Vo, J.; Lang, A.; Kleiner- Fisman, G.; Nieves, A.; Johnston, L.; So, J.; Podskalny, G.; Giffin, L.; Atchison, P.; Allen, C.; Martin, W.; Wieler, M.; Suchowersky, O.; Furtado, S.; Klimek, M.; Hermanowicz, N.; Niswonger, S.; Shults, C.; Fontaine, D.; Aminoff, M.; Christine, C.; Diminno, M.; Hevezi, J.; Dalvi, A.; Kang, U.; Richman, J.; Uy, S.; Sahay, A.; Gartner, M.; Schwieterman, D.; Hall, D.; Leehey, M.; Culver, S.; Derian, T.; Demarcaida, T.; Thurlow, S.; Rodnitzky, R.; Dobson, J.; Lyons, K.; Pahwa, R.; Gales, T.; Thomas, S.; Shulman, L.; Weiner, W.; Dustin, K.; Singer, C.; Zelaya, L.; Tuite, P.; Hagen, V.; Rolandelli, S.; Schacherer, R.; Kosowicz, J.; Gordon, P.; Werner, J.; Serrano, C.; Roque, S.; Kurlan, R.; Berry, D.; Gardiner, I.; Hauser, R.; Sanchez-Ramos, J.; Zesiewicz, T.; Delgado, H.; Price, K.; Rodriguez, P.; Wolfrath, S.; Pfeiffer, R.; Davis, L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Dewey, R.; Hayward, B.; Johnson, A.; Meacham, M.; Estes, B.; Walker, F.; Hunt, V.; O'Neill, C.; Racette, B.; Swisher, L.; Dijamco, Cheri; Conley, Emily Drabant; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Wojcicki, Anne; Lew, M.; Klein, C.; Golbe, L.; Growdon, J.; Wooten, G. F.; Watts, R.; Guttman, M.; Goldwurm, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M. H.; Baker, K.; Litvan, I.; Nicholson, G.; Nance, M.; Drasby, E.; Isaacson, S.; Burn, D.; Pramstaller, P.; Al-hinti, J.; Moller, A.; Sherman, S.; Roxburgh, R.; Slevin, J.; Perlmutter, J.; Mark, M. H.; Huggins, N.; Pezzoli, G.; Massood, T.; Itin, I.; Corbett, A.; Chinnery, P.; Ostergaard, K.; Snow, B.; Cambi, F.; Kay, D.; Samii, A.; Agarwal, P.; Roberts, J. W.; Higgins, D. S.; Molho, Eric; Rosen, Ami; Montimurro, J.; Martinez, E.; Griffith, A.; Kusel, V.; Yearout, D.; Zabetian, C.; Clark, L. N.; Liu, X.; Lee, J. H.; Taub, R. Cheng; Louis, E. D.; Cote, L. J.; Waters, C.; Ford, B.; Fahn, S.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Nuytemans, Karen; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; DeStefano, Anita; Seshadri, Sudha; Choi, Seung Hoan; Frank, Samuel; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth; Longstreth, W. T.; Ton, Thanh G. N.; Jain, Samay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vana; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas; Bozi, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas; Vassilatis, Dimitris; Koutsis, Georgios; Panas, Marios; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle; Powell, John; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were

  1. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Lindgren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580 informative for adult waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR. We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11 and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9. A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8. The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  3. Meta-analysis of grain yield QTL identified during agricultural drought in grasses showed consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, B P Mallikarjuna; Vikram, Prashant; Dixit, Shalabh; Ahmed, H U; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-06-16

    In the last few years, efforts have been made to identify large effect QTL for grain yield under drought in rice. However, identification of most precise and consistent QTL across the environments and genetics backgrounds is essential for their successful use in Marker-assisted Selection. In this study, an attempt was made to locate consistent QTL regions associated with yield increase under drought by applying a genome-wide QTL meta-analysis approach. The integration of 15 maps resulted in a consensus map with 531 markers and a total map length of 1821 cM. Fifty-three yield QTL reported in 15 studies were projected on a consensus map and meta-analysis was performed. Fourteen meta-QTL were obtained on seven chromosomes. MQTL1.2, MQTL1.3, MQTL1.4, and MQTL12.1 were around 700 kb and corresponded to a reasonably small genetic distance of 1.8 to 5 cM and they are suitable for use in marker-assisted selection (MAS). The meta-QTL for grain yield under drought coincided with at least one of the meta-QTL identified for root and leaf morphology traits under drought in earlier reports. Validation of major-effect QTL on a panel of random drought-tolerant lines revealed the presence of at least one major QTL in each line. DTY12.1 was present in 85% of the lines, followed by DTY4.1 in 79% and DTY1.1 in 64% of the lines. Comparative genomics of meta-QTL with other cereals revealed that the homologous regions of MQTL1.4 and MQTL3.2 had QTL for grain yield under drought in maize, wheat, and barley respectively. The genes in the meta-QTL regions were analyzed by a comparative genomics approach and candidate genes were deduced for grain yield under drought. Three groups of genes such as stress-inducible genes, growth and development-related genes, and sugar transport-related genes were found in clusters in most of the meta-QTL. Meta-QTL with small genetic and physical intervals could be useful in Marker-assisted selection individually and in combinations. Validation and comparative

  4. A Comparison of Regorafenib and TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao, Ana B K; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Berry, Scott; Chan, Kelvin K W

    2017-11-21

    Regorafenib and TAS-102 have shown to be superior to placebo in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. However, no studies have directly compared both drugs. Giving the lack of standard options in this scenario, a systematic review to compare the efficacy and safety of regorafenib and TAS-102 was performed. A systematic review using the PubMed, Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify published and unpublished studies up to November 2015 for randomized controlled trials for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, involving regorafenib or TAS-102, was performed. Data including overall survival, progression-free survival, and toxicity were extracted. Pairwise direct meta-analyses (regorafenib vs. placebo and TAS-102 vs. placebo) and indirect comparison (regorafenib vs. TAS-102) using network meta-analyses methods to preserve randomization were performed using random effects. Three randomized controlled trials fulfilled eligibility criteria (regorafenib monotherapy for previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer [CORRECT]: an international, multicentre, randomised, pacebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, regorafenib plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care in Asian patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer [CONCUR]: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, and randomized trial of TAS-102 for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer [RECOURSE] trials) involving 1764 patients (regorafenib, 641; TAS-102, 534; placebo, 589). Subgroups of patients (1659) who had not received prior regorafenib or TAS-102 were used to perform meta-analyses for efficacy. In the indirect comparison, no statistically significant differences were observed between regorafenib and TAS-102 in overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-1.66; P = .91) or progression-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.40-1.81; P = .67). However, regorafenib has statistically more all

  5. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeinera, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, William J.; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A.G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made to establish genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American-Australian-European collaborative meta-analysis of fourteen studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (childhood obesity cohorts (n = 2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). Finally, these two loci yielded directionally consistent associations in the GIANT meta-analysis of adult BMI1. PMID:22484627

  6. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Elks (Cathy); J.R.B. Perry (John); P. Sulem (Patrick); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); N. Franceschini (Nora); C. He (Chunyan); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); J.A. Visser (Jenny); E.M. Byrne (Enda); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); T. Esko (Tõnu); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); D.L. Koller (Daniel); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); P. Lin (Peng); M. Mangino (Massimo); M. Marongiu (Mara); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L. Stolk (Lisette); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); E. Albrecht (Eva); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Ingelsson (Erik); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); S. Ulivi (Shelia); N.M. Warrington (Nicole); L. Zgaga (Lina); H. Alavere (Helene); N. Amin (Najaf); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I.E. Barroso (Inês); G. Berenson (Gerald); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Blackburn (Hannah); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.E. Buring (Julie); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); W. Chen (Wei); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); P. d' Adamo (Pio); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Döring (Angela); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); T. Foroud (Tatiana); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Gasparini (Paolo); F. Geller (Frank); C. Gieger (Christian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.S. Hall (Alistair); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); L. Ferreli (Liana); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Hofman (Albert); F.B. Hu (Frank); T. Illig (Thomas); M.R. Järvelin; A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Karasik (David); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); T.O. Kilpelänen (Tuomas); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Kraft (Peter); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Li (Shengxu); J. Liu (Jianjun); D. Levy (Daniel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Melbye (Mads); V. Mooser (Vincent); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Navarro (Pau); M. Nelis (Mari); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.S. Plump (Andrew); A. Pouta (Anneli); E. Porcu (Eleonora); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger; N.J. Schork (Nicholas); A. Scuteri (Angelo); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); U. Sovio (Ulla); S.R. Srinivasan (Sathanur); D.P. Strachan (David); M.L. Tammesoo; E. Tikkanen (Emmi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); K. Tsui (Kim); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M. Uda (Manuela); R.M. van Dam (Rob); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D. Waterworth (Dawn); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.F. Wilson (James); A.F. Wright (Alan); L. Young (Lauren); G. Zhai (Guangju); W.V. Zhuang; L.J. Bierut (Laura); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H.A. Boyd (Heather); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M.J. Econs (Michael); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D. Hunter (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A. Metspalu (Andres); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); P.M. Ridker (Paul); T.D. Spector (Tim); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); K. Stefansson (Kari); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Murabito (Joanne); K. Ong (Ken); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10 -60) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10 -33), we identified 30

  7. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarc...

  8. Decoding and Reading Comprehension: A Meta-Analysis to Identify Which Reader and Assessment Characteristics Influence the Strength of the Relationship in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. Ricardo; Cain, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The twofold purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the relative importance of decoding skills to reading comprehension in reading development and to identify which reader characteristics and reading assessment characteristics contribute to differences in the decoding and reading comprehension correlation. A meta-analysis of 110 studies…

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cornelis (Marilyn); E.M. Byrne; T. Esko (Tõnu); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Ganna (Andrea); N.P. Paynter (Nina); K.L. Monda (Keri); N. Amin (Najaf); K. Fischer (Krista); F. Renström (Frida); J.S. Ngwa; V. Huikari (Ville); A. Cavadino (Alana); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); A. Teumer (Alexander); K. Yu; P. Marques-Vidal; R. Rawal; A. Manichaikul (Ani); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); J.M. Vink; J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); G. Burlutsky (George); J. Lahti (Jari); V. Mikkilä (Vera); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Eriksson; S. Musani (Solomon); T. Tanaka; F. Geller (Frank); J. Luan; J. Hui; R. Mägi (Reedik); M. Dimitriou (Maria); M. Garcia (Melissa); W.-K. Ho; M.J. Wright (Margaret); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); D.J. Couper (David); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Hofman (Albert); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); I. Barroso; I. Johansson (Ingegerd); L. Xue (Luting); M. Kaakinen (Marika); L. Milani (Lili); C. Power (Christine); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk; S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); R. Biffar; F. Gu; F. Bastardot (Francois); Z. Kutalik; D.R. Jacobs (David); N.G. Forouhi (Nita G.); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Lind (Lars); C. Lindgren; K. Michaëlsson; A.P. Morris (Andrew); M.K. Jensen (Majken K.); K.T. Khaw; R.N. Luben (Robert); J.J. Wang; S. Männistö (Satu); M.-M. Perälä; M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Viikari (Jorma); D. Mozaffarian; K. Mukamal (Kenneth); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Döring; A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); N. Dahmen (N.); T. Carithers; K.L. Tucker; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); H.A. Boyd; M. Melbye (Mads); J.L. Treur; D. Mellström (Dan); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); D.K. Houston; Y. Liu; J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed; M.A. Mason; A.B. Zonderman; L. Franke (Lude); B.S. Kristal; J. Karjalainen (Juha); D.R. Reed; H.-J. Westra; M.K. Evans; D. Saleheen; T.B. Harris (Tamara); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); G.C. Curhan (Gary); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Beilby (John); L.R. Pasquale; B. Feenstra; S. Bandinelli; J.M. Ordovas; A.T. Chan; U. Peters (Ulrike); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Gieger (Christian); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); D.S. Siscovick (David); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); P. Mitchell (Paul); D. Hunter (David); P. Kraft (Peter); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); N.J. Wareham (Nick); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); N. Caporaso; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); M.L. Neuhouser (Marian L.); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H. R.); F.B. Hu (Frank); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); P.W. Franks; P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.E. North (Kari); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.A. Nettleton; R.M. van Dam (Rob); D.I. Chasman (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCoffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day)

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkila, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Maegi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W-K; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaelsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Mannisto, S.; Perala, M-M; Kahonen, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Doering, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellstrom, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Toenjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H-J; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppoenen, E.; Jarvelin, M-R; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases...

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkilä, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Mägi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W.-K.; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaëlsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K.-T.; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Männistö, S.; Perälä, M.-M.; Kähönen, M.; Lehtimäki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Döring, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellström, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Tönjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H.-J.; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppönen, E.; Järvelin, M.-R.; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.; Nalls, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Hershey, Milton S.; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; München, Helmholtz Zentrum; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; O' Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Martinez, Maria; Sabatier, Paul; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Box, P. O.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  13. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, Andre; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J. P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, W. James; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Magi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A. G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimaki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Monica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Ines; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F. A.

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis of

  14. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradfield, J.P.; Taal, H.R.; Timpson, N.J.; Scherag, A.; Lecoeur, C.; Warrington, N.M.; Hypponen, E.; Holst, C.; Valcarcel, B.; Thiering, E.; Salem, R.M.; Schumacher, F.R.; Cousminer, D.L.; Sleiman, P.M.A.; Zhao, J.; Berkowitz, R.I.; Vimaleswaran, K.S.; Jarick, I.; Pennell, C.E.; Evans, D.M.; St Pourcain, B.; Berry, D.J.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Duijn, C.M.; van der Valk, R.J.P.; de Jongste, J.C.; Postma, D.S.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gauderman, W.J.; Hassanein, M.T.; Lindgren, C.M.; Mägi, R.; Boreham, C.A.G.; Neville, C.E.; Moreno, L.A.; Elliott, P.; Pouta, A.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Li, M.; Raitakari, O.; Lehtimäki, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; Palotie, A.; Dallongeville, J.; Das, S.; Deloukas, P.; McMahon, G.; Ring, S.M.; Kemp, J.P.; Buxton, J.L.; Blakemore, A.I.F.; Bustamante, M.; Guxens, M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Gillman, M.W.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Bisgaard, H.; Gilliland, F.D.; Heinrich, J.; Wheeler, E.; Barroso, I.; O'Rahilly, S.; Meirhaeghe, A.; Sørensen, T.I.A.; Power, C.; Palmer, L.J.; Hinney, A.; Widen, E.; Farooqi, I.S.; McCarthy, M.I.; Froguel, P.; Meyre, D.; Hebebrand, J.; Järvelin, M.J.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Smith, G.D.; Hakonarson, H.; Grant, S.F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis of

  15. A Two-Stage Meta-Analysis Identifies Several New Loci for Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, Vincent; Nalls, Michael A.; Bras, Jose M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Amouyel, Philippe; Arepalli, Sampath; Band, Gavin; Barker, Roger A.; Bellinguez, Celine; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Guenther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Duerr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Freeman, Colin; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gustafsson, Omar; Harris, Clare; Hellenthal, Garrett; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pearson, Richard; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Petursson, Hjoervar; Pirinen, Matti; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; de Silva, Rohan; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, Francois; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Vukcevic, Damjan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Weale, Michael E.; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefansson, Kari; Martinez, Maria; Donnelly, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study focused on the set

  16. Meta-analysis identifies five novel loci associated with endometriosis highlighting key genes involved in hormone metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Yadav; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a heritable hormone-dependent gynecological disorder, associated with severe pelvic pain and reduced fertility; however, its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we perform a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association case-control data sets, totalling 17,045 endomet......Endometriosis is a heritable hormone-dependent gynecological disorder, associated with severe pelvic pain and reduced fertility; however, its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we perform a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association case-control data sets, totalling 17......,045 endometriosis cases and 191,596 controls. In addition to replicating previously reported loci, we identify five novel loci significantly associated with endometriosis risk (P... identified five secondary association signals, including two at the ESR1 locus, resulting in 19 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with endometriosis, which together explain up to 5.19% of variance in endometriosis. These results highlight novel variants in or near...

  17. Genome-wide association study to identify common variants associated with brachial circumference: a meta-analysis of 14 cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Boraska

    Full Text Available Brachial circumference (BC, also known as upper arm or mid arm circumference, can be used as an indicator of muscle mass and fat tissue, which are distributed differently in men and women. Analysis of anthropometric measures of peripheral fat distribution such as BC could help in understanding the complex pathophysiology behind overweight and obesity. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic variants associated with BC through a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS meta-analysis. We used fixed-effects meta-analysis to synthesise summary results across 14 GWAS discovery and 4 replication cohorts comprising overall 22,376 individuals (12,031 women and 10,345 men of European ancestry. Individual analyses were carried out for men, women, and combined across sexes using linear regression and an additive genetic model: adjusted for age and adjusted for age and BMI. We prioritised signals for follow-up in two-stages. We did not detect any signals reaching genome-wide significance. The FTO rs9939609 SNP showed nominal evidence for association (p<0.05 in the age-adjusted strata for men and across both sexes. In this first GWAS meta-analysis for BC to date, we have not identified any genome-wide significant signals and do not observe robust association of previously established obesity loci with BC. Large-scale collaborations will be necessary to achieve higher power to detect loci underlying BC.

  18. A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies novel loci associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Liu, Xue-Feng; Aragam, Nagesh

    2010-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both have strong inherited components. Recent studies have indicated that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share more than half of their genetic determinants. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis (combined analysis) for genome-wide association data of the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 to detect genetic variants influencing both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using European-American samples (653 bipolar cases and 1034 controls, 1172 schizophrenia cases and 1379 controls). The best associated SNP rs11789399 was located at 9q33.1 (p=2.38 × 10(-6), 5.74 × 10(-4), and 5.56 × 10(-9), for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively), where one flanking gene, ASTN2 (220kb away) has been associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. The next best SNP was rs12201676 located at 6q15 (p=2.67 × 10(-4), 2.12 × 10(-5), 3.88 × 10(-8) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively), near two flanking genes, GABRR1 and GABRR2 (15 and 17kb away, respectively). The third interesting SNP rs802568 was at 7q35 within CNTNAP2 (p=8.92 × 10(-4), 1.38 × 10(-5), and 1.62 × 10(-7) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively). Through meta-analysis, we found two additional associated genes NALCN (the top SNP is rs2044117, p=4.57 × 10(-7)) and NAP5 (the top SNP is rs10496702, p=7.15 × 10(-7)). Haplotype analyses of above five loci further supported the associations with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These results provide evidence of common genetic variants influencing schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These findings will serve as a resource for replication in other populations to elucidate the potential role of these genetic variants in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies identifies multiple new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaoming; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The international Testicular Cancer Consortium (TECAC) combined five published genome-wide association studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT; 3,558 cases and 13,970 controls) to identify new susceptibility loci. We conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis, including, to our knowledge...... by identifying one and three additional independent SNPs, respectively. In aggregate, the 39 independent markers identified to date explain 37% of father-to-son familial risk, 8% of which can be attributed to the 12 new signals reported here. Our findings substantially increase the number of known TGCT...

  20. Integration of machine learning and meta-analysis identifies the transcriptomic bio-signature of mastitis disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Somayeh; Pakdel, Abbas; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Reecy, James M; Fazeli Farsani, Samaneh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2018-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) are assumed to be among the main agents that cause severe mastitis disease with clinical signs in dairy cattle. Rapid detection of this disease is so important in order to prevent transmission to other cows and helps to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics. With the rapid progress in high-throughput technologies, and accumulation of various kinds of '-omics' data in public repositories, there is an opportunity to retrieve, integrate, and reanalyze these resources to improve the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases and to provide mechanistic insights into host resistance in an efficient way. Meta-analysis is a relatively inexpensive option with good potential to increase the statistical power and generalizability of single-study analysis. In the current meta-analysis research, six microarray-based studies that investigate the transcriptome profile of mammary gland tissue after induced mastitis by E. coli infection were used. This meta-analysis not only reinforced the findings in individual studies, but also several novel terms including responses to hypoxia, response to drug, anti-apoptosis and positive regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter enriched by up-regulated genes. Finally, in order to identify the small sets of genes that are sufficiently informative in E. coli mastitis, the differentially expressed gene introduced by meta-analysis were prioritized by using ten different attribute weighting algorithms. Twelve meta-genes were detected by the majority of attribute weighting algorithms (with weight above 0.7) as most informative genes including CXCL8 (IL8), NFKBIZ, HP, ZC3H12A, PDE4B, CASP4, CXCL2, CCL20, GRO1(CXCL1), CFB, S100A9, and S100A8. Interestingly, the results have been demonstrated that all of these genes are the key genes in the immune response, inflammation or mastitis. The Decision tree models efficiently discovered the best combination of the meta-genes as

  1. GWAS meta-analysis of 16 852 women identifies new susceptibility locus for endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maxine M.; O'Mara, Tracy A.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Painter, Jodie N.; Attia, John; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Chu; Cheng, Timothy HT; Cook, Linda S.; Crous-Bou, Marta; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gorman, Maggie; Haiman, Christopher; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hodgson, Shirley; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Hunter, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Martin, Lynn; McEvoy, Mark; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Risch, Harvey; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Schumacher, Frederick; Wendy Setiawan, Veronica; Scott, Rodney J.; Sheng, Xin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Turman, Constance; Van Den Berg, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Weiss, Noel S.; Wentzensen, Nicholas; Xia, Lucy; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Zheng, Wei; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F.; Kraft, Peter; Spurdle, Amanda B.; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the developed world. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition to the disease, most of the genetic risk remains unexplained. We present the meta-analysis results of four genome-wide association studies (4907 cases and 11 945 controls total) in women of European ancestry. We describe one new locus reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 −8) at 6p22.3 (rs1740828; P = 2.29 × 10 −8, OR = 1.20), providing evidence of an additional region of interest for genetic susceptibility to endometrial cancer. PMID:27008869

  2. mTOR inhibitors, a new era for metastatic luminal HER2-negative breast cancer? A systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundo, Maria Saveria; Galeano, Teresa; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2016-05-10

    We evaluated if standard hormonal therapy (HT) could be improved by the addition of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) in metastatic luminal breast cancer. A meta-analysis on 4 phase II-III randomized clinical trials was performed. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) for progression free survival (PFS)/ time to progression (TTP) was 0.62 in favor of mTOR-I+HT arm (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.70; p<0.0001). There was significant heterogeneity for PFS/TTP (Cochran's Q 32, p<0.0001, I2 index 90.6%). Pooled HR for overall survival (OS) was 0.84 in favor of the combination arm (95% CI 0.71-0.99; p=0.04). Heterogeneity was not significant (Cochran's Q 4.47, p=0.1, I2 index 55.3%). Pooled risk ratio (RR) for objective response rate (ORR) was 0.88 in favor of experimental arm (95% CI 0.85-0.91; p<0.0001). Heterogeneity was not significant (Cochran's Q 2.11, p=0.3, I2 index 5.2%). Adverse events (AEs), in particular those of grade 3-4, mostly occurred in mTOR-I+HT arm. Combination therapy of HT plus mTOR-I improves the outcome of metastatic luminal breast cancer patients. Our results provide evidence of a class-effect of these targeting molecules.

  3. Meta-analysis identifies novel risk loci and yields systematic insights into the biology of male-pattern baldness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Herold, Christine; Hochfeld, Lara M; Hillmer, Axel M; Nyholt, Dale R; Hecker, Julian; Javed, Asif; Chew, Elaine G Y; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Drichel, Dmitriy; Heng, Xiu Ting; Del Rosario, Ricardo C-H; Fier, Heide L; Paus, Ralf; Rueedi, Rico; Galesloot, Tessel E; Moebus, Susanne; Anhalt, Thomas; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Rui; Kanoni, Stavroula; Papanikolaou, George; Kutalik, Zoltán; Deloukas, Panos; Philpott, Michael P; Waeber, Gérard; Spector, Tim D; Vollenweider, Peter; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Dedoussis, George; Richards, J Brent; Nothnagel, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Becker, Tim; Hinds, David A; Nöthen, Markus M

    2017-03-08

    Male-pattern baldness (MPB) is a common and highly heritable trait characterized by androgen-dependent, progressive hair loss from the scalp. Here, we carry out the largest GWAS meta-analysis of MPB to date, comprising 10,846 early-onset cases and 11,672 controls from eight independent cohorts. We identify 63 MPB-associated loci (Pbiological basis with numerous other human phenotypes and may deserve evaluation as an early prognostic marker, for example, for prostate cancer, sudden cardiac arrest and neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 39 studies identifies type 2 diabetes loci

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide signific...

  5. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Almoguera Castillo, Berta; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom similar to 50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with similar to 2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at ...

  6. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer...... cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1...... was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer...

  7. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O’Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li-san; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2,11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24162737

  8. Replication and meta-analysis of candidate loci identified variation at RAB3GAP1 associated with keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ha Ae; Mills, Richard A D; Lindsay, Richard G; Phillips, Tony; Coster, Douglas J; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P

    2013-07-30

    Keratoconus is a common complex corneal ectasia that can lead to severe visual impairment. Although a genetic component is well recognized, the genetic risk factors for keratoconus are yet to be fully elucidated. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) by Li et al. identified 15 potentially associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we aimed to replicate these associations, and conduct a meta-analysis of the current and previous studies. We genotyped the 15 reported associated SNPs in 524 Australian Caucasian cases with keratoconus and 2761 controls. Association analysis was conducted in PLINK. A meta-analysis of this study with the adjusted P values of the previously published GWAS was conducted using the method of Fisher to combine P values. Our Australian cohort showed association (P keratoconus, with P = 9.26 × 10(-9) passing the genome-wide significance level. Although the mechanism of disease association is yet to be determined, SNP rs4954218 is associated consistently with keratoconus and likely tags a functional variant that contributes to disease susceptibility.

  9. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 39 studies identifies type 2 diabetes loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R; Mega, Jessica L; Lanktree, Matthew B; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Böhm, Bernhard O; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Crook, Errol D; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C H; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S; Furlong, Clement E; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A; Glessner, Joseph T; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E; Kim, Cecilia E; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y; Lawlor, Debbie A; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Molony, Cliona M; Morrow, David A; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K; Nelson, Christopher P; Newhouse, Stephen J; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Erin N; Spijkerman, Annemieke W M; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L; van Iperen, Erik P A; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Cappola, Thomas P; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bhatt, Deepak; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dorn, Gerald W; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofker, Marten H; Huggins, Gordon S; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Klungel, Olaf H; Knowler, William C; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Meigs, James B; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bielinski, Susan J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Schadt, Eric E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Asselbergs, Folkert; de Bakker, Paul I W; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S; Keating, Brendan J

    2012-03-09

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10(-9)) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10(-6)). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10(-7)) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10(-15)). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10(-8)). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Elks, Cathy E.; Perry, John R.B.; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Visser, Jenny A.; Byrne, Enda M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 x 10(-60)) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 x 10(-33)), we identified 30 new menarche loci (all P < 5 x 10(-8)) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P < 1.9 x 10(-6)). The new loci included four previously associated with body mass index (in or near FTO, SE...

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis...... (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3...

  12. Mitogenomic Meta-Analysis Identifies Two Phases of Migration in the History of Eastern Eurasian Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Feng-Hua; Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Ji; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Li, Wen-Rong; Liu, Ming-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui; Zhao, Qian-Jun; Yang, Guang-Li; Wang, Feng; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Yong-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Sheng-Guo; Hehua, EEr; Gorkhali, Neena A.; Farhad Vahidi, S. M.; Muladno, Muhammad; Naqvi, Arifa N.; Tabell, Jonna; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Bruford, Michael W.; Kantanen, Juha; Han, Jian-Lin; Li, Meng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Despite much attention, history of sheep (Ovis aries) evolution, including its dating, demographic trajectory and geographic spread, remains controversial. To address these questions, we generated 45 complete and 875 partial mitogenomic sequences, and performed a meta-analysis of these and published ovine mitochondrial DNA sequences (n = 3,229) across Eurasia. We inferred that O. orientalis and O. musimon share the most recent female ancestor with O. aries at approximately 0.790 Ma (95% CI: 0.637–0.934 Ma) during the Middle Pleistocene, substantially predating the domestication event (∼8–11 ka). By reconstructing historical variations in effective population size, we found evidence of a rapid population increase approximately 20–60 ka, immediately before the Last Glacial Maximum. Analyses of lineage expansions showed two sheep migratory waves at approximately 4.5–6.8 ka (lineages A and B: ∼6.4–6.8 ka; C: ∼4.5 ka) across eastern Eurasia, which could have been influenced by prehistoric West–East commercial trade and deliberate mating of domestic and wild sheep, respectively. A continent-scale examination of lineage diversity and approximate Bayesian computation analyses indicated that the Mongolian Plateau region was a secondary center of dispersal, acting as a “transportation hub” in eastern Eurasia: Sheep from the Middle Eastern domestication center were inferred to have migrated through the Caucasus and Central Asia, and arrived in North and Southwest China (lineages A, B, and C) and the Indian subcontinent (lineages B and C) through this region. Our results provide new insights into sheep domestication, particularly with respect to origins and migrations to and from eastern Eurasia. PMID:26085518

  13. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of 78,308 individuals identifies new loci and genes influencing human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniekers, Suzanne; Stringer, Sven; Watanabe, Kyoko; Jansen, Philip R; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Krapohl, Eva; Taskesen, Erdogan; Hammerschlag, Anke R; Okbay, Aysu; Zabaneh, Delilah; Amin, Najaf; Breen, Gerome; Cesarini, David; Chabris, Christopher F; Iacono, William G; Ikram, M Arfan; Johannesson, Magnus; Koellinger, Philipp; Lee, James J; Magnusson, Patrik K E; McGue, Matt; Miller, Mike B; Ollier, William E R; Payton, Antony; Pendleton, Neil; Plomin, Robert; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Posthuma, Danielle

    2017-07-01

    Intelligence is associated with important economic and health-related life outcomes. Despite intelligence having substantial heritability (0.54) and a confirmed polygenic nature, initial genetic studies were mostly underpowered. Here we report a meta-analysis for intelligence of 78,308 individuals. We identify 336 associated SNPs (METAL P analysis indicates the involvement of genes regulating cell development (MAGMA competitive P = 3.5 × 10 -6 ). Despite the well-known difference in twin-based heritability for intelligence in childhood (0.45) and adulthood (0.80), we show substantial genetic correlation (r g = 0.89, LD score regression P = 5.4 × 10 -29 ). These findings provide new insight into the genetic architecture of intelligence.

  14. META - ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ilić

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis is a statistical and analytical method which combines and synthesizes different independent studies and integrates their results into a common result. In the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in meta-analysis from both medical researches and statisticians. One of the main targets of clinical research is to obtain reliable results, although clinical trials with the same topic often give contrasting results. Medical practice is strongly influenced by the results of clinical studies if they are brought to light through important scientific journals. This large amount of information often contains scattered data, and discordant conclusions, and sometimes it is very hard to define the quality and validity of each study. Today, a large number of biomedical journals give importance to articles using meta-analysis in their researches. By using meta-analysis as a method of summarizing, integrating and analyzing a large number of independent studies on the same topic and finally pooling their results into a common result, a researcher can achieve relevant, objective and unbiased conclusions, if the procedure is well-conducted and controlled by the experts. The aim of this paper is to provide the clinical researcher with the basic principles of meta-analysis and its concepts in order to perform a valid clinical study and to report results in the correct way. In today’s evidence-based medical practice, it is crucial for anyone who wants to deal seriously with the scientific work in the biomedical field to learn mathematical and statistical principles that build meta-analysis. In that way, this statistical method could be of great importance to the researcher who wants to respond to new demands of modern medical science.

  15. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  16. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab plus Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Alone to Treat Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cao

    Full Text Available Results from previous randomised controlled trials (RCTs investigating whether the addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC could statistically significantly increase the pathological complete response (pCR and to identify which subgroup would benefit most from such regimens have produced conflicting results. This meta-analysis was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone in the neoadjuvant setting.A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library was performed to identify eligible studies. The primary endpoint of interest was pCR. The secondary endpoints were clinical complete rate (cCR, surgery rate, breast-conserving surgery (BCS rate, and toxicity. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager software version 5.3.Nine RCTs matched the selection criteria, yielding a total of 4967 patients (bevacizumab plus chemotherapy: 50.1%, chemotherapy alone: 49.9%. The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that the addition of bevacizumab to NAC significantly increased the pCR rate (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34 [1.18-1.54]; P < 0.0001 compared with chemotherapy alone. Subgroup analysis showed that the effect of bevacizumab was more pronounced in patients with HER2-negative cancer (OR = 1.34 [1.17-1.54]; P < 0.0001 compared with HER2-positive cancer (OR = 1.69 [0.90-3.20]; P = 0.11. Similarly, in patients with HER2-negative cancer, the effect of bevacizumab was also more pronounced in patients with HR-negative cancer (OR = 1.38 [1.09-1.74]; P = 0.007 compared with HR-positive cancer (OR = 1.36 [0.78-2.35]; P = 0.27. No significant differences were observed between the groups with respect to cCR, surgery rate, or BCS rate. Additionally bevacizumab was associated with a higher incidence of neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and hand-foot syndrome.Higher proportions of patients achieved pCR when bevacizumab was added to NAC compared with

  17. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D.; Andersson, Charlotte; Buch, Stephan; Stender, Stefan; Noordam, Raymond; Weng, Lu-Chen; Weeke, Peter E.; Auer, Paul L.; Boehm, Bernhard; Chen, Constance; Choi, Hyon; Curhan, Gary; Denny, Joshua C.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Eicher, John D.; Ellinghaus, David; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fuchs, Charles; Gala, Manish; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J.; Janssen, Harry L.A.; Kang, Jae H.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Murad, Sarwa Darwish; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric; Rose, Lynda M.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Schafmayer, Clemens; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Uitterlinden, André G; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Wiggs, Janey L.; Zhu, Jun; Roden, Dan M.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Hampe, Jochen; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chan, Andrew T.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims A genome wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of GWASs of individuals of European ancestry with available prior genotype data, to identify additional genetic risk factors for gallstone disease. Methods We obtained per-allele odds ratio (OR) and standard error estimates using age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression models within each of the 10 discovery studies (8720 cases and 55,152 controls). We performed an inverse variance weighted, fixed-effects meta-analysis of study specific estimates to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were independently associated with gallstone disease. Associations were replicated in 6489 cases and 62,797 controls. Results We observed independent associations for 2 SNPs at the ABCG8 locus: rs11887534 (OR = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.86; P=2.44×10−60) and rs4245791 (OR=1.27; P=1.90×10−34). We also identified and/or replicated associations for rs9843304 in TM4SF4 (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.08–1.16; P=6.09×10−11), rs2547231 in SULT2A1 (encodes a sulfo-conjugation enzyme that acts on hydroxysteroids and cholesterol-derived sterol bile acids), (OR=1.17, 95% CI, 1.12– 1.21;P=2.24×10−10), rs1260326 in GCKR (encodes a glucokinase regulator) (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.07–1.17; P=2.55×10−10), and rs6471717 near CYP7A1 (encodes an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of cholesterol to primary bile acids) (OR=1.11; 95% CI, 1.08–1.15; P=8.84×10−9). Among individuals of African American and Hispanic American ancestry, rs11887534 and rs4245791 were positively associated with gallstone disease risk, while the association for the rs1260326 variant was inverse. Conclusions In this large-scale GWAS of gallstone disease, we identified 4 loci in genes that have

  18. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Heid (Iris); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J.C. Randall (Joshua); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); L. Qi (Lu); V. Ssteinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); G. Tthorleifsson (Ggudmar); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); E.K. Sspeliotes (Eelizabeth); R. Mägi (Reedik); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); C.C. White (Charles); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); E. Ingelsson (Erik); C.J. Willer (Cristen); J. Luan; S. Vedantam (Sailaja); T. Eesko (Tõnu); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); S. Li (Shengxu); K.L. Monda (Keri); A.L. Dixon (Anna); C. Holmes (Christopher); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); L. Liang (Liming); J. Min (Josine); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); C. Molony (Cliona); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); E.E. Sschadt (Eeric); K.T. Zondervan (Krina); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); T. Ferreira (Teresa); H.L. Allen; R.J. Weyant (Robert); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); A.R. Wood (Andrew); K. Eestrada (Karol); M.E. Goddard (Michael); G. Lettre (Guillaume); M. Mangino (Massimo); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); S. Purcell (Shaun); A.V. Ssmith; P.M. Visscher (Peter); J. Yang (Joanna); S.A. McCcarroll (Ssteven); J. Nemesh (James); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); D. Absher (Devin); N. Amin (Najaf); T. Aspelund (Thor); L. Coin (Lachlan); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); C. Hayward (Caroline); N. Heard-Ccosta (Nancy); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); M. Kaakinen (Marika); K. Kapur (Karen); S. Ketkar (Shamika); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); P. Kraft (Peter); A. Kraja (Aldi); C. Lamina (Claudia); M.F. Leitzmann (Michael); B. McKknight (Barbara); A.D. Morris (Andrew); K. Oong (Ken); J.R.B. Perry (John); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); O. Polasek (Ozren); I. Prokopenko (Inga); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); N.R. Robertson (Neil); S. Sanna (Serena); U. Sovio (Ulla); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); V. Vitart (Veronique); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); P.S. Chines (Peter); E. Fisher (Eeva); J.R. Kulzer (Jennifer); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); N. Narisu (Narisu); C. Sandholt (Camilla); L.J. Scott (Laura); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Stark (Klaus); M.L. Tammesoo; T.M. Teslovich (Tanya); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); R.P. Welch (Ryan); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); J.O. Jansson; J. Kettunen (Johannes); R. Wlawrence (Robert); N. Pellikka (Niina); M. Perola (Markus); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); H. Alavere (Helene); P. Almgren (Peter); L.D. Atwood (Larry); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R. Biffar (Reiner); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); H. Campbell (Harry); I.N.M. Day (Ian); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dörr (Marcus); P. Eelliott (Paul); M.R. Eerdos (Micheal); J.G. Eeriksson (Johan); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); M. Fu (Mao); S. Gaget (Stefan); E.J.C. Geus (Eco); A.P. Gjesing (Anette); H. Grallert (Harald); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); C.J. Groves (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.L. Hartikainen; N. Hassanali (Neelam); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); K.H. Herzig; A.A. Hicks (Andrew); J. Hui (Jennie); W. Igl (Wilmar); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); A. Jula (Antti); E. Kajantie (Eero); L. Kinnunen (Leena); I. Kolcic (Ivana); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); V. Krzelj (Vjekoslav); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); K. Kvaløy (Kirsti); J. Laitinen (Jaana); O. Lantieri (Olivier); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); M.L. Lokki; R.N. Luben (Robert); B. Ludwig (Barbara); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. McCcarthy (Anne); M.A. Morken (Mario); M. Nelis (Mari); M.J. Neville (Matthew); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); J. Peden (John); I. Pichler (Irene); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); C.P. Platou (Carl); A. Pouta (Anneli); M. Ridderstråle (Martin); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Saramies (Jouko); J. Sinisalo (Juha); J.H. Smit (Jan); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); M. Teder-Llaving (Maris); B. Thomson (Brian); G. Usala; J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); G.J. van Ommen (Gert); V. Vatin (Vincent); C.B. Volpato; H. Wallaschofski (Henri); G.B. Walters (Bragi); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); D.R. Witte (Deniel); L. Zgaga (Lina); P. Zitting (Paavo); J.P. Beilby (John); A. James (Alan); M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Palmer (Cameron); O. Raitakari (Olli); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Viikari (Jorma); B. Balkau (Beverley); Y. Ben-Shlomo; R.N. Bergman (Richard); H. Boeing (Heiner); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); S. Eebrahim (Shah); P. Froguel (Philippe); T. Hansen (Torben); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); K. Hveem (Kristian); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Jørgensen (Torben); F. Karpe (Fredrik); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Laakso (Markku); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Marre (Michel); T. Meitinger (Thomas); A. Metspalu (Andres); K. Midthjell (Kristian); O. Pedersen (Oluf); V. Salomaa (Veikko); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); T.T. Valle (Timo); N.J. Wareham (Nick); A.M. Arnold (Alice); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G. Eeiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A. Hofman (Albert); F.B. Hu (Frank); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); M.R. Järvelin; W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); L.J. Launer (Lenore); P. Munroe (Patricia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); T. Quertermous (Thomas); A. Rissanen (Aila); I. Rudan (Igor); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A.C. Syvanen; M. Uda (Manuela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Vollenweider (Peter); J.F. Wilson (James); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A.F. Wright (Alan); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunians (Talin); D.J. Hunter (David); K.E. North (Kari); J.R. O'Cconnell (Jeffrey); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); D. Schlessinger; D.P. Strachan (David); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K. Stefansson (Kari); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); I. Barroso (Inês); C.S. Fox (Caroline); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWaist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association

  19. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; den Heijer, Martin; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Doerr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R.; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O'Connell, Jeff; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Campbell, Harry; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Muenzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian; Dorr, M.; Munzel, T.; Volker, U.

    Background-Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.

  20. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heid, Iris M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Randall, Joshua C.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M. Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Maegi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Luan, Jianan; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tonu; Kilpelaeinen, Tuomas O.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L.; Dixon, Anna L.; Holmes, Christopher C.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Allen, Hana Lango; Weyant, Robert J.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E.; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R.; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M.; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A.; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F.; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T.; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F.; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R.; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proenca, Christine; Chines, Peter S.; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M.; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N. M.; Dei, Mariano; Doerr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J. C.; Gjesing, Anette P.; Grallert, Harald; Graessler, Juergen; Groves, Christopher J.; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Pichler, Irene; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstrale, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; James, Alan L.; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Toenjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jorgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Arnold, Alice M.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W. H. Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Oostra, Ben; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, Andre; Voelzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Wright, Alan F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; North, Kari E.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Stefansson, Kari; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Barroso, Ines; McCarthy, Mark I.; Fox, Caroline S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.

    2010-01-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR

  1. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1...

  2. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I.-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, Joellen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; van den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of

  3. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Deelen (Joris); M. Beekman (Marian); H.-W. Uh (Hae-Won); L. Broer (Linda); K.L. Ayers (Kristin); Q. Tan (Qihua); Y. Kamatani (Yoichiro); A.M. Bennet (Anna Michaela); R. Tamm (Riin); S. Trompet (Stella); D.F. Guobjartsson (Daníel); F. Flachsbart (Friederike); G. Rose (Giuseppina); A. Viktorin (Alexander); K. Fischer (Krista); M. Nygaard (Marianne); H.J. Cordell (Heather); P. Crocco (Paolina); E.B. van den Akker (Erik); S. Böhringer (Stefan); Q. Helmer (Quinta); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); G.I. Saunders (Gary); M. Alver (Maris); K. Andersen-Ranberg (Karen); G. Breen (Gerome); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); A. Caliebe (Amke); Y. Capri (Yline); E. Cevenini (Elisa); J.C. Collerton (Joanna); S. Dato (Serena); K. Davies (Karen); I. Ford (Ian); J. Gampe (Jutta); P. Garagnani (Paolo); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); J. Harrow (Jennifer); D. van Heemst (Diana); B.T. Heijmans (Bastiaan); F.-A. Heinsen (Femke-Anouska); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); B. Jeune (Bernard); P.V. Jonsson (Palmi); M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Lechner (Doris); C. Martin-Ruiz (Carmen); S.E. Mcnerlan (Susan); E. Mihailov (Evelin); A. Montesanto (Alberto); S.P. Mooijaart (Simon); A. Murphy (Anne); C. Nohr (Christian); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); D. Postmus (Douwe); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); O.A. Ross (Owen); S. Salvioli (Stefano); N. Sattar (Naveed); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Stefansson (Hreinn); D.J. Stott (David. J.); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); P. Galan (Pilar); H.G. Sorensen; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); D. Rea (Dan); G. Passarino (Giuseppe); A.J. de Craen (Anton); K. Christensen (Kaare); A. Nebel (Almut); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Metspalu (Andres); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); H. Blanché (Hélène); L. Christiansen (Lene); J.M. Kirkwood (John); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C. Franceschi (Claudio); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); P.E. Slagboom (Eline)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ~25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of

  4. Meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies identifies multiple new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; McGlynn, Katherine A; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Bishop, D Timothy; Chung, Charles C; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Greene, Mark H; Gupta, Ramneek; Grotmol, Tom; Haugen, Trine B; Karlsson, Robert; Litchfield, Kevin; Mitra, Nandita; Nielsen, Kasper; Pyle, Louise C; Schwartz, Stephen M; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Wiklund, Fredrik; Turnbull, Clare; Chanock, Stephen J; Kanetsky, Peter A; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2017-07-01

    The international Testicular Cancer Consortium (TECAC) combined five published genome-wide association studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT; 3,558 cases and 13,970 controls) to identify new susceptibility loci. We conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis, including, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the X chromosome. Eight new loci mapping to 2q14.2, 3q26.2, 4q35.2, 7q36.3, 10q26.13, 15q21.3, 15q22.31, and Xq28 achieved genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 -8 ). Most loci harbor biologically plausible candidate genes. We refined previously reported associations at 9p24.3 and 19p12 by identifying one and three additional independent SNPs, respectively. In aggregate, the 39 independent markers identified to date explain 37% of father-to-son familial risk, 8% of which can be attributed to the 12 new signals reported here. Our findings substantially increase the number of known TGCT susceptibility alleles, move the field closer to a comprehensive understanding of the underlying genetic architecture of TGCT, and provide further clues to the etiology of TGCT.

  5. Meta-analysis of IDH-mutant cancers identifies EBF1 as an interaction partner for TET2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhamon, Paul; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Halai, Dina; Wilson, Gareth A; Feber, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gomez, Valenti; Hergovich, Alexander; Tirabosco, Roberto; Fernanda Amary, M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Jundt, Gernot; Ross, Mark T; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Beck, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes 1 and 2 are frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and chondrosarcoma (CS). For AML, low-grade glioma and CC, mutant IDH status is associated with a DNA hypermethylation phenotype, implicating altered epigenome dynamics in the aetiology of these cancers. Here we show that the IDH variants in CS are also associated with a hypermethylation phenotype and display increased production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, supporting the role of mutant IDH-produced 2-hydroxyglutarate as an inhibitor of TET-mediated DNA demethylation. Meta-analysis of the acute myeloid leukaemia, low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma and CS methylation data identifies cancer-specific effectors within the retinoic acid receptor activation pathway among the hypermethylated targets. By analysing sequence motifs surrounding hypermethylated sites across the four cancer types, and using chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting, we identify the transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) as an interaction partner for TET2, suggesting a sequence-specific mechanism for regulating DNA methylation.

  6. A Meta-analysis of Multiple Myeloma Risk Regions in African and European Ancestry Populations Identifies Putatively Functional Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kristin A; Song, Chi; Dean, Eric; Serie, Daniel J; Curtin, Karen; Sheng, Xin; Hu, Donglei; Huff, Carol Ann; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Tomasson, Michael H; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Singhal, Seema; Pawlish, Karen; Peters, Edward S; Bock, Cathryn H; Stram, Alex; Van Den Berg, David J; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Zimmerman, Todd; Hwang, Amie E; Huntsman, Scott; Graff, John; Nooka, Ajay; Kong, Yinfei; Pregja, Silvana L; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chu, Lisa; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Lieber, Michael R; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hsing, Ann W; Mehta, Jayesh; Kittles, Rick A; Kolb, Suzanne; Klein, Eric A; Leske, Cristina; Murphy, Adam B; Nemesure, Barbara; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Strom, Sara S; Vij, Ravi; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Signorello, Lisa B; Witte, John S; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bhatti, Parveen; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Olshan, Andrew F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah J; Bandera, Elisa V; Birmann, Brenda M; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha J; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Jones, Brandt; Tricot, Guido; Martin, Thomas G; Kumar, Shaji K; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Deming Halverson, Sandra L; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chanock, Stephen J; Slager, Susan L; Severson, Richard K; Janakiraman, Nalini; Terebelo, Howard R; Brown, Elizabeth E; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mohrbacher, Ann F; Colditz, Graham A; Giles, Graham G; Spinelli, John J; Chiu, Brian C; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Levy, Joan; Zonder, Jeffrey A; Orlowski, Robert Z; Lonial, Sagar; Camp, Nicola J; Vachon, Celine M; Ziv, Elad; Stram, Daniel O; Hazelett, Dennis J; Haiman, Christopher A; Cozen, Wendy

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European populations have identified genetic risk variants associated with multiple myeloma. We performed association testing of common variation in eight regions in 1,318 patients with multiple myeloma and 1,480 controls of European ancestry and 1,305 patients with multiple myeloma and 7,078 controls of African ancestry and conducted a meta-analysis to localize the signals, with epigenetic annotation used to predict functionality. We found that variants in 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1 were statistically significantly (P ancestry and persons of European ancestry, and the variant in 3p22.1 was associated in European ancestry only. In a combined African ancestry-European ancestry meta-analysis, variation in five regions (2p23.3, 3p22.1, 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1) was statistically significantly associated with multiple myeloma risk. In 3p22.1, the correlated variants clustered within the gene body of ULK4 Correlated variants in 7p15.3 clustered around an enhancer at the 3' end of the CDCA7L transcription termination site. A missense variant at 17p11.2 (rs34562254, Pro251Leu, OR, 1.32; P = 2.93 × 10 -7 ) in TNFRSF13B encodes a lymphocyte-specific protein in the TNF receptor family that interacts with the NF-κB pathway. SNPs correlated with the index signal in 22q13.1 cluster around the promoter and enhancer regions of CBX7 CONCLUSIONS: We found that reported multiple myeloma susceptibility regions contain risk variants important across populations, supporting the use of multiple racial/ethnic groups with different underlying genetic architecture to enhance the localization and identification of putatively functional alleles. A subset of reported risk loci for multiple myeloma has consistent effects across populations and is likely to be functional. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(12); 1609-18. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pharoah, P.D.; Tsai, Y.Y.; Ramus, S.J.; Phelan, C.M.; Goode, E.L.; Lawrenson, K.; Buckley, M.; Fridley, B.L.; Tyrer, J.P.; Shen, H.; Weber, R.; Karevan, R.; Larson, M.C.; Song, H.; Tessier, D.C.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; Cunningham, J.M.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Armasu, S.M.; Baglietto, L.; Bandera, E.V.; Beckmann, M.W.; Birrer, M.J.; Bloom, G.; Bogdanova, N.; Brenton, J.D.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Brown, R.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.; Carney, M.E.; Carvalho, R.S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chen, Y.A.; Chen, Z.; Chow, W.H.; Cicek, M.S.; Coetzee, G.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cybulski, C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Despierre, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Durst, M.; Eccles, D.; Edwards, R.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fenstermacher, D.; Flanagan, J.; Gao, Y.T.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.; Gjyshi, A.; Gore, M.; Gronwald, J.; Guo, Q.; Halle, M.K.; Harter, P.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hillemanns, P.; Hoatlin, M.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.K.; Hosono, S.; Jakubowska, A.; Jensen, A.; Kalli, K.R.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kjaer, S.K.; Konecny, G.E.; Krakstad, C.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, N.; Lee, J. van der; Leminen, A.; Lim, B.K.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Lurie, G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Altena, A.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top

  8. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-analysis across 32 Studies Identifies Multiple Lipid Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E.; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F. L.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N.; Tischfield, Sam E.; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A.; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dejong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E.; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G.; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V.; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Post, Wendy S.; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C.; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Topol, Eric J.; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L.; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N. M.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaess, Bernhard M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Murray, Sarah S.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Whitfield, John B.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wilson, James G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C.; Keating, Brendan J.; Drenos, Fotios; de Boer, Rudolf; Hillege, Hans; van der Klauw, Melanie; Navis, Gerjan; Ormel, Hans; Postma, Dirkje; Rosmalen, Judith; Slaets, Joris; Stolk, Ronald; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; Alizadeh, Behrooz; Boezen, Marike; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Festen, Noortje; Franke, Lude; Snieder, Harold

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total

  9. 1000 Genomes-based meta-analysis identifies 10 novel loci for kidney function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorski, Mathias; Van der Most, Peter J.; Teumer, Alexander; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Nolte, Ilja M.; Cocca, Massimiliano; Taliun, Daniel; Gomez, Felicia; Li, Yong; Tayo, Bamidele; Tin, Adrienne; Feitosa, Mary F.; Aspelund, Thor; Attia, John; Biffar, Reiner; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chouraki, Vincent; Ciullo, Marina; Coresh, Josef; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Curhan, Gary C.; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Dehghan, Abbas; Dengler, Laura; Ding, Jingzhong; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Endlich, Karlhans; Enroth, Stefan; Esko, Tonu; Franco, Oscar H.; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Girotto, Giorgia; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hancock, Stephen J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Helmer, Catherine; Hoellerer, Simon; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Huth, Cornelia; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Imboden, Medea; Johansson, Asa; Kahonen, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraemer, Holly; Kramer, Bernhard K.; Kumar, Ashish; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; de Borst, Martin; Navis, Gerjan; Swertz, Morris; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Lu, Yingchang; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; McEvoy, Mark A.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Metzger, Marie; Mihailov, Evelin; Mitchell, Paul; Nauck, Matthias; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pistis, Giorgio; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rettig, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Ruggiero, Daniela; Saba, Yasaman; Sala, Cinzia; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Scott, Rodney J.; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Smith, Albert V.; Sorice, Rossella; Stengel, Benedicte; Stracke, Sylvia; Strauch, Konstantin; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Viikari, Jorma S.; Voelker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Voelzke, Henry; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Jie Jin; Yang, Qiong; Chasman, Daniel I.; Tromp, Gerard; Snieder, Harold; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.; Koettgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Boeger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    HapMap imputed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed > 50 loci at which common variants with minor allele frequency > 5% are associated with kidney function. GWAS using more complete reference sets for imputation, such as those from The 1000 Genomes project, promise to identify novel

  10. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. de Vries (Paul); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M. Sabater-Lleal (Maria); M.-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer E.); M. Steri (Maristella); W. Tang (Weihong); A. Teumer (Alexander); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); V. Grossmann (Vera); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Trompet (Stella); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); J. Brody (Jennifer); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); X. Guo (Xiuqing); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); P. Auer (Paul); J. Attia (John); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); J. Lahti (Jari); C. Venturini (Cristina); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Rocanin-Arjo (Ares); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Navarro (Pau); L.M. Rose (Lynda); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); H. Riess (Helene); J. Mazur (Johanna); S. Basu (Saonli); A. Goel (Anuj); Q. Yang (Qiong); M. Ghanbari (Mohsen); Gonnekewillemsen; A. Rumley (Ann); E. Fiorillo (Edoardo); A.J. de Craen (Anton); A. Grotevendt (Anne); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.D. Taylor (Kent D.); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); J. Yao (Jie); A. Kifley (Annette); C. Kooperberg (Charles); Q. Qayyum (Rehan); L. Lopez (Lornam); T.L. Berentzen (Tina L.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); Massimomangino; S. Bandinelli (Stefania); P.A. Peyser (Patricia A.); S. Wild (Sarah); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); A.F. Wright (Alan); J. Marten (Jonathan); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); B. Sennblad (Bengt); G.H. Tofler (Geoffrey); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G.D. Lowe (Gordon D.); M. Zoledziewska (Magdalena); N. Sattar (Naveed); H. Binder (Harald); U. Völker (Uwe); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); K.-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); B. McKnight (Barbara); J. Huang (Jian); N.S. Jenny (Nancy); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); L. Qi (Lihong); M.G. Mcevoy (Mark G.); D.M. Becker (Diane); J.M. Starr (John); A.-P. Sarin; P.G. Hysi (Pirro); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); H. Campbell (Harry); A. Hamsten (Anders); F. Sarin (Fernando); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); P. Eline Slagboom; T. Zeller (Tanja); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); B. Psaty (Brucem); T. Haritunians (Talin); J. Liu (Jingmin); A. Palotie (Aarno); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D.J. Stott (David J.); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); O. Polasek (Ozren); I. Rudan (Igor); P.-E. Morange (P.); J.F. Wilson (James F.); S.L. Kardia (Sharon L.r); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Hansen (Torben); I.J. Deary (Ian); L.C. Becker (Lewis); R.J. Scott (Rodney); P. Mitchell (Paul); W. März (Winfried); N.J. Wareham (Nick J.); A. Peters (Annette); A. Greinacher (Andreas); P.S. Wild (Philipp S.); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret I.); C. Hayward (Caroline); F. Cucca (Francesco); R.P. Tracy (Russell); H. Watkins (Hugh); A.P. Reiner (Alex P.); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher J.); N.L. Smith (Nicholas L.); D.P. Strachan (David P.); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes

  12. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. W...

  13. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Chen, Fei; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  14. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A.; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G.; Chung, Charles C.; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J.; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J. Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H.; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J.; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T.; Lee, I.-Min; Lemarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L.; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Oberg, Ann L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V.; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P.; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; van den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  15. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, Paul; Chasman, Daniel; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels.We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ~120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participant...

  16. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    associations close to genome-wide significance and identified three loci newly associated with risk: two loci associated with all EOC subtypes at 8q21 (rs11782652, P = 5.5 × 10−9) and 10p12 (rs1243180, P = 1.8 × 10−8) and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210, P = 8.1 × 10...

  17. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  18. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Kerns

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08–4.69, p-value 4.16 × 10−8 and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90–3.86, p-value = 3.21 × 10−8. These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling.

  19. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Sarah L; Dorling, Leila; Fachal, Laura; Bentzen, Søren; Pharoah, Paul D P; Barnes, Daniel R; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Carballo, Ana M; Dearnaley, David P; Peleteiro, Paula; Gulliford, Sarah L; Hall, Emma; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carracedo, Ángel; Sia, Michael; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N; Sydes, Matthew R; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Parliament, Matthew; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; Barnett, Gillian C; West, Catharine M L

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-4.69, p-value 4.16×10(-8)) and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90-3.86, p-value=3.21×10(-8)). These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling. Copyright © 2016 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2018-02-08

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10 -8 ). Replication of 10 promising signals in up to 2737 patients and 4752 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium yields new genome-wide significant loci: rs13303010 at 1p36.33 (NOC2L, P = 8.36 × 10 -14 ), rs2941471 at 8q21.11 (HNF4G, P = 6.60 × 10 -10 ), rs4795218 at 17q12 (HNF1B, P = 1.32 × 10 -8 ), and rs1517037 at 18q21.32 (GRP, P = 3.28 × 10 -8 ). rs78417682 is not statistically significantly associated with pancreatic cancer in PANDoRA. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in three independent pancreatic data sets provides molecular support of NOC2L as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene.

  1. Identifying placebo responders and predictors of response in osteoarthritis: a protocol for individual patient data meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of osteoarthritis (OA is unsatisfactory, as most treatments are not clinically effective over placebo and most drugs have considerable side effects. On average, 75 % of the analgesic effect from OA treatments in clinical trials can be attributed to a placebo response, and this response varies greatly from patient to patient. This individual patient data (IPD meta-analysis aims to identify placebo responders and the potential determinants of the placebo response in OA. Methods This study is undertaken in conjunction with the OA Trial Bank, an ongoing international consortium aiming to collect IPD from randomised controlled trials (RCTs for all treatments of OA. RCTs for each treatment of OA have been systematically searched for, and authors of the relevant trials have been contacted to request the IPD. We will use the IPD of placebo-controlled RCTs held by the OA Trial Bank for this project. The IPD in placebo groups will be used to investigate the placebo response according to the minimum clinically important difference (MCID threshold (e.g. 20 % pain reduction. Responders to placebo will be compared with non-responders to identify predictors of response. The quality of the trials will be assessed and potential determinants will be examined using multilevel logistic regression analyses. Discussion This study explores the varying magnitude of the placebo response and the proportion of participants that experience a clinically important placebo effect in OA RCTs. Potential determinants of the placebo response will also be investigated. These determinants may be useful for future studies as it may allow participants to be stratified into groups based on their likely response to placebo. The results of this study may also be useful for pharmaceutical companies, who could improve the design of their studies in order to separate the specific treatment from the non-specific contextual (i.e. placebo effects. Systematic

  2. A Meta-analysis of Carbon Nanoparticles for Identifying Lymph Nodes and Protecting Parathyroid Glands during Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Jian, Wen-Hua; Guo, Zhu-Ming; Li, Qiu-Li; Lin, Shao-Jian; Huang, Hai-Yan

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the ability of carbon nanoparticles (CNs) to identify lymph nodes and protect parathyroid glands during thyroid cancer surgery. English and Chinese literature in PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the China Biology Medicine Database, the China Master's and Doctoral Theses Full-Text Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the WANFANG database, and the Cqvip database (from January 2009 to July 2014). Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials or nonrandomized controlled trials for thyroidectomy and central neck dissections that compared the use of CNs with methylene blue or a blank control in patients undergoing initial thyroid cancer surgery. The primary outcomes were the number of retrieved central lymph nodes and the accidental parathyroid removal rate. This meta-analysis identified 11 randomized controlled trials and 4 nonrandomized controlled trials comprising 1055 patients. Compared with the outcomes of the blank controls, the use of CNs resulted in an average of 2.71 more lymph nodes removed per patient (weighted mean difference = 2.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68-3.74, P parathyroid removal (odds ratio = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.10-0.54, P = .0008), and similarly reduced rates of transient hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia. Compared with methylene blue, the use of CNs resulted in an average of 1.50 more lymph nodes removed per patient (weighted mean difference = 1.50, 95% CI = 0.11-2.89, P = .03) and a 5% reduction in the rate of accidental parathyroid removal (odds ratio = 0.05, 95% CI = 0.01-0.29, P = .0007). CNs partially improve the extent and accuracy of neck dissection and preserve the normal anatomic structure and physiologic function of the parathyroid glands during thyroid cancer surgery. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  3. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of 78,308 individuals identifies new loci and genes influencing human intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sniekers, Suzanne; Stringer, Sven; Watanabe, Kyoko; Jansen, Philip R; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Krapohl, Eva; Taskesen, Erdogan; Hammerschlag, Anke R; Okbay, Aysu; Zabaneh, Delilah; Amin, Najaf; Breen, Gerome; Cesarini, David; Chabris, Christopher F; Iacono, William G; Ikram, M Arfan; Johannesson, Magnus; Koellinger, Philipp; Lee, James J; Magnusson, Patrik K E; McGue, Matt; Miller, Mike B; Ollier, William E R; Payton, Antony; Pendleton, Neil; Plomin, Robert; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Posthuma, Danielle

    Intelligence is associated with important economic and health-related life outcomes. Despite intelligence having substantial heritability (0.54) and a confirmed polygenic nature, initial genetic studies were mostly underpowered. Here we report a meta-analysis for intelligence of 78,308 individuals.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Springelkamp (Henriët); R. Höhn (René); A. Mishra (Aniket); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); C.C. Khor; S.J. Loomis (Stephanie J.); J.N.C. Bailey (Jessica N. Cooke); J. Gibson (Jane); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.F. Janssen (Sarah); X. Luo (Xiaoyan); W.D. Ramdas (Wishal); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); M.E. Nongpiur (Monisha E.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); L. Xu (Liang); J.E. Mountain (Jenny E.); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); Y. Lu (Yi); N. Amin (Najaf); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); K.S. Sim; E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); A.I. Iglesias González (Adriana); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); M.A. Hauser (Michael); S.-C. Loon (Seng-Chee); D.D.G. Despriet (Dominique); A. Nag (Abhishek); C. Venturini (Cristina); P.G. Sanfilippo (Paul G.); A. Schillert (Arne); J.H. Kang (Jae H.); J. Landers (John); F. Jonasson (Fridbert); A.J. Cree (Angela); L.M.E. van Koolwijk (Leonieke); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); V. Jonsson (Vesteinn); G. Menon (Geeta); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); E. Rochtchina (Elena); J. Attia (John); R. Scott (Rodney); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); P.N. Baird (Paul); J. Xie (Jing); M. Inouye (Michael); A.C. Viswanathan (Ananth); X. Sim (Xueling); R.N. Weinreb (Robert N.); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Ennis (Sarah); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); H.G. Lemij (Hans); E.S. Tai (Shyong); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); T. Aung (Tin); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.E. Craig (Jamie); S. MacGregor (Stuart); D.A. Mackey (David); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); T.L. Young (Terri); J.L. Wiggs (Janey); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); L.R. Pasquale (Louis); A.W. Hewit (Alex); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C.J. Hammond (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractGlaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriet; Hoehn, Rene; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Montgomery, GrantW.; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hauser, Michael A.; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H.; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J.; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Spector, Timothy D.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Lemij, Hans G.; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Jonas, Jost B.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Young, Terri L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R.; Hewitt, Alex W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  7. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Q.; Verhoeven, V.J.; Wojciechowski, R.; Barathi, V.A.; Hysi, P.G.; Guggenheim, J.A.; Hohn, R.; Vitart, V.; Khawaja, A.P.; Yamashiro, K.; Hosseini, S.M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lu, Y.; Haller, T.; Xie, J.; Delcourt, C; Pirastu, M.; Wedenoja, J.; Gharahkhani, P.; Venturini, C.; Miyake, M.; Hewitt, A.W.; Guo, X.; Mazur, J.; Huffman, J.E.; Williams, K.M.; Polasek, O.; Campbell, H.; Rudan, I.; Vatavuk, Z.; Wilson, J.F.; Joshi, P.K.; McMahon, G.; St Pourcain, B.; Evans, D.M.; Simpson, C.L.; Schwantes-An, T.H.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Mirshahi, A.; Cougnard-Gregoire, A.; Bellenguez, C.; Blettner, M.; Raitakari, O.; Kahonen, M.; Seppala, I.; Zeller, T.; Meitinger, T.; Ried, J.S.; Gieger, C.; Portas, L.; Leeuwen, E.M. van; Amin, N.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.; Wang, Y.X.; Wang, X.; Boh, E.T.H.; Ikram, M.K.; Sabanayagam, C.; Gupta, P.; Tan, V.; Zhou, L; Ho, C.E.; Lim, W.; Beuerman, R.W.; Siantar, R.; Tai, E.S.; Vithana, E.; Mihailov, E.; Khor, C.C.; Hayward, C.; Luben, R.N.; Foster, P.J.; Klein, B.E.; Klein, R.; Wong, H.S.; Mitchell, P.; Metspalu, A.; Aung, T.; Young, T.L.; He, M.; Parssinen, O.; Duijn, C.M. van; Wang, J.J.; Williams, C.; Jonas, J.B.; Teo, Y.Y.; Mackey, D.A.; Oexle, K.; Yoshimura, N.; Paterson, A.D.; Pfeiffer, N.; Wong, T.Y.; Baird, P.N.; Stambolian, D.; Wilson, J.E.; Cheng, C.Y.; Hammond, C.J.; Klaver, C.C.W.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main

  8. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Fan (Qiao); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); R. Wojciechowski (Robert); V.A. Barathi (Veluchamy); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); J. Guggenheim (Jean); R. Höhn (René); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.P. Khawaja (Anthony P.); K. Yamashiro (Kenji); S.M. Hosseini (S Mohsen); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Lu (Yi); T. Haller (Toomas); J. Xie (Jing); C. Delcourt (Cécile); M. Pirastu (Mario); J. Wedenoja (Juho); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); C. Venturini (Cristina); M. Miyake (Masahiro); A.W. Hewit (Alex); X. Guo (Xiaobo); J. Mazur (Johanna); J.E. Huffman (Jenifer E.); K.M. Williams (Katie M.); O. Polasek (Ozren); H. Campbell (Harry); I. Rudan (Igor); Z. Vatavuk (Zoran); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.K. Joshi (Peter); G. Mcmahon (George); B. St Pourcain (Beate); D.M. Evans (David); C.L. Simpson (Claire); T.-H. Schwantes-An (Tae-Hwi); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); A. Cougnard-Grégoire (Audrey); C. Bellenguez (Céline); M. Blettner (Maria); O. Raitakari (Olli); M. Kähönen (Mika); I. Seppälä (Ilkka); T. Zeller (Tanja); T. Meitinger (Thomas); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Gieger (Christian); L. Portas (Laura); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); N. Amin (Najaf); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y. Wang (Ying); X. Wang (Xu); E. Tai-Hui Boh (Eileen); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); C. Sabanayagam (Charumathi); P. Gupta (Preeti); V. Tan (Vincent); L. Zhou (Lei); C.E.H. Ho (Candice E. H.); W. Lim (Wan'E); R.W. Beuerman (Roger W.); R. Siantar (Rosalynn); E.-S. Tai (E-Shyong); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); E. Mihailov (Evelin); C.C. Khor; C. Hayward (Caroline); R.N. Luben (Robert); P.J. Foster (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); R. Klein (Ronald); H.-S. Wong (Hoi-Suen); P. Mitchell (Paul); A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Aung (Tin); T.L. Young (Terri L.); M. He (Mingguang); O. Pärssinen (Olavi); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J. Jin Wang (Jie); C. Williams (Cathy); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); D.A. Mackey (David); K. Oexle (Konrad); N. Yoshimura; A.D. Paterson (Andrew D.); N. Pfeiffer (Norbert); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); P.N. Baird (Paul); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.E.B. Wilson (Joan E. Bailey); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); C.J. Hammond (Christopher J.); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.S. Rahi (Jugnoo); J.-F. Korobelnik (Jean-François); J.P. Kemp (John); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); G.D. Smith; J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn P.); R. Fogarty (Rhys); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.Y. Chew (Emily); S. Janmahasatian (Sarayut); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S. MacGregor (Stuart); L. Xu (Liang); M. Schache (Maria); M. Nangia (Monika); S. Panda-Jonas (Songhomitra); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.R. Fondran (Jeremy R.); J.H. Lass (Jonathan H.); S. Feng (Sheng); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); K.T. Khaw; N.J. Wareham (Nick); T. Rantanen (Taina); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); C.P. Pang (Chi Pui); L.J. Chen (Li Jia); P.O. Tam (Pancy O.); V. Jhanji (Vishal); A.L. Young (Alvin L.); A. Döring (Angela); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); M.-F. Cotch (Mary-Frances); X. Li (Xiaohui); S.P. Yip (Shea Ping); M.K.H. Yap (Maurice K.H.); G. Biino (Ginevra); S. Vaccargiu (Simona); M. Fossarello (Maurizio); B. Fleck (Brian); S. Yazar (Seyhan); J.W.L. Tideman (J. Willem L.); M. Tedja (Milly); T. Léveillard (Thierry); M.A. Morrison (Margaux A.); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); X. Zhou (Xiangtian); W. Chen (Wei); N. Mizuki (Nobuhisa); A. Meguro (Akira); K.M. Makela (Kari Matti)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Montgomery, Grant W; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Iglesias, Adriana I; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hauser, Michael A; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Lotery, Andrew J; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A B; Young, Terri L; Wiggs, Janey L; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important

  10. The ability of clinical balance measures to identify falls risk in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gillian; Comber, Laura; Galvin, Rose; Coote, Susan

    2017-12-01

    To determine the ability of clinical measures of balance to distinguish fallers from non-fallers and to determine their predictive validity in identifying those at risk of falls. AMED, CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, PubMed Central and Google Scholar. First search: July 2015. Final search: October 2017. Inclusion criteria were studies of adults with a definite multiple sclerosis diagnosis, a clinical balance assessment and method of falls recording. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 scale and the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Statistical analysis was conducted for the cross-sectional studies using Review Manager 5. The mean difference with 95% confidence interval in balance outcomes between fallers and non-fallers was used as the mode of analysis. We included 33 studies (19 cross-sectional, 5 randomised controlled trials, 9 prospective) with a total of 3901 participants, of which 1917 (49%) were classified as fallers. The balance measures most commonly reported were the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go and Falls Efficacy Scale International. Meta-analysis demonstrated fallers perform significantly worse than non-fallers on all measures analysed except the Timed Up and Go Cognitive ( p Balance Confidence Scale had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value (0.92), but without reporting corresponding measures of clinical utility. Clinical measures of balance differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers but have poor predictive ability for falls risk in people with multiple sclerosis.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2017-01-01

    studies (GWAS). Through a meta-analysis of 6 GWAS datasets and a validation study totalling 10,204 cases and 107,766 controls we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches we observed no new...

  12. Identifying Generalizable Image Segmentation Parameters for Urban Land Cover Mapping through Meta-Analysis and Regression Tree Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Johnson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of very high resolution (VHR satellite imagery and the development of Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA have led to many new opportunities for fine-scale land cover mapping, especially in urban areas. Image segmentation is an important step in the GEOBIA framework, so great time/effort is often spent to ensure that computer-generated image segments closely match real-world objects of interest. In the remote sensing community, segmentation is frequently performed using the multiresolution segmentation (MRS algorithm, which is tuned through three user-defined parameters (the scale, shape/color, and compactness/smoothness parameters. The scale parameter (SP is the most important parameter and governs the average size of generated image segments. Existing automatic methods to determine suitable SPs for segmentation are scene-specific and often computationally intensive, so an approach to estimating appropriate SPs that is generalizable (i.e., not scene-specific could speed up the GEOBIA workflow considerably. In this study, we attempted to identify generalizable SPs for five common urban land cover types (buildings, vegetation, roads, bare soil, and water through meta-analysis and nonlinear regression tree (RT modeling. First, we performed a literature search of recent studies that employed GEOBIA for urban land cover mapping and extracted the MRS parameters used, the image properties (i.e., spatial and radiometric resolutions, and the land cover classes mapped. Using this data extracted from the literature, we constructed RT models for each land cover class to predict suitable SP values based on the: image spatial resolution, image radiometric resolution, shape/color parameter, and compactness/smoothness parameter. Based on a visual and quantitative analysis of results, we found that for all land cover classes except water, relatively accurate SPs could be identified using our RT modeling results. The main advantage of our

  13. Meta-analysis of 28,141 individuals identifies common variants within five new loci that influence uric acid concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kolz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated serum uric acid levels cause gout and are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To investigate the polygenetic basis of serum uric acid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans from 14 studies totalling 28,141 participants of European descent, resulting in identification of 954 SNPs distributed across nine loci that exceeded the threshold of genome-wide significance, five of which are novel. Overall, the common variants associated with serum uric acid levels fall in the following nine regions: SLC2A9 (p = 5.2x10(-201, ABCG2 (p = 3.1x10(-26, SLC17A1 (p = 3.0x10(-14, SLC22A11 (p = 6.7x10(-14, SLC22A12 (p = 2.0x10(-9, SLC16A9 (p = 1.1x10(-8, GCKR (p = 1.4x10(-9, LRRC16A (p = 8.5x10(-9, and near PDZK1 (p = 2.7x10(-9. Identified variants were analyzed for gender differences. We found that the minor allele for rs734553 in SLC2A9 has greater influence in lowering uric acid levels in women and the minor allele of rs2231142 in ABCG2 elevates uric acid levels more strongly in men compared to women. To further characterize the identified variants, we analyzed their association with a panel of metabolites. rs12356193 within SLC16A9 was associated with DL-carnitine (p = 4.0x10(-26 and propionyl-L-carnitine (p = 5.0x10(-8 concentrations, which in turn were associated with serum UA levels (p = 1.4x10(-57 and p = 8.1x10(-54, respectively, forming a triangle between SNP, metabolites, and UA levels. Taken together, these associations highlight additional pathways that are important in the regulation of serum uric acid levels and point toward novel potential targets for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat hyperuricemia. In addition, these findings strongly support the hypothesis that transport proteins are key in regulating serum uric acid levels.

  14. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Optic Disc Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Höhn, René; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Koh, Victor; Yazar, Seyhan; Xu, Liang; Forward, Hannah; Kearns, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common optic neuropathy and an important cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The optic nerve head or optic disc is divided in two parts: a central cup (without nerve fibers) surrounded by the neuroretinal rim (containing axons of the retinal ganglion cells). The International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies consisting of 17,248 individuals of European ancestry and 6,841 individuals of Asia...

  15. Risk of adverse events with the addition of targeted agents to endocrine therapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Samuel; Bruzzone, Marco; Ceppi, Marcello; Maurer, Christian; Ponde, Noam Falbel; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Viglietti, Giulia; Del Mastro, Lucia; Prady, Catherine; de Azambuja, Evandro; Lambertini, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Combining targeted agents and endocrine therapy (ET) improves outcomes in hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients but increases the risk of adverse events (AEs). This meta-analysis aims to estimate the comparative risk of AEs with ET in addition to targeted agents in this setting. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and conference proceedings up to July 17th 2017 was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials investigating ET with or without CDK4/6, mTOR, PI3K inhibitors and anti-HER2 agents. We calculated summary risk estimates (odds ratio, OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each AE within each class of targeted agents for each trial, and pooled analysis using the random and fixed effect models. Sixteen studies (n=8529 patients) were included. The addition of targeted agents to ET was associated with a significant higher risk of grade 3-4 AEs: OR 2.86 (95% CI 2.49-3.27) for CDK4/6 inhibitors, 1.88 (95% CI 1.39-2.53) for mTOR inhibitors, 2.05 (95% CI 1.63-2.58) for PI3K inhibitors, and 2.48 (95% CI 1.09-5.66) for anti-HER2 agents. The highest class-specific risks were neutropenia grade 3-4 for CDK4/6 inhibitors (OR 40.77; 95% CI 19.52-85.19), stomatitis grade 3-4 for mTOR inhibitors (OR 11.92; 95% CI 3.68-38.57), hyperglycemia grade 3-4 for PI3K inhibitors (OR 40.93; 95% CI 10.08-166.22) and diarrhea for anti-HER2 agents (OR 9.93; 95% CI 4.71-20.95). Adding targeted agents to ET is associated with a significant increased risk of AEs. The risk of developing different AEs varies largely according to the type of agent used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in qualitative diagnosis of sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xia Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggests that CEUS may have high a diagnostic accuracy in testing for metastatic SLN in breast cancer. Thus, CEUS may be a good tool for differential diagnosis between metastatic and non-metastatic SLN.

  17. Diagnostic performance of neck circumference to identify overweight and obesity as defined by body mass index in children and adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunming; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yue; Lu, Qiang; Liu, Xiaoli; Yin, Fuzai

    2017-05-01

    The neck circumference (NC) has been shown to be an accurate index for screening overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. To perform a meta-analysis to assess the performance of NC for the assessment of overweight and obesity. Data sources were PubMed and EMBASE up to March 2016. Studies providing measures of diagnostic performance of NC and using body mass index as reference standard were included. Six eligible studies that evaluated 11 214 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years were included in the meta-analysis. NC showed pooled sensitivity to detect high body mass index of 0.780 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.765-0.794), specificity of 0.746 (95% CI =  0.736-0.756) and a diagnostic odds ratio of 17.343 (95% CI =  8.743-34.405). The NC had moderate diagnostic accuracy for identifying overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

  18. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillikens, M Carola; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Chou, Wen-Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S; Smith, Albert V; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weihua; Aghdassi, Ali; Åkesson, Kristina; Amin, Najaf; Baier, Leslie J; Barroso, Inês; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Biffar, Rainer; Bochud, Murielle; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Buchman, Aron S; Byberg, Liisa; Campbell, Harry; Campos Obanda, Natalia; Cauley, Jane A; Cawthon, Peggy M; Cederberg, Henna; Chen, Zhao; Cho, Nam H; Jin Choi, Hyung; Claussnitzer, Melina; Collins, Francis; Cummings, Steven R; De Jager, Philip L; Demuth, Ilja; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Diatchenko, Luda; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Enneman, Anke W; Erdos, Mike; Eriksson, Johan G; Eriksson, Joel; Estrada, Karol; Evans, Daniel S; Feitosa, Mary F; Fu, Mao; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Girke, Thomas; Glazer, Nicole L; Grallert, Harald; Grewal, Jagvir; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hanson, Robert L; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Hoffman, Eric P; Homuth, Georg; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hubal, Monica J; Hubbard, Alan; Huffman, Kim M; Husted, Lise B; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ittermann, Till; Jansson, John-Olov; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Karlsson, Magnus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Klopp, Norman; Kloth, Jacqueline S L; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kraus, William E; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lahti, Jari; Lang, Thomas; Langdahl, Bente L; Launer, Lenore J; Lee, Jong-Young; Lerch, Markus M; Lewis, Joshua R; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Maixner, William; McGuigan, Fiona E; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Meitinger, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Mellström, Dan; Melov, Simon; Michaëlsson, Karl; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morris, Andrew P; Mosekilde, Leif; Newman, Anne; Nielson, Carrie M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Orwoll, Eric S; Palotie, Aarno; Parker, Stephen C J; Peacock, Munro; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Prince, Richard L; Räikkönen, Katri; Ralston, Stuart H; Ripatti, Samuli; Robbins, John A; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Satterfield, Suzanne; Schadt, Eric E; Schipf, Sabine; Scott, Laura; Sehmi, Joban; Shen, Jian; Soo Shin, Chan; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Smith, Shad; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Swart, Karin M A; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Thompson, Patricia; Thomson, Cynthia A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tranah, Gregory J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verma, Arjun; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N; Welch, Ryan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Williams, Frances M K; Wilson, James F; Wright, Nicole C; Xie, Weijia; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Yanhua; Chambers, John C; Döring, Angela; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kooner, Jaspal S; Psaty, Bruce M; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ossowski, Vicky; Waterworth, Dawn; Loos, Ruth J F; Karasik, David; Harris, Tamara B; Ohlsson, Claes; Kiel, Douglas P

    2017-07-19

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, height, and fat mass. Twenty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with lean body mass either genome wide (p lean body mass and in 45,090 (42,360 of European ancestry) subjects from 25 cohorts for appendicular lean body mass was successful for five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near HSD17B11, VCAN, ADAMTSL3, IRS1, and FTO for total lean body mass and for three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near VCAN, ADAMTSL3, and IRS1 for appendicular lean body mass. Our findings provide new insight into the genetics of lean body mass.Lean body mass is a highly heritable trait and is associated with various health conditions. Here, Kiel and colleagues perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for whole body lean body mass and find five novel genetic loci to be significantly associated.

  19. 18F-FDG-PET and 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the detection of recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xu; Bao, Lihua; Xu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dianfu; Li, Yongjun; Wang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detection of recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in patients after surgery with a meta-analysis. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for relevant articles. Two investigators independently extracted the data about study characteristics and examination results. Pooled estimates of sensitivity of FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT were obtained. Fifteen studies met all inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of FDG-PET ranged from 0.47 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.21–0.73) to 0.96 (95%CI: 0.86–0.99), the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT ranger from 0.47 (95% CI: 0.31–0.64) to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65–0.90). The pooled sensitivities of FDG-PET and PET/CT were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.64–0.72) and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.64–0.74), respectively. There was no statistic significant between FDG-PET and PET/CT. Our results indicate that FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT has reasonable sensitivity in detecting recurrent or metastatic MTC after primary surgery. However, no single diagnostic technique is able to reliably demonstrate the full extent of disease in patients with recurrent or metastatic MTC, the combination of cross-sectional radiography with FDG-PET or PET/CT is recommended.

  20. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2014-01-01

    descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected...... by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103......, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less...

  1. Meta-analysis of Arabidopsis KANADI1 direct target genes identifies basic growth-promoting module acting upstream of hormonal signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Yakun; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere

    2015-01-01

    An intricate network of antagonistically acting transcription factors mediates formation of a flat leaf lamina of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. In this context, members of the class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factor family specify the adaxial domain (future upper side......) of the leaf, while antagonistically acting KANADI transcription factors determine the abaxial domain (future lower side). Here we used an mRNA-seq approach to identify genes regulated by KANADI1 (KAN1) and subsequently performed a meta-analysis approach combining our datasets with published genome......-wide datasets. Our analysis revealed that KAN1 acts upstream of several genes encoding auxin biosynthetic enzymes. When exposed to shade, we find three YUCCA genes, YUC2, YUC5 and YUC8 to be transcriptionally upregulated, which correlates with an increase in the levels of free auxin. When ectopically expressed...

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (PLRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  3. A meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies to identify novel loci for maximum number of alcoholic drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Manav; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Wetherill, Leah; Le, Nhung; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Budde, John; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen; Dick, Danielle; Harari, Oscar; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I; Rice, John; Saccone, Nancy; Schuckit, Marc; Tischfield, Jay; Porjesz, Bernice; Edenberg, Howard J; Bierut, Laura; Foroud, Tatiana; Goate, Alison

    2013-10-01

    Maximum number of alcoholic drinks consumed in a 24-h period (maxdrinks) is a heritable (>50 %) trait and is strongly correlated with vulnerability to excessive alcohol consumption and subsequent alcohol dependence (AD). Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have studied alcohol dependence, but few have concentrated on excessive alcohol consumption. We performed two GWAS using maxdrinks as an excessive alcohol consumption phenotype: one in 118 extended families (N = 2,322) selected from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), and the other in a case-control sample (N = 2,593) derived from the Study of Addiction: Genes and Environment (SAGE). The strongest association in the COGA families was detected with rs9523562 (p = 2.1 × 10(-6)) located in an intergenic region on chromosome 13q31.1; the strongest association in the SAGE dataset was with rs67666182 (p = 7.1 × 10(-7)), located in an intergenic region on chromosome 8. We also performed a meta-analysis with these two GWAS and demonstrated evidence of association in both datasets for the LMO1 (p = 7.2 × 10(-7)) and PLCL1 genes (p = 4.1 × 10(-6)) with maxdrinks. A variant in AUTS2 and variants in INADL, C15orf32 and HIP1 that were associated with measures of alcohol consumption in a meta-analysis of GWAS studies and a GWAS of alcohol consumption factor score also showed nominal association in the current meta-analysis. The present study has identified several loci that warrant further examination in independent samples. Among the top SNPs in each of the dataset (p ≤ 10(-4)) far more showed the same direction of effect in the other dataset than would be expected by chance (p = 2 × 10(-3), 3 × 10(-6)), suggesting that there are true signals among these top SNPs, even though no SNP reached genome-wide levels of significance.

  4. Quantitative Secretomic Analysis Identifies Extracellular Protein Factors That Modulate the Metastatic Phenotype of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongkuan; Huffman, Kenneth E; Chu, Michael; Zhang, Yajie; Minna, John D; Yu, Yonghao

    2016-02-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for men and women in the United States, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) representing 85% of all diagnoses. Late stage detection, metastatic disease and lack of actionable biomarkers contribute to the high mortality rate. Proteins in the extracellular space are known to be critically involved in regulating every stage of the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To investigate the mechanism by which secreted proteins contribute to the pathogenesis of NSCLC, we performed quantitative secretomic analysis of two isogenic NSCLC cell lines (NCI-H1993 and NCI-H2073) and an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (HBEC3-KT) as control. H1993 was derived from a chemo-naïve metastatic tumor, while H2073 was derived from the primary tumor after etoposide/cisplatin therapy. From the conditioned media of these three cell lines, we identified and quantified 2713 proteins, including a series of proteins involved in regulating inflammatory response, programmed cell death and cell motion. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicates that a number of proteins overexpressed in H1993 media are involved in biological processes related to cancer metastasis, including cell motion, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knock down of a number of these proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, AGR2, S100P, and S100A14, leads to dramatically reduced migration of these cells. In addition, meta-analysis of survival data indicates NSCLC patients whose tumors express higher levels of several of these secreted proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, S100P, and S100A14, have a worse prognosis. Collectively, our results provide a potential molecular link between deregulated secretome and NSCLC cell migration/metastasis. In addition, the identification of these aberrantly secreted proteins might facilitate the development of biomarkers for early detection of this devastating disease.

  5. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Bonilla, Carolina; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bacelis, Jonas; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Tiesler, Carla M T; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ring, Susan; Vissing, Nadja H; Fink, Nadia R; Jugessur, Astanand; Mentch, Frank D; Ballester, Ferran; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Wolsk, Helene M; Llop, Sabrina; Thiering, Elisabeth; Beth, Systke A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Andersen, Josefine; Schulz, Holger; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Evans, David M; Waage, Johannes; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A; Jacobsson, Bo; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Davey Smith, George; Moll, Henriette A; Heinrich, Joachim; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-09-15

    More than a million childhood diarrhoeal episodes occur worldwide each year, and in developed countries a considerable part of them are caused by viral infections. In this study, we aimed to search for genetic variants associated with diarrhoeal disease in young children by meta-analyzing genome-wide association studies, and to elucidate plausible biological mechanisms. The study was conducted in the context of the Early Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium. Data about diarrhoeal disease in two time windows (around 1 year of age and around 2 years of age) was obtained via parental questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1 year. Conditional analysis suggested that the causal variant could be rs601338 (W154X) in the FUT2 gene. Children with the A allele, which results in a truncated FUT2 protein, had lower risk of diarrhoea. FUT2 participates in the production of histo-blood group antigens and has previously been implicated in the susceptibility to infections, including Rotavirus and Norovirus Gene-set enrichment analysis suggested pathways related to the histo-blood group antigen production, and the regulation of ion transport and blood pressure. Among others, the gastrointestinal tract, and the immune and neuro-secretory systems were detected as relevant organs. In summary, this genome-wide association meta-analysis suggests the implication of the FUT2 gene in diarrhoeal disease in young children from the general population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis in multiple populations identifies new loci for peanut allergy and establishes C11orf30/EMSY as a genetic risk factor for food allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asai, Y. (Yuka); Eslami, A. (Aida); van Ginkel, C.D. (C. Dorien); Akhabir, L. (Loubna); Wan, M. (Ming); Ellis, G. (George); Ben-Shoshan, M. (Moshe); Martino, D. (David); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); Allen, K. (Katrina); Mazer, B. (Bruce); H. de Groot (Hans); N.W. de Jong (Nicolette); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); A.E.J. Dubois; Chin, R. (Rick); Cheuk, S. (Stephen); Hoffman, J. (Joshua); Jorgensen, E. (Eric); J.S. Witte (John); Melles, R.B. (Ronald B.); Hong, X. (Xiumei); Wang, X. (Xiaobin); J. Hui (Jennie); A.W. Musk (Arthur); M.L. Hunter (Michael); A. James (Alan); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); A. Sandford (Andrew); Clarke, A.E. (Ann E.); D. Daley (Denise)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Peanut allergy (PA) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic risk factors. Previously, PA loci were identified in filaggrin (FLG) and HLA in candidate gene studies, and loci in HLA were identified in a genome-wide association study and meta-analysis.

  7. Meta-Analysis at Middle Age: A Personal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Gene V.

    2015-01-01

    The 40-year history of meta-analysis is traced from the vantage point of one of its originators. Research syntheses leading to the first examples of meta-analysis are identified. Early meta-analyses of the literature on psychotherapy outcomes and school class size are recounted. The influence on the development of meta-analysis of several…

  8. Comprehensive meta-analysis, co-expression, and miRNA nested network analysis identifies gene candidates in citrus against Huanglongbing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Nidhi; Kiran, Sandhya P; Du, Dongliang; Gmitter, Fred G; Deng, Zhanao

    2015-07-28

    Huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus, is associated with infection by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas) and is vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Recently, the molecular basis of citrus-HLB interactions has been examined using transcriptome analyses, and these analyses have identified many probe sets and pathways modulated by CaLas infection among different citrus cultivars. However, lack of consistency among reported findings indicates that an integrative approach is needed. This study was designed to identify the candidate probe sets in citrus-HLB interactions using meta-analysis and gene co-expression network modelling. Twenty-two publically available transcriptome studies on citrus-HLB interactions, comprising 18 susceptible (S) datasets and four resistant (R) datasets, were investigated using Limma and RankProd methods of meta-analysis. A combined list of 7,412 differentially expressed probe sets was generated using a Teradata in-house Structured Query Language (SQL) script. We identified the 65 most common probe sets modulated in HLB disease among different tissues from the S and R datasets. Gene ontology analysis of these probe sets suggested that carbohydrate metabolism, nutrient transport, and biotic stress were the core pathways that were modulated in citrus by CaLas infection and HLB development. We also identified R-specific probe sets, which encoded leucine-rich repeat proteins, chitinase, constitutive disease resistance (CDR), miraculins, and lectins. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was conducted on 3,499 probe sets, and 21 modules with major hub probe sets were identified. Further, a miRNA nested network was created to examine gene regulation of the 3,499 target probe sets. Results suggest that csi-miR167 and csi-miR396 could affect ion transporters and defence response pathways, respectively. Most of the potential candidate hub probe sets were co-expressed with gibberellin pathway (GA

  9. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van‘t Hof, Femke N.G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A.W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association studies. Methods and Results: Through a meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association study data sets and a validation study totaling 10 204 cases and 107 766 controls, we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches, we observed no new associations between the lead AAA single nucleotide polymorphisms and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids, or diabetes mellitus. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R, and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. Conclusions: The 4 new risk loci for AAA seem to be specific for AAA compared with other cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease. PMID:27899403

  10. Longitudinal Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, J.J.; Maas, C.J.M.; Lensvelt-Mulders, G.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of meta-analysis is to integrate the research results of a number of studies on a specific topic. Characteristic for meta-analysis is that in general only the summary statistics of the studies are used and not the original data. When the published research results to be integrated

  11. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis in multiple populations identifies new loci for peanut allergy and establishes C11orf30/EMSY as a genetic risk factor for food allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asai, Yuka; Eslami, Aida; van Ginkel, C Dorien; Akhabir, Loubna; Wan, Ming; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Martino, David; Ferreira, Manuel A; Allen, Katrina; Mazer, Bruce; de Jong, Nicolette W; Gerth van Wijk, Roy N; Dubois, Anthony E J; Chin, Rick; Cheuk, Steven; Hoffman, Joshua; Jorgensen, Eric; Witte, John S; Melles, Ronald B; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Xiaobin; Hui, Jennie; Musk, Arthur W Bill; Hunter, Michael; James, Alan L; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sandford, Andrew J; Clarke, Ann E; Daley, Denise

    BACKGROUND: Peanut allergy (PA) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic risk factors. Previously PA loci were identified in FLG and HLA in candidate gene studies, and loci in HLA in a genome-wide association study and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To investigate genetic susceptibility

  12. The Reliability of the Tracheoesophageal Groove and the Ligament of Berry as Landmarks for Identifying the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: A Cadaveric Study and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Michael Henry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a comprehensive evidence-based assessment, supplemented by cadaveric dissections, of the value of using the Ligament of Berry and Tracheoesophageal Groove as anatomical landmarks for identifying the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve. Methods. Seven major databases were searched to identify studies for inclusion. Eligibility was judged by two reviewers. Suitable studies were identified and extracted. MetaXL was used for analysis. All pooled prevalence rates were calculated using a random effects model. Heterogeneity among included studies was assessed using the Chi2 test and the I2 statistic. Results. Sixteen studies (n=2,470 nerves, including original cadaveric data, were analyzed for the BL/RLN relationship. The RLN was most often located superficial to the BL with a pooled prevalence estimate of 78.2% of nerves, followed by deep to the BL in 14.8%. Twenty-three studies (n=5,970 nerves examined the RLN/TEG relationship. The RLN was located inside the TEG in 63.7% (95% CI: 55.3–77.7 of sides. Conclusions. Both the BL and TEG are landmarks that can help surgeons provide patients with complication-free procedures. Our analysis showed that the BL is a more consistent anatomical landmark than the TEG, but it is necessary to use both to prevent iatrogenic RLN injuries during thyroidectomies.

  13. Optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy following radiation therapy in intermediate- or high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Frederico; Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto Novis de; Sasse, Andre Deeke, E-mail: sasse@cevon.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Objectives: to investigate current evidence on the optimal duration of adjuvant hormone deprivation for prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases. Data from randomized trials comparing different durations of hormone blockade was collected for pooled analysis. Overall survival, disease-free survival, disease-specific survival and toxicity were the outcomes of interest. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects model. Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria. For overall survival, the pooled data from the studies demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for longer hormone deprivation (Hazard Ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.96). A statistically significant benefit was also found for disease-free survival (Hazard Ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.89), and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.85). Studies with longer blockade duration arm demonstrated greater benefit. Toxicity was low, with no increase in cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Longer duration of androgen deprivation combined to radiotherapy prolongs OS, DFS and DSS in patients with intermediate and high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer. However, this evidence is based on trials using older radiation techniques, and further research of combination of androgen deprivation and new RT technologies may be warranted. (author)

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  15. Exome-Wide Meta-Analysis Identifies Rare 3′-UTR Variant in ERCC1/CD3EAP Associated with Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley van der Spek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common sleep breathing disorder associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and mortality. Although OSA is fairly heritable (~40%, there have been only few studies looking into the genetics of OSA. In the present study, we aimed to identify genetic variants associated with symptoms of sleep apnea by performing a whole-exome sequence meta-analysis of symptoms of sleep apnea in 1,475 individuals of European descent. We identified 17 rare genetic variants with at least suggestive evidence of significance. Replication in an independent dataset confirmed the association of a rare genetic variant (rs2229918; minor allele frequency = 0.3% with symptoms of sleep apnea (p-valuemeta = 6.98 × 10−9, βmeta = 0.99. Rs2229918 overlaps with the 3′ untranslated regions of ERCC1 and CD3EAP genes on chromosome 19q13. Both genes are expressed in tissues in the neck area, such as the tongue, muscles, cartilage and the trachea. Further, CD3EAP is localized in the nucleus and mitochondria and involved in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha/nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Our results and biological functions of CD3EAP/ERCC1 genes suggest that the 19q13 locus is interesting for further OSA research.

  16. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Mägi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B; Berndt, Sonja I; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J; Weedon, Michael N; Luan, Jian'an; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tõnu; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kutalik, Zoltán; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L; Dixon, Anna L; Holmes, Christopher C; Kaplan, Lee M; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E; Zondervan, Krina T; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Lango Allen, Hana; Weyant, Robert J; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chines, Peter S; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D; Bennett, Amanda J; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Buchanan, Thomas A; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N M; Dei, Mariano; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J C; Gjesing, Anette P; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Peden, John F; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Arnold, Alice M; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W H Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J; Munroe, Patricia B; Oostra, Ben; Penninx, Brenda W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Wright, Alan F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Assimes, Themistocles L; Wichmann, H-Erich; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Fox, Caroline S; Mohlke, Karen L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2010-11-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10⁻⁹ to P = 1.8 × 10⁻⁴⁰) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10⁻³ to P = 1.2 × 10⁻¹³). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.

  17. Gene-centric Meta-analysis in 87,736 Individuals of European Ancestry Identifies Multiple Blood-Pressure-Related Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragante, Vinicius; Barnes, Michael R.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Wei; Franceschini, Nora; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Holmes, Michael V.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Almoguera, Berta; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Melander, Olle; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Witkowska, Kate; Wong, Caroline O.L.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Brown, Morris; Burt, Amber; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Curtis, Sean P.; Davey-Smith, George; Delles, Christian; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiqing, Shen; Hastie, Claire E.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kim, Daniel S.; Kirkland, Susan A.; Klein, Barbara E.; Klein, Ronald; Li, Yun R.; Maiwald, Steffi; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O’Brien, Eoin T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palmas, Walter; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pettinger, Mary; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; M Ridker, Paul; Rose, Lynda M.; Sever, Peter; Shimbo, Daichi; Steele, Laura; Stolk, Ronald P.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Fornage, Myriam; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halder, Indrani; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kumari, Meena; März, Winfried; Murray, Sarah S.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Pankow, James S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Snieder, Harold; Snyder, Michael; Stanton, Alice V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Johnson, Andrew D.; Reiner, Alex P.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Levy, Daniel; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10−7) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification. PMID:24560520

  18. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C

    2010-01-01

    adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1...... and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10¿¿ to P = 1.8 × 10¿4°) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10¿³ to P = 1.2 × 10¿¹³). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate......Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR...

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in celiac disease and rheumatoid arthritis identifies fourteen non-HLA shared loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zhernakova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for each disease are shared between both diseases. We hypothesized that there are additional shared risk alleles and that combining genome-wide association study (GWAS data from each disease would increase power to identify these shared risk alleles. We performed a meta-analysis of two published GWAS on CD (4,533 cases and 10,750 controls and RA (5,539 cases and 17,231 controls. After genotyping the top associated SNPs in 2,169 CD cases and 2,255 controls, and 2,845 RA cases and 4,944 controls, 8 additional SNPs demonstrated P<5 × 10(-8 in a combined analysis of all 50,266 samples, including four SNPs that have not been previously confirmed in either disease: rs10892279 near the DDX6 gene (P(combined =  1.2 × 10(-12, rs864537 near CD247 (P(combined =  2.2 × 10(-11, rs2298428 near UBE2L3 (P(combined =  2.5 × 10(-10, and rs11203203 near UBASH3A (P(combined =  1.1 × 10(-8. We also confirmed that 4 gene loci previously established in either CD or RA are associated with the other autoimmune disease at combined P<5 × 10(-8 (SH2B3, 8q24, STAT4, and TRAF1-C5. From the 14 shared gene loci, 7 SNPs showed a genome-wide significant effect on expression of one or more transcripts in the linkage disequilibrium (LD block around the SNP. These associations implicate antigen presentation and T-cell activation as a shared mechanism of disease pathogenesis and underscore the utility of cross-disease meta-analysis for identification of genetic risk factors with pleiotropic effects between two clinically distinct diseases.

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass ...

  1. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Almoguera Castillo, Berta; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Crook, Errol D.; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N.; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F. A.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F. L.; Molony, Cliona M.; Morrow, David A.; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Guenther; Smith, Erin N.; Spijkerman, Annemieke W. M.; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L.; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W. H. Linda; Pankow, James S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P.; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofker, Marten H.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Knowler, William C.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Maerz, Winfried; Meigs, James B.; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Bielinski, Susan J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J.; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S.; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom similar to 50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with similar to 2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.J.; Lee, S.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; Heijer, M. den; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. Van; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; Faire, U. de; Vegt, F. de; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass

  3. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, A.D. (Amit D.); Andersson, C. (Charlotte); T. Buch (Thorsten); Stender, S. (Stefan); R. Noordam; L.-C. Weng; Weeke, P.E. (Peter E.); P. Auer (Paul); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); C. Chen (Constance); Choi, H. (Hyon); Curhan, G. (Gary); J.C. Denny (Joshua C.); I. de Vivo (Immaculata); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); D. Ellinghaus (David); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); Fuchs, C. (Charles); Gala, M. (Manish); J. Haessler (Jeff); A. Hofman (Albert); Hu, F. (Frank); D. Hunter (David); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); J.H. Kang; C. Kooperberg (Charles); P. Kraft (Peter); W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); P.L. Lutsey (Pamela); S. Darwish Murad (Sarwa); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); L.R. Pasquale (Louis); A. Reiner (Alexander); P.M. Ridker (Paul); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Shaffer, C.M. (Christian M.); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); Tamimi, R.M. (Rulla M.); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); Wakabayashi, Y. (Yoshiyuki); J.L. Wiggs (Janey L.); Zhu, J. (Jun); Roden, D.M. (Dan M.); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); W. Tang (Weihong); A. Teumer (Alexander); J. Hampe (Jochen); A. Tybjaerg-Hansen; D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Chan, A.T. (Andrew T.); A.D. Johnson (Andrew)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale,

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Berndt (Sonja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Ganna (Andrea); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.E. Justice (Anne); K.L. Monda (Keri); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D. Gentilini (Davide); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); Y.-J. Hu (Yi-Juan); S.H. Lee (Sang Hong); L. Liang (Liming); D.Y. Lin (Dan); J. Min (Josine); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Yang (Jian); E. Albrecht (Eva); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); G. Cadby (Gemma); M. den Heijer (Martin); N. Eklund (Niina); K. Fischer (Krista); A. Goel (Anuj); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); I. Jarick (Ivonne); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); I.R. König (Inke); K. Kristiansson (Kati); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); C. Lamina (Claudia); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); G. Li (Guo); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.S. Ngwa; I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M. Perola (Markus); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); L.M. Rose (Lynda); J. Shi (Jianxin); D. Shungin (Dmitry); G.D. Smith; R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.D. Trip (Mieke); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); L. Waite (Lindsay); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); D. Absher (Devin); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Atalay (Mustafa); A.P. Attwood (Antony); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); D.C.G. Basart (Dick); J.P. Beilby (John); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M. Bruinenberg (M.); H. Campbell (Harry); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); W. O Cookson (William); U. de Faire (Ulf); F. de Vegt (Femmie); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dimitriou (Maria); T. Edkins (Ted); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); M. Farrall (Martin); F. Ferrario (Franco); J. Ferrières (Jean); L. Franke (Lude); F. Frau (Francesca); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); H. Grallert (Harald); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hall (Anne); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.L. Hartikainen; C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); A.C. Heath (Andrew); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); G. Homuth (Georg); F.B. Hu (Frank); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); E. Hyppönen (Elina); C. Iribarren (Carlos); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); F. Kee (F.); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kivimaki (Mika); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindstrom (Jaana); J. Liu (Jianjun); A. Liuzzi (Antonio); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); W. März (Winfried); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); V. Mooser (Vincent); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P. Munroe (Patricia); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); G. Navis (Gerjan); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); C. Nohr (Christian); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); A. Palotie (Aarno); J. Peden (John); N. Pedersen; A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); C. Pütter (Carolin); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Rendon (Augusto); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); T. Saaristo (Timo); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); A.R. Sanders (Alan); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S.-Y. Shin; S. Signorini (Stefano); J. Sinisalo (Juha); B. Skrobek (Boris); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A. Stancáková (Alena); K. Stark (Klaus); J. Stephens (Jonathan); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.J. Swift (Amy); E.V. Theodoraki (Eirini); B. Thorand (Barbara); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); V. Vitart (Veronique); G. Waeber (Gérard); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); B. Winkelmann; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); P. Amouyel (Philippe); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Gieger (Christian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L. Qi (Lu); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Snieder (Harold); H.G. Sorensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C. Fox (Craig); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunian (Talin); I.M. Heid (Iris); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); F. Karpe (Fredrik); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Y. Pawitan (Yudi); E.E. Schadt (Eric); D. Schlessinger (David); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D.P. Strachan (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); P.M. Visscher (Peter); A.M. Di Blasio (Anna Maria); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); A.D. Morris (Andrew); D. Meyre (David); A. Scherag (Andre); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); E. Ingelsson (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractApproaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies genetic risk factors for stroke in African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L.; Keene, Keith L.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H.; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, YongMei; Sale, Michèle M.; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, WT; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B.; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African-Americans despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population genome-wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Methods Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14,746 African-Americans (1,365 ischemic and 1,592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested SNPs with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. Results The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613, P=3.9×10−8) in African-Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/ mRNA pre-splicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. Conclusions We identified a novel SNP associated with total stroke in African-Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African-Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. PMID:26089329

  6. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Risk Factors for Stroke in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L; Keene, Keith L; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C; Kittner, Steven J; Rich, Stephen S; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Langefeld, Carl D; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, Yongmei; Sale, Michèle M; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, W T; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African Americans, despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14 746 African Americans (1365 ischemic and 1592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested genetic variants with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613; P=3.9×10(-8)) in African Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/mRNA presplicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, and IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. We identified a novel genetic variant associated with total stroke in African Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murabito, Joanne M; White, Charles C; Kavousi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (ß= -0.006, p=2.46x10(-8)). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined...... discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10(-9)). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI: DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10(-5)); CYBA...... (rs3794624, p=6.3x10(-5)); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). CONCLUSIONS: -GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI....

  8. Comprehensive Meta-analysis of Ontology Annotated 16S rRNA Profiles Identifies Beta Diversity Clusters of Environmental Bacterial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Henschel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive mapping of environmental microbiomes in terms of their compositional features remains a great challenge in understanding the microbial biosphere of the Earth. It bears promise to identify the driving forces behind the observed community patterns and whether community assembly happens deterministically. Advances in Next Generation Sequencing allow large community profiling studies, exceeding sequencing data output of conventional methods in scale by orders of magnitude. However, appropriate collection systems are still in a nascent state. We here present a database of 20,427 diverse environmental 16S rRNA profiles from 2,426 independent studies, which forms the foundation of our meta-analysis. We conducted a sample size adaptive all-against-all beta diversity comparison while also respecting phylogenetic relationships of Operational Taxonomic Units(OTUs. After conventional hierarchical clustering we systematically test for enrichment of Environmental Ontology terms and their abstractions in all possible clusters. This post-hoc algorithm provides a novel formalism that quantifies to what extend compositional and semantic similarity of microbial community samples coincide. We automatically visualize significantly enriched subclusters on a comprehensive dendrogram of microbial communities. As a result we obtain the hitherto most differentiated and comprehensive view on global patterns of microbial community diversity. We observe strong clusterability of microbial communities in ecosystems such as human/mammal-associated, geothermal, fresh water, plant-associated, soils and rhizosphere microbiomes, whereas hypersaline and anthropogenic samples are less homogeneous. Moreover, saline samples appear less cohesive in terms of compositional properties than previously reported.

  9. Genome-wide association meta-analysis in Chinese and European individuals identifies ten new loci associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Fei; Zhu, Zhengwei; Tombleson, Philip; Chen, Lingyan; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S; Bentham, James; Roberts, Amy L; Chen, Ruoyan; Zuo, Xianbo; Wang, Tingyou; Wen, Leilei; Yang, Chao; Liu, Lu; Yang, Lulu; Li, Feng; Huang, Yuanbo; Yin, Xianyong; Yang, Sen; Rönnblom, Lars; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Voll, Reinhard E; Schett, Georg; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Gaffney, Patrick M; Lau, Yu Lung; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Wanling; Cui, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 1 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 50 loci as robustly associated with the disease in single ancestries, but genome-wide transancestral studies have not been conducted. We combined three GWAS data sets from Chinese (1,659 cases and 3,398 controls) and European (4,036 cases and 6,959 controls) populations. A meta-analysis of these studies showed that over half of the published SLE genetic associations are present in both populations. A replication study in Chinese (3,043 cases and 5,074 controls) and European (2,643 cases and 9,032 controls) subjects found ten previously unreported SLE loci. Our study provides further evidence that the majority of genetic risk polymorphisms for SLE are contained within the same regions across both populations. Furthermore, a comparison of risk allele frequencies and genetic risk scores suggested that the increased prevalence of SLE in non-Europeans (including Asians) has a genetic basis. PMID:27399966

  10. A meta-analysis identifies adolescent idiopathic scoliosis association with LBX1 locus in multiple ethnic groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londono, Douglas; Kou, Ikuyo; Johnson, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    .31 LBX1 gene (OMIM #604255) was originally identified by a GWAS of Japanese subjects and replicated in additional Asian populations. To extend this result, and to create larger AIS cohorts for the purpose of large-scale meta-analyses in multiple ethnicities, we formed a collaborative group called...... cohorts containing both genders yielded P=1.22×10-43 for rs11190870, and P=2.94×10-48 for females in all nine cohorts. Comparing the regional haplotype structures for three populations, we refined the boundaries of association to a ∼25 kb block encompassing the LBX1 gene. The LBX1 protein, a homeobox...

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in East Asian-ancestry populations identifies four new loci for body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Zheng, Wei; Okada, Yukinori; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Li, Huaixing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Xiaobo; He, Jiang; Wu, Ying; He, Meian; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Jun; Guo, Xiuqing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Delahanty, Ryan; Guo, Xingyi; Kubo, Michiaki; Yamamoto, Ken; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Go, Min Jin; Liu, Jian Jun; Gan, Wei; Chen, Ching-Chu; Gao, Yong; Li, Shengxu; Lee, Nanette R; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xueya; Song, Huaidong; Yao, Jie; Lee, I-Te; Long, Jirong; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Koichi; Takashima, Naoyuki; Cho, Yoon Shin; Ong, Rick Th; Lu, Ling; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tan, Aihua; Rice, Treva K; Adair, Linda S; Gui, Lixuan; Allison, Matthew; Lee, Wen-Jane; Cai, Qiuyin; Isomura, Minoru; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Seielstad, Mark; Hixson, James; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Isono, Masato; Kim, Bong-Jo; Sim, Xueling; Lu, Wei; Nabika, Toru; Lee, Juyoung; Lim, Wei-Yen; Gao, Yu-Tang; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kang, Dae-Hee; Wong, Tien Yin; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Wu, I-Chien; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Bo Youl; Aung, Tin; Hu, Frank; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lim, Wei Yen; Wang, Tzung-Dao; Shin, Min-Ho; Lee, Jeannette; Ji, Bu-Tian; Lee, Young-Hoon; Young, Terri L; Shin, Dong Hoon; Chun, Byung-Yeol; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hwu, Chii-Min; Assimes, Themistocles L; Absher, Devin; Yan, Xiaofei; Kim, Eric; Kuo, Jane Z; Kwon, Soonil; Taylor, Kent D; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Qi, Lu; Zhu, Dingliang; Wu, Tangchun; Mohlke, Karen L; Gu, Dongfeng; Mo, Zengnan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lin, Xu; Miki, Tetsuro; Tai, E Shyong; Lee, Jong-Young; Kato, Norihiro; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2014-10-15

    Recent genetic association studies have identified 55 genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI). The vast majority, 51 loci, however, were identified in European-ancestry populations. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and ∼2.5 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms among 86 757 individuals of Asian ancestry, followed by in silico and de novo replication among 7488-47 352 additional Asian-ancestry individuals. We identified four novel BMI-associated loci near the KCNQ1 (rs2237892, P = 9.29 × 10(-13)), ALDH2/MYL2 (rs671, P = 3.40 × 10(-11); rs12229654, P = 4.56 × 10(-9)), ITIH4 (rs2535633, P = 1.77 × 10(-10)) and NT5C2 (rs11191580, P = 3.83 × 10(-8)) genes. The association of BMI with rs2237892, rs671 and rs12229654 was significantly stronger among men than among women. Of the 51 BMI-associated loci initially identified in European-ancestry populations, we confirmed eight loci at the genome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)) and an additional 14 at P < 1.0 × 10(-3) with the same direction of effect as reported previously. Findings from this analysis expand our knowledge of the genetic basis of obesity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  13. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic responses as a means to identify pulmonary disease outcomes for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikota, Jake; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    studies describing mouse pulmonary responses over time following intra-tracheal exposure to increasing doses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon black, and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles of varying properties were examined to understand underlying mechanisms of toxicity. mRNA profiles from...... evaluated the applicability of toxicogenomics data in identifying potential lung-specific (genomic datasets are currently available from experiments where mice have been exposed to various ENMs through this common route of exposure) disease outcomes following exposure to ENMs.Methods: Seven toxicogenomics...... of which are known to induce lung fibrosis, in a post-exposure-time dependent manner, irrespective of the CNT's physical-chemical properties. TiO2 samples clustered separately from CNTs and disease models.Conclusions: These results indicate that in the absence of apical toxicity data, a tiered strategy...

  14. Network-based SNP meta-analysis identifies joint and disjoint genetic features across common human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have provided a large set of genetic loci influencing the risk for many common diseases. Association studies typically analyze one specific trait in single populations in an isolated fashion without taking into account the potential phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits. However, GWA data can be efficiently used to identify overlapping loci with analogous or contrasting effects on different diseases. Results Here, we describe a new approach to systematically prioritize and interpret available GWA data. We focus on the analysis of joint and disjoint genetic determinants across diseases. Using network analysis, we show that variant-based approaches are superior to locus-based analyses. In addition, we provide a prioritization of disease loci based on network properties and discuss the roles of hub loci across several diseases. We demonstrate that, in general, agonistic associations appear to reflect current disease classifications, and present the potential use of effect sizes in refining and revising these agonistic signals. We further identify potential branching points in disease etiologies based on antagonistic variants and describe plausible small-scale models of the underlying molecular switches. Conclusions The observation that a surprisingly high fraction (>15% of the SNPs considered in our study are associated both agonistically and antagonistically with related as well as unrelated disorders indicates that the molecular mechanisms influencing causes and progress of human diseases are in part interrelated. Genetic overlaps between two diseases also suggest the importance of the affected entities in the specific pathogenic pathways and should be investigated further.

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis of five Asian cohorts identifies PDGFRA as a susceptibility locus for corneal astigmatism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Fan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corneal astigmatism refers to refractive abnormalities and irregularities in the curvature of the cornea, and this interferes with light being accurately focused at a single point in the eye. This ametropic condition is highly prevalent, influences visual acuity, and is a highly heritable trait. There is currently a paucity of research in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism. Here we report the results from five genome-wide association studies of corneal astigmatism across three Asian populations, with an initial discovery set of 4,254 Chinese and Malay individuals consisting of 2,249 cases and 2,005 controls. Replication was obtained from three surveys comprising of 2,139 Indians, an additional 929 Chinese children, and an independent 397 Chinese family trios. Variants in PDGFRA on chromosome 4q12 (lead SNP: rs7677751, allelic odds ratio = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.16-1.36, P(meta = 7.87×10(-9 were identified to be significantly associated with corneal astigmatism, exhibiting consistent effect sizes across all five cohorts. This highlights the potential role of variants in PDGFRA in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism across diverse Asian populations.

  16. Genome-wide in vivo screen identifies novel host regulators of metastatic colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weyden, Louise; Arends, Mark J.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Bald, Tobias; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Griggs, Nicola; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Tüting, Thomas; Sansom, Owen J.; Karp, Natasha A.; Clare, Simon; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Edward; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Cambridge, Emma L.; Voet, Thierry; Macaulay, Iain C.; Wong, Kim; Spiegel, Sarah; Speak, Anneliese O.; Adams, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death for cancer patients. This multi-stage process requires tumour cells to survive in the circulation, extravasate at distant sites, then proliferate; it involves contributions from both the tumour cell and tumour microenvironment (‘host’, which includes stromal cells and the immune system1). Studies suggest the early steps of the metastatic process are relatively efficient, with the post-extravasation regulation of tumour growth (‘colonization’) being critical in determining metastatic outcome2. Here we show the results of screening 810 mutant mouse lines using an in vivo assay to identify microenvironmental regulators of metastatic colonization. We identify 23 genes that, when disrupted in mouse, modify the ability of tumour cells to establish metastatic foci, with 19 of these genes not previously demonstrated to play a role in host control of metastasis. The largest reduction in pulmonary metastasis was observed in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter spinster homologue 2 (Spns2)-deficient mice. We demonstrate a novel outcome of S1P-mediated regulation of lymphocyte trafficking, whereby deletion of Spns2, either globally or in a lymphatic endothelial-specific manner, creates a circulating lymphopenia and a higher percentage of effector T cells and natural killer (NK) cells present in the lung. This allows for potent tumour cell killing, and an overall decreased metastatic burden. PMID:28052056

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Combined Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT and Docetaxel Compared with ADT Alone for Metastatic Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engel Ayer Botrel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and second most common cause of cancer mortality in older men in the United States (USA and Western Europe. Androgen-deprivation therapy alone (ADT remains the first line of treatment in most cases, for metastatic disease. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCT that compared the efficacy and adverse events profile of a chemohormonal therapy (ADT ± docetaxel for metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer (mHNPC.Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Data extracted from the studies were combined by using the hazard ratio (HR or risk ratio (RR with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI.The final analysis included 3 trials comprising 2,264 patients (mHNPC. Patients who received the chemohormonal therapy had a longer clinical progression-free survival interval (HR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.75; p<0.00001, and no heterogeneity (Chi2 = 0.64; df = 1 [p = 0.42]; I2 = 0%. The biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS also was higher in patients treated with ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.69; p<0.00001, also with no heterogeneity noted (Chi2 = 0.48; df = 2 [p = 0.79]; I2 = 0%. Finally, the combination of ADT with docetaxel showed a superior overall survival (OS compared with ADT alone (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.84; p<0.0001, with moderate heterogeneity (Chi2 = 3.84; df = 2 [p = 0.15]; I2 = 48%. A random-effects model analysis was performed, and the results remained favorable to the use of ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.60 to 0.89; p = 0.002. In the final combined analysis of the high-volume disease patients, the use of the combination therapy also favored an increased overall survival (HR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.83; p = 0.0003. Regarding adverse events and severe toxicity (grade ≥3, the group receiving the combined therapy

  18. Genome-wide linkage meta-analysis identifies susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31.3 for genetic generalized epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leu, Costin; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Zara, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% with heritability estimates of 80%. A considerable proportion of families with siblings affected by GGEs presumably display an oligogenic inheritance. The present genome-wide linkage meta-analysis aimed to map: (1) ...

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and east Asian ancestry. We tested the top BMD-associ...

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Estrada Gil (Karol); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Y.-H. Hsu (Yi-Hsiang); E.L. Duncan (Emma); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); L. Oei (Ling); O.M.E. Albagha (Omar M.); N. Amin (Najaf); J.P. Kemp (John); D.L. Koller (Daniel); G. Li (Guo); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); R.L. Minster (Ryan); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); D. Willner (Dana); S.-M. Xiao (Su-Mei); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); H.-F. Zheng (Hou-Feng); N. Alonso (Nerea); J. Eriksson (Joel); C.M. Kammerer (Candace); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); P.J. Leo (Paul); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.G. Wilson (Scott); J.F. Wilson (James); V. Aalto (Ville); T.A. van Alen (Theo); A.K. Aragaki (Aaron); T. Aspelund (Thor); J.R. Center (Jacqueline); Z. Dailiana (Zoe); C. Duggan; M. Garcia (Melissa); N. Garcia-Giralt (Natàlia); S. Giroux (Sylvie); G. Hallmans (Göran); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); L.B. Husted (Lise Bjerre); K. Jameson (Karen); R. Khusainova (Rita); G.S. Kim (Ghi Su); C. Kooperberg (Charles); T. Koromila (Theodora); M. Kruk (Marcin); M. Laaksonen (Marika); A.Z. LaCroix (Andrea); S.U. Lee (Seung); P.C. Leung (Ping); J.R. Lewis (Joshua); L. Masi (Laura); S. Mencej-Bedrac (Simona); T.V. Nguyen (Tuan); X. Nogues (Xavier); M.S. Patel (Millan); J. Prezelj (Janez); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Scollen (Serena); K. Siggeirsdottir (Kristin); G.D. Smith; O. Svensson (Olle); S. Trompet (Stella); O. Trummer (Olivia); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); M.M. Woo (Margaret M.); K. Zhu (Kun); S. Balcells (Susana); M.L. Brandi; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Cheng (Sulin); C. Christiansen; C. Cooper (Charles); G.V. Dedoussis (George); I. Ford (Ian); M. Frost (Morten); D. Goltzman (David); J. González-Macías (Jesús); M. Kähönen (Mika); M. Karlsson (Magnus); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.-M. Koh (Jung-Min); P. Kollia (Panagoula); B.L. Langdahl (Bente); W.D. Leslie (William); P. Lips (Paul); O. Ljunggren (Östen); R. Lorenc (Roman); J. Marc (Janja); D. Mellström (Dan); B. Obermayer-Pietsch (Barbara); D. Olmos (David); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); D.M. Reid (David); J.A. Riancho (José); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); P.E.S. Lagboom (P Eline); N.L.S. Tang (Nelson L.); R. Urreizti (Roser); W. Van Hul (Wim); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.T. Zarrabeitia (María); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); E. Grundberg (Elin); L. Herrera (Lizbeth); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Johannsdottir (Hrefna); T. Kwan (Tony); R. Li (Rui); R.N. Luben (Robert); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); S. Th Palsson (Stefan); S. Reppe (Sjur); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); D.J. Verlaan (Dominique); F.M. Williams (Frances); A.R. Wood (Andrew); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); K.M. Gautvik (Kaare); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J.A. Cauley (Jane); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); G.R. Clark (Graeme); S. Cummings; P. Danoy (Patrick); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); R. Eastell (Richard); J.A. Eisman (John); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); G. Jones (Graeme); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Liu (YongMei); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); E.V. McCloskey (Eugene); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K. Nandakumar (Kannabiran); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); R.L. Prince (Richard); O. Raitakari (Olli); I.R. Reid (Ian); J. Robbins (John); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); P.C. Sham (Pak); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); F.A. Tylavsky (Frances); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); N.J. Wareham (Nick); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); M.J. Econs (Michael); D.M. Evans (David); T.B. Harris (Tamara); A.W.C. Kung (Annie); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J. Reeve (Jonathan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Ohlsson (Claes); D. Karasik (David); J.B. Richards (Brent); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and east Asian ancestry. We tested the top

  1. Meta-analysis of 65,734 Individuals Identifies TSPAN15 and SLC44A2 as Two Susceptibility Loci for Venous Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Marine; Chasman, Daniel I.; de Haan, Hugoline; Tang, Weihong; Lindström, Sara; Weng, Lu-Chen; de Andrade, Mariza; de Visser, Marieke C.H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Suchon, Pierre; Saut, Noémie; Smadja, David M.; Le Gal, Grégoire; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Di Narzo, Antonio; Hao, Ke; Nelson, Christopher P.; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Folkersen, Lasse; Monajemi, Ramin; Rose, Lynda M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Slagboom, Eline; Aïssi, Dylan; Gagnon, France; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Berr, Claudine; Taylor, Kent D.; Civelek, Mete; Eriksson, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Houwing-Duitermaat, Jeanine; Goodall, Alison H.; Cambien, François; Kraft, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Samani, Nilesh J.; Basu, Saonli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Kabrhel, Christopher; Folsom, Aaron R.; Heit, John; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Smith, Nicholas L.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, is a complex thrombotic disorder with environmental and genetic determinants. Although several genetic variants have been found associated with VTE, they explain a minor proportion of VTE risk in cases. We undertook a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to identify additional VTE susceptibility genes. Twelve GWASs totaling 7,507 VTE case subjects and 52,632 control subjects formed our discovery stage where 6,751,884 SNPs were tested for association with VTE. Nine loci reached the genome-wide significance level of 5 × 10−8 including six already known to associate with VTE (ABO, F2, F5, F11, FGG, and PROCR) and three unsuspected loci. SNPs mapping to these latter were selected for replication in three independent case-control studies totaling 3,009 VTE-affected individuals and 2,586 control subjects. This strategy led to the identification and replication of two VTE-associated loci, TSPAN15 and SLC44A2, with lead risk alleles associated with odds ratio for disease of 1.31 (p = 1.67 × 10−16) and 1.21 (p = 2.75 × 10−15), respectively. The lead SNP at the TSPAN15 locus is the intronic rs78707713 and the lead SLC44A2 SNP is the non-synonymous rs2288904 previously shown to associate with transfusion-related acute lung injury. We further showed that these two variants did not associate with known hemostatic plasma markers. TSPAN15 and SLC44A2 do not belong to conventional pathways for thrombosis and have not been associated to other cardiovascular diseases nor related quantitative biomarkers. Our findings uncovered unexpected actors of VTE etiology and pave the way for novel mechanistic concepts of VTE pathophysiology. PMID:25772935

  2. A genome-wide meta-analysis of nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma identifies risk loci at 6p21.32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozen, Wendy; Li, Dalin; Best, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Cortessis, Victoria K; Skol, Andrew D; Mack, Thomas M; Glaser, Sally L; Weiss, Lawrence M; Nathwani, Bharat N; Bhatia, Smita; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Edlund, Christopher K; Hwang, Amie E; Slager, Susan L; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Strong, Louise C; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Cerhan, James R; Robison, Leslie L; Conti, David V; Onel, Kenan

    2012-01-12

    Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma (NSHL) is a distinct, highly heritable Hodgkin lymphoma subtype. We undertook a genome-wide meta-analysis of 393 European-origin adolescent/young adult NSHL patients and 3315 controls using the Illumina Human610-Quad Beadchip and Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. We identified 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21.32 that were significantly associated with NSHL risk: rs9268542 (P = 5.35 × 10(-10)), rs204999 (P = 1.44 × 10(-9)), and rs2858870 (P = 1.69 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed a previously reported association in the same region, rs6903608 (P = 3.52 × 10(-10)). rs204999 and rs2858870 were weakly correlated (r(2) = 0.257), and the remaining pairs of SNPs were not correlated (r(2) < 0.1). In an independent set of 113 NSHL cases and 214 controls, 2 SNPs were significantly associated with NSHL and a third showed a comparable odds ratio (OR). These SNPs are found on 2 haplotypes associated with NSHL risk (rs204999-rs9268528-rs9268542-rs6903608-rs2858870; AGGCT, OR = 1.7, P = 1.71 × 10(-6); GAATC, OR = 0.4, P = 1.16 × 10(-4)). All individuals with the GAATC haplotype also carried the HLA class II DRB1*0701 allele. In a separate analysis, the DRB1*0701 allele was associated with a decreased risk of NSHL (OR = 0.5, 95% confidence interval = 0.4, 0.7). These data support the importance of the HLA class II region in NSHL etiology.

  3. Prognostic biomarkers to identify patients destined to develop severe Crohn?s disease who may benefit from early biological therapy: protocol for a systematic review, meta-analysis and external validation

    OpenAIRE

    Halligan, Steve; Boone, Darren; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Ahmad, Tariq; Bloom, Stuart; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Taylor, Stuart A.; Mallett, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background It is believed increasingly that patients with severe Crohn?s disease are best treated early with biological therapy, which may ameliorate subsequent disease course and diminish long-term complications. However, we cannot predict currently which new presentations of Crohn?s disease are destined to develop severe disease so treatment cannot be targeted to the most appropriate patients. Accordingly, via systematic review and meta-analysis we aim to identify if biomarkers of disease a...

  4. The involvement of Kras gene 3'-UTR polymorphisms in risk of cancer and influence on patient response to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying HQ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hou-Qun Ying,1,2 Feng Wang,2 Bang-Shun He,2 Yu-Qin Pan,2 Tian-Yi Gao,2 Ye-Qiong Xu,2 Rui Li,2 Qi-Wen Deng,2 Hui-Lin Sun,2 Shu-Kui Wang21Medical College, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; 2Central Laboratory, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Genetic variation of the Kras oncogene is a candidate factor for increasing susceptibility to carcinoma and modulating response of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR. However, results from an increasing number of studies concerning the association of Kras gene rs712 and rs61764370 polymorphisms with risk of cancer and treatment of mCRC using anti-EGFR remain equivocal.Methods: Risk associations were evaluated in 1,661 cases and 2,139 controls from six studies concerning rs712 and 14,796 cases and 14,985 controls from 29 studies concerning rs61764370. Response association was also examined in a subset of four studies pertaining to rs61764370 and anti-EGFR treatment in mCRC.Results: Results of a meta-analysis showed that allele T (P-value of heterogeneity test [PH] =0.08, odds ratio [OR] =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.64 and genotype GT/TT (PH=0.14, OR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.10–1.55 in rs712 were strongly associated with cancer in Chinese subjects. No evidence of association was observed between rs712 and risk of cancer in the overall population or between rs61764370 and ovarian, breast, colorectal, or non-small-cell lung cancer risk in the Caucasian population. No significant association was found between rs61764370 and patient response to anti-EGFR therapy in mCRC.Conclusion: The findings not only provide further evidence that allele T of rs712 increases genetic predisposition to cancer in Chinese population, but also no significant association between rs61764370 and cancer risk in Caucasian population

  5. Meta-analysis with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarzer, Guido; Rücker, Gerta

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to performing meta-analysis using the statistical software R. It is intended for quantitative researchers and students in the medical and social sciences who wish to learn how to perform meta-analysis with R. As such, the book introduces the key concepts and models used in meta-analysis. It also includes chapters on the following advanced topics: publication bias and small study effects; missing data; multivariate meta-analysis, network meta-analysis; and meta-analysis of diagnostic studies.  .

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 8 novel loci involved in shape variation of human head hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Gu; Hysi, Pirro G; Wu, Sijie; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Breslin, Krystal; Pospiech, Ewelina; Hamer, Merel A; Peng, Fuduan; Muralidharan, Charanya; Acuna-Alonzo, Victor; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bortolini, Maria Catira; Gonzalez-Jose, Rolando; Zeng, Changqing; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Uitterlinden, André G; Ikram, M Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Nijsten, Tamar; Walsh, Susan; Branicki, Wojciech; Wang, Sijia; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Spector, Timothy D; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Kayser, Manfred

    2018-02-01

    Shape variation of human head hair shows striking variation within and between human populations, while its genetic basis is far from being understood. We performed a series of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and replication studies in a total of 28 964 subjects from 9 cohorts from multiple geographic origins. A meta-analysis of three European GWASs identified 8 novel loci (1p36.23 ERRFI1/SLC45A1, 1p36.22 PEX14, 1p36.13 PADI3, 2p13.3 TGFA, 11p14.1 LGR4, 12q13.13 HOXC13, 17q21.2 KRTAP, and 20q13.33 PTK6), and confirmed 4 previously known ones (1q21.3 TCHH/TCHHL1/LCE3E, 2q35 WNT10A, 4q21.21 FRAS1, and 10p14 LINC00708/GATA3), all showing genome-wide significant association with hair shape (P < 5e-8). All except one (1p36.22 PEX14) were replicated with nominal significance in at least one of the 6 additional cohorts of European, Native American and East Asian origins. Three additional previously known genes (EDAR, OFCC1, and PRSS53) were confirmed at the nominal significance level. A multivariable regression model revealed that 14 SNPs from different genes significantly and independently contribute to hair shape variation, reaching a cross-validated AUC value of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.62-0.70) and an AUC value of 0.64 in an independent validation cohort, providing an improved accuracy compared with a previous model. Prediction outcomes of 2504 individuals from a multiethnic sample were largely consistent with general knowledge on the global distribution of hair shape variation. Our study thus delivers target genes and DNA variants for future functional studies to further evaluate the molecular basis of hair shape in humans. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 8 novel loci involved in shape variation of human head hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Gu; Hysi, Pirro G; Wu, Sijie; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Breslin, Krystal; Pośpiech, Ewelina; Hamer, Merel A; Peng, Fuduan; Muralidharan, Charanya; Acuna-Alonzo, Victor; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bortolini, Maria Catira; Gonzalez-Jose, Rolando; Zeng, Changqing; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Uitterlinden, André G; Ikram, M Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Nijsten, Tamar; Walsh, Susan; Branicki, Wojciech; Wang, Sijia; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Spector, Timothy D; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Kayser, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Shape variation of human head hair shows striking variation within and between human populations, while its genetic basis is far from being understood. We performed a series of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and replication studies in a total of 28 964 subjects from 9 cohorts from multiple geographic origins. A meta-analysis of three European GWASs identified 8 novel loci (1p36.23 ERRFI1/SLC45A1, 1p36.22 PEX14, 1p36.13 PADI3, 2p13.3 TGFA, 11p14.1 LGR4, 12q13.13 HOXC13, 17q21.2 KRTAP, and 20q13.33 PTK6), and confirmed 4 previously known ones (1q21.3 TCHH/TCHHL1/LCE3E, 2q35 WNT10A, 4q21.21 FRAS1, and 10p14 LINC00708/GATA3), all showing genome-wide significant association with hair shape (P < 5e-8). All except one (1p36.22 PEX14) were replicated with nominal significance in at least one of the 6 additional cohorts of European, Native American and East Asian origins. Three additional previously known genes (EDAR, OFCC1, and PRSS53) were confirmed at the nominal significance level. A multivariable regression model revealed that 14 SNPs from different genes significantly and independently contribute to hair shape variation, reaching a cross-validated AUC value of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.62–0.70) and an AUC value of 0.64 in an independent validation cohort, providing an improved accuracy compared with a previous model. Prediction outcomes of 2504 individuals from a multiethnic sample were largely consistent with general knowledge on the global distribution of hair shape variation. Our study thus delivers target genes and DNA variants for future functional studies to further evaluate the molecular basis of hair shape in humans. PMID:29220522

  8. An Evaluation of Algorithms for Identifying Metastatic Breast, Lung, or Colorectal Cancer in Administrative Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Joanna L; Engel-Nitz, Nicole M; Teitelbaum, April; Gomez Rey, Gabriel; Kallich, Joel D

    2015-07-01

    Administrative health care claims data are used for epidemiologic, health services, and outcomes cancer research and thus play a significant role in policy. Cancer stage, which is often a major driver of cost and clinical outcomes, is not typically included in claims data. Evaluate algorithms used in a dataset of cancer patients to identify patients with metastatic breast (BC), lung (LC), or colorectal (CRC) cancer using claims data. Clinical data on BC, LC, or CRC patients (between January 1, 2007 and March 31, 2010) were linked to a health care claims database. Inclusion required health plan enrollment ≥3 months before initial cancer diagnosis date. Algorithms were used in the claims database to identify patients' disease status, which was compared with physician-reported metastases. Generic and tumor-specific algorithms were evaluated using ICD-9 codes, varying diagnosis time frames, and including/excluding other tumors. Positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity, and specificity were assessed. The linked databases included 14,480 patients; of whom, 32%, 17%, and 14.2% had metastatic BC, LC, and CRC, respectively, at diagnosis and met inclusion criteria. Nontumor-specific algorithms had lower specificity than tumor-specific algorithms. Tumor-specific algorithms' sensitivity and specificity were 53% and 99% for BC, 55% and 85% for LC, and 59% and 98% for CRC, respectively. Algorithms to distinguish metastatic BC, LC, and CRC from locally advanced disease should use tumor-specific primary cancer codes with 2 claims for the specific primary cancer >30-42 days apart to reduce misclassification. These performed best overall in specificity, positive predictive values, and overall accuracy to identify metastatic cancer in a health care claims database.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis for serum calcium identifies significantly associated SNPs near the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kapur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has a pivotal role in biological functions, and serum calcium levels have been associated with numerous disorders of bone and mineral metabolism, as well as with cardiovascular mortality. Here we report results from a genome-wide association study of serum calcium, integrating data from four independent cohorts including a total of 12,865 individuals of European and Indian Asian descent. Our meta-analysis shows that serum calcium is associated with SNPs in or near the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene on 3q13. The top hit with a p-value of 6.3 x 10(-37 is rs1801725, a missense variant, explaining 1.26% of the variance in serum calcium. This SNP had the strongest association in individuals of European descent, while for individuals of Indian Asian descent the top hit was rs17251221 (p = 1.1 x 10(-21, a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs1801725. The strongest locus in CASR was shown to replicate in an independent Icelandic cohort of 4,126 individuals (p = 1.02 x 10(-4. This genome-wide meta-analysis shows that common CASR variants modulate serum calcium levels in the adult general population, which confirms previous results in some candidate gene studies of the CASR locus. This study highlights the key role of CASR in calcium regulation.

  10. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis in multiple populations identifies new loci for peanut allergy and establishes C11orf30/EMSY as a genetic risk factor for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yuka; Eslami, Aida; van Ginkel, C Dorien; Akhabir, Loubna; Wan, Ming; Ellis, George; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Martino, David; Ferreira, Manuel A; Allen, Katrina; Mazer, Bruce; de Groot, Hans; de Jong, Nicolette W; Gerth van Wijk, Roy N; Dubois, Anthony E J; Chin, Rick; Cheuk, Stephen; Hoffman, Joshua; Jorgensen, Eric; Witte, John S; Melles, Ronald B; Hong, Xiumei; Wang, Xiaobin; Hui, Jennie; Musk, Arthur W Bill; Hunter, Michael; James, Alan L; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sandford, Andrew J; Clarke, Ann E; Daley, Denise

    2018-03-01

    Peanut allergy (PA) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic risk factors. Previously, PA loci were identified in filaggrin (FLG) and HLA in candidate gene studies, and loci in HLA were identified in a genome-wide association study and meta-analysis. We sought to investigate genetic susceptibility to PA. Eight hundred fifty cases and 926 hyper-control subjects and more than 7.8 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in a genome-wide association study to identify susceptibility variants for PA in the Canadian population. A meta-analysis of 2 phenotypes (PA and food allergy) was conducted by using 7 studies from the Canadian, American (n = 2), Australian, German, and Dutch (n = 2) populations. An SNP near integrin α6 (ITGA6) reached genome-wide significance with PA (P = 1.80 × 10 -8 ), whereas SNPs associated with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein 1 (SKAP1), matrix metallopeptidase 12 (MMP12)/MMP13, catenin α3 (CTNNA3), rho GTPase-activating protein 24 (ARHGAP24), angiopoietin 4 (ANGPT4), chromosome 11 open reading frame (C11orf30/EMSY), and exocyst complex component 4 (EXOC4) reached a threshold suggestive of association (P ≤ 1.49 × 10 -6 ). In the meta-analysis of PA, loci in or near ITGA6, ANGPT4, MMP12/MMP13, C11orf30, and EXOC4 were significant (P ≤ 1.49 × 10 -6 ). When a phenotype of any food allergy was used for meta-analysis, the C11orf30 locus reached genome-wide significance (P = 7.50 × 10 -11 ), whereas SNPs associated with ITGA6, ANGPT4, MMP12/MMP13, and EXOC4 and additional C11orf30 SNPs were suggestive (P ≤ 1.49 × 10 -6 ). Functional annotation indicated that SKAP1 regulates expression of CBX1, which colocalizes with the EMSY protein coded by C11orf30. This study identifies multiple novel loci as risk factors for PA and food allergy and establishes C11orf30 as a risk locus for both PA and food allergy. Multiple genes (C11orf30

  11. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 as shared risk loci for Crohn's disease and celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora A M Festen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and celiac disease (CelD are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0 x 10⁻⁵ in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value < 1 x 10⁻² in CelD and < 1 x 10⁻³ in CD. These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37 x 10⁻⁸ and 6.39 x 10⁻⁹, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071 in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55 x 10⁻¹⁰ and 1.38 x 10⁻¹¹ respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a

  12. A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Scans Identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 As Shared Risk Loci for Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Gabrielle; Beauchamp, Claudine; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C.; Lagacé, Caroline; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Hommes, Daan W.; Barisani, Donatella; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; van Heel, David A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Daly, Mark J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease (CelD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls) and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0×10−5 in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value <1×10−2 in CelD and <1×10−3 in CD). These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37×10−8 and 6.39×10−9, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls) and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls) cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071) in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55×10−10 and 1.38×10−11 respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a relatively small effect. PMID:21298027

  13. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  14. Expression microarray meta-analysis identifies genes associated with Ras/MAPK and related pathways in progression of muscle-invasive bladder transition cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Ewald

    Full Text Available The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta, superficial (T1 and muscle-invasive (≥T2 bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and

  15. Genome-wide linkage meta-analysis identifies susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31.3 for genetic generalized epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Costin; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Pezzella, Marianna; Robbiano, Angela; Bianchi, Amedeo; Bisulli, Francesca; Coppola, Antonietta; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Beccaria, Francesca; Trenité, Dorothée Kasteleijn-Nolst; Lindhout, Dick; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Janz, Dieter; Weber, Yvonne G; Becker, Felicitas; Lerche, Holger; Kleefuss-Lie, Ailing A; Hallman, Kerstin; Kunz, Wolfram S; Elger, Christian E; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Mullen, Saul; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Everett, Kate V; Gardiner, Mark R; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Siren, Auli; Nabbout, Rima; Baulac, Stephanie; Leguern, Eric; Serratosa, Jose M; Rosenow, Felix; Feucht, Martha; Unterberger, Iris; Covanis, Athanasios; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Kaneva, Radka; Caglayan, Hande; Turkdogan, Dilsad; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Ozbek, Ugur; Hempelmann, Anne; Schulz, Herbert; Rüschendorf, Franz; Trucks, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Avanzini, Giuliano; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Sander, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3% with heritability estimates of 80%. A considerable proportion of families with siblings affected by GGEs presumably display an oligogenic inheritance. The present genome-wide linkage meta-analysis aimed to map: (1) susceptibility loci shared by a broad spectrum of GGEs, and (2) seizure type-related genetic factors preferentially predisposing to either typical absence or myoclonic seizures, respectively. Meta-analysis of three genome-wide linkage datasets was carried out in 379 GGE-multiplex families of European ancestry including 982 relatives with GGEs. To dissect out seizure type-related susceptibility genes, two family subgroups were stratified comprising 235 families with predominantly genetic absence epilepsies (GAEs) and 118 families with an aggregation of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). To map shared and seizure type-related susceptibility loci, both nonparametric loci (NPL) and parametric linkage analyses were performed for a broad trait model (GGEs) in the entire set of GGE-multiplex families and a narrow trait model (typical absence or myoclonic seizures) in the subgroups of JME and GAE families. For the entire set of 379 GGE-multiplex families, linkage analysis revealed six loci achieving suggestive evidence for linkage at 1p36.22, 3p14.2, 5q34, 13q12.12, 13q31.3, and 19q13.42. The linkage finding at 5q34 was consistently supported by both NPL and parametric linkage results across all three family groups. A genome-wide significant nonparametric logarithm of odds score of 3.43 was obtained at 2q34 in 118 JME families. Significant parametric linkage to 13q31.3 was found in 235 GAE families assuming recessive inheritance (heterogeneity logarithm of odds = 5.02). Our linkage results support an oligogenic predisposition of familial GGE syndromes. The genetic risk factor at 5q34 confers risk to a broad spectrum of familial GGE syndromes, whereas susceptibility loci at 2q34 and 13q31

  16. Effectiveness of Reirradiation for Painful Bone Metastases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huisman, Merel; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Wijlemans, Joost W.; Vulpen, Marco van; Linden, Yvette M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases in nonresponders or patients with recurrent pain after initial response is performed in up to 42% of patients initially treated with radiotherapy. Literature on the effect of reirradiation for pain control in those patients is scarce. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we quantify the effectiveness of reirradiation for achieving pain control in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A free text search was performed to identify eligible studies using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration library electronic databases. After study selection and quality assessment, a pooled estimate was calculated for overall pain response for reirradiation of metastatic bone pain. Results: Our literature search identified 707 titles, of which 10 articles were selected for systematic review and seven entered the meta-analysis. Overall study quality was mediocre. Of the 2,694 patients initially treated for metastatic bone pain, 527 (20%) patients underwent reirradiation. Overall, a pain response after reirradiation was achieved in 58% of patients (pooled overall response rate 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.49–0.67). There was a substantial between-study heterogeneity (I 2 = 63.3%, p = 0.01) because of clinical and methodological differences between studies. Conclusions: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective in terms of pain relief for a small majority of patients; approximately 40% of patients do not benefit from reirradiation. Although the validity of results is limited, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview and the most quantitative estimate of reirradiation effectiveness to date.

  17. A Multi-Ethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Over 100,000 Subjects Identifies 23 Fibrinogen-Associated Loci but no Strong Evidence of a Causal Association between Circulating Fibrinogen and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Huang, Jie; Chasman, Daniel; Naitza, Silvia; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Teumer, Alexander; Reiner, Alex P; Folkersen, Lasse; Basu, Saonli; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Trompet, Stella; Mälarstig, Anders; Baumert, Jens; Bis, Joshua C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hottenga, Jouke J; Shin, So-Youn; Lopez, Lorna M; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Wilson, James F; Navarro, Pau; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zemunik, Tatijana; Redline, Susan; Mehra, Reena; Pulanic, Drazen; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Wild, Sarah H; Campbell, Harry; Curb, J David; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin; Eaton, Charles B.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Fornage, Myriam; Green, David; Gross, Myron; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Williams, Frances M.K.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strawbridge, Rona J; Silveira, Angela; Sennblad, Bengt; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Yao, Jie; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Haritunians, Talin; McKnight, Barbara; Lumley, Thomas; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Grotevendt, Anne; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Kocher, Thomas; Goel, Anuj; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Clarke, Robert; Steri, Maristella; Tarasov, Kirill V; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Stott, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Buckley, Brendan M; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D; McArdle, Wendy L; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Song, Jaejoon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Teichert, Martina; Ikram, M Arfan; Mosley, Thomas H; Bevan, Steve; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Nelson, Christopher P; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Eriksson, Johan G; Jacobs, David; Deary, Ian J; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; de Geus, Eco JC; Tracy, Russell P.; Hayward, Caroline; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cucca, Francesco; Jukema, J Wouter; Eriksson, Per; Seshadri, Sudha; Markus, Hugh S.; Watkins, Hugh; Samani, Nilesh J; Wallaschofski, Henri; Smith, Nicholas L.; Tregouet, David; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; Strachan, David P.; Hamsten, Anders; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), range from 34 to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies only explain a small proportion (< 2%) of its variation. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 GWA studies, including more than 90,000 subjects of European ancestry, the first GWA meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 African Americans studies totaling 8,289 samples, and a GWA study in Hispanic-Americans totaling 1,366 samples. Evaluation for association of SNPs with clinical outcomes included a total of 40,695 cases and 85,582 controls for coronary artery disease (CAD), 4,752 cases and 24,030 controls for stroke, and 3,208 cases and 46,167 controls for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the three structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead SNPs in a few loci were significantly associated with CAD, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead SNPs was not significant for CAD, stroke or VTE. Conclusion We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and CAD, stroke or VTE. PMID:23969696

  18. Genome-wide association and meta-analysis in populations from Starr County, Texas, and Mexico City identify type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci and enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci in top signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Below, J. E.; Gamazon, E. R.; Morrison, J. V.; Konkashbaev, A.; Pluzhnikov, A.; McKeigue, P. M.; Parra, E. J.; Elbein, S. C.; Hallman, D. M.; Nicolae, D. L.; Bell, G. I.; Cruz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses to identify and characterise risk loci for type 2 diabetes in Mexican-Americans from Starr County, TX, USA. Method Using 1.8 million directly interrogated and imputed genotypes in 837 unrelated type 2 diabetes cases and 436 normoglycaemic controls, we conducted Armitage trend tests. To improve power in this population with high disease rates, we also performed ordinal regression including an intermediate class with impaired fasting glucose and/or glucose tolerance. These analyses were followed by meta-analysis with a study of 967 type 2 diabetes cases and 343 normoglycaemic controls from Mexico City, Mexico. Result The top signals (unadjusted p value <1×10−5) included 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight gene regions (PER3, PARD3B, EPHA4, TOMM7, PTPRD, HNT [also known as RREB1], LOC729993 and IL34) and six intergenic regions. Among these was a missense polymorphism (rs10462020; Gly639Val) in the clock gene PER3, a system recently implicated in diabetes. We also report a second signal (minimum p value 1.52× 10−6) within PTPRD, independent of the previously implicated SNP, in a population of Han Chinese. Top meta-analysis signals included known regions HNF1A and KCNQ1. Annotation of top association signals in both studies revealed a marked excess of trans-acting eQTL in both adipose and muscle tissues. Conclusions/Interpretation In the largest study of type 2 diabetes in Mexican populations to date, we identified modest associations of novel and previously reported SNPs. In addition, in our top signals we report significant excess of SNPs that predict transcript levels in muscle and adipose tissues. PMID:21647700

  19. Identifying effective components for mobile health behaviour change interventions for smoking cessation and service uptake: protocol of a systematic review and planned meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingkaew, Pritaporn; Glidewell, Liz; Walwyn, Rebecca; Fraser, Hamish; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2017-10-06

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions for smoking cessation have been shown to be associated with an increase in effectiveness. However, interventions using mobile phones to change people's behaviour are often perceived as complex interventions, and the interactions between several components within them may affect the outcome. Therefore, it is important to understand how we can improve the design of mHealth interventions using mobile phones as a medium to deliver services. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of mHealth interventions to support smoking cessation or uptake of smoking cessation services for smokers will be included in this systematic review. A search will be performed by searching MEDLINE, MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and CINAHL. A search for new publications will be conducted 3 months prior to submission for publication as mHealth is an emerging area of research. A random-effects meta-analysis model will be used to summarise the effectiveness of mHealth interventions. The risk ratio will be used for the primary outcome, self-reported or verified smoking abstinence, and any binary outcomes for uptake of smoking cessation services. The standardised mean difference using Hedges' g will be reported for continuous data. Heterogeneity will be assessed using I 2 statistics. Where feasible, meta-regression analysis using random-effects multilevel modelling will be conducted to examine the association of pre-specified characteristics (covariates) at the study level with the effectiveness of interventions. Publication bias will be explored using Egger's test for continuous outcomes and Harbord and Peters tests for dichotomous outcomes. The funnel plot will be used to evaluate the presence of publication bias. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool will be used to assess differences in risks of bias. The results of this systematic review will provide future research with a foundation for designing and

  20. Meta-analysis for psychiatric research using free software R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ding-Geng

    2015-06-25

    This paper provides a brief overview of meta-analysis (MA) with emphasis on classical fixedeffects and random-effects MA models. It illustrates the application of MA models with the open-source software R using publicly available data from five studies on lamotrigine to treat bipolar depression and finds that meta-analysis identifies a statistically significant advantage of lamotrigine over placebo that was not evident in the individual studies.

  1. Association between the European GWAS-identified susceptibility locus at chromosome 4p16 and the risk of atrial septal defect: a case-control study in Southwest China and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao

    Full Text Available Atrial septal defect (ASD is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS of congenital heart disease (CHD identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018, 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012, and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025 increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016. Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI = 1.35 (1.24-1.46, P < 0.00001. Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology

  2. Genetic meta-analysis of 15,901 African Americans identifies variation in EXOC3L1 is associated with HDL concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B; Elbers, Clara C; Li, Yun; Zhang, Guosheng; Duan, Qing; Karczewski, Konrad J; Guo, Yiran; Tragante, Vinicius; North, Kari E; Cushman, Mary; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie A; Drenos, Fotios; Reiner, Alex P; Barnes, Michael R; Keating, Brendan J

    Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 150 loci associated with lipid levels, but results from additional ethnicities remain limited. Previously, we reported two novel lipid loci identified in a sample of 7,657 African Americans using a

  3. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Gregory T.; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van't Hof, Femke N. G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Zy, Zi Ye; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne E.; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzen, Oscar; Schadt, Eric; Bjorkegren, Johan L. M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; De Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Bown, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available

  4. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; Van't Hof, Femke N G; Webb, Thomas R; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Elmore, James R; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Borthwick, Kenneth M; Smelser, Diane T; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J; McCarty, Catherine A; Böttinger, Erwin P; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Crawford, Dana C; Carrell, David S; Gerhard, Glenn S; Franklin, David P; Carey, David J; Phillips, Victoria L; Williams, Michael J A; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A; Vasudevan, Thodor M; Lewis, David R; Thomson, Ian A; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A; Clough, Rachel E; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D Julian A; Futers, T Simon; Romaine, Simon P R; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Matthiasson, Stefan E; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Teijink, Joep A W; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lindholt, Jes S; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E; Powell, Janet T; Humphries, Steve E; Hamby, Stephen E; Goodall, Alison H; Nelson, Christopher P; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D; Johnson, Andrew D; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M; Verhoeven, Eric L; Zeebregts, Clark J; Geelkerken, Robert H; van Sambeek, Marc R; van Sterkenburg, Steven M; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D; Harrison, Seamus C; van Rij, Andre M; Samani, Nilesh J; Bown, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. OBJECTIVE: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available

  5. Meta-Analysis in Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Andrade Brei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis is a method that seeks to aggregate, integrate, and adjust results from previous studies, while considering the different conditions in which the original studies were investigated. The expected benefit is demonstration of the association between one or more variables, and generation of a systematic review and integration of studies. Hence, in the meta-analysis, the researcher can present broad evidence for or against a given theory. This study discusses the methodological and structural aspects of the organization of meta-analytical investigations in marketing. In addition, this paper suggests eight steps to organize the data and interpret the results. Lastly, we discuss the implications of the formulas and the corrections of the effects, as well as proposing paths for investigations that use meta-analysis in marketing. 

  6. Multi-ethnic meta-analysis identifies RAI1 as a possible obstructive sleep apnea related quantitative trait locus in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common heritable disorder displaying marked sexual dimorphism in disease prevalence and progression. Previous genetic association studies have identified a few genetic loci associated with OSA and related quantitative traits, but they have only focused on single et...

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published ...

  8. Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Peloso, Gina M; Liu, Dajiang J

    2017-01-01

    Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used a...

  9. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Pare, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E.; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert V.; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M.; Larson, Martin G.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P.; Launer, Lenore J.; Buring, Julie E.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F.; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, Joao D.; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C.; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H.; Kuss, Oliver; Schwabedissen, Henriette E. Meyer Zu; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Voelzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N.; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Doerte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M.; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justice, Anne E; Winkler, Thomas W; Feitosa, Mary F

    2017-01-01

    direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting...

  11. Metallothionein - immunohistochemical cancer biomarker: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromir Gumulec

    Full Text Available Metallothionein (MT has been extensively investigated as a molecular marker of various types of cancer. In spite of the fact that numerous reviews have been published in this field, no meta-analytical approach has been performed. Therefore, results of to-date immunohistochemistry-based studies were summarized using meta-analysis in this review. Web of science, PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL databases were searched (up to April 30, 2013 and the eligibility of individual studies and heterogeneity among the studies was assessed. Random and fixed effects model meta-analysis was employed depending on the heterogeneity, and publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's tests. A total of 77 studies were included with 8,015 tissue samples (4,631 cases and 3,384 controls. A significantly positive association between MT staining and tumors (vs. healthy tissues was observed in head and neck (odds ratio, OR 9.95; 95% CI 5.82-17.03 and ovarian tumors (OR 7.83; 1.09-56.29, and a negative association was ascertained in liver tumors (OR 0.10; 0.03-0.30. No significant associations were identified in breast, colorectal, prostate, thyroid, stomach, bladder, kidney, gallbladder, and uterine cancers and in melanoma. While no associations were identified between MT and tumor staging, a positive association was identified with the tumor grade (OR 1.58; 1.08-2.30. In particular, strong associations were observed in breast, ovarian, uterine and prostate cancers. Borderline significant association of metastatic status and MT staining were determined (OR 1.59; 1.03-2.46, particularly in esophageal cancer. Additionally, a significant association between the patient prognosis and MT staining was also demonstrated (hazard ratio 2.04; 1.47-2.81. However, a high degree of inconsistence was observed in several tumor types, including colorectal, kidney and prostate cancer. Despite the ambiguity in some tumor types, conclusive results are provided in the tumors of

  12. Gene expression profiles help identify the Tissue of Origin for metastatic brain cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandenBerg Scott R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic brain cancers are the most common intracranial tumor and occur in about 15% of all cancer patients. In up to 10% of these patients, the primary tumor tissue remains unknown, even after a time consuming and costly workup. The Pathwork® Tissue of Origin Test (Pathwork Diagnostics, Redwood City, CA, USA is a gene expression test to aid in the diagnosis of metastatic, poorly differentiated and undifferentiated tumors. It measures the expression pattern of 1,550 genes in these tumors and compares it to the expression pattern of a panel of 15 known tumor types. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Tissue of Origin Test in the diagnosis of primary sites for metastatic brain cancer patients. Methods Fifteen fresh-frozen metastatic brain tumor specimens of known origins met specimen requirements. These specimens were entered into the study and processed using the Tissue of Origin Test. Results were compared to the known primary site and the agreement between the two results was assessed. Results Fourteen of the fifteen specimens produced microarray data files that passed all quality metrics. One originated from a tissue type that was off-panel. Among the remaining 13 cases, the Tissue of Origin Test accurately predicted the available diagnosis in 12/13 (92.3% cases. Discussion This study demonstrates the accuracy of the Tissue of Origin Test when applied to predict the tissue of origin of metastatic brain tumors. This test could be a very useful tool for pathologists as they classify metastatic brain cancers.

  13. Immunotherapy in advanced melanoma: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Jung-Soo; Kang, Guhyun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of various immunotherapeutic agents and chemotherapy for unresected or metastatic melanomas. We performed a network meta-analysis using a Bayesian statistical model to compare objective response rate (ORR) of various immunotherapies from 12 randomized controlled studies. The estimated ORRs of immunotherapy and chemotherapy were 0.224 and 0.108, respectively. The ORRs of immunotherapy in untreated and pretreated patients were 0.279 and 0.176, respectively. In network meta-analysis, the odds ratios for ORR of nivolumab (1 mg/kg)/ipilmumab (3 mg/kg), pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg and nivolumab 3 mg/kg were 8.54, 5.39 and 4.35, respectively, compared with chemotherapy alone. Our data showed that various immunotherapies had higher ORRs rather than chemotherapy alone.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels.Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16 540 individuals from 10 independent stud...

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Anne E; Winkler, Thomas W; Feitosa, Mary F; Graff, Misa; Fisher, Virginia A; Young, Kristin; Barata, Llilda; Deng, Xuan; Czajkowski, Jacek; Hadley, David; Ngwa, Julius S; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Chu, Audrey Y; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Lim, Elise; Perez, Jeremiah; Eicher, John D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Xue, Luting; Mahajan, Anubha; Renström, Frida; Wu, Joseph; Qi, Qibin; Ahmad, Shafqat; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Bielak, Lawrence F; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bragg, Jennifer; Cadby, Gemma; Chittani, Martina; Coggeshall, Scott; Corre, Tanguy; Direk, Nese; Eriksson, Joel; Fischer, Krista; Gorski, Mathias; Neergaard Harder, Marie; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huang, Tao; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jackson, Anne U; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kinnunen, Leena; Kleber, Marcus E; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Lim, Unhee; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mangino, Massimo; Manichaikul, Ani; Marten, Jonathan; Middelberg, Rita P S; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Pérusse, Louis; Pervjakova, Natalia; Sarti, Cinzia; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smith, Jennifer A; Stančáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van der Most, Peter J; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vedantam, Sailaja L; Verweij, Niek; Vink, Jacqueline M; Vitart, Veronique; Wu, Ying; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zimmermann, Martina E; Zubair, Niha; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Adair, Linda S; Afaq, Saima; Afzal, Uzma; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bartz, Traci M; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin; Braga, Daniele; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chambers, John C; Collins, Francis S; Curran, Joanne E; de Borst, Gert J; de Craen, Anton J M; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Delgado, Graciela E; den Ruijter, Hester M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Anna L; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D; Ford, Ian; Forrester, Terrence; Gertow, Karl; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Gong, Jian; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Haitjema, Saskia; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas D; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J; Hollensted, Mette; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Homuth, Georg; Jan Hottenga, Jouke; Huang, Jie; Hung, Joseph; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; James, Alan L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A; Jørgensen, Marit E; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kooperberg, Charles; Krämer, Bernhard K; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Linneberg, Allan; Lobbens, Stephane; Loh, Marie; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lubke, Gitta; Ludolph-Donislawski, Anja; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A F; Männikkö, Reija; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Martin, Nicholas G; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Menni, Cristina; Montgomery, Grant W; Musk, Aw Bill; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peyser, Patricia A; Pisinger, Charlotta; Porteous, David J; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rawal, Rajesh; Rice, Treva; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Bien, Stephanie A; Rudan, Igor; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A; Sattar, Naveed; Savonen, Kai; Schlessinger, David; Scholtens, Salome; Schurmann, Claudia; Scott, Robert A; Sennblad, Bengt; Siemelink, Marten A; Silbernagel, Günther; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Staessen, Jan A; Stott, David J; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Taylor, Kent D; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothee; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Westendorp, R G J; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhao, Wei; Zillikens, M Carola; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Böger, Carsten A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bouchard, Claude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Yii-DerIda; Chines, Peter S; Cooper, Richard S; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Faire, Ulf de; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Hayward, Caroline; Hveem, Kristian; Johnson, Andrew D; Wouter Jukema, J; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Marchand, Loic Le; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew P; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smith, Blair H; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Strauch, Konstantin; Tiemeier, Henning; Tremoli, Elena; van der Harst, Pim; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Whitfield, John B; Wilson, James F; Tyrrell, Jessica; Frayling, Timothy M; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Fox, Caroline S; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hunter, David J; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Heid, Iris M; Mohlke, Karen L; Marchini, Jonathan; Loos, Ruth J F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Liu, Ching-Ti; Borecki, Ingrid B; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2017-04-26

    Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.

  16. Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Anne E.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Graff, Misa; Fisher, Virginia A.; Young, Kristin; Barata, Llilda; Deng, Xuan; Czajkowski, Jacek; Hadley, David; Ngwa, Julius S.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Lim, Elise; Perez, Jeremiah; Eicher, John D.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Xue, Luting; Mahajan, Anubha; Renström, Frida; Wu, Joseph; Qi, Qibin; Ahmad, Shafqat; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bragg, Jennifer; Cadby, Gemma; Chittani, Martina; Coggeshall, Scott; Corre, Tanguy; Direk, Nese; Eriksson, Joel; Fischer, Krista; Gorski, Mathias; Neergaard Harder, Marie; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huang, Tao; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jackson, Anne U.; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kinnunen, Leena; Kleber, Marcus E.; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Lim, Unhee; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mangino, Massimo; Manichaikul, Ani; Marten, Jonathan; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Pérusse, Louis; Pervjakova, Natalia; Sarti, Cinzia; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stančáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vedantam, Sailaja L.; Verweij, Niek; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Vitart, Veronique; Wu, Ying; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zimmermann, Martina E.; Zubair, Niha; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Afaq, Saima; Afzal, Uzma; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bartz, Traci M.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bottinger, Erwin; Braga, Daniele; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chambers, John C.; Collins, Francis S.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Borst, Gert J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dedoussis, George; Delgado, Graciela E.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Anna L.; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D.; Ford, Ian; Forrester, Terrence; Gertow, Karl; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Gong, Jian; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; Haitjema, Saskia; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hollensted, Mette; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Homuth, Georg; Jan Hottenga, Jouke; Huang, Jie; Hung, Joseph; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; James, Alan L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kooperberg, Charles; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Linneberg, Allan; Lobbens, Stephane; Loh, Marie; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lubke, Gitta; Ludolph-Donislawski, Anja; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Männikkö, Reija; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Martin, Nicholas G.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Menni, Cristina; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, AW (Bill); Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pisinger, Charlotta; Porteous, David J.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rawal, Rajesh; Rice, Treva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Bien, Stephanie A.; Rudan, Igor; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Sattar, Naveed; Savonen, Kai; Schlessinger, David; Scholtens, Salome; Schurmann, Claudia; Scott, Robert A.; Sennblad, Bengt; Siemelink, Marten A.; Silbernagel, Günther; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Staessen, Jan A.; Stott, David J.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothee; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhao, Wei; Zillikens, M Carola; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Böger, Carsten A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bouchard, Claude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Yii-DerIda; Chines, Peter S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Faire, Ulf de; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grabe, Hans- Jörgen; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hayward, Caroline; Hveem, Kristian; Johnson, Andrew D.; Wouter Jukema, J; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Marchand, Loic Le; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew P.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smith, Blair H.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tiemeier, Henning; Tremoli, Elena; van der Harst, Pim; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Whitfield, John B.; Wilson, James F.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Frayling, Timothy M.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Fox, Caroline S.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hunter, David J.; Spector, Tim D.; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Heid, Iris M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Marchini, Jonathan; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Borecki, Ingrid B.; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution. PMID:28443625

  17. Differential Adverse Event Profiles Associated with BCG as a Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccine or Therapeutic Bladder Cancer Vaccine Identified by Comparative Ontology-Based VAERS and Literature Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangan Xie

    Full Text Available M. bovis strain Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has been the only licensed live attenuated vaccine against tuberculosis (TB for nearly one century and has also been approved as a therapeutic vaccine for bladder cancer treatment since 1990. During its long time usage, different adverse events (AEs have been reported. However, the AEs associated with the BCG preventive TB vaccine and therapeutic cancer vaccine have not been systematically compared. In this study, we systematically collected various BCG AE data mined from the US VAERS database and PubMed literature reports, identified statistically significant BCG-associated AEs, and ontologically classified and compared these AEs related to these two types of BCG vaccine. From 397 VAERS BCG AE case reports, we identified 64 AEs statistically significantly associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 14 AEs with the BCG cancer vaccine. Our meta-analysis of 41 peer-reviewed journal reports identified 48 AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 43 AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine. Among all identified AEs from VAERS and literature reports, 25 AEs belong to serious AEs. The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE-based ontological hierarchical analysis indicated that the AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine were enriched in immune system (e.g., lymphadenopathy and lymphadenitis, skin (e.g., skin ulceration and cyanosis, and respiratory system (e.g., cough and pneumonia; in contrast, the AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine mainly occurred in the urinary system (e.g., dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria. With these distinct AE profiles detected, this study also discovered three AEs (i.e., chills, pneumonia, and C-reactive protein increased shared by the BCG TB vaccine and bladder cancer vaccine. Furthermore, our deep investigation of 24 BCG-associated death cases from VAERS identified the important effects of age, vaccine co-administration, and immunosuppressive status on the final BCG

  18. Differential Adverse Event Profiles Associated with BCG as a Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccine or Therapeutic Bladder Cancer Vaccine Identified by Comparative Ontology-Based VAERS and Literature Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangan; Codd, Christopher; Mo, Kevin; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    M. bovis strain Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has been the only licensed live attenuated vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) for nearly one century and has also been approved as a therapeutic vaccine for bladder cancer treatment since 1990. During its long time usage, different adverse events (AEs) have been reported. However, the AEs associated with the BCG preventive TB vaccine and therapeutic cancer vaccine have not been systematically compared. In this study, we systematically collected various BCG AE data mined from the US VAERS database and PubMed literature reports, identified statistically significant BCG-associated AEs, and ontologically classified and compared these AEs related to these two types of BCG vaccine. From 397 VAERS BCG AE case reports, we identified 64 AEs statistically significantly associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 14 AEs with the BCG cancer vaccine. Our meta-analysis of 41 peer-reviewed journal reports identified 48 AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 43 AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine. Among all identified AEs from VAERS and literature reports, 25 AEs belong to serious AEs. The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE)-based ontological hierarchical analysis indicated that the AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine were enriched in immune system (e.g., lymphadenopathy and lymphadenitis), skin (e.g., skin ulceration and cyanosis), and respiratory system (e.g., cough and pneumonia); in contrast, the AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine mainly occurred in the urinary system (e.g., dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria). With these distinct AE profiles detected, this study also discovered three AEs (i.e., chills, pneumonia, and C-reactive protein increased) shared by the BCG TB vaccine and bladder cancer vaccine. Furthermore, our deep investigation of 24 BCG-associated death cases from VAERS identified the important effects of age, vaccine co-administration, and immunosuppressive status on the final BCG-associated death

  19. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies loci associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels with impact on age-related traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teumer, Alexander; Qi, Qibin; Nethander, Maria

    2016-01-01

    . Through genomewide association study of up to 30 884 adults of European ancestry from 21 studies, we confirmed and extended the list of previously identified loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations (IGF1, IGFBP3, GCKR, TNS3, GHSR, FOXO3, ASXL2, NUBP2/IGFALS, SORCS2, and CELSR2......). Significant sex interactions, which were characterized by different genotype-phenotype associations between men and women, were found only for associations of IGFBP-3 concentrations with SNPs at the loci IGFBP3 and SORCS2. Analyses of SNPs, gene expression, and protein levels suggested that interplay between...

  20. Gene Expression Meta-Analysis identifies Cytokine Pathways and 5q Aberrations involved in Metastasis of ERBB2 Amplified and Basal Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Burton, Mark

    2013-01-01

    mechanisms, aside from the subtypes, were identified in a training set of 1,239 tumors and confirmed by survival analysis in two independent validation datasets from the same type of platform and consisting of very comparable node-negative patients that did not receive adjuvant medical therapy. The results...... show that high expression of 5q14 genes and low levels of TNFR2 pathway genes were associated with poor survival in basal-like cancers. Furthermore, low expression of 5q33 genes and interleukin-12 pathway genes were associated with poor outcome exclusively in ERBB2-like tumors. Conclusion...

  1. Meta-analysis in epidemiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... sciences.8. •. 9 The term refers to the 'epidemiology of results'. Stated more formally, Jenicek3 has defined meta-analysis as. 'the structured and systematic qualitative and quantitative integration of the ... In reality, most research involves re-search! ... Centre for Epidemiological Research in Southern Mrica,.

  2. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Soranzo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide (GW scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7 and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11. One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12 identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk and lower-body (hip axis and femur skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4, hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4, and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6. Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.

  3. Meta-Analysis of Aedes aegypti Expression Datasets: Comparing Virus Infection and Blood-Fed Transcriptomes to Identify Markers of Virus Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Ferreira Fukutani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti (L. is vector of several arboviruses including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, and more recently zika. Previous transcriptomic studies have been performed to elucidate altered pathways in response to viral infection. However, the intrinsic coupling between alimentation and infection were unappreciated in these studies. Feeding is required for the initial mosquito contact with the virus and these events are highly dependent. Addressing this relationship, we reinterrogated datasets of virus-infected mosquitoes with two different diet schemes (fed and unfed mosquitoes, evaluating the metabolic cross-talk during both processes. We constructed coexpression networks with the differentially expressed genes of these comparison: virus-infected versus blood-fed mosquitoes and virus-infected versus unfed mosquitoes. Our analysis identified one module with 110 genes that correlated with infection status (representing ~0.7% of the A. aegypti genome. Furthermore, we performed a machine-learning approach and summarized the infection status using only four genes (AAEL012128, AAEL014210, AAEL002477, and AAEL005350. While three of the four genes were annotated as hypothetical proteins, AAEL012128 gene is a membrane amino acid transporter correlated with viral envelope binding. This gene alone is able to discriminate all infected samples and thus should have a key role to discriminate viral infection in the A. aegypti mosquito. Moreover, validation using external datasets found this gene as differentially expressed in four transcriptomic experiments. Therefore, these genes may serve as a proxy of viral infection in the mosquito and the others 106 identified genes provides a framework to future studies.

  4. Meta-Analysis ofAedes aegyptiExpression Datasets: Comparing Virus Infection and Blood-Fed Transcriptomes to Identify Markers of Virus Presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Kiyoshi Ferreira; Kasprzykowski, José Irahe; Paschoal, Alexandre Rossi; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila I; Ramos, Pablo Ivan Pereira; de Queiroz, Artur Trancoso Lopo

    2017-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) is vector of several arboviruses including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, and more recently zika. Previous transcriptomic studies have been performed to elucidate altered pathways in response to viral infection. However, the intrinsic coupling between alimentation and infection were unappreciated in these studies. Feeding is required for the initial mosquito contact with the virus and these events are highly dependent. Addressing this relationship, we reinterrogated datasets of virus-infected mosquitoes with two different diet schemes (fed and unfed mosquitoes), evaluating the metabolic cross-talk during both processes. We constructed coexpression networks with the differentially expressed genes of these comparison: virus-infected versus blood-fed mosquitoes and virus-infected versus unfed mosquitoes. Our analysis identified one module with 110 genes that correlated with infection status (representing ~0.7% of the A. aegypti genome). Furthermore, we performed a machine-learning approach and summarized the infection status using only four genes (AAEL012128, AAEL014210, AAEL002477, and AAEL005350). While three of the four genes were annotated as hypothetical proteins, AAEL012128 gene is a membrane amino acid transporter correlated with viral envelope binding. This gene alone is able to discriminate all infected samples and thus should have a key role to discriminate viral infection in the A. aegypti mosquito. Moreover, validation using external datasets found this gene as differentially expressed in four transcriptomic experiments. Therefore, these genes may serve as a proxy of viral infection in the mosquito and the others 106 identified genes provides a framework to future studies.

  5. Can We Identify the Active Ingredients of Behaviour Change Interventions for Coronary Heart Disease Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Goodwin

    Full Text Available The main behaviour change intervention available for coronary heart disease (CHD patients is cardiac rehabilitation. There is little recognition of what the active ingredients of behavioural interventions for CHD might be. Using a behaviour change technique (BCT framework to code existing interventions may help to identify this. The objectives of this systematic review are to determine the effectiveness of CHD behaviour change interventions and how this may be explained by BCT content and structure.A systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo electronic databases was conducted over a twelve year period (2003-2015 to identify studies which reported on behaviour change interventions for CHD patients. The content of the behaviour change interventions was coded using the Coventry Aberdeen and London-Refined (CALO-RE taxonomy. Meta-regression analyses examined the BCT content as a predictor of mortality. Twenty two papers met the criteria for this review, reporting data on 16,766 participants. The most commonly included BCTs were providing information, and goal setting. There was a small but significant effect of the interventions on smoking (risk ratio (RR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97. The interventions did not reduce the risk of CHD events (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.68, 1.09, but significantly reduced the risk of mortality (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.69, 0.97. Sensitivity analyses did not find that any of the BCT variables predicted mortality and the number of BCTs included in an intervention was not associated with mortality (β = -0.02, 95% CI -0.06-0.03.Behaviour change interventions for CHD patients appear to have a positive impact on a number of outcomes. Using an existing BCT taxonomy to code the interventions helped us to understand which were the most commonly used techniques, providing information and goal setting, but not the active components of these complex interventions.

  6. Can We Identify the Active Ingredients of Behaviour Change Interventions for Coronary Heart Disease Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Laura; Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Khan, Nadia; Hotopf, Matthew H; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2016-01-01

    The main behaviour change intervention available for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients is cardiac rehabilitation. There is little recognition of what the active ingredients of behavioural interventions for CHD might be. Using a behaviour change technique (BCT) framework to code existing interventions may help to identify this. The objectives of this systematic review are to determine the effectiveness of CHD behaviour change interventions and how this may be explained by BCT content and structure. A systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo electronic databases was conducted over a twelve year period (2003-2015) to identify studies which reported on behaviour change interventions for CHD patients. The content of the behaviour change interventions was coded using the Coventry Aberdeen and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy. Meta-regression analyses examined the BCT content as a predictor of mortality. Twenty two papers met the criteria for this review, reporting data on 16,766 participants. The most commonly included BCTs were providing information, and goal setting. There was a small but significant effect of the interventions on smoking (risk ratio (RR) = 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97). The interventions did not reduce the risk of CHD events (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.68, 1.09), but significantly reduced the risk of mortality (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.69, 0.97). Sensitivity analyses did not find that any of the BCT variables predicted mortality and the number of BCTs included in an intervention was not associated with mortality (β = -0.02, 95% CI -0.06-0.03). Behaviour change interventions for CHD patients appear to have a positive impact on a number of outcomes. Using an existing BCT taxonomy to code the interventions helped us to understand which were the most commonly used techniques, providing information and goal setting, but not the active components of these complex interventions.

  7. Online open neuroimaging mass meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple format and a web service performs the numerical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system allows for mass meta-analysis, e.......g., meta-analysis across multiple brain regions and multiple mental disorders....

  8. Causal Meta-Analysis : Methodology and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a statistical method to summarize research data from multiple studies in a quantitative manner. This dissertation addresses a number of methodological topics in causal meta-analysis and reports the development and validation of meta-analysis software. In the first (methodological)

  9. Multiethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >100 000 subjects identifies 23 fibrinogen-associated Loci but no strong evidence of a causal association between circulating fibrinogen and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Huang, Jie; Chasman, Daniel; Naitza, Silvia; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Teumer, Alexander; Reiner, Alex P; Folkersen, Lasse; Basu, Saonli; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Trompet, Stella; Mälarstig, Anders; Baumert, Jens; Bis, Joshua C; Guo, Xiuqing; Hottenga, Jouke J; Shin, So-Youn; Lopez, Lorna M; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Wilson, James F; Navarro, Pau; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zemunik, Tatijana; Redline, Susan; Mehra, Reena; Pulanic, Drazen; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Wild, Sarah H; Campbell, Harry; Curb, J David; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin; Eaton, Charles B; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Bandinelli, Stefania; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Fornage, Myriam; Green, David; Gross, Myron; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Williams, Frances M K; Grant, Peter J; Spector, Timothy D; Strawbridge, Rona J; Silveira, Angela; Sennblad, Bengt; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; Yao, Jie; Swords Jenny, Nancy; Haritunians, Talin; McKnight, Barbara; Lumley, Thomas; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Grotevendt, Anne; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Kocher, Thomas; Goel, Anuj; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Clarke, Robert; Steri, Maristella; Tarasov, Kirill V; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Stott, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Buckley, Brendan M; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D; McArdle, Wendy L; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Song, Jaejoon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R; Rose, Lynda M; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Teichert, Martina; Ikram, M Arfan; Mosley, Thomas H; Bevan, Steve; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chambers, John C; Saleheen, Danish; Kooner, Jaspal S; Danesh, John; Nelson, Christopher P; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Eriksson, Johan G; Jacobs, David; Deary, Ian J; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; de Geus, Eco J C; Tracy, Russell P; Hayward, Caroline; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cucca, Francesco; Jukema, J Wouter; Eriksson, Per; Seshadri, Sudha; Markus, Hugh S; Watkins, Hugh; Samani, Nilesh J; Wallaschofski, Henri; Smith, Nicholas L; Tregouet, David; Ridker, Paul M; Tang, Weihong; Strachan, David P; Hamsten, Anders; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2013-09-17

    Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease, range from 34% to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a small proportion (90 000 subjects of European ancestry, the first genome-wide association meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 studies in blacks totaling 8289 samples, and a genome-wide association study in Hispanics totaling 1366 samples. Evaluation for association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms with clinical outcomes included a total of 40 695 cases and 85 582 controls for coronary artery disease, 4752 cases and 24 030 controls for stroke, and 3208 cases and 46 167 controls for venous thromboembolism. Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10(-8)) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the 3 structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines, and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a few loci were significantly associated with coronary artery disease, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead single-nucleotide polymorphisms was not significant for coronary artery disease, stroke, or venous thromboembolism. We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and coronary artery disease, stroke, or venous thromboembolism.

  10. Meta-analysis of gene expression microarrays with missing replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leckie Christopher

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many different microarray experiments are publicly available today. It is natural to ask whether different experiments for the same phenotypic conditions can be combined using meta-analysis, in order to increase the overall sample size. However, some genes are not measured in all experiments, hence they cannot be included or their statistical significance cannot be appropriately estimated in traditional meta-analysis. Nonetheless, these genes, which we refer to as incomplete genes, may also be informative and useful. Results We propose a meta-analysis framework, called "Incomplete Gene Meta-analysis", which can include incomplete genes by imputing the significance of missing replicates, and computing a meta-score for every gene across all datasets. We demonstrate that the incomplete genes are worthy of being included and our method is able to appropriately estimate their significance in two groups of experiments. We first apply the Incomplete Gene Meta-analysis and several comparable methods to five breast cancer datasets with an identical set of probes. We simulate incomplete genes by randomly removing a subset of probes from each dataset and demonstrate that our method consistently outperforms two other methods in terms of their false discovery rate. We also apply the methods to three gastric cancer datasets for the purpose of discriminating diffuse and intestinal subtypes. Conclusions Meta-analysis is an effective approach that identifies more robust sets of differentially expressed genes from multiple studies. The incomplete genes that mainly arise from the use of different platforms may also have statistical and biological importance but are ignored or are not appropriately involved by previous studies. Our Incomplete Gene Meta-analysis is able to incorporate the incomplete genes by estimating their significance. The results on both breast and gastric cancer datasets suggest that the highly ranked genes and associated GO

  11. Gene expression identifies heterogeneity of metastatic propensity in high-grade soft tissue sarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skubitz, Keith M; Francis, Princy; Skubitz, Amy P N

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic propensity of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is heterogeneous and may be determined by gene expression patterns that do not correlate well with morphology. The authors have reported gene expression patterns that distinguish 2 broad classes of clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC-gene set), and......), and other patterns that can distinguish heterogeneity of serous ovarian carcinoma (OVCA-gene set) and aggressive fibromatosis (AF-gene set); however, clinical follow-up data were not available for these samples.......Metastatic propensity of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is heterogeneous and may be determined by gene expression patterns that do not correlate well with morphology. The authors have reported gene expression patterns that distinguish 2 broad classes of clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC-gene set...

  12. Metastatic thyroid carcinoma without identifiable primary tumor within the thyroid gland: a retrospective study of a rare phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Cohen, Perry R; Prasad, Manju L; Hasanovic, Adnan; Tuttle, Robert Michael; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2017-07-01

    Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) without an identifiable primary tumor despite extensive microscopic examination of the thyroid gland is a rare but true phenomenon.We retrieved 7 of such cases and described in detail the clinical and pathologic features of these tumors. BRAF V600E immunohistochemistry and Sequenom molecular profile were conducted in selected cases. All patients harbored metastatic disease in the central (n=3), lateral (n=3), or both neck compartments (n=1). The histotype of the metastatic disease was PTC (n=5), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma in association with a PTC columnar variant (n=1), and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in association with a PTC tall cell variant (n=1). Fibrosis was present in the thyroid of 5 patients. All patients with PTC were alive without evidence of recurrence. The 76-year-old patient with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma did not recur and died of unknown causes. Finally, the patient with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma was alive with distant metastasis at last follow-up. The median follow-up for this cohort was 2.2years (range, 0.8-17). BRAF V600E was detected in 4 of 6 cases by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, metastatic nodal disease without identifiable thyroid primary is a rare but real phenomenon of unknown mechanisms. Although most tumors are low grade and well differentiated, aggressive behavior due to poorly differentiated or anaplastic carcinoma can happen. Most cases are BRAF V600E -positive thyroid tumors. A papillary carcinoma phenotype is found in all reported cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Ghatalia

    Full Text Available Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T, matched normal kidney (N and metastatic tumor tissue (M may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79 compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187. Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001. The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  14. Rethinking Meta-Analysis: Applications for Air Pollution Data and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Julie E; Petito Boyce, Catherine; Sax, Sonja N; Beyer, Leslie A; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses offer a rigorous and transparent systematic framework for synthesizing data that can be used for a wide range of research areas, study designs, and data types. Both the outcome of meta-analyses and the meta-analysis process itself can yield useful insights for answering scientific questions and making policy decisions. Development of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards illustrates many potential applications of meta-analysis. These applications demonstrate the strengths and limitations of meta-analysis, issues that arise in various data realms, how meta-analysis design choices can influence interpretation of results, and how meta-analysis can be used to address bias and heterogeneity. Reviewing available data from a meta-analysis perspective can provide a useful framework and impetus for identifying and refining strategies for future research. Moreover, increased pervasiveness of a meta-analysis mindset—focusing on how the pieces of the research puzzle fit together—would benefit scientific research and data syntheses regardless of whether or not a quantitative meta-analysis is undertaken. While an individual meta-analysis can only synthesize studies addressing the same research question, the results of separate meta-analyses can be combined to address a question encompassing multiple data types. This observation applies to any scientific or policy area where information from a variety of disciplines must be considered to address a broader research question. PMID:25969128

  15. Alcohol Involvement and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M.; Thorsteinsson, Einar B.; Rooke, Sally E.; Schutte, Nicola S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to quantify the relationship between the Five-Factor Model of personality and alcohol involvement and to identify moderators of the relationship. The meta-analysis included 20 studies, 119 effect sizes, and 7,886 participants. Possible moderators examined included: five-factor rating type (self vs. other);…

  16. A meta-analysis of cerebrovascular disease and hyperhomocysteinaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G M; Tvedegaard, K C; Andersen, Niels Trolle

    2000-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia has been identified as a risk factor for stroke and cerebrovascular disease in several studies. To evaluate the evidence we performed a meta-analysis. We found 21 studies searching Medline from 1966-July 1999 using the key words homocysteine, homocystine and cerebrovascular...... was used. The reports on 8 cross-sectional and 4 longitudinal studies gave data on the mean and standard deviations of plasma or serum homocysteine for both cases and controls, and these studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the 5 excluded studies all pointed to a positive relationship...

  17. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analys...

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Extensive Reading Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall effectiveness of extensive reading, whether learners' age impacts learning, and whether the length of time second language learners engage in extensive reading influences test scores. The author conducted a meta-analysis to answer research questions and to identify future research…

  19. Macroeconomics of natural disasters : Meta-analysis and policy options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter); S. Lazzaroni (Sara)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe use the case of the impact of natural disasters to analyse strengths and weaknesses of meta-analysis in an emerging research field. Macroeconomists have published on this issue since 2002 (we identified 22 studies to date). The results of the studies are contradictory and

  20. The Psychological Effects of Meditation: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Peter; Eberth, Juliane; Schwarz, Marcus; Zimmermann, Doreen; Haarig, Frederik; Jaeger, Sonia; Kunze, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we give a comprehensive overview of the effects of meditation on psychological variables that can be extracted from empirical studies, concentrating on the effects of meditation on nonclinical groups of adult meditators. Mostly because of methodological problems, almost 3/4 of an initially identified 595 studies had to be…

  1. A meta-analysis of electroconvulsive therapy efficacy in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kho, King Han; van Vreeswijk, Michiel Floris; Simpson, Steve; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently published controlled studies comparing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with other treatments for depression offer the opportunity to perform a meta-analysis of ECT in depression. Fifteen studies were identified which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these controlled trials, 20 effect

  2. Predictors of efficacy in depression prevention programmes. Meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jané Llopis, E.; Hosman, C.M.H.; Jenkins, R.B.; Anderson, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide, 340 million people are affected by depression, with high comorbid, social and economic costs. AIMS: To identify potential predictors of effect in prevention programmes. METHOD: A meta-analysis was made of 69 programmes to reduce depression or depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The

  3. A Meta-Analysis on Unconscious Thought Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strick, M.A.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Bos, M.W.; Sjoerdsma, A.; Baaren, R.B. van; Nordgren, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed on the unconscious thought effect (UTE). All available published and unpublished data on unconscious thought were included. Our aims were to provide a statistically robust estimate of the effect size of the UTE, to identify significant moderators, and to

  4. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis of homocysteine and methionine metabolism identifies five one carbon metabolism loci and a novel association of ALDH1L1 with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Williams

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy, a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD, cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the sole source of de novo methyl group synthesis, impacting many biological and epigenetic pathways. However, the genetic determinants of elevated tHcy (hyperhomocysteinemia, dysregulation of methionine metabolism and the underlying biological processes remain unclear. We conducted independent genome-wide association studies and a meta-analysis of methionine metabolism, characterized by post-methionine load test tHcy, in 2,710 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS and 2,100 participants from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP clinical trial, and then examined the association of the identified loci with incident stroke in FHS. Five genes in the FOCM pathway (GNMT [p = 1.60 × 10(-63], CBS [p = 3.15 × 10(-26], CPS1 [p = 9.10 × 10(-13], ALDH1L1 [p = 7.3 × 10(-13] and PSPH [p = 1.17 × 10(-16] were strongly associated with the difference between pre- and post-methionine load test tHcy levels (ΔPOST. Of these, one variant in the ALDH1L1 locus, rs2364368, was associated with incident ischemic stroke. Promoter analyses reveal genetic and epigenetic differences that may explain a direct effect on GNMT transcription and a downstream affect on methionine metabolism. Additionally, a genetic-score consisting of the five significant loci explains 13% of the variance of ΔPOST in FHS and 6% of the variance in VISP. Association between variants in FOCM genes with ΔPOST suggest novel mechanisms that lead to differences in methionine metabolism, and possibly the epigenome, impacting disease risk. These data emphasize the importance of a concerted effort to understand regulators of one carbon metabolism as potential therapeutic targets.

  6. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Song, G G

    2015-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes and biological processes associated with changes in gene expression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We performed a meta-analysis using the integrative meta-analysis of expression data program on publicly available microarray AS Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets. We performed Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses and pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Four GEO datasets, including 31 patients with AS and 39 controls, were available for the meta-analysis. We identified 65 genes across the studies that were consistently DE in patients with AS vs controls (23 upregulated and 42 downregulated). The upregulated gene with the largest effect size (ES; -1.2628, P = 0.020951) was integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), which is expressed by CD4+ T cells and plays a role in activation of T cells. The downregulated gene with the largest ES (1.2299, P = 0.040075) was mitochondrial ribosomal protein S11 (MRPS11). The most significant GO enrichment was in the respiratory electron transport chain category (P = 1.67 x 10-9). Therefore, our meta-analysis identified genes that were consistently DE as well as biological pathways associated with gene expression changes in AS.

  7. OHBM 2017: Practical intensity based meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maumet, Camille

    2017-01-01

    "Practical intensity-based meta-analysis" slides from my talk in the OHBM 2017 educational talk on Neuroimaging meta-analysis.http://www.humanbrainmapping.org/files/2017/ED Courses/Neuroimaging Meta-Analysis.pdf

  8. Sequential Stereotype Priming: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Ciara K; White, Katherine R; Hinojos, Michelle R; Sandoval, Mayra; Crites, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Psychological interest in stereotype measurement has spanned nearly a century, with researchers adopting implicit measures in the 1980s to complement explicit measures. One of the most frequently used implicit measures of stereotypes is the sequential priming paradigm. The current meta-analysis examines stereotype priming, focusing specifically on this paradigm. To contribute to ongoing discussions regarding methodological rigor in social psychology, one primary goal was to identify methodological moderators of the stereotype priming effect-whether priming is due to a relation between the prime and target stimuli, the prime and target response, participant task, stereotype dimension, stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and stimuli type. Data from 39 studies yielded 87 individual effect sizes from 5,497 participants. Analyses revealed that stereotype priming is significantly moderated by the presence of prime-response relations, participant task, stereotype dimension, target stimulus type, SOA, and prime repetition. These results carry both practical and theoretical implications for future research on stereotype priming.

  9. Meta-Analysis in Stata Using Gllamm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagos, Pantelis G.

    2015-01-01

    There are several user-written programs for performing meta-analysis in Stata (Stata Statistical Software: College Station, TX: Stata Corp LP). These include metan, metareg, mvmeta, and glst. However, there are several cases for which these programs do not suffice. For instance, there is no software for performing univariate meta-analysis with…

  10. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  11. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  12. Statistical Power in Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Statistical power is important in a meta-analysis study, although few studies have examined the performance of simulated power in meta-analysis. The purpose of this study is to inform researchers about statistical power estimation on two sample mean difference test under different situations: (1) the discrepancy between the analytical power and…

  13. SATB2 is a Promising Biomarker for Identifying a Colorectal Origin for Liver Metastatic Adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available SATB2 (Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 has recently been shown to be a specific biomarker of colorectal cancer (CRC. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic potential of SATB2 as a means of detecting a CRC origin for liver metastases. SATB2 expression was examined in a resection cohort of 101 CRC and 273 non-CRC adenocarcinoma samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC. The diagnostic accuracy of CRC origins of liver metastases based on SATB2 and a three marker panel of SATB2, CK20 and CDX2 was evaluated using an independent cohort of 192 liver biopsies. IHC showed 97 of the 101 (96.0% primary CRC samples were SATB2 positive, compared to only 6 of the 273 (2.1% samples of other cancer types. The sensitivity, specificity and AUC values of SATB2 expression in resection samples were 97%, 97.1% and 0.977, respectively. Meanwhile, for the liver biopsy samples, the sensitivity, specificity and AUC values of a CRC liver metastases was 92.2%, 97.8% and 0.948 for SATB2, 95.1%, 91.0% and 0.959 for CK20, and 100%, 85.4% and 0.976 for CDX2, respectively. Further analysis demonstrated that all three-marker positivity was detected in 92/103 (89.3% CRC and 2/89 (2.2% non-CRC liver metastases sampled by biopsy. Our findings suggest that SATB2, as measured by IHC, could serve as a promising diagnostic biomarker of CRC metastases. Combining evaluation of SATB2 with CK20 and CDX2 to form a three marker panel further improved the detection of metastatic CRCs in liver biopsy tissues.

  14. Meta-analysis of DNA methylation biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Jinyun; Huang, Tao; Duan, Shiwei; Dai, Dongjun; Jiang, Danjie; Sui, Xinbing; Li, Da; Chen, Yidan; Ding, Fei; Huang, Changxin; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Kaifeng

    2016-12-06

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate the contribution of DNA methylation to the risk of HCC. A total of 2109 publications were initially retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang literature database. After a four-step filtration, we harvested 144 case-control articles in the meta-analysis. Our results revealed that 24 genes (carcinoma tissues vs adjacent tissues), 17 genes (carcinoma tissues vs normal tissues) and six genes (carcinoma serums vs normal serums) were significantly hypermethylated in HCC. Subgroup meta-analysis by geographical populations showed that six genes (carcinoma tissues vs adjacent tissues) and four genes (carcinoma tissues vs normal tissues) were significantly hypermethylated in HCC. Our meta-analysis identified the correlations between a number of aberrant methylated genes (p16, RASSF1A, GSTP1, p14, CDH1, APC, RUNX3, SOCS1, p15, MGMT, SFRP1, WIF1, PRDM2, DAPK1, RARβ, hMLH1, p73, DLC1, p53, SPINT2, OPCML and WT1) and HCC. Aberrant DNA methylation might become useful biomarkers for the prediction and diagnosis of HCC.

  15. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  16. Living network meta-analysis compared with pairwise meta-analysis in comparative effectiveness research: empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Adriani; Mavridis, Dimitris; Furukawa, Toshi A; Cipriani, Andrea; Tricco, Andrea C; Straus, Sharon E; Siontis, George C M; Egger, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine whether the continuous updating of networks of prospectively planned randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (“living” network meta-analysis) provides strong evidence against the null hypothesis in comparative effectiveness of medical interventions earlier than the updating of conventional, pairwise meta-analysis. Design Empirical study of the accumulating evidence about the comparative effectiveness of clinical interventions. Data sources Database of network meta-analyses of RCTs identified through searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews until 14 April 2015. Eligibility criteria for study selection Network meta-analyses published after January 2012 that compared at least five treatments and included at least 20 RCTs. Clinical experts were asked to identify in each network the treatment comparison of greatest clinical interest. Comparisons were excluded for which direct and indirect evidence disagreed, based on side, or node, splitting test (Pmeta-analysis. The frequency and time to strong evidence was compared against the null hypothesis between pairwise and network meta-analyses. Results 49 comparisons of interest from 44 networks were included; most (n=39, 80%) were between active drugs, mainly from the specialties of cardiology, endocrinology, psychiatry, and rheumatology. 29 comparisons were informed by both direct and indirect evidence (59%), 13 by indirect evidence (27%), and 7 by direct evidence (14%). Both network and pairwise meta-analysis provided strong evidence against the null hypothesis for seven comparisons, but for an additional 10 comparisons only network meta-analysis provided strong evidence against the null hypothesis (P=0.002). The median time to strong evidence against the null hypothesis was 19 years with living network meta-analysis and 23 years with living pairwise meta-analysis (hazard ratio 2.78, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 7.72, P=0.05). Studies directly comparing

  17. Effectiveness and feasibility of hysteroscopic sterilization techniques: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Chapelle, C.F.; Veersema, S.; Brölmann, H.A.M.; Jansen, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether hysteroscopic sterilization is feasible and effective in preventing pregnancy. Secondarily, to identify risk factors for failure of hysteroscopic sterilization. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis. Setting Not applicable. Patient(s) Women undergoing hysteroscopic

  18. Application of a drug-induced apoptosis assay to identify treatment strategies in recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bosserman

    Full Text Available A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes.In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users, or elect to not use the test (non-users.The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73% used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04 and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01. Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01.The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00901264.

  19. Conducting Meta-Analysis Using SAS

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, Winfried; Huffcutt, Allen I; Arthur, Winfred

    2001-01-01

    Conducting Meta-Analysis Using SAS reviews the meta-analysis statistical procedure and shows the reader how to conduct one using SAS. It presents and illustrates the use of the PROC MEANS procedure in SAS to perform the data computations called for by the two most commonly used meta-analytic procedures, the Hunter & Schmidt and Glassian approaches. This book serves as both an operational guide and user's manual by describing and explaining the meta-analysis procedures and then presenting the appropriate SAS program code for computing the pertinent statistics. The practical, step-by-step instru

  20. Elevated osteopontin and thrombospondin expression identifies malignant human breast carcinoma but is not indicative of metastatic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Urquidi, Virginia; Rivard, Amber; Goodison, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Our previous characterization of a human breast tumor metastasis model identified several candidate metastasis genes. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) correlated with the metastatic phenotype, whereas thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TYRP-1) correlated with the nonmetastatic phenotype of independent MDA-MB-435 cell lines implanted orthotopically into athymic mice. The aim of the present study was to examine the cellular distribution of these molecules in human breast tissue and to determine whether the relative expression level of these three genes is associated with human breast tumor metastasis. Sixty-eight fresh, frozen specimens including 31 primary infiltrating ductal carcinomas, 22 nodal metastases, 10 fibroadenomas, and five normal breast tissues were evaluated for OPN expression, TSP-1 expression and TYRP-1 expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed to monitor the cellular distribution and to qualitatively assess expression. Quantitative analysis was achieved by enrichment of breast epithelial cells using laser-capture microdissection and subsequent real-time, quantitative PCR. The epithelial components of the breast tissue were the source of OPN and TSP-1 expression, whereas TYRP-1 was present in both the epithelial and stromal components. Both OPN and TSP-1 expression were significantly higher in malignant epithelial sources over normal and benign epithelial sources, but no difference in expression levels was evident between primary tumors with or without metastases, nor between primary and metastatic carcinomas. Elevated expression of OPN and TSP-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. The multiplex analysis of these molecules may enhance our ability to diagnose and/or prognosticate human breast malignancy

  1. Ischiofemoral impingement syndrome: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Subhawong, Ty K.; Jose, Jean; Tresley, Jonathan; Clifford, Paul D. [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this article are to review the imaging characteristics of ischiofemoral impingement (IFI), summarize measurement thresholds for radiologic diagnosis based on a meta-analysis of the literature and raise awareness among radiologists and clinicians of this entity. A PubMed search restricted to the English language containing the keywords ''ischiofemoral impingement'' and ''quadratus femoris MRI'' was performed, and citations in these articles were also used to identify a total of 27 studies discussing ischiofemoral impingement. After excluding case reports and non-representative studies, there were five remaining articles including 193 hip MRIs of IFI in 154 subjects (133 female, 21 male) and 135 asymptomatic control hip MRIs from 74 subjects (55 female, 19 male). Additionally, we performed a retrospective database search of pelvic and hip MRI reports from our institution including the terms ''quadratus femoris'' or ''ischiofemoral impingement'' from a 9-year period and 24 hip MRIs from 21 patients (18 female, 3 male) with IFI with 5 asymptomatic contralateral control hip MRIs identified. In all, 217 hip MRIs of IFI and 140 control cases were included. A meta-analysis of these hip MRIs was conducted to determine optimal thresholds of the ischiofemoral space (IFS) and quadratus femoris space (QFS) for identifying IFI. Cases of IFI showed significantly smaller IFS and QFS compared to controls (14.91 ± 4.8 versus 26.01 ± 7.98 and 9.57 ± 3.7 versus 15.97 ± 6.07, measured in mm, respectively, p < 0.0001 for both). Pooled analysis revealed that for IFS, using a cutoff of ≤15 mm yielded a sensitivity of 76.9 %, specificity of 81.0 % and overall accuracy of 78.3 %. For QFS, a cutoff of ≤ 10.0 mm resulted in 78.7 % sensitivity, 74.1 % specificity and 77.1 % overall accuracy. IFI is a potential cause of hip pain that can be accurately diagnosed with MRI in conjunction with

  2. Physical Readiness Training: A Meta-Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vickers, Jr, Ross R

    2007-01-01

    .... This meta-analysis of available PRT studies (k = 3) indicated that (a) Fitness gains in the PRT program were equal to the gains in traditional fitness programs, and (b) the injury rate (i.e., hazard ratio...

  3. Exercise and Bone Density: Meta-Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelley, George A; Sharpe-Kelley, Kristi

    2007-01-01

    .... Since no meta-analysis had existed using individual patient data (IPD) to examine the effects of exercise on BMD, our second two-year period of funding was devoted to examining the feasibility...

  4. Drivers of wetland conversion: a global meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanneke van Asselen

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis of case studies has become an important tool for synthesizing case study findings in land change. Meta-analyses of deforestation, urbanization, desertification and change in shifting cultivation systems have been published. This present study adds to this literature, with an analysis of the proximate causes and underlying forces of wetland conversion at a global scale using two complementary approaches of systematic review. Firstly, a meta-analysis of 105 case-study papers describing wetland conversion was performed, showing that different combinations of multiple-factor proximate causes, and underlying forces, drive wetland conversion. Agricultural development has been the main proximate cause of wetland conversion, and economic growth and population density are the most frequently identified underlying forces. Secondly, to add a more quantitative component to the study, a logistic meta-regression analysis was performed to estimate the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide, using globally-consistent biophysical and socioeconomic location factor maps. Significant factors explaining wetland conversion, in order of importance, are market influence, total wetland area (lower conversion probability, mean annual temperature and cropland or built-up area. The regression analyses results support the outcomes of the meta-analysis of the processes of conversion mentioned in the individual case studies. In other meta-analyses of land change, similar factors (e.g., agricultural development, population growth, market/economic factors are also identified as important causes of various types of land change (e.g., deforestation, desertification. Meta-analysis helps to identify commonalities across the various local case studies and identify which variables may lead to individual cases to behave differently. The meta-regression provides maps indicating the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide based on the location factors that have

  5. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Y.J.; Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Ganna, A.; Hirschhorn, J.; North, K.E.; Ingelsson, E.; Lin, D.Y.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Vermeulen, S.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with

  6. Efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stuart; Hansen, Thomas; Kasper, Siegfried

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical relevance of the relative antidepressant efficacy of escitalopram and citalopram by meta-analysis. Studies in major depressive disorder (MDD) with both escitalopram and citalopram treatment arms were identified. Adult patients had to meet DSM-IV criteria for MDD. The primary outcome measure was the treatment difference in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 8 (or last assessment if escitalopram, n=995; citalopram, n=1014). Escitalopram was significantly more effective than citalopram in overall treatment effect, with an estimated mean treatment difference of 1.7 points at week 8 (or last assessment if escitalopram. In this meta-analysis, the statistically significant superior efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram was shown to be clinically relevant.

  7. The prevalence of food allergy: A meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rona, Roberto J.; Keil, Thomas; Summers, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is uncertainty about the prevalence of food allergy in communities. Objective: To assess the prevalence of food allergy by performing a meta-analysis according to the method of assessment used. Methods: The foods assessed were cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, fish, shellfish......, and an overall estimate of food allergy. We summarized the information in 5 categories: self-reported symptoms, specific IgE positive, specific skin prick test positive, symptoms combined with sensitization, and food challenge studies. We systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for publications since 1990....... The meta-analysis included only original studies. They were stratified by age groups: infant/preschool, school children, and adults. Results: A total of 934 articles were identified, but only 51 were considered appropriate for inclusion. The prevalence of self-reported food allergy was very high compared...

  8. Meta-analysis: Problems with Russian Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskaya, E V

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a powerful tool to identify Evidence Based medical technologies (interventions) for use in every day practice. Meta-analysis uses statistical approaches to combine results from multiple studies in an effort to increase power (over individual studies), improve estimates of the size of the effect and/or to resolve uncertainty when reports disagree. Meta-analysis is a quantitative, formal study design used to systematically assess previous research studies to derive conclusions from this research. Meta-analysis may provide more precise estimate of the effect of treatment or risk factor for a disease, or other outcomes, than any individual study contributing to the pooled analysis.We have quite a substantial number of Russian medical publications, but not so many Meta-Analyses published in Russian. Russian publications are cited in English language papers not so often. A total of 90% of clinical studies included in published Meta-Analyses incorporate only English language papers. International studies or papers with Russian co-authors are published in English language. The main question is: what is the problem with inclusion of Russian medical publications in Meta-Analysis? The main reasons for this are the following: 1) It is difficult to find Russian papers, difficult to work with them and to work with Russian journals:a. There are single Russian Biomedical Journals, which are translated into English and are included in databases (PubMed, Scopus and other), despite the fact that all of them have English language abstracts.b. The majority the meta-analyses authors use in their work different citation management software such as the Mendeley, Reference Manager, ProCite, EndNote, and others. These citation management systems allow scientists to organize their own literature databases with internet searches and have adds-on for the Office programs what makes process of literature citation very convenient. The Internet sites of the majority of

  9. Air pollution and quality of sperm: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Namvar, Farideh; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid; Hadizadeh Talasaz, Zahra; Esmaeli, Mahin

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is common in all countries and affects reproductive functions in men and women. It particularly impacts sperm parameters in men. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of air pollution on the quality of sperm. The scientific databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, Cochrane Library, and Elsevier were searched to identify relevant articles published between 1978 to 2013. In the first step, 76 articles were selected. These studies were ecological correlation, cohort, retrospective, cross-sectional, and case control ones that were found through electronic and hand search of references about air pollution and male infertility. The outcome measurement was the change in sperm parameters. A total of 11 articles were ultimately included in a meta-analysis to examine the impact of air pollution on sperm parameters. The authors applied meta-analysis sheets from Cochrane library, then data extraction, including mean and standard deviation of sperm parameters were calculated and finally their confidence interval (CI) were compared to CI of standard parameters. The CI for pooled means were as follows: 2.68 ± 0.32 for ejaculation volume (mL), 62.1 ± 15.88 for sperm concentration (million per milliliter), 39.4 ± 5.52 for sperm motility (%), 23.91 ± 13.43 for sperm morphology (%) and 49.53 ± 11.08 for sperm count. The results of this meta-analysis showed that air pollution reduces sperm motility, but has no impact on the other sperm parameters of spermogram.

  10. Motivational interviewing: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubak, Sune; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Christensen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Background Motivational Interviewing is a well-known, scientifically tested method of counselling clients developed by Miller and Rollnick and viewed as a useful intervention strategy in the treatment of lifestyle problems and disease. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in different areas of disease and to identify factors shaping outcomes. Design of study A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials using motivational interviewing as the intervention. Method After selection criteria a systematic literature search in 16 databases produced 72 randomised controlled trials the first of which was published in 1991. A quality assessment was made with a validated scale. A meta-analysis was performed as a generic inverse variance meta-analysis. Results Meta-analysis showed a significant effect (95% confidence interval) for motivational interviewing for combined effect estimates for body mass index, total blood cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, blood alcohol concentration and standard ethanol content, while combined effect estimates for cigarettes per day and for HbA1c were not significant. Motivational interviewing had a significant and clinically relevant effect in approximately three out of four studies, with an equal effect on physiological (72%) and psychological (75%) diseases. Psychologists and physicians obtained an effect in approximately 80% of the studies, while other healthcare providers obtained an effect in 46% of the studies. When using motivational interviewing in brief encounters of 15 minutes, 64% of the studies showed an effect. More than one encounter with the patient ensures the effectiveness of motivational interviewing. Conclusion Motivational interviewing in a scientific setting outperforms traditional advice giving in the treatment of a broad range of behavioural problems and diseases. Large-scale studies are now needed to prove that motivational interviewing can be implemented into daily

  11. Meta-analysis of surgical techniques for preventing parotidectomy sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Joseph M; King, Nancy; Reiter, David; Fisher, Kyle; Heffelfinger, Ryan N; Pribitkin, Edmund A

    2009-01-01

    To conduct a meta-analysis of the literature on surgical methods for the prevention of Frey syndrome and concave facial deformity after parotidectomy. A PubMed search through February 2008 identified more than 60 English-language studies involving surgical techniques for prevention of these parameters. Analyzed works included 15 retrospective or prospective controlled studies reporting quantitative data for all included participants for 1 or more of the measured parameters in patients who had undergone parotidectomy. Report quality was assessed by the strength of taxonomy recommendation (SORT) score. Data were directly extracted from reports and dichotomized into positive and negative outcomes. The statistical significance was then calculated. The mean SORT score for all studies was 2.34, and the mean SORT score for all the analyzed studies was 1.88. Meta-analysis for multiple techniques to prevent symptomatic Frey syndrome, positive starch-iodine test results, and contour deformity favored intervention with a cumulative odds ratio (OR) of 3.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.81-5.34); OR, 3.66 (95% CI; 2.32-5.77); and OR, 5.25 (95% CI, 3.57-7.72), respectively. Meta-analysis of operative techniques to prevent symptomatic Frey syndrome, positive starch-iodine test results, and facial asymmetry suggests that such methods are likely to reduce the incidence of these complications after parotidectomy.

  12. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Liang; Shu, Long; Zheng, Pei-Fen; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Si, Cai-Juan; Yu, Xiao-Long; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Lun

    2017-05-01

    The analysis of dietary patterns has recently drawn considerable attention as a method of investigating the association between the overall whole diet and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, the results have yielded conflicting findings. Here, we carried out a meta-analysis to identify the association between dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal cancer. A total of 40 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The highest category of 'healthy' dietary pattern compared with the lowest category was apparently associated with a decreased risk for colorectal cancer [odds ratio (OR)=0.75; confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.83; Pcolorectal cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest category of a 'western-style' dietary pattern (OR=1.40; CI: 1.26-1.56; Pcolorectal cancer in the highest compared with the lowest category of 'alcohol-consumption' pattern (OR=1.44; CI: 1.13-1.82; P=0.003). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that a 'healthy' dietary pattern may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer, whereas 'western-style' and 'alcohol-consumption' patterns may increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

  13. Transgender Phonosurgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tara Elena; Jiang, Nancy

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Different surgical techniques have been described in the literature to increase vocal pitch. The purpose of this study is to systematically review these surgeries and perform a meta-analysis to determine which technique increases pitch the most. Data Sources CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, PubMed, and Science Direct. Review Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature was performed using the CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, PubMed, and Science Direct databases. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated pitch-elevating phonosurgical techniques in live humans and performed pre- and postoperative acoustic analysis. Data were gathered regarding surgical technique, pre- and postoperative fundamental frequencies, perioperative care measures, and complications. Results Twenty-nine studies were identified. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of 13 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Mechanisms of pitch elevation included increasing vocal cord tension (cricothyroid approximation), shortening the vocal cord length (cold knife glottoplasty, laser-shortening glottoplasty), and decreasing mass (laser reduction glottoplasty). The most common interventions were shortening techniques and cricothyroid approximation (6 studies each). The largest increase in fundamental frequency was seen with techniques that shortened the vocal cords. Preoperative speech therapy, postoperative voice rest, and reporting of patient satisfaction were inconsistent. Many of the studies were limited by low power and short length of follow-up. Conclusions Multiple techniques for elevation of vocal pitch exist, but vocal cord shortening procedures appear to result in the largest increase in fundamental frequency.

  14. Coffee and gastric cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botelho Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed the literature on the association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer and performed a meta-analysis of the results. Published cohort and case-control studies were identified in PubMed and reference lists. Random effects meta-analysis was used to pool effects from 23 studies, and heterogeneity was explored by stratification and meta-regression. The odds ratio (OR for the overall association between coffee and gastric cancer (highest vs. lowest category of exposure was 0.97 (95%CI: 0.86-1.09, similar for cohort (OR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.76-1.37 and case-control studies (population-based: OR = 0.90; 95%CI: 0.70-1.15; hospital-based: OR = 0.97; 95%CI: 0.83-1.13. The OR was 1.26 (95%CI: 1.02-1.57 when considering five studies conducted in the USA, 0.97 (95%CI: 0.82-1.14 for the five Japanese studies, 0.98 (95%CI: 0.81-1.17 for the six studies from Europe, and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.47-0.86 for the two studies from South America. In this meta-analysis we found no adverse effect of coffee associated with gastric cancer. Knowledge on the level of exposure to different coffee constituents may provide a deeper understanding of this reassuring result and the real role of coffee on cancer risk.

  15. Coffee and gastric cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Botelho

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed the literature on the association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer and performed a meta-analysis of the results. Published cohort and case-control studies were identified in PubMed and reference lists. Random effects meta-analysis was used to pool effects from 23 studies, and heterogeneity was explored by stratification and meta-regression. The odds ratio (OR for the overall association between coffee and gastric cancer (highest vs. lowest category of exposure was 0.97 (95%CI: 0.86-1.09, similar for cohort (OR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.76-1.37 and case-control studies (population-based: OR = 0.90; 95%CI: 0.70-1.15; hospital-based: OR = 0.97; 95%CI: 0.83-1.13. The OR was 1.26 (95%CI: 1.02-1.57 when considering five studies conducted in the USA, 0.97 (95%CI: 0.82-1.14 for the five Japanese studies, 0.98 (95%CI: 0.81-1.17 for the six studies from Europe, and 0.64 (95%CI: 0.47-0.86 for the two studies from South America. In this meta-analysis we found no adverse effect of coffee associated with gastric cancer. Knowledge on the level of exposure to different coffee constituents may provide a deeper understanding of this reassuring result and the real role of coffee on cancer risk.

  16. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Zachary D.; Batra, Sachin; Limb, Charles J.; Li, Gordon; Sughrue, Michael E.; Redmond, Kristin; Rigamonti, Daniele; Parsa, Andrew T.; Chang, Steven; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Lim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was 36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  17. Application of carbon nanoparticles in lymph node dissection and parathyroid protection during thyroid cancer surgeries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lun Wang, Dong Yang, Jun-Yuan Lv, Dan Yu, Shi-Jie Xin Department of Vascular and Thyroid Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To investigate whether carbon nanoparticles (CNs are helpful in identifying lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes and in parathyroid protection during thyroid cancer surgery. Methods: English and Chinese literature in PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, China Biology Medicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Master’s and Doctoral Theses Full-Text Database, Wanfang database, and Cqvip database were searched (till March 22, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared the use of CNs with a blank control in patients undergoing thyroid cancer surgery were included. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed, and a meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.1 software. The primary outcomes were the number of retrieved central lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, and the rate of accidental parathyroid removal. Results: We obtained 149 relevant studies, and only 47 RCTs with 4,605 patients (CN group: n=2,197; blank control group: n=2,408 met the inclusion criteria. Compared with the control group, the CN group was associated with more retrieved lymph nodes/patient (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.73–4.05, more retrieved metastatic lymph nodes (WMD: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.61–1.35, lower rate of accidental parathyroid removal, and lower rates of hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia. However, the total metastatic rate of the retrieved lymph nodes did not differ between the groups (odds ratio: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.87–1.47, P=0.35. Conclusion: CNs can improve the extent of neck dissection and protect the parathyroid glands during thyroid cancer surgery. And the number of identified metastatic lymph nodes can be simultaneously increased

  18. Efficacy and safety of endocrine monotherapy as first-line treatment for hormone-sensitive advanced breast cancer: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Huang, Yanhong; Wang, Changyi; He, Yuanfang; Zheng, Shukai; Wu, Kusheng

    2017-08-01

    Endocrine therapy was recommended as the preferred first-line treatment for hormone receptor-positive (HR+, i.e., ER+ and/or PgR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative (HER2-) postmenopausal advanced breast cancer (ABC), but which endocrine monotherapy is optimal lacks consensus. We aimed to identify the optimal endocrine monotherapy with a network meta-analysis. We performed a network meta-analysis for a comprehensive analysis of 6 first-line endocrine monotherapies (letrozole, anastrozole, exemestane, tamoxifen, fulvestrant 250 mg and 500 mg) for HR+ HER2- metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal patients. The main outcomes were objective response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP), and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary outcomes were adverse events. We identified 27 articles of 8 randomized controlled trials including 3492 patients in the network meta-analysis. For ORR, the treatments ranked in descending order of effectiveness were letrozole > exemestane > anastrozole > fulvestrant 500 mg > tamoxifen > fulvestrant 250 mg. For TTP/PFS, the order was fulvestrant 500 mg > letrozole > anastrozole > exemestane > tamoxifen > fulvestrant 250 mg. We directly compared adverse events and found that tamoxifen produced more hot flash events than fulvestrant 250 mg. Fulvestrant 500 mg and letrozole might be optimal first-line endocrine monotherapy choices for HR+ HER2- ABC because of efficacious ORR and TTP/PFS, with a favorable tolerability profile. However, direct comparisons among endocrine monotherapies in the first-line therapy setting are still required to robustly demonstrate any differences among these endocrine agents. Clinical choices should also depend on the specific disease situation and duration of endocrine therapy.

  19. Mass meta-analysis in Talairach space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2004-01-01

    We provide a method for mass meta-analysis in a neuroinformatics database containing stereotaxic Talairach coordinates from neuroimaging experiments. Database labels are used to group the individual experiments, e.g., according to cognitive function, and the consistent pattern of the experiments...... of experiments, and the distances to the null hypotheses are used to sort the voxels across groups of experiments. This allows for mass meta-analysis, with the construction of a list with the most prominent associations between brain areas and group labels. Furthermore, the method can be used for functional...

  20. Chemotherapy increases long-term survival in patients with adult medulloblastoma--a literature-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocakaya, Selin; Beier, Christoph Patrick; Beier, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    Adult medulloblastoma is a potentially curable malignant entity with an incidence of 0.5-1 per million. Valid data on prognosis, treatment, and demographics are lacking, as most current knowledge stems from retrospective studies. Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy are accepted parts of treatment regimes; however, established prognostic factors and data clarifying the role of chemotherapy are missing. We investigated 227 publications from 1969-2013, with 907 identifiable, individual patients being available for meta-analysis. Demographic data, risk stratification, and treatment of these patients were similar to previous cohorts. The median overall survival (mOS) was 65 months (95% CI: 54.6-75.3) , the 5-year overall survival was 50.9% with 16% of the patients dying more than 5 years after diagnosis. Incomplete resection, clinical and radiological signs for brainstem infiltration, and abstinence from radiotherapy were predictive of worse outcome. Metastatic disease at tumor recurrence was identified as a new prognostic factor, while neither metastasis at initial diagnosis nor desmoplastic/classic histology was correlated with survival. Patients receiving chemotherapy first-line survived significantly longer (mOS: 108 mo, 95% CI: 68.6-148.4) than patients treated with radiation alone (mOS: 57 mo, 95% CI: 39.6-74.4) or patients who received chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. This effect was not biased by tumor stage or decade of treatment. Importantly, (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy also significantly increased the chance for long-term survival (>5 y) compared with radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. This meta-analysis clarifies relevant prognostic factors and suggests that chemotherapy as part of first-line therapy improves overall survival and increases the proportion of patients with long-term survival. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  1. Unusual presentation of metastatic carcinoma cervix with clinically silent primary identified by 18F-flouro deoxy glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthil, Raja; Mohapatra, Ranjan Kumar; Srinivas, Shripriya; Sampath, Mouleeswaran Koramadai; Sundaraiya, Sumati

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma cervix is the most common gynecological malignancy among Indian women. The common symptoms at presentation include abnormal vaginal bleeding, unusual discharge from the vagina, or pain during coitus and postmenopausal bleeding. Rarely, few patients may present with distant metastases without local symptoms. We present two patients with an unusual presentation of metastatic disease without any gynecological symptoms, where 18 F-flouro deoxy glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography helped in identifying the primary malignancy in the uterine cervix

  2. A Bayesian Nonparametric Meta-Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabatsos, George; Talbott, Elizabeth; Walker, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In a meta-analysis, it is important to specify a model that adequately describes the effect-size distribution of the underlying population of studies. The conventional normal fixed-effect and normal random-effects models assume a normal effect-size population distribution, conditionally on parameters and covariates. For estimating the mean overall…

  3. Systematic review with meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, N; Krag, A; Møller, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rifaximin is recommended for prevention of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The effects of rifaximin on overt and minimal HE are debated. AIM: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on rifaximin for HE. METHODS: We performed electronic...

  4. Incorporating Quality Scores in Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soyeon; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of quality-score weights in meta-analysis. A simulation examines the roles of study characteristics such as population effect size (ES) and its variance on the bias and mean square errors (MSEs) of the estimators for several patterns of relationship between quality and ES, and for specific patterns of systematic…

  5. Wind power externalities: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattmann, M.; Logar, I.; Brouwer, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative meta-analysis of the non-market valuation literature on the external effects associated with wind power production. A data set of 60 observations drawn from 32 studies is constructed. The relative economic values of different types of externalities as well

  6. Risk factors for radiation-induced hypothyroidism: A Literature-Based Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Bentzen, Søren; Maraldo, Maja V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A systematic overview and meta-analysis of studies reporting data on hypothyroidism (HT) after radiation therapy was conducted to identify risk factors for development of HT. METHODS: Published studies were identified from the PubMed and Embase databases and by hand-searching published...... reviews. Studies allowing the extraction of odds ratios (OR) for HT in 1 or more of several candidate clinical risk groups were included. A meta-analysis of the OR for development of HT with or without each of the candidate risk factors was performed. Furthermore, studies allowing the extraction...... of radiation dose-response data were identified for a meta-analysis of the dose-response curve. RESULTS: Female gender (OR = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.9; P

  7. Meta-analysis of SNPs involved in variance heterogeneity using Levene's test for equal variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei Q; Asma, Senay; Paré, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a commonly used approach to increase the sample size for genome-wide association searches when individual studies are otherwise underpowered. Here, we present a meta-analysis procedure to estimate the heterogeneity of the quantitative trait variance attributable to genetic variants using Levene's test without needing to exchange individual-level data. The meta-analysis of Levene's test offers the opportunity to combine the considerable sample size of a genome-wide meta-analysis to identify the genetic basis of phenotypic variability and to prioritize single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for gene–gene and gene–environment interactions. The use of Levene's test has several advantages, including robustness to departure from the normality assumption, freedom from the influence of the main effects of SNPs, and no assumption of an additive genetic model. We conducted a meta-analysis of the log-transformed body mass index of 5892 individuals and identified a variant with a highly suggestive Levene's test P-value of 4.28E-06 near the NEGR1 locus known to be associated with extreme obesity. PMID:23921533

  8. The Effects of Alveolar Ridge Preservation: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbacher, Maximillian; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Berres, Manfred; Kämmerer, Peer W; Schiegnitz, Eik

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze the horizontal, vertical, and histological effects of alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) versus the ones of unassisted socket healing, in the format of an up-to-date review and meta-analysis. An extensive electronic search in the electronic databases of the National Library of Medicine was conducted for articles published up to June 2014 to identify literature presenting data on the topic of ARP. Only randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and prospective trials were included for meta-analysis. After screening 903 abstracts from the electronic database, we included 64 studies in qualitative and 18 in quantitative synthesis. Quality assessment characterized a medium risk of bias for the included literature. The meta-analysis showed a mean difference between test and control groups of approximately 1.31 to 1.54 mm in bucco-oral bone width and 0.91 to 1.12 mm in bone height. Additionally, the intergroup difference in percentage of vital bone was assessed to be inconclusive across the included studies. Implants could be inserted into the determined position without further augmentation in 90.1% of the experimental sites, while this was the case in only 79.2% of the control sockets. Resorption of the alveolar ridge cannot be totally stopped by ARP, while it still can be prevented compared with unassisted healing. No reliable predictions on the histological effects could be made due to limited data. Further on, no recommendation for a specific technique of ARP could be made. In conclusion, there is still need for ongoing research on the topic, even though the lower percentage of implant sites that needed additional augmentation in test sockets seemed to bring a patient benefit. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Robotic thyroidectomy versus endoscopic thyroidectomy: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shuang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To conduct a meta-analysis to determine the relative merits of robotic thyroidectomy (RT and endoscopic thyroidectomy (ET. Methods A literature search was performed to identify comparative studies reporting peri-operative outcomes for RT and ET. Pooled odds ratios (ORs and weighted mean differences (WMDs with 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated using either a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. Results Six studies matched the selection criteria, which reported on 2048 subjects, of whom 978 underwent RT and 1070 underwent ET. Comparing the outcomes of RT with ET, this meta-analysis indicated that RT was associated with more complications (WMD = 1.51, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.94 and greater amount of drainage fluid (WMD = 17.10, 95% CI 5.69 to 28.51. Meanwhile, operating time (WMD = 1.50, 95% CI −39.59 to 42.58, conversion (WMD = 0.63, 95% CI 0.07 to 6.17, post-operative hospital stay (WMD = −0.05; 95% CI −0.18 to 0.08, and the number of lymph nodes harvested (WMD = 0.62, 95% CI −0.29 to 1.53 were similar for both procedures. Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis indicated that RT is associated with an increased risk of complications and a greater amount of drainage fluid. Therefore, RT does not appear to have any advantage over ET. Further studies are required to confirm these results.

  10. Scientists Admitting to Plagiarism: A Meta-analysis of Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupovac, Vanja; Fanelli, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of anonymous surveys asking scientists whether they ever committed various forms of plagiarism. From May to December 2011 we searched 35 bibliographic databases, five grey literature databases and hand searched nine journals for potentially relevant studies. We included surveys that asked scientists if, in a given recall period, they had committed or knew of a colleague who committed plagiarism, and from each survey extracted the proportion of those who reported at least one case. Studies that focused on academic (i.e. student) plagiarism were excluded. Literature searches returned 12,460 titles from which 17 relevant survey studies were identified. Meta-analysis of studies reporting committed (N = 7) and witnessed (N = 11) plagiarism yielded a pooled estimate of, respectively, 1.7% (95% CI 1.2-2.4) and 30% (95% CI 17-46). Basic methodological factors, including sample size, year of survey, delivery method and whether survey questions were explicit rather than indirect made a significant difference on survey results. Even after controlling for these methodological factors, between-study differences in admission rates were significantly above those expected by sampling error alone and remained largely unexplained. Despite several limitations of the data and of this meta-analysis, we draw three robust conclusions: (1) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is higher than for data fabrication and falsification; (2) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is correlated to that of fabrication and falsification; (3) The rate at which scientists admit having committed either form of misconduct (i.e. fabrication, falsification and plagiarism) in surveys has declined over time.

  11. Revisiting a Meta-Analysis of Helpful Aspects of Therapy in a Community Counselling Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Emma L; Dowd, Claire; Spong, Sheila

    2018-01-01

    This small scale mixed methods study examines helpful events in a community counselling setting, categorising impacts of events according to Timulak's [(2007). Identifying core categories of client-identified impact of helpful events in psychotherapy: A qualitative meta-analysis. "Psychotherapy Research," 17, 305-314] meta-synthesis of…

  12. Prison Privatization: A Meta-Analysis of Cost and Quality of Confinement Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Brad W.; Kunz, Chelsea; Brownell, Cyndi; Harris, Norma; Van Vleet, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the results of prison privatization. Method: In an effort to provide an empirical base from which decisions about privatization might be made, we conducted a meta-analysis of reports on head-to-head comparisons between an identifiable privately managed and publicly managed prison(s). Results: Our search identified 12 studies.…

  13. Multivariate meta-analysis: Potential and promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan; Riley, Richard; White, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    The multivariate random effects model is a generalization of the standard univariate model. Multivariate meta-analysis is becoming more commonly used and the techniques and related computer software, although continually under development, are now in place. In order to raise awareness of the multivariate methods, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, we organized a one day ‘Multivariate meta-analysis’ event at the Royal Statistical Society. In addition to disseminating the most recent developments, we also received an abundance of comments, concerns, insights, critiques and encouragement. This article provides a balanced account of the day's discourse. By giving others the opportunity to respond to our assessment, we hope to ensure that the various view points and opinions are aired before multivariate meta-analysis simply becomes another widely used de facto method without any proper consideration of it by the medical statistics community. We describe the areas of application that multivariate meta-analysis has found, the methods available, the difficulties typically encountered and the arguments for and against the multivariate methods, using four representative but contrasting examples. We conclude that the multivariate methods can be useful, and in particular can provide estimates with better statistical properties, but also that these benefits come at the price of making more assumptions which do not result in better inference in every case. Although there is evidence that multivariate meta-analysis has considerable potential, it must be even more carefully applied than its univariate counterpart in practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21268052

  14. Meta-analysis on the association between toothbrushing and head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Leng, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Jing; Cao, Shi-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have focused on the association between toothbrushing and head and neck cancer (HNC). However, the question of whether toothbrushing is associated with decreased risk of HNC remains unanswered. Since there is currently no systematic review or meta-analysis available to provide quantitative findings on this important clinical question; we consequently performed this meta-analysis to investigate the association between toothbrushing and HNC risk. We searched PubMed and Embase up to January 13 (updated on October 20), 2014 to identify observational studies that investigated the association between toothbrushing and HNC. After study section and data extraction, the meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.2 software. A total of 18 case-control studies involving 7068 cases and 9990 controls were included. The meta-analysis showed that compared with highest toothbrushing frequency, lowest level was significantly increased risk of HNC 2.08 times (odds ratio=2.08, 95% confidence interval=1.65-2.62). This significant association remained consistent after adjusting for smoking status and alcohol consumption. No publication bias was detected. This meta-analysis found frequency of toothbrushing was significantly associated with HNC risk. Effective toothbrushing may be potentially important for the prevention of HNC and we suggest that the frequency be twice per day (morning and night). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of Pap test screening against cervical cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggiolaro, A; Unim, B; Semyonov, L; Miccoli, S; Maffongelli, E; La Torre, G

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this article is to quantify the role of Pap test in cervical cancer prevention, updating the pool of available studies included in a previous meta-analysis. Potential sources of meta-analysis heterogeneity were investigated as second aim. Further evidence of cost-effectiveness has been provided about age and best time interval to perform Pap test screening. The articles' search was conducted using four medical electronic databases: PubMed, Google Scholar, ISI Web, and Scopus. Papers published until the 30th November 2013 were included. The research on Google Scholar was limited to the first 10 pages of web for each study design. A systematic review/meta-analysis was performed according to PRISMA Statement. New-Castle-Ottawa Scale and Jadad have been adopted for articles quality assessment. From 4143 screened articles, 34 met eligibility criteria and 30 case-control studies were included in meta-analysis. Meta-analysis was carried out using StatsDirect2.8.0. Heterogeneity was investigated with qualitative and quantitative approaches in sensitivity-analysis. Despite a great heterogeneity (Cochran Q=504.466, df=29, pPap test has been identified (OR=0.33; 95%CI=0.268-0.408, P Pap test against cervical cancer has been confirmed especially among women <40 years. Annual screening still remains the most cost-effective preventive strategy.

  16. Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials in the era of individual patient data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takuya; Fukuda, Musashi; Oba, Koji; Sakamoto, Junichi; Buyse, Marc

    2018-01-12

    Individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis is considered to be a gold standard when the results of several randomized trials are combined. Recent initiatives on sharing IPD from clinical trials offer unprecedented opportunities for using such data in IPD meta-analyses. First, we discuss the evidence generated and the benefits obtained by a long-established prospective IPD meta-analysis in early breast cancer. Next, we discuss a data-sharing system that has been adopted by several pharmaceutical sponsors. We review a number of retrospective IPD meta-analyses that have already been proposed using this data-sharing system. Finally, we discuss the role of data sharing in IPD meta-analysis in the future. Treatment effects can be more reliably estimated in both types of IPD meta-analyses than with summary statistics extracted from published papers. Specifically, with rich covariate information available on each patient, prognostic and predictive factors can be identified or confirmed. Also, when several endpoints are available, surrogate endpoints can be assessed statistically. Although there are difficulties in conducting, analyzing, and interpreting retrospective IPD meta-analysis utilizing the currently available data-sharing systems, data sharing will play an important role in IPD meta-analysis in the future.

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Mathematics and Working Memory: Moderating Effects of Working Memory Domain, Type of Mathematics Skill, and Sample Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Namkung, Jessica; Barnes, Marcia; Sun, Congying

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the relation between mathematics and working memory (WM) and to identify possible moderators of this relation including domains of WM, types of mathematics skills, and sample type. A meta-analysis of 110 studies with 829 effect sizes found a significant medium correlation of mathematics and WM, r…

  18. Prognostic factors of early metastasis and mortality in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma after receiving surgery : an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.F.; Nielen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123535298; Klungel, O.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; Hoes, A.W.; de Boer, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Groenwold, R.H.H.; Kirpensteijn, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189846992

    2013-01-01

    Recently an aggregated data meta-analysis showed that serum alkaline phosphatase (SALP) and proximal humerus location are predictors for shorter survival in canine osteosarcoma. To identify additional prognostic factors of mortality and metastasis an individual patient data meta-analysis (IPDMA) was

  19. Research Protocol for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Elder Abuse Prevalence Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Yongjie; Mikton, Christopher; Gassoumis, Zachary D; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2017-06-01

    Elder abuse is an important public health and human rights issue, yet its true extent is not well understood. To address this, we will conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of elder abuse prevalence studies from around the world. This protocol describes the methodological approach to be adopted for conducting this systematic review and meta-analysis. In particular, the protocol describes the search strategies and eligibility criteria to be used to identify and select studies and how data from the selected studies will be extracted for analysis. The protocol also describes the analytical approach that will be used to calculate pooled prevalence estimates and discusses the use of meta-regression to assess how studies' characteristics influence the prevalence estimates. This protocol conforms to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis - or PRISMA - guidelines and has been registered with the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of systematic reviews.

  20. Meta-analysis: Nitroglycerin for prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, C; Matzen, P; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute pancreatitis after ERCP is a severe side effect. AIM: To evaluate the preventive effect of nitroglycerin on post-ERCP pancreatitis by a meta-analysis of randomized clinical studies. METHODS: We searched on Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library and all abstracts presented at Digestive......-ERCP pancreatitis after administration of nitroglycerin were identified. Meta-analysis including all five studies showed a relative risk (RR) of 0.61 (95% CI; 0.44, 0.86) with the number needed to treat (NNT) of 26 (95% CI: 16, 82). Three studies evaluated nitroglycerin administered by a dermal patch reaching...... together an RR of 0.66 (95% CI; 0.43, 1.01). The use of nitroglycerin is associated with a significantly increased risk of hypotension (RR 2.25) and headache (RR 3.64). No difference in mortality was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our meta-analysis supports the use of nitroglycerin in the prevention...

  1. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Predictors of Positive68Ga-Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography in Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Marlon; Papa, Nathan; Christidis, Daniel; Wetherell, David; Hofman, Michael S; Murphy, Declan G; Bolton, Damien; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of 68 Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen ( 68 Ga-PSMA) is an emerging imaging modality introduced to assess the burden of prostate cancer, typically in biochemically recurrent or advanced disease. 68 Ga-PSMA PET provides the ability to selectively identify and localize metastatic prostate cancer cells and subsequently change patient management. Owing to its limited history, robust sensitivity and specificity data are not available for 68 Ga-PSMA PET-positive scans. A systematic review and meta-analysis of reported predictors of positive 68 Ga-PSMA PET and corresponding sensitivity and specificity profiles. We performed critical reviews of MEDLINE, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases in April 2016 according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. Quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment if Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. Meta-analysis and meta-regression of proportions were performed using a random-effects model with pre-PET prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels as the dependent variable. Summary sensitivity and specificity values were obtained by fitting bivariate hierarchical regression models. Sixteen articles involving 1309 patients were analysed. The overall percentage of positive 68 Ga-PSMA PET among patients was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19-64%) for primary staging and 76% (95% CI 66-85%) for biochemical recurrence (BCR). Positive 68 Ga-PSMA PET scans for BCR patients increased with pre-PET PSA. For the PSA categories 0-0.2, 0.2-1, 1-2, and >2 ng/ml, 42%, 58%, 76%, and 95% scans, respectively, were positive. Shorter PSA doubling time increased 68 Ga-PSMA PET positivity. On per-patient analysis, the summary sensitivity and specificity were both 86%. On per-lesion analysis, the summary sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 97%, respectively. In the setting of BCR prostate cancer, pre-PET PSA predicts the

  2. Smoking and risk of colonic diverticulosis: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Wijarnpreecha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: The possible relationship between smoking and risk of colonic diverticulosis has been suggested by recent epidemiological studies, although the results were inconsistent. This meta-analysis was conducted to summarize all available data. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases through May 2017 to identify all studies that compared the risk of colonic diverticulosis among current and former smokers versus nonsmokers. Effect estimates from each study were extracted and combined together using the random-effect, generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird. Results: Of 465 potentially eligible articles, three prospective cohort studies with 130,520 participants met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of colonic diverticulosis in current smokers was significantly higher than nonsmokers with the pooled risks ratio of 1.46 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13–1.89. However, the risk of colonic diverticulosis in former smokers was not significantly higher than nonsmokers with the pooled risk ratio of 1.13 (95% CI, 0.88–1.44. Conclusions: A significantly increased risk of colonic diverticulosis among current smokers is demonstrated in this study.

  3. Narcissism and Social Networking Behavior: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnambs, Timo; Appel, Markus

    2018-04-01

    The increasing popularity of social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook and Twitter has given rise to speculations that the intensity of using these platforms is associated with narcissistic tendencies. However, recent research on this issue has been all but conclusive. We present a three-level, random effects meta-analysis including 289 effect sizes from 57 studies (total N = 25,631) on the association between trait narcissism and social networking behavior. The meta-analysis identified a small to moderate effect of ρ = .17 (τ = .11), 95% CI [.13, .21], for grandiose narcissism that replicated across different social networking platforms, respondent characteristics, and time. Moderator analyses revealed pronounced cultural differences, with stronger associations in power-distant cultures. Moreover, social networking behaviors geared toward self-presentation and the number of SNS friends exhibited stronger effects than usage durations. Overall, the study not only supported but also refined the notion of a relationship between engaging in social networking sites and narcissistic personality traits. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Psychological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim; Sijbrandij, Marit; Koole, Sander; Huibers, Marcus; Berking, Matthias; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a near-doubling of the number of studies examining the effects of psychotherapies for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. The present article integrates this new evidence with the older literature through a quantitative meta-analysis. A total of 41 studies (with 2132 patients meeting diagnostic criteria for GAD) were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases, and were included in the meta-analysis. Most studies examined the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The majority of studies used waiting lists as control condition. The pooled effect of the 38 comparisons (from 28 studies) of psychotherapy versus a control group was large (g=0.84; 95% CI: 0.71-0.97) with low to moderate heterogeneity. The effects based on self-report measures were somewhat lower than those based on clinician-rated instruments. The effects on depression were also large (g=0.71; 95% CI: 0.59-0.82). There were some indications for publication bias. The number of studies comparing CBT with other psychotherapies (e.g., applied relaxation) or pharmacotherapy was too small to draw conclusions about comparative effectiveness or the long-term effects. There were some indications that CBT was also effective at follow-up and that CBT was more effective than applied relaxation in the longer term. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bullied children and psychosomatic problems: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gini, Gianluca; Pozzoli, Tiziana

    2013-10-01

    A previous meta-analysis showed that being bullied during childhood is related to psychosomatic problems, but many other studies have been published since then, including some longitudinal studies. We performed a new meta-analysis to quantify the association between peer victimization and psychosomatic complaints in the school-aged population. We searched online databases up to April 2012, and bibliographies of retrieved studies and of narrative reviews, for studies that examined the association between being bullied and psychosomatic complaints in children and adolescents. The original search identified 119 nonduplicated studies, of which 30 satisfied the prestated inclusion criteria. Two separate random effects meta-analyses were performed on 6 longitudinal studies (odds ratio = 2.39, 95% confidence interval, 1.76 to 3.24) and 24 cross-sectional studies (odds ratio = 2.17, 95% confidence interval, 1.91 to 2.46), respectively. Results showed that bullied children and adolescents have a significantly higher risk for psychosomatic problems than non-bullied agemates. In the cross-sectional studies, the magnitude of effect size significantly decreased with the increase of the proportion of female participants in the study sample. No other moderators were statistically significant. The association between being bullied and psychosomatic problems was confirmed. Given that school bullying is a widespread phenomenon in many countries around the world, the present results indicate that bullying should be considered a significant international public health problem.

  6. Acupuncture for Alcohol Use Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research has produced mixed results regarding the effects of acupuncture on the treatment of alcohol use disorder in humans. Few studies have provided a comprehensive review or a systematic overview of the magnitude of the treatment effect of acupuncture on alcoholism. This study investigated the effects of acupuncture on alcohol-related symptoms and behaviors in patients with this disorder. The PubMed database was searched until 23 August 2016, and reference lists from review studies were also reviewed. Seventeen studies were identified for a full-text inspection, and seven (243 patients of these met our inclusion criteria. The outcomes assessed at the last posttreatment point and any available follow-up data were extracted from each of the studies. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that an acupuncture intervention had a stronger effect on reducing alcohol-related symptoms and behaviors than did the control intervention (g=0.67. A beneficial but weak effect of acupuncture treatment was also found in the follow-up data (g=0.29. Although our analysis showed a significant difference between acupuncture and the control intervention in patients with alcohol use disorder, this meta-analysis is limited by the small number of studies included. Thus, a larger cohort study is required to provide a firm conclusion.

  7. Multiple Sclerosis Increases Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between multiple sclerosis (MS and fracture risk has been reported, but results of previous studies remain controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MS and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Method. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MS and fracture risk. The pooled risk ratios (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Results. A significant association between MS and fracture risk was found. This result remained statistically significant when the adjusted RRs were combined. Subgroup analysis stratified by the site of fracture suggested significant associations between MS and tibia fracture risk, femur fracture risk, hip fracture risk, pelvis fracture risk, vertebrae fracture risk, and humerus fracture risk. In the subgroup analysis by gender, female MS patients had increased fracture risk. When stratified by history of drug use, use of antidepressants, hypnotics/anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and glucocorticoids increased the risk of fracture risk in MS patients. Conclusions. This meta-analysis demonstrated that MS was significantly associated with fracture risk.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of Predictors of Offender Treatment Attrition and Its Relationship to Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Mark E.; Stockdale, Keira C.; Wormith, J. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The failure of offenders to complete psychological treatment can pose significant concerns, including increased risk for recidivism. Although a large literature identifying predictors of offender treatment attrition has accumulated, there has yet to be a comprehensive quantitative review. Method: A meta-analysis of the offender…

  9. Discrimination against Latina/os: A Meta-Analysis of Individual-Level Resources and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes the findings of 60 independent samples from 51 studies examining racial/ethnic discrimination against Latina/os in the United States. The purpose was to identify individual-level resources and outcomes that most strongly relate to discrimination. Discrimination against Latina/os significantly results in outcomes…

  10. Sildenafil during Pregnancy : A Preclinical Meta-Analysis on Fetal Growth and Maternal Blood Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paauw, Nina D.; Terstappen, Fieke; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Joles, Jaap A.; Gremmels, Hendrik; Lely, A. Titia

    2017-01-01

    Sildenafil is a new approach to treat fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia. We performed a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate effects of sildenafil. Our search identified 22 animal studies (mouse, rat, rabbit, sheep, and guinea pigs) and 2 human randomized controlled trials. Data were

  11. Sildenafil During Pregnancy A Preclinical Meta-Analysis on Fetal Growth and Maternal Blood Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paauw, Nina D.; Terstappen, Fieke; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Joles, Jaap A.; Gremmels, Hendrik; Lely, A. Titia

    2017-01-01

    Sildenafil is a new approach to treat fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia. We performed a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate effects of sildenafil. Our search identified 22 animal studies (mouse, rat, rabbit, sheep, and guinea pigs) and 2 human randomized controlled trials. Data were

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and

  13. Cinnamon intake lowers fasting blood glucose: an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE – To determine if meta-analysis of recent clinical studies of cinnamon intake by people with Type II diabetes and/or prediabetes resulted in significant changes in fasting blood glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -- Published clinical studies were identified using a literature search (P...

  14. Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Treatment Trials for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis on randomized, controlled treatment trials of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Studies were included if they employed randomized, controlled methodology and treated young people (19 years or under) with OCD. A comprehensive literature search identified 13 RCTs containing 10…

  15. A Meta-Analysis of Writing Instruction for Students in the Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Steve; McKeown, Debra; Kiuhara, Sharlene; Harris, Karen R.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to identify effective instructional practices for teaching writing to elementary grade students, we conducted a meta-analysis of the writing intervention literature, focusing our efforts on true and quasi-experiments. We located 115 documents that included the statistics for computing an effect size (ES). We calculated an average…

  16. Weight change and all-cause mortality in older adults: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This meta-analysis of observational cohort studies examined the association between weight change (weight loss, weight gain, and weight fluctuation) and all-cause mortality among older adults. We used PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, and Cochrane Library to identify prospective studies published in...

  17. Novel non-HLA-susceptible regions determined by meta-analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We identified novel non-HLA-susceptible regions for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by applying the genome-search-meta-analysis (GSMA) method to combine the previous four AS genomewide scan studies including 479 families with 1175 affected individuals. Three original genomescans were mainly analysed for Caucasian ...

  18. Differential Identification of Females and Males with Reading Difficulties: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.

    2018-01-01

    Males are more likely than females to be identified as having reading difficulties, but it is unclear if this is a result of sample ascertainment or identification bias. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the magnitude of gender differences in reading difficulties using available studies in which researchers investigated this…

  19. The economic costs of avoided deforestation in the developing world: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, D.T.H.; Brouwer, R.; Davidson, M.

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis aims to identify the key factors governing the economic costs of avoided deforestation in developing countries. To this end, data were collected from 32 primary studies published between 1995 and 2012, yielding 277 observations. Results show that unit costs depend significantly on

  20. The economic costs of avoided deforestation in the developing world: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, D.T.H.; Brouwer, R.; Davidson, M.

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis aims to identify the key factors governing the economic costs of avoided deforestation in developing countries. To this end, data were collected from 32 primary studies published between 1995 and 2012, yielding 277 observations. Results show that unit costs depend significantly on

  1. How Will DSM-5 Affect Autism Diagnosis? A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M.; Smaldone, Arlene M.; Cohn, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5 on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and explore policy implications. We identified 418 studies; 14 met inclusion criteria. Studies consistently reported decreases in ASD diagnosis (range 7.3-68.4%) using DSM-5…

  2. Gender Differences in Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed…

  3. Effects of Exercise Therapy on Balance Capacity in Chronic Stroke: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, H.J.R. van; Heeren, A.; Peters, M.A.; Veerbeek, J.M.; Kwakkel, G.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of exercise training on balance capacity in people in the chronic phase after stroke. Furthermore, we aimed to identify which training regimen was most effective. METHODS: Electronic

  4. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  5. Effective self-regulation change techniques to promote mental wellbeing among adolescents: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genugten, L. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Massey, E.K.; Empelen, P. van

    2017-01-01

    Mental wellbeing is influenced by self-regulation processes. However, little is known on the efficacy of change techniques based on self-regulation to promote mental wellbeing. The aim of this meta-analysis is to identify effective self-regulation techniques (SRTs) in primary and secondary

  6. Feedback for Simulation-Based Procedural Skills Training: A Meta-Analysis and Critical Narrative Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A.; Zendejas, Benjamin; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Brydges, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Although feedback has been identified as a key instructional feature in simulation based medical education (SBME), we remain uncertain as to the magnitude of its effectiveness and the mechanisms by which it may be effective. We employed a meta-analysis and critical narrative synthesis to examine the effectiveness of feedback for SBME procedural…

  7. Meta-Analysis of Reading Comprehension Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities: Strategies and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sencibaugh, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines research studies, which focus on interventions commonly used with students who are learning disabled and identifies effective methods that produce substantial benefits concerning reading comprehension. This paper synthesizes previous observation studies by conducting a meta-analysis of strategies used to improve the reading…

  8. Reading Comprehension Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities, 1995-2006: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley, Sheri; Scruggs, Thomas E.; Mastropieri, Margo A.

    2010-01-01

    Meta-analysis procedures were employed to synthesize findings of research for improving reading comprehension of students with learning disabilities published in the decade following previous meta-analytic investigations. Forty studies, published between 1995 and 2006, were identified and coded. Nearly 2,000 students served as participants.…

  9. Online Open Neuroimaging Mass Meta-Analysis with a Wiki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Arup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple comma-separated values format and a web service performs the numerical statistical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system...... allows for mass meta-analysis, e.g., meta-analysis across multiple brain regions and multiple mental disorders providing an overview of important relationships and their uncertainties in a collaborative environment....

  10. Multiethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >100 000 subjects identifies 23 fibrinogen-associated Loci but no strong evidence of a causal association between circulating fibrinogen and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabater-Lleal, M.; Huang, J.; Chasman, D.I.; Naitza, S.; Dehghan, A.; Johnson, A.D.; Teumer, A.; Reiner, A.P.; Folkersen, L.; Basu, S.; Rudnicka, A.R.; Trompet, S.; Mälarstig, A.; Baumert, J.; Bis, J.C.; Guo, X.; Hottenga, J.J.; Shin, S.Y.; Lopez, L.M.; Lahti, J.; Tanaka, T.; Yanek, L.R.; Oudot-Mellakh, T.; Wilson, J.F.; Navarro, P.; Huffman, J.E.; Zemunik, T.; Redline, S.; Mehra, R.; Pulanic, D.; Rudan, I.; Wright, A.F.; Kolcic, I.; Polasek, O.; Wild, S.H.; Campbell, H.; Curb, J.D.; Wallace, R.; Liu, S.; Eaton, C.B.; Becker, D.M.; Becker, L.C.; Bandinelli, S.; Räikkönen, K.; Widén, E.; Palotie, A.; Fornage, M.; Green, D.; Gross, M.; Davies, G.E.; Harris, S.E.; Liewald, D.C.; Starr, J.M.; Williams, F.M.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, T.D.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Silveira, A.; Sennblad, B.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Franco, O.H.; Hofman, A.; van Dongen, J.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Yao, J.; Swords Jenny, N.; Haritunians, T.; McKnight, B.; Lumley, T.; Taylor, K.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Psaty, B.M.; Peters, A.; Gieger, C.; Illig, T.; Grotevendt, A.; Homuth, G.; Völzke, H.; Kocher, T.; Goel, A.; Franzosi, M.G.; Seedorf, U.; Clarke, R.; Steri, M.; Tarasov, K.V.; Sanna, S.; Schlessinger, D.; Stott, D.J.; Sattar, N.; Buckley, B.M.; Rumley, A.; Lowe, G.D.; McArdle, W.L.; Chen, M.H.; Tofler, G.H.; Song, J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Folsom, A.R.; Rose, L.M.; Franco-Cereceda, A.; Teichert, M.; Ikram, M.A.; Mosley, T.H.; Bevan, S.; Dichgans, M.; Rothwell, P.M.; Sudlow, C.L.; Hopewell, J.C.; Chambers, J.C.; Saleheen, D.; Kooner, J.S.; Danesh, J.; Nelson, C.P.; Erdmann, J.; Reilly, M.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Schunkert, H.; Morange, P.E.; Ferrucci, L.; Eriksson, J.G.; Jacobs, D.; Deary, I.J.; Soranzo, N.; Witteman, J.C.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Tracy, R.P.; Hayward, C.; Koenig, W.; Cucca, F.; Jukema, J.W.; Eriksson, P.; Seshadri, S.; Markus, H.S.; Watkins, H.; Samani, N.J.; Wallaschofski, H.; Smith, N.L.; Tregouet, D.A.; Ridker, P.M.; Tang, W.; Strachan, D.P.; Hamsten, A.; O'Donnell, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND-: Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease, range from 34% to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a small proportion (<2%) of its variation. METHODS AND

  11. Brief Report: IRF4 Newly Identified as a Common Susceptibility Locus for Systemic Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cross-Disease Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-Isac, Elena; Martín, Jose Ezequiel; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen P.; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Beltrán, Emma; Narváez, Javier; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; Ortiz, Ana M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg H W; Riekemasten, Gabriella; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H.; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Molberg, Øyvind; Merriman, Tony; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Herrick, Ariane; Eyre, Steve; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Denton, Christopher P.; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Worthington, Jane; Mayes, Maureen D.; Martín, Javier; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, Jose Luis; Hitos, José Antonio Vargas; Portales, Rosa García; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, Ma Jesús; Ángeles Aguirre, Ma; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Peña, Paloma García de la; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; de Castro, Mónica Fernández; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Guillén, Alfredo; Castellví, Iván; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Carballeira, Mónica Rodríguez; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rivas, Manel Rubio; Ortiz-Santamaría, Vera; Madroñero, Ana Belén; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Mateo, Patricia Fanlo; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre-Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that have similar clinical and immunologic characteristics. To date, several shared SSc–RA genetic loci have been identified independently. The aim of the current study was to systematically search for new

  12. Multiethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >100 000 subjects identifies 23 fibrinogen-associated Loci but no strong evidence of a causal association between circulating fibrinogen and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabater-Lleal, M.; Huang, J.; Chasman, D.; Naitza, S.; Dehghan, A.; Johnson, A.D.; Teumer, A.; Reiner, A.P.; Folkersen, L.; Basu, S.; Rudnicka, A.R.; Trompet, S.; Malarstig, A.; Baumert, J.; Bis, J.C.; Guo, X.; Hottenga, J.J.; Shin, S.Y.; Lopez, L.M.; Lahti, J.; Tanaka, T.; Yanek, L.R.; Oudot-Mellakh, T.; Wilson, J.F.; Navarro, P.; Huffman, J.E.; Zemunik, T.; Redline, S.; Mehra, R.; Pulanic, D.; Rudan, I.; Wright, A.F.; Kolcic, I.; Polasek, O.; Wild, S.H.; Campbell, H.; Curb, J.D.; Wallace, R.; Liu, S.; Eaton, C.B.; Becker, D.M.; Becker, L.C.; Bandinelli, S.; Raikkonen, K.; Widen, E.; Palotie, A.; Fornage, M.; Green, D.; Gross, M.; Davies, G.; Harris, S.E.; Liewald, D.C.; Starr, J.M.; Williams, F.M.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, T.D.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Silveira, A.; Sennblad, B.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Franco, O.H.; Hofman, A.; Dongen, J. Van; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Yao, J.; Jenny, N. Swords; Haritunians, T.; McKnight, B.; Lumley, T.; Taylor, K.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Psaty, B.M.; Peters, A.; Gieger, C.; Illig, T.; Grotevendt, A.; Homuth, G.; Volzke, H.; Kocher, T.; Goel, A.; Franzosi, M.G.; Seedorf, U.; Clarke, R.; Steri, M.; Tarasov, K.V.; Sanna, S.; Schlessinger, D.; Stott, D.J.; Sattar, N.; Buckley, B.M.; Rumley, A.; Lowe, G.D.; McArdle, W.L.; Chen, M.H.; Tofler, G.H.; Song, J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Folsom, A.R.; Teichert, M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease, range from 34% to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a small proportion (<2%) of its variation. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  13. When Is Hub Gene Selection Better than Standard Meta-Analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, Peter; Mischel, Paul S.; Horvath, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Since hub nodes have been found to play important roles in many networks, highly connected hub genes are expected to play an important role in biology as well. However, the empirical evidence remains ambiguous. An open question is whether (or when) hub gene selection leads to more meaningful gene lists than a standard statistical analysis based on significance testing when analyzing genomic data sets (e.g., gene expression or DNA methylation data). Here we address this question for the special case when multiple genomic data sets are available. This is of great practical importance since for many research questions multiple data sets are publicly available. In this case, the data analyst can decide between a standard statistical approach (e.g., based on meta-analysis) and a co-expression network analysis approach that selects intramodular hubs in consensus modules. We assess the performance of these two types of approaches according to two criteria. The first criterion evaluates the biological insights gained and is relevant in basic research. The second criterion evaluates the validation success (reproducibility) in independent data sets and often applies in clinical diagnostic or prognostic applications. We compare meta-analysis with consensus network analysis based on weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) in three comprehensive and unbiased empirical studies: (1) Finding genes predictive of lung cancer survival, (2) finding methylation markers related to age, and (3) finding mouse genes related to total cholesterol. The results demonstrate that intramodular hub gene status with respect to consensus modules is more useful than a meta-analysis p-value when identifying biologically meaningful gene lists (reflecting criterion 1). However, standard meta-analysis methods perform as good as (if not better than) a consensus network approach in terms of validation success (criterion 2). The article also reports a comparison of meta-analysis techniques applied to

  14. Cholelithiasis, cholecystectomy and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Available evidence of the relationship between cholelithiasis, cholecystectomy, and risk of liver cancer and hence we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationships. PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched to identify all published cohort studies and case-control studies that evaluated the relationships of cholelithiasis, cholecystectomy and risk of liver cancer and single-cohort studies which evaluated the incidence of liver cancer among patients who understood cholecystectomy (up to February 2013. Comprehensive meta-analysis software was used for meta-analysis. A total of 11 observational studies (six cohort studies and five case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. The result from meta-analysis showed that cholecystectomy (risk ratio [RR]: 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.51, I2 = 72% and cholecystolithiasis (RR: 5.40, 95% CI: 3.69-7.89, I2 = 93% was associated with more liver cancer, especially for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC (cholecystectomy: RR: 3.51, 95% CI: 1.84-6.71, I2 = 26%; cholecystolithiasis: RR: 11.06, 95% CI: 6.99-17.52, I2 = 0%. The pooled standardized incidence rates (SIR of liver cancer in patients who understood cholecystectomy showed cholecystectomy might increase the incidence of liver cancer (SIR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.13-2.20, I2 = 15%. Based on the results of the meta-analysis, cholecystectomy and cholecystolithiasis seemed to be involved in the development of liver cancer, especially for ICC. However, most available studies were case-control studies and short-term cohort studies, so the future studies should more long-term cohort studies should be well-conducted to evaluate the long-term relationship.

  15. When is hub gene selection better than standard meta-analysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Langfelder

    Full Text Available Since hub nodes have been found to play important roles in many networks, highly connected hub genes are expected to play an important role in biology as well. However, the empirical evidence remains ambiguous. An open question is whether (or when hub gene selection leads to more meaningful gene lists than a standard statistical analysis based on significance testing when analyzing genomic data sets (e.g., gene expression or DNA methylation data. Here we address this question for the special case when multiple genomic data sets are available. This is of great practical importance since for many research questions multiple data sets are publicly available. In this case, the data analyst can decide between a standard statistical approach (e.g., based on meta-analysis and a co-expression network analysis approach that selects intramodular hubs in consensus modules. We assess the performance of these two types of approaches according to two criteria. The first criterion evaluates the biological insights gained and is relevant in basic research. The second criterion evaluates the validation success (reproducibility in independent data sets and often applies in clinical diagnostic or prognostic applications. We compare meta-analysis with consensus network analysis based on weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA in three comprehensive and unbiased empirical studies: (1 Finding genes predictive of lung cancer survival, (2 finding methylation markers related to age, and (3 finding mouse genes related to total cholesterol. The results demonstrate that intramodular hub gene status with respect to consensus modules is more useful than a meta-analysis p-value when identifying biologically meaningful gene lists (reflecting criterion 1. However, standard meta-analysis methods perform as good as (if not better than a consensus network approach in terms of validation success (criterion 2. The article also reports a comparison of meta-analysis techniques

  16. Global meta-analysis of transcriptomics studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Caldas

    Full Text Available Transcriptomics meta-analysis aims at re-using existing data to derive novel biological hypotheses, and is motivated by the public availability of a large number of independent studies. Current methods are based on breaking down studies into multiple comparisons between phenotypes (e.g. disease vs. healthy, based on the studies' experimental designs, followed by computing the overlap between the resulting differential expression signatures. While useful, in this methodology each study yields multiple independent phenotype comparisons, and connections are established not between studies, but rather between subsets of the studies corresponding to phenotype comparisons. We propose a rank-based statistical meta-analysis framework that establishes global connections between transcriptomics studies without breaking down studies into sets of phenotype comparisons. By using a rank product method, our framework extracts global features from each study, corresponding to genes that are consistently among the most expressed or differentially expressed genes in that study. Those features are then statistically modelled via a term-frequency inverse-document frequency (TF-IDF model, which is then used for connecting studies. Our framework is fast and parameter-free; when applied to large collections of Homo sapiens and Streptococcus pneumoniae transcriptomics studies, it performs better than similarity-based approaches in retrieving related studies, using a Medical Subject Headings gold standard. Finally, we highlight via case studies how the framework can be used to derive novel biological hypotheses regarding related studies and the genes that drive those connections. Our proposed statistical framework shows that it is possible to perform a meta-analysis of transcriptomics studies with arbitrary experimental designs by deriving global expression features rather than decomposing studies into multiple phenotype comparisons.

  17. Meta-analysis a structural equation modeling approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Mike W-L

    2015-01-01

    Presents a novel approach to conducting meta-analysis using structural equation modeling. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and meta-analysis are two powerful statistical methods in the educational, social, behavioral, and medical sciences. They are often treated as two unrelated topics in the literature. This book presents a unified framework on analyzing meta-analytic data within the SEM framework, and illustrates how to conduct meta-analysis using the metaSEM package in the R statistical environment. Meta-Analysis: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach begins by introducing the impo

  18. Thrombocytosis as a prognostic factor in patients with renal cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic implications of perioperative thrombocytosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Materials and Methods: We conducted search on two medical databases, PubMed and EMBASE, to identify all studies. A meta-analysis was performed to clarify the prognostic role of thrombocytosis. Results: Twelve studies (N = 8735 were included which evaluated the relation of thrombocytosis and 5-year overall survival (OS or cancer-specific survival (CSS. One thousand and fifty-nine (12.1% of the 8735 patients exhibited thrombocytosis, and for OS, their estimated risk of death in 5 years was 1.61-fold higher compared with the normal platelet count group [(RR = 1.61, 95% CI = (1.31-1.98, P < 0.001]. While for CSS, the mortality was 2.56-fold higher [(RR = 2.56, 95% CI = (1.73-3.80, P < 0.00001. According to subgroup analyses, significant positive influence of thrombocytosis on 5-year OS and CSS was displayed only in patients with localized RCC and was also found in patients originated from different areas, such as Asian, Europe or North American. Conclusions: Thrombocytosis indicates worse OS and CSS for patients with RCC, and it showed stronger specificity or sensitivity for CSS. Thrombocytosis is more frequently in patients with metastatic RCC but only showed significant influence on survival of localized RCC patients.

  19. Estimate of undergraduate university student alcohol use in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ian; Ding, Lanyan; Feng, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    To develop an estimate of self-reported last 30 day alcohol use by university students in China. A search of papers published in English and Chinese between 2006 and 2015, following pre-established selection criteria, identified 30 papers that were included in this meta-analysis. Nine moderator variables were preselected for this analysis. A total of 749 papers were identified in the keyword search, and 30 studies (28 in Chinese, 2 in English) met all selection criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The self-reported last-30-day alcohol use for undergraduate university students was 66.8% for males and 31.7% for females. Meta-regression identified three moderators associated with the different drinking rates reported: the definition of drinking, the origin of the questionnaire used in the survey, and the geographic region where the survey was conducted. These three moderators explained 56% of the heterogeneity of reported drinking rates for the male students and 47% of the heterogeneity of reported drinking rates for the female students. The results of this meta-analysis provide an estimate of last 30 day alcohol use by university students (age 18-23) and increase our understanding of drinking by young people in China. The meta-analysis suggested three variables that could have affected the results and which are worthy of further study. The discussion places these results in the context of Chinese drinking culture and university life.

  20. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Autism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Altered blood BDNF levels have been frequently identified in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There are however wide discrepancies in the evidence. Therefore, we performed the present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at qualitative and quantitative synthesis of studies that measured blood BDNF levels in ASD and control subjects. Observational studies were identified through electronic database searching and also hand-searching of reference lists of relevant articles. A total of 183 papers were initially identified for review and eventually twenty studies were included in the meta-analysis. A meta-analysis of blood BDNF in 887 patients with ASD and 901 control subjects demonstrated significantly higher BDNF levels in ASD compared to controls with the SMD of 0.47 (95% CI 0.07-0.86, p = 0.02). In addition subgroup meta-analyses were performed based on the BDNF specimen. The present meta-analysis study led to conclusion that BDNF might play role in autism initiation/ propagation and therefore it can be considered as a possible biomarker of ASD.

  1. Hydropower externalities: A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattmann, Matteo; Logar, Ivana; Brouwer, Roy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a meta-analysis of existing research related to the economic valuation of the external effects of hydropower. A database consisting of 81 observations derived from 29 studies valuing the non-market impacts of hydropower electricity generation is constructed with the main aim to quantify and explain the economic values for positive and negative hydropower externalities. Different meta-regression model specifications are used to test the robustness of significant determinants of non-market values, including different types of hydropower impacts. The explanatory and predictive power of the estimated models is relatively high. Whilst controlling for sample and study characteristics, we find significant evidence for public aversion towards deteriorations of landscape, vegetation and wildlife caused by hydropower projects. There is however only weak evidence of willingness to pay for mitigating these effects. The main positive externality of hydropower generation, the avoidance of greenhouse gas emission, positively influences welfare estimates when combined with the share of hydropower in national energy production. Sensitivity to scope is detected, but not linked to specific externalities or non-market valuation methods. - Highlights: • A global meta-analysis of valuation studies of hydropower externalities is presented. • Positive and negative externalities are distinguished. • Welfare losses due to environmental deteriorations outweigh gains of GHG reductions. • There is only weak evidence of public WTP for mitigating negative externalities. • The non-market values of hydropower externalities are sensitive to scope.

  2. Identification of suitable genes contributes to lung adenocarcinoma clustering by multiple meta-analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-Hui; Zheng, Rui; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    With the widespread application of high-throughput technology, numerous meta-analysis methods have been proposed for differential expression profiling across multiple studies. We identified the suitable differentially expressed (DE) genes that contributed to lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) clustering based on seven popular multiple meta-analysis methods. Seven microarray expression profiles of ADC and normal controls were extracted from the ArrayExpress database. The Bioconductor was used to perform the data preliminary preprocessing. Then, DE genes across multiple studies were identified. Hierarchical clustering was applied to compare the classification performance for microarray data samples. The classification efficiency was compared based on accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Across seven datasets, 573 ADC cases and 222 normal controls were collected. After filtering out unexpressed and noninformative genes, 3688 genes were remained for further analysis. The classification efficiency analysis showed that DE genes identified by sum of ranks method separated ADC from normal controls with the best accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 0.953, 0.969 and 0.932, respectively. The gene set with the highest classification accuracy mainly participated in the regulation of response to external stimulus (P = 7.97E-04), cyclic nucleotide-mediated signaling (P = 0.01), regulation of cell morphogenesis (P = 0.01) and regulation of cell proliferation (P = 0.01). Evaluation of DE genes identified by different meta-analysis methods in classification efficiency provided a new perspective to the choice of the suitable method in a given application. Varying meta-analysis methods always present varying abilities, so synthetic consideration should be taken when providing meta-analysis methods for particular research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Western Dietary Pattern Increases Prostate Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Roberto; Minelli, Liliana; Bertarelli, Gaia; Bacci, Silvia

    2016-10-12

    Dietary patterns were recently applied to examine the relationship between eating habits and prostate cancer (PC) risk. While the associations between PC risk with the glycemic index and Mediterranean score have been reviewed, no meta-analysis is currently available on dietary patterns defined by "a posteriori" methods. A literature search was carried out (PubMed, Web of Science) to identify studies reporting the relationship between dietary patterns and PC risk. Relevant dietary patterns were selected and the risks estimated were calculated by a random-effect model. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs), for a first-percentile increase in dietary pattern score, were combined by a dose-response meta-analysis. Twelve observational studies were included in the meta-analysis which identified a "Healthy pattern" and a "Western pattern". The Healthy pattern was not related to PC risk (OR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.04) while the Western pattern significantly increased it (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.08-1.65). In addition, the "Carbohydrate pattern", which was analyzed in four articles, was positively associated with a higher PC risk (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.35-2.00). A significant linear trend between the Western ( p = 0.011) pattern, the Carbohydrate ( p = 0.005) pattern, and the increment of PC risk was observed. The small number of studies included in the meta-analysis suggests that further investigation is necessary to support these findings.

  4. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Hong-Bo; Chen, Liang-Hua; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study. Methods We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196). Results Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03). Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future. PMID:26375022

  5. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Hong-Bo; Chen, Liang-Hua; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study. We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196). Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03). Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future.

  6. Use of network meta-analysis in systematic reviews: a survey of authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew W

    2016-01-19

    The reporting of network meta-analysis in systematic reviews has increased rapidly since 2009. This qualitative study was undertaken to identify authors' perceptions of the use of these methods and of what standards for conduct and reporting should apply. This is a survey of authors of systematic reviews reporting network meta-analysis. The response rate was 32 % of the authors contacted, with these authors responsible for 34 % of the fully published systematic reviews identified within the period searched. Almost all authors would use the method again. Elements of reporting standards were proposed. Responses revealed some tensions between the view that use of network meta-analysis should be more easily accessible, particularly in the form of software tools, and concern that there is some inappropriate use of the methods, which wider use and greater accessibility could exacerbate. Authors demonstrated strong support for adoption of standards for conduct and reporting. The elements of reporting standards proposed are consistent with those included in the 2015 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) extension statement. Adoption of standards for conduct and reporting will be a significant step towards clarifying what is appropriate use of the methods and what is not. This should be followed by the development of a critical appraisal tool to support end users of systematic reviews reporting network meta-analysis.

  7. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP = 299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP = 335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was “immune system process” (P = 3.46 × 10−26). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P = 8.40 × 10−5). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25688367

  8. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP was GNG11 (combined RP=299.64. The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP=335.94. In the gene ontology (GO analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was “immune system process” (P=3.46×10-26. The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P=8.40×10-5. The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis.

  9. Identification of potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis of gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP=299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP=335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was "immune system process" (P=3.46×10(-26)). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P=8.40×10(-5)). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis.

  10. A Meta-Analysis on Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that there is an association between prehypertension and an increased risk of end-stage renal disease. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between prehypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD. This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the association between prehypertension and the incidence of CKD and identify the impacts of gender and ethnic differences.MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library (from inception through March 2016 and article reference lists were searched for relevant studies regarding blood pressure and CKD. Blood pressure (BP measurements were classified as follows: optimal BP (less than 120/80 mmHg, prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mmHg and hypertension (over 140/90 mmHg. CKD was defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or proteinuria. Two investigators independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of studies enrolled in this meta-analysis using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS. We performed the meta-analysis using Stata/SE 12.0 (StataCorp LP. The random-effect models were used in the heterogeneous analyses.After retrieving data from 4,537 potentially relevant articles, we identified 7 cohort studies including 261,264 subjects, according to the predefined selection criteria. Five studies were conducted in Mongolians from East Asia, and the other two studies were performed in Indo-Europeans from Austria and Iran. The participants ranged in age from 20 to 89 years, and the proportion of females ranged from 27.2% to 63.8%. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 11 years. Compared with the optimal BP values, prehypertension showed an increased risk of CKD (pooled RR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.13-1.44; P = 0.000; I2 = 77.9%. In the sex-stratified analysis, we found a similar trend in women (pooled RR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.63; P = 0.039; I2 = 76.1% but not in men. This effect was observed only in Mongolians from East Asia (pooled RR = 1.37; 95

  11. A Review of Meta-Analysis Packages in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Hennessy, Emily A.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a statistical technique that allows an analyst to synthesize effect sizes from multiple primary studies. To estimate meta-analysis models, the open-source statistical environment R is quickly becoming a popular choice. The meta-analytic community has contributed to this growth by developing numerous packages specific to…

  12. Teaching meta-analysis using MetaLight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas James

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of primary studies. It is often used in systematic reviews and is increasingly a method and topic that appears in student dissertations. MetaLight is a freely available software application that runs simple meta-analyses and contains specific functionality to facilitate the teaching and learning of meta-analysis. While there are many courses and resources for meta-analysis available and numerous software applications to run meta-analyses, there are few pieces of software which are aimed specifically at helping those teaching and learning meta-analysis. Valuable teaching time can be spent learning the mechanics of a new software application, rather than on the principles and practices of meta-analysis. Findings We discuss ways in which the MetaLight tool can be used to present some of the main issues involved in undertaking and interpreting a meta-analysis. Conclusions While there are many software tools available for conducting meta-analysis, in the context of a teaching programme such software can require expenditure both in terms of money and in terms of the time it takes to learn how to use it. MetaLight was developed specifically as a tool to facilitate the teaching and learning of meta-analysis and we have presented here some of the ways it might be used in a training situation.

  13. Meta-analysis in epidemiology | Yach | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meta-analysis is the structured and systematic qualitative and quantitative integration of the results of several independent studies (Le. the epidemiology of results). As in any epidemiological study, a meta-analysis needs to start with clearly stated aims and objectives. Attention needs to be paid to selection bias in selecting ...

  14. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis: Why, when, and how?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crocetti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews with meta-analysis represent the gold standard for conducting reliable and transparent reviews of the literature. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) to address why and when it is worthwhile to conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis, covering advantages of this

  15. Statistical learning in specific language impairment : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, Imme; Boersma, Paul; Wijnen, Frank; Rispens, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current meta-analysis provides a quantitative overview of published and unpublished studies on statistical learning in the auditory verbal domain in people with and without specific language impairment (SLI). The database used for the meta-analysis is accessible online and open to

  16. Meta-analysis in a nutshell: Techniques and general findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the technique and main findings of meta-analysis to the reader, who is unfamiliar with the field and has the usual objections. A meta-analysis is a quantitative survey of a literature reporting estimates of the same parameter. The funnel showing...

  17. Physical Activity and Risk of Lymphoma: A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaete, N.V.H.; Wolter, P.; Verhoef, G.E.G.; Kollen, B.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Schepers, L.; Gosselink, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Physical activity has a protective effect on some types of cancer. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to explore the literature on the association between physical activity and risk of lymphoma. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted for cohort and case-control studies examining

  18. Physical Activity and Risk of Lymphoma : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaete, Nele V. H.; Wolter, Pascal; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Kwakkel, Gert; Schepers, Leen; Gosselink, Rik

    Background: Physical activity has a protective effect on some types of cancer. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to explore the literature on the association between physical activity and risk of lymphoma. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted for cohort and case-control studies examining

  19. Estimating individual rates of discount: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percoco, M.; Nijkamp, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present the results from a meta-analysis conducted over 44 experimental and field studies, which report individual discount rate estimates. We find in our research that the experimental design of a study has a decisive impact on these estimates, and conclude that meta-analysis,

  20. The health effects of education: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furnée, C.A.; Groot, W.; Maassen van den Brink, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is an abundance of empirical evidence, mainly from the epidemiological and social science literature, on the relation between education and health. Until now a meta-analysis of the relation between education and health was not available. This article presents a meta-analysis of

  1. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  2. META-ANALYSIS: THE WAY FORWARD IN MEDICAL DISCOVERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    data, and (6) report the results. Define the Research Question. A meta-analysis begins with a question. Common questions addressed in meta-analyses are whether one. META-ANALYSIS: THE WAY FORWARD IN MEDICAL DISCOVERY. Akinyemi J.O. MSc (Medical Statistics), B Tech (Comp. Sc.) Correspondence:.

  3. Childhood maltreatment and obesity: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, A; Tan, M

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a prevalent global-health problem associated with substantial morbidity, impairment and economic burden. Because most readily available forms of treatment are ineffective in the long term, it is essential to advance knowledge of obesity prevention by identifying potentially modifiable risk factors. Findings from experimental studies in non-human primates suggest that adverse childhood experiences may influence obesity risk. However, observations from human studies showed heterogeneous results. To address these inconsistencies, we performed Medline, PsycInfo and Embase searches till 1 August 2012 for articles examining the association between childhood maltreatment and obesity. We then conducted a meta-analysis of the identified studies and explored the effects of various possible sources of bias. A meta-analysis of 41 studies (190 285 participants) revealed that childhood maltreatment was associated with elevated risk of developing obesity over the life-course (odds ratio=1.36; 95% confidence interval=1.26-1.47). Results were not explained by publication bias or undue influence of individual studies. Overall, results were not significantly affected by the measures or definitions used for maltreatment or obesity, nor by confounding by childhood or adult socioeconomic status, current smoking, alcohol intake or physical activity. However, the association was not statistically significant in studies of children and adolescents, focusing on emotional neglect, or adjusting for current depression. Furthermore, the association was stronger in samples including more women and whites, but was not influenced by study quality. Child maltreatment is a potentially modifiable risk factor for obesity. Future research should clarify the mechanisms through which child maltreatment affects obesity risk and explore methods to remediate this effect.

  4. Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Jason; Mullen, Sean P; McAuley, Edward

    2012-11-21

    Regular physical activity has established physical and mental health benefits; however, merely one quarter of the U.S. adult population meets national physical activity recommendations. In an effort to engage individuals who do not meet these guidelines, researchers have utilized popular emerging technologies, including mobile devices (ie, personal digital assistants [PDAs], mobile phones). This study is the first to synthesize current research focused on the use of mobile devices for increasing physical activity. To conduct a meta-analysis of research utilizing mobile devices to influence physical activity behavior. The aims of this review were to: (1) examine the efficacy of mobile devices in the physical activity setting, (2) explore and discuss implementation of device features across studies, and (3) make recommendations for future intervention development. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO, SCOPUS) and identified publications through reference lists and requests to experts in the field of mobile health. Studies were included that provided original data and aimed to influence physical activity through dissemination or collection of intervention materials with a mobile device. Data were extracted to calculate effect sizes for individual studies, as were study descriptives. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software suite. Study quality was assessed using the quality of execution portion of the Guide to Community Preventative Services data extraction form. Four studies were of "good" quality and seven of "fair" quality. In total, 1351 individuals participated in 11 unique studies from which 18 effects were extracted and synthesized, yielding an overall weight mean effect size of g = 0.54 (95% CI = 0.17 to 0.91, P = .01). Research utilizing mobile devices is gaining in popularity, and this study suggests that this platform is an effective means for influencing physical activity behavior. Our focus

  5. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Tinnitus Patients: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Jin Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has already been used to manage tinnitus patients, paucity of reports and variations in protocols preclude a comprehensive understanding. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis based on systemic review to assess effectiveness of tDCS in tinnitus management and to compare stimulation parameters. PubMed was searched for tDCS studies in tinnitus. For randomized controlled trials (RCTs, a meta-analysis was performed. A total of 17 studies were identified and 6 of them were included in the systemic review and 2 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Overall 39.5% responded to active tDCS with a mean tinnitus intensity reduction of 13.5%. Additionally, left temporal area (LTA and bifrontal tDCS indicated comparable results. Active tDCS was found to be more effective than sham tDCS for tinnitus intensity reduction (Hedges' g=.77, 95% confidence interval 0.23–1.31. The efficacy of tDCS in tinnitus could not be fully confirmed by the current study because of the limited number of studies, but all studies included in the current systemic review and meta-analysis demonstrated significant tinnitus intensity improvement. Therefore, tDCS may be a promising tool for tinnitus management. Future RCTs in a large series regarding the efficacy as well as the comparison between LTA- and bifrontal tDCS are recommended.

  6. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-06-02

    Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. All studies (1997-2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  7. Legume intake and risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mao, Qi-Qi

    2017-07-04

    Previous studies regarding the relationship between legume intake and risk of prostate cancer have reported inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to summarize evidence on this association. A systematic literature search of articles published through June 2016 was performed using PubMed and Web of Science databases. The combined relative risk (RR) with its 95% confidence interval (CI) for the highest versus the lowest intake of legumes was calculated with a random-effects model. Dose-response meta-analysis was also performed for the studies that provided at least three levels of legume consumption. Ten articles (eight cohorts) reporting 281,034 individuals and 10,234 incident cases were identified. The individuals with high consumption of legumes compared with the reference group experienced a significantly reduced risk for developing prostate cancer (RR: 0.85 [95% CI 0.75-0.96], P = 0.010). Moderate heterogeneity of RRs was observed across these studies (P = 0.064 for heterogeneity, I2 = 45.8 %). Dose-response meta-analysis indicated that the risk of prostate cancer reduced by 3.7% (95% CI 1.5%-5.8%) for each 20 grams per day increment of legume intake. In conclusion, the results from this meta-analysis suggest that a high intake of legumes is associated with a low incidence of prostate cancer.

  8. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelnuovo Gianluca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007, both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68 in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634 in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  9. A meta-analysis of peripheral blood nerve growth factor levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X-Y; Wu, H-T; Cao, C; Loh, Y P; Cheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Neurotrophins particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are crucial modulators in the neurodevelopment and maintenance of central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurotrophin hypothesis of schizophrenia (SCZ) postulated that the changes in the brains of SCZ patients are the result of disturbances of developing processes involving neurotrophic factors. This hypothesis was mainly supported by the abnormal regulation of BDNF in SCZ, especially the decreased peripheral blood BDNF levels in SCZ patients validated by several meta-analyses. However, the regulation of NGF in SCZ remains unclear because of the inconsistent findings from the clinical studies. Therefore, we undertook, to the best of our knowledge, the first systematic review with a meta-analysis to quantitatively summarize the peripheral blood NGF data in SCZ patients compared with healthy control (HC) subjects. A systematic search of Pubmed, PsycINFO and Web of Science identified 13 articles encompassing a sample of 1693 individuals for the meta-analysis. Random-effects meta-analysis showed that patients with SCZ had significantly decreased peripheral blood levels of NGF when compared with the HC subjects (Hedges's g=-0.633, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.948 to -0.318, Panalysis, whereas disease severity might be a confounding factor for the meta-analysis. These results demonstrated that patients with SCZ are accompanied by the decreased peripheral blood NGF levels, strengthening the clinical evidence of an abnormal neurotrophin profile in the patients with SCZ.

  10. How Acute Total Sleep Loss Affects the Attending Brain: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F.; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Design: Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. Methods: The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Conclusion: Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. Citation: Ma N, Dinges DF, Basner M, Rao H. How acute total

  11. Macroeconomics of Natural Disasters: Strengths and Weaknesses of Meta-Analysis Versus Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A G van Bergeijk, Peter; Lazzaroni, Sara

    2015-06-01

    We use the case of the macroeconomic impact of natural disasters to analyze strengths and weaknesses of meta-analysis in an emerging research field. Macroeconomists have published on this issue since 2002 (we identified 60 studies to date). The results of the studies are contradictory and therefore the need to synthesize the available research is evident. Meta-analysis is a useful method in this field. An important aim of our article is to show how one can use the identified methodological characteristics to better understand the robustness and importance of new findings. To provide a comparative perspective, we contrast our meta-analysis and its findings with the major influential research synthesis in the field: the IPCC's 2012 special report Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation. We show that the IPCC could have been more confident about the negative economic impact of disasters and more transparent on inclusion and qualification of studies, if it had been complemented by a meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis shows that, controlling for modeling strategies and data set, the impact of disasters is significantly negative. The evidence is strongest for direct costs studies where we see no difference between our larger sample and the studies included in the IPCC report. Direct cost studies and indirect cost studies differ significantly, both in terms of the confidence that can be attached to a negative impact of natural disasters and in terms of the sources of heterogeneity of the findings reported in the primary studies. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Cognitive Expertise: An ALE Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Nicola; Lotze, Martin; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-01-01

    Expert performance constitutes the endpoint of skill acquisition and is accompanied by widespread neuroplastic changes. To reveal common mechanisms of reorganization associated with long-term expertise in a cognitive domain (mental calculation, chess, language, memory, music without motor involvement), we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis and compared brain activation of experts to nonexperts. Twenty-six studies matched inclusion criteria, most of which reported an increase and not a decrease of activation foci in experts. Increased activation occurred in the left rolandic operculum (OP 4) and left primary auditory cortex and in bilateral premotor cortex in studies that used auditory stimulation. In studies with visual stimulation, experts showed enhanced activation in the right inferior parietal cortex (area PGp) and the right lingual gyrus. Experts' brain activation patterns seem to be characterized by enhanced or additional activity in domain-specific primary, association, and motor structures, confirming that learning is localized and very specialized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Early Start DENVER Model: A Meta - analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane P. Canoy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Each child with Autism Spectrum Disorder has different symptoms, skills and types of impairment or disorder with other children. This is why the word “spectrum” is included in this disorder. Eapen, Crncec, and Walter, 2013 claimed that there was an emerging evidence that early interventions gives the greatest capacity of child’s development during their first years of life as “brain plasticity” are high during this period. With this, the only intervention program model for children as young as 18 months that has been validated in a randomized clinical trial is “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the outcome of “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM towards young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This study made use of meta-analysis method. In this study, the researcher utilized studies related to “Early Start Denver Model (ESDM” which is published in a refereed journal which are all available online. There were five studies included which totals 149 children exposed to ESDM. To examine the “pooled effects” of ESDM in a variety of outcomes, a meta-analytic procedure was performed after the extraction of data of the concrete outcomes. Comprehensive Meta Analysis Version 3.3.070 was used to analyze the data.  The effectiveness of the outcome of “Early Start Denver Model” towards young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD highly depends on the intensity of intervention and the younger child age. This study would provide the basis in effectively implementing an early intervention to children with autism such as the “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM that would show great outcome effects to those children that has “Autism Spectrum Disorder”.

  14. Personality Consistency in Dogs: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratkin, Jamie L.; Sinn, David L.; Patall, Erika A.; Gosling, Samuel D.

    2013-01-01

    Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that ‘puppy tests’ measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., ‘puppy tests’) versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed. PMID:23372787

  15. Personality consistency in dogs: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratkin, Jamie L; Sinn, David L; Patall, Erika A; Gosling, Samuel D

    2013-01-01

    Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that 'puppy tests' measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., 'puppy tests') versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed.

  16. Personality consistency in dogs: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Fratkin

    Full Text Available Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that 'puppy tests' measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family. Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43. Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., 'puppy tests' versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Surgeon Burnout Syndrome and Specialty Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Alex J; Houk, Anna K; Pulcrano, Marisa; Shara, Nawar M; Kwagyan, John; Jackson, Patrick G; Sosin, Michael

    2018-02-27

    Surgeon burnout compromises the quality of life of physicians and the delivery of care to patients. Burnout rates and interpretation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) complicates the interpretation of surgeon burnout. The purpose of this study is to apply a standardized interpretation of severe surgeon burnout termed, "burnout syndrome" to analyze inherent variation within surgical specialties. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE to identify studies reporting MBI data by surgical specialty. Data extraction was performed to isolate surgeon specific data. A meta-analysis was performed. A total of 16 cross-sectional studies were included in this meta-analysis, totaling 3581 subjects. A random effects model approximated burnout syndrome at 3.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-5.0%; I 2 = 78.1%). Subscale analysis of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment indicated subscale burnout in 30.0% (CI: 25.0%-36.0%; I 2 = 93.2%), 34.0% (CI: 25.0%-43.0%; I 2 = 96.9%), and 25.0% (CI: 18.0%-32.0%; I 2 = 96.5%) of surgeons, respectively. Significant differences (p burnout termed "burnout syndrome," although surgeon burnout may occur in up to 34% of surgeons, characterized by high burnout in 1 of 3 subscales. Surgical specialties have significantly different rates of burnout subscales. Future burnout studies should target the specialty-specific level to understand inherent differences in an effort to better understand methods of improving surgeon burnout. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Meta-analysis of biomarkers for severe dengue infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Meng Soo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Dengue viral infection is an acute infection that has the potential to have severe complications as its major sequela. Currently, there is no routine laboratory biomarker with which to predict the severity of dengue infection or monitor the effectiveness of standard management. Hence, this meta-analysis compared biomarker levels between dengue fever (DF and severe dengue infections (SDI to identify potential biomarkers for SDI. Methods Data concerning levels of cytokines, chemokines, and other potential biomarkers of DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever, dengue shock syndrome, and severe dengue were obtained for patients of all ages and populations using the Scopus, PubMed, and Ovid search engines. The keywords “(IL1* or IL-1* AND (dengue*” were used and the same process was repeated for other potential biomarkers, according to Medical Subject Headings terms suggested by PubMed and Ovid. Meta-analysis of the mean difference in plasma or serum level of biomarkers between DF and SDI patients was performed, separated by different periods of time (days since fever onset. Subgroup analyses comparing biomarker levels of healthy plasma and sera controls, biomarker levels of primary and secondary infection samples were also performed, as well as analyses of different levels of severity and biomarker levels upon infection by different dengue serotypes. Results Fifty-six studies of 53 biomarkers from 3,739 dengue cases (2,021 DF and 1,728 SDI were included in this meta-analysis. Results showed that RANTES, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-b, and VEGFR2 levels were significantly different between DF and SDI. IL-8, IL-10, and IL-18 levels increased during SDI (95% CI, 18.1–253.2 pg/mL, 3–13 studies, n = 177–1,909, I2 = 98.86%–99.75%. In contrast, RANTES, IL-7, TGF-b, and VEGFR2 showed a decrease in levels during SDI (95% CI, −3238.7 to −3.2 pg/mL, 1–3 studies, n = 95–418, I2 = 97.59%–99.99%. Levels of these biomarkers were also

  19. Physical Activity and Cognitive Development: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William M; Davis, Nicholas; Sands, Stephen A; Whittington, Robert A; Sun, Lena S

    2016-10-01

    Is there an association between regular exercise, defined as a structured program of increased physical activity at least 1 month in duration, and improvements in measures of executive functions compared with children who engage in their normal daily activities? The association between increased physical activity and changes in performance on tasks of executive functions have not been well elucidated in children. Executive functioning is important to intellectual development and academic success in children, and inexpensive, nonpharmacological methods for the treatment of executive dysfunction represent an attractive interventional target. To estimate the effect of a structured regular exercise program on neuropsychological domains of executive function in children ages 7 to 12. We performed a systematic review of English and non-English articles using Cochrane Library, EBSCO CINAHL, Ovid MEDLINE, PSYCInfo, Pubmed, and Web of Science, including all years allowed by each individual search engine. The search string used was "(exercise OR phys*) AND (cognit* OR executive) AND (child* OR preadolesc*)." The authors of the studies selected for review were contacted for any unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials, which enrolled children between the ages of 7 and 12, with randomization to either normal activity or a structured physical activity intervention consisting of scheduled aerobic exercise, at least once per week, for a period of at least 1 month. Eligible studies must have included a neuropsychological battery of tests that measured at least 1 executive function both before and after the intervention was completed. Two independent reviewers examined the screened studies in detail for potential inclusion. The results of the individual examinations were compared; if any discrepancies were present, a third party analyzed the study to determine if it should be included in the meta-analysis. A total of 18 studies were identified by abstract as candidates for

  20. An overview of meta-analysis for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho

    2018-01-01

    The number of medical studies being published is increasing exponentially, and clinicians must routinely process large amounts of new information. Moreover, the results of individual studies are often insufficient to provide confident answers, as their results are not consistently reproducible. A meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of different studies on the same topic and it may resolve conflicts among studies. Meta-analysis is being used increasingly and plays an important role in medical research. This review introduces the basic concepts, steps, advantages, and caveats of meta-analysis, to help clinicians understand it in clinical practice and research. A major advantage of a meta-analysis is that it produces a precise estimate of the effect size, with considerably increased statistical power, which is important when the power of the primary study is limited because of a small sample size. A meta-analysis may yield conclusive results when individual studies are inconclusive. Furthermore, meta-analyses investigate the source of variation and different effects among subgroups. In summary, a meta-analysis is an objective, quantitative method that provides less biased estimates on a specific topic. Understanding how to conduct a meta-analysis aids clinicians in the process of making clinical decisions. PMID:29277096

  1. How Does Physical Activity Intervention Improve Self-Esteem and Self-Concept in Children and Adolescents? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mingli; Wu, Lang; Ming, Qingsen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis for the effects of physical activity intervention on self-esteem and self-concept in children and adolescents, and to identify moderator variables by meta-regression. Design A meta-analysis and meta-regression. Method Relevant studies were identified through a comprehensive search of electronic databases. Study inclusion criteria were: (1) intervention should be supervised physical activity, (2) reported sufficient data to estimate po...

  2. Plasma Exchange for Renal Vasculitis and Idiopathic Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis: A Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis. STUDY DESIGN:: Systematic review and meta-analysis of articles identified from...... electronic databases, bibliographies, and studies identified by experts. Data were abstracted in parallel by 2 reviewers. SETTING & POPULATION:: Adults with idiopathic renal vasculitis or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. SELECTION CRITERIA FOR STUDIES:: Randomized controlled trials that compared...... standard care with standard care plus adjuvant plasma exchange in adult patients with either renal vasculitis or idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. INTERVENTION:: Adjuvant plasma exchange. OUTCOME:: Composite of end-stage renal disease or death. RESULTS:: We identified 9 trials including...

  3. Food and drug cues activate similar brain regions: a meta-analysis of functional MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D W; Fellows, L K; Small, D M; Dagher, A

    2012-06-06

    In healthy individuals, food cues can trigger hunger and feeding behavior. Likewise, smoking cues can trigger craving and relapse in smokers. Brain imaging studies report that structures involved in appetitive behaviors and reward, notably the insula, striatum, amygdala and orbital frontal cortex, tend to be activated by both visual food and smoking cues. Here, by carrying out a meta-analysis of human neuro-imaging studies, we investigate the neural network activated by: 1) food versus neutral cues (14 studies, 142 foci) 2) smoking versus neutral cues (15 studies, 176 foci) 3) smoking versus neutral cues when correlated with craving scores (7 studies, 108 foci). PubMed was used to identify cue-reactivity imaging studies that compared brain response to visual food or smoking cues to neutral cues. Fourteen articles were identified for the food meta-analysis and fifteen articles were identified for the smoking meta-analysis. Six articles were identified for the smoking cue correlated with craving analysis. Meta-analyses were carried out using activation likelihood estimation. Food cues were associated with increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, bilateral orbital frontal cortex, and striatum. Smoking cues were associated with increased BOLD signal in the same areas, with the exception of the insula. However, the smoking meta-analysis of brain maps correlating cue-reactivity with subjective craving did identify the insula, suggesting that insula activation is only found when craving levels are high. The brain areas identified here are involved in learning, memory and motivation, and their cue-induced activity is an index of the incentive salience of the cues. Using meta-analytic techniques to combine a series of studies, we found that food and smoking cues activate comparable brain networks. There is significant overlap in brain regions responding to conditioned cues associated with natural and drug rewards

  4. Meniscal allograft transplantation: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bruycker Manolito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This meta-analysis evaluates the mid- to long-term survival outcome of MAT (meniscal allograft transplantation. Potential prognosticators, with particular focus on chondral status and age of the patient at the time of transplantation, were also analysed. Study design: Meta-analysis. Methods: An online database search was performed using following search string: “meniscal allograft transplantation” and “outcome”. A total of 65 articles were analysed for a total of 3157 performed MAT with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Subjective and clinical data was analysed. Results: The subjective and objective results of 2977 patients (3157 allografts were analysed; 70% were male, 30% were female. Thirty-eight percent received an isolated MAT. All other patients underwent at least one concomitant procedure. Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores were analysed. All scores showed a good patient satisfaction at long-term follow-up. The mean overall survival rate was 80.9%. Complication rates were comparable to standard meniscal repair surgery. There was a degenerative evolution in osteoarthritis with at least one grade in 1760 radiographically analysed patients. Concomitant procedures seem to have no effect on the outcome. Age at transplantation is a negative prognosticator. The body mass index (BMI of the patient shows a slightly negative correlation with the outcome of MAT. Conclusions: MAT is a viable solution for the younger patient with chronic pain in the meniscectomised knee joint. The complications are not severe and comparable to meniscal repair. The overall failure rate at final follow-up is acceptable and the allograft heals well in most cases, but MAT cannot be seen as a definitive solution for post-meniscectomy pain. The correct approach to the chronic painful total meniscectomised knee joint thus requires consideration of all

  5. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  6. Plasma Exchange for Renal Vasculitis and Idiopathic Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis: A Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir

    2010-01-01

    .9). LIMITATIONS:: Although the primary result was statistically significant, there is insufficient statistical information to reliably determine whether plasma exchange decreases the composite of end-stage renal disease or death. CONCLUSIONS:: Plasma exchange may decrease the composite end point of end......BACKGROUND:: Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis. STUDY DESIGN:: Systematic review and meta-analysis of articles identified from...... electronic databases, bibliographies, and studies identified by experts. Data were abstracted in parallel by 2 reviewers. SETTING & POPULATION:: Adults with idiopathic renal vasculitis or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. SELECTION CRITERIA FOR STUDIES:: Randomized controlled trials that compared...

  7. A Meta-Analysis of the Relations among Training Criteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alliger, George

    1998-01-01

    .... Meta-analysis results among criteria using this framework include the finding of substantial reliabilities across training criteria and reasonable convergence among subdivisions of criteria within a larger level...

  8. Effect of Metformin on Plasma Fibrinogen Concentrations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Mendia, Luis E; Pirro, Matteo; Atkin, Stephen L; Banach, Maciej; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-11-03

    Fibrinogen is a key mediator of thrombosis and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Because metformin has shown a potential protective effect on different atherothrombotic risk factors, we assessed in this meta-analysis its effect on plasma fibrinogen concentrations. A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to identify randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the effect of metformin administration on fibrinogen levels. The search included PubMed-Medline, Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar databases (by June 2, 2017) and quality of studies was performed according to Cochrane criteria. Quantitative data synthesis was conducted using a random-effects model and sensitivity analysis by the leave-one-out method. Meta-regression analysis was performed to assess the modifiers of treatment response. Meta-analysis of data from 9 randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials with 2302 patients comprising 10 treatment arms did not suggest a significant change in plasma fibrinogen concentrations following metformin therapy (WMD: -0.25 g/L, 95% CI: -0.53, 0.04, p = 0.092). The effect size was robust in the leave-one-out sensitivity analysis and remained non-significant after omission of each single study from the meta-analysis. No significant effect of metformin on plasma fibrinogen concentrations was demonstrated in the current meta-analysis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Meta-Analysis of Complex Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Grant, Sean

    2018-04-01

    Meta-analysis is a prominent method for estimating the effects of public health interventions, yet these interventions are often complex in ways that pose challenges to using conventional meta-analytic methods. This article discusses meta-analytic techniques that can be used in research syntheses on the effects of complex public health interventions. We first introduce the use of complexity frameworks to conceptualize public health interventions. We then present a menu of meta-analytic procedures for addressing various sources of complexity when answering questions about the effects of public health interventions in research syntheses. We conclude with a review of important practices and key resources for conducting meta-analyses on complex interventions, as well as future directions for research synthesis more generally. Overall, we argue that it is possible to conduct meaningful quantitative syntheses of research on the effects of public health interventions, though these meta-analyses may require the use of advanced techniques to properly consider and attend to issues of complexity.

  10. The Neural Correlates of Moral Thinking: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas J. Bryant; Wang F; Kelley Deardeuff; Emily Zoccoli; Chang S. Nam

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate current research that aims to map the neural correlates of two typical conditions of moral judgment: right-wrong moral judgments and decision-making in moral dilemmas. Utilizing the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) method, we conducted a meta-analysis using neuroimaging data obtained from twenty-one previous studies that measured responses in one or the other of these conditions. We found that across the studies (n = 400), distinct neural circuit...

  11. Meta-analysis of DNA methylation biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Jinyun; Huang, Tao; Duan, Shiwei; Dai, Dongjun; Jiang, Danjie; Sui, Xinbing; Li, Da; Chen, Yidan; Ding, Fei; Huang, Changxin; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Kaifeng

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate the contribution of DNA methylation to the risk of HCC. A total of 2109 publications were initially retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang literature database. After a four-step filtration, we harvested 144 case-control articles in the meta-analysis. Our results revealed that 24 genes (carcinoma t...

  12. Teaching Children to Write : A Meta-Analysis of Writing Intervention Research

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, M.P.; Tribushinina, E.; De Jong, Peter; van den Bergh, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that in the Netherlands, as in other countries, a majority of students do not attain the desired level of writing skills at the end of elementary school. Time devoted to writing is limited, and only a minority of schools succeed in effectively teaching writing. An improvement in the way writing is taught in elementary school is clearly required. In order to identify effective instructional practices we conducted a meta-analysis of writing intervention studies aimed at ...

  13. Consequences of bullying victimization in childhood and adolescence: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Sophie E; Norman, Rosana E; Suetani, Shuichi; Thomas, Hannah J; Sly, Peter D; Scott, James G

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify health and psychosocial problems associated with bullying victimization and conduct a meta-analysis summarizing the causal evidence. METHODS A systematic review was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC and PsycINFO electronic databases up to 28 February 2015. The study included published longitudinal and cross-sectional articles that examined health and psychosocial consequences of bullying victimization. All meta-analyses were based on quality-effects models. Evidence for cau...

  14. Diagnostic indicators of non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wertli, Maria M; Ruchti, Katrin B; Steurer, Johann; Held, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) has a high healthcare cost, but insufficient guidelines exist for its diagnostic investigation. The objective of the present work was to identify important diagnostic indicators and their accuracy for specific and non-specific conditions underlying NCCP. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. In May 2012, six databases were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Studies evaluating a diagnostic test...

  15. Bayesian meta-analysis models for microarray data: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Joon J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the growing abundance of microarray data, statistical methods are increasingly needed to integrate results across studies. Two common approaches for meta-analysis of microarrays include either combining gene expression measures across studies or combining summaries such as p-values, probabilities or ranks. Here, we compare two Bayesian meta-analysis models that are analogous to these methods. Results Two Bayesian meta-analysis models for microarray data have recently been introduced. The first model combines standardized gene expression measures across studies into an overall mean, accounting for inter-study variability, while the second combines probabilities of differential expression without combining expression values. Both models produce the gene-specific posterior probability of differential expression, which is the basis for inference. Since the standardized expression integration model includes inter-study variability, it may improve accuracy of results versus the probability integration model. However, due to the small number of studies typical in microarray meta-analyses, the variability between studies is challenging to estimate. The probability integration model eliminates the need to model variability between studies, and thus its implementation is more straightforward. We found in simulations of two and five studies that combining probabilities outperformed combining standardized gene expression measures for three comparison values: the percent of true discovered genes in meta-analysis versus individual studies; the percent of true genes omitted in meta-analysis versus separate studies, and the number of true discovered genes for fixed levels of Bayesian false discovery. We identified similar results when pooling two independent studies of Bacillus subtilis. We assumed that each study was produced from the same microarray platform with only two conditions: a treatment and control, and that the data sets

  16. Can retention forestry help conserve biodiversity? A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrowitz, Katja; Koricheva, Julia; Baker, Susan C; Lindenmayer, David B; Palik, Brian; Rosenvald, Raul; Beese, William; Franklin, Jerry F; Kouki, Jari; Macdonald, Ellen; Messier, Christian; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne; Gustafsson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Industrial forestry typically leads to a simplified forest structure and altered species composition. Retention of trees at harvest was introduced about 25 years ago to mitigate negative impacts on biodiversity, mainly from clearcutting, and is now widely practiced in boreal and temperate regions. Despite numerous studies on response of flora and fauna to retention, no comprehensive review has summarized its effects on biodiversity in comparison to clearcuts as well as un-harvested forests. Using a systematic review protocol, we completed a meta-analysis of 78 studies including 944 comparisons of biodiversity between retention cuts and either clearcuts or un-harvested forests, with the main objective of assessing whether retention forestry helps, at least in the short term, to moderate the negative effects of clearcutting on flora and fauna. Retention cuts supported higher richness and a greater abundance of forest species than clearcuts as well as higher richness and abundance of open-habitat species than un-harvested forests. For all species taken together (i.e. forest species, open-habitat species, generalist species and unclassified species), richness was higher in retention cuts than in clearcuts. Retention cuts had negative impacts on some species compared to un-harvested forest, indicating that certain forest-interior species may not survive in retention cuts. Similarly, retention cuts were less suitable for some open-habitat species compared with clearcuts. Positive effects of retention cuts on richness of forest species increased with proportion of retained trees and time since harvest, but there were not enough data to analyse possible threshold effects, that is, levels at which effects on biodiversity diminish. Spatial arrangement of the trees (aggregated vs. dispersed) had no effect on either forest species or open-habitat species, although limited data may have hindered our capacity to identify responses. Results for different comparisons were largely

  17. Meta-analysis: Its role in psychological methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Kastrin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis refers to the statistical analysis of a large collection of independent observations for the purpose of integrating results. The main objectives of this article are to define meta-analysis as a method of data integration, to draw attention to some particularities of its use, and to encourage researchers to use meta-analysis in their work. The benefits of meta-analysis include more effective exploitation of existing data from independent sources and contribution to more powerful domain knowledge. It may also serve as a support tool to generate new research hypothesis. The idea of combining results of independent studies addressing the same research question dates back to sixteenth century. Metaanalysis was reinvented in 1976 by Glass, to refute the conclusion of an eminent colleague, Eysenck, that psychotherapy was essentially ineffective. We review some major historical landmarks of metaanalysis and its statistical background. We present the concept of effect size measure, the problem of heterogeneity and two models which are used to combine individual effect sizes (fixed and random effect model in great details. Two visualization techniques, forest and funnel plot graphics are demonstrated. We developed RMetaWeb, simple and fast web server application to conduct meta-analysis online. RMetaWeb is the first web meta-analysis application and is completely based on R software environment for statistical computing and graphics.

  18. Network meta-analysis of longitudinal data using fractional polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J P; Vieira, M C; Cope, S

    2015-07-10

    Network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are often based on one treatment effect measure per study. However, many studies report data at multiple time points. Furthermore, not all studies measure the outcomes at the same time points. As an alternative to a network meta-analysis based on a synthesis of the results at one time point, a network meta-analysis method is presented that allows for the simultaneous analysis of outcomes at multiple time points. The development of outcomes over time of interventions compared in an RCT is modeled with fractional polynomials, and the differences between the parameters of these polynomials within a trial are synthesized across studies with a Bayesian network meta-analysis. The proposed models are illustrated with an analysis of RCTs evaluating interventions for osteoarthritis of the knee. Fixed and random effects second order fractional polynomials were applied to the case study. Network meta-analysis with models that represent the treatment effects in terms of several parameters using fractional polynomials can be considered a useful addition to models for network meta-analysis of repeated measures previously proposed. When RCTs report treatment effects at multiple follow-up times, these models can be used to synthesize the results even if reporting times differ across the studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effect of chest tube size on pleurodesis efficacy in malignant pleural effusion: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thethi, Inderpal; Ramirez, Shokufeh; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Dingding; Mohamad, Maha; Kaphle, Upendra; Kheir, Fayez

    2018-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) develops in approximately 50% of all patients with metastatic cancer. The efficacy of small- vs. large-bore chest tube for pleurodesis in patients with MPE is still not clear. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chest tube size in the management of MPE. A systematic search of Medline (Ovid) and Embase (from 1980 to March 2016) was performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of small (≤14 French) vs. large (>14 French) chest tube size on successful pleurodesis for patients with MPE. Of 708 potentially relevant publications, four matched the selection criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Q statistic (significant at Ptube groups with a pooled RR of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.77-1.05; P=0.19; I 2 =17.4%) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.42-2.15; P=0.90; I 2 =0.9%) respectively. Successful pleurodesis and complication proportion for small vs. large chest tubes were 73.8% vs. 82.0% and 13.0% vs. 10.5%, respectively. This meta-analysis suggests that small and large chest tubes are both effective treatment for MPE with similar successful pleurodesis and complication proportion. Further RCTs are needed to more clearly determine which size tube is superior.

  20. Garlic intake lowers fasting blood glucose: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-qiong; Liu, Yun-hui; Zhang, Yi-yi

    2015-01-01

    Garlic is a common spicy flavouring agent also used for certain therapeutic purposes. Garlic's effects on blood glucose have been the subject of many clinical and animal studies, however, studies reporting hypoglycemic effects of garlic in humans are conflicting. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify relevant trials of garlic or garlic extracts on markers of glycemic control [fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)]. A meta-analysis of the effect of garlic intake on human was done to assess garlic's effectiveness in lowering glucose levels. Two reviewers extracted data from each of the identified studies. Seven eligible randomized controlled trials with 513 subjects were identified. Pooled analyses showed that garlic intake results in a statistically significant lowering in FBG [SMD=-1.67; 95% CI (-2.80, -0.55), p=0.004]. Our pooled analyses did not include PPG control and HbA1c outcomes. Because only 1 study included in the meta-analysis reported PPG variables and only 2 studies reported HbA1c variables. In conclusion, the current meta-analysis showed that the administration of garlic resulted in a significant reduction in FBG concentrations. More trials are needed to investigate the effectiveness of garlic on HbA1c and PPG.

  1. Association between developmental defects of enamel and dental caries: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ferreira, F; Salas, M M S; Nascimento, G G; Tarquinio, S B C; Faggion, C M; Peres, M A; Thomson, W M; Demarco, F F

    2015-06-01

    Dental caries is the main problem oral health and it is not well established in the literature if the enamel defects are a risk factor for its development. Studies have reported a potential association between developmental defects enamel (DDE) and dental caries occurrence. We investigated the association between DDE and caries in permanent dentition of children and teenagers. A systematic review was carried out using four databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and Science Direct), which were searched from their earliest records until December 31, 2014. Population-based studies assessing differences in dental caries experience according to the presence of enamel defects (and their types) were included. PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews were followed. Meta-analysis was performed to assess the pooled effect, and meta-regression was carried out to identify heterogeneity sources. From the 2558 initially identified papers, nine studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria after checking the titles, abstracts, references, and complete reading. Seven of them were included in the meta-analysis with random model. A positive association between enamel defects and dental caries was identified; meta-analysis showed that individuals with DDE had higher pooled odds of having dental caries experience [OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.3; 3.54)]. Meta-regression analysis demonstrated that adjustment for sociodemographic factors, countries' socioeconomic status, and bias (quality of studies) explained the high heterogeneity observed. A higher chance of dental caries should be expected among individuals with enamel defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of amfepramone and mazindol as a monotherapy for the treatment of obese or overweight patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; Riveros, Bruno Salgado; Pontarolo, Roberto; Radominski, Rosana Bento; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of amfepramone, fenproporex and mazindol as a monotherapy for the treatment of obese or overweight patients. A systematic review of primary studies was conducted, followed by a direct meta-analysis (random effect) and mixed treatment comparison. Medline and other databases were searched. Heterogeneity was explored through I2 associated with a p-value. Of 739 identified publications, 25 were included in the meta-analysis. The global eva...

  3. Who will benefit more from maintenance therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingyi; Fu, Lingyu; Zhang, Jingdong

    2018-02-23

    Whether there is a difference in the efficacy of maintenance treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) between patients who achieve complete response (CR)/partial response (PR) and those with stable disease (SD) after induction treatment is controversial. PubMed, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Collaboration Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, and databases of conferences were queried to identify randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of maintenance treatment for mCRC patients. The search included articles dated from the inception of these resources until June 20, 2017. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Network meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy of four regimens as maintenance treatment. Three randomized controlled trials comprising 1,301 patients were included in this network meta-analysis. Patients who achieved CR/PR after induction therapy benefited more from maintenance treatment than patients who achieved SD (PFS: HR [CR/PR] 1.50, 95% CI 1.09-2.08, vs. HR [SD] 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.74; OS: HR [CR/PR] 1.04, 95% CI 0.94-1.15, vs. HR [SD] 1.03, 95% CI 0.99-1.07). The results of network meta-analysis suggested that chemotherapy alone and observation were inferior to chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as maintenance treatment. Patients with mCRC who achieve CR/PR after induction therapy might benefit more from maintenance treatment than those with SD. Chemotherapy plus bevacizumab was the most appropriate regimen for maintenance treatment.

  4. Risk of recurrent stillbirth: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Kathleen; Scott, Neil W; Jones, Gareth T; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2015-06-24

    To determine the risk of recurrent stillbirth. Systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort and case-control studies. Embase, Medline, Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus searched systematically with no restrictions on date, publication, or language to identify relevant studies. Supplementary efforts included searching relevant internet resources as well as hand searching the reference lists of included studies. Where published information was unclear or inadequate, corresponding authors were contacted for more information. Cohort and case-control studies from high income countries were potentially eligible if they investigated the association between stillbirth in an initial pregnancy and risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy. Stillbirth was defined as fetal death occurring at more than 20 weeks' gestation or a birth weight of at least 400 g. Two reviewers independently screened titles to identify eligible studies based on inclusion and exclusion criteria agreed a priori, extracted data, and assessed the methodological quality using scoring criteria from the critical appraisal skills programme. Random effects meta-analyses were used to combine the results of the included studies. Subgroup analysis was performed on studies that examined unexplained stillbirth. 13 cohort studies and three case-control studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Data were available on 3,412,079 women with pregnancies beyond 20 weeks duration, of who 3,387,538 (99.3%) had had a previous live birth and 24,541 (0.7%) a stillbirth. A total of 14,283 stillbirths occurred in subsequent pregnancies, 606/24,541 (2.5%) in women with a history of stillbirth and 13,677/3,387,538 (0.4%) among women with no such history (pooled odds ratio 4.83, 95% confidence interval 3.77 to 6.18). 12 studies specifically assessed the risk of stillbirth in second pregnancies. Compared with women who had a live birth in their first pregnancy, those who experienced a

  5. Toxoplasmosis and epilepsy--systematic review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoungou, Edgard B; Bhalla, Devender; Nzoghe, Amandine; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important, widespread, parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii. The chronic infection in immunocompetent patients, usually considered as asymptomatic, is now suspected to be a risk factor for various neurological disorders, including epilepsy. We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available literature to estimate the risk of epilepsy due to toxoplasmosis. A systematic literature search was conducted of several databases and journals to identify studies published in English or French, without date restriction, which looked at toxoplasmosis (as exposure) and epilepsy (as disease) and met certain other inclusion criteria. The search was based on keywords and suitable combinations in English and French. Fixed and random effects models were used to determine odds ratios, and statistical significance was set at 5.0%. Six studies were identified, with an estimated total of 2888 subjects, of whom 1280 had epilepsy (477 positive for toxoplasmosis) and 1608 did not (503 positive for toxoplasmosis). The common odds ratio (calculated) by random effects model was 2.25 (95% CI 1.27-3.9), p = 0.005. Despite the limited number of studies, and a lack of high-quality data, toxoplasmosis should continue to be regarded as an epilepsy risk factor. More and better studies are needed to determine the real impact of this parasite on the occurrence of epilepsy.

  6. Neuropsychological characteristics of Gulf War illness: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Janulewicz

    Full Text Available Gulf War illness (GWI is a disorder related to military service in the 1991 GW. Prominent symptoms include fatigue, pain and cognitive problems. These symptoms were reported by GW Veterans (GWV immediately after the war and were eventually incorporated into case definitions of GWI. Neuropsychological function in GW veterans has been studied both among deployed GWV and in GWV diagnosed with GWI. Results have been inconsistent between and across GW populations. The purpose of the present investigation was to better characterize neuropsychological function in this veteran population.Meta-analysis techniques were applied to published studies on neuropsychological performance in GWV to identify domains of dysfunction in deployed vs. non-deployed GW-era veterans and symptomatic vs. non-symptomatic GWVs.Significantly decreased performance was found in three functional domains: attention and executive function, visuospatial skills and learning/memory.These findings document the cognitive decrements associated with GW service, validate current GWI case definitions using cognitive criteria, and identify test measures for use in GWI research assessing GWI treatment trial efficacy.

  7. Prognostic significance of IDH mutation in adult low-grade gliomas: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hairui; Yin, Lianhu; Li, Showwei; Han, Song; Song, Guangrong; Liu, Ning; Yan, Changxiang

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have been identified in approximately 65-90 % of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Various studies examining the relationship between IDH mutation with the clinical outcome in patients with LGGs have yielded inconclusive results. The purpose of the present meta-analysis of literature is to determine this effect. We conducted a meta-analysis of 10 studies (937 patients) that evaluated the correlation between IDH mutation and overall survival (OS). For the quantitative aggregation of the survival results, the IDH mutation effect was measured by hazard ratio (HR). Overall, the pooled HR was 0.585 (95 % CI, 0.376-0.911, p = 0.025, random effect model) for patients with IDH mutation vs patients without IDH mutation. IDH mutation was associated with better overall survival of LGGs. At least this trend was observed in our analysis.

  8. Energy efficiency in Germany - a meta-analysis. Analysis and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauernhansl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Stuttgart Institute of energy efficiency in production compiled the first meta-analysis ''Energy Efficiency in Germany''.It provides facts and figures on the development atatus and knowledge level of energy efficiency in Germany. The study shows the contribution have been made by individual measures and the potentials which are known, but have not yet been lifted. For this meta-analysis more than 250 items available from research institutions, government departments, professional and industry associations have been identified with the main topic of energy efficiency and evaluated. It provides an overview of the status of development and is an important reference work for industry, associations and politics. [de

  9. Effects of Peer-Led Interventions for Patients With Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Suh, Soon-Rim

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of peer-led supportive interventions for patients with cancer.
. Six electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE®, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Medical Library, and CINAHL®) were searched for articles published from 1997 to May 2017.
. A total of 159 studies were identified. Eighteen (16 randomized, controlled trials [RCTs] and 2 non-RCTs) were eligible for systematic review and 16 for meta-analysis. The Cochrane risk of bias tool and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software were used for analysis.
. The authors synthesized the results of the effect size of each trial according to cancer symptoms, coping, emotional health, quality of life, self-efficacy, sexuality, social support, and health-related behaviors. 
. The findings from this study suggest that an additional tiered evaluation that has a theoretical underpinning and high-quality methodology is required to confirm the efficacy of peer-led supportive interventions within cancer care models.

  10. Mass shootings: a meta-analysis of the dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura C

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the dose-response theory as it relates to posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) following mass shootings. It was hypothesized that greater exposure to a mass shooting would be associated with greater PTSSs. Trauma exposure in the current study was broadly defined as the extent to which a person experienced or learned about a mass shooting. The meta-analysis identified 11 qualifying studies that included 13 independent effect sizes from a total of 8,047 participants. The overall weighted mean effect size, based on a random effects model, was r = .19, p shooting on the relationship between exposure and PTSSs. Because so few studies satisfied the inclusion criteria, the present study also documents that this area of the literature is underresearched. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  11. Associations of general parenting and parent-child relationship with pediatric obesity: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the meta-analysis is to integrate available results on associations of general parenting (not specific to feeding and activity promotion) and parent-child relations with child weight status, eating, and physical activity. Searching in electronic databases and cross-referencing identified 156 empirical studies. Random-effects meta-analysis was computed. A positive parent-child relationship and higher levels of parental responsiveness were associated with lower weight, healthier eating, and more physical activity of the child. Parental demandingness, overprotection, psychological control, inconsistency, and parenting styles showed associations with some of the assessed outcome variables. Most effect sizes were small and varied by study characteristics. The small effects do not support making general parenting styles, parental demandingness, responsiveness, and the quality of the parent-child relationship a main target of preventing and treating obesity. Reducing parental inconsistency may be a better target if available results are replicated in future studies.

  12. 5-HT3Receptor Antagonists for the Prevention of Perioperative Shivering: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Chaobin; Sun, Li

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the preventive efficacy and safety of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists (5-HT 3 RAs) on perioperative shivering. Relevant databases were searched to identify eligible randomized, controlled trials through January 2016. Primary outcome was the incidence of perioperative shivering, and secondary outcomes were the incidence of safety-related outcomes including postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), bradycardia, and hypotension. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous data. Trial sequential analysis was performed to assess the risk of random errors and calculate the required information size. Sixteen studies with a total of 1126 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with the control group, 5-HT 3 RAs administered intravenously could statistically significantly reduce the incidence of perioperative shivering (RR, 0.44; 95%CI, 0.35 to 0.56; P shivering prevention in the future. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Childhood trauma and suicide attempt: A meta-analysis of longitudinal studies from the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatti, Cleonice; Rosa, Virgínia; Barros, Alcina; Valdivia, Lucianne; Calegaro, Vitor Crestani; Freitas, Lúcia Helena; Ceresér, Keila Maria Mendes; Rocha, Neusa Sica da; Bastos, Andre Goettems; Schuch, Felipe Barreto

    2017-10-01

    Childhood trauma (CT) is a modifiable risk factor for lifetime suicide attempts (SA). However, the extent to which each type of CT increases SA risk is unclear. This study aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies published in the last 10 years about the relationship between CT and lifetime SA risk. The PUBMED, PsycINFO, ISI, and EMBASE databases were searched for cohort studies that reported AS during follow-up and included an assessment of CT. A meta-analysis was conducted to identify potential effects of each type of CT on SA. Seven unique studies were included for review. Sexual (n=6, OR=3.73, 95%CI 2.94-4.75, pbroken home were not significantly associated with further SA. The modes of CT that most contribute to SA in later life are physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and physical neglect, in descending order. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) for alcoholism: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Teri S; Johansen, Pål-Ørjan

    2012-07-01

    Assessments of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the treatment of alcoholism have not been based on quantitative meta-analysis. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in order to evaluate the clinical efficacy of LSD in the treatment of alcoholism. Two reviewers independently extracted the data, pooling the effects using odds ratios (ORs) by a generic inverse variance, random effects model. We identified six eligible trials, including 536 participants. There was evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD on alcohol misuse (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.36-2.84; p = 0.0003). Between-trial heterogeneity for the treatment effects was negligible (I² = 0%). Secondary outcomes, risk of bias and limitations are discussed. A single dose of LSD, in the context of various alcoholism treatment programs, is associated with a decrease in alcohol misuse.

  15. Disclosure of sensitive behaviors across self-administered survey modes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnambs, Timo; Kaspar, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In surveys, individuals tend to misreport behaviors that are in contrast to prevalent social norms or regulations. Several design features of the survey procedure have been suggested to counteract this problem; particularly, computerized surveys are supposed to elicit more truthful responding. This assumption was tested in a meta-analysis of survey experiments reporting 460 effect sizes (total N =125,672). Self-reported prevalence rates of several sensitive behaviors for which motivated misreporting has been frequently observed were compared across self-administered paper-and-pencil versus computerized surveys. The results revealed that computerized surveys led to significantly more reporting of socially undesirable behaviors than comparable surveys administered on paper. This effect was strongest for highly sensitive behaviors and surveys administered individually to respondents. Moderator analyses did not identify interviewer effects or benefits of audio-enhanced computer surveys. The meta-analysis highlighted the advantages of computerized survey modes for the assessment of sensitive topics.

  16. The effects of aromatherapy on sleep improvement: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Shin, Sujin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the existing data on aromatherapy interventions for improvement of sleep quality. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effects of aromatherapy. Study Sources: Electronic databases, including the Korea Education and Research Information Service (KERIS), Korean studies Information Service System (KISS), National Assembly Library, and eight academies within the Korean Society of Nursing Science, were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and August 2013. Randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trials that included aromatherapy for the improvement of sleep quality. Of the 245 publications identified, 13 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 12 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the 12 studies using a random-effects model revealed that the use of aromatherapy was effective in improving sleep quality (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.540-1.745; Z=3.716). Subgroup analysis revealed that inhalation aromatherapy (95% CI, 0.792-1.541; Z=6.107) was more effective than massage therapy (95% CI, 0.128-2.166; Z=2.205) in unhealthy (95% CI, 0.248-1.100; Z=3.100) and healthy (95% CI, 0.393-5.104; Z=2.287) participants, respectively. Readily available aromatherapy treatments appear to be effective and promote sleep. Thus, it is essential to develop specific guidelines for the efficient use of aromatherapy.

  17. The Effect of Hypnosis on Anxiety in Patients With Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ying; Liu, Ying-Mei; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety is a common form of psychological distress in patients with cancer. One recognized nonpharmacological intervention to reduce anxiety for various populations is hypnotherapy or hypnosis. However, its effect in reducing anxiety in cancer patients has not been systematically evaluated. This meta-analysis was designed to synthesize the immediate and sustained effects of hypnosis on anxiety of cancer patients and to identify moderators for these hypnosis effects. Qualified studies including randomized controlled trials (RCT) and pre-post design studies were identified by searching seven electronic databases: Scopus, Medline Ovidsp, PubMed, PsycInfo-Ovid, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL Plus with FT-EBSCO, and SDOL. Effect size (Hedges' g) was computed for each study. Random-effect modeling was used to combine effect sizes across studies. All statistical analyses were conducted with Comprehensive Meta-Analysis, version 2 (Biostat, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Our meta-analysis of 20 studies found that hypnosis had a significant immediate effect on anxiety in cancer patients (Hedges' g: 0.70-1.41, p Hypnosis delivered by a therapist was significantly more effective than self-hypnosis. Hypnosis can reduce anxiety of cancer patients, especially for pediatric cancer patients who experience procedure-related stress. We recommend therapist-delivered hypnosis should be preferred until more effective self-hypnosis strategies are developed. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. The effectiveness of interprofessional education in healthcare: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Yousuf Guraya

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE emphasizes collaborative practice that aims at promoting the working relationships between two or more healthcare professions. However, there is paucity of literature about the effectiveness of IPE program in the healthcare. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to objectively determine the effectiveness of IPE in that field in terms of the improvement of students' knowledge, skills and attitudes. The databases of OVID, ISI Knowledge of Science, and Medline (PubMed were searched for the full-text English language articles published during 2000–2016 using the MeSH terms “interprofessional education” AND “healthcare professionals” AND “multi-professional” AND “impact” AND “effectiveness” OR “collaborative practice” OR “medical students” in Endnote X7. A systematic search finally selected 12 articles for detailed review and meta-analysis. The effect summary value of 1.37 with confidence interval of 0.92–1.82 identifies statistically significant effectiveness of intervention by IPE program in healthcare. The Z test value of 5.99, significant at 5% level of significance, also shows a significant impact of IPE intervention as calculated by the random-effects model. This meta-analysis shows a positive impact and effectiveness of educational intervention by IPE program in various disciplines of healthcare. However, analysis of further clinical trials may be helpful in identifying the effect of IPE program on the students’ clinical competence.

  19. Transcriptomic responses to biotic stresses in Malus x domestica: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Bipin; Marra, Francesco Paolo; Caruso, Tiziano; Martinelli, Federico

    2018-01-31

    RNA-Seq analysis is a strong tool to gain insight into the molecular responses to biotic stresses in plants. The objective of this work is to identify specific and common molecular responses between different transcriptomic data related to fungi, virus and bacteria attacks in Malus x domestica. We analyzed seven transcriptomic datasets in Malus x domestica divided in responses to fungal pathogens, virus (Apple Stem Grooving Virus) and bacteria (Erwinia amylovora). Data were dissected using an integrated approach of pathway- and gene- set enrichment analysis, Mapman visualization tool, gene ontology analysis and inferred protein-protein interaction network. Our meta-analysis revealed that the bacterial infection enhanced specifically genes involved in sugar alcohol metabolism. Brassinosteroids were upregulated by fungal pathogens while ethylene was highly affected by Erwinia amylovora. Gibberellins and jasmonates were strongly repressed by fungal and viral infections. The protein-protein interaction network highlighted the role of WRKYs in responses to the studied pathogens. In summary, our meta-analysis provides a better understanding of the Malus X domestica transcriptome responses to different biotic stress conditions; we anticipate that these insights will assist in the development of genetic resistance and acute therapeutic strategies. This work would be an example for next meta-analysis works aiming at identifying specific common molecular features linked with biotic stress responses in other specialty crops.

  20. Associations Between TNFAIP3 Gene Polymorphisms and Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Yuan, Xier; Zhou, Qiang; Shi, Jiujun; Song, Zhoufeng; Quan, Renfu; Zhang, Dawei

    2017-05-01

    A host of studies investigated the associations between tumor necrosis factor alpha inducible protein 3 (TNFAIP3) gene rs2230926 and rs5029937 polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility, but with conflicting findings. Therefore, we explored whether TNFAIP3 gene rs2230926 and rs5029937 polymorphisms are associated with RA by meta-analysis. We performed out a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Elsevier, Embase, and CNKI databases to identify relevant studies. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. Literature search identified 10 case-control studies involving 18,014 cases and 20,112 controls in this meta-analysis. Our data supported an association between TNFAIP3 gene rs2230926 and rs5029937 polymorphisms and RA risk. Stratification analysis of ethnicity indicated that rs5029937 polymorphism increased the risk of RA among Caucasians, while rs2230926 polymorphism increased the risk of RA among Asians and Caucasians. In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrates that TNFAIP3 gene polymorphisms (rs2230926 and rs5029937) are associated with the increased risk of RA. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Statin Treatment and Mortality in Bacterial Infections – A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Bergman, Peter; Andersson, Jan; Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported improved survival in severe bacterial infections among statin treated patients. In addition, statins have been ascribed beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of statin-treatment on mortality in patients with bacterial infections, by means of a systematic review and a meta-analysis. Methodology and Principal Findings Studies investigating the association between statin use and mortality in patients with bacterial disease were identified in a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis was performed to calculate the overall odds ratio of mortality in statin users. The literature search identified 947 citations from which 40 relevant studies were extracted. In all, 15 studies comprising 113 910 patients were included in the final analysis. Statin use was associated with a significantly (pstatin treatment was no longer significant, with an OR of 0.79 (95% CI 0.58–1.07). Conclusion/Significance According to the meta-analysis of observational studies presented here, patients on statin therapy seem to have a better outcome in bacterial infections. However, the association did not reach statistical significance after adjustment for apparent publication bias. Thus, there is a great need for randomised controlled trials investigating the possible beneficial effect of statins in bacterial infections. PMID:20502712

  2. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Avraham, Dan; Karasik, David; Verghese, Joe; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Smith, Jennifer A; Eicher, John D; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M; Buchman, Aron S; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H; Matteini, Amy M; Callisaya, Michele L; Smith, Albert V; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J; Knopman, Davis S; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P; Liewald, David C; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Weir, David R; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M; Johnson, Andrew D; Ikram, M Arfan; Bennett, David A; Cummings, Steven R; Deary, Ian J; Harris, Tamara B; Kardia, Sharon L R; Mosley, Thomas H; Srikanth, Velandai K; Windham, Beverly G; Newman, Ann B; Walston, Jeremy D; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S; Slagboom, Eline P; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P; Murabito, Joanne M; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-10

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging.

  3. A meta-analysis of the effects of β-adrenergic blockers in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Shen, Chengwu; Zhai, Shujun; Liu, Yukun; Yue, Wen-Wei; Han, Li

    2016-10-01

    Adrenergic β-blockers are drugs that bind to, but do not activate β-adrenergic receptors. Instead they block the actions of β-adrenergic agonists and are used for the treatment of various diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, headache, migraines, stress, anxiety, prostate cancer, and heart failure. Several meta-analysis studies have shown that β-blockers improve the heart function and reduce the risks of cardiovascular events, rate of mortality, and sudden death through chronic heart failure (CHF) of patients. The present study identified results from recent meta-analyses of β-adrenergic blockers and their usefulness in CHF. Databases including Medline/Embase/Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PubMed were searched for the periods May, 1985 to March, 2011 and June, 2013 to August, 2015, and a number of studies identified. Results of those studies showed that use of β-blockers was associated with decreased sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. However, contradictory results have also been reported. The present meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of β-blockers on mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure. The results showed that mortality was significantly reduced by β-blocker treatment prior to the surgery of heart failure patients. The results from the meta-analysis studies showed that β-blocker treatment in heart failure patients correlated with a significant decrease in long-term mortality, even in patients that meet one or more exclusion criteria of the MERIT-HF study. In summary, the findings of the current meta-analysis revealed beneficial effects different β-blockers have on patients with heart failure or related heart disease.

  4. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hua Li

    Full Text Available The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study.We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196.Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03. Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (< 733 mg/day, median level of the included studies or patients with metabolic syndrome. Contrarily, diastolic blood pressure was not significantly decreased in the grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure.Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future.

  5. Longevity of materials for pit and fissure sealing--results from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnisch, Jan; Mansmann, Ulrich; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Hickel, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the clinical retention of pit and fissure sealants in relation to observation time and material type. A search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases identified 2944 abstracts (published prior to 9/30/2011), of which 485 clinical publications were analyzed in detail. A total of 146 articles included information about sealant retention, with a minimum observation time of 2 years. These publications were analyzed to determine the retention rates of the various materials studied (UV-light-, light- and auto-polymerizing resin-based sealants, fluoride-releasing materials, compomers, flowable composites and glass-ionomer-cement-based sealants). The meta-analysis used random effects models for longitudinal logistic regression and Bayesian statistics. As part of the systematic review, 98 clinical reports and 12 field trial reports were identified. Auto-polymerizing sealants had the longest observation time (up to 20 years) and were found to have a 5-year retention rate of 64.7% (95%CI=57.1-73.1%), which was estimated from the meta-analysis model. Resin-based light-polymerizing sealants and fluoride-releasing products showed similar 5-year retention rates (83.8%, 95%CI=54.9-94.7% and 69.9%, 95%CI=51.5-86.5%, respectively) for completely retained sealants. In contrast to these high retention rates, poor retention rates were documented for UV-light-polymerizing materials, compomers and glass-ionomer-cement-based sealants (5-year retention rates were materials, compomers and glass-ionomer-cement-based sealants were classified as inferior. The results of this meta-analysis suggested that resin-based sealants can be recommended for clinical use. The faster and less error-prone clinical application of light-polymerizing materials, however, makes them the preferred choice for daily dental practice. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Bayesian network meta-analysis on second-line systemic therapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofu; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Berry, Scott; Shah, Keya; Lee, Esther; Chan, Kelvin

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear which regimen is the most efficacious among the available therapies for advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. We performed a network meta-analysis to determine their relative benefits. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) through the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstracts up to June 2014 to identify phase III RCTs on advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. Overall survival (OS) data were the primary outcome of interest. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the publications on the basis of reported values or were extracted from survival curves by established methods. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed with WinBUGS to compare all regimens simultaneously. Eight RCTs (2439 patients) were identified and contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that paclitaxel plus ramucirumab was superior to single-agent ramucirumab [OS HR 0.51, 95 % credible region (CR) 0.30-0.86], paclitaxel (OS HR 0.81, 95 % CR 0.68-0.96), docetaxel (OS HR 0.56, 95 % CR 0.33-0.94), and irinotecan (OS HR 0.71, 95 % CR 0.52-0.99). Paclitaxel plus ramucirumab also had an 89 % probability of being the best regimen among all these regimens. Single-agent ramucirumab, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and irinotecan were comparable to each other with respect to OS and were superior to best supportive care. This is the first network meta-analysis to compare all second-line regimens reported in phase III gastric cancer trials. The results suggest the paclitaxel plus ramucirumab combination is the most effective therapy and should be the reference regimen for future comparative trials.

  7. Regression and local control rates after radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulsteijn, Leonie T. van; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Coremans, Ida E.M.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; Jansen, Jeroen C.; Dekkers, Olaf M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary treatment goal of radiotherapy for paragangliomas of the head and neck region (HNPGLs) is local control of the tumor, i.e. stabilization of tumor volume. Interestingly, regression of tumor volume has also been reported. Up to the present, no meta-analysis has been performed giving an overview of regression rates after radiotherapy in HNPGLs. The main objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess regression of tumor volume in HNPGL-patients after radiotherapy. A second outcome was local tumor control. Design of the study is systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier and references of key articles were searched in March 2012 to identify potentially relevant studies. Considering the indolent course of HNPGLs, only studies with ⩾12 months follow-up were eligible. Main outcomes were the pooled proportions of regression and local control after radiotherapy as initial, combined (i.e. directly post-operatively or post-embolization) or salvage treatment (i.e. after initial treatment has failed) for HNPGLs. A meta-analysis was performed with an exact likelihood approach using a logistic regression with a random effect at the study level. Pooled proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Fifteen studies were included, concerning a total of 283 jugulotympanic HNPGLs in 276 patients. Pooled regression proportions for initial, combined and salvage treatment were respectively 21%, 33% and 52% in radiosurgery studies and 4%, 0% and 64% in external beam radiotherapy studies. Pooled local control proportions for radiotherapy as initial, combined and salvage treatment ranged from 79% to 100%. Radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas results in excellent local tumor control and therefore is a valuable treatment for these types of tumors. The effects of radiotherapy on regression of tumor volume remain ambiguous, although the data suggest that regression can

  8. Mesh Location in Open Ventral Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holihan, Julie L; Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Mo, Jiandi; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the ideal location for mesh placement in open ventral hernia repair (OVHR). We aim to identify the mesh location associated with the lowest rate of recurrence following OVHR using a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was performed for studies comparing at least two of four locations for mesh placement during OVHR (onlay, inlay, sublay, and underlay). Outcomes assessed were hernia recurrence and surgical site infection (SSI). Pairwise meta-analysis was performed to compare all direct treatment of mesh locations. A multiple treatment meta-analysis was performed to compare all mesh locations in the Bayesian framework. Sensitivity analyses were planned for the following: studies with a low risk of bias, incisional hernias, by hernia size, and by mesh type (synthetic or biologic). Twenty-one studies were identified (n = 5,891). Sublay placement of mesh was associated with the lowest risk for recurrence [OR 0.218 (95% CI 0.06-0.47)] and was the best of the four treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 94.2%]. Sublay was also associated with the lowest risk for SSI [OR 0.449 (95% CI 0.12-1.16)] and was the best of the 4 treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 77.3%]. When only assessing studies at low risk of bias, of incisional hernias, and using synthetic mesh, the probability that sublay had the lowest rate of recurrence and SSI was high. Sublay mesh location has lower complication rates than other mesh locations. While additional randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these findings, this network meta-analysis suggests the probability of sublay being the best location for mesh placement is high.

  9. How acute total sleep loss affects the attending brain: a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-02-01

    Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Methadone Poisoning in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Allameh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Symptoms of methadone poisoning, as one of the most dangerous types of poisoning, are very serious in children. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe causes and clinical symptoms of methadone poisoning in children admitted to hospitals in Iran. Data Sources Relevant studies published in national and international journals before January 29, 2016 were identified by studying the available databases, including PubMed, Web of Sciences, Google Scholar, Scopus, SID, Iranmedex, MagIran, and Irandoc. Study Selection After excluding duplicate, irrelevant, and low-quality articles, relevant papers were entered into the meta-analysis. The prevalence, mean, and standard deviation of methadone poisoning symptoms in children were statistically analyzed, using Stata version 11, and causes of methadone poisoning were presented in tables. Data Extraction Studies with unknown sample sizes, abstracts without access to full text, articles with quality assessment scores below 15.5, and studies carried out on non-Iranian populations were excluded from the meta-analysis. Results During the initial advanced search, 1594 articles were identified. After quality assessment, 12 papers were found eligible for the final systematic review and meta-analysis, based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The reported symptoms included drowsiness, vomiting, apnea, cyanosis, seizure, ataxia, and delirium. In the meta-analysis, prevalence of symptoms in referred patients was estimated at 44% (0.95% confidence interval, 0.288 to 0.609. The causes of poisoning in children included accidental feeding by parents, storage of drugs in inappropriate containers, parental addiction, and low educational level of parents. Conclusions It is important to keep methadone in a suitable container away from children. Also, it is essential to focus on educating parents on health issues of their children.

  11. Smoking and olfactory dysfunction: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Gaurav S; Suh, Helen H; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Pinto, Jayant M

    2017-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature was undertaken, examining the association between tobacco smoking and olfactory function in humans, utilizing PubMed and Web of Science (1970-2015) as data sources. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. This database review of studies of smoking and olfaction, with a focus on identifying high-quality studies (based on modified versions of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale), used validated olfactory tests among the generally healthy population. We identified 11 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Of 10 cross-sectional studies, two were excluded from meta-analysis because the cohorts they studied were included in another article in the review. In meta-analysis, current smokers had substantially higher odds of olfactory dysfunction compared to never smokers (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.37-1.85). In contrast, former smokers were found to have no difference in risk of impaired olfaction compared to never smokers (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.91-1.21). The single longitudinal study reviewed found a trend toward increased risk of olfactory decline over time in ever smokers; this trend was stronger in current as compared to former smokers. Current smoking, but not former smoking, is associated with significantly increased risk of olfactory dysfunction, suggesting that the effects of smoking on olfaction may be reversible. Future studies that prospectively evaluate the impact of smoking cessation on improvement in olfactory function are warranted. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:1753-1761, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Fluoroquinolone Sequential Therapy for Helicobacter pylori: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B; Mihaescu, Anela; Wilhelm, Sheila M

    2015-08-01

    As resistance of Helicobacter pylori to standard first-line therapy is increasing globally, alternative treatment regimens, such as a fluoroquinolone-based sequential regimen, have been explored. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of fluoroquinolone-based sequential therapy with standard first-line treatment for H. pylori infection. Meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials. A total of 738 H. pylori-infected, treatment-naive adults who received fluoroquinolone-based sequential therapy (5-7 days of a proton pump inhibitor [PPI] and amoxicillin therapy followed by 5-7 days of a PPI, a fluoroquinolone, and metronidazole or tinidazole or furazolidone therapy) and 733 H. pylori-infected, treatment-naive adults who received guideline-recommended, first-line therapy with standard triple therapy (7-14 days of a PPI plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin) or standard sequential therapy (5 days of a PPI plus amoxicillin, followed by an additional 5 days of triple therapy consisting of a PPI, clarithromycin, and metronidazole or tinidazole). A systematic literature search of the MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases (from inception through January 2015) was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials that compared fluoroquinolone-based sequential therapy with guideline-recommended, first-line treatment regimens in H. pylori-infected, treatment-naive adults. All selected trials confirmed H. pylori infection prior to treatment as well as post-treatment eradication. A meta-analysis was performed by using Review Manager 5.2. Treatment effect was determined with a random-effects model by using the Mantel-Haenszel method and was reported as a risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In the six randomized controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria, 648 (87.8%) of 738 patients receiving fluoroquinolone-based sequential therapy and 521 (71.1%) of 733 patients receiving standard

  13. Genome-wide meta-analysis increases to 71 the number of confirmed Crohn's disease susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Andre; McGovern, Dermot P. B.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Wang, Kai; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; Ahmad, Tariq; Lees, Charlie W.; Balschun, Tobias; Lee, James; Roberts, Rebecca; Anderson, Carl A.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bumpstead, Suzanne; Ellinghaus, David; Festen, Eleonora M.; Georges, Michel; Green, Todd; Haritunians, Talin; Jostins, Luke; Latiano, Anna; Mathew, Christopher G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Prescott, Natalie J.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schumm, Philip; Sharma, Yashoda; Simms, Lisa A.; Taylor, Kent D.; Whiteman, David; Wijmenga, Cisca; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barclay, Murray; Bayless, Theodore M.; Brand, Stephan; Buening, Carsten; Cohen, Albert; Colombel, Jean-Frederick; Cottone, Mario; Stronati, Laura; Denson, Ted; De Vos, Martine; D'Inca, Renata; Dubinsky, Marla; Edwards, Cathryn; Florin, Tim; Franchimont, Denis; Gearry, Richard; Glas, Juergen; Van Gossum, Andre; Guthery, Stephen L.; Halfvarson, Jonas; Verspaget, Hein W.; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Karban, Amir; Laukens, Debby; Lawrance, Ian; Lemann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Libioulle, Cecile; Louis, Edouard; Mowat, Craig; Newman, William; Panes, Julian; Phillips, Anne; Proctor, Deborah D.; Regueiro, Miguel; Russell, Richard; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sanderson, Jeremy; Sans, Miquel; Seibold, Frank; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Torkvist, Leif; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd; Wilson, David; Walters, Thomas; Targan, Stephan R.; Brant, Steven R.; Rioux, John D.; D'Amato, Mauro; Weersma, Rinse K.; Kugathasan, Subra; Griffiths, Anne M.; Mansfield, John C.; Vermeire, Severine; Duerr, Richard H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stefan; Cho, Judy H.; Annese, Vito; Hakonarson, Hakon; Daly, Mark J.; Parkes, Miles

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a meta-analysis of six Crohn's disease genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising 6,333 affected individuals (cases) and 15,056 controls and followed up the top association signals in 15,694 cases, 14,026 controls and 414 parent-offspring trios. We identified 30 new

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Distributed Leadership from 2002 to 2013: Theory Development, Empirical Evidence and Future Research Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Meng; Risku, Mika; Collin, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a meta-analysis of research conducted on distributed leadership from 2002 to 2013. It continues the review of distributed leadership commissioned by the English National College for School Leadership (NCSL) ("Distributed Leadership: A Desk Study," Bennett et al., 2003), which identified two gaps in the research…

  15. Anxiety Disorders in Williams Syndrome Contrasted with Intellectual Disability and the General Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, R.; Howlin, P.; Waite, J.; Oliver, C.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with specific genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability (ID), such as Williams syndrome (WS), are at increased risk for developing anxiety disorders. A systematic literature review identified sixteen WS papers that could generate pooled prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders for WS. A meta-analysis compared these…

  16. Meta-analysis method for discovering reliable biomarkers by integrating statistical and biological approaches: An application to liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeyoung; Kim, Hyosil; Na, Dokyun; Kim, So Youn; Jo, Deokyeon; Lee, Doheon

    2016-03-04

    Biomarkers that are identified from a single study often appear to be biologically irrelevant or false positives. Meta-analysis techniques allow integrating data from multiple studies that are related but independent in order to identify biomarkers across multiple conditions. However, existing biomarker meta-analysis methods tend to be sensitive to the dataset being analyzed. Here, we propose a meta-analysis method, iMeta, which integrates t-statistic and fold change ratio for improved robustness. For evaluation of predictive performance of the biomarkers identified by iMeta, we compare our method with other meta-analysis methods. As a result, iMeta outperforms the other methods in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and especially shows robustness to study variance increase; it consistently shows higher classification accuracy on diverse datasets, while the performance of the others is highly affected by the dataset being analyzed. Application of iMeta to 59 drug-induced liver injury studies identified three key biomarker genes: Zwint, Abcc3, and Ppp1r3b. Experimental evaluation using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR shows that their expressional changes in response to drug toxicity are concordant with the result of our method. iMeta is available at http://imeta.kaist.ac.kr/index.html. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The obsessive compulsive spectrum in schizophrenia, a meta-analysis and meta-regression exploring prevalence rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swets, Marije; Dekker, Jack; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Smid, Geert E.; Smit, Filip; de Haan, Lieuwe; Schoevers, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to conduct a meta-analysis and meta-regression to estimate the prevalence rates for obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in schizophrenia, and to investigate what influences these prevalence rates. Studies were identified via an

  18. A meta-analysis of Hodgkin lymphoma reveals 19p13.3 TCF3 as a novel susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozen, W.; Timofeeva, M.N.; Li, D.; Diepstra, A.; Hazelett, D.; Delahaye-Sourdeix, M.; Edlund, C.K.; Franke, L.; Rostgaard, K.; Berg, D.J. Van Den; Cortessis, V.K.; Smedby, K.E.; Glaser, S.L.; Westra, H.J.; Robison, L.L.; Mack, T.M.; Ghesquieres, H.; Hwang, A.E.; Nieters, A.; Sanjose, S. de; Lightfoot, T.; Becker, N.; Maynadie, M.; Foretova, L.; Roman, E.; Benavente, Y.; Rand, K.A.; Nathwani, B.N.; Glimelius, B.; Staines, A.; Boffetta, P.; Link, B.K.; Kiemeney, B.; Ansell, S.M.; Bhatia, S.; Strong, L.C.; Galan, P.; Vatten, L.; Habermann, T.M.; Duell, E.J.; Lake, A.; Veenstra, R.N.; Visser, L de; Liu, Y.; Urayama, K.Y.; Montgomery, D.; Gaborieau, V.; Weiss, L.M.; Byrnes, G.; Lathrop, M.; Cocco, P.; Best, T.; Skol, A.D.; Adami, H.O.; Melbye, M.; Cerhan, J.R.; Gallagher, A.; Taylor, G.M.; Slager, S.L.; Brennan, P.; Coetzee, G.A.; Conti, D.V.; Onel, K.; Jarrett, R.F.; Hjalgrim, H.; Berg, A. van den; McKay, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have identified associations with genetic variation at both HLA and non-HLA loci; however, much of heritable HL susceptibility remains unexplained. Here we perform a meta-analysis of three HL GWAS totaling 1,816 cases and 7,877

  19. A meta-analysis of Hodgkin lymphoma reveals 19p13.3 TCF3 as a novel susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozen, W.; Timofeeva, M. N.; Li, D.; Diepstra, A.; Hazelett, D.; Delahaye-Sourdeix, M.; Edlund, C. K.; Franke, L.; Rostgaard, K.; Van Den Berg, D. J.; Cortessis, V. K.; Smedby, K. E.; Glaser, S. L.; Westra, H. -J.; Robison, L. L.; Mack, T. M.; Ghesquieres, H.; Hwang, A. E.; Nieters, A.; de Sanjose, S.; Lightfoot, T.; Becker, N.; Maynadie, M.; Foretova, L.; Roman, E.; Benavente, Y.; Rand, K. A.; Nathwani, B. N.; Glimelius, B.; Staines, A.; Boffetta, P.; Link, B. K.; Kiemeney, L.; Ansell, S. M.; Bhatia, S.; Strong, L. C.; Galan, P.; Vatten, L.; Habermann, T. M.; Duell, E. J.; Lake, A.; Veenstra, R. N.; Visser, Lydia; Liu, Y.; Urayama, K. Y.; Montgomery, D.; Gaborieau, V.; Weiss, L. M.; Byrnes, G.; Lathrop, M.; Cocco, P.; Best, T.; Skol, A. D.; Adami, H. -O.; Melbye, M.; Cerhan, J. R.; Gallagher, A.; Taylor, G. M.; Slager, S. L.; Brennan, P.; Coetzee, G. A.; Conti, D. V.; Onel, K.; Jarrett, R. F.; Hjalgrim, H.; van den Berg, A.; Mckay, J. D.

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have identified associations with genetic variation at both HLA and non-HLA loci; however, much of heritable HL susceptibility remains unexplained. Here we perform a meta-analysis of three HL GWAS totaling 1,816 cases and 7,877

  20. Quality of life in eating disorders: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Christiansen, Erik; Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hansen, Nina Beck; Bilenberg, Niels; Støving, René Klinkby

    2014-09-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) comprise a variety of symptoms and have a profound impact on everyday life. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to analyse published data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in EDs so as to compare the results to general population norm data and to investigate potential differences between ED diagnostic groups. A systematic review of the current literature was conducted using a keyword-based search in PubMed and PsychInfo. The search covered anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and binge eating disorder (BED) and used the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) as a measure of HRQoL. Of the 102 citations identified, 85 abstracts were reviewed and seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. AN patients were included in five studies (n=227), BN in four studies (n=216), EDNOS in two studies (n=166) and BED in four studies (n=148). We tested for between-study variation and significant differences between the diagnostic groups. The results confirmed a significantly lower level of HRQoL in all EDs compared to a population mean. It was not possible to establish any differences between the diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Affective mapping: An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lauren A J; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2017-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging has the spatial resolution to explain the neural basis of emotions. Activation likelihood estimation (ALE), as opposed to traditional qualitative meta-analysis, quantifies convergence of activation across studies within affective categories. Others have used ALE to investigate a broad range of emotions, but without the convenience of the BrainMap database. We used the BrainMap database and analysis resources to run separate meta-analyses on coordinates reported for anger, anxiety, disgust, fear, happiness, humor, and sadness. Resultant ALE maps were compared to determine areas of convergence between emotions, as well as to identify affect-specific networks. Five out of the seven emotions demonstrated consistent activation within the amygdala, whereas all emotions consistently activated the right inferior frontal gyrus, which has been implicated as an integration hub for affective and cognitive processes. These data provide the framework for models of affect-specific networks, as well as emotional processing hubs, which can be used for future studies of functional or effective connectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Local Climate Change Adaptation Actions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Local governments are beginning to take steps to address the consequences of climate change, such as sea level rise and heat events. However, we do not have a clear understanding of what local governments are doing -- the extent to which they expect climate change to affect their community, the types of actions they have in place to address climate change, and the resources at their disposal for implementation. Several studies have been conducted by academics, non-governmental organizations, and public agencies to assess the status of local climate change adaptation. This project collates the findings from dozens of such studies to conduct a meta-analysis of local climate change adaptation actions. The studies will be characterized along several dimensions, including (a) methods used, (b) timing and geographic scope, (c) topics covered, (d) types of adaptation actions identified, (e) implementation status, and (f) public engagement and environmental justice dimensions considered. The poster presents the project's rationale and approach and some illustrative findings from early analyses. [Note: The document being reviewed is an abstract in which a poster is being proposed. The poster will enter clearance if the abstract is accepted] The purpose of this poster is to present the research framework and approaches I am developing for my ORISE postdoctoral project, and to get feedback on early analyses.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Urban Climate Change Adaptation ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of people, infrastructure, and ecosystem services in urban areas make them prime sites for climate change adaptation. While advances have been made in developing frameworks for adaptation planning and identifying both real and potential barriers to action, empirical work evaluating urban adaptation planning processes has been relatively piecemeal. Existing assessments of current experience with urban adaptation provide necessarily broad generalizations based on the available peer-reviewed literature. This paper uses a meta-analysis of U.S. cities’ current experience with urban adaptation planning drawing from 54 sources that include peer-reviewed literature, government reports, white papers, and reports published by non-governmental organizations. The analysis specifically evaluates the institutional support structures being developed for urban climate change adaptation. The results demonstrate that adaptation planning is driven by a desire to reduce vulnerability and often catalyzes new collaborations and coordination mechanisms in urban governance. As a result, building capacity for urban climate change adaptation planning requires a focus not only on city governments themselves but also on the complex horizontal and vertical networks that have arisen around such efforts. Existing adaptation planning often lacks attention to equity issues, social vulnerability, and the influence of non-climatic factors on vulnerability. Engaging city govern

  4. Abreaction for conversion disorder: systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Norman A; Wuerz, Axel; Agrawal, Niruj

    2010-08-01

    The value of drug interviews in the treatment of conversion disorder is at present unknown. To review all the available papers published in English that report on the use of drug interviews for treating conversion/dissociative disorder. Databases (including EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO) were searched from 1920 to 2009. Selected publications had to report on the use of drug interviews in people diagnosed with a conversion/dissociative disorder. Qualitative and quantitative data were extracted. Predictors of a positive response were ascertained using meta-analytic techniques. Fifty-five papers meeting inclusion criteria were identified. No studies compared the intervention with a suitable control group. However, two studies reported high response rates when drug interview was used in individuals with treatment-resistant conversion disorder. In the meta-analysis, the use of suggestion and occurrence of emotional catharsis during the interview were positively associated with recovery. Combining two medications and comorbid psychiatric disorder were negatively associated with recovery. The evidence for effectiveness of drug interviews is of poor quality but it may be of benefit in the treatment of acute and treatment-resistant conversion disorder. A proactive approach during the interview, making suggestions the individual will respond, could influence outcome. Comorbid psychiatric disorder should be treated conventionally. Experimental studies to determine efficacy are required.

  5. The Association Between Anxiety and Falls: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, David John; Nicholson, Geoff; Sanders, Kerrie; McCabe, Marita P

    2017-09-01

    Falls occur frequently among older adults and can lead to a range of adverse and debilitating outcomes. Although symptoms of clinical anxiety have been implicated as risk factors for falls, there is no current consensus on the empirical association between anxiety and falls. The current study aimed to address this gap in the literature by conducting a quantitative, meta-analytic review of findings from previous studies. A systematic literature search of bibliographic databases was conducted, yielding 18 studies that fit the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A random-effects model of all 18 studies showed a significant overall odds ratio of 1.53 (95% CI 1.28-1.83, p anxiety were associated with a 53% increased likelihood of falls. A high amount of variance among effect sizes was observed. Only age was identified as a moderator of this relationship in a subgroup of the samples. Clinical anxiety is associated with falls, however, further research is required to elucidate the factors that might moderate or mediate this relationship, the casual pathways through which they are related, and the associations between different types of anxiety and falls. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Upward counterfactual thinking and depression: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomhall, Anne Gene; Phillips, Wendy J; Hine, Donald W; Loi, Natasha M

    2017-07-01

    This meta-analysis examined the strength of association between upward counterfactual thinking and depressive symptoms. Forty-two effect sizes from a pooled sample of 13,168 respondents produced a weighted average effect size of r=.26, pdesign (cross-sectional versus longitudinal). Significant effect size heterogeneity was observed across sample types, methods of assessing upward counterfactual thinking, and types of depression scale. Significant positive effects were found in studies that employed samples of bereaved individuals, older adults, terminally ill patients, or university students, but not adolescent mothers or mixed samples. Both number-based and Likert-based upward counterfactual thinking assessments produced significant positive effects, with the latter generating a larger effect. All depression scales produced significant positive effects, except for the Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview. Research and theoretical implications are discussed in relation to cognitive theories of depression and the functional theory of upward counterfactual thinking, and important gaps in the extant research literature are identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Sleepwalking: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Stallman

    Full Text Available Sleepwalking is thought to be a common arousal disorder; however, the epidemiology of this disorder has not yet been systematically examined. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and ScienceDirect was conducted for 'sleepwalking' OR 'somnambulism' in any field, to identify studies that reported the epidemiology of sleepwalking or sleepwalking disorders. Fifty-one studies assessed the prevalence rates of sleepwalking in a total sample of 100 490. The meta-analysis showed the estimated lifetime prevalence of sleepwalking was 6.9% (95% CI 4.6%-10.3%. The current prevalence rate of sleepwalking-within the last 12 months-was significantly higher in children 5.0% (95% CI 3.8%-6.5% than adults 1.5% (95% CI 1.0%-2.3%. There was no evidence of developmental trends in sleepwalking across childhood. The significant risk of bias across all studies suggests these results should be used cautiously. Further epidemiological research that addresses methodological problems found in studies of sleepwalking to date is needed.

  8. Prevalence of Sleepwalking: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallman, Helen M; Kohler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sleepwalking is thought to be a common arousal disorder; however, the epidemiology of this disorder has not yet been systematically examined. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and ScienceDirect was conducted for 'sleepwalking' OR 'somnambulism' in any field, to identify studies that reported the epidemiology of sleepwalking or sleepwalking disorders. Fifty-one studies assessed the prevalence rates of sleepwalking in a total sample of 100 490. The meta-analysis showed the estimated lifetime prevalence of sleepwalking was 6.9% (95% CI 4.6%-10.3%). The current prevalence rate of sleepwalking-within the last 12 months-was significantly higher in children 5.0% (95% CI 3.8%-6.5%) than adults 1.5% (95% CI 1.0%-2.3%). There was no evidence of developmental trends in sleepwalking across childhood. The significant risk of bias across all studies suggests these results should be used cautiously. Further epidemiological research that addresses methodological problems found in studies of sleepwalking to date is needed.

  9. Meta-Analysis of the Prevalence of Unacknowledged Rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura C; Miller, Katherine E

    2016-04-01

    Many sexual violence survivors do not label their experiences as rape but instead use more benign labels, such as "bad sex" or "miscommunication." A meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the mean prevalence of unacknowledged rape and to inform our understanding of methodological factors that influence the detection of this phenomenon. Studies were identified using PsycINFO, PubMED, and PILOTS and were required to report the percentage of unacknowledged rape that had occurred since the age of 14 among female survivors. Moderator variables included mean participant age, recruitment source, rape definition, and unacknowledged rape definition. Twenty-eight studies (30 independent samples) containing 5,917 female rape survivors met the inclusion criteria. Based on a random effects model, the overall weighted mean percentage of unacknowledged rape was 60.4% (95% confidence interval [55.0%, 65.6%]). There was a large amount of heterogeneity, Q(29) = 445.11, p rape survivors do not acknowledge that they have been raped. The results suggest that screening tools should use behaviorally descriptive items about sexual contact, rather than using terms such as "rape." © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Addition to Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaseela Chiramel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR occurs in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs and is associated with a poorer prognosis. A systematic review of electronic databases identified studies exploring the addition of EGFR-targeted treatment to chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced (LA/metastatic PDAC. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of EGFR-targeted therapy were explored using meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Meta-regression was utilised to explore factors associated with improved prognosis (all studies and benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy (RCTs. Twenty-eight studies (7 RCTs and 21 cohort studies comprising 3718 patients were included. The addition of EGFR-targeted treatment to chemotherapy did not improve progression-free (pooled hazard ratio (HR: 0.90, p = 0.15 or overall survival (HR: 0.94, p = 0.18. EGFR-targeted therapy was associated with increased treatment-related deaths (pooled odds ratio (OR: 5.18, p = 0.007, and grade (G3/4 rash (OR: 4.82, p = 0.03. There was a borderline significant increase in G3/4 diarrhoea (OR: 1.75, p = 0.06, but no effect on treatment discontinuation without progression (OR: 0.87, p = 0.25. Neither G3/4 rash nor diarrhoea were associated with increased survival benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy. The effect of EGFR-targeted therapy on overall survival (OS appeared greater in studies with a greater proportion of LA rather than metastatic patients (R = −0.69, p < 0.001. Further studies in unselected patients with advanced PDAC are not warranted. The benefit from EGFR inhibitors may be limited to patient subgroups not yet clearly defined.

  11. Effect of Probiotics on Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixue; Wang, Ke; Hu, Jianan

    2016-08-06

    It has been reported that gut probiotics play a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Probiotics may be essential to people with depression, which remains a global health challenge, as depression is a metabolic brain disorder. However, the efficacy of probiotics for depression is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the existing evidence on the effect of probiotics-based interventions on depression. Randomized, controlled trials, identified through screening multiple databases and grey literature, were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 software using a fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis showed that probiotics significantly decreased the depression scale score (MD (depressive disorder) = -0.30, 95% CI (-0.51--0.09), p = 0.005) in the subjects. Probiotics had an effect on both the healthy population (MD = -0.25, 95% CI (-0.47--0.03), p = 0.03) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (MD = -0.73, 95% CI (-1.37--0.09), p = 0.03). Probiotics had an effect on the population aged under 60 (MD = -0.43, 95% CI (-0.72--0.13), p = 0.005), while it had no effect on people aged over 65 (MD = -0.18, 95% CI (-0.47-0.11), p = 0.22). This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis with the goal of determining the effect of probiotics on depression. We found that probiotics were associated with a significant reduction in depression, underscoring the need for additional research on this potential preventive strategy for depression.

  12. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Prognostic value of stromal decorin expression in patients with breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang-Jiang; Chen, Da-Li; Zhang, Wen-Biao; Shen, Cheng; Che, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Numbers of studies have investigated the biological functions of decorin (DCN) in oncogenesis, tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. Although many of them aim to highlight the prognostic value of stromal DCN expression in breast cancer, some controversial results still exist and a consensus has not been reached until now. Therefore, our meta-analysis aims to determine the prognostic significance of stromal DCN expression in breast cancer patients. PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched for full-text literatures met out inclusion criteria. We applied the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) as the appropriate summarized statistics. Q-test and I(2) statistic were employed to estimate the level of heterogeneity across the included studies. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to further identify the possible origins of heterogeneity. The publication bias was detected by Begg's test and Egger's test. There were three English literatures (involving 6 studies) included into our meta-analysis. On the one hand, both the summarized outcomes based on univariate analysis (HR: 0.513; 95% CI: 0.406-0.648; Panalysis (HR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.388-0.763; Panalysis (HR: 0.504; 95% CI: 0.389-0.651; Panalysis (HR: 0.568; 95% CI: 0.400-0.806; P=0.002) also indicated that stromal DCN expression was positively associated with high disease-free survival (DFS) of breast cancer patients. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed within this meta-analysis. The present evidences indicate that high stromal DCN expression can significantly predict the good prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The discoveries from our meta-analysis have better be confirmed in the updated review pooling more relevant investigations in the future.

  14. Association between polypharmacy and death: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelakanok, Nattawut; Holcombe, Andrea L; Lund, Brian C; Gu, Xiaomei; Schweizer, Marin L

    Polypharmacy has been linked to a myriad of adverse consequences, and escalating rates of polypharmacy present an emerging concern, particularly among older adults. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes the existing literature concerning the association between polypharmacy and mortality. A systematic literature review was done by searching the EMBASE, PubMed, Scopus, and International Pharmaceutical Abstract databases to identify studies assessing the association between polypharmacy and death published until June 2016. Studies that investigated the association between polypharmacy and mortality were eligible for this systematic review and meta-analysis. Data were extracted by the first and second authors independently using a data extraction form. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. A meta-analysis was performed using random effect models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 statistic. Forty-seven studies were included in this meta-analysis. The underlying populations were heterogeneous (I 2 = 91.5%). When defined as a discrete variable, pooled risk estimates demonstrated a significant association between polypharmacy and death (pooled-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.08 [95% CI 1.04-1.12]). When defined categorically, a dose-response relationship was observed across escalating thresholds for defining polypharmacy. Categorical thresholds for polypharmacy using values of 1-4 medications, 5 medications, and 6-9 medications were significantly associated with death (P discrete and categorical definitions. The causality of this relationship remains unclear, but it emphasizes the need for approaches to health care delivery that achieve an optimal balance of risk and benefit in medication prescribing. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  15. Meta-analysis of Gaussian individual patient data: Two-stage or not two-stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tim P; Fisher, David J; Kenward, Michael G; Carpenter, James R

    2018-04-30

    Quantitative evidence synthesis through meta-analysis is central to evidence-based medicine. For well-documented reasons, the meta-analysis of individual patient data is held in higher regard than aggregate data. With access to individual patient data, the analysis is not restricted to a "two-stage" approach (combining estimates and standard errors) but can estimate parameters of interest by fitting a single model to all of the data, a so-called "one-stage" analysis. There has been debate about the merits of one- and two-stage analysis. Arguments for one-stage analysis have typically noted that a wider range of models can be fitted and overall estimates may be more precise. The two-stage side has emphasised that the models that can be fitted in two stages are sufficient to answer the relevant questions, with less scope for mistakes because there are fewer modelling choices to be made in the two-stage approach. For Gaussian data, we consider the statistical arguments for flexibility and precision in small-sample settings. Regarding flexibility, several of the models that can be fitted only in one stage may not be of serious interest to most meta-analysis practitioners. Regarding precision, we consider fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis and see that, for a model making certain assumptions, the number of stages used to fit this model is irrelevant; the precision will be approximately equal. Meta-analysts should choose modelling assumptions carefully. Sometimes relevant models can only be fitted in one stage. Otherwise, meta-analysts are free to use whichever procedure is most convenient to fit the identified model. © 2018 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of Probiotics on Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixue Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that gut probiotics play a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Probiotics may be essential to people with depression, which remains a global health challenge, as depression is a metabolic brain disorder. However, the efficacy of probiotics for depression is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the existing evidence on the effect of probiotics-based interventions on depression. Randomized, controlled trials, identified through screening multiple databases and grey literature, were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 software using a fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis showed that probiotics significantly decreased the depression scale score (MD (depressive disorder = −0.30, 95% CI (−0.51–−0.09, p = 0.005 in the subjects. Probiotics had an effect on both the healthy population (MD = −0.25, 95% CI (−0.47–−0.03, p = 0.03 and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD (MD = −0.73, 95% CI (−1.37–−0.09, p = 0.03. Probiotics had an effect on the population aged under 60 (MD = −0.43, 95% CI (−0.72–−0.13, p = 0.005, while it had no effect on people aged over 65 (MD = −0.18, 95% CI (−0.47–0.11, p = 0.22. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis with the goal of determining the effect of probiotics on depression. We found that probiotics were associated with a significant reduction in depression, underscoring the need for additional research on this potential preventive strategy for depression.

  17. Association between Fever and Primary Tooth Eruption: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Nemezio, Mariana; Mh De Oliveira, Katharina; C Romualdo, Priscilla; M Queiroz, Alexandra; Wg Paula-E-Silva, Francisco; Ab Silva, Raquel; C Küchler, Erika

    2017-01-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish if fever is associated with primary tooth eruption. Literature searches involved Pubmed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane. The potentially relevant studies had the full text analyzed. Only studies concerning fever during eruption period of primary tooth in humans were included. Papers in non-English language, and papers that included syndromic patients or patients with any disease were excluded. The meta-analyses were performed with Review Manager (version 5.3). Only studies that reported the results as dichotomous data were analyzed with Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test in meta-analysis function of Review Manager 5.3. The fixed-effects model was used to evaluate the association between tooth eruption and fever. Search identified 83 potential studies. After exclusion of the duplicated studies, or were not related to the criteria of inclusion only 6 studies were selected for the systematic review. In the overall meta-analysis, no association was found [OR = 1.32 (0.88-1.96)] between fever and primary tooth eruption. However, in the subgroup analysis, when the method used to measure fever was the rectal temperature there was an association [OR = 2.82 (1.55-5.14)] between fever and primary tooth eruption. There are few suitable studies in the literature regarding the association between primary tooth eruption and fever. However, our study found an association between fever and primary tooth eruption only when rectal temperature was performed. Nemezio MA, De Oliveira KMH, Romualdo PC, Queiroz AM, Paula-e-Silva FWG, Silva RAB, Kuchler EC. Association between Fever and Primary Tooth Eruption: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):293-298.

  18. Network meta-analysis of survival data with fractional polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Jeroen P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise meta-analysis, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis for aggregate level survival data are often based on the reported hazard ratio, which relies on the proportional hazards assumption. This assumption is implausible when hazard functions intersect, and can have a huge impact on decisions based on comparisons of expected survival, such as cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods As an alternative to network meta-analysis of survival data in which the treatment effect is represented by the constant hazard ratio, a multi-dimensional treatment effect approach is presented. With fractional polynomials the hazard functions of interventions compared in a randomized controlled trial are modeled, and the difference between the parameters of these fractional polynomials within a trial are synthesized (and indirectly compared across studies. Results The proposed models are illustrated with an analysis of survival data in non-small-cell lung cancer. Fixed and random effects first and second order fractional polynomials were evaluated. Conclusion (Network meta-analysis of survival data with models where the treatment effect is represented with several parameters using fractional polynomials can be more closely fitted to the available data than meta-analysis based on the constant hazard ratio.

  19. Network meta-analysis of survival data with fractional polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jeroen P

    2011-05-06

    Pairwise meta-analysis, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis for aggregate level survival data are often based on the reported hazard ratio, which relies on the proportional hazards assumption. This assumption is implausible when hazard functions intersect, and can have a huge impact on decisions based on comparisons of expected survival, such as cost-effectiveness analysis. As an alternative to network meta-analysis of survival data in which the treatment effect is represented by the constant hazard ratio, a multi-dimensional treatment effect approach is presented. With fractional polynomials the hazard functions of interventions compared in a randomized controlled trial are modeled, and the difference between the parameters of these fractional polynomials within a trial are synthesized (and indirectly compared) across studies. The proposed models are illustrated with an analysis of survival data in non-small-cell lung cancer. Fixed and random effects first and second order fractional polynomials were evaluated. (Network) meta-analysis of survival data with models where the treatment effect is represented with several parameters using fractional polynomials can be more closely fitted to the available data than meta-analysis based on the constant hazard ratio.

  20. Association between Lutein and Zeaxanthin Status and the Risk of Cataract: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Liu, Rong; Hao, Zhen-Xuan; Han, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Zhong-Hai; Ma, Le

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentration and the risk of age-related cataract (ARC). MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI and Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant studies up to April 2013. Meta-analysis was conducted to obtain pooled relative risks (RRs) for the highest-versus-lowest categories of blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations. One cohort study and seven cross-sectional studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant inverse associations between nuclear cataract and blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, with the pooled RRs ranging from 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.77) for zeaxanthin to 0.73 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.87) for lutein. A stronger association between nuclear cataract and blood zeaxanthin might be noted for the studies conducted in the European Nations. Blood lutein and zeaxanthin were also noted to lead towards a decrease in the risk of cortical cataract and subcapsular cataract; however, these pooled RRs were not statistically significant, with the exception of a marginal association between lutein and subcapsular cataract. Our results suggest that high blood lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly associated with a decrease in the risk of nuclear cataract. However, no significant associations were found for ARC in other regions of the lens. PMID:24451312

  1. Copper in Diabetes Mellitus: a Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review of Plasma and Serum Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qihong; Zhang, Fuping; Zhu, Wenjun; Wu, Juan; Liang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is an important trace element involved in oxidative stress, which is associated with the onset and progression of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, clinical studies comparing plasma or serum Cu levels in patients with DM and in healthy individuals report conflicting findings. Therefore, in this meta-analysis, we analyzed the circulating levels of Cu associated with DM (including type 1 diabetes mellitus [T1DM] and type 2 diabetes mellitus [T2DM]). We searched the articles indexed in PubMed, OVID, and Cochrane databases, published through January 2016 and meeting our predefined criteria. Requisite data were extracted, and a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model was used to conduct the meta-analysis. Fifteen eligible studies involving a total of 1079 DM patients and 561 healthy controls were identified. Overall, the DM patients showed higher Cu levels than the healthy controls (plasma Cu mean difference [MD] = 1.69 μmol/L, p diabetes also indicated higher levels of Cu in the plasma and serum of DM patients than in healthy controls, respectively. Stratification of DM patients associated with and without complications also revealed similar results. This meta-analysis suggests that DM patients carried higher levels of Cu than healthy individuals. However, international cohort studies are needed to corroborate our findings.

  2. Steep Delay Discounting and Addictive Behavior: A Meta-Analysis of Continuous Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlung, Michael; Vedelago, Lana; Acker, John; Balodis, Iris; MacKillop, James

    2016-01-01

    Aims To synthesize continuous associations between delayed reward discounting (DRD) and both addiction severity and quantity-frequency (QF); to examine moderators of these relationships; and to investigate publication bias. Methods Meta-analysis of published studies examining continuous associations between DRD and addictive behaviors. Published, peer-reviewed studies on addictive behaviors (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, stimulants, opiates, and gambling) were identified via PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsycInfo. Studies were restricted to DRD measures of monetary gains. Random effects meta-analysis was conducted using Pearson’s r as the effect size. Publication bias was evaluated using fail-safe N, Begg-Mazumdar and Egger’s tests, meta-regression of publication year and effect size, and imputation of missing studies. Results The primary meta-analysis revealed a small magnitude effect size that was highly significant (r = 0.14, p addictive behavior (p = 0.30) or DRD assessment (p = 0.90). Indices of publication bias suggested a modest impact of unpublished findings. Conclusions Delayed reward discounting is robustly associated with continuous measures of addiction severity and quantity-frequency. This relation is generally robust across type of addictive behavior and delayed reward discounting assessment modality. PMID:27450931

  3. Prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis among Children in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Abedi, Ghasem; Afshari, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seif Ali; Farshidi, Fereshteh; Kheradmand, Elham

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Enterobius vermicularis is a parasitic disease that is common in crowded areas such as schools and kindergartens. Primary investigations of electronic evidence have reported different prevalences of E. vermicularis in Iran. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the total prevalence of this infection among Iranian children using a meta-analysis. Methods Relevant studies were identified in national and international databases. We selected eligible papers for meta-analysis after investigating titles, abstracts, and full texts; assessing study quality; and applying inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two independent researchers. The results were combined using a random effects model in Stata v. 11 software. Results Among 19 eligible articles including 11,676 participants, the prevalences of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 1.2%–66.1%, 2.3%–65.5%, and 1.7%–65.5%, respectively. Pooled prevalences (95% confidence interval) of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 17.2% (12.6%–21.8%), 17.2% (12.6%–21.8%), and 16.9% (9.03%–24.8%), respectively. Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that a great majority of Iranian children are infected with E. vermicularis, possibly due to poor public health. PMID:28540154

  4. Prevalence ofEnterobius vermicularisamong Children in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Abedi, Ghasem; Afshari, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seif Ali; Farshidi, Fereshteh; Kheradmand, Elham

    2017-04-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is a parasitic disease that is common in crowded areas such as schools and kindergartens. Primary investigations of electronic evidence have reported different prevalences of E. vermicularis in Iran. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the total prevalence of this infection among Iranian children using a meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified in national and international databases. We selected eligible papers for meta-analysis after investigating titles, abstracts, and full texts; assessing study quality; and applying inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two independent researchers. The results were combined using a random effects model in Stata v. 11 software. Among 19 eligible articles including 11,676 participants, the prevalences of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 1.2%-66.1%, 2.3%-65.5%, and 1.7%-65.5%, respectively. Pooled prevalences (95% confidence interval) of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 17.2% (12.6%-21.8%), 17.2% (12.6%-21.8%), and 16.9% (9.03%-24.8%), respectively. This meta-analysis showed that a great majority of Iranian children are infected with E. vermicularis , possibly due to poor public health.

  5. Ketogenic diet for treatment of intractable epilepsy in adults: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Yunbing; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2018-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for children with drug-resistant epilepsy and has been widely used in young children. Adult patients with intractable epilepsy would also benefit from this dietary treatment. However, only a few studies have been published, and the use of the KD in intractable epilepsy in adults has been limited. This meta-analysis summarized the findings of the relevant published studies to identify the efficacy of the KD for the treatment of intractable epilepsy in adults. In this meta-analysis, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were used for searching studies concerning the effects of the KD and its major subtypes with intractable epilepsy in adults published up to January 10, 2017. The primary outcomes were seizure freedom, seizure reduction by 50% or more, and seizure reduction by epilepsy were 13%, 53%, and 27%, respectively. The adverse reactions of the KD were mild, whereas low glycemic index diet (LGID) and low-dose fish oil diet (LFOD) may have fewer side effects. Weight loss, high level of low-density lipoprotein, and elevated total cholesterol were most frequent. The meta-analysis indicates that the KD for refractory epilepsy in adults is a well-tolerated treatment and that its side effects are acceptable, which show that the KD is a promising treatment in adult intractable epilepsy. Further research is needed to assess which type of diet or ratio is more effective in the KD treatment.

  6. Association of LPP and TAGAP Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis

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    Shi-Qi Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipoma preferred partner (LPP and T-cell activation Rho GTPase activating protein (TAGAP polymorphisms might influence the susceptibility to celiac disease. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis by identifying relevant studies to estimate the risks of these polymorphisms on celiac disease. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases were searched (up to October 2016 for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074 polymorphisms. Results: This meta-analysis included the same 7 studies for LPP rs1464510 and TAGAP rs1738074. The minor risk A allele at both rs1464510 and rs1738074 carried risks (odds ratios of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.22–1.30 and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14–1.21, respectively, which contributed to increased risks in all celiac disease patients by 10.72% and 6.59%, respectively. The estimated lambdas were 0.512 and 0.496, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model would be suitable for both gene effects. Conclusions: This meta-analysis provides robust estimates that polymorphisms in LPP and TAGAP genes are potential risk factors for celiac disease in European and American. Prospective studies and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS are needed to confirm these findings, and some corresponding molecular biology experiments should be carried out to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of celiac disease.

  7. Acupuncture for Acne Vulgaris: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi S. Y. Mansu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the current best available evidence of the efficacy and safety of acupuncture and related therapies for acne vulgaris. Methods. Eleven English and Chinese databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs of acne vulgaris compared to pharmacotherapies, no treatment, and sham or placebo acupuncture. Methodological quality was assessed using Cochrane Collaboration’s risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan software. Results. Twelve RCTs were included in the qualitative review and 10 RCTs were included in meta-analysis. Methodological quality of trials was generally low. The chance of achieving ≥30% change in lesion count in the acupuncture group was no different to the pharmacotherapy group (RR: 1.07 [95% CI 0.98, 1.17]; I2=8% and ≥50% change in lesion count in the acupuncture group was not statistically different to the pharmacotherapy group (RR: 1.07 [95% CI 0.98, 1.17]; I2=50%. Conclusions. While caution should be exercised due to quality of the included studies, acupuncture and auricular acupressure were not statistically different to guideline recommended treatments but were with fewer side effects and may be a treatment option. Future trials should address the methodological weaknesses and meet standard reporting requirements stipulated in STRICTA.

  8. Genome-wide meta-analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Matthew; Zhang, Cathy R; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Devan, William J; Parsons, Owen E; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Gregory, Sarah; Cloonan, Lisa; Falcone, Guido J; Radmanesh, Farid; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Barrick, Thomas R; Moynihan, Barry; Lewis, Cathryn M; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Lemmens, Robin; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Wardlaw, Joanna; Rothwell, Peter M; Meschia, James F; Worrall, Bradford B; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Furie, Karen L; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S; Rost, Natalia

    2016-01-12

    For 3,670 stroke patients from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, Belgium, and Italy, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis of white matter hyperintensity volumes (WMHV) on data imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference dataset to provide insights into disease mechanisms. We first sought to identify genetic associations with white matter hyperintensities in a stroke population, and then examined whether genetic loci previously linked to WMHV in community populations are also associated in stroke patients. Having established that genetic associations are shared between the 2 populations, we performed a meta-analysis testing which associations with WMHV in stroke-free populations are associated overall when combined with stroke populations. There were no associations at genome-wide significance with WMHV in stroke patients. All previously reported genome-wide significant associations with WMHV in community populations shared direction of effect in stroke patients. In a meta-analysis of the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci (p EVL], p = 4.0 × 10(-8); rs962888 [C1QL1], p = 1.1 × 10(-8); rs9515201 [COL4A2], p = 6.9 × 10(-9)). Genetic associations with WMHV are shared in otherwise healthy individuals and patients with stroke, indicating common genetic susceptibility in cerebral small vessel disease. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Survival after radiotherapy in gastric cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Francesco; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Balducci, Mario; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Elisa; Dinapoli, Nicola; Nicolotti, Nicola; Valentini, Chiara; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the impact of radiotherapy on both 3- and 5-year survival in patients with resectable gastric cancer. Methods: Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) in which radiotherapy, (preoperative, postoperative and/or intraoperative), was compared with surgery alone or surgery plus chemotherapy in resectable gastric cancer were identified by searching web-based databases and supplemented by manual examination of reference lists. Meta-analysis was performed using Risk Ratios (RRs). Random or fixed effects models were used to combine data. The methodological quality was evaluated by Chalmers' score. Results: Radiotherapy had a significant impact on 5-year survival. Using an intent to treat (ITT) and a Per Protocol (PP) analysis, the overall 5-year RR was 1.26 (95% CI: 1.08-1.48; NNT = 17) and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.04-1.66; NNT = 13), respectively. Although the quality of the studies was variable, the data were consistent and no clear publication bias was found. Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed a statistically significant 5-year survival benefit with the addition of radiotherapy in patients with resectable gastric cancer. Radiotherapy remains a standard component in the treatment of resectable gastric cancer and new RCTs need to address the impact of new conformal radiotherapy technologies.

  10. Meta-analysis of perceived stress and its association with incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Safiya; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Falzon, Louise; Krupka, David; Davidson, Karina W; Edmondson, Donald

    2012-12-15

    Most studies examining potential associations between psychological factors and cardiovascular outcomes have focused on depression or anxiety. The effect of perceived stress on incident coronary heart disease (CHD) has yet to be reviewed systematically. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between perceived stress and incident CHD. Ovid, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched as data sources. Prospective observational cohort studies were selected that measured self-reported perceived stress and assessed incident CHD at ≥6 months. We extracted study characteristics and estimates of the risk of incident CHD associated with high perceived stress versus low perceived stress. We identified 23 potentially relevant articles, of which 6 met our criteria (n = 118,696). Included studies measured perceived stress with validated measurements and nonvalidated simple self-report surveys. Incident CHD was defined as new diagnosis of, hospitalization for, or mortality secondary to CHD. Meta-analysis yielded an aggregate risk ratio of 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.45) for the magnitude of the relation between high perceived stress and incident CHD. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that high perceived stress is associated with a moderately increased risk of incident CHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Mechanical Workplace Risk Factors and Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Harry S.; Wells, Richard P.; Walter, Stephen D.; Cole, Donald C.; Côté, Pierre; Frank, John; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Langlois, Lacey E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We used individual participant data from multiple studies to conduct a comprehensive meta-analysis of mechanical exposures in the workplace and low back pain. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature search and contacted an author of each study to request their individual participant data. Because outcome definitions and exposure measures were not uniform across studies, we conducted 2 substudies: (1) to identify sets of outcome definitions that could be combined in a meta-analysis and (2) to develop methods to translate mechanical exposure onto a common metric. We used generalized estimating equation regression to analyze the data. Results. The odds ratios (ORs) for posture exposures ranged from 1.1 to 2.0. Force exposure ORs ranged from 1.4 to 2.1. The magnitudes of the ORs differed according to the definition of low back pain, and heterogeneity was associated with both study-level and individual-level characteristics. Conclusions. We found small to moderate ORs for the association of mechanical exposures and low back pain, although the relationships were complex. The presence of individual-level OR modifiers in such an area can be best understood by conducting a meta-analysis of individual participant data. PMID:22390445

  12. Quantifying the dose-response of walking in reducing coronary heart disease risk: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Henry; Orsini, Nicola; Amin, Janaki; Wolk, Alicja; Nguyen, Van Thi Thuy; Ehrlich, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of walking in reducing the risk of and preventing coronary heart disease (CHD) is not completely understood. This meta-analysis aimed to quantify the dose-response relationship between walking and CHD risk reduction for both men and women in the general population. Studies on walking and CHD primary prevention between 1954 and 2007 were identified through Medline, SportDiscus and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Random-effect meta-regression models were used to pool the relative risks from individual studies. A total of 11 prospective cohort studies and one randomized control trial study met the inclusion criteria, with 295,177 participants free of CHD at baseline and 7,094 cases at follow-up. The meta-analysis indicated that an increment of approximately 30 min of normal walking a day for 5 days a week was associated with 19% CHD risk reduction (95% CI = 14-23%; P-heterogeneity = 0.56; I (2) = 0%). We found no evidence of heterogeneity between subgroups of studies defined by gender (P = 0.67); age of the study population (P = 0.52); or follow-up duration (P = 0.77). The meta-analysis showed that the risk for developing CHD decreases as walking dose increases. Walking should be prescribed as an evidence-based effective exercise modality for CHD prevention in the general population.

  13. Nerve growth factor for Bell’s palsy: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; LIU, JUAN; HU, YAOZHI; CHEN, JINBO

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of Bell’s palsy. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase and a number of Chinese databases, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine disc, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wan Fang Data, were used to collect randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of NGF for Bell’s palsy. The span of the search covered data from the date of database establishment until December 2013. The included trials were screened comprehensively and rigorously. The efficacies of NGF were pooled via meta-analysis performed using Review Manager 5.2 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis of eight RCTs showed favorable effects of NGF on the disease response rate (n=642; OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.13–7.03; PBell’s palsy is limited. The number and quality of trials are too low to form solid conclusions. Further meticulous RCTs are required to overcome the limitations identified in the present study. PMID:25574223

  14. Indwelling versus Intermittent Urinary Catheterization following Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of urinary tract infection (UTI and postoperative urinary retention (POUR in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization.We conducted a meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCT to compare the rates of UTI and POUR in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization. A comprehensive search was carried out to identify RCTs. Study-specific risk ratios (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were pooled. Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.Nine RCTs with 17