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Sample records for mestranol

  1. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cumulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  2. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. Review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cummulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  3. [Etude statistique a propos de 496 utilisatrices). (Monilial vulvovaginitis and oral contraceptives. Statistical study on 496 users)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugois, P; Amblard, F; Manent, J; Bignicourt B, D E

    1971-12-08

    Incidence of vaginitis due to Candida albicans confirmed by culture was 46 of 496 (9.3%) French women taking contraceptive pills. The women had used pills for a total of 5198 cycles, in which 1991 were combined lynestrenol-mestranol, 804 were norethynodrel, 525 were ethynodiol and 473 were norethisterone combinations. The study group varied widely in age, economic class, marital status and parity, but no relationship could be found between yeast infection and age, parity, marital status, miscarriages or product used. This 9.3% incidence is about the same as that in healthy women not using pills. The authors thought that virulence was increased in these pill users, although all responded to local treatment without recurrence.

  4. Angioneurotic edema from an oral contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R L

    1967-09-18

    To the editor:--A 29-year-old white woman was seen April 17, 1967, with a severe angioneurotic edema of the face which had developed suddenly. She had taken aspirin for the two previous days and ethynodiol diacetate with mestranol (Ovulen) for 15 days. Treatment with epinephrine and dexamethasone administered parenterally and diphenhydramine orally did not benefit. Oral contraceptive thereapy was discontinued, and the edema subsided five days later. On April 25, she was asymptomatic. Aspirin had produced no ill effect, and oral contraceptive therapy was started again. After four days edema of the uvula and soft palate appeared, and again medication did not give relief. The edema subsided after a few days during which the patient abstained from cosmetics, tooth pastes, and all allergenic dietary items. Later she resumed all foods and contactants, but has taken no oral contraceptives, and has remained asymptomatic.

  5. New low-dose, extended-cycle pills with levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol: an evolutionary step in birth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anita

    2010-08-09

    To review milestones in development of oral contraceptive pills since their introduction in the US 50 years ago in order to better understand how a new formulation with low-dose estrogen in an extended-cycle pattern fits into the evolution of birth control pills. This is a review of trends in the development of various birth controls pills and includes data from phase III clinical trials for this new formulation. The first birth control pill was a very high-dose monophasic formulation with the prodrug estrogen mestranol and a first-generation progestin. Over the decades, the doses of hormones have been markedly reduced, and a new estrogen and several different progestins were developed and used in different dosing patterns. The final element to undergo change was the 7-day pill-free interval. Many of these same changes have been made in the development of extended-cycle pill formulation. The newest extended-cycle oral contraceptive formulation with 84 active pills, each containing 20 μg ethinyl estradiol and 100 μg levonorgestrel, represents an important evolution in birth control that incorporates lower doses of estrogen (to reduce side effects and possibly reduce risk of thrombosis), fewer scheduled bleeding episodes (to meet women's desires for fewer and shorter menses) and the use of low-dose estrogen in place of placebo pills (to reduce the number of days of unscheduled spotting and bleeding). Hopefully, this unique formation will motivate women to be more successful contraceptors.

  6. Occurrence and partitioning of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the marine environment of Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Add knowledge regarding the fate of EDCs in marine environment. ► Nonylphenols and its ethoxylates are the dominant pollutants. ► EDCs originated from mainly from river and urban effluents. ► The partition coefficients negatively correlated to suspended particulate matter. ► Mussels exhibited low bioconcentartion factors for nonylphenol and octylphenol. - Abstract: An integrated study was conducted to determine the presence of phenolic and steroid endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), in the marine environment of Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece. Seawater, suspended particulate matter, sediments and biota were examined for nonylphenol, octylphenol, their mono- and diethoxylate oligomers, bisphenol A, estrone, 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, estriol, mestranol and 17 α-ethynylestradiol. Phenolic compounds were detected in all of the compartments, with nonylphenol and its ethoxylates being the dominant pollutants. The occurrence of nonylphenol in sediments presents a significant risk to the biota. Mussels exhibited relatively low concentrations and low bioconcentration factors for NP and OP. The effect of terrestrial sources of the EDCs on the marine environment is discussed. The influence of suspended particulate matter and organic carbon in the partition of the EDCs between the dissolved and the particulate phase was investigated.

  7. Estrogenic potential of the Venice, Italy, lagoon waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pojana, Giulio; Bonfà, Angela; Busetti, Francesco; Collarin, Anna; Marcomini, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    The exposure of the Venice lagoon (Italy) to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from different sources was investigated. Spatial and time distribution of EDC concentrations were determined in four sampling sessions (December 2001-May 2002) by solid phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography separation coupled with mass spectrometry detection via electrospray interface (SPE-HPLC-ESI-MS), which allowed identification of natural (estradiol, estrone) and synthetic estrogenic compounds, both steroidal (ethinylestradiol, mestranol) and nonsteroidal (benzophenone, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, nonylphenol monoethoxylate carboxylate). No significant differences in the EDC distribution were observed between stations located near selected sources (raw sewage from the historical center of Venice, treated municipal and industrial effluents from sewage treatment plants, and areas undergoing the inflow of rivers). While synthetic nonsteroidal analytes were recorded in the 1 to 1040 ng/L range (average concentration: 34 ng/L), steroidal EDC (estradiol, ethinylestradiol) concentrations were lower (1-125 ng/L; average concentration: 8 ng/L). The estrogenic activity of lagoon waters was estimated in terms of estradiol equivalent concentration (EEQ) by applying the estradiol equivalency factors (EEFs). Steroidal EDCs (estradiol, ethinylestradiol) contributed >97% to the total potential estrogenicity of the waters, which accounted for 4 to 172 ng/L (average: 25 ng/L), as total EEQs. These levels are likely to pose adverse effects on the Venice lagoon aquatic organisms.

  8. Progestational agents and blood coagulation. IV. Changes induced by progestogen alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, I B; Courey, N G; Moore, R H; Ambrus, C M; Ambrus, J L

    1972-07-15

    To evaluate the effects of chlormadinone acetate upon the coagulation of blood and fibrinolysin systems, 35 healthy, young women voluntarily using some form of birth control were studied. 10 women who served as controls used intrauterine devices; 25 women took either a progestin-estrogen (1 mg norethindrone acetate and 1 mg mestranol) combination or a synthetic progestational agent (0.5 mg chlormadinone acetate) on a coded, double-blind basis. Platelet counts, thrombelastograms, and plasma assays were performed prior to and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. After 3 months, those taking progestin-estrogen showed a highly significant increase toward hypercoagulability in Quick time, Factors II, VII, and X, and increased levels in the thromboplastin generation time (TGT), Factors V and IX, and plasminogen. At 6 months all levels remained elevated except for TGT. Those on chlormadinone acetate had only a slightly significant change toward hypercoagulability in Quick time and Factor VIII, an increase in Factor IX, and a decrease in Factor X. In the control group only TGT was elevated. The progestin alone induced only minimal changes in comparison to the marked rises accompanied with progestin-estrogen therapy.

  9. Trace analysis of selected hormones and sterols in river sediments by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, Ivana; Grujić, Svetlana; Jauković, Zorica; Laušević, Mila

    2014-10-17

    In this paper, development and optimization of new LC-MS method for determination of twenty selected hormones, human/animal and plant sterols in river sediments were described. Sediment samples were prepared using ultrasonic extraction and clean up with silica gel/anhydrous sodium sulphate cartridge. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The optimized extraction parameters were extraction solvent (methanol), weight of the sediment (2 g) and time of ultrasonic extraction (3× 10 min). Successful chromatographic separation of hormones (estriol and estrone, 17α- and 17β-estradiol) and four human/animal sterols (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, α-cholestanol and β-cholestanol) that have identical fragmentation reactions was achieved. The developed and optimized method provided high recoveries (73-118%), low limits of detection (0.8-18 ng g(-1)) and quantification (2.5-60 ng g(-1)) with the RSDs generally lower than 20%. Applicability of the developed method was confirmed by analysis of six river sediment samples. A widespread occurrence of human/animal and plant sterols was found. The only detected hormone was mestranol in just one sediment sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of oral contraceptive on the pituitary and plasma L.H. levels and on the hypothalamic LH-RH level (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, N; Yanaihara, T; Kanazawa, M; Okinaga, S; Arai, K

    1976-08-20

    The effects of the oral contraceptive on the pituitary content and plasma level of LH and the hypothalamic LH-RH level were investigated in 16 adult female rabbits. The oral contraceptive preparation, Sophia-C (Norethindrone 2mg + Mestranol 0.1 mg), as administered orally by a stomach tube each day for 7 days in 8 adult female rabbits. At the end of the treatment, the rabbits were bled from the abdominal aorta into heparinized syringes and the plasma was separated. The stalk median eminences were excised. All the materials were stored in -80 degrees C until assayed. Plasma level and the pituitary content of LH and the hypothalamic LH-RH were measured by radioimmunoassay. All the dose response curved were drawn using logitlog transformation. Radioimmunoassay procedures for LH was described in detail elsewhere. Purified rabbit LH for iodination (125-I) and strandard were prepared by T. Makino and R.O. Greep, at Research Laboratories for Human Reproduction, Harvard Medical School, Boston, U.S.A. The starting B/T was 25% at the final dilution of the antibody of 1/20,000. Minimal detectable quantity was about 40 pg/tube. The 50% intercepts were approximately 460 pg/tube. Radioimmunoassay procedures for LH-RH were performed according to the method described by Arimura et al. Antiserum against synthetic LH-RH was kindly supplied to us by Drs. A. Arimura and A.V. Schally, New Orleans, U'S.A. The synthetic LH-RH was kindly supplied to us by Dr. N. Yanaihara. The starting B/T ratio was 29% at the final dilution of the antibody of I/17,500. Minimal detectable quantity was about 40pg/tube and the 50% intercepts were 150pg/tube. It has been assumed that oral contraceptive drugs exert their action by blocking the hypothalamic LH-RH, resulting in a depression of the plasma level of LH, because plasma level of LH returned to the normal level when LH-RH was administered intravenously even while oral contraceptive steroids were given continuously. However, these findings concerning

  11. New low-dose, extended-cycle pills with levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol: an evolutionary step in birth control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Anita NelsonHarbor-UCLA Hospital, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USAAim: To review milestones in development of oral contraceptive pills since their introduction in the US 50 years ago in order to better understand how a new formulation with low-dose estrogen in an extended-cycle pattern fits into the evolution of birth control pills.Methods: This is a review of trends in the development of various birth controls pills and includes data from phase III clinical trials for this new formulation.Results: The first birth control pill was a very high-dose monophasic formulation with the prodrug estrogen mestranol and a first-generation progestin. Over the decades, the doses of hormones have been markedly reduced, and a new estrogen and several different progestins were developed and used in different dosing patterns. The final element to undergo change was the 7-day pill-free interval. Many of these same changes have been made in the development of extended-cycle pill formulation.Conclusion: The newest extended-cycle oral contraceptive formulation with 84 active pills, each containing 20 μg ethinyl estradiol and 100 μg levonorgestrel, represents an important evolution in birth control that incorporates lower doses of estrogen (to reduce side effects and possibly reduce risk of thrombosis, fewer scheduled bleeding episodes (to meet women’s desires for fewer and shorter menses and the use of low-dose estrogen in place of placebo pills (to reduce the number of days of unscheduled spotting and bleeding. Hopefully, this unique formation will motivate women to be more successful contraceptors.Keywords: extended-cycle oral contraceptives, low-dose extended-cycle pills, Lo Seasonique

  12. Modelling defined mixtures of environmental oestrogens found in domestic animal and sewage treatment effluents using an in vitro oestrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Gray, L Earl; Wilson, Vickie S

    2012-06-01

    There is growing concern of exposure of fish, wildlife and humans to water sources contaminated with oestrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental oestrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipal waste, agricultural and industrial effluents. US EPA's drinking water contaminant candidate list 3 (CCL3) includes several oestrogenic compounds. Although these contaminants are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, they are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems and may require future regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Using an in vitro transcriptional activation assay, this study evaluated oestrogens from CCL3 both individually and as a seven oestrogen mixture (fixed ray design) over a broad range of concentrations, including environmentally relevant concentrations. Log EC(50) and Hillslope values for individual oestrogens were as follows: estrone, -11.92, 1.283; estradiol-17α, -9.61, 1.486; estradiol-17β, 11.77, 1.494; estriol, -11.14, 1.074; ethinyl estradiol-17α, -12.63, 1.562; Mestranol, -11.08, 0.809 and Equilin, -11.48, 0.946. In addition, mixtures that mirrored the primary oestrogens found in swine, poultry and dairy CAFO effluent (fixed-ratio ray design), and a ternary mixture (4 × 4 × 4 factorial design) of oestrogens found in hormone replacement therapy and/or oral contraceptives were tested. Mixtures were evaluated for additivity using both the concentration addition (CA) model and oestrogen equivalence (EEQ) model. For each of the mixture studies, a broad range of concentrations were tested, both above and below environmentally relevant concentrations. Results show that the observed data did not vary consistently from either the CA or EEQ predictions for any mixture. Therefore, either the CA or EEQ model should be useful predictors for modelling oestrogen mixtures. © 2012 The Authors

  13. Microwave-accelerated derivatization for the simultaneous gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of natural and synthetic estrogenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yuegang; Zhang, Kai; Lin, Yuejuan

    2007-05-04

    A rapid microwave-accelerated derivatization process for the GC-MS analysis of steroid estrogens, estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and mestranol (MeEE2), was developed. Under microwave irradiation, the five estrogenic hormones studied were simultaneously derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA)+trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) in pyridine solution. Effects of irradiation time (15-120 s) and power level (240-800 W) on the yield of the derivatization were investigated. The derivatization under the irradiation of 800 W microwave for 60s produced comparable results when compared with the conventional heating process in a sand bath for 30 min at 80 degrees C in terms of derivatization yield, linearity and precision for all steroid hormones tested. The calibration curves are linear between 3.00 and 3.00 x 10(2) microg mL(-1). The square of the regression coefficients (R(2)) range from 0.979 to 1.000. The applicability of the method was evaluated on spiked river and distilled water samples at two concentrations, 25.0 and 2.00 x 10(2) ng mL(-1). The recoveries obtained by using microwave heating (60s, 800 W) were similar to those by conventional heating. When combined solid-phase extraction (SPE) with the application of the microwave-accelerated derivatization proposed here, the detection limits of 0.02-0.1 ng L(-1) for the steroid hormones have been achieved. The results demonstrated that microwave-accelerated derivatization is an efficient and suitable sample preparation method for the GC-MS analysis of estrogenic steroids.

  14. Chemical approach to solvent removal during nanoencapsulation: its application to preparation of PLGA nanoparticles with non-halogenated solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngme; Sah, Eric; Sah, Hongkee

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new oil-in-water emulsion-based nanoencapsulation method for the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles using a non-halogenated solvent. PLGA (60-150 mg) was dissolved in 3 ml of methyl propionate, which was vortexed with 4 ml of a 0.5-4 % polyvinyl alcohol solution. This premix was sonicated for 2 min, added into 30 ml of the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution, and reacted with 3 ml of 10 N NaOH. Solvent removal was achieved by the alkaline hydrolysis of methyl propionate dissolved in an aqueous phase into water-soluble methanol and sodium propionate. It was a simple but effective technique to quickly harden nanoemulsion droplets into nanoparticles. The appearing PLGA nanoparticles were recovered by ultracentrifugation and/or dialysis, lyophilized with trehalose, and redispersed by water. This nanoencapsulation technique permitted a control of their mean diameters over 151.7 ± 3.8 to 440.2 ± 22.2 nm at mild processing conditions. When the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol concentration was set at ≥1 %, nanoparticles showed uniform distributions with polydispersity indices below 0.1. There were no significant changes in their mean diameters and size distribution patterns before and after lyophilization. When mestranol was encapsulated into nanoparticles, the drug was completely nanoencapsulated: depending on experimental conditions, their encapsulation efficiencies were determined to be 99.4 ± 7.2 to 105.8 ± 6.3 %. This simple, facile nanoencapsulation technique might have versatile applications for the preparation of polymeric nanoparticulate dosage forms.

  15. A prospective cohort study of oral contraceptive use and ovarian cancer among women in the United States born from 1947 to 1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafrir, Amy L; Schock, Helena; Poole, Elizabeth M; Terry, Kathryn L; Tamimi, Rulla M; Hankinson, Susan E; Rosner, Bernard A; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2017-05-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been consistently associated with a reduced ovarian cancer risk; however, most previous studies included women in older birth cohorts using high-dose OC formulations. We assessed OC use, including type and dose, and ovarian cancer risk among women born between 1947 and 1964 using more recent formulations. We included 110,929 Nurses' Health Study II participants. Women reported duration of OC use and brands used from age 13 to baseline (1989) and every 2 years thereafter through 2009. We categorized brands by estrogen and progestin type, dose, and potency, and used Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, calendar time, reproductive factors, and body mass index, to assess associations with ovarian cancer. Over 2,178,679 person-years of follow-up, we confirmed 281 cases. At baseline, 83% of participants reported ever using OCs. Compared to never use, we observed an increased risk of ovarian cancer with ≤6 months of OC use (HR 1.82; 95% CI 1.13-2.93) but a non-significant 57% (95% CI 0.18-1.03) decreased risk with ≥15 years of OC use. The increased risk among short-term users (≤1 year) was restricted to OCs containing mestranol (HR 1.83; 95% CI 1.16-2.88) and first-generation progestin (HR 1.72; 95% CI 1.11-2.65). The associations between OCs and ovarian cancer observed for this younger birth cohort differ substantially from the results of previous cohort studies, possibly reflecting changes in OC formulations and use patterns over time, although these results could be due to chance. Additional studies should evaluate newer OC formulations and ovarian cancer risk.

  16. Chemical approach to solvent removal during nanoencapsulation: its application to preparation of PLGA nanoparticles with non-halogenated solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngme; Sah, Eric; Sah, Hongkee

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new oil-in-water emulsion-based nanoencapsulation method for the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles using a non-halogenated solvent. PLGA (60–150 mg) was dissolved in 3 ml of methyl propionate, which was vortexed with 4 ml of a 0.5–4 % polyvinyl alcohol solution. This premix was sonicated for 2 min, added into 30 ml of the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution, and reacted with 3 ml of 10 N NaOH. Solvent removal was achieved by the alkaline hydrolysis of methyl propionate dissolved in an aqueous phase into water-soluble methanol and sodium propionate. It was a simple but effective technique to quickly harden nanoemulsion droplets into nanoparticles. The appearing PLGA nanoparticles were recovered by ultracentrifugation and/or dialysis, lyophilized with trehalose, and redispersed by water. This nanoencapsulation technique permitted a control of their mean diameters over 151.7 ± 3.8 to 440.2 ± 22.2 nm at mild processing conditions. When the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol concentration was set at ≥1 %, nanoparticles showed uniform distributions with polydispersity indices below 0.1. There were no significant changes in their mean diameters and size distribution patterns before and after lyophilization. When mestranol was encapsulated into nanoparticles, the drug was completely nanoencapsulated: depending on experimental conditions, their encapsulation efficiencies were determined to be 99.4 ± 7.2 to 105.8 ± 6.3 %. This simple, facile nanoencapsulation technique might have versatile applications for the preparation of polymeric nanoparticulate dosage forms.Graphical AbstractSchematic illustration of an innovative chemical approach to solvent removal during nanoencapsulation. Methyl propionate present in the aqueous continuous phase reacts with sodium hydroxide, thereby producing methanol and sodium propionate. Its alkaline hydrolysis allows the continuous extraction of the solvent out of nanoemulsion

  17. Oral contraceptives: Pt. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    This discussion of oral contraceptives (OCs) presents information on the following: types of steroidal contraception OCs, injectable contraceptive agents, implants, intravaginal rings, IUD bearing steroids, male pills, intracervical devices, contraceptive bracelets, and intranasal administration of hormones); guidelines for adolescent usage (why adolescents use OCs, common medical concerns, assessment, prescribing, educating for user effectiveness, and the length of time that the adolescent can use OCs); the marketing of OCs; attitudes toward OCs; the effect of OCs on insulin requirements in diabetes; mortality among OC users; assessing new knowledge of mortality trends and OCs; beneficial and adverse effects; sexual and psychological response to OCs; chromosomal abnormalities and OCs; ectopic pregnancies and the progestogen only pill; liver tumors and OCs; cancer and OCs; eye conditions and OCs; and postpill amenorrhea and infertility. Most adolescents choose OCs as their initial contraceptive method because it is probably the only method of which they have much knowledge. Most adolescents lack the needed level of sexual maturity and sexual sophistication to pause to insert a diaphrage or to use a condom. Another attraction of OCs is reliability. At this time 12 major companies based in 8 countries (excluding China) produce and market OCs. Basically either of 2 estrogens, ethinyl estradiol and mestranol, are used in combination with about 6 different progestogens. Attitudes vary greatly and range from total acceptance to total rejection. Despite some negative views about OC, 32.2% of Australian women in childbearing years are using OCs indicating a high degree of acceptance. The new data available indicate strongly that the hazards of using OCs are somewhat greater than previously suspected. In 1977 the Royal College of General Practitioners reported a death rate from circulatory disease which was in OC users 4.7 times that of women who had never used OCs. The

  18. Ferrrate(VI) and freeze-thaw treatment for oxidation of hormones and inactivation of fecal coliforms in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the individual and combined effects of potassium ferrate(VI) additions and freeze-thaw conditioning for the treatment and dewatering of wastewater sludge in cold climates, with particular focus on the inactivation of fecal coliforms and oxidation of estrogens, androgens, and progestogens. The first phase of the study evaluated the effects of potassium ferrate(VI) pre-treatment followed by freeze-thaw at -20 °C using a low (0.5 g/L) and high (5.0 g/L) dose of potassium ferrate(VI). The results showed that pre-treatment of anaerobically digested sludge with 5 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI) reduced the concentration of fecal coliforms in the sludge cake to below 100 MPN/g DS. The second phase evaluated the ability of ferrate(VI) to oxidise selected hormones in sludge. Anaerobically digested sludge samples were spiked with 10 different hormones: estrone (E1), 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), equilin, mestranol, testosterone, norethindrone and norgestrel in two groups of low (3-75 ng/mL) and high (12-300 ng/L) concentration ranges of hormones. The samples were treated with either 0.5 or 1.0 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI), and hormone concentrations were measured again after treatment. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions as low as 1.0 g/L reduced the concentration of estrogens in sludge. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions of 0.5 and 1.0 g/L were less effective at reducing the concentrations of androgens and progestogens. Increasing ferrate(VI) dose would likely result in more substantial decreases in the concentrations of fecal coliforms and hormones. The results of this study indicate that the combined use of freeze-thaw and ferrate(VI) has the potential to provide a complete sludge treatment solution in cold regions.

  19. Chemical approach to solvent removal during nanoencapsulation: its application to preparation of PLGA nanoparticles with non-halogenated solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngme [Ewha Womans University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of); Sah, Eric [University of Notre Dame, College of Science (United States); Sah, Hongkee, E-mail: hsah@ewha.ac.kr [Ewha Womans University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a new oil-in-water emulsion-based nanoencapsulation method for the preparation of PLGA nanoparticles using a non-halogenated solvent. PLGA (60–150 mg) was dissolved in 3 ml of methyl propionate, which was vortexed with 4 ml of a 0.5–4 % polyvinyl alcohol solution. This premix was sonicated for 2 min, added into 30 ml of the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution, and reacted with 3 ml of 10 N NaOH. Solvent removal was achieved by the alkaline hydrolysis of methyl propionate dissolved in an aqueous phase into water-soluble methanol and sodium propionate. It was a simple but effective technique to quickly harden nanoemulsion droplets into nanoparticles. The appearing PLGA nanoparticles were recovered by ultracentrifugation and/or dialysis, lyophilized with trehalose, and redispersed by water. This nanoencapsulation technique permitted a control of their mean diameters over 151.7 ± 3.8 to 440.2 ± 22.2 nm at mild processing conditions. When the aqueous polyvinyl alcohol concentration was set at ≥1 %, nanoparticles showed uniform distributions with polydispersity indices below 0.1. There were no significant changes in their mean diameters and size distribution patterns before and after lyophilization. When mestranol was encapsulated into nanoparticles, the drug was completely nanoencapsulated: depending on experimental conditions, their encapsulation efficiencies were determined to be 99.4 ± 7.2 to 105.8 ± 6.3 %. This simple, facile nanoencapsulation technique might have versatile applications for the preparation of polymeric nanoparticulate dosage forms.Graphical AbstractSchematic illustration of an innovative chemical approach to solvent removal during nanoencapsulation. Methyl propionate present in the aqueous continuous phase reacts with sodium hydroxide, thereby producing methanol and sodium propionate. Its alkaline hydrolysis allows the continuous extraction of the solvent out of nanoemulsion