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Sample records for mesozoic granitic rocks

  1. Reconstruction of crustal blocks of California on the basis of initial strontium isotopic compositions of Mesozoic granitic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Ronald Wayne; Peterman, Zell E.

    1978-01-01

    Initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr was determined for samples of Mesozoic granitic rocks in the vicinity of the Garlock fault zone in California. These data along with similar data from the Sierra Nevada and along the San Andreas fault system permit a reconstruction of basement rocks offset by the Cenozoic lateral faulting along both the San Andreas and Garlock fault systems. The location of the line of initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7060 can be related to the edge of the Precambrian continental crust in the western United States. Our model explains the present configuration of the edge of Precambrian continental crust as the result of two stages of rifting that occurred about 1,250 to 800 m.y. ago, during Belt sedimentation, and about 600 to 350 m.y. ago, prior to and during the development of the Cordilleran geosyncline and to left-lateral translation along a locus of disturbance identified in the central Mojave Desert. The variations in Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr of the Mesozoic granitic rocks are interpreted as due to variations in composition and age of the source materials of the granitic rocks. The variations of Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr in Mesozoic granitic rocks, the sedimentation history during the late Precambrian and Paleozoic, and the geographic position of loci of Mesozoic magmatism in the western United States are related to the development of the continental margin and different types of lithosphere during rifting.

  2. Petrogenesis of Mesozoic granites in the Xitian, South China: Evidence from whole-rock geochemistry and zircon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Sun, J.; He, M.; Hou, Q.; Niu, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mesozoic granitoids are widespread in southeastern China, which accompanied with lots of world-famous polymetallic deposits. The mineralization is believed to be related to the Mesozoic granitic magmatism. However, the petrogenesis of these granites and their relation to the mineralization are still debated. As a typical granitic pluton, Xitian granites from the eastern Hunan Province are formed during this period and associated with tungsten-tin deposit. Whole-rock geochemical, SIMS zircon geochronology and oxygen isotopes, as well as LA-ICPMS zircon Lu-Hf isotopic analyses, were carried out on a suite of rocks from Xitian granitic pluton to constrain their magmatic sources and petrogenesis. Xitian granitic pluton is mainly composed of biotite adamellite, biotite granite, fine-grained granite. SIMS and LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating of zircons indicate that there are two episodes of these rocks, i.e., Late Triassic granites (227-233Ma) and Late Jurassic granites (150-154Ma). The Xitian granites are silica-rich, potassic and weakly peraluminous. Petrographic and geochemical features show that they are highly fractionated I-type granites. The combined elemental and isotopic results indicated that the Late Triassic granite in Xitian area experienced a process of crystal fractionation of crustal-derived magmas coupled with strong assimilation of the surrounding rocks. The occurrence of Jurassic granitoids in Xitian area is attributed to ascending of mantle-derived magmas, which provide heat for partial melting of crustal materials. The Late Jurassic granite may be derived from juvenile crust or partial melting of ancient crustal rocks, whereas high degrees of crystal fractionation further enriched tungsten-tin in the evolved granitic rocks. This work was financially supported by the Research Cooperation between Institute and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences grant (Y552012Y00), Public Welfare Project of the Ministry of land and Resources of China (201211024

  3. Isotopic data bearing on the origin of Mesozoic and Tertiary granitic rocks in the western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaolo, D.J.; Farmer, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A regional survey of initial Nd and Sr isotopic compositions has been done on Mesozoic and Tertiary granitic rocks from a 500 000 km 2 area in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and Colorado. The plutons, which range in composition from quartz diorite to monzogranite, are intruded into accreted oceanic geosynclinal terrains in the west and north and into Precambrian basement in the east. Broad geographic coverage allows the data to be interpreted in the context of the regional pre-Mesozoic crustal structure. Initial Nd isotopic compositions exhibit a huge range, encompassing values typical of oceanic magmatic arcs and Archean basement. The sources of the magmas can be inferred from the systematic geographic variability of Nd isotopic compositions. The plutons in the accreted terrains represent mantle-derived magma that assimilated crust while differentiating at deep levels. Those emplaced into Precambrian basement are mainly derived from the crust. The regional patterns can be understood in terms of: (1) the flux of mantle magma entering the crust; (2) crustal thickness; and (3) crustal age. The mantle magma flux apparently decreased inland; in the main batholith belts purely crustal granitic rocks are not observed because the flux was too large. Inland, crustal granite is common because mantle magma was scarce and the crust was thick, and hot enough to melt. The epsilonsub(Nd) values of peraluminous granite formed by melting of the Precambrian basement depend on the age of the local basement source. (author)

  4. Heat production in granitic rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Jakobsen, Kiki

    2017-01-01

    Granitic rocks play special role in the dynamics and evolution of the Earth and its thermal regime. First, their compositional variability, reflected in the distribution of concentrations of radiogenic elements, provides constraints on global differentiation processes and large scale planetary...... evolution, where emplacement of granites is considered a particularly important process for the formation of continental crust. Second, heat production by radioactive decay is among the main heat sources in the Earth. Therefore knowledge of heat production in granitic rocks is pivotal for thermal modelling...... of the continental lithosphere, given that most radiogenic elements are concentrated in granitic rocks of the upper continental crust whereas heat production in rocks of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle is negligible. We present and analyze a new global database GRANITE2017 (with about 500 entries...

  5. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  6. Study on Sr-Nd isotopes of mesozoic-cenozoic granites in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Ruizhao; Deng Jinfu; Zhou Su; Xiao Qinghui; Cai Zhiyong

    2003-01-01

    Mesozoic-Cenozoic magmatic activities were intensive in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau. Nd-Sr isotopic compositions of representative granitic plutons in western Qinghai-Tibetan plateau are reported in this paper. Combining with past isotopic data, which has reported in eastern Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and material source and genesis of Mesozoic and Cenozoic granites in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau have been studied. The research result indicates there are three types of granite existing in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, the granites of Late stage of Yanshan Period which distributing on north and south boundary of Gandes block (namely in north and south granitic belts of Dangdes) and cause of oceanic crust subduction, have ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i of 0.7041-0.7064, ε (Nd) t of +2.5 - +5.7 and TDM age of 312-562 Ma, positive ε Nd, low ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i ratio and young Nd model ages suggest relatively high contents of mantle-derived components in their sources, and this type granite might melt from subduction oceanic crust. The granites occurred intra-Gangdes block which were caused by collision of continent and post-collision, have ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i of 0.706-0.719, ε (Nd) t of -5.3 - -8.3 and TDM age of 1323-1496 Ma, negative ε Nd, relative high ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i ratio with an mid-Proterozoic Nd model ages, suggest granite has the mixing genesis of mantle-derived components and old crustal components in their sources. With relatively small variation range in ε (Nd) t and TDM age, it might imply granitic isotopic source in Gandes block to keep relative homogenization in long period. The granites in Himalayan block which there is not oceanic material to join in melting and to cause of intra-continental subduction, has most ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i ratio more than 0.720, ε (Nd) t of -10.3 - -16.3 and TDM age of 1792-2206 Ma, high ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)i ratio, low negative ε (Nd)t with old Nd isotopic model ages and consistent with the Sr, Nd isotopic compositions of basement

  7. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina; Denyak, Valeriy

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), thorium ( 232 Th) and potassium ( 40 K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m 3 to 2087±19 Bq/m 3 , which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  8. Thermal expansion of granite rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1978-04-01

    The thermal expansion of rocks is strongly controlled by the thermal expansion of the minerals. The theoretical thermal expansion of the Stripa Granite is gound to be 21 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 25 deg C and 38 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 400 deg C. The difference in expansion for the rock forming minerals causes micro cracking at heating. The expansion due to micro cracks is found to be of the same order as the mineral expansion. Most of the micro cracks will close at pressures of the order of 10 - 20 MPa. The thermal expansion of a rock mass including the effect of joints is determined in the pilot heater test in the Stripa Mine

  9. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe (IPPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) and thorium ({sup 232}Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn), radium ({sup 226}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th) and potassium ({sup 40}K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m{sup 3} to 2087±19 Bq/m{sup 3}, which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  10. Deep fracturation of granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bles, J.L.; Blanchin, R.; Bonijoly, D.; Dutartre, P.; Feybesse, J.L.; Gros, Y.; Landry, J.; Martin, P.

    1986-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground, in various feasibility studies dealing with radioactive wastes disposal. The Mont Blanc road tunnel, the EDF Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater [fr

  11. Deformation style of the Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2014-10-01

    Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in southern Thailand are widespread from NNE-SSW and N-S in Chumphon and Trang provinces. The Mesozoic stratigraphic units are the marine Triassic Sai Bon Formation and the non-marine Jurassic-Cretaceous Thung Yai Group, the latter subdivided into Khlong Min, Lam Thap, Sam Chom, and Phun Phin Formations. These units overlie Permian carbonate rocks with an angular unconformity, and are overlain unconformably by Cenozoic units and the Quaternary sediments. The Mesozoic rocks have been folded to form two huge first-ordered syncline or synclinoria, the Chumphon and Surat Thani-Krabi-Trang synclinoria. These synclinoria are elongated in NNE-SSW to N-S direction, and incorporate asymmetric lower-order parasitic folds. The folds have moderately to steeply dipping eastward limbs and more gently dipping westward limbs. These folds were transected by brittle fractures in four major directions. These geologic structures indicate WNW-ESE to E-W contraction with top-to-the-east simple shear at some time before the deposition of the Cenozoic sedimentary units. No major deformation has affected the rocks subsequently, apart from the formation of the fault-controlled Cenozoic basins.

  12. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic ... This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern ... Frost and Frost 2013). ...... King P L, White A J R, Chappell B W and Allen C M 1997.

  13. Sorption of actinides in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, B

    1982-11-01

    The sorption of americium (III), neptunium(V) and plutonium on geologic media under oxic conditions has been measured by a batch technique. The aqueous phase was a synthetic groundwater or 4M NaCl solution. The solid phase was a pure mineral, representative of igneous rocks, or granite. Altogether 40 different minerals and rocks were used. The effects of pH and the ionic strength of the aqueous phase as well as of the cation exchange capacity and the surface/mass ratio of the solid sorbent are discussed. Empirical equations giving the distribution coefficient as a function of pH in the environmental pH-range 7-9 are suggested. Some observations and conclusions concerning sorption mechanisms are given. (author)

  14. Example of fracture characterization in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, R.K.

    1981-03-01

    A detailed study of geologic discontinuities for an underground heater test in highly fractured granitic rock is reported. Several prominent shear fractures were delineated within a 6 x 30 x 15 m rock mass by correlating surface mapping and borehole fracture logs. Oblique-reverse faulting is suspected on at least one of the surfaces, and its inferred borehole intercepts appear to be collinear in the direction of slickensiding observed in the field. Four distinct joint sets were identified, one of which coincides with the shear fractures. Another lies nearly horizontal, and two others are steeply inclined and orthogonal. Fracture lengths and spacings for the four joint sets are represented by lognormal probability distributions

  15. The source rock characters of U-rich granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng; Debao, He [CNNC Key Laboratory of Uranium Resources Exploration and Evaluation Technology, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

    2012-03-15

    This paper discusses the stratum composition, lithological association, uranium content of crust and the activation, migration, concentration of uranium at each tectonic cycle in South China. The authors point out that the source rock of U-rich granite is U-rich continental crust which is rich in Si, Al and K. The lithological association is mainly composed of terrestrial clastic rocks formation of mudstone and sandstone, mingled with intermediate-acidic, mafic pyroclastic rocks and carbonate rocks formation. During tectonic movements, the rocks had undergone regional metamorphism, migmatitization, granitization, and formed U-rich granites finally. (authors)

  16. The source rock characters of U-rich granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue; He Debao

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the stratum composition, lithological association, uranium content of crust and the activation, migration, concentration of uranium at each tectonic cycle in South China. The authors point out that the source rock of U-rich granite is U-rich continental crust which is rich in Si, Al and K. The lithological association is mainly composed of terrestrial clastic rocks formation of mudstone and sandstone, mingled with intermediate-acidic, mafic pyroclastic rocks and carbonate rocks formation. During tectonic movements, the rocks had undergone regional metamorphism, migmatitization, granitization, and formed U-rich granites finally. (authors)

  17. Aqueous phase transport through granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Green, A.

    1984-03-01

    Using Scottish granites of UK origin it has been established that : (1) pore connectivity exists over metre distances and does not vary significantly with distance. (2) The formation factor may show an increase by a factor of approx. 2 for thin samples (approx. 1 cm). Since diffusion samples are of this order of thickness, laboratory measurements may be overestimating the diffusion coefficient appropriate for use in migration model calculations by a factor of approx. 2. (3) The effect of confining pressures up to approx. 16 MPa is to reduce diffusion coefficients by 50 to 60%. This implies that diffusion coefficients appropriate to granite at depths of approx. 500 m are approximately a factor of two lower than those obtained in the laboratory. (4) Diffusion rates through weathered fissure surfaces can be significantly greater (up to approx. 200 times) than through 'good' rock and are strongly dependent on the severity of the weathering. No evidence for pore blocking by weathering products was found. (5) Latex colloids having a diameter of 0.312 μm neither cause pore blocking nor do they penetrate the pore structure. (author)

  18. Prospecting ideas for mesozoic granite-type, volcanics-type and exo-contact-type uranium deposits in South China. Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dagan

    2001-01-01

    The Mesozoic uranium ore-formation process in South China resulted from the intense volcanic magmatism, the crust-mantle interaction and the fluidization in Yanshanian period, and there is great prospect for large-scale uranium concentration and ore-formation. Therefore, during the prospecting for Mesozoic granite-type, volcanics-type and exo-contact-type uranium deposits it is necessary to introduce deep-source metallogenic theory, to 'desalt' metallogenic theory of epithermal activation, to fully realize that uranium deposits may be formed not only at shallow depth, but also in conditions of deep-source, great depth and high temperature, as well as in environments of deep-source, shallow depth and median temperature, to give emphasis to the early-stage (130-95 Ma) uranium mineralization, to break the man-made boundary in prospecting for uranium only based on host rock type, to strengthen the research on Cretaceous magmatic system

  19. Granitic rocks from the southern Gyeongsang basin, southeastern Korea, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon-Jong

    1980-01-01

    In southern Gyeongsang basin, southeastern Korea, there are many granitic rock masses. They were divided into 7 groups according to their geological evidences. K-Ar age was determined on 36 samples obtained from the respective groups. Group A: pre-Gyeongsang granitic rock (Pre-Cretaceous), A 1 220 m.y., A 2 166 m.y.; group B: outer zone granitic rock (Cretaceous), 115-72 m.y.; group C: ditto (ditto), 97-70 m.y.; group D: ditto (ditto), 89-68 m.y.; group E: ditto (ditto), 82-68 m.y.; group F: inner zone granitic rock (Cretaceous), 75-74 m.y.; group G: Tertiary granitic rock, 63-41 m.y. The large part of the Cretaceous granitic masses show the double elongated ring form. Most of the Tertiary granitic rocks were probably emplaced in close relation with the Eonyang fault line and Ulsan fault line/or their extension line of the area. (J.P.N.)

  20. Mechanical properties of granitic rocks from Gideaa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljunggren, C.; Stephansson, O.; Alm, O.; Hakami, H.; Mattila, U.

    1985-10-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties were determined for two rock types from the Gideaa study area. Gideaa is located approximately 30 km north-east of Oernskoeldsvik, Northern Sweden. The rock types that were tested were migmatitic gneiss and migmatitic granite. The following tests were conducted: - sound velocity measurements; - uniaxial compression tests with acoustic emission recording; - brazilian disc tests; - triaxial tests; - three point bending tests. All together, 12 rock samples were tested with each test method. Six samples of these were migmatic gneiss and six samples were migmatitic granite. The result shows that the migmatitic gneiss has varying strength properties with low compressive strength in comparison with its high tensile strength. The migmatitic granite, on the other hand, is found to have parameter values similar to other granitic rocks. With 15 refs. (Author)

  1. Rb-Sr ages and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of late paleozoic granitic rocks from northern Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Ken; Ishihara, Shunso; Ulriksen, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron ages were determined on three suites of so-called Paleozoic granitic rocks from northern coastal Chile. The granitic rocks from the Valparaiso and Ci Funcho areas are dated as 296.3 +- 5.4 Ma and 262.2 +- 4.6 Ma, respectively, which are in accord with geologically estimated age. The rocks from the Chanaral area is dated as 212.8 +- 8.6 Ma, which is correlated close to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary age. A K-Ar age of 196 +- 6 Ma was obtained on biotite in granite from Esmeralda between Ci Funcho and Chanaral. These age results demonstrate that no Precambrian plutonism occurred in the studied area, and that so-called Paleozoic granitic rocks in the Ci Funcho-Chanaral area are divided into Permian and early Mesozoic in age. Initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of the ilmenite-series granitic rocks from the coastal region are 0.70641 (Valparaiso), 0.70635 (Ci Funcho) and 0.70455 (Chanaral). These relatively low ratios deny substantial crustal contribution to the granitoids. The initial ratios of magnetite-series granitoids from porphyry- and manto-type mineralized areas (Chiquicamata, El Salvador and Tocopilla) are as low as 0.70344 to 0.70464. (author)

  2. Hydrothermal alteration of Hercynian granites, its significance to the evolution of geothermal systems in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Jose M.; Matias, Maria J.; Basto, Maria J.; Aires-Barros, Luis A. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Carreira, Paula M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional n 10, 2686 - 953 Sacavem (Portugal); Goff, Fraser E. [Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We discuss geochemical and isotopic ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) data recording the hydrothermal alteration of northern Portuguese Hercynian granites by Na-HCO{sub 3}-CO{sub 2}-rich mineral waters. Whole-rock samples from drill cores of Vilarelho da Raia granite have {delta}{sup 18}O values in the +11.47 to +10.10 permille range. The lower values correspond to highly fractured granite samples displaying vein and pervasive alteration. In the pervasive alteration stage, which probably results from a convective hydrothermal system set up by the intrusion of the granites, the metamorphic waters are in equilibrium with hydrous minerals. In contrast, the vein alteration of these granitic rocks was caused by water of meteoric origin. The oxygen ratios between water (W) and rock (R), the so-called W/R ratios, obtained for the open system (where the heated water is lost from the system by escape to the surface) range between 0.05 and 0.11, suggesting that the recrystallization of the veins was influenced by a small flux of meteoric water. Stable isotope analyses performed on the cores show that the vein alteration stage relates to post-emplacement tectonic stresses acting on the granite, probably of late Hercynian age. Our results are consistent with the existence of two separate alteration events (pervasive and vein) caused by hydrothermal waters of different isotopic characteristics. The studies presented in this paper should be viewed as a natural analogue that uses the alteration features observed in a fossil geothermal system at Vilarelho da Raia to assess possible water-rock reactions presently occurring at depth in granitic rocks of the nearby Chaves area. (author)

  3. Diffusion in the matrix of granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-07-01

    A migration experiment in the rock matrix is presented. The experiment has been carried out in undisturbed rock, that is rock under its natural stress environment. Since the experiment was performed at the 360 m-level (in the Stripa mine), the rock had nearly the same conditions as the rock surrounding a nuclear waste storage. The results show that all three tracers (Uranine, Cr-EDTA and I - ) have passed the disturbed zone from the injection hole and migrated into undisturbed rock. At the distance of 11 cm from the injection hole 5-10 percent of the injection concentration was found. The results also indicate that the tracer have passed through fissure filling material. These results indicate that it is possible for tracers (and therefore radionuclides) to migrate from a fissure, through fissure filling material, and into the undisturbed rock matrix. (Authors)

  4. The Landforms of Granitic Rocks: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    vertical joints are dominant. Duricrust and rock basins are common. The latter are independent of jointing and are associated with the older, thicker... duricrust . 15 Davis, W. M. 1933. Granitic domes of the Mohave Desert, California. Transactions of the San Diego Society of Natural History, vol. 7, pp

  5. Chemical Variations in a Granitic Pluton and Its Surrounding Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, A K; McIntyre, D B; Welday, E E; Madlem, K W

    1964-10-09

    New techniques of x-ray fluorescence spectrography have provided, for the first time, abundant data regarding chemical variability of granitic rocks on different scales. The results suggest that current designs of sampling plans for trend surface analysis should be modified; in particular several specimens, preferably drillcores, may be required at each locality.

  6. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies of plutonic granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, H.P. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The primary deltaD values of the biotites and hornblendes in granitic batholiths are remarkably constant at about -50 to -85, identical to the values in regional metamorphic rocks, marine sediments and greenstones, and most weathering products in temperate climates. Therefore the primary water in these igneous rocks is probably not 'juvenile', but is ultimately derived by dehydration and/or partial melting of the lower crust or subducted lithosphere. Most granitic rocks have delta 18 O = +7.0 to +10.0, probably indicating significant involvment of high- 18 O metasedimentary or altered volcanic rocks in the melting process; such an origin is demanded for many other granodiorites and tonalites that have delta 18 O = +10 to +13. Gigantic meteoric-hydrothermal convective circulation systems were established in the epizonal portions of all batholiths, locally producing very low delta 18 O values (particularly in feldspars) during subsolidus exchange. Some granitic plutons in such environments also were emplaced as low- 18 O magmas probably formed by melting or assimilation of hydrothermally altered roof rocks. However, the water/rock ratios were typically low enough that over wide areas the only evidence for meteoric water exchange in the batholiths is given by low D/H ratios (deltaK as low as -180); for example, because of latitudinal isotopic variations in meteoric waters, as one moves north through the Cordilleran batholiths of western North America an increasingly higher proportion of the granitic rocks have deltaD values lower than -120. The lowering of deltaD values commonly corelates with re-setting of K-Ar ages. (Auth.)

  7. Study of deep fracturation of granitic rock mass. Documentary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bles, J.L.; Landry, J.

    1984-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground. The Mt Blanc road tunnel, the EDF's Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied because detailed structural and geological studies have been realized these last 20 years. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater

  8. Chemical alteration of a granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A study of reaction of a well characterized biotite granodiorite with initially distilled water at 300 0 C and 1/3 kb for 8 months has produced many morphological and chemical effects. Solution samples were taken at 1 day, 2 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, and 8 months. Rock samples were removed after 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, and 8 months. Eight polished rock disks were mounted on a tantalum pedestal inside a 500 ml autoclave. The autoclave is part of a circulation system designed for operation at T and P of 500 0 C and 1/3 kb. The starting granodiorite consisted of quartz (23 percent), microcline (20 percent, Or/sub 94 +- 2/-Ab/sub 6 +- 1/An/sub 0 + 1/), plagioclase (37 percent, core Or/sub 2 +- 1/Ab/sub 73 +- 2/An/sub 25 +- 1/, rim Or/sub 2 +- 1/Ab/sub 88 +- 5/An/sub 10 +- 5/), chloritized biotite (13 percent), epidote (2 percent), sphene (2 percent), apatite (1 percent) and opaques (2 percent). The reactivity of phases as shown by scanning electron microscope are: quartz much greater than microcline greater than plagioclase greater than mafics, opaques, and apatite. Major phase morphology and composition are monitored throughout the experiment by scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. After 8 months, quartz showed etching several mm in depth. Plagioclase became much more calcic with time. Plagioclase changed from oligoclase (fresh) to andesine (1 month) to labradorite (2 months) to bytownite (4 months). Microcline showed almost congruent dissolution. Analyses from the most reacted disks indicate the presence of a possibly amorphous alumina rich phase on a microcline substrate. Biotite and the other phases were essentially inert. Three secondary overgrowths were observed: vermiculite, growing on the mafic phases and two zeolites, thomsonite and ashcroftine, growing on the plagioclase feldspars

  9. Radionuclide sorption on crushed and intact granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Tryggve E.; Locklund, Birgitta

    1989-05-01

    The specific surface areas and distribution ratios for sorption of 85 Sr, 137 Cs and 152 Eu were measured for crushed and intact granite rock. The experimental data can be accommodated by a sorption model encompassing sorption on outer and inner surface. It is clearly demonstrated that the time required to obtain reliable Kd-values for the sorption of strongly sorbing radionuclides like 152 Eu is very long due to solution depletion and slow diffusion into the rock. A combination of surface area measurements and batch sorption with small particles may therefore be preferable when studying strongly sorbing nuclides. (authors) (17 figs., 6 tabs.)

  10. Testing the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis: Evidence from Paleoproterozoic igneous rocks and deformed Mesozoic strata in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, J.M.; Lawton, T.F.; Mauel, D.J.; Leggett, W.J.; Gonzalez-Leon, C. M.; Farmer, G.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    U-Pb ages and Nd isotope values of Proterozoic rocks in Sonora, Mexico, indicate the presence of Caborca-type basement, predicted to lie only south of the Mojave-Sonora mega-shear, 40 km north of the postulated megashear. Granitoids have U-Pb zircon ages of 1763-1737 Ma and 1076 Ma, with ??Nd(t) values from +1.4 to -4.3, typical of the Caborca block. Lower Jurassic strata near the Proterozoic rocks contain large granitic clasts with U-Pb ages and ??Nd(t) values indistinguishable from those of Caborcan basement. Caborca-type basement was thus present at this location north of the megashear by 190 Ma, the depositional age of the Jurassic strata. The Proterozoic rocks are interpreted as parautochthonous, exhumed and juxtaposed against the Mesozoic section by a reverse fault that formed a footwall shortcut across a Jurassic normal fault. Geochronology, isotope geochemistry, and structural geology are therefore inconsistent with Late Jurassic megashear displacement and require either that no major transcurrent structure is present in Sonora or that strike-slip displacement occurred prior to Early Jurassic time. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  11. Inelastic deformations of fault and shear zones in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1986-02-01

    Deformations during heating and cooling of three drifts in granitic rock were influenced by the presence of faults and shear zones. Thermal deformations were significantly larger in sheared and faulted zones than where the rock was jointed, but neither sheared nor faulted. Furthermore, thermal deformations in faulted or sheared rock were not significantly recovered during subsequent cooling, thus a permanent deformation remained. This inelastic response is in contrast with elastic behavior identified in unfaulted and unsheared rock segments. A companion paper indicates that deformations in unsheared or unfaulted rock were effectively modeled as an elastic response. We conclude that permanent deformations occurred in fractures with crushed minerals and fracture filling or gouge materials. Potential mechanisms for this permanent deformation are asperity readjustments during thermal deformations, micro-shearing, asperity crushing and crushing of the secondary fracture filling minerals. Additionally, modulus differences in sheared or faulted rock as compared to more intact rock would result in greater deformations in response to the same thermal loads

  12. The Influence Of Hydrothermal Alteration And Weathering On Rock Magnetic Properties Of Granites From The Eps-1 Drilling (soultz-sous-forÊts / France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, J.; Schleicher, A.; Kontny, A.; de Wall, H.

    The EPS-1 drilling in Soultz-sous-Forêts (Rhinegraben, France) recovered a core pro- file of Tertiary to Permo-Mesozoic sediments deposited on a Variscan granitic base- ment. Magnetic susceptibility (k) measurements on the core material revealed a con- tinous increase from the basement/cover boundary (kmean 0.4 x 10-3 SI) into the magnetite-bearing granite (kmean 13 x 10-3 SI) over a depth range of 1417 U 1555 m. Rock magnetic and mineralogic studies were performed for the fresh granite, the hydrothermally altered granite near a fault zone and the altered granite from the fossil land surface near the basement/cover boundary. The decrease in susceptibility can be correlated with a gradual decomposition of magnetite to hematite and an alteration of the matrix minerals feldspars, biotite and hornblende to clay minerals and carbon- ates. Along with this transition, characteristic rock magnetic signatures can be dis- criminated for different degrees of alteration. While temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility k(T)-curves in fresh granites indicate a typical multidomain magnetite course with good reversibility, different types of irreversible courses are observed for the altered granite. However, hematite could not be identified in the k(T)-curves. Al- tered granite shows relatively weak magnetic behaviour in AF-demagnetisation exper- iments, untypical for hematite. The alteration of the fresh granite also causes a change in magnetic fabric parameter, especially of the anisotropy factor. The magnetic min- eralogy from the altered granite in respect to the changes in rock magnetic properties will be discussed.

  13. Characterizing gas permeability and pore properties of Czech granitic rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2016), s. 331-338 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : granitic rocks * permeability * pore properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2016_doi/Konecny_AGG_2016_0015.pdf

  14. Underground nuclear explosion effects in granite rock fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derlich, S.

    1970-01-01

    On the Saharan nuclear test site in Hoggar granite, mechanical properties of the altered zones were studied by in situ and laboratory measurements. In situ methods of study are drillings, television, geophysical and permeability measurements. Fracturing is one of the most important nuclear explosion effects. Several altered zones were identified. There are: crushed zone, fractured zone and stressed zone. Collapse of crushed and fractured zone formed the chimney. The extent of each zone can be expressed in terms of yield and of characteristic parameters. Such results are of main interest for industrial uses of underground nuclear explosives in hard rock. (author)

  15. Underground nuclear explosion effects in granite rock fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlich, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etude de Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    1970-05-01

    On the Saharan nuclear test site in Hoggar granite, mechanical properties of the altered zones were studied by in situ and laboratory measurements. In situ methods of study are drillings, television, geophysical and permeability measurements. Fracturing is one of the most important nuclear explosion effects. Several altered zones were identified. There are: crushed zone, fractured zone and stressed zone. Collapse of crushed and fractured zone formed the chimney. The extent of each zone can be expressed in terms of yield and of characteristic parameters. Such results are of main interest for industrial uses of underground nuclear explosives in hard rock. (author)

  16. Waste disposal in granitic rocks: analysis of thermal microcracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoto, M.; Roeshoff, K.; Leojon, B.; Bel-Lan, A.

    1981-04-01

    The possible development of microcracks from a thermal origin has been researched in the granitic rocks of Shipa (Sweden), within which in a real scale have been originated some thermal gradients similar to the ones which could take place in the waste disposal. To achieve an optimal fratographic information, with some petrographic meaning, different microscopic techniques, optical and electronic, have been combined and an automatized quantification methodology has also been developed by means of digitals. Between warmed and unwarmed granitis no microfractographic differences have been detected. The observed variations are only apparent and may be explained as a function of the inherent petrographic heterogeneity of rocky blocks. In any case in the internal temperatures generated within these rocks have not attained its own threshold of thermal microcracking. (author)

  17. Characteristics of mesozoic magmatic rocks in western Zhejiang and their relation with uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jiazhi

    2000-01-01

    The author summarizes characteristics of Mesozoic (Yangshanian Period) acid-intermediate volcanics, sub-volcanics and basic intrusive from aspects of formation time of rock series, petrogenic sequence, chemical composition, rock -controlling factors and petrogenic environments. It is suggested that these rocks were originated from different source areas of crust and mantle. Based on the time-space relation between different types uranium deposits and magmatic rocks, the author proposes that: the earlier stage (Earlier Cretaceous) U-hematite ores were originated from acid volcanic magmatism of crustal source, but the later stage (Late Cretaceous) pitchblende-polymetallic sulfide and pitchblende-purple fluorite rich ores were derived from basic magmatism of mantle source. Finally, the author proposes prospecting criteria of the above two types of uranium deposits

  18. Stable isotope systematics in mesozoic granites of Central and Northern California and Southwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, U.; O'Neil, J.R.; Kistler, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    18O, D, and H2O+ contents were measured for whole-rock specimens of granitoid rocks from 131 localitics in California and southwestern Oregon. With 41 new determinations in the Klamath Mountains and Sierra Nevada, initial strontium isotope ratios are known for 104 of these samples. Large variations in ??18O (5.5 to 12.4), ??D (-130 to -31), water contents (0.14 to 2.23 weight percent) and initial strontium isotope ratios (0.7028 to 0.7095) suggest a variety of source materials and identify rocks modified by secondary processes. Regular patterns of variation in each isotopic ratio exist over large geographical regions, but correlations between the ratios are generally absent except in restricted areas. For example, the regular decrease in ??D values from west to east in the Sierra Nevada batholith is not correlative with a quite complex pattern of ??18O values, implying that different processes were responsible for the isotopic variations in these two elements. In marked contrast to a good correlation between (87Sr/86Sr)o and ??18O observed in the Peninsular Ranges batholith to the south, such correlations are lacking except in a few areas. ??D values, on the other hand, correlate well with rock types, chemistry, and (87Sr/86Sr)o except in the Coast Ranges where few of the isotopic signatures are primary. The uniformly low ??D values of samples from the Mojave Desert indicate that meteoric water contributed much of the hydrogen to the rocks in that area. Even so, the ??18O values and 18O fractionations between quartz and feldspar are normal in these same rocks. This reconnaissance study has identified regularities in geochemical parameters over enormous geographical regions. These patterns are not well understood but merit more detailed examination because they contain information critical to our understanding of the development of granitoid batholiths. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Hydrogeologic characterization of a fractured granitic rock aquifer, Raymond, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Andrew J.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The hydrogeologic properties of a shallow, fractured granitic rock aquifer in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California were investigated via the analysis of borehole geophysical logs and pumping tests. The drawdowns produced during these tests are not indicative of any simple conceptual aquifer model, and borehole logs show that the granite is intensely fractured. These observations are suggestive of a complex fracture-flow geometry which is extremely difficult to decipher. However, through the measurement of orientations of individual subsurface fractures from acoustic televiewer logs, and correlation between particular fractures and electrical resistivity and thermal-pulse flowmeter logs, it was found that the aquifer is, in general, comprised of two subhorizontal and nearly parallel zones of unloading fractures. Downhole flowmeter measurements taken in several wells provide further evidence for the inferred dual-layer structure of the aquifer, as well as yield quantitative measures of the contribution of flow from each zone. Analysis of drawdowns in pumped wells reveals that there are zones of relatively high transmissivity immediately around them. It was found that these properties, as well as a nearby zone of lower transmissivity, can account for their observed drawdowns. A numerical model was constructed to test whether these major heterogeneities could also account for the drawdowns in observation wells. This stepwise analysis of both the geophysical and hydrological data resulted in the formulation of a conceptual model of the aquifer which is consistent with observations, and which can account for its behavior when subjected to pumping.

  20. Rock mass characterization for storage of nuclear waste in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Nelson, P.; Doe, T.; Thorpe, R.; Paulsson, B.; Gale, J.; Forster, C.

    1979-02-01

    The rock mass characterization in granite adjacent to an iron mine at Stripa, Sweden is being carried out by four different methods. The mechanical characterization includes monitoring the responses to thermal loading of jointed rock in situ, and mechanical tests on cores from 25 mm to 1 m in diameter. Geological characterization includes detailed surface mapping, subsurface mapping, and core mapping. Geophysical characterization uses a variety of borehole techniques, with emphasis on sonic methods. The hydrologic characterization is done through injection tests, pump tests, water pressure measurements, and controlled inflow tests to tunnels. Since the data are not yet complete, only tentative conclusions can be drawn regarding the best combinations of techniques for rock-mass characterization. Mapping studies are useful in defining continuity and fracture-system geometry. They do not give aperture, a factor significant in terms of both water flow and the displacements due to heating. Of the geophysical techniques, sonic methods appear most effective in fracture definition; other methods, gamma and neutron particularly, give data on radionuclide and water content and need further analysis with geologic and hydrologic data to determine their significance. Hydrologic work yields primarily aperture data, which with fracture geometry can be used to calculate directional permeabilities. Pressure measurements may provide one means of assessing fracture continuity. Finally, laboratory tests on large cores suggest considerable refinement in testing techniques may be needed before stress-aperture data can be extrapolated from laboratory to field

  1. Oxygen isotope studies of early Precambrian granitic rocks from the Giants Range batholith, northeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of granitic rocks from the 2.7 b.y.-old composite Giants Range batholith show that: (1) ??(O18)quartz values of 9 to 10 permil characterize relatively uncontaminated Lower Precambrian, magmatic granodiorites and granites; (2) granitic rocks thought to have formed by static granitization have ??(O18)quartz values that are 1 to 2 permil higher than magmatic granitic rocks; (3) satellite leucogranite bodies have values nearly identical to those of the main intrusive phases even where they transect O18-rich metasedimentary wall rocks; (4) oxygen isotopic interaction between the granitic melts and their O18-rich wall rocks was minimal; and (5) O18/O18 ratios of quartz grains in a metasomatic granite are largely inherited from the precursor rock, but during the progression - sedimentary parent ??? partially granitized parent ??? metasomatic granite ??? there is gradual decrease in ??(O18)quartz by 1 to 2 permil. ?? 1974.

  2. Rare metal granites and related rocks of the Ukrainian shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esipchuk, K.Ye.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Two rare metal leucocratic granites, Perga and Kamennaya complexes, can be distinquished on the Ukrainian shield. The Perga complex consists of medium- and coarse grained, mainly porphyric, biotite, riebeckite and aegirine granites, granite porphyries, microclinites and albitites with rare metal mineralization (genthelvite, phenacite, tantalite, cassiterite and wolframite etc.. Granites from several stocks (up to 30 km2 in the northwestern part of the shield, situated along the fracture zone, restricted the large Korosten pluton of rapakivi granites to the northwest. The age of these granites (Pb-Pb and U-Pb methods on zircon and monazite practically coincide with the age of rapakivi granites being 1750 Ma. Within the Korosten complex of rapakivi granites we consider that zinnwaldite granites, which are characterized by fluorite and topazine mineralization, represent the final phase of pluton. These granites differ from the Perga ones by their low content of rare metals. The Kamennaya Mogila complex lies in the southeastern part of the Ukrainian shield. It consists of biotite and muscovite-biotite, medium- and coarse-grained (also porphyric, and occasionally greisining granites with rare metal mineralization (cassiterite, columbite, molybdenite, wolframite and beryl. Granites form several stocks (5-30 km2 situated 10-30 km to the west-northwest of the South-Kalchik gabbro-syenite-granite pluton. Granitoids in both of these complexes have similar isotopic ages (1800 Ma. Leucocratic subalkaline granites (the Novoyanisol type are known within the pluton itself, occupying an intermediate position between the above mentioned in terms of mineral and geochemical composition. The gabbro-syenite-granite formation of the Nearazov region has a substantial similarity to the anorthosite-rapakivi-granite formation. In this respect the relation of each of them to rare metal granites is rather remarkable. This relation is, most probably, not only spatial, but

  3. Magmatic and Crustal Differentiation History of Granitic Rocks from Hf-O Isotopes in Zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, , A. I. S.; Hawkesworth, , C. J.; Foster, , G. L.; Paterson, , B. A.; Woodhead, , J. D.; Hergt, , J. M.; Gray, , C. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2007-02-01

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  4. The transition from granite to banded aplite-pegmatite sheet complexes: An example from Megiliggar Rocks, Tregonning topaz granite, Cornwall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, K.; Ďurišová, J.; Hrstka, T.; Korbelová, Z.; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Müller, A.; Simons, B.; Shail, R. K.; Williamson, B. J.; Davies, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    The genetic relationship between a granite pluton and adjacent complex of rare-metal pegmatite-aplite-banded sheets (Megiliggar Sheet Complex - MSC) has been studied at the border of the Tregonning topaz granite at Megiliggar Rocks, Cornwall, SW England. Similarities in whole-rock chemical and mineralogical compositions, together with a gradual change in textures away from the granite margin, provide strong evidence for a genetic link between the Tregonning Granite and MSC. The sheets are likely to represent apophyses of residual melt which escaped from the largely crystallized roof of the granite pluton. The escaping melt was peraluminous, had a composition near the F, B, Li slightly enriched granite minimum, and, in comparison with other Cornish granites, was enriched in F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, W, Nb, Ta, and U, and depleted in Fe, Mg, Ca, Sr, Th, Zr, and REE. With increasing distance from the Tregonning Granite, the silicate melt crystallized as homogeneous leucogranite sheets and banded complex sheets (i.e. combinations of bands with granitic, aplitic and pegmatitic textures), then layered aplite-pegmatites; this sequence becoming progressively more depleted in the fluxing and volatile elements F, Li, Rb, and Cs, but showing no change in Zr/Hf ratios. The fixed Zr/Hf ratio is interpreted as indicating a direct genetic link (parental melt) between all rock types, however the melt progressively lost fluxing and volatile elements with distance from the granite pluton, probably due to wall-rock reaction or fluid exsolution and migration via fractures. Differentiation of the primary melt into Na-Li-F-rich and separate K-B-rich domains was the dominant chemical process responsible for the textural and mineral diversity of the MSC. On a large (cliff-section) scale, the proximal Na-Li-F-rich leucogranite passes through complex sheets into K-B-rich aplite-pegmatites, whilst at a smaller (<1 m) scale, the K-B-rich bands are interspersed (largely overlain) by Na

  5. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates on Ryoke granitic rocks in Ikoma Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tadashi; Ueshima, Masaaki; Shibayama, Motohiko; Hiraoka, Yoshitsugu; Muslim, Dicky

    2012-01-01

    We measured the γ dose rate of 16 rock bodies in the field, which belonged to Ryoke granitic rocks distributed over Ikoma Mountains. The measurement points were 190 spots, and the mean dose rate was 82.0 ± 21.0 nGy/h. Results of analysis were summarized as follows. (1) The distribution of the dose rate in the Fukihata quartz diorite showed that the rocks crystallization differentiation had progressed from the south to the north. (2) The dose rate of granite tended to arise with the increase of SiO 2 quantity, but in the Iwahashiyama granite, the Takayasuyama granite, the Omichi granite and the Katakami granite, it was revealed that the dose rate was low in spite of high SiO 2 quantity. (3) It became clear that the dose rate of Ryoke granitic rocks from the first stage to the fourth stage was high to be considered as a new rock body. (4) Because the relationship between the dose rate of rocks and the main chemical elements did not show a common characteristic, it may be that those rocks were formed from different Magma. (author)

  6. The transition from granite to banded aplite-pegmatite sheet complexes: An example from Megiliggar Rocks, Tregonning topaz granite, Cornwall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel; Ďurišová, Jana; Hrstka, Tomáš; Korbelová, Zuzana; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Müller, A.; Simons, B.; Shail, R. K.; Williamson, B. J.; Davies, J. A.

    302/303, March 2018 (2018), s. 370-388 ISSN 0024-4937 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13600S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : granite * aplite * pegmatite * magmatic layering * Megiliggar Rocks * Cornwall Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.677, year: 2016

  7. Chemical analysis of minerals in granitic rocks by electron probe micro analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yoshihiro

    1994-01-01

    The chemical compositions of minerals in a few granitic rocks were determined by electron probe micro analyser (EPMA). The accurate analytical data for standard feldspar groups were obtained by correcting the low analytical values of sodium and potassium that were arised from the damage in EPMA analysis. Using this method, feldspar groups and biotites in three granitic rocks gathered from Hiei, Hira and Kurama areas respectively, were analyzed. As the results, the local characteristics were observed in the kinds of feldspar groups and the chemical compositions of biotites that were contained in granitic rocks. (author)

  8. Isotopic geochronology of granitic rocks from the Central Iberian Zone: comparison of methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, I. M. H. R.; Neiva, A. M. R.; Silva, M. M. V. G.

    2010-07-01

    Five granitic rocks, concentrically disposed from core to rim, were distinguished in the Castelo Branco pluton. U-Pb-Th electron microprobe monazite ages from granitic rocks are similar and ranging between 297-303 Ma. The granitic rocks from Castelo Branco pluton are 310 {+-} 1 Ma old, obtained by U-Pb (ID-TIMS) in separated zircon and monazite crystals, indicating a similar emplacement age for all granitic rocks of the pluton. Initial {sup 8}7Sr/{sup 8}6Sr isotopic ratios and {epsilon}Nd{sub 3}10 and {delta}{sup 1}8O values suggest three distinct pulses of granitic magma and that they are derived from partial melting of heterogeneous metasedimentary materials. The other granitic rocks are related by magmatic differentiation and show small variations in ({sup 8}7Sr/{sup 8}6Sr)310, {epsilon}Nd{sub 3}10 and {delta}{sup 1}8O. The granitic pluton of Castelo Branco shows a rare reverse zoning. (Author) 12 refs.

  9. The bowing potential of granitic rocks: rock fabrics, thermal properties and residual strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegesmund, S.; Mosch, S.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Nikolayev, D. I.

    2008-10-01

    The bowing of natural stone panels is especially known for marble slabs. The bowing of granite is mainly known from tombstones in subtropical humid climate. Field inspections in combination with laboratory investigations with respect to the thermal expansion and the bowing potential was performed on two different granitoids (Cezlak granodiorite and Flossenbürg granite) which differ in the composition and rock fabrics. In addition, to describe and explain the effect of bowing of granitoid facade panels, neutron time-of-flight diffraction was applied to determine residual macro- and microstrain. The measurements were combined with investigations of the crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz and biotite. Both samples show a significant bowing as a function of panel thickness and destination temperature. In comparison to marbles the effect of bowing is more pronounced in granitoids at temperatures of 120°C. The bowing as well as the thermal expansion of the Cezlak sample is also anisotropic with respect to the rock fabrics. A quantitative estimate was performed based on the observed textures. The effect of the locked-in stresses may also have a control on the bowing together with the thermal stresses related to the different volume expansion of the rock-forming minerals.

  10. Palaeomagnetism and K-Ar age of Mesozoic and Cenozoic igneous rocks from Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencio, D.A.; Mendia, J.E.; Vilas, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    A new analysis of palaeomagnetic data for igneous rocks from Deception Island, 25 de Mayo Island (King George Island) and Cape Spring, are given. K-Ar age determinations indicate that most of the igneous samples from 25 de Mayo Island included in the palaeomagnetic study are of Late Mesozoic/Early Tertiary age. The significance of these palaeomagnetic-radiometric data on the hypothesis of oroclinal bending of the Antarctic Peninsula and on the apparent polar movement of Antarctica is discussed. The positions of palaeomagnetic poles for the Andean igneous complex indicate that there has not been any apparent post-Late Cretaceous/Early Tertiary oroclinal bending in the Antarctic Peninsula from 74 0 S to 62 0 S. A comparison of the positions of palaeomagnetic poles for Antarctica and Australia suggests that the direction of apparent polar movement relative to Antarctica reversed after the Miocene. (Auth.)

  11. The water retention of a granite rock fragments in High Tatras stony soils

    OpenAIRE

    Novák, Viliam; Šurda, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The water retention capacity of coarse rock fragments is usually considered negligible. But the presence of rock fragments in a soil can play an important role in both water holding capacity and in hydraulic conductivity as well. This paper presents results of maximum water holding capacity measured in coarse rock fragments in the soil classified as cobbly sandy loam sampled at High Tatra mountains. It is shown, that those coarse rock (granite) fragments have the maximum retention capacity up...

  12. Host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue

    1997-01-01

    The author expounds the host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type, i.e., the high initial content of uranium, the high cataclasis of host rocks, the strong alteration of host rocks, the simple composition of host rocks favourable for the leaching of uranium, as well as the low content of harmful associated elements. These characteristics may be regarded as petrological criteria for recognition and prospecting for such type of uranium deposits

  13. Host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology (China)

    1997-03-01

    The author expounds the host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type, i.e., the high initial content of uranium, the high cataclasis of host rocks, the strong alteration of host rocks, the simple composition of host rocks favourable for the leaching of uranium, as well as the low content of harmful associated elements. These characteristics may be regarded as petrological criteria for recognition and prospecting for such type of uranium deposits.

  14. A source-depleted Early Jurassic granitic pluton from South China: Implication to the Mesozoic juvenile accretion of the South China crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zuo-Min; Ma, Chang-Qian; Wang, Lian-Xun; Chen, Shu-Guang; Xie, Cai-Fu; Li, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Source-depleted granites were rarely reported in South China. Hereby we identified such a granitic pluton, the Tiandong pluton, at Northeastern Guangdong province in Southeastern (SE) China. Whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopes of the Tiandong granites both revealed obviously depleted source signatures, with initial isotopic values of initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7032-0.7040, εNd(t) = 1.1-1.5, and εHf(t) = 6-13, respectively. Zircon U-Pb dating implied the granite was intruded in Early Jurassic (188 Ma). The dominant minerals of the Tiandong granite consist of K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz and biotite, with accessory mineral assemblage of apatite + zircon + magnetite. Based on the mineralogy and the depleted isotopic signature, the granites chemically show I-type affinity such as low Zr + Nb + Ce + Y (131.6 to 212.2), 104 × Ga/Al (2.12-2.27), A/CNK values ages (TDM = 0.89 to 0.84 Ga, T2DM = 0.88 to 0.85 Ga) are consistent. TDM(Hf) values of 0.31-0.63 Ga are also indistinguishable from T2DM(Hf) values of 0.35-0.75 Ga. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions confirm that the Tiandong granites are juvenile crustal accretion but decoupled Nd-Hf isotopic systems. The juvenile crust is likely to originate from a mixed source of the primary asthenospheric mantle and the subordinate EMII. Combined with early studies of adjacent rocks, we propose that the early Jurassic ( 200-175 Ma) magmatism as evidenced by the Tiandong granites might be driven by upwelling of asthenosphere and subsequent underplating of mafic melts in an intra-plate extensional setting as a response to far-field stress during early stage subduction of the paleo-pacific plate.

  15. Microstructural variation of vitrified floor tile incorporated with granitic rock waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.J.; Holanda, J.N.F.

    2009-01-01

    The ornamental rock industry from Northwest Fluminense generates huge amounts of wastes in the form of a fine powder. These wastes are deposited in nature without any care about environmental degradation, which can cause damage to public health, pollution of the natural water sources, and silted banks of rivers. In addition, they also can to affect the landscape aesthetically. In this work was used a granitic rock waste from Santo Antonio de Padua-RJ. This waste is rich in alkaline oxides, which promote the formation of liquid phase and assist the densification of traditional ceramics. The ceramic bodies with up to 47.5% granitic rock waste were pressed at 50 MPa. The ceramic pieces were fired at 1250 deg C. The evolution of sintered microstructure was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the granitic rock waste influences significantly the microstructure of the sintered ceramic bodies. (author)

  16. Uranium distribution in Brazilian granitic rocks. Identification of uranium provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassinari, C.G.G.

    1993-01-01

    The research characterized and described uranium enriched granitoids in Brazil. They occur in a variety of tectonic environments and are represented by a variety granite types of distinct ages. It may be deduced that in general they have been generated by partial melting process of continental crust. However, some of them, those with tonality composition, indicate a contribution from mantle derived materials, thus suggesting primary uranium enrichment from the upper mantle. Through this study, the identification and characterization of uranium enriched granite or uranium provinces in Brazil can be made. This may also help identify areas with potential for uranium mineralization although it has been note that uranium mineralization in Brazil are not related to the uranium enrichment process. In general the U-anomalous granitoids are composed of granites with alkaline composition and granite ''sensu strictu'' which comprise mainly of syenites, quartz-syenites and biotite-hornblende granites, with ages between 1,800 - 1,300 M.a. The U-anomalous belongings to this period present high Sr initial ratios values, above 0.706, and high Rb contents. Most of the U-enriched granitoids occur within ancient cratonic areas, or within Early to Mid-Proterozoic mobile belts, but after their cratonization. Generally, these granitoids are related to the border zones of the mobile belts or deep crustal discontinuity. Refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Uranium migration and retention during weathering of a granitic waste rock pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekhout, F.; Gérard, M.; Kanzari, A.; Michel, A.; Déjeant, A.; Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Descostes, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate the environmental impact of the granitic waste rock piles. • The majority of the waste rocks in the pile is barren- or overburden rock. • The main neo-formed U-bearing phases are (Ca) and (Cu) uranyl phosphates. • Under circum-neutral pH conditions they do not pose an environment threat. - Abstract: This study investigates the post-mining evolution of S-type granitic waste rocks around a former uranium mine, Vieilles Sagnes (Haute Vienne, NW Massif Central, France). This mine was operated between 1957 and 1965 in the La Crouzille former world-class uranium mining district and is representative of intra-granitic vein-type deposits. 50 years after mine closure and the construction and subsequent re-vegetation of the granitic waste rock pile, we evaluate the environmental evolution of the rock pile, including rock alteration, neo-formation of U-bearing phases during weathering, and U migration. Vertical trenches have been excavated through the rock pile down to an underlying paleo-soil, allowing the investigation of the vertical differentiation of the rock pile and its influence on water pathways, weathering processes and U migration and retention. Arenization dominantly drives liberation of U, by dissolution of uraninite inclusions in the most alterable granitic minerals (i.e. K-feldspar and biotite). Retention of U in the matrix at the base of the waste rock pile, and in the underlying paleo-soil most likely occurs by precipitation of (nano-) uranyl phosphates or a combination of co-precipitation and adsorption reactions of U onto Fe (oxy)hydroxides and/or clay minerals. Even though U-migration was observed, U is retained in stable secondary mineral phases, provided the current conditions will not be modified

  18. Retardation of radionuclide transport by fracture flow in granite and argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Green, A.

    1985-11-01

    Laboratory techniques have been developed for the measurement of diffusion rates and permeabilities through highly consolidated rock samples. The work has predominantly concentrated on the generation of diffusion data for slates and granites in particular. Rock properties fundamental to mass transfer processes have been obtained. Diffusion rates have been measured through weathered granite fissure surfaces and as a function of distance from such surfaces on core samples obtained from Troon, Cornwall. Pore connectivity over metre distances in granite cores has been shown to exist and diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of confining pressure in a specially designed rig. The Dsub(i) (intrinsic diffusion coefficient) values determined at ambient pressure were approximately a factor of 2 greater than those measured at pressures equivalent to 500 m of rock overburden. Some initial experiments on the accessibility of the pore space in granites to colloids based on a permeability technique indicated that such particles neither blocked pores nor penetrated through 15 mm thick samples over times of the order 2 to 3 thousand hours. Diffusion rates through samples of Canadian granites, some of which contained weathered fissure surfaces, were measured. (author)

  19. Natural analogue and microstructural studies in relation to radionuclide retardation by rock matrix diffusion in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoto, M.; Rodriguez Rey, A.; Ruiz de Argandona, V.G.; Calleja, L.; Menendez, B.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that radionuclide retardation by rock matrix diffusion will be limited in granitic rocks by geological factors is studied, as well as the possibility that diffusion will be confined to a narrow zone from water-conducting fractures. Petrophysical measurements, uranium series and geochemical analyses in the rock adjacent to fractures, have been performed to establish the extent of fracture-related microstructural changes that might influence the potential for diffusion and whether or not there is any record of diffusion of uranium, its daughters, or other elements. The results obtained from El Berrocal (Spain), Stripa (Sweden) and White-shell (Canada) granites, suggest that: (a) there is a zone adjacent to the fractures (generally less than 100 mm) where microstructural changes and enhanced uranium mobility exist; (b) the evidence for diffusion having taken place in the rock is confined largely to this zone. So, it appears that diffusivity determinations on rock collected away from the influence of fractures will not give representative data for diffusion modelling, in addition to the effect of distressing after removing rocks from depth. It is suggested that diffusion will be of limited effectiveness as a retardation mechanism in many granitic rocks, particularly in water movement confined to narrow channels where access by nuclides to the fracture walls is restricted. 51 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs., 9 appendices

  20. A compilation of radioelement concentrations in granitic rocks of the contiguous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckless, J.S.; VanTrump, G. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Concentration data for uranium, thorium, and potassium have been compiled for approximately 2,500 granitic samples from the contiguous United States. Uranium and thorium concentrations and ratios involving these elements exhibit a log-normal distribution with statistical parameters. In order to check for a bias in the results due to high concentrations of data in anomalous or heavily sampled areas, the data were reevaluated by averaging all analyses within a 0.5 0 latitude by 0.5 0 longitude grid. The resulting data set contains 330 entries for which radioelements are log-normally distributed. Mean values are not significantly different from those of the ungridded data, but standard deviations are lower by as much as nearly 50 percent. The areal distribution of anomalously high values (more than one standard deviation greater than the geometric mean) does not delineate large uranium districts by either treatment of the data. There is sufficient information for approximately 1,500 samples to permit subdivision of the granites by degree of alumina saturation. Relative to the six variables listed above, peraluminous samples have slightly lower mean values, but the differences are not statistically significant. Standard deviations are also largest for the peraluminous granites with α for Th/U nearly 3 times larger for peraluminous granite than for metaluminous granite. Examination of the variations in Th/U ratios for a few specific granites for which isotopic data are available suggests that variability is caused by late-stage magmatic or secondary processes that may be associated with ore-forming processes. Therefore, although anomalous radioelement concentrations in granitic rocks do not seem to be useful in delineating large uranium provinces with sediment-hosted deposits, highly variable uranium concentrations or Th/U ratios in granitic rocks may be helpful in the search for uranium deposits

  1. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  2. Petrogenesis of late Paleozoic-to-early Mesozoic granitoids and metagabbroic rocks of the Tengchong Block, SW China: implications for the evolution of the eastern Paleo-Tethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ren-Zhi; Lai, Shao-Cong; Qin, Jiang-Feng; Zhao, Shao-Wei

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents precise zircon U-Pb, bulk-rock geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for metagabbro, quartz diorite, and granite units within the Tengchong Block of SW China, which forms the southeastern extension of the Himalayan orogeny and the southwestern section of the Sanjiang orogenic belt, a key region for furthering our understanding of the evolution of the eastern Paleo-Tethys. These data reveal four groups of zircon U-Pb ages that range from the late Paleozoic to the early Mesozoic, including a 263.6 ± 3.6 Ma quartz diorite, a 218.5 ± 5.4 Ma two-mica granite, a 205.7 ± 3.1 Ma metagabbroic unit, and a 195.5 ± 2.2 Ma biotite granite. The quartz diorite in this area contains low concentrations of SiO2 (60.71-64.32 wt%), is sodium-rich, and is metaluminous, indicating formation from magmas generated by a mixed source of metamafic rocks with a significant metapelitic sedimentary material within lower arc crust. The two-mica granites contain high concentrations of SiO2 (73.2-74.3 wt%), are strongly peraluminous, and have evolved Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions, all of which are indicative of a crustal source, most probably from the partial melting of felsic pelite and metagreywacke/psammite material. The metagabbros contain low concentrations of SiO2 (50.17-50.96 wt%), are sodium-rich, contain high concentrations of Fe2O3T (9.79-10.06 wt%) and CaO (6.88-7.12 wt%), and are significantly enriched in the Sr (869-894 ppm) and LREE (198.14-464.60 ppm), indicative of derivation from magmas generated by a metasomatized mantle wedge modified by the sedimentary-derived component. The biotite granites are weakly peraluminous and formed from magmas generated by melting of metasedimentary sources dominated by metagreywacke/psammite material. Combining the petrology and geochemistry of these units with the regional geology of the Indosinian orogenic belt provides evidence for two stages of magmatism: an initial stage that generated magmas during partial melting of

  3. Technical concept for rock mechanics tests, Climax Granite, NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearst, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    If we are to believe our predictions of the thermomechanical behavior of the material surrounding a nuclear waste repository in granite, we must test the computational methods used in making the predictions. If thermal loadings appropriate to a real repository are used, thermally induced displacements and strains are quite small, and available geotechnical instrumentation is only marginally able to measure these effects to the accuracy desired to make thorough tests of the predictions. We outline a three-step program to address these issues. (1) Conduct experiments in which the thermal loading is large compared to that induced by a real repository. This will permit us to make accurate measurements with available instrumentation. (2) Simultaneously, develop improved instrumentation that will enable us to make accurate measurements of motions induced by thermal loadings appropriate to a real repository. (3) Finally, conduct a second set of experiments, with the improved instrumentation and thermal loading similar to that of a real repository in granite. If we can predict the effects of this thermal loading to a few percent over distances of tens of meters for time periods of a few years, and demonstrate that these predictions are correct, we can have reasonable confidence that, using the same methods, we can predict the behavior over thousands of meters for hundreds of years to an order of magnitude. That accuracy should be satisfactory for those distances and times

  4. Link between the granitic and volcanic rocks of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Hatton, C. J.; De Waal, S. A.

    1997-02-01

    Until recently, it was proposed that the Bushveld Complex, consisting of the extrusive Rooiberg Group and the intrusive Rashoop Granophyre, Rustenburg Layered and Lebowa Granite Suites, evolved over a long period of time, possibly exceeding 100 Ma. Most workers therefore considered that the various intrusive and extrusive episodes were unrelated. Recent findings suggest that the intrusive, mafic Rustenburg Layered Suite, siliceous Rashoop Granophyre Suite and the volcanic Rooiberg Group were synchronous, implying that the Bushveld igneous event was short-lived. Accepting the short-lived nature of the complex, the hypothesis that the granites are genetically unrelated to the other events of the Bushveld Complex can be reconsidered. Re-examination of the potential Rooiberg Group/Lebowa Granite Suite relationship suggests that the granites form part of the Bushveld event. Rhyolite lava, granite and granophyre melts originated from a source similar in composition to upper crustal rocks. This source is interpreted to have been melted by a thermal input associated with a mantle plume. Granite intruded after extrusion of the last Rooiberg rhyolite, or possibly overlapped in time with the formation of the youngest volcanic flows.

  5. Determination of rare-earth elements content in granitic rocks by argon plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merodio, J.C.; Martinez, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed that enables the rare-earth elements in granitic rocks to be measured sequentially, using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source spectrometer with medium spectral resolution (0,02nm). The rocks were dissolved in an open system with a mixture of nitric-hydrofluoric-perchloric acids. Any residues remaining at this stage were removed by filtration and digested using a mini-fusion method with lithium tetraborate. Prior to the excitation in the spectrometer the rare-earth group was separated from other constituents using cation-exchange chromatography. A detailed study of spectral interferences and the evaluation of the detection limits have been performed. Five geochemical reference sample (granitic rocks) were analyzed and the obtained results agree favourably with recommended values and with reported determinations, using high spectral resolution ICP spectrometry. (Author) [es

  6. Layout Optimization for the Repository within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Seok

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the present study is a layout optimization of a single and double layer repositories within a repository site with special joint set arrangements. Single and double layer repository models, subjected to the variation of repository depth, cavern spacing, pitch, and layer spacing, are analyzed for the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior during the period of 2000 years from waste emplacement. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and groundwater are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  7. SITE-94. Estimated rates of redox-front migration in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    Analytical models for the rate of migration of oxidizing groundwaters are derived based on the stationary-state approximation to coupled fluid flow and water-rock interaction, and are constrained by molar concentrations of ferrous silicate, oxide, and sulfide minerals in the granites and associated fractures comprising the host rock beneath Aespoe. Model results indicate that small amounts of ferrous minerals in Aespoe granites and fractures will retard the downward migration of oxidizing conditions that could be generated by infiltration of glacial meltwaters during periods of glacial maxima and retreat. Calculated front velocities are retarded relative to Darcy fluxes observed in conductive fracture zones at Aespoe (0.3 to 3 m/y) by factors ranging from 10 -3 to 10 -4 . Corresponding times for the front to migrate 500 m vary from 5,100 to 4,400,000 years. Retardation efficiency depends on mineralogy and decreases in the order: fractures > altered granites > unaltered granite. The most conductive structures in these rocks are therefore the most efficient in limiting the rate of front migration. Periods of recharge during glaciation are comparable to times required for an oxidizing front to migrate to repository levels. This suggests an oxidizing front could reach repository depths during a single glacial-interglacial event. The persistence of oxidizing conditions could be relatively short lived, however, because reversal of flow conditions driven by the advance and retreat of ice sheets could cause reducing conditions to be restored. 27 refs

  8. Temporal evolution of a granitic rock under thermal loads generated by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.; Ferreri, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of the thermal history of a granitic mass under thermal loads originating in terminal subproducts of the fuel cycle is performed. Variations of the conductivity and density of the rock and the unit cell dimensions are considered. In this way it was tried to delimit (for short time intervals of the order of 100 years) the influence of possible uncertainties in the rock's knowledge on the results of interest for the engineering design. In the reasonable situations considered, the maximum temperature in the rock did not rise over 80 deg C. (Author) [es

  9. Deep fracturation of granitic rock mass. Fracturation profonde des massifs rocheux granitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, J L; Blanchin, R; Bonijoly, D; Dutartre, P; Feybesse, J L; Gros, Y; Landry, J; Martin, P

    1986-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground, in various feasibility studies dealing with radioactive wastes disposal. The Mont Blanc road tunnel, the EDF Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater.

  10. Isotopic geochronology of granitic rocks from the Central Iberian Zone: comparison of methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes, I. M.H.R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Five granitic rocks, concentrically disposed from core to rim, were distinguished in the Castelo Branco pluton. U-Pb-Th electron microprobe monazite ages from granitic rocks are similar and ranging between 297-303 Ma. The granitic rocks from Castelo Branco pluton are 310 ± 1 Ma old, obtained by U-Pb (ID-TIMS in separated zircon and monazite crystals, indicating a similar emplacement age for all granitic rocks of the pluton. Initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios and epsilon-Nd310 and delta-18O values suggest three distinct pulses of granitic magma and that they are derived from partial melting of heterogeneous metasedimentary materials. The other granitic rocks are related by magmatic differentiation and show small variations in (87Sr/86Sr310, epsilon-Nd310 and delta-18O. The granitic pluton of Castelo Branco shows a rare reverse zoning.

    En el plutón de Castelo Branco, se distinguen cinco granitoides, dispuestos concéntricamente de núcleo a borde del plutón. Las edades U-Pb-Th obtenidas en cristales de monacita por microsonda electrónica en estos granitoides son similares entre sí y varían entre 297 y 303 Ma. Los resultados de datación por U-Pb (ID-TIMS en cristales de circón y de monacita de los tres granitos seleccionados, indican una edad de implantación de 310 ± 1 Ma y que son rocas emplazadas simultáneamente. Las relaciones isotópicas iniciales de 87Sr/86Sr y los valores de epsilon-Nd310 y delta-18O de los tres pulsos magmáticos son característicos de granitos resultantes de anatexia cortical a partir de rocas metasedimentarias heterogéneas. En la secuencia de diferenciación magmática, las rocas graníticas presentan pequeñas variaciones en (87Sr/86Sr310, epsilon-Nd310 y delta-18O. El plutón de Castelo Branco presenta un

  11. The role of the microfissuration of the rock matrix in the abrasion resistance of ornamental granitic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Angel; Sanchez-Delgado, Nuria; Camino, Clara; Calleja, Lope; Ruiz de Argandoña, Vicente G.; Setien, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    The microcrack density and the abrasion resistance of five ornamental granites (Albero, Gris Alba, Mondariz, Rosa Porriño and Traspieles) from Galicia (NW Spain) have been quantified as part of a research aimed to interpret the cuttability of the rocks in relation to the petrophysical properties of the rock matrix. Large blocks from the quarries have been cut with an industrial saw and the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance have been measured in two surfaces: H, parallel to the cut surface; T, perpendicular both to the cut surface and the cutting direction. Both planes are perpendicular to the rift plane, as it is known in quarry works. The microcrack density has been quantified following an stereological procedure applied to polished sections imaged under scanning electron microscopy. The magnification of the images allowed the study of microcracks as narrow as 2 microns in aperture. The density has been quantified in terms of length of microcrack traces per surface unit so possible anisotropies of the microcrack network could be detected. The obtained values are in the typical range for this type of rocks although the Traspieles granite shows a higher value due to its weathering degree (H: 5.11, T: 5.37 mm/mm2). The values measured in the two surfaces (H and T) are quite similar in four of the rocks; only the Albero granite shows a marked anisotropy (H: 2.76 T: 3.53 mm/mm2). The abrasion resistance of the rocks has been measured following the european standard EN 14157:2004 using the capon method. The rocks can be classified in two groups according to their abrasion resistance. Rosa Porriño, Gris Alba and Mondariz granites are the more resistant to abrasion with values around 16-17 mm. Albero and Traspieles granites are less resistant with values higher than 19 mm. The results show a good correlation between the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance. As can be expected the rocks with high microcrack density show low abrasion resistance. The

  12. Characterization of microbial communities in deep groundwater from granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, D.K.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Providenti, M.; Tanner, C.; Cord, I.

    1997-01-01

    The microbial characteristics of deep granitic nutrient-poor groundwater from two boreholes at the Underground Research Laboratory of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited were studied. Scanning electron microscopy of the groundwater samples revealed significant numbers of bacteria of various sizes and shapes, including spherical, rod, and curved shaped. A few bacteria with appendages were also observed. Significant numbers of bacteria (∼l0 5 /mL) were enumerated using acridine orange (AO) staining. An active microbial population was detected with three direct methods and it ranged from 1 to 83% of the AO count, depending on the method used. Culturable aerobic and anaerobic (including facultative) heterotrophic bacteria ranged from 0.06 to 10.2% and 0.008 to 7.35%, respectively, of the AO count. Denitrifying. N 2 - fixing, sulphate-reducing, and iron-precipitating bacteria were present, but no iron-oxidizing bacteria or methanogens could be detected. Tentative identification of 160 isolates using the Biolog system showed a predominance of three Pseudomonas species, P. fluorescens, P. marginalis, and P. corrugata. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that the bacteria in the groundwater samples faced starvation stress. However, laboratory studies showed that these bacteria can efficiently uptake and mineralize organic substrates when supplied. (author)

  13. Chemical and isotopic studies of granitic Archean rocks, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming: Geochronology of an Archean granite, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedge, C.E.; Simmons, K.R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rubidium-strontium analyses of whole-rock samples of an Archean granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyo., indicate an intrusive age of 2640 ± 125 Ma. Muscovite-bearing samples give results suggesting that these samples were altered about 2300 Ma. This event may have caused extensive strontium loss from the rocks as potassium feldspar was altered to muscovite. Alteration was highly localized in nature as evidence by unaffected rubidium-strontium mineral ages in the Owl Creek Mountains area. Furthermore, the event probably involved a small volume of fluid relative to the volume of rock because whole-rock δ 18 O values of altered rocks are not distinct from those of unaltered rocks. In contrast to the rubidium-strontium whole-rock system, zircons from the granite have been so severely affected by the alteration event, and possibly by a late-Precambrian uplift event, that the zircon system yields little usable age information. The average initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr (0.7033 ± 0.0042) calculated from the isochron intercept varies significantly. Calculated initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for nine apparently unaltered samples yield a range of 0.7025 to 0.7047. These calculated initial ratios correlate positively with whole-rock δ 18 O values; and, therefore, the granite was probably derived from an isotopically heterogeneous source. The highest initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio is lower than the lowest reported for the metamorphic rocks intruded by the granite as it would have existed at 2640 Ma. Thus, the metamorphic sequence, at its current level of exposure, can represent no more than a part of the protolith for the granite

  14. Determining heterogeneous deformation for granitic rocks in the northern thrust in Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Osama M. K.

    2011-05-01

    Finite-strain was studied in the mylonitic granitic and metasedimentary rocks in the northern thrust in Wadi Mubarak belt to show a relationship to nappe contacts between the old granitic and metavolcano-sedimentary rocks and to shed light on the heterogeneous deformation for the northern thrust in Wadi Mubarak belt. We used the Rf/ϕ and Fry methods on feldspar porphyroclasts, quartz and mafic grains from 7 old granitic and 7 metasedimentary samples in the northern thrust in Wadi Mubarak belt. The finite-strain data shows that old granitic rocks were moderate to highly deformed and axial ratios in the XZ section range from 3.05 to 7.10 for granitic and metasedimentary rocks. The long axes (X) of the finite-strain ellipsoids trend W/WNW and E/ENE in the northern thrust in Wadi Mubarak belt. Furthermore, the short axes (Z) are subvertical associated with a subhorizontal foliation. The value of strain magnitudes mainly constants towards the tectonic contacts between the mylonitic granite and metavolcano-sedimentary rocks. The data indicate oblate strain symmetry (flattening strain) in the mylonitic granite rocks. It is suggested that the accumulation of finite strain was formed before or/and during nappe contacts. The penetrative subhorizontal foliation is subparallel to the tectonic contacts with the overlying nappes and foliation was formed during nappe thrusting.

  15. Uranium-lead age determinations on granitic rocks from the eastern Bushveld Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faurie, J.N.

    1978-08-01

    Uranium-lead age determinations were carried out on four types of granitic rocks from the eastern Bushveld Complex. The oldest rocks in the area are gneisses and felsites - 2604 plus minus 100 m.y. old - which form the centre of the Dennilton dome. The Rooiberg felsites could not be dated directly because of the absence of zircon, however a porphyritic granite sill, which shows intrusive relations with the Rooiberg felsites, was dated at 2090 plus minus 40 m.y., an age which can also be regarded as a minimum age for the Rooiberg felsites. No reliable age could be determined for the granophyres because of the large amount of lead-loss reflected in the zircon. The majority of zircons from these granophyres showed a peculiar hieroglyphic texture, a phenomena which has not yet been recorded in literature. The samples collected from the granites gave an age of 1950 plus minus 80 m.y. and thus form part of the Nebo Granite. Attempts have been made to obtain more concordant zircon ages throughout the present study. Although some success was achieved by analysing different size fractions of a zircon population, the non-magnetic fractions gave the most promising results [af

  16. The geochemistry of high-level waste disposal in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.; Sargent, F.P.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the cooperative agreement between Euratom and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd about radioactive waste management and disposal, a joint workshop was held on the topic of the geochemistry of high-level waste disposal in granitic rocks. The report covers (1) waste form leaching, (2) thermodynamics, (3) geochemical models, (4) the role of colloids, (5) sorption phenomena, (6) the linking of flow and geochemical models, (7) microbial activity

  17. A practical assessment of aquifer discharge for regional groundwater demand by characterizing leaky confined aquifer overlain on a Mesozoic granitic gneiss basement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David Ching-Fang

    2018-04-01

    Due to increasing population worldwide, there is an urgent need to manage these important but diminishing groundwater resources efficiently to ensure their continued availability. The major innovative design of this study is to provide a practical assessment process for groundwater discharge under a regional demand by characterizing the nature of leaky confined aquifers overlain on a Mesozoic granitic gneiss basement which involves the important groundwater system in the Kinmen region (Taiwan, ROC) and the assessment of adoptable groundwater discharge in aquifer is needed. The storage coefficient presents an order of one in a thousand and hydraulic conductivity is approximately at the order of 1-8 m/d and 0.4-0.9 m/d for aquifer and aquitard respectively. Groundwater discharge and admissible number of pumping well is suggested considering scheduled maximum groundwater volume and head decline change for eastern and western studied area respectively. The safety subjected to the conservative issue is then addressed by the use of scheduled maximum groundwater volume. It reveals that the safety can be ensured using the indicator as scheduled maximum groundwater volume with predefined scenarios. The result can be utilized practically for developing management strategy of groundwater resources due to the applicability and novel of method.

  18. Protocol proposal for radon concentration mensuration from granitic rocks in marble factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. Radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), the thoron ( 220 Rn), radio ( 2 '2'6Ra), thorium ( 23 '2Th) and potassium ( 40 K) may occur in materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. Thus, the radioactivity from marbles and granites is of importance, so that under certain conditions these materials radioactivity levels can be hazardous requiring the implementation of mitigation measurements. This research presents a technical protocol marble factories for the control human exposure to natural radioactivity exhaled from granitic rocks. The protocol was based on measurements of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentration in Brazilian granite rocks commonly nationally and exported. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were done using the AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and RAD7 (Durridge Company) apparatus, respectively. The samples of granite were sealed in glass jars for 40 days in to achieve secular equilibrium between 226 Ra and 222 Rn radionuclides. The measurements were performed on Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the Federal Technological University of Parana. Also, solid-state nuclear track detectors CR-39 were installed in a marble factory environments located in Curitiba - Parana for the evaluation of 222 Rn concentrations in workplaces. The CR-39 detectors were exposed for about 90 days and submitted to etching process. The alpha particle tracks were observed using an optical microscope. Some granite samples analyzed presented 222 Rn concentrations of attention, since the average values ranged from 3 ± 1 Bq/m 3 to 2087 ± 19 Bq/m 3 . The results obtained

  19. Mechanisms of hydrothermal alteration in a granitic rock. Consequences for high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parneix, J.C.

    1987-06-01

    The study of hydrothermal alteration in the Auriat granitic rock (France, Massif-Central) has evidenced three main events: - a pervasive chloritisation of biotites in some parts of the drill-core, - an alteration localized around subvertical cracks and superimposed on previously chloritized or unaltered granite, - an alteration localized around subhorizontal cracks cross-cutting the preceding ones. The second type of alteration, produced by a geothermal system, gives the most interesting results to be applied to the nuclear radwaste disposal problem. Among primary minerals of granite, only biotite (or chlorite) and oligoclase are intensively altered. Therefore, the chemical composition of these minerals induces the nature of secondary parageneses. These, associated to the subvertical cracks network, indicate a thermal gradient of 150 C/Km. The geochemical code has allowed to corroborate that the thermal gradient was responsible for the occurrence of different parageneses with depth. Moreover, it was shown that the variable mineralogy around cracks was due to a thermal profile established at equilibrium between the rock and the fluid. Therefore, the extent of the alteration was proportional to the thermal power of the fluid. A dissolution and next a precipitation phase of new minerals characterize hydrothermal alteration, which is due to the thermal power emitted by radioactive waste and linked with the evolution of temperature during time. This alteration provokes two favourable events to storage: decrease of rock porosity and increase of sorption capacity [fr

  20. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Y.T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  1. Between-hole acoustic surveying and monitoring of a granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to present preliminary results of an acoustic monitoring study performed as part of a comprehensive rock mechanic and geophysics research program (Ref.20) associated with large-scale heater tests in an abandoned iron-ore mine in central Sweden. The investigation was performed in a fractured granitic rock mass at a sub-surface depth of 340 m, in a drift adjacent to the original iron-ore mine workings. Acoustic monitoring took place between four empty, dry, vertical boreholes of 10 m depth spaced in the vicinity of a vertical heater borehole in the floor of a drift

  2. Characterization on the Fracture system in jurassic granitic rocks: Kosung and Yusung areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Park, Byung Yoon; Koh, Yong Kweon

    2001-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in rock mass. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of regional lineaments and background fractures in eastern and western-type granite rock mass.

  3. Characterization on the Fracture system in jurassic granitic rocks: Kosung and Yusung areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Park, Byung Yoon; Koh, Yong Kweon

    2001-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in rock mass. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of regional lineaments and background fractures in eastern and western-type granite rock mass

  4. REE enrichment in granite-derived regolith deposits of the southeast United States: Prospective source rocks and accumulation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Simandl, G.J.; Neetz, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Southeastern United States contains numerous anorogenic, or A-type, granites, which constitute promising source rocks for REE-enriched ion adsorption clay deposits due to their inherently high concentrations of REE. These granites have undergone a long history of chemical weathering, resulting in thick granite-derived regoliths, akin to those of South China, which supply virtually all heavy REE and Y, and a significant portion of light REE to global markets. Detailed comparisons of granite regolith profiles formed on the Stewartsville and Striped Rock plutons, and the Robertson River batholith (Virginia) indicate that REE are mobile and can attain grades comparable to those of deposits currently mined in China. A REE-enriched parent, either A-type or I-type (highly fractionated igneous type) granite, is thought to be critical for generating the high concentrations of REE in regolith profiles. One prominent feature we recognize in many granites and mineralized regoliths is the tetrad behaviour displayed in REE chondrite-normalized patterns. Tetrad patterns in granite and regolith result from processes that promote the redistribution, enrichment, and fractionation of REE, such as late- to post- magmatic alteration of granite and silicate hydrolysis in the regolith. Thus, REE patterns showing tetrad effects may be a key for discriminating highly prospective source rocks and regoliths with potential for REE ion adsorption clay deposits.

  5. Patherns in the rare earth elements of the Serra do Carambei granite (Parana) and the others associated ignous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.; Marini, O.J.

    1986-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) distribution patters in igneous rocks of the Serra do Carambei Granite area (Parana) were a very important tool to elucidate the genetic processes and the cogenetic relationships between these rocks. The porphyroid facies of the Cunhaporanga Granitoid Complex has a REE distribution pattern characterized by decreasing concentrations in direction to the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) and the smooth Eu negative anomalie, compatible with amphibole fractionation during the magma ascent and the incipient plagioclase fractionation. The REE pattern of the Serra do Carambei Granite is characterized by the strong Eu negative anomalie, by the light rare earth element (LREE) depletion and by the HREE increase. This shape of the REE patterns is frequently observed in Sn-W granites, according to French authors. However in the igneous rocks of the Serra do Carambei Granite area this is not true. ''Rhyolite'' dytes intrusives in the Serra do Carambei Granite exhibit REE pattern similar to the wall rock, indicating then the same genetic processes. The Castro Group rhyolites have REE patterns with decreasing concentrations in direction to the HREE and smooth Eu negative anomalie. The REE distribution patterns is against the consanguinity between the ''rhyolites'' intruded in the Serra do Carambei Granite and the rhyolites of the Castro Group and also between these rhyolites and the above mentioned Granite. (author) [pt

  6. Greenhouse Gases and Energy Intensity of Granite Rock Mining Operations in Thailand: A Case of Industrial Rock-Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipongvises Suthirat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed to systematically assess greenhouse gases (GHGs and energy intensity of the granite rock mining operations in Thailand and also identify a range of feasible options to minimize their GHG emissions. Mining factories A, B and C, located in the Eastern region of Thailand, were selected as research case studies. The results indicated that the 3-year average of GHGs emissions from factories A to C was 3387 718 kgCO2e per year with approximately 2.92 kgCO2e per ton of granite rock produced over 2012 to 2014. Of this, the carbon intensity of grid-electricity consumption for the crushed rock production was 1.84 kgCO2/kWh. Diesel fuel combustion for transport activities in the mining factories was the greatest contributor to GHGs emissions (68 % compared to the purchased electricity and explosion process, with 31 % and 1 %, respectively. In-Pit Crushing and Conveying (IPCC installation, haul truck payload optimization and management, and reduction in tire rolling resistance have shown potential to reduce carbon emissions accounted for 20 % to 70 %.

  7. Greenhouse Gases and Energy Intensity of Granite Rock Mining Operations in Thailand: A Case of Industrial Rock-Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittipongvises, Suthirat; Chavalparit, Orathai; Sutthirat, Chakkaphan

    2016-12-01

    This paper is aimed to systematically assess greenhouse gases (GHGs) and energy intensity of the granite rock mining operations in Thailand and also identify a range of feasible options to minimize their GHG emissions. Mining factories A, B and C, located in the Eastern region of Thailand, were selected as research case studies. The results indicated that the 3-year average of GHGs emissions from factories A to C was 3387 718 kgCO2e per year with approximately 2.92 kgCO2e per ton of granite rock produced over 2012 to 2014. Of this, the carbon intensity of grid-electricity consumption for the crushed rock production was 1.84 kgCO2/kWh. Diesel fuel combustion for transport activities in the mining factories was the greatest contributor to GHGs emissions (68 %) compared to the purchased electricity and explosion process, with 31 % and 1 %, respectively. In-Pit Crushing and Conveying (IPCC) installation, haul truck payload optimization and management, and reduction in tire rolling resistance have shown potential to reduce carbon emissions accounted for 20 % to 70 %.

  8. Radionuclide migration in fractured rock: hydrological investigations at an experimental site in the Carnmennellis granite, Cornwall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, M.J.; Durrance, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives, methods and results of hydrological investigation of the granite at an experimental site in Cornwall are described and discussed. Constant head injection tests and radioactive tracer experiments have revealed a fracture permeability in which water movement is confined to discrete fractures separated by rock of very low permeability. Data on flow path frequency, orientation and effective hydraulic aperture, required for network modelling, are presented for a 700 m borehole, with additional hydraulic data from three other boreholes. In addition to fractures of average hydraulic conductivity a small number of major hydraulic features (''main drains'') with major implications for radionuclide migration have been identified. A mean hydraulic conductivity for the granite investigated of 1.57x10 -7 ms -1 has been obtained, 2.11x10 -8 ms -1 if the major hydraulic features are excluded

  9. The origin of groundwater salinity in granitic rocks: identification and characterisation of chloride sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, Sebastien

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis aims at clearly identifying the possible origins of chlorine in solution in underground waters in a granitic environment, and is thus a first step in the prediction of concentration of dissolved compounds in waters in crystalline environment, with respect to the geological context. In a first part, the author proposes a synthetic and critical overview of knowledge and previous studies: definition of the term 'salinity', presentation of geochemical tracers, presentation of available data on potential chlorine sources in granitic rocks. The author then describes the experimental protocols and studied sites, reports results of the characterisation of different chlorine tanks performed on samples from each studied site. Based on mass assessment calculations and on the use of tracers, the author finally discusses the contribution of each of the chlorine tanks to the salinity of underground waters [fr

  10. Geochemical studies of granitic rocks of Kallur area, Manvi Taluk, Raichur district, Karnataka (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, N R; Reddy, R Purushottam; Nijagunappa, R

    2011-01-01

    The geochemical data is much widely used in establishing the overall chemical relation existing between the different rock types with their parentage. A major impetus for this shift comes not only from the need to understand and quantify better the spatial and temporal evolution, with emphasis on the younger greenstone belts (Kallur copper formations), but also from the recognition that such knowledge could form the basis for the sustainable development of our natural resources. In addition, the recurrence of natural hazards has reinforced the need to learn more about the mechanics and to develop predictive modeling with advanced technical tools. This paper is emphasizing on Granodiorites of Kallur area of Manvi Taluk, Raichur District to substantiate the classical approaches of exploration and data gathering through quantitative methods of data processing and interpretation. The trilinear diagram indicates that the granites are rich in Potash and Soda. This clearly indicates that Granites are fairly rich in K2O than Na2O.

  11. Study on Kalimantan uranium province: The assessment on uranium mineralization of metamorphic and granitic rocks at Schwaner mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjokrokardono, Soeprapto

    2002-01-01

    Uranium exploration activities done by CEA-BATAN had discovered uranium occurrences as the radiometric and uranium content anomalies at metamorphic and granite rocks of Schwaner Mountains, Kalimantan. A part of the occurrences on metamorphic rocks at Kalan basin has been evaluated and be developed onto follow-up step of prospecting by construction of some drilling holes and an exploration adit. In order to increase the national uranium resources, it is necessarily to extent the exploration activity to out side or nearby of Kalan basin. The goal of this assessment is to understand the uranium accumulation mechanism at Pinoh metamorphic rocks of Kalan Kalimantan and to delineate areas that uranium may exist. The assessment was based on the aspect of geology, anomaly of radioactivity and uranium contents, tectonics and alterations. Pinoh metamorphic rocks which is influenced by Sukadana granite intrusion are the high potential rocks for the uranium accumulation, because the intrusion contains a relatively high of U, Th, Cu, Zn, Nb, Mn, and W. The potential rock distributions are in between G. Ransa granite intrusion at the east and Kotabaru granite intrusions at the west. The mineralizations are categorized as vein type deposits of granitic association

  12. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 5. Baseline rock properties-granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/5, Baseline Rock Properties--Granite, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This report, on the rock properties of typical granites, includes an evaluation of the various test results reported in the literature. Firstly, a literature survey was made in order to obtain a feel for the range of rock properties encountered. Then, granites representative of different geologic ages and from different parts of the United States were selected and studied in further detail. Some of the special characteristics of granite, such as anisotropy, creep and weathering were also investigated. Lastly, intact properties for a typical granite were selected and rock mass properties were derived using appropriate correction factors

  13. Assessment of the Alteration of Granitic Rocks and its Influence on Alkalis Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Ana Rita; Fernandes, Isabel; Soares, Dora; Santos Silva, António; Quinta-Ferreira, Mário

    2017-12-01

    Several concrete structures had shown signs of degradation some years after construction due to internal expansive reactions. Among these reactions there are the alkali-aggregate reactions (AAR) that occur between the aggregates and the concrete interstitial fluids which can be divided in two types: the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR). The more common is the ASR which occurs when certain types of reactive silica are present in the aggregates. In consequence, an expansive alkali-silica gel is formed leading to the concrete cracking and degradation. Granites are rocks composed essentially of quartz, micas and feldspars, the latter being the minerals which contain more alkalis in their structure and thus, able to release them in conditions of high alkalinity. Although these aggregates are of slow reaction, some structures where they were applied show evidence of deterioration due to ASR some years or decades after the construction. In the present work, the possible contribution of granitic aggregates to the interstitial fluids of concrete by alkalis release was studied by performing chemical attack with NaOH and KOH solutions. Due to the heterogeneity of the quarries in what concerns the degree of alteration and/or fracturing, rock samples with different alteration were analysed. The alteration degree was characterized both under optical microscope and image analysis and compared with the results obtained from the chemical tests. It was concluded that natural alteration reduces dramatically the releasable alkalis available in the rocks.

  14. An in situ test of vibrating wire stressmeters in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinney, M.H.

    1990-02-01

    An in situ test was conducted to assess the ability of vibrating-wire stressmeters to measure stress changes in hard, unfractured granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Twelve vibrating-wire stressmeters installed ahead of the face and below floor grade of Room 205 were monitored during the excavation of Room 205. The results were compared with results from CSIRO hollow inclusion triaxial strain cells, USBM boreholes deformation gauge overcore tests done before and after excavation, and a two-dimensional numerical model

  15. A study on the characteristics of site-scale fracture system in granite and volcanic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Park, Byoung Yoon; Koh, Young Kown [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in granite and volcanic rock mass. 10 refs., 32 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  16. Experimental early crystallization of K-feldspar in granitic systems. Implications on the origin of magmatic fabrics in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Alvarado, J.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most outstanding characteristics of some granodioritic to granitic rocks is the presence of K-feldspar megacrysts. For instance, granodiorites and monzogranites of the Spanish Central System batholith present variable amounts of large (up to 10cm in length) euhedral K-feldspar crystals. The porphyritic textures, the euhedral shape, the alignment of plagioclase and biotite inclusions and the magmatic fabrics point to a magmatic origin for these megacrysts. This work presents a phase equilibria study in a high-K2O granodioritic system. A series of experiments were conducted with a granodioritic composition (GEMbiot) to study the crystallization sequence at the emplacement conditions in the Gredos massif, i.e. 4 H2O wt.% and 0.4GPa. Experimental results show that orthopiroxene is the liquidus phase at 1010ºC, which reacts with the H2O-rich melt to stabilize biotite between 980 and 940ºC. Plagioclase crystallizes at around 910ºC, and K-feldspar crystallizes in the matrix between 750 and 700ºC when the crystal fraction is around 0.5. However, at 850 ºC, a pelite-doped experiment shows euhedral K-feldspar (≈5vol%) in both the reactive xenolith domain together with cordierite and the granodioritic domain, where the K2O wt.% rise from 4.5 in the normal experiment to 5.9 in the doped experiment. These results suggest that the bulk-assimilation process promotes the bulk and heterogeneous K2O enrichment in a huge granodioritic magma volume, which triggers an early crystallization of K-feldspar megacrysts. Because of this early crystallization of the megacrysts, the magmatic foliations defined by K-feldspar megacrysts are formed during and after the emplacement processes and are highly influenced by tectonic kinematics.

  17. Temporal evolution of a granitic rock under thermal loads generated by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.; Ferreri, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal time history of a granitic mass under thermal loads, generated by the terminal subproducts arising from the Argentine nuclear programme is analyzed. This rock will be the final repository of those subproducts. The analysis is based on the consideration of a representative unit cell of the rock's centre using the Heating 5 programme. A preliminary analysis is made in order to obtain criteria with respect to the accuracy of the problem. Temporal evolution curves of the temperature on zones of interest of the unit cell considered are shown. Under the thermal loads considered, 500W by container, a maximum temperature of 55 deg C at the wall of the orifice subproducts' deposit is obtained. (Author) [es

  18. Preliminary study of the uranium favorability of Mesozoic intrusive and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Central Mojave Desert, Kern and San Bernardino counties, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leedom, S.H.; Kiloh, K.D.

    1978-02-01

    Numerous, small, low-grade, supergene uranium deposits are found in Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the central Mojave Desert of southern California. Large thorium-to-uranium ratios in samples of Mesozoic intrusive rocks exposed in the area indicate that these rocks have been extensively weathered, eroded, and subsequently leached by ground waters, and that they may have been the primary source of uranium for the deposits. The uranium content of samples of volcanic intrusive and extrusive rocks is average for intermediate to silicic rocks, but samples of basalt flows in the area contain six times the average uranium content of mafic igneous rocks. Devitrified tuffs and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, interbedded with calcareous units, are additional sources of uranium for supergene uranium deposits found in calcareous units. Uranium is also found in accessory minerals in a few Mesozoic quartz-rich pegmatite dikes. Uranium deposits in the central Mojave Desert have been formed by enrichment during diagenetic replacement of Tertiary carbonate rocks; by supergene enrichment along fractures, joints, and bedding planes in Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks; during formation of Holocene caliche; and by deposition within hydrothermally altered shear zones. Within the area, the diagenetic replacement type of deposit has the greatest potential for large, low-grade uranium occurrences. The other type of uranium deposits are small, erratically distributed, and extensively covered by alluvium

  19. Research on isotope geology. Assessment of heat production potential of granitic rocks and development of geothermal exploration techniques using radioactive/stable isotopes and fission track 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Cheon; Chi, Se Jung [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Radioelements and heat production rates of granitic rocks and stable isotopes of groundwaters were analyzed to investigate the geothermal potential of Wolchulsan granite complex in the southern Yeongam area. Wolchulsan granite complex is composed mainly by Cretaceous pink alkali-feldspar granite and partly Jurassic biotite granite. The main target for the geothermal exploration is the alkali-feldspar granite that is known in general to be favorable geothermal reservoir(e.g., Shap granite in UK). To develop exploration techniques for geothermal anomalies, all geochemical data were compared to those from the Jeonju granite complex. Heat production rates(HPR) of the alkali-feldspar granite is 1.8 - 10.6 {mu}Wm{sup -3}. High radio-thermal anomalies were revealed from the central western and northern parts of the granite body. These are relatively higher than the Caledonian hot dry granites in the UK. The integrated assessment of Wolchulsan granite complex suggests potential of the Cretaceous alkali-feldspar granite as a geothermal targets. Groundwater geochemistry of the Yeongam area reflects simple evaporation process and higher oxidation environment. Stable isotope data of groundwaters are plotted on or close to the Meteoric Water Line(MWL). These isotopic data indicate a significant meteoric water dominance and do not show oxygen isotope fractionation between groundwater and wall rocks. In despite of high HPR values of the Yeongam alkali-feldspar granite, groundwater samples do not show the same geochemical properties as a thermal water in the Jeonju area. This reason can be well explained by the comparison with geological settings of the Jeonju area. The Yeongam alkali-feldspar granite does not possess any adjacent heat source rocks despite its high radio-thermal HPR. While the Jeonju granite batholith has later heat source intrusive and suitable deep fracture system for water circulation with sedimentary cap rocks. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Dynamic rock tensile strengths of Laurentian granite: Experimental observation and micromechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiwen Xia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile strength is an important material property for rocks. In applications where rocks are subjected to dynamic loads, the dynamic tensile strength is the controlling parameter. Similar to the study of static tensile strength, there are various methods proposed to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks. Here we examine dynamic tensile strength values of Laurentian granite (LG measured from three methods: dynamic direct tension, dynamic Brazilian disc (BD test, and dynamic semi-circular bending (SCB. We found that the dynamic tensile strength from direct tension has the lowest value, and the dynamic SCB gives the highest strength at a given loading rate. Because the dynamic direct tension measures the intrinsic rock tensile strength, it is thus necessary to reconcile the differences in strength values between the direct tension and the other two methods. We attribute the difference between the dynamic BD results and the direct tension results to the overload and internal friction in BD tests. The difference between the dynamic SCB results and the direct tension results can be understood by invoking the non-local failure theory. It is shown that, after appropriate corrections, the dynamic tensile strengths from the two other tests can be reduced to those from direct tension.

  1. Analysis of the Toxic Element Concentrations in the Mesozoic Siliceous Rocks in Terms of the Raw Material Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    As part of an integrated system of environmental protection at every stage of the product life cycle such as: raw material extraction, its transportation and processing as well the subsequent use and development is required to carry out actions towards reducing or completely eliminating products that contain harmful substances to the environment. The purpose of the presented paper is an analysis of the toxic element concentrations in the extracted siliceous minerals at the initial stage of the raw material recognition. The research material is constituted by rocks collected from the Mesozoic bedrock from the Bełchatów lignite deposit. A group of the studied rocks is represented by diatomites, gaizes, opoka-rocks and light opoka-rocks, enriched with minerals from the group of SiO2. Most of the recognized petrographic sediments have a real possibility of potential applications in the building material industry, but it needs to carry out a detailed and thorough research. The studies of the chemical composition were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) using Philips PU 9100Xi Camera SX-100 spectrometer and an atomic emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP AES) using PLASMA 40 spectrometer. There were carried out a chemical analyses and determined the content of some toxic elements: Pb, Cr, Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co, As, Sr, Ba, Zr. in the studied sedimentary rocks. The analysis of the results draws attention to the high content of cadmium in the case of the studied sediments. The concentration of this element in the described rocks is an average of 0.22 mg/kg -the diatomites, 0.05 mg/kg -the gaizes, 0.4 mg/kg -the opoka-rocks, 2.23 mg/kg -the light opoka-rocks. It was moreover registered varied concentration of arsenic in diatomites, that is formed in the range of 0.05 - 9.6 mg/kg, an average of 6.3 mg/kg. The content of the other designated elements with toxic properties in the analysed groups of rocks does not exceed the limit values. An

  2. Early Cretaceous I-type granites in the Tengchong terrane: New constraints on the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Early Cretaceous granitoids that are widespread in the Tengchong terrane of Southwest China play a critical role in understanding the tectonic framework associated with the Tethyan oceans. In this study, we present a detailed description of zircon U–Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Hf isotopes for the Laoxiangkeng pluton in the eastern Tengchong terrane and elucidate their petrogenesis and geodynamic implications. Zircon U–Pb dating of the Laoxiangkeng pluton yields ages of 114 ± 1 Ma and 115 ± 1 Ma, which imply an Early Cretaceous magmatic event. The Laoxiangkeng pluton enriched in Si and Na, is calc-alkaline and metaluminous, and has the characteristics of highly fractionated I-type granites. Zircons from the pluton have calculated εHf(t values of −12.7 to −3.7 and two-stage model ages of 1327–1974 Ma, respectively, indicating a mixed source of partial melting of Paleo-Neoproterozoic crust-derived compositions with some inputs of mantle-derived magmas. By integrating all available data for the regional tectonic evolution of the eastern Tethys tectonic domain, we conclude that the Early Cretaceous magmatism in the Tengchong terrane was produced by the northeastward subduction of the Meso-Tethyan Bangong–Nujiang Ocean.

  3. Geodynamic setting of mesozoic magmatism and its relationship to uranium metallogenesis in southeastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peirong

    2004-01-01

    In the southeastern China, magmatism was developed quite intensely in Mesozoic forming a large quantity of rare and nonferrous metal deposits. The Indosinian orogenic movement ( Early Mesozoic) and the Yanshanian movement (Late Mesozoic) provided the dynamic force for magmatism and metallogenesis in this region. The intra-plate extension was induced by the Indosinian orogenic movement in South China continent under a regionally compressional framework to form Indosinian granites. The Yanshanian movement was a post-orogenic geologic event in relation to the Indosinian orogeny, and characterized by intense lithosphere breaking-up, resulting in large scale magmatic activities and a great amount of mineral resources was formed. The Indosinian granites overprinted by the Yanshanian tectono-magma event were closely related to uranium metallogenesis and were likely a kind of uranium source rock. Therefore, research on the distribution pattern of Indosinian granitoids and factors favorable to uranium ore-formation should be enhanced during prospecting in southern China. (author)

  4. Hydrogen isotope ratios of clay minerals constituting clay veins found in granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Ryuji; Kakitani, Satoru; Kuroda, Yoshimatsu; Matsuo, Sadao; Suzuoki, Tetsuro.

    1980-01-01

    The deuterium content of the constitutional and interlayer water extracted from the clay minerals (illite, montmorillonite, interstratified illite-montmorillonite mineral, kaolinite, halloysite) constituting the clay veins found in the granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture was measured. The clay minerals were heated at 270 deg C to extract the interlayer water, then heated to 1,400 or 1,500 deg C to extract the constitutional water. The deuterium content of the local surface water collected from sampling points was measured. In the clay veins formed along perpendicular joints, the constituent clay minerals change from lower to upper part: illite → montmorillonite → kaolinite → halloysite. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for illite and montmorillonite were estimated to be -67 to -69% and -86 to -89%, respectively. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for halloysite range from -68 to -80% and for kaolinite from -63 to -67%. (J.P.N.)

  5. Formation of chemical gardens on granitic rock. A new type of alteration for alkaline systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Hisao [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Naka (Japan). Energy Project and Technology Center; Tsukamoto, Katsuo [Tohoku Univ. Aramaki, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Materials Science; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Manuel [Granada Univ., Armilla (Spain). Lab. de Estudios Cristalograficos

    2014-06-15

    In order to understand the groundwater flow at near-underground facilities such as waste repositories, we have studied the effects of flowing an alkaline solution leached from cementitious building materials through the fractures of low-porosity granitic rocks under laboratory conditions. The results show that silica released from the dissolution of sodium-rich plagioclase and quartz reacts with the calcium leached from cementitious buildings to form calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) phases in the form of hollow tubular structures. These tubular structures form selectively on the surface of plagioclase in a similar way to reverse silica gardens structures. It was found that the rate of precipitation of C-S-H phases is faster than the rate of dissolution of plagioclase. This selftriggered dissolution/precipitation phenomenon may be an important factor controlling groundwater permeation in natural alkaline underground systems.

  6. Geohydrology of the climax stock granite and surrounding rock formations, NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.A.

    1981-05-01

    The location of the water table and the degree of saturation of the granitic rocks in the Climax stock are presently unknown. Based on existing knowledge and an extrapolation of available geohydrologic data, it appears that the water table may lie at about 1100 to 1200 m above mean sea level (MSL) in the northeastern part of the stock and at about 800 to 900 m in the southwest. A drilling program would be required to establish these levels precisely. The degree of saturation at a given underground elevation may be approximated by a detailed inventory of seeps at that level. More precise determination of degree of saturation will require a water budet. 27 figures, 2 tables

  7. Formation of chemical gardens on granitic rock. A new type of alteration for alkaline systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Hisao; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the groundwater flow at near-underground facilities such as waste repositories, we have studied the effects of flowing an alkaline solution leached from cementitious building materials through the fractures of low-porosity granitic rocks under laboratory conditions. The results show that silica released from the dissolution of sodium-rich plagioclase and quartz reacts with the calcium leached from cementitious buildings to form calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) phases in the form of hollow tubular structures. These tubular structures form selectively on the surface of plagioclase in a similar way to reverse silica gardens structures. It was found that the rate of precipitation of C-S-H phases is faster than the rate of dissolution of plagioclase. This selftriggered dissolution/precipitation phenomenon may be an important factor controlling groundwater permeation in natural alkaline underground systems.

  8. The Mineral Character and Geomechanical Properties of the Transitional Rocks from the Mesozoic-Neogene Contact Zone in the Bełchatów Lignite Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pękala

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: Against the background of a number of published papers on the rocks accompanying lignite seams there is a lack of the "Bełchatów" mineralogical-petrographic studies of the transitional sediments in the Mesozoic-Neogene contact zone in the "Bełchatów" lignite deposit taking into account the aspect of raw materials. This paper has been produced to fill the void in this area.

  9. Temperature measurements of Transdanubian Mesozoic rocks by the oxygen isotope method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornides, I.; Csaszar, G.; Haas, J.; Jochane Edelenyi, E.

    1979-01-01

    Subjected to paleotemperature measurements with the use of oxygen and carbon isotopes were Upper Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and their fossils from the Transdanubian Central Mountains, the Mecsek and the Villany Mts. In determining formation temperature, an important parameter of the environment of formation, the authors relied on the fact that the oxygen isotope composition of calcium carbonate precipitating from its aqueous solution deviates, in dependence on the temperature of the solution concerned, from that of the water. Consequently, the temperature of the water of the one-time seas must have been recorded by the 18 O/ 16 O ratio in the calcite of fossils or sediments. The results reported indicate smaller changes in temperature as compared to international results. In the Jurassic the values of temperature remain consistently below those quoted for Swiss and French territories, being around the values reported from/sroe/thern Germany. These u curves have their maxima in the Toarcian, Aalenian, sediments for which unfortunately no Hungarian results are available. The few results of Cretaceous belemnites are values higher than their international counterparts. The high temperature value obtained for the Albian correlates very well with the formation of rocks known from this stratigraphic stage (red clays, bauxites). (A.L.)

  10. Paleozoic and Mesozoic deformations in the central Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Kistler, Ronald Wayne

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of structural and stratigraphic data indicates that several periods of regional deformation, consisting of combined folding, faulting, cataclasis, and regional metamorphism, occurred throughout the central Sierra Nevada during Paleozoic and Mesozoic time. The oldest regional deformation occurred alono northward trends during the Devonian and Mississippian periods in most roof pendants containing lower Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks at the center and along the crest of the range. This deformation is expressed in some roof pendants by an angular unconformity separating older thrice-deformed from younger twice-deformed Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The first Mesozoic deformation, which consisted of uplift and erosion and was accompanied by the onset of Andean-type volcanism during the Permian and Triassic, is expressed by an angular unconformity in several roof pendants from the Saddlebag Lake to the Mount Morrison areas. This unconformity is defined by Permian and Triassic andesitic to rhyolitic metavolcanic rocks unconformably overlying more intensely deformed Pennsylvanian, Permian(?), and older metasedimentary rocks. A later regional deformation occurred during the Triassic along N. 20?_30? W. trends in Permian and Triassic metavolcanic rocks of the Saddlebag Lake and Mount Dana roof pendants, in upper Paleozoic rocks of the Pine Creek roof pendant, and in the Calaveras Formation of the western metamorphic belt; the roof pendants are crosscut by Upper Triassic granitic rocks of the Lee Vining intrusive epoch. A still later period of Early and Middle Jurassic regional deformation occurred along N. 30?-60? E. trends in upper Paleozoic rocks of the Calaveras Formation of the western metamorphic belt. A further period of deformation was the Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny, which occurred along N. 20?_40? W. trends in Upper Jurassic rocks of the western metamorphic belt that are crosscut by Upper Jurassic granitic rocks of the Yosemite intrusive epoch

  11. Observations of borehole deformation modulus values before and after extensive heating of a granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.; Yow, J.L.; Caxelrod, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive campaign of in situ deformation modulus measurements was recently completed using a standard NX borehole jack. These results were obtained in a granite intrusive where spent nuclear-fuel assemblies and electrical heaters had raised the rock temperatures 10 0 C to 40 0 C above ambient. We present an analysis of temperature effects based on 41 preheat and 63 post-heat measurements in three boreholes. Using analysis of covariance statistical techniques, we found that the deformation modulus is affected by heat, loading direction, and position within the borehole. The analysis also uncovered a significant interaction between the effects of heating and loading direction. We used 123 measurements from the same boreholes to evaluate the ''Draft Standard Guide for Estimating the In Situ Modulus of Rock Masses Using the NX-Borehole Jack'' which was recently proposed by Heuze. In particular, we examined the criterion for screening measurements in those cases where contact between the jack platen and the borehole wall was incomplete. We found that the proposed screen appears to operate randomly on the data and is therefore ineffective

  12. U/Th-isotopes as natural analogues for the mobility of actinides in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengel, K.; Gerdes, A.

    2001-01-01

    The short-lived decay products of 238 U ( 234 U and 230 Th) can be used as natural analogues for actinides in a hard rock repository. Their mobility in the past may serve as a key for understanding actinide migration in the future. For generally old calcites of the HRL Aespoethe age of disturbance of 238 U/ 234 U and 234 U/ 230 Th activity ratios ranges from 30 000 to 436 000 years at degrees of disturbance ranging from 0.5 to 6.7. The results obtained imply that during the past 440 000 years U was mobile throughout the tunnel sections of the HRL Aespoeinvestigated here. For the FL Grimsel, the disequilibrium states of the 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 234 U activity ratios in fracture minerals (calcites silicates) also imply that the reactions causing isotopic disturbances have occurred within the past 500 000 years. The U/Th-isotope data of both the samples from the HRL Aespoeand the FL Grimsel have in common the mobilization of U in secondary fracture minerals by migrating solutions within the past 500 000 years. As for the question of a final disposal of radioactive waste in granite host rocks, the transport of U - and thus of similarly behaving actinides - in migrating underground solutions can therefore not be ruled out, if suitable hydraulic systems are considered. (orig.)

  13. Hydrothermal alterations as natural analogues of radionuclide migration in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piantone, P.

    1989-01-01

    The document is the final report of the project Hydrothermal alteration systems as analogues of nuclear waste repositories in granitic rocks which was the subject of contract n 0 F1 1 W/0072-F (CD) performed at shared cost between the Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and the Commission of the European Communities as part of the MIRAGE programme. This study is the continuation of a preliminary study made by BRGM in 1986 and which concerned the same programme. The data given in this report were obtained from the study of the infilling and hydrothermalized walls of a mineralized vein located at Fombillou, Lot Department, in the French Massif Central. A satisfactory model of the processes generated by hydrothermal alteration then by climatic weathering such as formation of new minerals, flow of elements and variations in volume, was thus built. The mobility of elements displaying physical and chemical properties similar to those of radionuclides present in high-level radioactive waste was studied. A preliminary thermodynamic simulation of mineral transformations and transfers of matter during hydrothermal alteration was performed using the calculation code CEQCSY (Chemical EQuilibrium in Complex SYstem). This simulation is based on the values of the main physical and chemical parameters deduced from the analysis of the natural system. On the basis of the results obtained from Fombillou, an appraisal was made of the response of the granitic environment which has been disturbed by a hydrothermal system produced by heat emitted by the storage of high-level radio-active waste as well as its potential capacities of retention in case of possible leakage

  14. A microfluidic approach to water-rock interactions using thin rock sections: Pb and U sorption onto thin shale and granite sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Youn Soo [Institute of Mine Reclamation Technology, Mine Reclamation Corp., 2 Segye-ro, Wonju-si, Gangwon-do, 26464 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Ho Young, E-mail: hyjo@korea.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji-Hun; Kim, Geon-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Microfluidic tests was used to investigate water-rock (mineral) interactions. • Pb and U sorption onto thin shale and granite sections was evaluated. • Pb removal by thin shale section is related primarily to Fe-containing minerals. • A slightly larger amount of U was removed onto the thin granite section with Fe-containing minerals. - Abstract: The feasibility of using microfluidic tests to investigate water-rock (mineral) interactions in fractures regarding sorption onto thin rock sections (i.e., shale and granite) of lead (Pb) and uranium (U) was evaluated using a synthetic PbCl{sub 2} solution and uranium-containing natural groundwater as fluids. Effluent composition and element distribution on the thin rock sections before and after microfluidic testing were analyzed. Most Pb removal (9.8 mg/cm{sup 2}) occurred within 3.5 h (140 PVF), which was 74% of the total Pb removal (13.2 mg/cm{sup 2}) at the end of testing (14.5 h, 560 PVF). Element composition on the thin shale sections determined by μ-XRF analysis indicated that Pb removal was related primarily to Fe-containing minerals (e.g., pyrite). Two thin granite sections (biotite rich, Bt-R and biotite poor, Bt-P) exhibited no marked difference in uranium removal capacity, but a slightly higher amount of uranium was removed onto the thin Bt-R section (266 μg/cm{sup 2}) than the thin Bt-P section (240 μg/cm{sup 2}) within 120 h (4800 PVF). However, uranium could not be detected by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis, likely due to the detection limit. These results suggest that microfluidic testing on thin rock sections enables quantitative evaluation of rock (mineral)-water interactions at the micro-fracture or pore scale.

  15. The geology of the surrounding metamorphic rock of Zaer granite (Morocco): contribution to the search for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Laurent

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports a study which aimed at reconstituting the geological history of the Zaer region in Morocco with objectives of mining exploration and of assessment of its uranium metallogenic potential. The author examined the whole geological context by studying stratigraphy, sedimentology, tectonic, and petrography of rocks belonging to the concerned area. The main objective was to determine the origin of uranium between a granitic one and a sedimentary one. This meant a reconstitution of the geological history, and therefore the study of the metamorphized sedimentary surrounding rock, of the intrusive granite and of their different possible relationships. On a first part, the author analysed outcropping formations and tried to assign them with a stratigraphic position. He also tried to define the deposition modalities of these formations which could have conditioned sedimentary sites. In a second part, the author reports the study of geological structures and tectonic in order to try to recognise possible structures which could have promoted uranium deposition and trapping in the surrounding rock as well as in granite. The last part addresses the petrography of the different rocks met in the area, and mineralization, notably that of uranium [fr

  16. Fission track analysis and evolution of mesozoic-paleozoic hydrocarbon resource-rocks headed in Northern Jiangsu-South Yellow sea basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hong; Cai Qianzhong; Sun Heqing; Guo Zhenxuan; Yan Guijing; Dai Jing; Liu Dongying

    2008-01-01

    Fission track data of different geologic epoches from Binhai salient, Yancheng sag, Haian sag, Baiju sag, Gaoyou sag, Hongze sag and Jinhu sag of northern Jiangsu basin and seismic data from Laoshan uplift in South Yellow Sea basin and evolution of Paleozoic hydrocarbon resource-rocks headed in the Northern Jiangsu-South Yellow Sea basin were studied. Results indicate that Binhai salient uplifted in 38-15 Ma, forming 'structure uplifting model', Paleozoic hydrocarbon resource-rocks have the appearance of 'different layers but identical mature, different layers but identical temperature' with Laoshan uplift. All sags have the characters of 'long time heating model', and sedimentations in Cenozoic were exploited by 2 km. Mesozoic-Paleozoic hydrocarbon resource- rocks of Laoshan uplift get ahead of 10 km. Structure evolution was compared with Binhai salient. According to the modeling results of secondary hydrocarbon generation, Mesozoic-Paleozoic hydrocarbon resource-rocks of Laoshan uplift have the good reservoir potentiality and probably become an important new window for sea oil and gas exploration. (authors)

  17. Radiometric age determination on some granitic rocks in the Hida Range, central Japan. Remarkable age difference across a fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    K-Ar and zircon fission-track dating was carried out on some granitic rocks in the Hida Range, central Japan. The samples analyzed were collected on both sides of one of the major faults in the Hida Range: the Kurobe-Takase fracture zone. Ages obtained west of the fault are ∼60 Ma, while those obtained to the east of the fault are less than ∼5 Ma. These results indicate a remarkable age difference across the fault. The Okukurobe granite, located west of the fault, cooled rapidly from ∼600degC to ∼240degC between 60-55 Ma, and the Kanazawa granodiorite, located east of the fault, cooled rapidly from ∼600degC to ∼240degC between 5-1 Ma. The Okukurobe granite has remained cooler than ∼240degC since ∼55 Ma. Thus, it was found that the granitic rocks across the fault have experienced a remarkable different cooling history. (author)

  18. Investigated conductive fracture in the granitic rocks by flow-meter logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Nobuhisa; Koide, Kaoru; Takeichi, Atsushi

    1997-01-01

    Test of the use of a measurement technique for the hydraulic conductivity of geological structures which act as flow paths or are impermeable to groundwater flow. In order to prove the value of flow-meter logging as an in-situ technique for detecting conductive fractures in granitic rocks, the method has been applied to a borehole near the Tono uranium mine, Gifu, Japan. This study in involved with detecting a conductive fracture and calculating the hydraulic conductivities. The results were as follows: (1) In a zone of groundwater inflow into the borehole, the hydraulic conductivity was calculated to be of the order of the 10 -3 - 10 -4 (cm/sec) from flow-meter logging. This value agreed with the results of a in-situ borehole permeability test carried out with a similar depth interval. (2) The study showed that flow-meter logging is effective for detecting the distribution of high conductivity fractures and calculating the hydraulic conductivity. (author)

  19. Evaluation of some chemical analysis of granite rocks for rare elements (Tungsten, Nobuim, Tin, Tantalum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohmmed, I. A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, granite rocks samples were collected from Jebel Nikrab, in the eastern Sudan. A total of 16 samples were analyzed for Fe 2 O 3 , Mg O, CaO, Na 2 O, K 2 O and MnO 2 , using the atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS) and SiO 2 Al 2 O 3 using colorimeter. By classical methods analyzed for W, Ta, Nb and Sn, and all these results compared with the results have been done in the international laboratories give the same results even the results of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Ca O, MnO, Fe 2 O 3 , Mg O, K 2 O and Na 2 O. The range of W (0.0001-0.0005), Sn (0.00010.0024), Ta (0.003-0.0042), Nb (0.007-0.05). The range of oxide of Mn (0.07-0.1), Fe (0.17-17), Mg (0,009-0.3), Ca (0.05-1.2), Na (0.07-4.29) and K (0.02-3.7). (Author)

  20. Tracer movement in a single fissure in granitic rock - some experimental results and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.; Eriksen, T.; Taetinen, P.

    1980-08-01

    Radionuclide migration was studied in a natural fissure in a granite core. The fissure was oriented parallel to the axis in a cylindrical core 30 cm long and 20 in diameter. The traced solution was injected at one end of the core and collected at the other. Breakthrough curves were obtained for the nonsorbing tracers tritiated water, and a large molecular weight lignosulphonate molecule and the sorbing tracers cesium and strontium. From the breakthrough curves for the nonsorbing tracers it could be concluded that channeling occurs in the single fissure. A 'dispersion' model based on channeling is presented. The results from the sorbing tracers indicate that there is substantial diffusion into and sorption in the rock matrix. Sorption on the surface of the fissure also accounts for a part of the retardation effect of the sorbing species. A model which includes the mechanisms of channeling, surface sorption matrix diffusion and matrix sorption is presented. The experimental breakthrough curves can be fitted fairly well by this model by use of independently obtained data on diffusivities and matrix sorption. (author)

  1. Tracer Movement in a Single Fissure in Granitic Rock: Some Experimental Results and Their Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Eriksen, Tryggve; TäHtinen, PäIvi

    1982-08-01

    Radionuclide migration was studied in a natural fissure in a granite core. The fissure was oriented parallel to the axis in a cylindrical core 30 cm long and 20 cm in diameter. The traced solution was injected at one end of the core and collected at the other. Breakthrough curves were obtained for the nonsorbing tracers, tritiated water, and a large-molecular-weight lignosulphonate molecule and for the sorbing tracers, cesium and strontium. From the breakthrough curves for the nonsorbing tracers it could be concluded that channeling occurs in the single fissure. A `dispersion' model based on channeling is presented. The results from the sorbing tracers indicate that there is substantial diffusion into and sorption in the rock matrix. Sorption on the surface of the fissure also accounts for a part of the retardation effect of the sorbing species. A model which includes the mechanisms of channeling, surface sorption, matrix diffusion, and matrix sorption is presented. The experimental breakthrough curves can be fitted fairly well by this model by use of independently obtained data on diffusivities and matrix sorption.

  2. Rational Rock Physics for Improved Velocity Prediction and Reservoir Properties Estimation for Granite Wash (Tight Sands in Anadarko Basin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Z. A. Durrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complex nature, deriving elastic properties from seismic data for the prolific Granite Wash reservoir (Pennsylvanian age in the western Anadarko Basin Wheeler County (Texas is quite a challenge. In this paper, we used rock physics tool to describe the diagenesis and accurate estimation of seismic velocities of P and S waves in Granite Wash reservoir. Hertz-Mindlin and Cementation (Dvorkin’s theories are applied to analyze the nature of the reservoir rocks (uncemented and cemented. In the implementation of rock physics diagnostics, three classical rock physics (empirical relations, Kuster-Toksöz, and Berryman models are comparatively analyzed for velocity prediction taking into account the pore shape geometry. An empirical (VP-VS relationship is also generated calibrated with core data for shear wave velocity prediction. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each rock physics model in detail. In addition, cross-plots of unconventional attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional attributes.

  3. Application of Ga-Al discrimination plots in identification of high strength granitic host rocks for deep geological repository of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Narayan, P.K.; Trivedi, R.K.; Purohit, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    The permanent disposal of vitrified high level wastes and in some cases even spent fuel, is being planned in specifically designed and built deep geological repository located in the depth range of 500-600m in appropriate host rock at carefully selected sites. Such facilities are expected to provide very long term isolation and confinement to the disposed waste by means of long term mechanical stability of such structures that results from very high strength and homogeneity of the chosen rock, geochemical compatible environment around the disposed waste and general lack of groundwater. In Indian geological repository development programme, granites have been selected as target host rock and large scale characterization studies have been undertaken to develop database of mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry and rock mechanical characteristics. The paper proposes a new approach for demarcation of high strength homogeneous granite rocks from within an area of about 100 square kilometres wherein a cocktail of granites of different origins with varying rock mass characteristics co exists. The study area is characterised by the presence of A, S and I type granites toughly intermixed. The S type granites are derived from sedimentary parent material and therefore carry relics of parent fabric and at times undigested material with resultant reduction in their strength and increased inhomogeneity. On the other hand I type varieties are derived from igneous parents and are more homogeneous with sufficient strength. The A type granites are emplaced as molten mass in a complete non-tectonic setting with resultant homogeneous compositions, absence of tectonic fabric and very high strength. Besides they are silica rich with less vulnerability to alterations with time. Thus A type granites are most suited for construction of Deep Geological Repository. For developing a geochemical approach for establishing relation between chemical compositions and rock strength parameters, a

  4. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  5. Geophysical characterization of an active hydrothermal shear zone in granitic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, Tobias; Baron, Ludovic; Holliger, Klaus; Egli, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermally active faults and shear zones in the crystalline massifs of the central Alps are currently of particular interest because of their potential similarities and analogies with planned deep petrothermal reservoirs in the Alpine foreland. In order to better understand such hydrothermal systems, a near-vertical, hydrothermally active shear zone embedded in low-permeability granitic rocks has been drilled. This borehole is located on the Grimsel Pass in the central Swiss Alps, has an inclination of 24 degrees with regard to the vertical, and crosses the targeted shear zone between about 82 and 86 meters depth. The borehole has been fully cored and a comprehensive suite of geophysical logging data has been acquired. The latter comprises multi-frequency sonic, ground-penetrating radar, resistivity, self-potential, gamma-gamma, neutron-neutron, optical televiewer, and caliper log data. In addition to this, we have also performed a surface-to-borehole vertical seismic profiling experiment. The televiewer data and the retrieved core samples show a marked increase of the fracture density in the target region, which also finds its expression in rather pronounced and distinct signatures in all other log data. Preliminary results point towards a close correspondence between the ground-penetrating radar and the neutron-neutron log data, which opens the perspective of constraining the effective fracture porosity at vastly differing scales. There is also remarkably good agreement between the sonic log and the vertical seismic profiling data, which may allow for assessing the permeability of the probed fracture network by interpreting these data in a poroelastic context.

  6. Relict zircon U-Pb age and O isotope evidence for reworking of Neoproterozoic crustal rocks in the origin of Triassic S-type granites in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xiang; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Xia, Xiao-Ping

    2018-02-01

    Granites derived from partial melting of sedimentary rocks are generally characterized by high δ18O values and abundant relict zircons. Such relict zircons are valuable in tracing the source rocks of granites and the history of crustal anatexis. Here we report in-situ U-Pb ages, O isotopes and trace elements in zircons from Triassic granites in the Zhuguangshan and Jiuzhou regions, which are located in the Nanling Range and the Darongshan area, respectively, in South China. Zircon U-Pb dating yields magma crystallization ages of 236 ± 2 Ma for the Zhuguangshan granites and 246 ± 2 Ma to 252 ± 3 Ma for the Jiuzhou granites. The Triassic syn-magmatic zircons are characterized by high δ18O values of 10.1-11.9‰ in Zhuguangshan and 8.5-13.5‰ in Jiuzhou. The relict zircons show a wide range of U-Pb ages from 315 to 2185 Ma in Zhuguangshan and from 304 to 3121 Ma in Jiuzhou. Nevertheless, a dominant age peak of 700-1000 Ma is prominent in both occurrences, demonstrating that their source rocks were dominated by detrital sediments weathered from Neoproterozoic magmatic rocks. Taking previous results for regional granites together, Neoproterozoic relict zircons show δ18O values in a small range from 5 to 8‰ for the Nanling granites but a large range from 5 to 11‰ for the Darongshan granites. In addition, relict zircons of Paleozoic U-Pb age occur in the two granitic plutons. They exhibit consistently high δ18O values similar to the Triassic syn-magmatic zircons in the host granites. These Paleozoic relict zircons are interpreted as the peritectic product during transient melting of the metasedimentary rocks in response to the intracontinental orogenesis in South China. Therefore, the relict zircons of Neoproterozoic age are directly inherited from the source rocks of S-type granites, and those of Paleozoic age record the transient melting of metasedimentary rocks before intensive melting for granitic magmatism in the Triassic.

  7. Modelling the diffusion-available pore space of an unaltered granitic rock matrix using a micro-DFN approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Urban; Löfgren, Martin; Trinchero, Paolo; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2018-04-01

    In sparsely fractured rock, the ubiquitous heterogeneity of the matrix, which has been observed in different laboratory and in situ experiments, has been shown to have a significant influence on retardation mechanisms that are of importance for the safety of deep geological repositories for nuclear waste. Here, we propose a conceptualisation of a typical heterogeneous granitic rock matrix based on micro-Discrete Fracture Networks (micro-DFN). Different sets of fractures are used to represent grain-boundary pores as well as micro fractures that transect different mineral grains. The micro-DFN model offers a great flexibility in the way inter- and intra-granular space is represented as the different parameters that characterise each fracture set can be fine tuned to represent samples of different characteristics. Here, the parameters of the model have been calibrated against experimental observations from granitic rock samples taken at Forsmark (Sweden) and different variant cases have been used to illustrate how the model can be tied to rock samples with different attributes. Numerical through-diffusion simulations have been carried out to infer the bulk properties of the model as well as to compare the computed mass flux with the experimental data from an analogous laboratory experiment. The general good agreement between the model results and the experimental observations shows that the model presented here is a reliable tool for the understanding of retardation mechanisms occurring at the mm-scale in the matrix.

  8. Sedimentary facies analysis of the Mesozoic clastic rocks in Southern Peru (Tacna, 18°S): Towards a paleoenvironmental Redefinition and stratigraphic Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alván, Aldo; Jacay, Javier; Caracciolo, Luca; Sánchez, Elvis; Trinidad, Inés

    2018-07-01

    The Mesozoic rocks of southern Peru comprise a Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sedimentary sequence deposited during a time interval of approximately 34 Myr. In Tacna, these rocks are detrital and constitute the Yura Group (Callovian to Tithonian) and the Hualhuani Formation (Berriasian). Basing on robust interpretation of facies and petrographic analysis, we reconstruct the depositional settings of such units and provide a refined stratigraphic framework. Accordingly, nine types of sedimentary facies and six architectural elements are defined. They preserve the record of a progradational fluvial system, in which two styless regulated the dispersion of sediments: (i) a high-to moderate-sinuosity meandering setting (Yura Group), and a later (ii) incipient braided setting (Hualhuani Formation). The Yura Group (Callovian-Tithonian) represents the onset of floodplain deposits and lateral accretion of point-bar deposits sited on a semi-flat topography. Nonetheless, the progradational sequence was affected by at least two rapid marine ingressions occurred during Middle Callovian and Tithonian times. Such marine ingressions reveal the proximity of a shallow marine setting and incipient carbonate deposition. In response to increase in topographic gradient, the Hualhuani Formation (Berriasian) deposited as extensive multistory sandy channels. The mineralogy of the Mesozoic sediments suggests sediment supplies and intense recycling from a craton interior (i.e. Amazon Craton and/or plutonic sources) located eastward of the study area.

  9. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer

  10. Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser removal of graffiti from granite. Influence of paint and rock properties on cleaning efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, T., E-mail: trivas@uvigo.es [Dpto. Ingenieria de los Recursos Naturales y Medio Ambiente. Universidad de Vigo, Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Pozo, S. [Dpto. Ingenieria de los Recursos Naturales y Medio Ambiente. Universidad de Vigo, Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Fiorucci, M.P.; Lopez, A.J.; Ramil, A. [Centro de Investigacions Tecnoloxicas (CIT), Universidade da Coruna, 15403 Ferrol (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cleaning using NdYVO{sub 4} laser at 355 nm of four different graffiti colours applied on granites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of the influence of paint composition and properties of rocks on the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of the paints and, in turn reflectance, determine the removal effectiveness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser removal is not conditioned by properties of the stones. - Abstract: This paper presents the cleaning efficiency results for four differently coloured graffiti paints applied to two types of granitic stone by Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 355 nm. The paints were characterized in terms of mineralogy and chemistry using x-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM); paint absorbance in the ultraviolet-visible-infrared range (200-2000 nm) was also assessed. The studied granites had different mineralogy, texture and porosity properties. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by polarized microscopy, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy and spectrophotometer colour measurements. The results indicate differences in the effectiveness of surface cleaning for the blue, red and black paints as opposed to the silver paint, mainly attributed to chemical composition. No evidence was found that the granite properties had a bearing on laser effectiveness, although the degree, type and spatial distribution of transgranular fissures in the stone affected the overall assessment of cleaning effectiveness. Polarized light microscopy observations and colour measurements showed that the intensity and distribution of fissures affect the depth of paint penetration, ultimately affecting the cleaning efficiency for both granites.

  11. Nd:YVO4 laser removal of graffiti from granite. Influence of paint and rock properties on cleaning efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, T.; Pozo, S.; Fiorucci, M.P.; López, A.J.; Ramil, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cleaning using NdYVO 4 laser at 355 nm of four different graffiti colours applied on granites. ► Analysis of the influence of paint composition and properties of rocks on the process. ► Composition of the paints and, in turn reflectance, determine the removal effectiveness. ► The laser removal is not conditioned by properties of the stones. - Abstract: This paper presents the cleaning efficiency results for four differently coloured graffiti paints applied to two types of granitic stone by Nd:YVO 4 laser at 355 nm. The paints were characterized in terms of mineralogy and chemistry using x-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM); paint absorbance in the ultraviolet–visible-infrared range (200–2000 nm) was also assessed. The studied granites had different mineralogy, texture and porosity properties. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by polarized microscopy, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy and spectrophotometer colour measurements. The results indicate differences in the effectiveness of surface cleaning for the blue, red and black paints as opposed to the silver paint, mainly attributed to chemical composition. No evidence was found that the granite properties had a bearing on laser effectiveness, although the degree, type and spatial distribution of transgranular fissures in the stone affected the overall assessment of cleaning effectiveness. Polarized light microscopy observations and colour measurements showed that the intensity and distribution of fissures affect the depth of paint penetration, ultimately affecting the cleaning efficiency for both granites.

  12. Petrography, mineral chemistry and lithochemistry of the albitite and granite-gneissics rocks of anomaly 35 from Lagoa Real uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Camila Marques dos

    2016-01-01

    In the northwestern portion of the Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP), located in south-central Bahia, it is located one of the most promising uranium anomalies Brazil (an35, Gameleira I deposit), the reserves and proximity to the Cachoeira mine. Other anomalies of this sector (eg. 31 AN and AN34), are also considered strategic for the content of radioactive minerals and REE. The objective was to develop a study of a representative drill core of an35, where the main rocks PULR are present. The research focused on the mineralogical and chemical changes observed in the passages of a lithology to another, from the rock to the meta granitic albitites, through gneiss and transitional rocks, and making comparisons with similar lithologies sampled on testimonies of AN31 and 34. The granites are classified as hypersolvus coarse alkali-feldspar granite and are variably deformed. The main mineral assemblage in granites are perthitic orthoclase+hedenbergite+ quartz +hastingsite + biotite, and zircon, apatite, ilmenite and titanite are accessories. The reddening of these rocks are characterized by feldspars sericitization and hematitization and the presence of 'vazios'. The gneisses are mainly gray and reach milonitic to protomilonitics terms. These rocks have characteristics of subsolidus changes as swapped rims and metasomatic perthites. The tardi-magmatic association (amphibole+biotite) indicates final crystallization or late influx by superficial fluids resulting in an increase in water and volatiles, such as F and Cl in the system, which must also have carried rare-earth elementsGranites have geochemical affinity with A-type ferroan granite, A2, reduced and are post-collisional. Their patterns of incompatible elements and rare earths are comparable to Sao Timoteo Granite, but their petrographic features indicate that it is a less common granite facies. Albitites were classified as garnet albitites, magnetite albitites and biotite albitites. Contacts between

  13. Zircon Hf-O isotopic constraints on the origin of Late Mesozoic felsic volcanic rocks from the Great Xing'an Range, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mingyue; Tian, Wei; Fu, Bin; Wang, Shuangyue; Dong, Jinlong

    2018-05-01

    The voluminous Late Mesozoic magmatism was related to extensive re-melting of juvenile materials that were added to the Central East Asia continent in Phanerozoic time. The most favoured magma generation mechanism of Late Mesozoic magmas is partial melting of underplated lower crust that had radiogenic Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics, but this mechanism faces difficulties when interpreting other isotopic data. The tectonic environment controlling the generation of the Late Mesozoic felsic magmas is also in dispute. In this study, we obtained new U-Pb ages, and geochemical and isotopic data of representative Jurassic (154.4 ± 1.5 Ma) and Cretaceous (140.2 ± 1.5 Ma) felsic volcanic samples. The Jurassic sample has inherited zircon cores of Permian age, with depleted mantle-like εHf(t) of +7.4 - +8.5, which is in contrast with those of the magmatic zircons (εHf(t) = +2.4 ± 0.7). Whereas the inherited cores and the magmatic zircons have identical mantle-like δ18O composition ranges (4.25-5.29‰ and 4.69-5.54‰, respectively). These Hf-O isotopic characteristics suggest a mixed source of enriched mantle materials rather than ancient crustal components and a depleted mantle source represented by the inherited Permian zircon core. This mechanism is manifested by the eruption of Jurassic alkaline basalts originated from an enriched mantle source. The Cretaceous sample has high εHf(t) of +7.0 - +10.5, suggesting re-melting of a mafic magma derived from a depleted mantle-source. However, the sub-mantle zircon δ18O values (3.70-4.58‰) suggest the depleted mantle-derived mafic source rocks had experienced high temperature hydrothermal alteration at upper crustal level. Therefore, the Cretaceous felsic magma, if not all, could be generated by re-melting of down-dropped supracrustal volcanic rocks that experienced high temperature oxygen isotope alteration. The two processes, enriched mantle-contribution and supracrustal juvenile material re-melting, are new

  14. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  15. Mechanical behavior of host rock close to H.L.W. disposal cavities in a deep granitic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoorelbeke, J.M.; Dourthe, M.

    1986-01-01

    The construction of a H.L.W. repository in a deep granitic formation creates mechanical disturbances in the rock on the scale of the massif and in the nearfield. Amongst all the disturbances noted in the nearfield, this study is concerned with examining the evolution of stresses linked with the excavation of the rock and the rise in temperature in the proximity of the waste packages. Several linear elasticity calculations were made using on the one hand finite element models and on the other simple analytical models. These calculations concern two different storage concepts - in room concept and in floor concept- whose differences in mechanical behavior are analyzed. A study of sensitivity with regard to the characteristics of the rock and to the initial geostatic stresses is presented. The comparison of the calculated stresses with three-dimensional failure criteria gives a clear indication of the satisfactory behavior of granite for final storage. However, the need for experimental study and complementary calculation must be emphasized

  16. Microstructural variation of vitrified floor tile incorporated with granitic rock waste; Variacao microestrutural de piso ceramico vitrificado incorporado com residuos de rocha granitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, A.J.; Holanda, J.N.F., E-mail: ajsouza@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (LAMAV/CCT/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Avancados. Grupo de Materiais Ceramicos

    2009-07-01

    The ornamental rock industry from Northwest Fluminense generates huge amounts of wastes in the form of a fine powder. These wastes are deposited in nature without any care about environmental degradation, which can cause damage to public health, pollution of the natural water sources, and silted banks of rivers. In addition, they also can to affect the landscape aesthetically. In this work was used a granitic rock waste from Santo Antonio de Padua-RJ. This waste is rich in alkaline oxides, which promote the formation of liquid phase and assist the densification of traditional ceramics. The ceramic bodies with up to 47.5% granitic rock waste were pressed at 50 MPa. The ceramic pieces were fired at 1250 deg C. The evolution of sintered microstructure was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the granitic rock waste influences significantly the microstructure of the sintered ceramic bodies. (author)

  17. Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport in Fault Zones in Granitic Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, Joel Edward

    2004-12-01

    Fault zones are potential paths for release of radioactive nuclides from radioactive-waste repositories in granitic rock. This research considers detailed maps of en echelon fault zones at two sites in southern Sweden, as a basis for analyses of how their internal geometry can influence groundwater flow and transport of radioactive nuclides. Fracture intensity within these zones is anisotropic and correlated over scales of several meters along strike, corresponding to the length and spacing of the en echelon steps. Flow modeling indicates these properties lead to correlation of zone transmissivity over similar scales. Intensity of fractures in the damage zone adjoining en echelon segments decreases exponentially with distance. These fractures are linked to en echelon segments as a hierarchical pattern of branches. Echelon steps also show a hierarchical internal structure. These traits suggest a fractal increase in the amount of pore volume that solute can access by diffusive mass transfer, with increasing distance from en echelon segments. Consequences may include tailing of solute breakthrough curves, similar to that observed in underground tracer experiments at one of the mapping sites. The implications of echelon-zone architecture are evaluated by numerical simulation of flow and solute transport in 2-D network models, including deterministic models based directly on mapping data, and a statistical model. The simulations account for advection, diffusion-controlled mixing across streamlines within fractures and at intersections, and diffusion into both stagnant branch fractures and macroscopically unfractured matrix. The simulations show that secondary fractures contribute to retardation of solute, although their net effect is sensitive to assumptions regarding heterogeneity of transmissivity and transport aperture. Detailed results provide insight into the function of secondary fractures as an immobile domain affecting mass transfer on time scales relevant to

  18. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Pulverized Granitic Rock Adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto Faults: Implications for Earthquake Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Sisk, M.; Stillings, M.; Girty, G.; Dor, O.; Wechsler, N.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We present new detailed analyses of pulverized granitic rocks from sections adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto faults in southern California. Along the San Andreas and Garlock faults, the Tejon Lookout Granite is pulverized in all exposures within about 100 m of both faults. Along the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault in Horse Canyon, the pulverization of granitic rocks is highly asymmetric, with a much broader zone of pulverization along the southwest side of the Clark fault. In areas where the granite is injected as dyke rock into schist, only the granitic rock shows pulverization, demonstrating the control of rock type on the pulverization process. Chemical analyses indicate little or no weathering in the bulk of the rock, although XRD analysis shows the presence of smectite, illite, and minor kaolinite in the clay-sized fraction. Weathering products may dominate in the less than 1 micron fraction. The average grain size in all samples of pulverized granitic rock range between about 20 and 200 microns (silt to fine sand), with the size distribution in part a function of proximity to the primary slip zone. The San Andreas fault samples are generally finer than those collected from along the Garlock or San Jacinto faults. The particle size distribution for all samples is non-fractal, with a distinct slope break in the 60-100 micron range, which suggests that pulverization is not a consequence of direct shear. This average particle size is quite coarser than previous reports, which we attribute to possible measurement errors in the prior work. Our data and observations suggest that dynamic fracturing in the wall rock of these three major faults only accounts for 1% or less of the earthquake energy budget.

  19. Release of U, Th, and REE from granitic rock: A mineralogical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovaara-Koivisto, M.

    2006-01-01

    Finland plans to dispose of its spent nuclear fuel deep in the bedrock, and comprehensive assessment of the potential risks is required. One risk is glaciations induced by climate change, which might eventually cause malfunction of the engineered barrier system and breakdown of the copper-iron canisters containing the spent fuel. The fuel might then come into contact with groundwater. This groundwater might be acidic rain water, or oxygenated glacial melt water, which intrudes into the bedrock with hydrostatic pressure under the ice sheet. In this study, behaviour of uranium and rare earth elements was investigated in the Palmottu uranium deposit. Studies in the Palmottu deposit provide an indication of how uranium and other harmful elements could migrate from the repository to the surrounding bedrock in the event the canisters were breached. The spent fuel contains uranium and other actinides. The possible release of these elements and their behaviour after release in bedrock and groundwater were studied by means of chemical analogues occurring in nature, namely uranium (U), thorium (Th) and rare earth elements (REE). The study was focused on the mode of occurrence of these elements in granitic rocks. The chemistry of the mineral phases was explored by scanning electron microscopy and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, while the release of the elements was investigated with leaching experiments. In the first phase the samples were leached with artificial groundwater. In the second phase a HNO 3 solution of pH 5 was used, and in the final step a solution of pH 3. The U, Th and REE phases after each leaching were studied by fieldemission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive XRay microanalysis (EDAX), and the leachates were analysed by mass spectrometry (ICPMS and ICPAES). The aim of this study was to clarify how U, Th and REEs behave in the leaching processes associated with solutions simulating possible natural water conditions in the bedrock and to

  20. Extra-terrestrial igneous granites and related rocks: A review of their occurrence and petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    The telluric planets and the asteroid belt display the same internal structure with a metallic inner core and a silicate outer shell. Experimental data and petrological evidence in silicate systems show that granite can be produced by extreme igneous differentiation through various types of igneous processes. On Moon, 4.4-3.9 Ga granite clasts display dry mineral assemblages. They correspond to at least 8 discrete intrusive events. Large K/Ca enrichment and low REE abundances in granite relative to KREEP are consistent with silicate liquid immiscibility, a process observed in melt inclusions within olivine of lunar basalts and in lunar meteorites. Steep-sided domes identified by remote sensing can represent intrusive or extrusive felsic formations. On Mars, black-and-white rhythmic layers observed on the Tharsis rise along the flanks of the peripheral scarps of the Tharsis Montes giant volcanoes suggest the possible eruption of felsic pyroclastites. Though no true granites were found so far in the Martian SNC meteorites, felsic glasses and mesostases were identified and a component close to terrestrial continental (granitic) crust is inferred from trace element and isotope systematics. Venus has suffered extensive volcanic resurfacing, whereas folded and faulted areas resemble terrestrial continents. Near large shield volcanoes, with dominant basaltic compositions, steep-sided domes have been interpreted as non-degassed silicic extrusions. The hypothesis of a granitic component is "tantalising". Extra-terrestrial granite is frequently found as clasts and mesostases in asteroidal meteorites. Porphyritic textures, with alkali feldspar crystals up to several centimetres in size, were observed in silicate enclaves within iron meteorites. In the chondrite clan, polymict breccias can contain granitic clasts, whose provenance is debated. One clast from the Adzhi-Bogdo meteorite yields a 4.53 ± 0.03 Ga Pb-Pb age, making it the oldest known granite in the solar system. The

  1. Isotopic age determineations on granitic and gneissic rocks from the Ubendian-Usagaran System in southern Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priem, H.N.A.; Boelrijk, N.A.I.M.; Hebeda, E.H.; Verdurmen, E.A.Th.; Verschure, R.H.; Oen, I.S.; Westra, L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic age measurements on granites and gneisses are reported from the Ubendian-Usagaran System in southern Tanzania. For the Lukumburu-Wino Granites a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron (9 points) of 1771 +- 145 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr of 0.704 +- 0.003 was obtained (γ 87 Rb = 1.42 10 -11 a -1 ; errors 95% confidence level). Two samples from neighbouring granites and three gneisses from the contact zone of the Lukumburu-Wino Granites also fit to this isochron; inclusion into the isochron calculation yields an age of 1747 +- 85 Ma with the same initial Sr composition. Five parts of a banded Usagaran gneiss sample produce an isochron of 589 +- 70 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr of 0.7194 +- 0.0005. This internal isochron is interpreted as reflecting Sr isotopic equilibration through the sample during the main phase (or one of the main phases) of the Pan-African thermotectonic episode. Rb-Sr and K-Ar ages of 17 micas show a general resetting by the Pan-African thermotectonic episode. The Rb-Sr ages of the muscovites and the biotites average 528 Ma and 463 Ma, respectively, and are interpreted as reflecting subsequent stages in the cooling history after the termination of the event. Biotites have K-Ar ages persistently higher than the corresponding Rb-Sr ages, possibly reflecting a high partial 40 Ar pressure through the crust during the resetting of the biotite K-Ar systems. (Auth.)

  2. Hydrogeologic characteristics of domains of sparsely fractured rock in the granitic Lac Du Bonnet Batholith, southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.R.; Kozak, E.T.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; Broadfoot, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    The hydrogeologic characteristics of the granitic Lac du Bonnet batholith in southeastern Manitoba have been studied since 1978, as part of AECL's program to assess the concept of disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste deep within plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield (Davison et al. 1994a). These studies have included an extensive program of drilling, logging, testing, sampling and monitoring in 19 deep surface boreholes drilled at Grid areas located across the Lac du Bonnet batholith, at the Whiteshell Laboratory (WL), and in surface and underground boreholes at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Based on these investigations domains of low permeability, sparsely fractured rock (SFR) have been identified in the Lac du Bonnet batholith

  3. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  4. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil gutierrez, B.; Garcia Sanz, S.; Lago San Jose, M.; Arranz Yague, E.; Auque Sanz, L.

    2002-01-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  5. Validation of modeling team solution and matrix porosity of granitic rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněček, M.; Hanuš, R.; Doležalová, L.; Michálková, J.; Rousová, P.; Sosna, K.; Křížová, H.; Záruba, J.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Nakládal, P.; Brož, M.; Rohovec, Jan; Polák, M.; Milický, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 4/6 (2008), s. 1343396-1343396 ISSN 0161-6951. [International Geological Congress /33./. 06.08.2008-14.08.2008, Oslo] R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/31 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : radioactive waste * granite * hydrogeology * model ing * porosity Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  6. Rock-water interaction involving uranium and thorium isotopes in the fractures of El Berrocal granite, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Cahmbers, N.; Hernandez-Benitez, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of a number of R and D programmes, low permeability rocks in which the groundwater flow is governed by fractures are being considered as potentially suitable candidates for the long-term storage of radioactive waste at depth [1]. Such rocks are often one of the main sources of the radionuclides deriving from the natural radioactive decay chains headed by U and Th. This characteristic makes this type of rock very useful in providing geochemical analogues for the behaviour of transuranic radionuclides present in the nuclear waste [2,3]. The main aim of the work reported here is to study in detail the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides in several types of fracture infill material from the El Berrocal granitic pluton. The pluton in situated at the southern edge of the Spanish Central System and contains a uranium-mineralized quartz vein (UQV) that has been mined for uranium in the past [4]. Groundwaters as well as natural colloids have been sampled from some of the boreholes with the ultimate intention to model rock/water interaction processes which may take place in the water-bearing fractures in the batholith. The second aim of this work has been to date some of the calcite-rich fracture infills derived from the drill cores at depth, especially at water-bearing horizons. (Author)

  7. Emplacement mechanisms and structural influences of a younger granite intrusion into older wall rocks - a principal study with application to the Goetemar and Uthammar granites. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruden, Alexander R.

    2008-12-01

    The c. 1.80 Ga old bedrock in the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, which is the focus of the site investigation at Oskarshamn, is dominated by intrusive rocks belonging to the c. 1.86-1.65 Ga Transscandinavian Igneous Belt (TIB). However, the site investigation area is situated in between two c. 1.45 Ga old anorogenic granites, the Goetemar granite in the north and the Uthammar granite in the south. This study evaluates the emplacement mechanism of these intrusions and their structural influence on the older bedrock. Field observations and structural measurements indicate that both the Goetemar and the Uthammar granites are discordant and have not imposed any significant ductile deformation on their wall-rocks. The apparent conformity of geological contacts and fabrics in the wall rocks and the southern margin of the Goetemar granite is coincidental and inherited from the pattern of Svecokarelian deformation of the TIB. However, interpretation of regional aeromagnetic data suggests that the granites occur within a broad, NNE-SSW trending linear belt, pointing to deep seated tectonic control on their generation, ascent and emplacement. Thermochronology indicates that the granites were emplaced at depths between 4 and 8 km into brittle wall rocks. The 3-D shape of the Goetemar and Uthammar plutons has been investigated by 2.75D forward modelling of the residual gravity anomalies due to both granites. Both granites are associated with strong residual gravity anomalies of up to -10 mgal. Constraints on the geometry of the plutons at the surface are provided from surface geology maps and several deep boreholes located on or close to the model profiles. A further variable in the gravity modelling is introduced by either allowing the upper contact of the plutons to assume the most suitable orientation to produce the best fit between the modelled and observed gravity ('unconstrained models') or by forcing the near surface orientation of the contacts to be vertical ('constrained

  8. Emplacement mechanisms and structural influences of a younger granite intrusion into older wall rocks - a principal study with application to the Goetemar and Uthammar granites. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruden, Alexander R. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2008-12-15

    The c. 1.80 Ga old bedrock in the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, which is the focus of the site investigation at Oskarshamn, is dominated by intrusive rocks belonging to the c. 1.86-1.65 Ga Transscandinavian Igneous Belt (TIB). However, the site investigation area is situated in between two c. 1.45 Ga old anorogenic granites, the Goetemar granite in the north and the Uthammar granite in the south. This study evaluates the emplacement mechanism of these intrusions and their structural influence on the older bedrock. Field observations and structural measurements indicate that both the Goetemar and the Uthammar granites are discordant and have not imposed any significant ductile deformation on their wall-rocks. The apparent conformity of geological contacts and fabrics in the wall rocks and the southern margin of the Goetemar granite is coincidental and inherited from the pattern of Svecokarelian deformation of the TIB. However, interpretation of regional aeromagnetic data suggests that the granites occur within a broad, NNE-SSW trending linear belt, pointing to deep seated tectonic control on their generation, ascent and emplacement. Thermochronology indicates that the granites were emplaced at depths between 4 and 8 km into brittle wall rocks. The 3-D shape of the Goetemar and Uthammar plutons has been investigated by 2.75D forward modelling of the residual gravity anomalies due to both granites. Both granites are associated with strong residual gravity anomalies of up to -10 mgal. Constraints on the geometry of the plutons at the surface are provided from surface geology maps and several deep boreholes located on or close to the model profiles. A further variable in the gravity modelling is introduced by either allowing the upper contact of the plutons to assume the most suitable orientation to produce the best fit between the modelled and observed gravity ('unconstrained models') or by forcing the near surface orientation of the contacts to be vertical (&apos

  9. Evaluation of natural radioactivity in some granitic rocks in the state of Parana, Brazil and its use in civil construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ademar de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Primordial, or terrestrial natural radionuclides, are found in different amounts in the environment. In dwellings, an important dose increment is due to building materials, which contribute for both the external gamma dose from the radionuclides of the 238 U, 235 U and 232 Th series and the natural 40 K and the internal dose, due mainly to 222 Rn inhalation. Once granitic rocks are widely used both as construction materials or structural flooring, those rocks can become an important dose source, depending on the content of concentrations of radioactivity, and the construction application. In this work, a database for granitic rocks of the crystalline shield of Parana (mainly in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba, RMC), used in civil construction, was generated, evaluating in terms of radiological protection the external and internal dose increments, caused by the use of these materials. Also, possible correlations between the 226 Ra activity concentration, the 222 Rn exhalation rate, density, porosity and chemical composition (oxide content) in these samples had been studied. The external dose was assessed by gamma-ray spectrometry with High-Purity Germanium detectors, where the activity concentration of the radionuclides 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K are the parameters used in dosimetric models (Dosimetric Indexes), which established limits in accordance with the form, amount and application of material of construction. For the calculation of the annual effective external dose it was assumed a room model with dimensions of 4 m x 5 m x 2:8 m and all walls internally covered with 2 cm thickness of granite and an annual exposure time of 7000 h as suggested by the European Commission of Radiological Protection for internal superficial coating materials. The internal exposure was assessed from the radon concentration in the air of the room model, simulated from the superficial exhalation rate of 222 Rn. The exhalation rate was determined by the passive detection technique

  10. Geochronology of the Swift Current granite and host volcanic rocks of the Love Cove group, southwestern Avalon zone, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallmeyer, R.D.; O'Driscoll, C.F.; Hussey, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Zircon fractions from the variably deformed and metamorphosed Swift Current granite and host volcanic rocks of the Love Cove Group record individually discordant U-Pb ages with well-defined upper concordia intercept ages of 580 +- 20 and 590 +- 30 Ma, respectively. These are interpreted to be crystallization dates and indicate a late Proterozoic cogmagmatic relationship. Primary hornblende from the pluton record disturbed 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age spectra that suggest postcrystallization argon loss, probably during Acadian (Devonian) regional metamorphism. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar plateau ages of 560-566 Ma are well defined for the hornblende and are interpreted to date times of postmagmatic cooling. The similarity between zircon and hornblende dates suggests relatively rapid postmagmatic cooling. A six-point, Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron age of 548 +- 11 Ma is defined for the pluton. The slight discordancy of this date in comparison with the zircon and hornblende ages may reflect a minor disturbance of whole-rock isotopic systems during Acadian regional metamorphism. (author)

  11. Geochemistry of rare earths and oxygen isotopes in granitic rocks from Monte das Gameleiras and Dona Ines, Rio Grande do Norte-Paraiba border, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sial, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The study of oxygen isotopes and rare earth elements in granitic plutons of Monte das Gameleiras and Dona Ines, Rio Grande do Norte-Paraiba border, in Brazil, to define the nature of source rock of progenitor magmas, is presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of Cretaceous to Early Paleogene granites and volcanic rocks in the Sikhote-Alin Orogenic Belt (Russian Far East): implications for the regional tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Jahn, Bor-ming; Xu, Bei

    2017-09-01

    The Sikhote-Alin Orogenic Belt in Russian Far East is an important Late Mesozoic to Early Cenozoic accretionary orogen related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This belt was generated by successive accretion of terranes made of accretionary prisms, turbidite basins and island arcs to the continental margin of northeastern Asia (represented by the Bureya-Jiamusi-Khanka Block) from Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. In order to study the tectonic and crustal evolution of this orogenic belt, we carried out zircon U-Pb dating, and whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on granites and volcanic rocks from the Primorye region of southern Sikhote-Alin. Zircon dating revealed three episodes of granitoid emplacement: Permian, Early Cretaceous and Late Cretaceous to Early Paleogene. Felsic volcanic rocks (mainly rhyolite, dacite and ignimbrite) that overlay all tectonostratigraphic terranes were erupted during 80-57 Ma, postdating the accretionary process in the Sikhote-Alin belt. The Cretaceous-Paleogene magmatism represents the most intense tectonothermal event in the Sikhote-Alin belt. Whole-rock major and trace elemental data show arc-like affinity for granitoids and volcanic rocks, indicating that they were likely generated in a supra-subduction setting. Their initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.7048 to 0.7114, and εNd(t) values vary from +1.7 to -3.8 (mostly < 0). Thus, the elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest that the felsic magmas were generated by partial melting of source rocks comprising mantle-derived juvenile component and recycled crustal component. In addition to the occurrence in the Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt, Cretaceous to Early Paleogene magmatic rocks are also widespread in NE China, southern Korean peninsula, Japanese islands and other areas of Russian Far East, particularly along the coastal regions of the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. These rocks constitute an extended magmatic belt along the continental margin of NE Asia. The

  13. Natural analogue studies in crystalline rock: the influence of water-bearing fractures on radionuclide immobilisation in a granitic rock repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; MacKenzie, A.B.; Scott, R.D.; McKinley, I.G.

    1990-06-01

    Current Swiss concepts for the disposal of radioactive waste involve disposal in deep mined repositories to ensure that only insignificant quantities of radionuclides will ever reach the surface and so enter the biosphere. The rock formations presently considered as potential candidates for hosting radwaste repositories have thus been selected on the basis of their capacity to isolate radionuclides from the biosphere. An important factor in ensuring such containment is a very low solute transport rate through the host formation. However, it is considered likely that, in the formations of interest in the Swiss programme (eg. granites, argillaceous sediments, anhydrite), the rocks will be fractured to some extent even at repository depth. In the instance of the cumulative failure of near-field barriers in the repository, these hydraulically connected fractures in the host formation could be very important far-field routes of migration (and possible sites of retardation) of radionuclides dissolved in the groundwaters. In this context, the so-called 'matrix diffusion' mechanism is potentially very important for radionuclide retardation. This report is the culmination of a programme which has attempted to assess the potential influence of these water-bearing fractures on radionuclide transport in a crystalline rock radwaste repository. 162 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs

  14. The Shahewan rapakivi-textured granite – quartz monzonite pluton, Qinling orogen, central China: mineral composition and petrogenetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mesozoic Shahewan pluton consists of four texturally different types of biotite-hornblende quartz monzonite. In the porphyritic types alkali feldspar occurs as euhedral or ovoidal megacrysts that are often mantled by one or more plagioclase shells, and as smaller grains in the groundmass. Quartz, plagioclase (An20–28, biotite, and hornblende occur as inclusions in the alkali feldspar megacrystsand, more abundantly, in the groundmass. Euhedral quartz crystals in the groundmass are not as common and well developed as in typical rapakivi granite. Compared to typical rapakivi granites, the mafic minerals (biotite and hornblende are rich in Mg and poor in Fe, and the whole rock is low in Si, K, F, Ga, Zr, LREE, Fe/Mg, and K/Na. The rocks of the Shahewan pluton are thus regarded as rapakivi-textured quartz monzonites and granites but not true rapakivi granites.

  15. Variscan thrusting in I- and S-type granitic rocks of the Tribeč Mountains, Western Carpathians (Slovakia: evidence from mineral compositions and monazite dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broska Igor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tribeč granitic core (Tatric Superunit, Western Carpathians, Slovakia is formed by Devonian/Lower Carboniferous, calc-alkaline I- and S-type granitic rocks and their altered equivalents, which provide a rare opportunity to study the Variscan magmatic, post-magmatic and tectonic evolution. The calculated P-T-X path of I-type granitic rocks, based on Fe-Ti oxides, hornblende, titanite and mica-bearing equilibria, illustrates changes in redox evolution. There is a transition from magmatic stage at T ca. 800–850 °C and moderate oxygen fugacity (FMQ buffer to an oxidation event at 600 °C between HM and NNO up to the oxidation peak at 480 °C and HM buffer, to the final reduction at ca. 470 °C at ΔNN= 3.3. Thus, the post-magmatic Variscan history recorded in I-type tonalites shows at early stage pronounced oxidation and low temperature shift back to reduction. The S-type granites originated at temperature 700–750 °C at lower water activity and temperature. The P-T conditions of mineral reactions in altered granitoids at Variscan time (both I and S-types correspond to greenschist facies involving formation of secondary biotite. The Tribeč granite pluton recently shows horizontal and vertical zoning: from the west side toward the east S-type granodiorites replace I-type tonalites and these medium/coarse-grained granitoids are vertically overlain by their altered equivalents in greenschist facies. Along the Tribeč mountain ridge, younger undeformed leucocratic granite dykes in age 342±4.4 Ma cut these metasomatically altered granitic rocks and thus post-date the alteration process. The overlaying sheet of the altered granites is in a low-angle superposition on undeformed granitoids and forms “a granite duplex” within Alpine Tatric Superunit, which resulted from a syn-collisional Variscan thrusting event and melt formation ~340 Ma. The process of alteration may have been responsible for shifting the oxidation trend to the observed

  16. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables

  17. Data and uncertainty assessment for radionuclide Kd partitioning coefficients in granitic rock for use in SR-Can calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, James; Neretnieks, Ivars; Malmstroem, Maria

    2006-10-01

    SKB is currently preparing licence applications related to the proposed deep repository for spent nuclear fuel as well as the encapsulation plant required for canister fabrication. The present report is one of several specific data reports that form the data input to an interim safety report (SR-Can) for the encapsulation plant licence application. This report concerns the derivation and recommendation of generic K d data (i.e. linear partitioning coefficients) for safety assessment modelling of far-field radionuclide transport in fractured granitic rock. The data are derived for typical Swedish groundwater conditions and rock types distinctive of those found on the Simpevarp peninsula and Forsmark. Data have been derived for 8 main elements (Cs, Sr, Ra, Ni, Th, U, Np, Am) and various oxidation states. The data have also been supplied with tentative correction factors to account for artefacts that have not been previously considered in detail in previous compilations. For the main reviewed solutes the data are given in terms of a best estimate K d value assumed to be the median of the aggregate set of selected data. A range corresponding to the 25-75% inter-quartile range is also specified and probable ranges of uncertainty are estimated in the form of an upper and lower limit to the expected variability. Data for an additional 19 elements that have not been reviewed are taken from a previous compilation by Carbol and Engkvist

  18. Rapakivi granites and other postorogenic rocks in Finland: their age and the lead isotopic composition of certain associated galena mineralizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaasjoki, Matti

    1977-01-01

    The ages of the postorogenic rocks of southern Finland have been investigated by utilizing the U-Pb method on zircons. There exists one group of postorgenic intrusions in the Aaland Islands with ages ranging from 1840 to 1800 Ma. The rapakivi granites are younger, the Wiborg massif being 1700-1650, the Aaland massif 1670, the Vehmaa massif 1590 and the Laitila massif 1570 Ma old. In the cases of the Wiborg, Aaland and Laitila massives, younger intrusive phases of 1640 Ma, 1620 Ma and 1540 Ma, respectively, have been met with. The porphyry dikes are in every case of the same age as the main parts of the massifs. Anorthosites spatially associated with the Laitila and Wiborg massifs register a temporal relationship as well. Within the Wiborg massif there seem to have occurred three major magmatic phases: at 1700-1660 Ma, at 1650 Ma and at 1640 Ma. The results of the U-Pb determinations suggest that zircons formed from residual magmatic solutions are liable to produce unusually discordant age patterns. This property is attributed to an abnormally high initial lead content, which may have resulted in an initial distortion of the zircon lattice. The Pb-Pb determinations made from galena occurrences in the rapakivi massifs suggest that they are generated by their host rock. The results also suggest that the radiogeneity of the leads contained in the vein deposits increases as the temperature and the pressure prevailing during ore formation decrease. (author)

  19. Geochronology, geochemistry, and petrogenesis of late Permian to early Triassic mafic rocks from Darongshan, South China: Implications for ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism and S-type granite generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Chun; Luo, Bi-Ji; Xu, Ya-Jun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi

    2018-05-01

    The role of the mantle in generating ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism and peraluminous S-type granites, and the extent of crust-mantle interaction are topics fundamental to our understanding of the Earth's evolution. In this study we present geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data for dolerites and mafic volcanic rocks from the Darongshan granite complex belt in western Cathaysia, South China. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon analyses yielded magma crystallization ages of ca. 250-248 Ma for the dolerites, which are coeval with eruption of the mafic volcanic rocks, ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism, and emplacement of S-type granites in the Darongshan granite complex belt. The mafic volcanic rocks are high-K calc-alkaline or shoshonitic, enriched in Th, U, and light rare earth elements, and depleted in Nb, Ta and Ti. The dolerites are characterized by high Fe2O3tot (11.61-20.39 wt%) and TiO2 (1.62-3.17 wt%), and low MgO (1.73-4.38 wt%), Cr (2.8-10.8 ppm) and Ni (2.5-11.4 ppm). Isotopically, the mafic volcanic rocks have negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (-6.7 to -9.0) and high ISr values (0.71232 to 0.71767), which are slightly depleted compared with the dolerite samples (εNd(t) = -10.3 to -10.4 and ISr = 0.71796 to 0.71923). Zircons in the dolerites have εHf(t) values of -7.6 to -10.9. The mafic volcanic rocks are interpreted to have resulted from the partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle source with minor crustal contamination during ascent, whereas the dolerites formed by late-stage crystallization of enriched lithospheric mantle-derived magmas after fractionation of olivine and pyroxene. The formation of these mantle-derived mafic rocks may be attributed to transtension along a NE-trending strike-slip fault zone that was related to oblique subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath South China. Such underplated mafic magmas would provide sufficient heat for the generation of ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism and S-type granites, and

  20. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  1. Kinetic approach for interactive reactions of radionuclide, bacteria and granitic crushed rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang; Kim, Seung Soo; Oh, Jong Min; Lee, Tae Yup

    2011-01-01

    For many radionuclides, sorption is an important phenomenon as their migration rates in groundwater are reduced in both engineered barrier and fractured rock matrix. Sorption of radionuclides is strongly dependent on the chemistry of the surrounding groundwater, such as pH, Eh, ionic strength, etc., by changing their valence states (e.g.,). In addition, it is also known that some bacteria can change the mobility and speciation of a radionuclide in groundwater. Biological immobilization mechanisms of radionuclides include precipitation, transformation to less soluble forms and so on. On the other hand, bacteria can also play a role of sorbent for radionuclides. Since bacteria can not only be mobile as a colloid but also be immobile as biofilm in the rock fracture, the bacteria as the sorbents of radionuclides in the groundwater can have both positive and negative effects on the radionuclide migration. In this study, therefore, sorption of radionuclide onto rock surface in the presence of bacteria was investigated via batch experiments. Although sorption equilibrium state can be expected in the transport of weakly sorbing (distribution coefficient, K d -3 m 3 kg -1 ) or strongly adsorbing (K d > ∼4.6 m 3 kg -1 ) nuclides in fractured rock, sorption kinetics needs to be considered in the intermediate range. Therefore, the sorption of radionuclide whose valence state is expected to be changed by biological reduction was evaluated in a kinetic approach

  2. Structural geology and geophysics as a support to build a hydrogeologic model of granite rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gómez, Paloma; Bajos, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    A method developed for low-permeability fractured media was applied to understand the hydrogeology of a mine excavated in a granitic pluton. This method includes (1) identifying the main groundwater-conducting features of the medium, such as the mine, dykes, and large fractures, (2) implementing this factors as discrete elements into a three-dimensional numerical model, and (3) calibrating these factors against hydraulic data . A key question is how to identify preferential flow paths in the first step. Here, we propose a combination of several techniques. Structural geology, together with borehole sampling, geophysics, hydrogeochemistry, and local hydraulic tests aided in locating all structures. Integration of these data yielded a conceptual model of the site. A preliminary calibration of the model was performed against short-term (Model validity was tested by blind prediction of a long-term (4 months) large-scale (1 km) pumping test from the mine, which yielded excellent agreement with the observations. Model results confirmed the sparsely fractured nature of the pluton, which has not been subjected to glacial loading-unloading cycles and whose waters are of Na-HCO3 type.

  3. Monitoring Local Changes in Granite Rock Under Biaxial Test: A Spatiotemporal Imaging Application With Diffuse Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fan; Ren, Yaqiong; Zhou, Yongsheng; Larose, Eric; Baillet, Laurent

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse acoustic or seismic waves are highly sensitive to detect changes of mechanical properties in heterogeneous geological materials. In particular, thanks to acoustoelasticity, we can quantify stress changes by tracking acoustic or seismic relative velocity changes in the material at test. In this paper, we report on a small-scale laboratory application of an innovative time-lapse tomography technique named Locadiff to image spatiotemporal mechanical changes on a granite sample under biaxial loading, using diffuse waves at ultrasonic frequencies (300 kHz to 900 kHz). We demonstrate the ability of the method to image reversible stress evolution and deformation process, together with the development of reversible and irreversible localized microdamage in the specimen at an early stage. Using full-field infrared thermography, we visualize stress-induced temperature changes and validate stress images obtained from diffuse ultrasound. We demonstrate that the inversion with a good resolution can be achieved with only a limited number of receivers distributed around a single source, all located at the free surface of the specimen. This small-scale experiment is a proof of concept for frictional earthquake-like failure (e.g., stick-slip) research at laboratory scale as well as large-scale seismic applications, potentially including active fault monitoring.

  4. Some additional observations on inclusions in the granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Kistler, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Microgranular quartz diorite and diorite inclusions are widespread in central Sierra Nevada granitoid rocks and are almost exclusively restricted to hornblende-bearing rocks, most commonly felsic tonalites and mafic granodiorites. The Nd-Sm and Rb-Sr systematics indicate that most inclusions were in isotopic equilibrium with enclosing materials at the time of formation. Silica contents of inclusions and granitoids are contiguous, but inclusions generally contain less than, and granitoids more than, 60% SiO2. Ferric oxide and H2O+ trends relative to SiO2 suggests many inclusions formed as concentrations of hydrous mafic minerals. Variation of other major element oxides and trace elements support this inference. Most inclusions represent fragmented crystal accumulations of early-formed, near-liquidus minerals generated from these previously mixed magmas. -from Authors

  5. The uranium behaviour during rock-water interaction in the granites from the Itu complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil): a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helen S.B. da; Marques, Leila S.; Kawauchi, Roberto K., E-mail: leila@iag.usp.br, E-mail: keiji@iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the process of uranium leaching due to the rock-water interaction in the granitic rocks from Itu Complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil), an experimental arrangement was developed and built. About 2.5kg of crushed rock fragments from Cabreuva and Indaiatuba Intrusions were maintained at room temperature within a glass flask filled with circulating water. The percolating water was removed periodically (from 10 to 30 days) for uranium analysis and then replaced by an equal volume of fresh water. Alpha spectrometry was used to determine the activity concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U, and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios, of the waters as well as of the granites. The results for both samples showed that most of the uranium is leached in the first days after the contact between rock and water. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were significantly greater than unity, indicating radioactive disequilibrium between those isotopes, probably due to alpha recoil. Although the uranium activity concentrations in the water samples diminished with the increasing of time, it was not observed considerable variations of the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios. It was also noticed that, the amount of leached uranium as well as the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are characteristics of each sample submitted to leaching, reflecting the differences of the granite facies mineralogy.(author)

  6. Excavation and drilling at a spent-fuel test facility in granitic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, W.C.; Mayr, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Funding for a project to test the feasibility of safe and reliable storage and retrieval of spent fuel from a commercial nuclear reactor was approved by the Department of Energy on June 2, 1978. By May 28, 1980, 11 spent-fuel assemblies had been emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Design and construction of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax, including fuel emplacement, had taken less than two years, at a total cost of $18.4 million. Construction activities were preceded by geologic exploration using four cored holes and existing underground workings. The sinking of a 0.76-m-diam shaft to the 420-m level initiated construction at the site. Effective rates of sinking varied from 0.16 m/h with a rotary tricone drill to 0.5 m/h with a hammer drill. Underground excavation included a central canister-storage drift 4.6 x 6.1 x 64 m long, two parallel 3.4 x 3.4-m heater drifts, and a tail drift. About 6700 m{sup 3} were excavated at an average rate of 2 m{sup 3}/h, and 178 cored holes, with diameters from 38 to 152 mm, were drilled. A total length of nearly 1100 m was drilled at rates ranging from 0.4 m/h to 1 m/h, depending on hole size and drilling equipment. Eighteen 610-mm-diam canister emplacement holes were hammer-drilled at an average rate of 1.4 m/h. The use of the critical path method, integrated contractors, and close cooperation between project participants facilitated completion of the project on schedule.

  7. Excavation and drilling at a spent-fuel test facility in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.; Mayr, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Funding for a project to test the feasibility of safe and reliable storage and retrieval of spent fuel from a commercial nuclear reactor was approved by the Department of Energy on June 2, 1978. By May 28, 1980, 11 spent-fuel assemblies had been emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Design and construction of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax, including fuel emplacement, had taken less than two years, at a total cost of $18.4 million. Construction activities were preceded by geologic exploration using four cored holes and existing underground workings. The sinking of a 0.76-m-diam shaft to the 420-m level initiated construction at the site. Effective rates of sinking varied from 0.16 m/h with a rotary tricone drill to 0.5 m/h with a hammer drill. Underground excavation included a central canister-storage drift 4.6 x 6.1 x 64 m long, two parallel 3.4 x 3.4-m heater drifts, and a tail drift. About 6700 m 3 were excavated at an average rate of 2 m 3 /h, and 178 cored holes, with diameters from 38 to 152 mm, were drilled. A total length of nearly 1100 m was drilled at rates ranging from 0.4 m/h to 1 m/h, depending on hole size and drilling equipment. Eighteen 610-mm-diam canister emplacement holes were hammer-drilled at an average rate of 1.4 m/h. The use of the critical path method, integrated contractors, and close cooperation between project participants facilitated completion of the project on schedule

  8. Fluid geochemistry associated associated to rocks: preliminary tests om minerals of granite rocks potentially hostess of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Rios, Francisco J.; Oliveira, Lucilia A.R. de; Alves, James V.; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Garcia, Luiz; Ribeiro, Yuri; Matos, Evandro C. de

    2009-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (FI) are micro cavities present on crystals and imprison the mineralizer fluids, and are formed during or posterior to the mineral formation. Those kind of studies are very important for orientation of the engineer barrier projects for this purpose, in order to avoid that the solutions present in the mineral FI can affect the repository walls. This work proposes the development of FI micro compositional studies in the the hostess minerals viewing the contribution for a better understanding of the solution composition present in the metamorphosis granitoid rocks. So, micro thermometric, microchemical and characterization of the material confined in the FI, and the hostess minerals. Great part of the found FI are present in the quartz and plagioclase crystals. The obtained data on the mineral compositions and their inclusions will allow to formulate hypothesis on the process which could occurs at the repository walls, decurrens from of the corrosive character (or not) of the fluids present in the FI, and propose measurements to avoid them

  9. Natural organics in groundwaters and their potential effect on contaminant transport in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Bachinski, D.B.; Richer, D.

    1996-07-01

    Naturally occurring organics in groundwaters of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) of southern Manitoba and of the Atikokan Research Area of northwestern Ontario were investigated to assess their potential role in radionuclide transport within granite fractures of the Canadian Shield. A survey of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, carried out to determine the variability in the organic content of these groundwaters, showed average concentrations in WRA deep groundwaters of 0.8 ± 0.1 mg/L for Fracture Zone 2, 0.8 ± 0.4 mg/L for near-vertical fractures, and 2.3 ± 0.8 mg/L for deeper saline groundwater. Surface waters and near-surface groundwaters had significantly higher DOC with 29.2 ± 0.6 mg/L in streams from the East Swamp. The DOC consisted mainly of hydrophilic neutral compounds 60 to 75%, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids 23 to 39%, along with very small amounts of hydrophobic bases and neutrals, and hydrophilic bases. The average complexing capacity of natural organics in WRA deep groundwaters was calculated to be 6.7 x 10 -6 eq/L. The ability of these organics to complex radionuclides was tested using conditional stability constants from the literature for humic complex formation with trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent actinides. The chemistries of Np(V) and U(VI) were predicted to be dominated by inorganic complexes and not significantly affected by organics. Accurate predictions for AM(III) and Th(IV) could not be made since the literature contains a wide range in values of stability constants for humic complexes with these elements. Surface waters and near-surface groundwaters in many areas of the Canadian Shield contain enough humics to complex a significant fraction of dissolved actinides. Radiocarbon ages of humics from WRA groundwater varied between 3600 and 6200 years before present, indicating that a component of humic substances in deep groundwaters must originate from near-surface waters. 54 refs., 15 tabs., 5

  10. Deposition behavior of polystyrene latex particles on solid surfaces during migration through an artificial fracture in a granite rock sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinju, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Satoru; Kuno, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The deposition behavior of colloids during transport through heterogeneous media was observed by conducting column experiments to study migration of polystyrene latex particles (diameter=309 nm) through columns packed with artificially fractured granite rock (length=300 and 150 mm). The experiments were conducted under conditions of different ionic strengths and flow rates. The results were similar to those for colloid deposition in columns packed with glass beads reported previously; the colloid breakthrough curves showed three stages, characterized by different rates of change in the concentration of effluent. Colloid deposition on the fracture surfaces was described by considering strong and weak deposition sites. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations indicated the existence of strong and weak sites on the fracture surfaces regardless of mineral composition. The observations also showed that the strong deposition sites tended to exist on surface irregularities such as cracks or protrusions. The degree of colloid deposition increased with increasing ionic strength and decreasing flow rate. The dependencies on ionic strength and flow rate agreed qualitatively with the DLVO theory and the previous experimental results, respectively. (author)

  11. Protocol proposal for radon concentration mensuration from granitic rocks in marble factory; Proposta de protocolo para medicao de concentracoes de radonio proveniente de rochas graniticas em marmorarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flavia

    2016-11-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) and thorium ({sup 232}Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. Radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), the thoron ({sup 220}Rn), radio ({sup 2}'2'6Ra), thorium ({sup 23}'2Th) and potassium ({sup 40}K) may occur in materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. Thus, the radioactivity from marbles and granites is of importance, so that under certain conditions these materials radioactivity levels can be hazardous requiring the implementation of mitigation measurements. This research presents a technical protocol marble factories for the control human exposure to natural radioactivity exhaled from granitic rocks. The protocol was based on measurements of the {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentration in Brazilian granite rocks commonly nationally and exported. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn measurements were done using the AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and RAD7 (Durridge Company) apparatus, respectively. The samples of granite were sealed in glass jars for 40 days in to achieve secular equilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn radionuclides. The measurements were performed on Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the Federal Technological University of Parana. Also, solid-state nuclear track detectors CR-39 were installed in a marble factory environments located in Curitiba - Parana for the evaluation of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in workplaces. The CR-39 detectors were exposed for about 90 days and submitted to etching process. The alpha particle tracks were observed using an optical microscope. Some granite samples analyzed presented {sup 222}Rn concentrations of attention, since the average

  12. The ongoing search for the oldest rock on the Danish island of Bornholm: new U-Pb zircon ages for a quartz-rich xenolith and country rock from the Svaneke Granite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Serre, Simon H.; Næsby, Sebastian H.

    2017-01-01

    Previous geochronological studies on the Danish island of Bornholm have not identified any rocks older than c. 1.46 Ga. New LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages are presented for a xenolith within, and the country rock gneiss adjacent to, the Svaneke Granite on Bornholm. The xenolith is fine......-grained and quartz-rich and was likely derived from either a quartz-rich sedimentary protolith or a hydrothermally altered felsic volcanic rock. The relatively fine-grained felsic nature of the country rock gneiss and the presence of large zoned feldspars that may represent phenocrysts suggest its protolith may have...... been a felsic volcanic or shallow intrusive rock. A skarn-like inclusion from a nearby locality likely represents an originally carbonate sediment and is consistent with supracrustal rocks being present at least locally. Zircon data from the xenolith define an upper intercept age of 1483 ± 12 Ma (2σ...

  13. Programme of research into the management and storage of radioactive waste. Aqueous phase transport through granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Green, A.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of work on aqueous phase transport by diffusion through porous granites are considered (1) The formation factor and long range connectivity of pore structure. (2) The effect of degraded fissure surfaces on diffusion into the main pore structure. (3) Effect of overburden pressures at depth on diffusion rates. Experiments were conducted on Cornish carnmenellis granite. (U.K.)

  14. Evaluation of color and radon exhalation rate in granite rocks between accelerated aging cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Francisco Diones Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Data used for the assessment of the analyzes performed on three types of dimension stone (Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Artico), in natural state and after several cycles of accelerated aging are presented, correlating them with the gas exhalation rate radon issued by the analyzed lithologies. In the samples were conducted permeability, porosity, colorimetry, image analysis, petrographic and exhalation rate of radon, accompanied by aging tests on climate simulation chamber which simulates change situations of materials by weathering agents, accelerating wear and tear samples. The measurements were performed on samples in natural state, with 50 and 100 cycles of aging acceleration, where each cycle corresponds to variations in temperature and humidity in climatic simulation chamber, with the addition of an internal atmosphere of SO_2 with 25 concentration ppm. The results obtained during the tests were related to better analysis of the changes observed on the samples and the variation rate of exhalation radon emitted. The rocks have radon concentration values above the limits suggested by relevant international agencies (200-400 Bq/m³), with average values in the natural state, in 6149, 1619 and 866 Bq/m³ for Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Arctic, respectively. The other aging cycles (50 and 100 cycles) showed an average increase of 0.8% for Juparana Bordeaux, 6.9% for White Blizzard and -23.87% for the Golden Arctic, with 50 cycles. From 50 to 100 cycles, there was reduction of 3.43% for Juparana Bordeaux and 22.15% for Branco Nevasca and an increase of 13.82% in the Golden Artico. The porosity results in the natural state obtained values an average of 0.696% for Juparana Bordeaux, 0.919% for Branco Nevasca and 0.830% for Golden Artico, and after 50 cycles of accelerated aging, obtained 0.621% to Juparana Bordeaux, 0.910% for Branco Nevasca and 0.840% for Golden Artico. The permeability of the samples showed values in the natural

  15. Age and isotopic fingerprints of some plutonic rocks in the Wiborg rapakivi granite batholith with special reference to the dark wiborgite of the Ristisaari Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rämö, O.T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mid-Proterozoic, locus classicus Wiborg rapakivi granite batholith of southeastern Finland and adjacent Russia comprises a varying, bimodal (silicic-basic sequence of plutonic, subvolcanic, and volcanic rocks. At the current level of erosion silicic rocks are dominant, the most prominent of which are wiborgites and dark wiborgites (that have been considered to mark the main build-up stage of the batholith and pyterlites. New observations and optical microscopy data from the dark wiborgite-dominated Ristisaari Island in the southern, off-shore part of the Wiborg batholith show that dark plagioclase megacrysts in dark wiborgite are calcic xenocrysts. They were probably incorporated into wiborgite magma from consanguineous massiftype anorthosite magmas in the course of the evolution of the bimodal magmatic system. Our new ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon age of the Ristisaari Island dark wiborgite, 1627±3 Ma, is the youngest isotopic age so far determined for the plutonic rocks of the Wiborg batholith. This, combined with preexisting U-Pb zircon data, implies a minimum duration of 12 m.y. (1642–1630 Ma for the emplacement of the plutonic rocks of the batholith. Combined with data on highlevel dike rocks, a window of at least 20 m.y. (1642–1622 Ma is implied. Furthermore, as the batholith grew, the overall locus of magmatism may have shifted southwards. New whole-rock Nd isotope data on the dark wiborgite of the Ristisaari Island and three further granites of the batholith, as well as Nd (whole-rock and Sr (whole-rock, plagioclase isotope data on a spectrolite massif-type anorthosite from the east-central part of the batholith, are also presented. These data suggest that the lithosphere across the Wiborg batholith area in the southeastern part of the Svecofennian orogen may vary slightly in overall mantle separation age.

  16. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin; Smellie, John; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2010-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely ∼0.00073 mole fraction methane and ∼10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (∼20 deg C and ∼100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of satisfactory

  17. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin (Hydrafact Ltd, Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Puigdomenech, Ignasi (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely approx0.00073 mole fraction methane and approx10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (approx20 deg C and approx100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of

  18. Highly differentiated magmas linked with polymetallic mineralization: A case study from the Cuihongshan granitic intrusions, Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xianghui; Zhang, Zhaochong; Cheng, Zhiguo; Santosh, M.; Jin, Ziliang; Wen, Bingbing; Li, Zixi; Xu, Lijuan

    2018-03-01

    The genetic link between granitoids and polymetallic skarn mineralization has remained equivocal. The Cuihongshan skarn-porphyry W-Mo-Pb-Zn-(Fe-Cu) deposit in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt provides a unique example to address this issue. The major rock types in the mine area are Early Paleozoic intrusions composed of biotite syenogranite and biotite porphyritic granite and Early Mesozoic intrusions represented by porphyritic quartz monzonite, biotite monzogranite, and porphyritic granite. The diagnostic mineralogical and geochemical features indicate that the rocks belong to A2-type granites. The Early Paleozoic suite shows zircon U-Pb ages of 501 Ma, and εHf(t) values of - 4.4 to + 2.7 and + 2.4 to + 7.6, respectively. In combination with their coherent geochemical trends, these rocks are inferred to be products of in-situ differentiation. Although the Mesozoic suite shows crystallization ages of 194-196 Ma, εHf(t) values are in the range of - 2.5 to + 7.5 for the porphyritic quartz monzonite, the - 1.8 to + 4.5 values for the monzogranite and the + 2.3 to + 8.0 range for the porphyritic granite. The porphyritic quartz monzonite displays distinct mineral assemblage and shows significant compositional gap with the other two lithofacies. In contrast, the monzogranite and porphyritic granite have similar geochemical features, and are thus inferred to be co-magmatic. Considering the high SiO2 contents, variable εHf(t) (- 4.4 to + 8.0) and εNd(t) values (- 8.4 to + 0.28) for the two suites, we infer that both episodes of granitoid magmatism resulted from partial melting of crustal materials with a mixed source containing varying proportions of juvenile and Precambrian crustal components. The Early Mesozoic porphyritic granite shows a highly evolved F-rich geochemical affinity, and experienced magma-fluid interaction. Cassiterite from the calcic skarn and the magnesian skarn that coexists with magnetite orebodies shows a mean U-Pb age of 195

  19. Seismogenic faulting in the Meruoca granite, NE Brazil, consistent with a local weak fracture zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA CATARINA A. MOURA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of earthquakes occurred in 2008 in the Meruoca granitic pluton, located in the northwestern part of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. A seismological study defined the seismic activity occurring along the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault, a 081° striking, 8 km deep structure. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between this seismic activity and geological structures in the Meruoca granite. We carried out geological mapping in the epicentral area, analyzed the mineralogy of fault rocks, and compared the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault with geological data. We concluded that the seismically-defined fault coincides with ∼E–W-striking faults observed at outcrop scale and a swarm of Mesozoic basalt dikes. We propose that seismicity reactivated brittle structures in the Meruoca granite. Our study highlights the importance of geological mapping and mineralogical analysis in order to establish the relationships between geological structures and seismicity at a given area.

  20. Seismogenic faulting in the Meruoca granite, NE Brazil, consistent with a local weak fracture zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Ana Catarina A; De Oliveira, Paulo H S; Ferreira, Joaquim M; Bezerra, Francisco H R; Fuck, Reinhardt A; Do Nascimento, Aderson F

    2014-12-01

    A sequence of earthquakes occurred in 2008 in the Meruoca granitic pluton, located in the northwestern part of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. A seismological study defined the seismic activity occurring along the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault, a 081° striking, 8 km deep structure. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between this seismic activity and geological structures in the Meruoca granite. We carried out geological mapping in the epicentral area, analyzed the mineralogy of fault rocks, and compared the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault with geological data. We concluded that the seismically-defined fault coincides with ∼E-W-striking faults observed at outcrop scale and a swarm of Mesozoic basalt dikes. We propose that seismicity reactivated brittle structures in the Meruoca granite. Our study highlights the importance of geological mapping and mineralogical analysis in order to establish the relationships between geological structures and seismicity at a given area.

  1. K, Rb and Sr abundances and Sr isotopic composition of the Tanzawa granitic and associated gabbroic rocks, Japan: low-potash island arc plutonic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, K.; Yanagi, T.

    1977-01-01

    The granitic and associated gabbroic rocks of the Tanzawa plutonic complex of Miocene age occurring in the northern part of the Izu-Bonin arc are characterized by low abundances of K (229-6790 ppm) and Rb (0.414-12.1 ppm), low K 2 O/Na 2 O ratios (0.037-0.21), moderately high K/Rb ratios (541-630), low Rb/Sr ratios (0.00137-0.0579) and low initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios (0.70332-0.70372). This indicates that acid to intermediate plutonic rocks with these geochemical characteristics also occur in island arc environments besides mid-oceanic ridge environments. They represent, together with associated gabbroic rocks, a low-potash island arc plutonic complex and are expected to occur beneath young island arcs, although now unexposed. The Tanzawa plutonic complex may have been formed by differentiation of low-K calc-alkaline magma. (Auth.)

  2. Airborne radiometric anomalies caused by late kinematic granite rocks in the Molson Lake-Red Sucker Lake area, east-central Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.; Schledewitz, D.C.P.; Soonawala, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    Geological mapping with simultaneous ground gamma ray spectrometer surveys in an area with a chain of airborne radiometric anomalies of greater than 2 ppm eU indicate uranium enrichment in late kinematic pink leucogranitic rocks including granites, alaskites, and syenites which form dykes, stocks and small plutons in a batholithic tonalite - granodiorite complex. Field geolocial evidence suggests that the potassium-rich rocks were formed by hydrothermal solutions and that at least some of them are metasomatic replacement bodies. Results of geophysical grid survey over a pronounced anomaly indicate that it is caused by a significant volume of leucogranitic rocks with an unusually high background concentration of uranium averaging 25 ppm eU. The uranium seems to be associated with hematite which coats mineral grains and fills small fractures

  3. Long term thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior study of the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass around the radwaste repository using a steady state flow algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Suk; Kang, Chul Hyung; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the long term (500 years) thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior of the 500 m depth underground radwaste repository in the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass using a steady state flow algorithm. The numerical model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints around the repository and a 45 .deg. C fault passing through the tunnel roof-wall intersection, and a canister with PWR spent fuels surrounded by the compacted bentonite and mixed-bentonite. Barton-Bandis joint constitutive model from the UDEC code is used for the joints. For the hydraulic analysis, a steady state flow algorithm is used for the groundwater flow through the rock joints. For the thermal analysis, heat transfer is modeled as isotropic conduction and heat decays exponentially with time. The results show that the variations of the hydraulic aperture, hydraulic conductivity, normal stress, normal displacements, and shear displacements of the joints are high in the vicinity of the repository and stay fairly constant on the region away from the repository. 14 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  4. The effect of secondary apatite on the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio determination in granitic rocks: a case study of the Tadamigawa pluton, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasugi, Y.; Ichino, K.; Tanioka, Y.; Wakaki, S.; Tsuboi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    Apatite is a major accessory mineral in igneous rocks. Because Rb contents in apatite are very low, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of magmatic apatite are useful to estimate the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio (SrI) of igneous rocks. Secondary post-magmatic event such as hydrothermal alteration may also crystallize secondary apatite, which may inhibit the estimation of SrI of igneous rocks. In this study, we examine the effects of secondary apatite on the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio determination of granitic rocks by using acid leaching technique. Leached apatite samples were first separated from the whole rock powder as a heavy mineral fraction by heavy liquid technique, and the heavy mineral fraction was then leached by 3 M HNO3. The isotopic ratios of Sr and the concentrations of Rb and Sr were analyzed by TIMS and ICP-MS at Kochi Core Center, respectively. The Tadamigawa Older-stage granites, which locate in the Taishaku Mountains at the northeastern part of Japan, intrude into the Ashio Jurassic complex, and the ages of these rocks are late Cretaceous to Paleogene. The U-Pb ages of zircon and the K-Ar ages of biotite for these rocks are c. 100 Ma [1, 2]. Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron age of the pluton is 96.5 ± 1.3 Ma (SrI = 0.70534 ± 0.00003) and it is concordant with other radiometric ages. Rb-Sr mineral isochron ages range from 84.4 to 97.3 Ma and these ages are relatively younger than the Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron age. The difference among radiometric ages may reflect the difference of the closure temperature in each isotopic system. The Tadamigawa Older-stage granites have SrI for Rb-Sr mineral isochron range from 0.7053 to 0.7061 and are very similar to that (0.70534) for Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron. These may suggest that the Tadamigawa Older-stage granites are generated from same parental magma. However, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the leached apatite samples were 0.70544-0.70856 and are relatively higher than SrI obtained from the Rb-Sr mineral isochrons (0.7053-0.7061). This result

  5. Geochemical simulation of the evolution of granitic rocks and clay minerals submitted to a temperature increase in the vicinity of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, B.; Kam, M.; Tardy, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The alteration of a granitic rock around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the effect of an increase of temperature due to this kind of induced geothermal system. The results of the simulation have been interpreted in terms of mass transfer and volumic consequences. The alteration proceeds by dissolution of minerals (with an increase of the volumes of fissures and cracks) and precipitation of secondary miminerals as calcite and clay minerals particularly (with a decrease of the porosity). The increase of the temperature from 10 degrees C to about 100 degrees C will favour the alteration of the granitic rock around the repository by the solution filling the porosity. The rock is characterized by a very low fissure porosity and a consequent very low water velocity. This too, favours intense water rock interactions and production of secondary clays and the total possible mass transfer will decrease the porosity. A combination of these thermodynamic mass balance calculations with a kinetic approach of mineral dissolutions gives a first attempt to calibrate the modelling in the time scale: the decrease of porosity can be roughly estimated between 2 and 20% for 100,000 years. The particular problem of Na-bentonites behaviour in the proximate vicinity of the repository has been studied too. One must distinguish between two types of clay-water interactions: -within the rock around the repository, Na-bentonites should evolute with illitization in slighltly open system with low clay/water ratios, -within the repository itself, the clay reacts in a closed system for a long time with high clay/water ratios and a self-buffering effect should maintain the bentonite type. This chemical buffering effect is a positive point for the use of this clay as chemical barrier. (Author)

  6. Estimated method of permeability in the granitic rocks by geophysical loggings; Butsuri kenso shuho ni yoru kakoganchu no tosuisei ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, K; Hashimoto, N. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)]Ogata, N. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Water permeability in granite is estimated by performing geophysical investigation using a 500m-deep test hole drilled in granitic rocks in the vicinity of a Tono mine. The investigation consists of flowmeter logging and geophysical logging. In flowmeter logging, a probe is moved up and down in the hole at a constant speed by use of a cable, and the cable speed and impeller revolution are used to workout the relative speed of the fluid in the hole. In the geophysical logging, a probe attached to the leading end of a logging cable is replaced with other probes so as to acquire different geophysical data. In a hole drilled in a crack-abundant rockbed such as a granitic rockbed, the inflow and outflow of ground water is governed mainly by water-permeable crack zones, and the result of the flowmeter logging show that this hole has three highly water-permeable zones. Using the results of the loggings, a correlative equation is worked out between changes in flow speed and changes in permeability index obtained by hydraulics tests. Among the various results achieved by the geophysical logging, a fine correlationship is found between an equation relative to permeability obtained using electricity and density and water-permeability indexes obtained by hydraulic tests conducted in situ. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral ages, K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb mineral ages, and strontium, lead, neodymium, and oxygen isotopic compositions for granitic rocks from the Salinian Composite Terrane, California:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, R.W.; Champion, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes new and published age and isotopic data for whole-rocks and minerals from granitic rocks in the Salinian composite terrane, California. Rubidium-strontium whole-rock ages of plutons are in two groups, Early Cretaceous (122 to 100 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (95 to 82 Ma). Early Cretaceous plutons occur in all granitic rock exposures from Bodega Head in the north to those from the Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges in the central part of the terrane. Late Cretaceous plutons have been identified in the Point Reyes Peninsula, the Santa Lucia and the Gabilan Ranges, and in the La Panza Range in the southern part of the terrane. Ranges of initial values of isotopic compositions are 87Sr/86Sr, 0.7046-0.7147, δ18O, +8.5 to +12.5 per mil, 206Pb/204Pb, 18.901-19.860, 207Pb/204Pb, 15.618-15.814, 208Pb/204Pb, 38.569- 39.493, and εNd, +0.9 to -8.6. The initial 87Sr/86Sr=0.706 isopleth is identified in the northern Gabilan Range and in the Ben Lomond area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in Montara Mountain, in Bodega Head, and to the west of the Farallon Islands on the Cordell Bank. This isotopic boundary is offset about 95 miles (160km) by right-lateral displacements along the San Gregorio-Hosgri and San Andreas fault systems.

  8. Granites petrology, structure, geological setting, and metallogeny

    CERN Document Server

    Nédélec, Anne; Bowden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Granites are emblematic rocks developed from a magma that crystallized in the Earth’s crust. They ultimately outcrop at the surface worldwide. This book, translated and updated from the original French edition Pétrologie des Granites (2011) is a modern presentation of granitic rocks from magma genesis to their crystallization at a higher level into the crust. Segregation from the source, magma ascent and shapes of granitic intrusions are also discussed, as well as the eventual formation of hybrid rocks by mingling/mixing processes and the thermomechanical aspects in country rocks around granite plutons. Modern techniques for structural studies of granites are detailed extensively. Granites are considered in their geological spatial and temporal frame, in relation with plate tectonics and Earth history from the Archaean eon. A chapter on granite metallogeny explains how elements of economic interest are concentrated during magma crystallization, and examples of Sn, Cu, F and U ore deposits are presented. Mi...

  9. A comparison study of single and double layer repositories for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Suk

    2004-02-01

    The present study is to analyze and compare a long term thermohydro mechanical interaction behavior of a single layer and a double layer repository for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, and then to contribute this understanding to the development of a Korean disposal concept. The model includes a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, PWR spent nuclear fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and mixed bentonite backfilled in the rest of the space within a repository cavern. It is assumed that two joint sets exist within the model. Joint set 1 includes joints of 56 .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m, and joint set 2 is in the perpendicular direction to joint set 1 and includes joints of .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m. The two dimensional distinct element code, UDEC is used for the analysis. To understand the joint behavior adjacent to the repository cavern, Barton-Bandis joint model is used. Effect of the decay heat from PWR spent fuels on the repository model has been analyzed, and a steady state flow algorithm is used for the hydraulic analysis

  10. Verification of the both hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical code results by an on-site test in granitic rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Polák

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The project entitled “Methods and tools for the evaluation of the effect of engeneered barriers on distant interactions in the environment of a deep repository facility” deals with the ability to validate the behavior of applied engeneered barriers on hydrodynamic and migration parameters in the water-bearing granite environment of a radioactive waste deep repository facility. A part of the project represents a detailed mapping of the fracture network by means of geophysical and drilling surveys on the test-site (active granite quarry, construction of model objects (about 100 samples with the shape of cylinders, ridges and blocks, and the mineralogical, petrological and geochemical description of granite. All the model objects were subjected to migration and hydrodynamic tests with the use of fluorescein and NaCl as tracers. The tests were performed on samples with simple fractures, injected fractures and with an undisturbed integrity (verified by ultrasonic. The gained hydrodynamic and migration parameters of the model objects were processed with the modeling software NAPSAC and FEFLOW. During the following two years, these results and parameters will be verified (on the test-site by means of a long-term field test including the tuning of the software functionality.

  11. Petrophysical and Mineralogical Research on the Influence of CO2 Injection on Mesozoic Reservoir and Cap-rocks from the Polish Lowlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkowski, R.; Wdowin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Special equipment, simulating formation conditions, was designed to study interactions between injected CO 2 , rocks and brines. The investigations were carried out on samples collected from reservoir and cap-rocks of the Pagorki (Cretaceous deposits) and Brzesc Kujawski (Jurassic deposits) boreholes. Mineralogical and petrographic investigations were carried out on the samples before and after the experiment to determine changes occurring as a result of the processes. The investigations proved that these rocks show good quality reservoir and sealing properties. The experiment did not significantly worsen the reservoir properties of the rocks. (authors)

  12. Analysis of Precursors Prior to Rock Burst in Granite Tunnel Using Acoustic Emission and Far Infrared Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhao Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the physical mechanism of the anomalous behaviors observed prior to rock burst, the acoustic emission (AE and far infrared (FIR techniques were applied to monitor the progressive failure of a rock tunnel model subjected to biaxial stresses. Images of fracturing process, temperature changes of the tunnel, and spatiotemporal serials of acoustic emission were simultaneously recorded during deformation of the model. The b-value derived from the amplitude distribution data of AE was calculated to predict the tunnel rock burst. The results showed that the vertical stress enhanced the stability of the tunnel, and the tunnels with higher confining pressure demonstrated a more abrupt and strong rock burst. Abnormal temperature changes around the wall were observed prior to the rock burst of the tunnel. Analysis of the AE events showed that a sudden drop and then a quiet period could be considered as the precursors to forecast the rock burst hazard. Statistical analysis indicated that rock fragment spalling occurred earlier than the abnormal temperature changes, and the abnormal temperature occurred earlier than the descent of the AE b-value. The analysis indicated that the temperature changes were more sensitive than the AE b-value changes to predict the tunnel rock bursts.

  13. Geochronology and geochemistry of Mesozoic intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif of NE China: Implications for the evolution and spatial extent of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Xu, Wen-Liang; Tang, Jie; Pei, Fu-Ping; Wang, Feng; Sun, Chen-Yang

    2018-04-01

    This study presents new zircon U-Pb-Hf and whole-rock geochemical data for intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif of NE China, with the aim of furthering our understanding of the evolution and spatial influence of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that five stages of Mesozoic magmatism are recorded in the Xing'an Massif, namely during the Middle Triassic ( 237 Ma), the Late Triassic ( 225 Ma), the Early Jurassic ( 178 Ma), the Middle Jurassic ( 168 Ma), and the late Early Cretaceous ( 130 Ma). The Middle Triassic-Early Jurassic intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif are dominantly granodiorites, monzogranites, and syenogranites that formed from magma generated by partial melting of newly accreted continental crust. Geochemistry of the Middle Triassic-Early Jurassic granitoid suites of the Xing'an Massif indicates their formation at an active continental margin setting, related to the southwards subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate. The Middle Jurassic monzogranites in the Xing'an Massif are geochemically similar to adakites and have εHf(t) values (+3.8 to +5.8) and Hf two-stage model ages (TDM2; 979-850 Ma) that are indicative of derivation from magma generated by partial melting of thickened juvenile lower crust. The Middle Jurassic monzogranites formed in a compressional setting related to the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif are dominated by A-type granitoids that are associated with bimodal volcanic rocks, suggesting their formation in an extensional environment related to either (i) delamination of a previously thickened region of the crust, associated with the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime; (ii) the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate; or (iii) the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  14. Late Mesozoic basin and range tectonics and related magmatism in Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezi Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During the Late Mesozoic Middle Jurassic–Late Cretaceous, basin and range tectonics and associated magmatism representative of an extensional tectonic setting was widespread in southeastern China as a result of Pacific Plate subduction. Basin tectonics consists of post-orogenic (Type I and intra-continental extensional basins (Type II. Type I basins developed in the piedmont and intraland during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, in which coarse-grained terrestrial clastic sediments were deposited. Type II basins formed during intra-continental crustal thinning and were characterized by the development of grabens and half-grabens. Graben basins were mainly generated during the Middle Jurassic and were associated with bimodal volcanism. Sediments in half-grabens are intercalated with rhyolitic tuffs and lavas and are Early Cretaceous in age with a dominance of Late Cretaceous–Paleogene red beds. Ranges are composed of granitoids and bimodal volcanic rocks, A-type granites and dome-type metamorphic core complexes. The authors analyzed lithological, geochemical and geochronological features of the Late Mesozoic igneous rock assemblages and proposed some geodynamical constraints on forming the basin and range tectonics of South China. A comparison of the similarities and differences of basin and range tectonics between the eastern and western shores of the Pacific is made, and the geodynamical evolution model of the Southeast China Block during Late Mesozoic is discussed. Studied results suggest that the basin and range terrane within South China developed on a pre-Mesozoic folded belt was derived from a polyphase tectonic evolution mainly constrained by subduction of the western Pacific Plate since the Late Mesozoic, leading to formation of various magmatism in a back-arc extensional setting. Its geodynamic mechanism can compare with that of basin and range tectonics in the eastern shore of the Pacific. Differences of basin and range

  15. Catchment-wide weathering and erosion rates of mafic, ultramafic, and granitic rock from cosmogenic meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhaus, N.; Wittmann, H.; Krám, P.; Christl, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2018-02-01

    Quantifying rates of weathering and erosion of mafic rocks is essential for estimating changes to the oceans alkalinity budget that plays a significant role in regulating atmospheric CO2 levels. In this study, we present catchment-wide rates of weathering, erosion, and denudation measured with cosmogenic nuclides in mafic and ultramafic rock. We use the ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be, deposited from the atmosphere onto the weathering zone, to stable 9Be, a trace metal released by silicate weathering. We tested this approach in stream sediment and water from three upland forested catchments in the north-west Czech Republic. The catchments are underlain by felsic (granite), mafic (amphibolite) and ultramafic (serpentinite) lithologies. Due to acid rain deposition in the 20th century, the waters in the granite catchment exhibit acidic pH, whereas waters in the mafic catchments exhibit neutral to alkaline pH values due to their acid buffering capability. The atmospheric depositional 10Be flux is estimated to be balanced with the streams' dissolved and particulate meteoric 10Be export flux to within a factor of two. We suggest a correlation method to derive bedrock Be concentrations, required as an input parameter, which are highly heterogeneous in these small catchments. Derived Earth surface metrics comprise (1) Denudation rates calculated from the 10Be/9Be ratio of the "reactive" Be (meaning sorbed to mineral surfaces) range between 110 and 185 t km-2 y-1 (40 and 70 mm ky-1). These rates are similar to denudation rates we obtained from in situ-cosmogenic 10Be in quartz minerals present in the bedrock or in quartz veins in the felsic and the mafic catchment. (2) The degree of weathering, calculated from the fraction of 9Be released from primary minerals as a new proxy, is about 40-50% in the mafic catchments, and 10% in the granitic catchment. Lastly, (3) erosion rates were calculated from 10Be concentrations in river sediment and corrected for sorting

  16. Analysis of Precursors Prior to Rock Burst in Granite Tunnel Using Acoustic Emission and Far Infrared Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zhengzhao; Liu, Xiangxin; Zhang, Yanbo; Tang, Chunan

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical mechanism of the anomalous behaviors observed prior to rock burst, the acoustic emission (AE) and far infrared (FIR) techniques were applied to monitor the progressive failure of a rock tunnel model subjected to biaxial stresses. Images of fracturing process, temperature changes of the tunnel, and spatiotemporal serials of acoustic emission were simultaneously recorded during deformation of the model. The b-value derived from the amplitude distribution data of AE wa...

  17. Determination of radioactive materials in granite used as ornamental rocks; Determinacao de materiais radioativos em granitos utilizados como rochas ornamentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Humberto Terrazas; Barbosa, Joao Batista Santos; Murta, Clecio Campi; Rocha, Francisco de Assis [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)). E-mail: salasht@urano.cdtn.br; Nalini Junior, Herminio Arias; Mendes, Julio Cesar [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas. Dept. de Geologia

    2000-07-01

    For environment quality control, either in a global or regional perspective, the determination of the radioactivity present in the minerals of rocks must be included. This control is carried out through specific analysis, applied to all geological materials used in civil architecture design and other applications (e.g. artistic). To date, the radioactivity of rocks has not been specifically studied, from which an adequate and comprehensive systematics is applied, in order to determine the radioactive minerals and their corresponding alterations. In Brazil, the industry of ornamental rocks is continually increasing at high rates, with a growing variety of rocks being commercialized locally as well as abroad. To a certain extent, the technical characterization of these rocks, through standard procedures defined by standardization institutions, is already available worldwide. However, among the petrographic properties specified for these rocks, minor or accessory minerals (less than 1%) are not adequately determined and detected. Among these components are radioactive minerals and, occasionally, carriers of precious metals, rare earths and other economically important minerals. (author)

  18. Rock Magnetic Study of IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Site M0077A Drill Cores: Post-Impact Sediments, Impact Breccias, Melt, Granitic Basement and Dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Tikoo, S.; Zylberman, W.; Lofi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling at Site M0077 sampled post-impact sediments overlying a peak ring consisting of impact breccias, melt rock and granitoids. Here we focus on characterizing the peak ring using magnetic properties, which vary widely and depend on mineralogy, depositional and emplacement conditions and secondary alterations. Rock magnetic properties are integrated with Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) data, vertical seismic profile, physical properties, petrographic and chemical analyses and geophysical models. We measure low-field magnetic susceptibility at low- and high-frequencies, intensity and direction of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and laboratory-induced isothermal (IRM) and anhysteretic (ARM) magnetizations, alternating-field demagnetization of NRM, IRM and NRM, susceptibility variation with temperature, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis and IRM back-field demagnetization. Post-impact carbonates show low susceptibilities and NRM intensities, variable frequency-dependent susceptibilities and multivectorial remanences residing in low and high coercivity minerals. Hysteresis loops show low coercivity saturation magnetizations and variable paramagnetic mineral contents. Impact breccias (suevites) and melt rock show higher susceptibilities, low frequency-dependent susceptibilities, high NRM, ARM and IRM intensities and moderate ARM intensity/susceptibility ratios. Magnetic signal is dominated by fine-grained magnetite and titanomagnetites with PSD domain states. Melt rocks at the base of impactite section show the highest susceptibilities and remanence intensities. Basement section is characterized by low susceptibilities in the granites and higher values in the dikes, with NRM and ARM intensities increasing towards the base. The high susceptibilities and remanence intensities correlate with high seismic velocities, density and decreased porosity and electrical resistivity. Fracturing and alteration account for the reduced seismic velocities

  19. Granites and granitoids of the southern region - Granite molybdenite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issler, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Economic concentrations of molybdenum are genetically closely associated with acidic and moderately acid granitoids-granites, granodiorites, monzonites and diorites, and are located in two geotectonic settings: subduction-related and rift-related. The aim of this paper is twofold, first succinctly approach the geology, tectonic setting and chemical parameters of the 'granite molybdenite system' as defined by Mutschler and/or alcali granite porphyry bodies emplaced in the North American continent for occasion of a Mesozoic-Fanerozoic extensile event; second to relate the computer-assisted evaluation of 422 major element chemical analysis of granites and granitoids of southern region of Brazil, using chemical fingerprints (SiO 2 ≥ 74. Owt%, Na 2 O ≤ 3.6wt%, K 2 O ≥ 4.5wt%), and K 2 O/Na 2 O ratio > 1.5 developed and testified from North American and Finnish occurrences, may locate molybdenite-bearing granite bodies with high exploration potential. These techniques suggest that some late Precambrian to early Paleozoic granite-rhyolite assemblages inserted at domains of the SG. 22/23 Curitiba/Iguape, SH. 21/22 Uruguaiana/Porto Alegre and SI.22 Lagoa Mirim Sheets, have exploration potential for molybdenum. (author) [pt

  20. Data and uncertainty assessment for radionuclide K{sub d} partitioning coefficients in granitic rock for use in SR-Can calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, James; Neretnieks, Ivars; Malmstroem, Maria [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-10-15

    SKB is currently preparing licence applications related to the proposed deep repository for spent nuclear fuel as well as the encapsulation plant required for canister fabrication. The present report is one of several specific data reports that form the data input to an interim safety report (SR-Can) for the encapsulation plant licence application. This report concerns the derivation and recommendation of generic K{sub d} data (i.e. linear partitioning coefficients) for safety assessment modelling of far-field radionuclide transport in fractured granitic rock. The data are derived for typical Swedish groundwater conditions and rock types distinctive of those found on the Simpevarp peninsula and Forsmark. Data have been derived for 8 main elements (Cs, Sr, Ra, Ni, Th, U, Np, Am) and various oxidation states. The data have also been supplied with tentative correction factors to account for artefacts that have not been previously considered in detail in previous compilations. For the main reviewed solutes the data are given in terms of a best estimate K{sub d} value assumed to be the median of the aggregate set of selected data. A range corresponding to the 25-75% inter-quartile range is also specified and probable ranges of uncertainty are estimated in the form of an upper and lower limit to the expected variability. Data for an additional 19 elements that have not been reviewed are taken from a previous compilation by Carbol and Engkvist.

  1. The Cambrian-Ordovician rocks of Sonora, Mexico, and southern Arizona, southwestern margin of North America (Laurentia): chapter 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, William R.; Harris, Alta C.; Repetski, John E.; Derby, James R.; Fritz, R.D.; Longacre, S.A.; Morgan, W.A.; Sternbach, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cambrian and Ordovician shelf, platform, and basin rocks are present in Sonora, Mexico, and southern Arizona and were deposited on the southwestern continental margin of North America (Laurentia). Cambrian and Ordovician rocks in Sonora, Mexico, are mostly exposed in scattered outcrops in the northern half of the state. Their discontinuous nature results from extensive Quaternary and Tertiary surficial cover, from Tertiary and Mesozoic granitic batholiths in western Sonora, and from widespread Tertiary volcanic deposits in the Sierra Madre Occidental in eastern Sonora. Cambrian and Ordovician shelf rocks were deposited as part of the the southern miogeocline on the southwestern continental margin of North America.

  2. Controls on Weathering of Pyrrhotite in a Low-Sulfide, Granitic Mine-Waste Rock in the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, J. B.; Holland, S.; Sinclair, S.; Blowes, D.

    2013-12-01

    Increased environmental risk is incurred with expansion of mineral extraction in the Arctic. A greater understanding of geochemical processes associated with hard-rock mining in this cold climate is needed to evaluate and mitigate these risks. A laboratory and in-situ experiment was conducted to examine mineral weathering and the generation of acid rock drainage in a low-sulfide, run-of-mine waste rock in an Arctic climate. Rock with different concentrations of sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite [Fe7S8] containing small amounts of Co and Ni) and carbonates were weathered in the laboratory and in-situ, large-scale test piles to examine leachate composition and mineral weathering. The relatively larger sulfide-containing rock produced sufficient acid to overcome carbonate buffering and produced a declining pH environment with concomitant release of SO4, Fe, Co, and Ni. Following carbonate consumption, aluminosilicate buffering stabilized the pH above 4 until a reduction in acid generation. Results from the laboratory experiment assisted in determining that after consumption of 1.6 percent of the total sulfide, the larger sulfide-concentration test pile likely is at an internal steady-state or maximal weathering rate after seven years of precipitation input and weathering that is controlled by an annual freeze-thaw cycle. Further weathering of the test pile should be driven by external factors of temperature and precipitation in this Arctic, semi-arid region instead of internal factors of wetting and non-equilibrium buffering. It is predicted that maximal weathering will continue until at least 20 percent of the total sulfide is consumed. Using the identified evolution of sulfide consumption in this Arctic climate, a variable rate factor can now be assessed for the possible early evolution and maximal weathering of larger scale waste-rock piles and seasonal differences because of changes in the volume of a waste-rock pile undergoing active weathering due to the freeze

  3. Migration of fluids as a tool to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of geological radioactive wastes repositories (RARN) in granitoid rocks: tests on granites submitted to natural deformation vs. not deformed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Nilo Henrique Balzani; Barbosa, Pedro Henrique Silva; Santos, Alanna Leite dos; Amorim, Lucas Eustáquio Dias; Freitas, Mônica Elizetti de; Rios, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Fluid composition and migration studies in granitoid rocks subjected to deformation events are a factor that should be considered in the selection of geologically favorable areas for RANR construction, and may be an excellent complement to engineering barrier designs. The research objective was to develop an academic approach, comparing the behavior of deformed and non-deformed granites, not being related to any CNEN project of deploying repositories. It is concluded that in the choice of suitable sites for the construction of repositories, granite bodies that are submitted to metamorphic / deformation / hydrothermal events or that are very fractured should be disregarded. The domes of granite batholith that have undergone hydraulic billing should also be discarded. It has been found that, because of the warming caused by radioactive decay reactions, there is a real possibility that the release of potentially abrasive fluids contained in the minerals can reach and corrode the walls of the repositories and / or packaging

  4. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

    1978-02-15

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced

  6. Geochronology (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb) of the proterozoic granulitic and granitic rocks around Usilampatti, Madurai district, Tamil Nadu: implication on age of various lithounits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, U.K.; Pandey, B.K.; Krishnamurthy, P.

    2005-01-01

    Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb systematics on mafic granulites, intermediate- charnockites, charnockites, calc-granulites, orthogneisses, leptynites, granites and two (2) mineral samples (microcline and muscovite) from pegmatite have been studied. Sm-Nd model ages (T DM ) for most of the rocks cluster around 2.1 Ga. Calc-granulites gave Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of 1339 ± 110 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio (I.R.) = 0.709. Mesoproterozoic age for the Metasedimentary Group of rocks (calc-granulites) has been inferred based on their 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio also. Granites and leptynites have yielded Rb-Sr whole rock isochron ages of 823± 38 Ma, with I.R. = 0.713 and 894± 82 Ma, with I.R. = 0.708 respectively which are younger than the calc-granulites. Microcline and muscovite from pegmatite gave Rb-Sr model ages as 532 and 491 Ma respectively. Granites, leptynites and calc-granulites are derived from the crustal source as indicated by their high initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios. Most probably the protolith of the granitic and granulitic rocks is of Palaeoproterozoic age in this part of the Madurai Block. The minimum age of granulite grade of metamorphism has been inferred at c. 850 Ma, indirectly on the basis of Rb-Sr ages of leptynites, which normally form during the evolution of granulite facies assemblages. Both granulite facies metamorphism and granitic magmatism probably took place during Neoproterozoic period correlatable to the early phase of Pan-African orogeny. Later decompression, causing mineral scale resetting of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd systematics, around 450-550 Ma, may correspond to the final exhumation, which brought the middle to lower crustal granulites to upper crustal levels, during the last phase of Pan-African activity. As per ages obtained on various lithounits in the present study the Metasedimentary Group of rocks (Mesoproterozoic) are younger than the Charnockite Group of rocks (Palaeoproterozoic) followed by the rocks belonging to the Migmatite Complex

  7. Geochronology (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb) of the proterozoic granulitic and granitic rocks around Usilampatti, Madurai District, Tamil Nadu: implication on age of various lithounits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, U.K.; Pandey, B.K.; Krishnamurthy, P.

    2005-01-01

    Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb systematics on mafic granulites, intermediate-charnockites, charnockites, calc- granulites, orthogneisses, leptynites, granites and two (2) mineral samples (microcline and muscovite) from pegmatite have been studied. Sm-Nd model ages (T DM ) for most of the rocks cluster around 2.1 Ga. Calc-granulites gave Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of 1339± 110 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio (IR)= 0.709. Mesoproterozoic age for the metasedimentary group of rocks (calc-granulites) has been inferred based on their 86 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio also. Granites and leptynites have yielded Rb-Sr whole rock isochron ages of 823 ± 38 Ma, with I.R. = 0.713 and 894± 82 Ma, with I.R.= 0.708 respectively which are younger than the calc-granulites. Microcline and muscovite from pegmatite gave Rb-Sr model ages as 532 and 491 Ma respectively. Granites, leptynites and calc-granulites are derived from the crustal source as indicated by their high initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios. Most probably the protolith of the granitic and granulitic rocks is of Palaeoproterozoic age in this part of the Madurai Block. The minimum age of granulite grade of metamorphism has been inferred at c. 850 Ma, indirectly on the basis of Rb-Sr ages of leptynites, which normally form during the evolution of granulite facies assemblages. Both granulite facies metamorphism and granitic magmatism probably took place during Neoproterozoic period correlatable to the early phase of Pan-African orogeny. Later decompression, causing mineral scale resetting of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd systematics, around 450-550 Ma, may correspond to the final exhumation, which brought the middle to lower crustal granulites to upper crustal levels, during the last phase of Pan-African activity. As per ages obtained on various lithounits in the present study the Metasedimentary Group of rocks (Mesoproterozoic) are younger than the Charnockite Group of rocks (Palaeoproterozoic) followed by the rocks belonging to the Migmatite Complex

  8. Preliminary study of the uranium favorability of granitic and contact-metamorphic rocks of the Owens Valley area, Inyo and Mono Counties, California, and Esmeralda and Mineral Counties, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupp, G.M.; Mitchell, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    Granitic and contact-metamorphic rocks of the Owens Valley area were sampled to determine their favorability for uranium. Uranium deposits associated with these rocks were examined to determine the mode of occurrence. Metamorphic rocks near contacts with intrusive rocks include skarns, schists, quartzites, metaconglomerates, hornfels, gneisses, and metavolcanics. The grade of contact metamorphism ranges from slight to intense, depending upon the distance from the intrusive contact. The average U 3 O 8 content of the metamorphic rock samples is 3 ppM. Metamorphic rock samples in a roof pendant at the Claw prospect contain as much as 3 percent U 3 O 8 . Skarn samples from the Birch Creek pluton contain as much as 114 ppM U 3 O 8 ; those from the Santa Rita Flat pluton contain as much as 23 ppM U 3 O 8 . Most of the intrusive rocks are granite, quartz monzonite, or monzonite. Granodiorite and diorite are less common, and gabbro is rare. The average U 3 O 8 content of the crystalline rock samples is 4 ppM. Samples from a quartz-monzonite pluton east of Lone Pine, California, and quartz monzonite in the Santa Rosa Hills had maximum contents of 28 and 13 ppM U 3 O 8 , respectively. Areas of contact metamorphism and metasomatism, such as those at the Claw prospect and Birch Creek pluton, are probably the most favorable sites for uranium deposits. There are many miles of granitic and contact-metamorphic zones in which undiscovered uranium deposits may exist. Although the overall uranium content of granitic rocks appears to be low, the pluton east of Lone Pine and the Hunter Mountain pluton in the area of the Santa Rosa Hills have sufficient uranium to have acted as uranium and detrital source rocks for uranium deposits that may now be buried in Tertiary sediments in the basins around the plutons. The Claw deposit is the only known uranium deposit of a size and grade to be of possible commercial interest

  9. Modeling of damage, permeability changes and pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel in granitic rock at URL, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Börgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of a test tunnel associated with the tunnel sealing experiment (TSX) at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters, the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increase alongside the tunnel is a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis’ coefficient, α ≈ 0.2, a porosity of n ≈ 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k ≈ 2 × 10-22 m2, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

  10. Petrochemistry and zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks in the Wang Nam Khiao area, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand: Implications for petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanka, Alongkot; Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Daorerk, Veerote; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Takamura, Yusuke; Sutthirat, Chakkaphan

    2018-05-01

    Carboniferous biotite granite, Late Permian hornblende granite, and Triassic biotite-hornblende granite, all of which belong to the Eastern Granite Belt, expose in the Wang Nam Khiao area, Nakhon Ratchasima, northeastern Thailand. The Carboniferous biotite granite is dominated by quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, and biotite. The Late Permian hornblende granite contains dominant assemblages of plagioclase, quartz, K-feldspar, hornblende, and minor amount of biotite, while the Triassic biotite-hornblende granite consists of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar with small amounts of biotite, and hornblende. The REE patterns with steep decrease from light to heavy REE together with the LILE (e.g. K, Sr) enrichment and depletion of some particular HFSE (e.g. Nb, Ti) indicate low degree of partial melting. Mineral chemistry of biotite and hornblende in the granites reflects crystallization from hydrous calc-alkaline arc-derived magmas possibly formed by subduction. Amphibole-plagioclase thermometry and Al-in-hornblende barometry indicate that the Late Permian hornblende granite and the Triassic biotite-hornblende granite may have equilibrated at 3.0-5.8 kbar/700-820 °C and 2.0-3.2 kbar/600-750 °C, respectively, in the middle-upper crust (about 10-15 km depth). Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the Carboniferous biotite granite, Late Permian hornblende granite and Triassic biotite-hornblende granite yielded intrusion ages of 314.6-284.9 Ma, 253.4 Ma, and 237.8 Ma, respectively, which implies multiple episodes of arc-magmatism formed by Palaeo-Tethys subduction beneath Indochina Terrane during Late Carboniferous/Early Permian, Late Permian and Middle Triassic.

  11. Application of streaming potential method for detection of fractures in granitic rock; Kamaishi kozan ni okeru ryutai ryudo den`iho tekiyo shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negi, T; Yokoi, K; Yoneda, Y [Nittetsu Mining Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Senba, T [Power Reactor and Nuclear fuel Development Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Measurements were made using the streaming potential method for the purpose of investigating the expansion of hydration cracks, direction of their propagation, and the chaining of cracked surfaces, in the granitic rock. Tests were conducted by use of a bore hole in the gallery wall. The bore hole yielded approximately 400 liters of water per minute, the bore hole was closed and then opened, and the change with the passage of time in the spontaneous potential (SP) on the gallery wall was measured. At a spot 31.2m from the mine entrance, the SP dropped by 15mV simultaneously with the opening of the bore hole, and rose by 14mV simultaneously with the closure of the same. The phenomenon was true for other locations, that is, for the section from the mine entrance to a spot 9.0m therefrom, and for a section beginning at 15.0m and ending at 19.2m therefrom. No change in the SP was observed in a group of cracks with water springing out of the gallery roof, beginning at a point 40m and ending at a point 54m from the mine entrance. The result suggests the possible application of the streaming potential method to the investigation of cracks. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  12. Deep ground water microbiology in Swedish granite rock and it's relevance for radio-nuclide migration from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1989-03-01

    Data on numbers, species and activity of deep ground water microbial populations in Swedish granite rock have been collected. Specific studies are performed on radio-nuclid uptake on bacteria judge to be probable inhabitants in Swedish nuclear waste repositories. An integrated mobile field laboratory was used for water sampling and for the immediate counting and inoculation of the samples from boreholes at levels between 129 and 860 m. A sampler adapted for the collection of undisturbed samples for gas analysis was used to collect samples for bacterial enumerations and enrichments. The sampler can be opened and closed from the surface at the actual sampling depth. The samples can subsequently be brought to the surface without contact with air and with the pressure at the actual sampling depth. The number of bacteria were determined in samples from the gas sampler when this was possible. Else numbers are determined in the water that is pumped up to the field lab. The average total number of bacteria is 3 x 10 5 bacterial ml -1 . The number of bacteria possible to recover with plate count arrays from 0.10 to 21.9%. (author)

  13. Present status of the interlaboratorial co-operative study for standards rocks of granite (GB-1) and basalt (BB-1) from the Geochemistry Department of I.G.U.F. Ba./Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhares, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Results for major, minor and trace elements obtained by twelve laboratories for the standards rocks, Granite (GB-1) and Basalte (BB-1), of the Geochemistry Department of Geociences Institute-U-F.Ba are presented. At present status of the study it is possible to approach the most probably correct value (usable value) for the concentration of each of the major and minor elements. (author) [pt

  14. Europe's last Mesozoic bird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyke, Gareth J.; Dortangs, Rudi W.; Jagt, John W.; Mulder, Eric W. A.; Schulp, Anne S.; Chiappe, Luis M.

    2002-01-01

    Birds known from more than isolated skeletal elements are rare in the fossil record, especially from the European Mesozoic. This paucity has hindered interpretations of avian evolution immediately prior to, and in the aftermath of, the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction event. We report on a

  15. Structure of aluminosilicate melts produced from granite rocks for the manufacturing of petrurgical glass-ceramics construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakin, A. G.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aluminosilicate melt is a partly ordered phase and is the origin of glass for producing glassceramics and petrurgical materials. They are well extended used as construction materials for pavings and coatings. Its structure can be described in the terms of the aluminosilica tetrahedras coordination so-called Q speciation. The proportions of tetrahedra with different degree of connectivity with others (from totally connected to free has been studied by NMR and IR methods for sodium-silicate melts. Medium range structure can be characterized by the sizes of irreducible rings composed of the aluminosilica tetrahedra. Systematic increase of the four member rings proportion in the sequence of the Ab-An glasses were observed. The water dissolution in sodium-silicate glass affects the Q speciation. Cations network-modifiers positions in the melt structure are important to know since these cations stabilize particular structure configurations. Modification of the distribution of Na coordination in the sodium-silicate glass at water dissolution was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The observed modification of the hydrous aluminosilicate melt structure resulted in the shift of the eutectic composition in the granite system with decreasing of the crystallization field of feldspars. The feldspar growth rates show practically no dependence on the water content in the concentration range 2-4 wt.%. Likewise, the solved water has a little influence on the crystal growth rate of the lithium silicate phase in lithium containing glasses in accordance with estimated enhancing of the diffusion transport.

    Los fundidos de alumino-silicato son una fase parcialmente ordenada. Su estructura puede ser descrita en términos de la coordinación de tetraedros de alúmina-sílice también denominados especies Q. La proporción de tetraedros con diferente grado de conectividad entre si se ha investigado por espectroscopias de RMN e IR en fundidos de silicatos

  16. Redox front penetration in the fractured Toki Granite, central Japan: An analogue for redox reactions and redox buffering in fractured crystalline host rocks for repositories of long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koshi; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Akagawa, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Shoji; Metcalfe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep redox front developed in orogenic granitic rock have been studied. • The process was controlled by the buffering capacity of minerals. • This is an analogue of redox front penetration into HLW repositories in Japan. - Abstract: Redox buffering is one important factor to be considered when assessing the barrier function of potential host rocks for a deep geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste. If such a repository is to be sited in fractured crystalline host rock it must be demonstrated that waste will be emplaced deeper than the maximum depth to which oxidizing waters can penetrate from the earth’s surface via fractures, during the assessment timeframe (typically 1 Ma). An analogue for penetration of such oxidizing water occurs in the Cretaceous Toki Granite of central Japan. Here, a deep redox front is developed along water-conducting fractures at a depth of 210 m below the ground surface. Detailed petrographical studies and geochemical analyses were carried out on drill core specimens of this redox front. The aim was to determine the buffering processes and behavior of major and minor elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), during redox front development. The results are compared with analytical data from an oxidized zone found along shallow fractures (up to 20 m from the surface) in the same granitic rock, in order to understand differences in elemental migration according to the depth below the ground surface of redox-front formation. Geochemical analyses by XRF and ICP-MS of the oxidized zone at 210 m depth reveal clear changes in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratios and Ca depletion across the front, while Fe concentrations vary little. In contrast, the redox front identified along shallow fractures shows strong enrichments of Fe, Mn and trace elements in the oxidized zone compared with the fresh rock matrix. The difference can be ascribed to the changing Eh and pH of groundwater as it flows downwards in the granite, due to

  17. A tale of 10 plutons - Revisited: Age of granitic rocks in the White Mountains, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, E.H.; Conrad, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analysis and conventional K-Ar age determinations on plutonic rocks of the White Mountains define two stages of magmatic emplacement: Late Cretaceous, between ca. 90 Ma and 75 Ma, and Middle-Late Jurassic, between ca. 180 and 140 Ma. The Jurassic stage can be divided into two substages, 180-165 Ma and 150-140 Ma. Thermal effects of the younger plutons on the older granitoids partially to completely reset ages, making it difficult to determine the age of emplacement and cooling of several of the plutons even by 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analyses. New data together with published ages and regional geochronological synthesis of the Sierra Nevada batholith indicate that regions within the batholith have coherent periods or episodes of magmatic activity. In the White Mountains and Sierra Nevada directly to the west there was little or no activity in Early Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time; magmatism took place during relatively short intervals of 15 m.y. or less in the Middle and Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous periods. The new K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar analyses of granitoids from the White Mountains help, but do not completely clarify the complex history of emplacement, cooling, and reheating of the batholith.

  18. New paleomagnetic results from the Permian and Mesozoic rocks in central and northeast Thailand: their implications for the construction of the Indochina block in Pangea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Yan, Y.; Huang, B.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of the Indochina block, aiming to reconstruct the paleogeography, have been undertaken for several decades. Since the Indochina block is lack of reliable paleomagnetic data to constraint its paleo-positions during the Middle Permian to Upper Triassic, the paleogeography reconstruction is still in debate between different models reported. Here we present new paleomagnetic data of Middle Permian to Upper Triassic sediment rocks from the Indochina block in Thailand, and recalculate paleomagnetic data reported by different authors. We collected the Permian samples in 20 sites distributed in the central Thailand, and Triassic samples from the Huai Hin Lat and Nam Phong formations in 13 sites in the northern Thailand.The magnetic directions of the 11 sites of Permian limestones are not significantly clustered after tilt correction which implying a remagnetized result. Remarkably, in geographic coordinate, the 11 sites were distributed along a circle showing a similar inclination which is 22.9° implying the paleolatitude to be about 12°. Totally, 13 sites from the Huai Hin Lat formation are included in the calculation of the formation mean direction Dg/Ig = 21.4°/38.1°, kg = 19.5, α95 = 9.6° before and Ds/Is = 43.0°/48.0°, ks = 47.4, α95 = 6.1°, N = 13 after bedding correction. A pre-folding characteristic magnetization is suggested by the positive fold test result derived from the Huai Hin Lat formation, and thus implies a primary remanence of the Norian Stage Upper Triassic rocks. A new Nam Phong formation mean direction derived from 11 sites is Dg/Ig = 36.5°/31.3°, kg = 14.7, α95 = 12.3°before and Ds/Is = 36.4°/37.8°, ks = 68.5, α95 = 5.6°, N = 11 after bedding correction. The two formation mean directions correspond to the magnetic pole positions , Plat./Plon=48.7°N/165.9°E, A95=7.2° and Plat./Plon=55.2°N/178.0°E, A95=5.9°, respectively. A remarkable tectonic movement (~8° southward) of the Indochina block from the age of

  19. Multiple Mesozoic mineralization events in South China—an introduction to the thematic issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui-Zhong; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2012-08-01

    Mesozoic mineral deposits in South China include world-class deposits of W, Sn and Sb and those that provide the major sources of Ta, Cu, Hg, As, Tl, Pb, Zn, Au and Ag for the entire country. These deposits can be classified into polymetallic hydrothermal systems closely related to felsic intrusive rocks (Sn-W -Mo granites, Cu porphyries, polymetallic and Fe skarns, and polymetallic vein deposits) and low-temperature hydrothermal systems with no direct connection to igneous activities (MVT deposits, epithermal Au and Sb deposits). Recent studies have shown that they formed in the Triassic (Indosinian), Jurassic-Cretaceous (Early Yanshanian), and Cretaceous (Late Yanshanian) stages. Indosinian deposits include major MVT (Pb-Zn-Ag) deposits and granite-related W-Sn deposits. Early Yanshanian deposits are low-temperature Sb-Au and high-temperature W-Sn and Cu porphyry types. Many Late Yanshanian deposits are low-temperature Au-As-Sb-Hg and U deposits, and also include high-temperature W-Sn polymetallic deposits. The formation of these deposits is linked with a specific tectonothermal evolution and igneous activities. This special issue brings together some of the latest information in eight papers that deal with the origins and tectonic environments of mineral deposits formed in these stages. We anticipate that this issue will stimulate more interests in these ore deposits in South China.

  20. Immobilization of uranium in biofilm microorganisms exposed to groundwater seeps over granitic rock tunnel walls in Olkiluoto, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Pedersen, Karsten; Arnold, Thuro; Bok, Frank; Steudtner, Robin; Lehtinen, Anne; Brendler, Vinzenz

    2012-11-01

    In an underground rock characterization facility, the ONKALO tunnel in Finland, massive 5-10-mm thick biofilms were observed attached to tunnel walls where groundwater was seeping from bedrock fractures at a depth of 70 m. In laboratory experiments performed in a flow cell with detached biofilms to study the effect of uranium on the biofilm, uranium was added to the circulating groundwater (CGW) obtained from the fracture feeding the biofilm. The final uranium concentration in the CGW was adjusted to 4.25 × 10-5 M, in the range expected from a leaking spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister in a future underground repository. The effects were investigated using microelectrodes to measure pH and Eh, time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies and thermodynamic calculations were utilized as well. The results indicated that the studied biofilms constituted their own microenvironments, which differed significantly from that of the CGW. A pH of 5.37 was recorded inside the biofilm, approximately 3.5 units lower than the pH observed in the CGW, due to sulfide oxidation to sulfuric acid in the biofilm. Similarly, the Eh of +73 mV inside the biofilm was approximately 420 mV lower than the Eh measured in the CGW. Adding uranium increased the pH in the biofilm to 7.27 and reduced the Eh to -164 mV. The changes of Eh and pH influenced the bioavailability of uranium, since microbial metabolic processes are sensitive to metals and their speciation. EF-TEM investigations indicated that uranium in the biofilm was immobilized intracellularly in microorganisms by the formation of metabolically mediated uranyl phosphate, similar to needle-shaped autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2·2-6H2O) or meta-autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2·10-12H2O). In contrast, TRLFS studies of the contaminated CGW identified aqueous uranium carbonate species, likely (Ca2UO2[CO3]3), formed due to the high

  1. Natural radionuclide distribution in Brazilian commercial granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.M.; Veiga, R.; Soares, T.; Santos, A.M.A.; Aguiar, J.G.; Frasca, M.H.B.O.; Brage, J.A.P.; Uzeda, D.; Mangia, L.; Facure, A.; Mosquera, B.; Carvalho, C.; Gomes, P.R.S.

    2005-01-01

    The dimension stones sector in Brazil produces several varieties of granites, marbles, slates and basalts. More than half of this production corresponds to around 200 different commercial types of granites with specific names, geographical and geological origins and mineral compositions. The well-known natural radioactivity present in rocks, where high radiation levels are associated with igneous rocks such as granite, can be used to determine their general petrologic features. This subject is important in environmental radiological protection, since granites are widely used as building and ornamental stones. In this paper, it is applied to correlate the petrographic characteristics of commercial granites with their corresponding dose rates for natural radioactivity. Amounts of thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations have been reported in several Brazilian commercial granite samples

  2. Developing a Fracture Model of the Granite Rocks Around the Research Tunnel at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E.; Hadgu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) is located in Tono area in Central Japan. It is operated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with the main purpose of providing scientific basis for the research and development of technologies needed for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in fractured crystalline rocks. The current work is focused on the research and experiments in the tunnel located at 500 m depth. The data collected in the tunnel and exploratory boreholes were shared with the participants of the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX), an international research and model comparison collaboration. This study describes the development of the fracture model representing granite rocks around the research tunnel. The model domain is 100x150x100m with the main experimental part of the tunnel, Closure Test Drift, located approximately in the center. The major input data were the fracture traces measured on the tunnel walls (total of 2,023 fractures), fractures observed in the horizontal borehole parallel to the tunnel, and the packer tests conducted in this borehole and one vertical borehole located within the modeling domain. 78 fractures (the ones with the inflow) in the tunnel were incorporated in the development of the fracture model. Fracture size was derived from the fracture trace analysis. It was shown that the fracture radius followed lognormal distributions. Fracture transmissivity was estimated from an analytical solution of inflow into the tunnel through an individual fracture and the total measured inflow into the tunnel. 16 fractures were incorporated in the model along the horizontal borehole. The packer test data in the different well intervals were used to estimate the range in fracture transmissivity. A relationship between the fracture transmissivity and fracture radius was developed. The fractures in the tunnel and borehole were used to derive fracture orientation and

  3. Status of LLNL granite projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site

  4. Petrography, mineral chemistry and lithochemistry of the albitite and granite-gneissics rocks of anomaly 35 from Lagoa Real uranium province; Petrografia, quimica mineral e litoquimica do albitito e das rochas granito-gnaissicas da anomalia 35, provincia uranifera de Lagoa Real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Marques dos

    2016-07-01

    In the northwestern portion of the Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP), located in south-central Bahia, it is located one of the most promising uranium anomalies Brazil (an35, Gameleira I deposit), the reserves and proximity to the Cachoeira mine. Other anomalies of this sector (eg. 31 AN and AN34), are also considered strategic for the content of radioactive minerals and REE. The objective was to develop a study of a representative drill core of an35, where the main rocks PULR are present. The research focused on the mineralogical and chemical changes observed in the passages of a lithology to another, from the rock to the meta granitic albitites, through gneiss and transitional rocks, and making comparisons with similar lithologies sampled on testimonies of AN31 and 34. The granites are classified as hypersolvus coarse alkali-feldspar granite and are variably deformed. The main mineral assemblage in granites are perthitic orthoclase+hedenbergite+ quartz +hastingsite + biotite, and zircon, apatite, ilmenite and titanite are accessories. The reddening of these rocks are characterized by feldspars sericitization and hematitization and the presence of 'vazios'. The gneisses are mainly gray and reach milonitic to protomilonitics terms. These rocks have characteristics of subsolidus changes as swapped rims and metasomatic perthites. The tardi-magmatic association (amphibole+biotite) indicates final crystallization or late influx by superficial fluids resulting in an increase in water and volatiles, such as F and Cl in the system, which must also have carried rare-earth elementsGranites have geochemical affinity with A-type ferroan granite, A2, reduced and are post-collisional. Their patterns of incompatible elements and rare earths are comparable to Sao Timoteo Granite, but their petrographic features indicate that it is a less common granite facies. Albitites were classified as garnet albitites, magnetite albitites and biotite albitites. Contacts between

  5. A conceptual hydrodynamic model of a geological discontinuity in hard rock aquifers: Example of a quartz reef in granitic terrain in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Lachassagne, Patrick; Zaidi, Faisal K.; Chandra, Subash

    2011-08-01

    SummaryThe structure and hydrodynamic properties of geological discontinuities and of a deeply weathered granite aquifer near these structures are described on the basis of geological, geophysical and hydrodynamic investigations in two sites of South India located along a 20-40-m-wide quartz reef intruding a weathered Archean biotite granite. One of the two sites also comprises a metre-wide dolerite dyke. Weathering processes appear to be at the origin of fissures development and of a related enhanced local hydraulic conductivity, both in the quartz reef and in the surrounding granite. The weathering profile in the granite (saprolite and fissured layer) is characterized by an abrupt deepening of the weathered layers in the granite near the contact and in the quartz reef itself. Therefore, the weathering profile shows a 'U'-shape geometry with, among others, the verticalization of the granite's fissured layer. The hydraulic conductivity of this verticalized layer is on average 5 × 10 -6 m/s and storativity about 10 -3 (-). The hydraulic conductivity of the fissured quartz is 4-6 × 10 -6 m/s and its storativity about 3-5 × 10 -4 (-). Both media are also characterized by a matrix hydraulic conductivity (10 -7-10 -9 m/s) and by a significant heterogeneity in hydrodynamic properties that generates preferential flow paths along the sub-vertical fissures parallel to the reef axis. A special attention has been paid for characterizing this heterogeneity. The weathering of the dolerite dyke, however, results in a local low hydraulic conductivity, which consequently does not enhance either the thickness of weathered granite layers or its hydraulic conductivity. The obtained results complete the conceptual hydrogeological model developed for weathered granite aquifers in characterizing the relationships between weathering processes and hydrodynamic properties near geological discontinuities.

  6. Chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron ages of zircon and monazite from granitic rocks of the Negele area, southern Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yihunie, Tadesse

    2003-01-01

    CHIME (Chemical Th-U-total Pb Isochron Method) age determinations were made on zircon and monazite grains from granitoid samples in the Negele area of southern Ethiopia. A 611±32 Ma zircon age was obtained from a syn-tectonic hornblende-biotite granite of the Alghe domain. A 453±29 Ma zircon age and a 459±16 Ma monazite age were also obtained from post-tectonic two-mica granites of the Alghe domain and the Kenticha domain, respectively. Since these ca. 450 Ma zircon and monazite ages coincide well, as significant post-tectonic granitic magmatism appears to have occurred in southern Ethiopia in early Paleozoid time. The new CHIME age results indicate at least two episodes of granitic magmatism in southern Ethiopia in the late Proterozoic to early Paleozoic, with a ca. 150 Ma interval between syn- and post-tectonic granitic emplacements, and have a important geochronological constraint on the evolution of the East African Orogen. (author)

  7. Attempts of whole-rock K/Ar dating of mesozoic volcanic and hypabissal igneous rocks from the Central Subbetic (Southern Spain: A case of differential Argon loss related to very low-grade metamorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz de Galdeano, C.

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available 12 samples of basic intrusives within Triassic rocks «ophites» and 11 samples of volcanic and associated intrusives within Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sequences of the Subbetic Zone were subjected to whole-rock K/Ar dating in combination with chemical/petrological analysis. Satisfactory results were obtained only from a number of samples of volcanic rocks, however, analytical ages commonly agree, within about 10 relative percent, with those deduced from stratigraphic location. «Ophite» samples, on the other hand, may reveal considerably lower analytic ages than the volcanics and show much stronger scattering, even among samples collected within a small area. It is argued that the inferred loss of Ar results from very-low-grade alpine metamorphic alteration, which affected the «ophites» more intensely than the higher volcanic rocks. Other post-emplacement chemical changes, such as the degree of secondary oxidation of Fe, are also distintive among the two groups of samples, and are to some extent consistent with the above view in that the alteration environment of the ophites should have produced conditions for more penetrative fluid-rock interactions and homogeneous recrystallization. Overall, the magmatic activity from which the ophitic rocks originated might have started in the Late Triassic and continued in the Lower Jurassic. 80th, the «ophites» and the volcanics are though to be the result of magmatic events Collowing tensional to transtensive crustal movements affecting the external basins of the Betic Cordilleras Crom Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous times.Doce muestras de cuerpos básicos intrusivos en rocas triásicas («ofitas» y 11 muestras de volcanitas y rocas intrusivas asociadas en secuencias jurásico-cretáceas de la zona Subbética han sido objeto de datación radiométrica K/Ar (roca total en combinación con análisis químico-petrográfico. Las edades analíticas obtenidas son 's

  8. Experimental thermomechanical damage as first approach to understand the petrophysical behavior of the granitic host-rocks from an active fractured-geothermal system (Liquiñe, Chile - 39º S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Piernas, E.; Sepúlveda, J.; Arancibia, G.; Roquer, T.; Morata, D.; Bracke, R.; Vázquez, P.

    2017-12-01

    Chile's location along an active subduction zone has endowed it with a high geothermal potential. However, a better understanding of the thermomechanical and fluid transport properties of rocks is required to assess the potential of geothermal systems and thereby enhance the possibilities for their use. We have focused in the area surrounding Liquiñe, in the Southern Andean Volcanic Zone (Chile, 39º S). This area hosts several recent thermal manifestations, predominantly hot springs, and it is affected by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), which controls the position of the modern volcanic arc in southern Chile and cuts the Patagonian batholith. We have carried out experimental analyzes in order to understand this geothermal system and the influence of the thermomechanical features over the granitic host-rocks (low-porous crystalline rocks). To do this, physical properties such as capillary water absorption coefficient, Vp-wave velocity and compressive resistance were evaluated before and after heating rock samples at 150 ºC and 210 ºC (at ambient pressure) in an oven at a heating rate of 6 °C/min and maintaining the maximum temperature for 4 hours. The cooling rate was less than 2 °C/min to avoid shrinkage phenomena. The results show that the damage by heat was greater at 210 ºC than 150 ºC, likely due to an increased capillary coefficient ( 30% and 25%). On the contrary, Vpvelocity ( -19% and -13%) and compressive resistance ( -27% in both cases) decreased, with respect to unheated samples. Consequently, we can infer an inherent effect on the later fracture process due to the thermal stress when this granitic body was at depth. After that, and considering the local and regional strain-stress state, both factors have facilitated the fluid flow, increasing the permeability of this granitic host-rock allowing the presence of hot-springs. Future work will be to acquire complementary petrophysical parameters, such as porosity, permeability, thermal

  9. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif; Estudio geoquimico de los procesos de interaccion agua-roca sobre sistemas goetermales de aguas alcalinas en granitoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buil gutierrez, B; Garcia Sanz, S; Lago San Jose, M; Arranz Uague, E; Auque Sanz, L [Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  10. Rapid extensional unroofing of a granite-migmatite dome with relics of high-pressure rocks, the Podolsko complex, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, J.; Sláma, Jiří; Burjak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 154, č. 2 (2017), s. 354-380 ISSN 0016-7568 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) * granite-migmatite dome * exhumation * metamorphic core complex * U-Pb zircon geochronology Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 1.965, year: 2016

  11. Zircon and whole-rock Zr/Hf ratios as markers of the evolution of granitic magmas: Examples from the Teplice caldera (Czech Republic/Germany)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel; Škoda, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 4 (2017), s. 435-457 ISSN 0930-0708 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13600S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Zr/Hf value * zircon * Teplice caldera * rhyolite * rare-metal granite * Cínovec deposit Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.236, year: 2016

  12. Determination of granite rock massif weathering and cracking of surface layers in the oldest parts of medieval mine depending on used mining method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2016), s. 381-395 ISSN 0860-7001 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Jeroným Mine * non-destructive testing * granite Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2016 http://archiwum.img-pan.krakow.pl/index.php/AMS/article/view/785/692

  13. Evaluation of natural radioactivity in some granitic rocks in the state of Parana, Brazil and its use in civil construction; Avaliacao da radioatividade natural em algumas rochas graniticas do estado do Parana e sua utilizacao na construcao civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ademar de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Primordial, or terrestrial natural radionuclides, are found in different amounts in the environment. In dwellings, an important dose increment is due to building materials, which contribute for both the external gamma dose from the radionuclides of the {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th series and the natural {sup 40}K and the internal dose, due mainly to {sup 222}Rn inhalation. Once granitic rocks are widely used both as construction materials or structural flooring, those rocks can become an important dose source, depending on the content of concentrations of radioactivity, and the construction application. In this work, a database for granitic rocks of the crystalline shield of Parana (mainly in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba, RMC), used in civil construction, was generated, evaluating in terms of radiological protection the external and internal dose increments, caused by the use of these materials. Also, possible correlations between the {sup 226}Ra activity concentration, the {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate, density, porosity and chemical composition (oxide content) in these samples had been studied. The external dose was assessed by gamma-ray spectrometry with High-Purity Germanium detectors, where the activity concentration of the radionuclides {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K are the parameters used in dosimetric models (Dosimetric Indexes), which established limits in accordance with the form, amount and application of material of construction. For the calculation of the annual effective external dose it was assumed a room model with dimensions of 4 m x 5 m x 2:8 m and all walls internally covered with 2 cm thickness of granite and an annual exposure time of 7000 h as suggested by the European Commission of Radiological Protection for internal superficial coating materials. The internal exposure was assessed from the radon concentration in the air of the room model, simulated from the superficial exhalation rate of {sup 222}Rn. The exhalation

  14. Stratigraphy of Slick Rock district and vicinity, San Miguel and Dolores Counties, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Simmons, George C.; Archbold, Norbert L.

    1968-01-01

    The Slick Rock district covers about 570 square miles in western San Miguel and Dolores Counties, in southwestern Colorado. It is at the south edge of the salt-anticline region of southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah and of the Uravan mineral belt.Deposition of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the district and vicinity was principally controlled by development of the Paradox Basin, and of Mesozoic rocks by development of a depositional basin farther west. The Paleozoic rocks generally are thickest at the northeast side of the Paradox Basin in a northwest- trending trough which seems to be a wide graben in Precambrian igneous and metamorphic basement rocks; Mesozoic rocks generally thicken westward and southwestward from the district.Sedimentary rocks rest on a Precambrian basement consisting of a variety of rocks, including granite and amphibolite. The surface of the Precambrian rocks is irregular and generally more than 2,000 feet below sea level and 7,000-11,000 feet below the ground surface. In the northern part of the district the Precambrian surface plunges abruptly northeastward into the trough occupying the northeast side of the Paradox Basin, and in the southern part it sags in a narrow northeasterly oriented trough. Deepening of both troughs, or crustal deformation in their vicinity, influenced sedimentation during much of late Paleozoic and Mesozoic time.The maximum total thickness of sedimentary rocks underlying the district is 13,000 feet, and prior to extensive erosion in the late Tertiary and the Quaternary it may have been as much as about 18,000 feet. The lower 5,000 feet or more of the sequence of sedimentary rocks consists of arenaceous strata of early Paleozoic age overlain by dominantly marine carbonate rocks and evaporite beds interbedded with lesser amounts of clastic sediments of late Paleozoic age. Overlying these rocks is about 4,500 feet of terrestrial clastic sediments, dominantly sandstone with lesser amounts of shale, mudstone

  15. Climax granite test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  16. 2005 dossier: granite; Dossier 2005: granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - advantage of granitic formations for the geologic disposal; 2 - containers; 3 - design study of a disposal facility in granitic environment; 4 - understanding and modelling of granite; 5 - description of disposal concepts in granitic environment; 6 - long-term and safety aspects; 7 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  17. Portuguese granites associated with Sn-W and Au mineralizations

    OpenAIRE

    Ana M.R. Neiva

    2002-01-01

    In northern and central Portugal, there are different tin-bearing granites. Most of them are of S-type, others have mixed characteristics of I-type and S-type granites and a few are of I-type. Tin-tungsten deposits are commonly associated with Hercynian tin-bearing S-type granites. Some quartz veins with wolframite are associated with an I-type granite, which has a low Sn content. In suites of tin-bearing S-type granitic rocks, Sn content increases as a function of the degree of fractional cr...

  18. Mesozoic tectonomagmatic activity and uranium metallogenetic sequence in mid-Nanling tectonic belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Ping; Shu Liangshu

    2002-01-01

    Based on the synthesis and analysis of the relationship of various Mesozoic intrusive massifs, the tectonic activity, and the hydrothermal veins, as well as data of isotopic geochronology, the author makes a time sequence of the tectonomagmatic activities, the hydrothermal activities and uranium mineralization, and summarizes characteristics of tectonomagmatic and hydrothermal activities of different stages, and discusses the time sequence of various ore-controlling factors for granite-type uranium metallogeny. Finally, authors conclude that uranium metallogeny shows a very close spatial and temporal relationship to Mesozoic tectonomagmatic and hydrothermal activities

  19. Granite Exfoliation, Cosumnes River Watershed, Somerset, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, I. Q.; Neiss-Cortez, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada foothills of California there are many exposed granite plutons within the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. As with most exposed parts of the batholith, these granite slabs exfoliate. It is important to understand exfoliation for issues of public safety as it can cause rock slides near homes, roads, and recreation areas. Through observation, measuring, and mapping we characterize exfoliation in our Cosumnes River watershed community.

  20. The Mesozoic Caosiyao giant porphyry Mo deposit in Inner Mongolia, North China and Paleo-Pacific subduction-related magmatism in the northern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaying; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Shu, Qihai; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Mingtian; Xiang, Peng

    2016-09-01

    The Caosiyao giant porphyry Mo deposit is located in the Wulanchabu area of Inner Mongolia, within the northern North China Craton (NCC). It contains more than 2385 Mt of ore with an average grade of 0.075% Mo. In the Caosiyao mining district, Mo mineralization occurs mainly in a Mesozoic granite porphyry as disseminations and stockworks, with some Mo distributed in Archean metamorphic rocks and diabase as stockworks and veins. The host granite porphyry is composed of two different phases that can be distinguished based on mineral assemblages and textures: one phase contains large and abundant phenocrysts (coarse-grained), while the other phase is characterized by fewer and smaller phenocrysts (medium-grained). Zircon U-Pb-Hf analyses of the former phase yielded a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 149.8 ± 2.4 Ma with a 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 149.9 ± 2.4 Ma and εHf(t) values ranging from -12.2 to 18.3, while the latter phase gave a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 149.0 ± 2.2 Ma with a 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 149.0 ± 2.1 Ma and εHf(t) values ranging from -13.1 to 17.7. Five samples of disseminated molybdenite have a 187Re-187Os isochron age of 149.5 ± 5.3 Ma with a weighted average age of 149.0 ± 1.8 Ma, whereas six veinlet-type molybdenite samples have a well-constrained 187Re-187Os isochron age of 146.9 ± 3.1 Ma and a weighted average age of 146.5 ± 0.8 Ma. Thus, it is suggested that the Mo mineralization of the Caosiyao deposit occurred during the Late Jurassic (ca. 147-149 Ma), almost coeval with the emplacement of the host granite porphyry (ca. 149-150 Ma). The host granite porphyry is characterized by high silica (SiO2 = 71.52-74.10 wt%), relatively high levels of oxidation (Fe2O3/FeO = 0.32-0.94 wt%) and high alkali element concentrations (Na2O + K2O = 8.21-8.76 wt%). The host granite porphyry also shows enrichments in U and K, and depletion in Ba, Sr, P, Eu, and Ti, suggesting strong fractional crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, and

  1. Palaeozoic and Mesozoic igneous activity in the Netherlands: a tectonomagmatic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sissingh, W.

    To date, igneous rocks, either intrusive or extrusive, have been encountered in the Palaeozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary series of the Netherlands in some 65 exploration and production wells. Following 17 new isotopic K/Ar age determinations of the recovered rock material (amounting to a total of 28

  2. Surveying for migration pathways in the granitic rock using nuclear track detectors, autoradiography and digital image analysis as an aid to construct the basis for heterogeneous diffusion modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemppainen, M.; Oila, E.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radioelement migration within a rock matrix under natural long-term conditions is a complex process controlled by various parameters. Pure physical parameters such as porosity, hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity are usually sufficient to describe transport in well-defined laboratory systems. In natural rock matrices transport is influenced by physical pore properties such as pore size distribution, connectivity, tortuosity, constrictivity and petrological and chemical nature and charge on the fluid-rock interface. The overall characterization of heterogeneous rock structures is needed for the accurate heterogeneous diffusion modeling. Here we describe a method for the detection of α-particles from uranium in cm-scale rock samples based on the analysis of the tracks formed in organic polymer, CR-39. On the other hand the uranium tracks were compared with the migration pathways and porosity distribution produced with the 14 C-polymethylmethacrylate impregnation method ( 14 C-PMMA). For analyzing mineral specific uranium occurrence and porosities the staining methods were used to produce the mineral map of the rock sample. Digital image analysis techniques were applied to the different cm-scale pictures of rock samples. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDS) were performed in order both to study the pore apertures of grain boundaries and fissures in greater detail and to detect the uranium phases. The high uranium content was found to be congruent with the porous mineral phases; altered plagioclase and biotite grains, and the intra- and intergranular fissures detected with the 14 C-PMMA technique. Plenty of microfractures transsecting potassium feldspar and quartz grains were filled with calcite together with precipitated uranium. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  3. Granitoid magmatism of Alarmaut granite-metamorphic dome, West Chukotka, NE Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Bondarenko, G. E.; Katkov, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    -metamorphic domes at Russian North-East. Paper 2. Magmatism, metamorphism and migmatization in Late Mesozoic domes // Pacific geology. 1996. V. 15. № 1. P. 84-93. (in Russian) 13. Bering Strait Geologic Field Party, Koolen metamorphic complex, NE Russia: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Bering Strait region // Tectonics, vol. 16, no. 5, p. 713-729 14. Bondarenko G.E., Luchitskaya M.V. Mesozoic tectonic evolution of Alarmaut rise // Byul. MOIP. Otd. Geol. V. 78. Is. 3. P. 25-38. (in Russian) 15. Katkov S.M., Strikland A., Miller E.L. Age of granite batholiths in the Anyui-Chukotka Foldbelt // Doklady. Earth Sciences. 2007. Vol. 414. № 4. P. 515-518. 16. Amato J.M., Wright J.E. Potassic mafic magtism in the Kigluaik gneiss dome, northern Alaska: a geochemical study of arc magmatism in an extensional tectonic setting // J. Geophys. Res. 1997. Vol.102. N B4. P.8065-8084 17. Tikhomirov P.L., Luchitskaya M.V., Kravchenko-Berezhnoy I.R. Comparison of Cretaceous granitoids of the Chaun tectonic zone to those of the Taigonos Peninsula, NE Asia: rock chemistry, composition of rock forming minerals, and conditions of formation // Stephan Mueller series. Geology and Tectonic Origins of Northeast Russia: A Tribute to Leonid Parfenov (in press) 28. Velikoslavinsky S.D. Geochemical typification of acid magmatic rocks of leading geodynamic settings // Petrology. 2003. V. 11. № 4. P.363-380. (in Russian) 19. Pearce J.A. Sources and settings of granitic rocks // Episodes. 1996. V. 19. N. 4. P. 120-125

  4. The origin of groundwater salinity in granitic rocks: identification and characterisation of chloride sources; Origine de la salinite des eaux souterraines en milieu granitique: identification et caracterisation des sources de chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoye, S.

    1998-04-29

    Hydrogeological research in crystalline rocks, developed either in geothermics or in feasibility studies for geological disposal of radioactive waste, points out a wide range of chloride contents in associated groundwaters. The aim of this dissertation is to identify the possible origins of chloride in groundwaters within different geological conditions. The three possible chloride reservoirs (chloride-bearing minerals, fluid inclusions, micro-porosity) located in rock have been characterised by studying samples from eight granitic sites with different technical approaches (electronic microbeam, alkaline fusion, micro-thermometry, crush-leaching, diffusion experiment). Firstly, this allows the definition of a new typology of the sites, by considering not only hydrogeological features but also occurrence of salt-rich fluid inclusions with sedimentary origin. Secondly, the use of tracers (such as Cl/Br ratio, {delta}{sup 37}Cl) and mass balance calculations shows that the contribution of fluid inclusions trapped in quartz and chloride-bearing minerals cannot account for the high salinity of groundwater. In this case, the chloride origin could be of sedimentary type. Chloride would be stored in micro-porosity and in fluid inclusions trapped in carbonates. Thirdly, we have pointed out the importance of micro-porosity, acting more as a sieve and a buffer than as a source. Finally, we have shown that the low salinity of groundwaters has not always an internal origin. (author) 187 refs.

  5. From Compression to Extension: Cretaceous A-type Granite as Indicator of Geodynamic Changes in the Adria Part of the European Neotethys Suture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balen, D.; Schneider, P.; Massonne, H. J.; Opitz, J.; Petrinec, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Cretaceous suture zone between the colliding plates of European and Adria (Gondwana) marks the closure of the W Neotethys branch. This zone, partly located in the northern Croatia, comprises reddish alkali granite which is mainly composed of alkali feldspar and quartz, with small amounts of albite, white mica and hematite with ilmenite exsolutions. Accessory minerals include zircon, apatite and Fe-(Ti)-oxides. This granite shows a geochemical signature typical for A2-type granite characterized by a highly siliceous composition and an enrichment in alkalies (high-K calc-alkaline series) and Al (strongly peraluminous, ASI>1.1). The rock belongs to the group of oxidized and ferroan granites with low CaO, MgO, MnO and FeO* contents. Characteristic trace element ratios, primitive mantle and OIB normalized spider-diagrams show significant positive anomalies of Rb, Th, U, K, Zr and Pb accompanied with clear negative anomalies of Ba, Nb, Sr, P, Eu and Ti. The negative anomalies suggest fractionation of plagioclase, apatite and Fe-Ti oxide. Based on the geochemical characteristics the magma originated mainly from melting of lower continental crust (granulite facies metasediments) although a mantle contribution cannot be excluded. The melting process could have been triggered by a heat from the upwelling upper mantle as inferred from zircon typology (D and J5 types prevail), as well from the zircon and whole-rock chemistry accompanied with high zircon saturation temperatures (T=860-950°C). Subsequent ascent of granitic magma was localized along the Europe-Adria suture i.e. the Sava Zone segment of the Late Cretaceous collisional zone where granite was emplaced at ca. 20 km depth. The emplacement followed a long period of Mesozoic orogenic compressional activity. Typical for A-type granites, although in our case related to the subduction of the Adria plate underneath the European plate, is their formation in an extensional tectonic regime. Thus, the studied A

  6. U-Pb zircon geochronology and Sm-Nd-Pb isotopic constraint for precambrian plutonic rocks in the northeastern part of Ryeongnam massif, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ho-Wan

    2003-01-01

    The Ryeongnam massif is composed of Precambrian gneisses, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and extensive Triassic-Jurassic plutonic rocks of felsic to mafic composition. In the northeast Ryeongnam massif, the oldest rocks belong to the Sobaegsan gneiss complex, which is composed of orthogneisses, paragneisses and mafic plutonic rocks. U-Pb zircon ages for the felsic and mafic intrusive bodies within the Sobaegsan gneiss complex are: the Icheon granite gneiss, 2357±43 and 2342±47 Ma; the Buncheon granite gneiss, 1963±5 Ma; the Pyeonghae granite gneiss, 1936±21 Ma; the Ogbang amphibolite, 1918±10 Ma; the Imwon leucogranite gneiss, 1826±20 Ma. The Hyeondong biotite schist, which is intruded by the Buncheon granite gneiss and the Ogbang amphibolite, yielded an age of 2271±44 Ma. The Nd-Sm-Pb isotopic data indicate that the felsic plutonic rocks are derived from an older Archean crust. The Nd T DM ages are Archean, and the εNd values are negative for the felsic rocks and positive for the amphibolite. Common Pb isotope compositions also indicate a crustal source for the felsic intrusives. The U-Pb ages of Precambrian rocks of the Ryeongnam massifs are similar to those in the Gyeonggi massif, and may have a similar crustal evolutionary history. The Precambrian rocks of South Korea could be related either to the North China block or to the South China block, as the isotope ages and patterns are not unique to either block. Similarly, a geologic correlation with Japan, although possible, is tenuous at present. (author)

  7. The Mexican mesozoic uranium province: its distribution and metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazan B, S.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of uranium scattered in sedimentary terrains of the continental jurassic such as those found in the Tlaxiaco-Guerrero Basin encourage the outlook for uncovering extensive new deposits of strato-bound uranium belonging to the Mexican mesozoic in other structurally similar intercratonic basins. Stratographic and paleographic structural references define the simultaneous evolution of five sedimentary basins during the Mexican geotechtonic cycle: 1. the Tlaxiaco-Guerrero basin, 2. the Huayacocotla basin, 3. the Gulf of Sabinas basin, 4. the Chihuahua basin and 5. the Sonora basin. From the various lithostratographic formations in them we favourably infer the presence of intermountainous mesozoic concentrations of uranium sediments leached from crystalline precambric packets and from nevadian plutonites and volcanic rocks. During the metallogeny process described under the techtonic evolution of the Mexican structural belt, the presence is established of extensive terciary hydrothermal uranium deposits in the districts of Aldama, Chihuahua; Coneto-El Rodeo, Durango; Vizarron de Montes, Queretaro; Tlaucingo, Puebla; Los Amoles, Sonora; El Picacho, Sonora; Amalia Margarita, Coahuila; etc., scattered in sandstones and sinters of the continental mesozoic and shifted during the postorogenic phase of the Mexican geotectonic cycle. The extensive mesozoic province defined within the Mexican territory favourable to large deposits of uranium, scattered and strato-bound in triassic, jurassic and cretaceous sandstone and sinters, could resolve future demands for energetics within a modified philosophy and resourceful policy of regional mining. (author)

  8. Two-mica granites of northeastern Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.E.; Kistler, R.W.; Friedman, I.; Van Loenen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The field settings are described and analytical data are presented for six two-mica granites from NE Nevada. High delta 18O and 87Sr/86Sr values indicate that all are S-type granite, derived from continental crust. The major element chemistry and accessory mineral contents of these rocks also are characteristic of S-type granites. Chemical, X ray, and other data are presented for the micas recovered from these granites. The muscovites are notably high in Fe2O3, FeO, and MgO. Except for one hydrobiotite, each of the biotites has an MgO content near 6.0 wt%. Two different types of two-mica granites are recognized in the area of this study. One type is distinguished by the presence of many biotite euhedra within muscovite phenocrysts and by an unusual suite of accessory minerals completely devoid of opaque oxides. This type probably resulted from anatexis of late Precambrian argillites under conditions of relatively low oxygen fugacity, along a line that roughly coincides with the westward disappearance of continental basement. In the other textural type of two-mica granite the micas are equigranular and there is a greater variety of accessory minerals. The magmatic evolution of this type also appears to reflect the influence of late Precambrian argillites; there may be age differences between the two types of two-mica granites.-Author

  9. 2005 dossier: granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - advantage of granitic formations for the geologic disposal; 2 - containers; 3 - design study of a disposal facility in granitic environment; 4 - understanding and modelling of granite; 5 - description of disposal concepts in granitic environment; 6 - long-term and safety aspects; 7 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  10. PRINCIPLE ROCK TYPES FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Borojević Šostarić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Underground geological storage of high- and intermediate/low radioactive waste is aimed to represent a barrier between the surface environment and potentially hazardous radioactive elements. Permeability, behavior against external stresses, chemical reacatibility and absorption are the key geological parameters for the geological storage of radioactive waste. Three principal rock types were discussed and applied to the Dinarides: (1 evaporites in general, (2 shale, and (3 crystalline basement rocks. (1 Within the Dinarides, evaporite formations are located within the central part of a Carbonate platform and are inappropriate for storage. Offshore evaporites are located within diapiric structures of the central and southern part of the Adriatic Sea and are covered by thick Mesozoic to Cenozoic clastic sediment. Under very specific circumstances they can be considered as potential site locations for further investigation for the storage of low/intermediate level radioactive wast e. (2 Thick flysch type formation of shale to phyllite rocks are exposed at the basement units of the Petrova and Trgovska gora regions whereas (3 crystalline magmatic to metamorphic basement is exposed at the Moslavačka Gora and Slavonian Mts. regions. For high-level radioactive waste, basement phyllites and granites may represent the only realistic potential option in the NW Dinarides.

  11. The research frontier and beyond: granitic terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidale, C. R.

    1993-07-01

    been subjected will be more and more appreciated as offering explanations for a wide range of granite forms, major and minor, ancient and recent. In particular, investigations of rock strain, including gravitational loading, at a variety of scales, and especially as it influences fracture patterns and susceptibility to weathering, will assume a prime importance in the explanation of granitic landforms and landscapes. Finally, there as genuine hopes that the close dating of surfaces and weathering events will allow structural and process studies to be placed in their chronilogical contexts. New techniques and observations will prove important to advances in the understanding of granitic forms, but, as in other areas of geomorphological endeavour, fresh perceptions, different linkages and new ideas are critical.

  12. The instrumental neutron-activation analysis of granites from the Bushveld Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watterson, J.I.W.

    1978-01-01

    Three methods of instrumental neutron-activation analysis, 14MeV, reactor thermal, and reactor epithermal, are compared for the analysis of granites form the Bushveld Complex. A total of 34 elements can be determined in the granites by these methods. Samples from the Zaaiplaats area were analysed by thermal neutron activation, and 22 elements were determined in all of them. These elements were used to distinguish between the mineralized Bobbejaankop and Lease granites and the Main granite by the use of multivariate statistics. The Bobbejaankop granite appears as a more-differentaited rock carrying greater amounts of the incompatible elements than does the Main granite [af

  13. Anatexis, hybridization and the modification of ancient crust: Mesozoic plutonism in the Old Woman Mountains area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.F.; Wooden, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A compositionally expanded array of granitic (s.l.) magmas intruded the > 2 Ga crust of the Old Woman Mountains area between 160 and 70 Ma. These magmas were emplaced near the eastern (inland) edge of the Jurassic/Cretaceous arcs of western North America, in an area where magma flux, especially during the Jurassic, was considerably lower than to the west. The Jurassic intrusives and over half of the Cretaceous intrusives are predominantly metaluminous and variable in composition; a major Cretaceous suite comprises only peraluminous monzogranite. Only the Jurassic intrusions show clear evidence for the presence of mafic liquids. All units, including the most mafic rocks, reveal isotopic evidence for a significant crustal component. However, none of the Mesozoic intrusives matches in isotopic composition either average pre-intrusion crust or any major unit of the exposed crust. Elemental inconsistencies also preclude closed system derivation from exposed crust. Emplacement of these magmas, which doubled the volume of the mid- to upper crust, did not dramatically change its elemental composition. It did, however, affect its Nd and especially Sr isotopic composition and modify some of the distinctive aspects of the elemental chemistry. We propose that Jurassic magmatism was open-system, with a major influx of mantle-derived mafic magma interacting strongly with the ancient crust. Mesozoic crustal thickening may have led to closed-system crustal melting by the Late Cretaceous, but the deep crust had been profoundly modified by earlier Mesozoic hybridization so that crustal melts did not simply reflect the original crustal composition. The clear evidence for a crustal component in magmas of the Old Woman Mountains area may not indicate any fundamental differences from the processes at work elsewhere in this or other magmatic arcs where the role of pre-existing crust is less certain. Rather, a compositionally distinctive, very old crust may simply have yielded a more

  14. Petrographic and mineralogical features of the uraniferous pink granites in the north eastern desert of egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atawiya, M.Y.; Salman, A.B.; El-Bayyomi, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of some uranium bearing younger granites in the north eastern desert of egypt particularly Gebel Gattar area. The area around Gebel Gattar comprises the following rock units (starting from the oldest): meta volcanic, diorite-grano-diorite complex- Dokhan volcanics- Hammamat sediments, younger granites and dykes. The most significant structural features are represented by NNE-ENE dominantly trending faults and joints. Petrographicaly, the pink granites are divided into normal and mineralized (uraniferous) granites. Normal granites are classified into three types; a) leucocratic perthitic granite, b) hornblende- biotite perthitic granite and c) two feldspars perthitic granite. Mineralized granites are sheared, deformed, pinkish brown in colour and strongly altered. A remarkable secondary uranium mineralization has been recorded along fault and fracture zones

  15. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  16. The relational of Mesozoic volcanism to uranium mineralization in Guyuan-Hongshanzi area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Rengui; Xu Zhe; Yu Zhenqing; Jiang Shan; Shen Kefeng

    2011-01-01

    Based on the time of Mesozoic volcanism,the characteristic of major and trace element, and REE pattern of the volcanic rocks in Guyuan-Hongshanzi area, The Mesozoic volcanism can be divided into the early cycle and later cycle during the Early Cretaceous, and it's magma series is classified in two sub-series, one is alkaline series of trachyte dominated and another is subalkaline series of rhyolite dominated. The relations between Mesozoic volcanism and uranium mineralization is mainly shown in four aspects: (1) Uranium mineralization controlled by the coexist of two magma series; (2) Uranium mineralization controlled by superhypabyssal porphyry body in later cycle volcanism during the Early Cretaceous; (3) The porphyry body close to uranium mineralization,bearing the genesis characteristics of crust-mantle action; and (4) High Si and K content in the chemical composition of the mineralization volcanic rocks. (authors)

  17. Mesozoic lithofacies palaeogeography and petroleum prospectivity in North Carnarvon Basin, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chongzhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The North Carnarvon Basin, which lies in the North West Shelf of Australia, is highly rich in gas resources. As a typical passive marginal basin, it experienced the pre-rifting, early rifting, main rifting, late rifting, post-rifting sagging and passive margin stages. The basin was mainly filled with thick Mesozoic-Cenozoic sediments, of which the Mesozoic hosts the principal source, reservoir and seal intervals. Mesozoic palaeogeography has an important control on the oil and gas distribution. Triassic gas-prone source rocks of deltaic origin determine the high endowment of natural gases in the North Carnarvon Basin. The more restricted distribution of oil accumulations is controlled by oil source rocks in the Upper Jurassic Dingo Claystone. The Muderong Shale deposited in the Early Cretaceous marine transgression provides the effective regional seal for the underlying oil and gas reservoirs.

  18. Application of streaming potential method for detection of fractures in granitic rock. part 2; Kamaishi kozan ni okeru ryutai ryudo den`iho tekiyo shiken. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negi, T; Yoneda, Y [Nittetsu Mining Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Senba, T [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Streaming potential method has been applied in the Kamaishi Mine. In FY 1995, self-potential (SP) was monitored on the wall of gallery by varying the pressure in the well with open/close operation of the mouth of well having spring water, which was drilled from the gallery. It was confirmed that SP changes remarkably at the wall having a great number of fractures with spring water. It was considered that the change in SP is due to the streaming potential generated by the flowing underground water from the gallery side to the fractures in the well. In this paper, this continuity of the wall of gallery and the fractures in the well is estimated. In the present tests, SP changes were observed at walls of surrounding galleries by varying the pressure in the well with open/close operation of the mouth of borehole at various drilling depths during drilling of borehole. As a result, SP changes were observed at the wall of gallery when reaching to the depth with increased spring water. The results agreed well with the test results conducted at the same field in FY 1995. It was confirmed that the streaming potential method is a useful method for grasping the hydraulic continuity in the rocks. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng; Debao, He [CNNC Key Laboratory of Uranium Resource Exploration and Evaluation Technology, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

    2012-07-15

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  20. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue; He Debao

    2012-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  1. Artificial weathering of granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes a series of artificial weathering tests run on granite designed to: simulate the action of weathering agents on buildings and identify the underlying mechanisms, determine the salt resistance of different types of rock; evaluate consolidation and water-repellent treatment durability; and confirm hypotheses about the origin of salts such as gypsum that are often found in granite buildings. Salt crystallization tests were also conducted, using sodium chloride, sodium sulphate, calcium sulphate and seawater solutions. One of these tests was conducted in a chamber specifically designed to simulate salt spray weathering and another in an SO2 chamber to ascertain whether granite is subject to sulphation. The test results are analyzed and discussed, along with the shortcomings of each type of trial as a method for simulating the decay observed in monuments. The effect of factors such as wet-dry conditions, type of saline solution and the position of the planes of weakness on the type of decay is also addressed.En este trabajo se hace una síntesis de varios ensayos de alteración artificial realizados con rocas graníticas. Estos ensayos tenían distintos objetivos: reproducir las formas de alteración encontradas en los edificios para llegar a conocer los mecanismos que las generan, determinar la resistencia de las diferentes rocas a la acción de las sales, evaluar la durabilidad de tratamientos de consolidación e hidrofugación y constatar hipótesis acerca del origen de algunas sales, como el yeso, que aparecen frecuentemente en edificios graníticos. En los ensayos de cristalización de sales se utilizaron disoluciones de cloruro de sodio, sulfato de sodio, sulfato de calcio y agua de mar. Uno de estos ensayos se llevó a cabo en una cámara especialmente diseñada para reproducir la alteración por aerosol marino y otro se realizó en una cámara de SO2, con el objeto de comprobar si en rocas graníticas se puede producir

  2. EXPLOITATION OF GRANITE BOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cotman

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of forming, petrography, features, properties and exploitation of granite boulders are described. The directional drilling and black powder blasting is the succesful method in exploitation of granite boulders (boulder technology (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Mesozoic to Cenozoic magmatic history of the Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, James B.; Scoggin, Shane H.; Kapp, Paul; Carrapa, Barbara; Ducea, Mihai N.; Worthington, James; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon; Gadoev, Mustafo

    2018-01-01

    New geochronologic, geochemical, and isotopic data for Mesozoic to Cenozoic igneous rocks and detrital minerals from the Pamir Mountains help to distinguish major regional magmatic episodes and constrain the tectonic evolution of the Pamir orogenic system. After final accretion of the Central and South Pamir terranes during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, the Pamir was largely amagmatic until the emplacement of the intermediate (SiO2 > 60 wt.%), calc-alkaline, and isotopically evolved (-13 to -5 zircon εHf(t)) South Pamir batholith between 120-100 Ma, which is the most volumetrically significant magmatic complex in the Pamir and includes a high flux magmatic event at ∼105 Ma. The South Pamir batholith is interpreted as the northern (inboard) equivalent of the Cretaceous Karakoram batholith and the along-strike equivalent of an Early Cretaceous magmatic belt in the northern Lhasa terrane in Tibet. The northern Lhasa terrane is characterized by a similar high-flux event at ∼110 Ma. Migration of continental arc magmatism into the South Pamir terrane during the mid-Cretaceous is interpreted to reflect northward directed, low-angle to flat-slab subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. Late Cretaceous magmatism (80-70 Ma) in the Pamir is scarce, but concentrated in the Central and northern South Pamir terranes where it is comparatively more mafic (SiO2 roll-back of the Neotethyan oceanic slab, which is consistent with similarly aged extension-related magmatism in the Karakoram terrane and Kohistan. There is an additional pulse of magmatism in the Pamir at 42-36 Ma that is geographically restricted (∼150 km diameter ellipsoidal area) and referred to as the Vanj magmatic complex. The Vanj complex comprises metaluminous, high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic monzonite, syenite, and granite that is adakitic (La/YbN = 13 to 57) with low Mg# (35-41). The Vanj complex displays a range of SiO2 (54-75 wt.%) and isotopic compositions (-7 to -3 εNd(i), 0.706 to

  4. Portuguese granites associated with Sn-W and Au mineralizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.R. Neiva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In northern and central Portugal, there are different tin-bearing granites. Most of them are of S-type, others have mixed characteristics of I-type and S-type granites and a few are of I-type. Tin-tungsten deposits are commonly associated with Hercynian tin-bearing S-type granites. Some quartz veins with wolframite are associated with an I-type granite, which has a low Sn content. In suites of tin-bearing S-type granitic rocks, Sn content increases as a function of the degree of fractional crystallization. Greisenizations of two-mica S-type granites associated with tin-tungsten mineralizations are accompanied by an increase in SiO2, H2O+, Sn, W, Nb, Ta, Rb, Zn, and Pb and decrease in MgO, Na2O, V, Sc,Zr, and Sr. The granite associated with the Jales gold deposit is of S-type and strongly differentiated like the tin-bearing S-type granites, but it has a very low Sn content. During fractional crystallization, Si, Rb, Sn, Pb, Au, As, Sb, and S increase. During increasing degree of hydrothermal alteration of this granite at the gold-quartz vein walls, there are progressive increases in K2O, H2O+, Sn, Cs, Cu, Pb, Au, Sb, As, and S.

  5. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 3. Stratigraphies of salt, granite, shale, and basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This study presents the methodology and basic literature used to develop generic stratigraphic sections for the various geologic repository host rocks under considerations: salt, granite, shale and basalt

  6. Contribution To The Geology Of Basement Rocks In The South Western Desert Of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, M.F.; Khyamy, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Three major Precambrian basement inliers are exposed in the South Western Desert of Egypt between Long. 29 degree E and the River Nile within the Uweinat-Bir Safsaf-Aswan E-W uplift system. These are Bir Safsaf, Gabal EI-Asr and Gabal Umm Shaghir areas. Smaller outcrops include Gabal EI-Gara El-Hamra and Gabal El-Gara EI-Soda, Gabal Siri, GabaI EI-Fantas and Aswan-Kalabsha area as well as the scattered outcrops around Darb El-Arbain road. Band ratios 5/7, 5/1, 4 of Landsat TM images were applied to delineate the borders, the lithologic units and structural features of low relief basement outcrops within the surrounding flat lying sedimentary rocks and sand plains. These basement rocks comprise ortho gneisses (assumed by many authors as related to old continent pre Pan-African rocks), G 1 tonalite-granodiorite, and G2 monzogranite-alkali feldspar granite intruded by variable dykes. The boundaries between the basement exposures and the sedimentary rocks are marked by nonconformity surfaces or sets of faults. Both basement and sedimentary rocks are intruded by Mesozoic syenite-G3 granites, rhyolite, trachytic plugs and Upper Cretaceous to Tertiary basalts. The basement exposures are structurally controlled by major E- W fault systems. Their vertical uplifting is overprinted by folding the overlying sedimentary rocks. This study revealed that, the different basement exposures in the SE of the Western Desert of Egypt are similar in appearance and field relations to the Pan-African basement rocks extending towards the east of the River Nile and exposed everywhere in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

  7. Pb-Sr-Nd-O isotopic characterization of Mesozoic rocks throughout the northern end of the Peninsular Ranges batholith: Isotopic evidence for the magmatic evolution of oceanic arc–continental margin accretion during the Late Cretaceous of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Ronald W.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Premo, Wayne R.; Morton, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the duration of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)–based Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), many samples from the northern Peninsular Ranges batholith were studied for their whole-rock radioisotopic systematics (rubidium-strontium [Rb-Sr], uranium-thorium-lead [U-Th-Pb], and samarium-neodymium [Sm-Nd]), as well as oxygen (O), a stable isotope. The results of three main studies are presented separately, but here we combine them (>400 analyses) to produce a very complete Pb-Sr-Nd-O isotopic profile of an arc-continent collisional zone—perhaps the most complete in the world. In addition, because many of these samples have U-Pb zircon as well as argon mineral age determinations, we have good control of the timing for Pb-Sr-Nd-O isotopic variations.The ages and isotopic variations help to delineate at least four zones across the batholith from west to east—an older western zone (126–108 Ma), a transitional zone (111–93 Ma), an eastern zone (94–91 Ma), and a much younger allochthonous thrust sheet (ca. 84 Ma), which is the upper plate of the Eastern Peninsular Ranges mylonite zone. Average initial 87Sr/86 Sr (Sri), initial 206Pb/204Pb (206 Pbi), initial 208Pb/204Pb (average 208Pbi), initial epsilon Nd (average εNdi), and δ18O signatures range from 0.704, 18.787, 38.445, +3.1, and 4.0‰–9.0‰, respectively, in the westernmost zone, to 0.7071, 19.199, 38.777, −5, and 9‰–12‰, respectively, in the easternmost zone. The older western zone is therefore the more chemically and isotopically juvenile, characterized mostly by values that are slightly displaced from a mantle array at ca. 115 Ma, and similar to some modern island-arc signatures. In contrast, the isotopic signatures in the eastern zones indicate significant amounts of crustal involvement in the magmatic plumbing of those plutons. These isotopic signatures confirm previously published results that interpreted the Peninsular Ranges batholith as a progressively

  8. Water - rock interaction in different rock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamminen, S.

    1995-01-01

    The study assesses the groundwater geochemistry and geological environment of 44 study sites for radioactive waste disposal. Initially, the study sites were divided by rock type into 5 groups: (1) acid - intermediate rocks, (2) mafic - ultramafic rocks, (3) gabbros, amphibolites and gneisses that contain calc-silicate (skarn) rocks, (4) carbonates and (5) sandstones. Separate assessments are made of acid - intermediate plutonic rocks and of a subgroup that comprises migmatites, granite and mica gneiss. These all belong to the group of acid - intermediate rocks. Within the mafic -ultramafic rock group, a subgroup that comprises mafic - ultramafic plutonic rocks, serpentinites, mafic - ultramafic volcanic rocks and volcanic - sedimentary schists is also evaluated separately. Bedrock groundwaters are classified by their concentration of total dissolved solids as fresh, brackish, saline, strongly saline and brine-class groundwaters. (75 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.)

  9. Fluid geochemistry associated associated to rocks: preliminary tests om minerals of granite rocks potentially hostess of radioactive waste repository; Geoquimica de fluidos associados a rochas: testes preliminares em minerais de rochas granitoides potencialmente hospedeiras de repositorios de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Rios, Francisco J.; Oliveira, Lucilia A.R. de; Alves, James V.; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Garcia, Luiz; Ribeiro, Yuri, E-mail: LDAmorim@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matos, Evandro C. de [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Caetite, BA (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fluid inclusions (FI) are micro cavities present on crystals and imprison the mineralizer fluids, and are formed during or posterior to the mineral formation. Those kind of studies are very important for orientation of the engineer barrier projects for this purpose, in order to avoid that the solutions present in the mineral FI can affect the repository walls. This work proposes the development of FI micro compositional studies in the the hostess minerals viewing the contribution for a better understanding of the solution composition present in the metamorphosis granitoid rocks. So, micro thermometric, microchemical and characterization of the material confined in the FI, and the hostess minerals. Great part of the found FI are present in the quartz and plagioclase crystals. The obtained data on the mineral compositions and their inclusions will allow to formulate hypothesis on the process which could occurs at the repository walls, decurrens from of the corrosive character (or not) of the fluids present in the FI, and propose measurements to avoid them

  10. Paleoproterozoic mojaveprovince in northwestern Mexico? Isotopic and U-Pb zircon geochronologic studies of precambrian and Cambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Caborca, Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Farmer G.; Bowring, S.A.; Matzel, J.; Maldonado, G.E.; Fedo, C.; Wooden, J.

    2005-01-01

    Whole-rock Nd isotopic data and U-Pb zircon geochronology from Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Caborca area, northern Sonora, reveal that these rocks are most likely a segment of the Paleoproterozoic Mojave province. Supporting this conclusion are the observations that paragneiss from the ??? 1.75 Ga Bamori Complex has a 2.4 Ga Nd model age and contains detrital zircons ranging in age from Paleo- proterozoic (1.75 Ga) to Archean (3.2 Ga). Paragneisses with similar age and isotopic characteristics occur in the Mojave province in southern California. In addition, "A-type" granite exposed at the southern end of Cerro Rajon has ca 2.0 Ga Nd model age and a U-Pb zircon age of 1.71 Ga, which are similar to those of Paleoproterozoic granites in the Mojave province. Unlike the U.S. Mojave province, the Caborcan crust contains ca. 1.1 Ga granite (Aibo Granite), which our new Nd isotopic data suggest is largely the product of anatexis of the local Precambrian basement. Detrital zircons from Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian miogeoclinal arenites at Caborca show dominant populations ca. 1.7 Ga, ca. 1.4 Ga, and ca. 1.1 Ga, with subordinate Early Cambrian and Archean zircons. These zircons were likely derived predominately from North American crust to the east and northeast, and not from the underlying Caborcan basement. The general age and isotopic similarities between Mojave province basement and overlying miogeoclinal sedimentary rocks in Sonora and southern California is necessary, but not sufficient, proof of the hypothesis that Sonoran crust is allochthonous and was transported to its current position during the Mesozoic along the proposed Mojave-Sonora megashear. One viable alternative model is that the Caborcan Precambrian crust is an isolated, autochthonous segment of Mojave province crust that shares a similar, but not identical, Proterozoic geological history with Mojave province crust found in the southwest United States ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  11. Chronological study of the pre-jurassic basement rocks of southern Patagonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankhurst, R.J; Rapela, C.W; Loske, W.P; Fanning, C.M

    2001-01-01

    Southern Patagonia east of the Andes was the site of extensive rhyolite volcanism during the Jurassic rifting of Gondwana and subsequent shallow marine basin formation during the Cretaceous. Thus exposures of pre-Jurassic basement are extremely sparse. Nevertheless, extraction of the maximum amount of information from these scattered outcrops of granite and metamorphic rocks is crucial to assessment of the Palaeozoic and earliest Mesozoic history and crustal structure of the Pacific margin of the supercontinent. In particular, the identification and possible correlation of early terrane accretion on this margin depends on comparison of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic events with adjacent areas. This is a preliminary report on work now in progress to this end (au)

  12. Division of volcanic activity cycles in the late mesozoic in South Jiangxi and North Guangdong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qinglong; Wu Jianhua

    1999-01-01

    Based on stratigraphical unconformity, rock association, fossil assemblage, isotope age and tectonic features, the volcanic activity in late Mesozoic in south Jiangxi and north Guandong can be divided into four cycles: Yutian volcanic activity cycle, Lianhuazhai volcanic activity cycle. Banshi volcanic activity cycle and Nanxiong volcanic activity cycle. Yutian volcanic cycle which occurs in middle Jurassic epoch is the bimodal rock association composed of rhyolite and basalt. Lianhuazhai volcanic cycle which occurs in late Jurassic epoch is unimodal rock association composed of rhyolite. Banshi volcanic cycle occurs from the late stage of early Cretaceous to the early stage of late Cretaceous epoch. There are two types of rock associations related to this cycle: unimodal rock association composed of rhyolite or basalt and bimodal rock association composed of rhyolite and basalt. Nanxiong volcanic activity cycle which occurred in late stage of late Cretaceous epoch is the unimodal rock association composed of basalt which is the interlayer of the red sedimentary series

  13. The Serra do Carambei Granite - PR and the uraniferous anomalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Serra do Carambei Granite forms a pluton relatively homogeneous, covering about 33 km 2 , cropping out as an elongate retangular body trending NE-SW, being emplaced in the Cunhaporanga Granitoid Complex. Its characteristics indicates a kind of hololeucocratic granite, equigranular, medium to coarse-grained, consisting predominantly of microperthitic alkali-feldspar, quartz and a small amount of biotite (less than 1%), thus being classified as an alaskite. Chemical data allows a classification in the group of granite with high contents of silica (74-76% Wt. SiO 2 ), dominantly alkaline chemism and hypersolvus character, derived from a parental magma under saturated in water with distinguished features of granitoids from the magnetite series and types I and A granites. The pluton shows important chemical variations due to weathering processes. However detailed chemical studies reveal the presence of anomalous concentrations of trace elements such as U, Sn, Nb, Y, Zr, the Serra do Carambei Granite lacks economically important mineralizations because of the absence of well-developed tardi/pos-magmatic processes that could concentrate them. The SW side of the granite is cut by leucocratic rhyolite dykes that show some radiometric anomalies. These rocks, which are highly diferentiated, were emplaced contemporaneously to the Serra do Carambei Granite. Although petrographic and chronological similarities are found between the uraniferous alaskite of Roessing (Namibia) and the Serra do Carambei Granite anyhow it was not possible to establish any lateral continuity with the uranifeous Pan-African Province. (Author) [pt

  14. Field guide to the Mesozoic arc and accretionary complex of South-Central Alaska, Indian to Hatcher Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Oswald, P.J.; Hults, Chad P.

    2015-01-01

    This field trip traverses exposures of a multi-generation Mesozoic magmatic arc and subduction-accretion complex that had a complicated history of magmatic activity and experienced variations in composition and deformational style in response to changes in the tectonic environment. This Mesozoic arc formed at an unknown latitude to the south, was accreted to North America, and was subsequently transported along faults to its present location (Plafker and others, 1989; Hillhouse and Coe, 1994). Some of these faults are still active. Similar tectonic, igneous, and sedimentary processes to those that formed the Mesozoic arc complex persist today in southern Alaska, building on, and deforming the Mesozoic arc. The rocks we will see on this field trip provide insights on the three-dimensional composition of the modern arc, and the processes involved in the evolution of an arc and its companion accretionary complex.

  15. Geological, radiometrical, and geochemical studies of Banggai granites and Bobong formation to determine potential Uranium area in Taliabu Island, North Maluku

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngadenin

    2016-01-01

    Geological, radiometrical, and geochemical studies of Banggai granites and Bobong Formation have been conducted in order to obtain potential uranium area. Taliabu Island is selected for the study because Taliabu Island is a micro continent fraction of the Gondwana super continent that separated at the end of the Mesozoic to Paleogene period. Some types of uranium mineralization formed in the period of Gondwana include sandstone-type, lignite coal type, and vein-type. Taliabu Island is a small part from the Gondwana super continent so it is expected will be found uranium mineralization or at least indications of uranium mineralization occurrences. The aim of this study is to obtain uranium potential areas for the development of uranium exploration in the future. The methods used are reviewing geological, radiometric, and geochemical data from various sources. The results of review showed that geological setting, radiometric, and geochemical data gives positive indication to the formation of uranium mineralization for sandstone type. Banggai granite is a potential uranium source. Sandstone of Bobong Formation as a potential host rock. Coal and pyrite as a potential precipitant. Uranium potential area is located on Bobong Formation and its surrounding. (author)

  16. Melting of subducted continental crust: Geochemical evidence from Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, east-central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Syn-collisional and postcollisional granitoids are common in collisional orogens, and they were primarily produced by partial melting of subducted continental crust. This is exemplified by Mesozoic granitoids from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in east-central China. These granitoids were emplaced in small volumes in the Late Triassic (200-206 Ma) and the Late Jurassic (146-167 Ma) but massively in the Early Cretaceous (111-143 Ma). Nevertheless, all of them exhibit arc-like trace element distribution patterns and are enriched in Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, indicating their origination from the ancient continental crust. They commonly contain relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages, respectively, consistent with the protolith and metamorphic ages for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metaigneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt. Some granitoids show low zircon δ18O values, and SIMS in-situ O isotope analysis reveals that the relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages also commonly exhibit low δ18O values. Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages and low δ18O values are the two diagnostic features that distinguish the subducted South China Block from the obducted North China Block. Thus, the magma source of these Mesozoic granitoids has a genetic link to the subducted continental crust of the South China Block. On the other hand, these granitoids contain relict zircons with Paleoproterozoic and Archean U-Pb ages, which are present in both the South and North China Blocks. Taken together, the Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its hanging wall have their magma sources that are predominated by the continental crust of the South China Block with minor contributions from the continental crust of the North China Block. The Triassic continental collision between the South and North China Blocks brought the continental crust into the thickened orogen, where they underwent the three episodes of partial melting in the Late Triassic, Late

  17. Formation of Cretaceous Cordilleran and post-orogenic granites and their microgranular enclaves from the Dalat zone, southern Vietnam: Tectonic implications for the evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Lan, Ching-Ying; Van Long, Trinh; Usuki, Tadashi; Yang, Huai-Jen; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Iizuka, Yoshi; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Hsu, Wen-Yu

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran-type batholiths are useful in understanding the duration, cyclicity and tectonic evolution of continental margins. The Dalat zone of southern Vietnam preserves evidence of Late Mesozoic convergent zone magmatism superimposed on Precambrian rocks of the Indochina Block. The Dinhquan, Deoca and Ankroet plutons and their enclaves indicate that the Dalat zone transitioned from an active continental margin producing Cordilleran-type batholiths to highly extended crust producing within-plate plutons. The Deoca and Dinhquan plutons are compositionally similar to Cordilleran I-type granitic rocks and yield mean zircon U/Pb ages between 118 ± 1.4 Ma and 115 ± 1.2 Ma. Their Sr-Nd whole rock isotopes (ISr = 0.7044 to 0.7062; εNd(T) = - 2.4 to + 0.2) and zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(T) = + 8.2 ± 1.2 and + 6.4 ± 0.9) indicate that they were derived by mixing between a mantle component and an enriched component (i.e. GLOSS). The Ankroet pluton is chemically similar to post-orogenic/within-plate granitic rocks and has a zircon U/Pb age of 87 ± 1.6 Ma. Geobarometric calculations indicate that amphibole within the Ankroet pluton crystallized at a depth of ~ 6 kbar which is consistent with the somewhat more depleted Sr-Nd isotope (ISr = 0.7017 to 0.7111; εNd(T) = - 2.8 to + 0.6) and variable εHf(T) compositions suggesting a stronger influence of crustal material in the parental magma. The compositional change of the Dalat zone granitic rocks during the middle to late Cretaceous indicates that the tectonic regime evolved from a continental arc environment to one of post-orogenic extension. The appearance of sporadic post-90 Ma magmatism in the Dalat zone and along the eastern margin of Eurasian indicates that there was no subsequent orogenic event and the region was likely one of highly extended crust that facilitated the opening of the South China Sea during the latter half of the Cenozoic.

  18. Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern and central Alaska Range: Progressive basin development and deformation in a suture zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, K.D.; Trop, J.M.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Davidson, C.M.; Eastham, K.R. [Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Science

    2002-07-01

    Analysis of late Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, metamorphic rocks, and major faults in the eastern and central Alaska Range documents the progressive development of a suture zone that formed as a result of collision of an island-arc assemblage (the Wrangellia composite terrane) with the former North American continental margin. New basin-analysis, structural, and geochronologic data indicate the following stages in the development of the suture zone: (1) Deposition of 3-5 km of Upper Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous marine strata (the Kahiltna assemblage) recorded the initial collision of the island-arc assemblage with the continental margin. (2) Metamorphism of submarine-fan deposits of the Kahiltna basin, located near the leading edge of the island-arc assemblage, occurred at ca. 74 Ma, as determined from a new U-Pb zircon age for a synkinematic sill. (3) Shortening and exhumation of the suture zone peaked from 65 to 60 Ma on the basis of metamorphic and geochronologic data. (4) From 60 to 54 Ma, about 3 km of volcanic strata were deposited over deformed sedimentary strata of the Cantwell basin, and several granitic plutons (the McKinley sequence) were emplaced along the suture zone. (5) Following igneous activity, strike-slip displacement occurred from ca. 54 to 24 Ma along the Denali fault system, which had developed in the existing suture zone. (6) Regional transpressive shortening characterized the suture zone from ca. 24 Ma to the present. Regional subsidence resulted in Miocene coal seams up to 20 m thick and well-developed lacustrine deposits. Overlying the Miocene deposits are about 1.2 km of Pliocene and Holocene conglomeratic deposits. These mapping relationships provide evidence that regional shortening continues to the present in the eastern and central Alaska Range.

  19. Permian ultrafelsic A-type granite from Besar Islands group, Johor, peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Azman A.; Hazad, Fatin Izzani; Jamil, Azmiah; Xiang, Quek Long; Atiqah Wan Ismail, Wan Nur; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lai, Yu-Ming; Roselee, Muhammad Hatta; Islami, Nur; Nyein, Kyaw Kyaw; Amir Hassan, Meor Hakif; Abu Bakar, Mohd Farid; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2014-12-01

    The granitic rocks of the peninsula have traditionally been divided into two provinces, i.e., Western and Eastern provinces, corresponding to S- and I-type granite respectively. The Western Province granite is characterised by megacrystic and coarse-grained biotite, tin-mineralised, continental collision granite, whereas, the Eastern Province granite is bimodal I-type dominated by granodiorite and associated gabbroic of arc type granite. This paper reports the occurrence of an A-type granite from peninsular Malaysia. The rocks occur in the Besar, Tengah, and Hujung islands located in the southeastern part of the peninsula. The granite is highly felsic with SiO2 ranging from 75.70% to 77.90% (differentiation index = 94.2-97.04). It is weakly peraluminous (average ACNK =1.02), has normative hypersthene (0.09-2.19%) and high alkali content (8.32-8.60%). The granites have many A-type characteristics, among them are shallow level of emplacement, high Ga, FeT/MgO and low P, Sr, Ti, CaO and Nb. Calculated zircon saturation temperatures for the Besar magma ranging from 793 ∘ to 806 ∘C is consistent with high temperature partial melting of a felsic infracrustal source which is taken as one of the mechanisms to produce A-type magma. The occurrence of the A-type granite can be related to the extensional back arc basin in the Indo-China terrane during the earliest Permian.

  20. On the sources of uranium in some Scottish Caledonian granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The lead isotope systematics, zircon uranium concentrations and whole-rock rubidium concentrations of 11 Scottish Caledonian granites are examined for clues to the origin of their uranium. A positive correlation between U in zircon and initial lead isotope ratios suggests that U and Pb were derived from the same source which, as some of these granites contain their U in inherited zircons, is likely to have been within the crust. It is argued, therefore, that most of the uranium in these granites had a crustal derivation but lead isotope ratios indicate that any Lewisian contribution was minor in comparison with those from postulated Grenville, Morarian or Caledonian metamorphic reservoirs. However, additional data are required before this conclusion can be extended to include uraniferous Caledonian granites such as Cairngorm. (author)

  1. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1967. Date of birth: 30 October 1900. Date of death: 11 March 1991. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  2. Petrogenesis of the Yaochong granite and Mo deposit, Western Dabie orogen, eastern-central China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaowen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Chao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hao; Su, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The Dabie orogen is among the most famous continent-continent collisional orogenic belts in the world, and is characterized by intensive post-collisional extension, magmatism and Mo mineralization. However, the genetic links between the mineralization and the geodynamic evolution of the orogen remain unresolved. In this paper, the Yaochong Mo deposit and its associated granitic stocks were investigated to elucidate this issue. Our new zircon U-Pb ages yielded an Early Cretaceous age (133.3 ± 1.3 Ma) for the Yaochong granite, and our molybdenite Re-Os dating gave a similar age (135 ± 1 Ma) for the Mo deposit. The Yaochong stock is characterized by high silica and alkali but low Mg, Fe and Ca. It is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs: Rb, K, Th and U), but strongly depleted in heavy REEs, and high field strength elements (HFSEs: Nb, Ta, Ti and Y). The Yaochong granite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7087-0.7096, and Pb isotopic ratios of (206Pb/204Pb)i = 16.599-16.704, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.170-15.618 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 36.376-38.248. The granite has εNd(t) of -18.0 to -16.3 and εHf(t) values of -26.5 to -20.0. All these data indicate that the Yaochong granite is a high-K calc-alkaline fractionated I-type granite, and may have originated from partial melting of the thickened Yangtze continental crust. The Mo ores also show low radiogenic Pb isotopes similar to the Yaochong stock. Medium Re content in molybdenite (21.8-74.8 ppm) also suggests that the ore-forming materials were derived from the thickened lower crust with possibly minor mixing with the mantle. Similar to the Eastern Dabie orogen, the thickened crust beneath the Western Dabie orogen may also have experienced tectonic collapse, which may have exerted fundamental geodynamic controls on the two-stage Mo mineralization in the region.

  3. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to ...

  4. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  5. Preliminary experiences of radionuclide migration with granitic materials: El Berrocal (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gutierrez, M.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the radionuclide migration in granitic rocks used for radioactive waste storage. This project is developed in El Berrocal (Spain). The author studies the absorption process, applies the transport equation, the column migration and analyzes the curves

  6. Radiatives elements distribution in Serra do Carambei granite, Parana, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.; Siedlecki, K.N.

    1988-01-01

    In the Serra do Carambei Granite, the uranium present in the rock in anomalous concentration is hosted, preferentially, in accessory mineralogical phases-zircon, xenotime, magnetite and ilmenite, and, in lesser proportion, in the essential minerals of the rock-potassium feldspar and also iron oxydes/hydroxydes and alterated biotite. Optical petrography, autorradiomicrography, scanning electronic microscopy, and the utilization of correlation matrixes and the respective dendrograms revealed a distribution of radioactive elements basically controlled by autometassomatic, tardi/pos-magmatic or supergene processes. Intrusive felsic dikes in the Serra do Carambei Granite have radioelement concentration level approximately four times higher than the enclosing granite, where uranium as well as thorium is preferentially found in metamictized accessory minerals-zircon and allanite. (author) [pt

  7. Mesozoic anomalies in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Nair, R.R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K.S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; D; Subrahmanyam, C.; Paul, J.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Sekhar, D

    . The configuration of the offsets of the isochrons allowed us to propose approximately N120~'E-trending oceanic fracture zones. The Mesozoic crust of 132.5-118 Ma is estimated to evolve with an average half-spreading rate of 3.5 cm/yr, except for the ocean floor...

  8. Geologic setting of the St. Catherine basement rocks, Sinai, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Maksoud, M. A. [محمد علي عبدالمقصود; Khalek, M. L. Abdel; Oweiss, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    St. Catherine area, some 900 km in size, is dominated by basement rocks Encompassing old continental gneisses, metasediments, greenstone belt, calc-alkaline granites (G-II-granites), rift-related volcanics (RV), and anorogenic within plate granites (G-III-granites). The greenstone belt is composed of subduction-related volcanics (SV) intercalated with metasediments. These volcanics split into older group (moderately metamorphosed) and younger group (slightly metamorphosed). The calc-alkaline ...

  9. Fault rocks and uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Hangshou.

    1991-01-01

    The types of fault rocks, microstructural characteristics of fault tectonite and their relationship with uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area are discussed. According to the synthetic analysis on nature of stress, extent of crack and microstructural characteristics of fault rocks, they can be classified into five groups and sixteen subgroups. The author especially emphasizes the control of cataclasite group and fault breccia group over uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area. It is considered that more effective study should be made on the macrostructure and microstructure of fault rocks. It is of an important practical significance in uranium exploration

  10. Microstructural modeling of Vienne granite damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homand, F.; Hoxha, D.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural approach in damage modeling, which is presented in this paper describes the evolution of micro-crack geometry as a function of history loading. If the crack geometry is known, the effective properties could then be calculated foe any cracked rock by the mean of a micro-mechanical model. The P L evolution law which is necessary in the describing of crack geometry evolution is hardly based on the crack microscope observation as well as on the theory of fabric tensors. This approach is applied in the modeling of mechanical behaviour of Vienne granite. The result of model simulations are compared with laboratory tests. (author)

  11. Radiometric age of granite from Campo Formoso, BA-Brazil - a minimum age for Jacobina group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquato, J.R.; Oliveira, M.A.F.T. de; Bartels, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The Campo Formoso granite represents the magmatic phase of the remobilized Pre-Jacobina basement, located within an are defined by the Serra de Jacobina, north of Campo Formoso, Bahia. Intrusive relationships between this granite and the Jacobina Group metasediments, gradational changes in textures and compositions between the granite and basement rocks, and the general structural-topographic expression of this suggest a mantled gneiss dome model for this area. A RB/Sr whole rock isochron age of 1911 +- 13 m.y. for the Campo Formoso granite is established. This date is interpreted as the age of the development of the structure, as well as a minimum age for the Jacobina Group metasediments. K/Ar dates on muscovites from the Campo Formoso granite are concordant with the Rb/Sr isocron. It is suggested that a lower regional thermal gradient in the Campo Formoso area during Transamazonic time is the cause for a more rapid cooling environment. (Author) [pt

  12. Weathering-related origin of widespread monazite in S-type granites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawka, W N; Banfield, J F; Chappell, B W

    1986-01-01

    The S-type granite suites comprising more than a quarter of the extensively developed granites in the Lachlan Fold Belt, Australia, contain monazite which may be related to the chemical weathering of the sedimentary source rocks. We report a process whereby chemical weathering fixes mobile rare-earth elements (REE) in hydrous phosphate phases such as florencite and rhabdophane. This material contains up to 50 wt.% LREE and occurs as very small particles (approx. 3 ..mu..m). Dehydration of these hydrous REE phases during anatexis directly yields monazite. The low solubility of phosphorus in S-type granite melts inhibits dissolution of both monazite and apatite. Refractory monazite may be thus entrained and transported in S-type granites in a manner similar to processes resulting in inherited zircon. Since both Th and the light REE are major components in monazite, materials containing this minute phase may be of widespread geochemical significance in both granites and metamorphic rocks.

  13. Greisen deposits associated to carboniferous post-orogenic granites with mineralization potential, Sierra de Fiambala, Catamarca, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A. S.; Rubinstein, N. R.; Avila, J. C.; Baez, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Fiambala range is located in the central south part of the province of Catamarca, Western Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina. It is largely conformed by Precambrian metamorphic rocks, a Cambrian granitic intrusive, Ordovician basic and ultra basic rocks and epi zonal Carboniferous granites (Los Ratones, El Salto and Ayacucho Granites). The Carboniferous granites are sub alkaline, weakly peraluminous, high silica (except for the porphyritic facies of Los Ratones granite) and moderately enriched in K. Contents of trace elements and REE indicate that El S alto and Ayacucho granites and the granular facies of Los Ratones granite have characteristics of evolved and differentiated granite associated with hydrothermal systems. The variations of trace elements, particularly Sn, W, U, Rb, Ba, Zr and Sr suggest that they correspond to granites with mineralization potential. Genetically linked to these granites there are Sn, W, U and minor base metals greisen deposits. The hydrothermal process that yield to these deposits involved two main alteration stages, beginning with alkali metasomatism follow by greissenization. According to the isotopic ages the hydrothermal processes postdate about 1 Ma the magmatic activity. The analyses of the granites and the associated greisen deposits confirm that the post orogenic carboniferous magmatism is the major metallogenetic control of the ore deposits from the studied area. This metallogenetic control could be a useful tool in prospecting similar deposits in the rest of the Western Sierras Pampeanas. (Author)

  14. Movement of fossil pore fluids in granite basement, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of pore fluids in granite cores from the Precambrian basement in northern Illinois were determined. The estimated chloride concentration in the aqueous phase increases from near zero at the upper contact with sandstone to 2.7 M at 624 m below the contact. Traces of aliphatic oil are present in the overlying sandstone and the upper 516 m of granite, and oil occupies most of the pore space in one sample of unaltered granite 176 m below the contact. The oil has a Δ 13 C of -25%, about the same as average petroleum. The high concentrations of salt more than 500 m below the contact imply that little or no fresh water has reached these levels of the granite by flow. Lower concentrations near the contact are consistent with replacement of brine in the sandstone by fresh water at least 11 m.y. ago and subsequent upward diffusion of salt from the granite. Geologic data suggest that the time of replacement was about 130 Ma. The purpose of the investigation is to study the record of movement of intergranular fluids within a granite pluton. The composition and movement of ground waters can determine the extent that hazardous or radioactive wastes disposed in igneous rock will remain isolated

  15. Geothermal potential of Caledonian granites underlying Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins astride the Iapetus Suture Zone in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; McConnell, Brian; Buhre, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins in Ireland overlie crystalline rocks within the Caledonian Iapetus Suture Zone. Beneath these basins, Lower Palaeozoic rocks, formed and deformed during the Caledonian orogenic cycle, were intruded by c. 420-390 Ma late-tectonic granites at various tectonic levels. These include the subsurface Kentstown and Glenamaddy granites discovered by mineral exploration drilling. While these granites comprise actual targets for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) exploration, several others likely exist based on geophysical considerations. In order to test the regional geothermal potential, the buried granites as well as analogue exposed rocks are being investigated geochemically. The geothermal potential of the intrusives depends on their heat production rate (HPR), which is calculated using rock density and concentrations of the heat producing elements (HPE) uranium, thorium and potassium. In spite of their close spacing and similar ages, the whole-rock geochemistry of the granites varies significantly, but with no obvious geographical control (Fritschle et al., 2013; 2014). The granite HPR values range from 1.4 μW/m3 for the Dhoon Granite (Isle of Man) to 4.9 μW/m3 for the Drogheda Granite (Ireland). This compares with the average HPR for a 'typical' granite of 2.7 μW/m3 (Goldstein et al., 2009). It is demonstrated that an elevated HPR of a granite can be related to enrichment in one of the HPE alone (e.g., uranium-enrichment in the Foxdale Granite (Isle of Man), or thorium-enrichment in the Drogheda Granite). Enrichment in HPE in a granite may occur due to different reasons including hydrothermal (re-) distribution of uranium, or the assimilation of thorium-rich wall-rocks. Hence, the distribution of the HPE in particular minerals, veins and source lithologies, along with the petrophysical characteristics of the sedimentary basins and the granites' petrogenesis, are currently being investigated as possible mechanisms controlling their

  16. Rare metal granites in the structures of the Russian sector of Pacific ore belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. И. Алексеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Data are presented on the geology of areas of rare metal granites proliferation in the Russian sector of the Pacific Ore Belt that make one take a fresh look at the East Asian granitoid area to update its metallogeny. History is reviewed of studying rare metal granites of the Russian Far East. As a rule, these are found in the vicinity of major tungsten-stanniferous ore deposits, except much later than discovering the former, at the stages of their assessment and survey. Rare earth granites are usually missed by the geologists during the early stages of regional geological surveys due to their small size, weak eroding and external similarity with earlier granites. Using the examples of the Central Polousny, Badzhal and Kuyviveem-Pyrekakay regions the structural and geological conditions are characterized of localization of rare metal granites. Comparative analysis of geological situations made it possible to formulate the areal character of manifestation of rare metal granites; their confinedness to late Mesozoic orogenic arched uplifts of bogen structures above deep granitoid batholiths; positioning in the areas where longitudinal and transversal deep laying faults cross; gravitation to the environs of pre-Cambrian median masses. Similarity of structural-geological conditions for manifestation of the well-studied ore-containing granites serves to confirm the hypothesis on the joint stage of late Cretaceous rare metal magmatism in the Russian sector of the Pacific Ore Belt and the existence in the region of a magmatic super-province – the Far East belt of rare metal granites that includes the Novosibirsk-Chukotka, the Yana-Kolyma and the Sikhote-Alin rare metal – granite provinces.

  17. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-09-01

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff

  18. Petrogenesis of the Zheduoshan Cenozoic granites in the eastern margin of Tibet: Constraints on the initial activity of the Xianshuihe Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shao-cong; Zhao, Shao-wei

    2018-06-01

    The Zheduoshan Miocene granitic pluton is exposed at the eastern margin of Tibet and along the strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault, and is the product of syn-tectonic magmatism closely related to this fault. This paper is focused on the petrogenesis of different granitic lithological units in the Zheduoshan composite intrusion, and the results of geochronology and lithology show that the Zheduoshan Miocene granitic pluton is incremental assembly by three stages of granitic magma influx and growth, represented by fine-grain biotite granite at 18.0 Ma, corase-grain and porphyraceous biotite monzogranite at 16.0 Ma and medium-grain two-mica monzogranite at 14.0 Ma. Combining with the geochemical signatures, these granitic rocks have high intial 87Sr/86Sr ratios, enriched Nd and Hf isotopic compositions, revealing that the sources of these granitic rocks are metabasatic rocks for fine-grain biotite granite, greywackes for coarse-grain biotite monzogranite and medium-grain monzogranite. These granites have high Sr/Y ratios, revealing that these granitic magma form at high pressure condition. The Sr/Y ratios and calculated crystallization pressure gradually decreased, implying the pressure gradually decreasing with the formation of these three stages of granites, which is probably caused by the tectonic mechanism transition from compression to strike-slip extension during the generation of these granites at 18.0-14.4 Ma. This tectonic mechanism change implied the initial activity of Xianshuihe Fault at least before 14.4 Ma.

  19. Thermo-mechanical analysis of high level nuclear wastes in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, A.; Guri, G.; Raimbault, M.

    1991-01-01

    In order to appraise the safety of a storage of high level nuclear wastes in rock masses, it is necessary to assess, among other features, the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the host rock for long periods (thousands of years). In France, four different media are considered as potential host rocks: granite, shale, salt, clay. The present paper is devoted to some analysis of a generic storage configuration in granite. The case of a rock mass without any major fault has been considered. The granite is modelled by means of an elastic fracturing model (no tension type). The results obtained show that some fissures, induced by the heat generation, develop mainly above the repository. The opening of the fissures, within the frame of the adopted hypothesis, have not a strong influence on the rock mass, as a geological barrier for the radionuclides. (author)

  20. Petrography and petrology of the Ayghalesi granite, east of Takab area (northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kamran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigated granite intrusion is located at the north of Ayghalesi village, east of Takab The Ayghalesi granite has been intruded the Eocene sandstone and conglomerate rocks and low grade metamorphic hornfels have been metamorphosed host rocks. The main constituent minerals are K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz and muscovite.and minor garnet. The main texture is granular but pegmatitic, myrmektitic, graphic and perthitic occur as minor textures. Chemically, the rocks are granite on the various classification diagrams. The Ayghalesi intrusion body is classified as S-type, peraluminous composition, calc-alkaline nature and is calcic-alkali to alkali-calcic on the base of modified alkali lime index (MALI. The investigated body, on the tectonic discrimination diagrams, fall on syn-collisional tectonic setting domain, suggesting that it was originated during collision of Central Iranian and Arabian plates Key words: granite,

  1. Anomalously low strength of serpentinite sheared against granite and implications for creep on the Hayward and Calaveras Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Ponce, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Serpentinized ophiolitic rocks are juxtaposed against quartzofeldspathic rocks at depth across considerable portions of the Hayward and Calaveras Faults. The marked compositional contrast between these rock types may contribute to fault creep that has been observed along these faults. To investigate this possibility, we are conducting hydrothermal shearing experiments to look for changes in frictional properties resulting from the shear of ultramafic rock juxtaposed against quartzose rock units. In this paper we report the first results in this effort: shear of bare-rock surfaces of serpentinite and granite, and shear of antigorite-serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granitic rock. All experiments were conducted at 250°C. Serpentinite sheared against granite at 50 MPa pore-fluid pressure is weaker than either rock type separately, and the weakening is significantly more pronounced at lower shearing rates. In contrast, serpentinite gouge sheared dry between granite blocks is as strong as the bare granite surface. We propose that the weakening is the result of a solution-transfer process involving the dissolution of serpentine minerals at grain-to-grain contacts. Dissolution of serpentine is enhanced by modifications to pore-fluid chemistry caused by interaction of the fluid with the quartz-bearing rocks. The compositional differences between serpentinized ultramafic rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and quartzofeldspathic rock units such as those of the Franciscan Complex may provide the mechanism for aseismic slip (creep) in the shallow crust along the Hayward, Calaveras, and other creeping faults in central and northern California.

  2. Electrical conductivity of sandstone, limestone, and granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duba, A.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Santor, M.; Weed, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of cylindrical cores of Westerly granite, Indiana limestone and Nugget, St Peter and Kayenta sandstones was measured at about 25/sup 0/C in vacuo, in air, and after saturation in distilled water, tap water, and 0.1 M NaCl solution. The three-electrode technique with a guard ring and the two-electrode technique without a guard ring were used. Core aspect ratio over the range of 2.00 to 0.25, as well as frequency over the range of 50 Hz to 10 kHz, influences the conductivity of all rocks, especially those measured in vacuo. Measurements from water-saturated samples using a guard ring are not appreciably different from those obtained without a guard ring. The conductivity of rocks saturated in 0.1 M NaCl solution changes least with a change in aspect ratio; for these rocks a linear relationship, known as Archie's Law, exists between log porosity and log conductivity. No simple correlation was found between those factors in rocks saturated with tap or distilled water. Thus, it appears Archie's Law is of questionable value for correlating laboratory data from rocks saturated with low-conductivity fluids.

  3. Leaching of gallium from gaiter granite, eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, M.A.; Mahmoud, KH.F.; Mahdy, M.A.; Abd El-Hamid, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary leaching tests of gallium from some Egyptian granite rocks such as those of Gabal Gattar area was investigated by using 8 M HCl acid and sodium perchlorate as oxidant. To achieve the optimum leaching conditions, the factors affecting the leaching efficiency as the acid type and concentration, oxidant type and amount, leaching temperature, agitation time, solid / liquid ratio and the effect of grain size were studied. The complete chemical analysis of the collected samples was firstly carried out to determine the chemical features of the Gattarian granite. More than 97% of gallium content was leached when applying these optimum leaching conditions

  4. Depositional features and stratigraphic sections in granitic plutons: implications for the emplacement and crystallization of granitic magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, R. A.; Collins, W. J.

    1998-09-01

    Many granitic plutons contain sheet-like masses of dioritic to gabbroic rocks or swarms of mafic to intermediate enclaves which represent the input of higher temperature, more mafic magma during crystallization of the granitic plutons. Small-scale structures associated with these bodies (e.g. load-cast and compaction features, silicic pipes extending from granitic layers into adjacent gabbroic sheets) indicate that the sheets and enclave swarms were deposited on a floor of the magma chamber (on granitic crystal mush and beneath crystal-poor magma) while the mafic magma was incompletely crystallized. These structures indicate 'way up', typically toward the interior of the intrusions, and appear to indicate that packages of mafic sheets and enclave concentrations in these plutons are a record of sequential deposition. Hence, these plutons preserve a stratigraphic history of events involved in the construction (filling, replenishment) and crystallization of the magma chamber. The distinctive features of these depositional portions of plutons allow them to be distinguished from sheeted intrusions, which usually preserve mutual intrusive contacts and 'dike-sill' relations of different magma types. The considerable thickness of material that can be interpreted as depositional, and the evidence for replenishment, suggest that magma chamber volumes at any one time were probably much less than the final size of the pluton. Thus, magma chambers may be constructed much more slowly than presently envisaged. The present steep attitudes of these structures in many plutons may have developed gradually as the floor of the chamber (along with the underlying solidified granite and country rock) sank during continuing episodes of magma chamber replenishment. These internal magmatic structures support recent suggestions that the room problem for granites could be largely accommodated by downward movement of country rock beneath the magma chamber.

  5. Petrology and geochronology of metamorphosed volcanic rocks and a middle Cretaceous volcanic neck in the east-central Sierra Nevada, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, R.W.; Swanson, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Metamorphosed Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the E-central Sierra Nevada range in composition from basalt to rhyolite and have ages, based on whole rock Rb-Sr and U-Pb zircon dating, of about 237- 224, 185, 163, 134, and 100Ma. The major plutons of the batholith in this area are of Triassic (215-200Ma) and Cretaceous (94-80Ma) ages. Initial 87Sr/86Sr values for the metamorphosed volcanic rocks of the area are in the range from 0.7042 to 0.7058 and are generally different from the values for the surrounding batholithic rocks (0.7056-0.7066). A circular, zoned granitic pluton, with an outcrop area of 2.5km2, similar in appearance to a ring dike complex, was apparently a conduit for some or possibly all of the middle-Cretaceous metamorphosed volcanic rocks exposed about 5km to the S in the western part of the Ritter Range. Samples from the metamorphosed volcanic rocks and the pluton yield a Rb/Sr whole rock isochron age of 99.9+ or -2.2Ma with an intitial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7048+ or -0.00001. Major element variation diagrams of the pluton and volcanic rocks define coincident compositional trends. The ages of volcanic events relative to the ages of the major intrusive epochs and the major element and isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks relative to the major plutons indicate that the volcanic rocks are not simply or directly related to the major plutons in the Sierra Nevada. -from Authors

  6. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, R.

    1959-01-01

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [fr

  7. MESOZOIC MAGMATISM IN EAST URUGUAY: PETROLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS RELATED TO THE SIERRA SAN MIGUEL REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Bruno

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents new results of a detailed geological and structural investigation focusing the easternmost Uruguayan Mesozoic magmatic occurrences related to the south Atlantic opening. Lithological descriptions, their stratigraphic relationships and complimentary lithochemical characterizations carried out in the San Miguel region (East Uruguay are presented. Three volcanic/sub-volcanic units have been recognized. The felsic volcanic association is composed by rhyolitic - dacitic flows, mainly with porphyritic textures and sub-alkalinenature and related pyroclastic rocks. The felsic sub-volcanic association is characterized by granophyres of about 25 km2 of exposed area, cross- cut by mafic and felsic dykes. Finally, a mafic association has been identified characterized by dykes and a small intrusion of gabbroic composition.All these units are Mesozoic in age (130 - 127 Ma and according to their chemical nature they correspond tosub-alkaline to weak peralkaline magmas.

  8. Geological characteristics of granite type uranium deposits in middle of Inner Mongolia in comparison with south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gui

    2012-01-01

    Granites extensively distributed in middle of Inner Mongolia and South China, namely Caledonian, Hercynian and Yanshanian. Some of the intrusive are composed of granites which belong to different ages. Some of the uranium deposits were found inside the granite bodies or in sedimentary rocks and meta sedimentary rocks along the exocontact zone. Granite rock was comparing in middle Inner Mongolia and South China, including Uranium ore-forming geological conditions. ore-forming process and Ore-controlling factors. Think the Uranium ore-forming geological conditions is similar; ore-forming process is mainly for low-mid temperature hot liquid; Uranium ore bodies (uranium mineralization) was controlled by fracture. Explain granite type uranium mineralization potential is tremendous in middle of Inner Mongolia. (author)

  9. The regional geological and structural setting of the uraniferous granitic provinces of Southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, R.E.; Corner, B.; Brynard, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium-bearing granites, comprising both potentially economic deposits and source rocks for uranium deposits is duricrustal and sedimentary sequences, are confined chiefly to the mobile belts of Southern Africa and to the Cape granites emplaced during late Precambrian times. The direct uranium potential of the mobile belts, i.e. the Damara, Namaqua-Natal and Limpopo belts, decreases with an increase in the age of associated ensialic diastrophism. This review paper is thus mainly confined to the Damara Belt, although a brief discussion of the potential of the Namaqua Belt is presented. Aspects of the Damara Belt that are discussed in detail, with particular reference to the occurrence of uraniferous granite, include regional tectonic setting, stratigraphy, structure, metamorphism and the patterns and origin of the uranium mineralization. Initial concentrations of uranium in basement and Nosib rocks have led, through ultrametamorphism and fractionation, to uraniferous granites of both economic and sub-economic grade. These granites, in turn, have acted as source of secondary mineralization in overlying superficial calcareous and gypsiferous deposits. The Damara Belt thus provides a good example of multicyclic processes of ore formation. With regard to the uraniferous granites of Namaqualand it is concluded that the porphyroblastic gneisses and late-intrusive Concordia granites, although not of direct economic interest, represent major sources of uranium for secondary superficial deposits. Smaller bodies of late-phase differentiates associated with the Concordia granitic gneiss may themselves, however, represent potentially economically viable deposits

  10. Age and Isotopic Studies of Some Pan-African Granite from North-Central Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breemen, O. van; Pidgeon, R.T.; Bowden, P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-nine Rb-Sr whole-rock isotopic analyses and three U-Pb zircon analyses on foliated granites and largely unfoliated charnockitic rocks indicate that the central part of the Pan-African belt in west Africa was characterised by intense orogenic plutonism. These data and Rb-Sr analyses on muscovite books from late cross-cutting pegmatites indicate that the peak of magmatic activity occurred 610 +- 10 m.y.ago. Initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for the granitic and charnockitic rocks are in the range 0.7065-0.7125, and indicate a significantly older crustal component in the magmas

  11. Distribution of monazite in granite and alluvial of South Bangka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngadenin

    2011-01-01

    Monazite is one source of thorium (Th), which has significant economic value and potential as an alternative fuel of nuclear power plants. The aims of research is to find out the distribution monazite alternative fuel of nuclear power plants. The aims of research is to find out the distribution monazite and its potential as a resource of radioactive minerals on the Bangka Island, then the data will be used and its potential as a resource of radioactive minerals on the Bangka Island, then the data will be used as a reference in the development of radioactive minerals exploration areas in the coming year. The research location is in the Bencah and Gadung villages, South Bangka Regency. The method used is the geological mapping, sampling of rock for petrographic, mineragraphic and autoradiographic analysis and heavy mineral for grains counting analysis. The results showed that lithologic area of Bencah Village composed of clay stone and alluvial deposits, while the Gadung Village composed by granite and alluvial deposits. Granite Gadung is predicted as the ilmenite series granite and tend to be of S type, while the material of Bencah alluvial is predicted come from the Klabat granite groups. In general, distribution of monazite in the alluvial slightly more potent of monazite than in the granite so that the development of radioactive minerals exploration will be prioritized in the alluvial areas. (author)

  12. Experimental Researches on Long-Term Strength of Granite Gneiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to confirm the long-term strength of rock materials for the purpose of evaluating the long-term stability of rock engineering. In this study, a series of triaxial creep tests were conducted on granite gneiss under different pore pressures. Based on the test data, we proposed two new quantitative methods, tangent method and intersection method, to confirm the long-term strength of rock. Meanwhile, the isochronous stress-strain curve method was adopted to make sure of the accuracy and operability of the two new methods. It is concluded that the new methods are suitable for the study of the long-term strength of rock. The effect of pore pressure on the long-term strength of rock in triaxial creep tests is also discussed.

  13. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of The Geysers reservoir rocks, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, Richard P.; Moore, Joseph N.

    1994-01-20

    Whole-rock oxygen isotopic compositions of Late Mesozoic graywacke, the dominant host rock at The Geysers, record evidence of a large liquid-dominated hydrothermal system that extended beyond the limits of the present steam reservoir. The graywackes show vertical and lateral isotopic variations that resulted from gradients in temperature, permeability, and fluid composition during this early liquid-dominated system. All of these effects are interpreted to have resulted from the emplacement of the granitic "felsite" intrusion 1-2 million years ago. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke are strongly zoned around a northwest-southeast trending low located near the center of and similar in shape to the present steam system. Vertical isotopic gradients show a close relationship to the felsite intrusion. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke decrease from approximately 15 per mil near the surface to 4-7 per mil 300 to 600 m above the intrusive contact. The {delta}{sup 18}O values then increase downward to 8-10 per mil at the felsite contact, thereafter remaining nearly constant within the intrusion itself. The large downward decrease in {delta}{sup 18}O values are interpreted to be controlled by variations in temperature during the intrusive event, ranging from 150{degree}C near the surface to about 425{degree}C near the intrusive contact. The upswing in {delta}{sup 18}O values near the intrusive contact appears to have been caused by lower rock permeability and/or heavier fluid isotopic composition there. Lateral variations in the isotopic distributions suggests that the effects of temperature were further modified by variations in rock permeability and/or fluid-isotopic composition. Time-integrated water:rock ratios are thought to have been highest within the central isotopic low where the greatest isotopic depletions are observed. We suggest that this region of the field was an area of high permeability within the main upflow zone of the liquid

  14. The distribution and uranium content characteristics of Indosinian granite in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenliang; Zhang Zhuo; Chen Wenwen; Chen Lulu; Xu Wenzheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, more and more Indosinian granite plutons has been found in South China, so some new ideas about the granity were proposed by scholars. The Indosinian granite in South China distributed in lineshape, and is controlled by some regional faults. Its formation was mainly related to geodynamic setting which began in the late Permian (about 256 Ma) by the subduction of the ancient Pacific Plate to the Eurasia. The average uranium content of Indosinian granite is 10.34ppm, much higher than the average value of world's acid rock. There occurs some couplings between the distribution of the Indosinian granite plutons and uranium mineralization belt in South China. So the Indosinian granite in South China may act as important uranium sources for the mineralization. (authors)

  15. A fractal derivative constitutive model for three stages in granite creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wang

    Full Text Available In this paper, by replacing the Newtonian dashpot with the fractal dashpot and considering damage effect, a new constitutive model is proposed in terms of time fractal derivative to describe the full creep regions of granite. The analytic solutions of the fractal derivative creep constitutive equation are derived via scaling transform. The conventional triaxial compression creep tests are performed on MTS 815 rock mechanics test system to verify the efficiency of the new model. The granite specimen is taken from Beishan site, the most potential area for the China’s high-level radioactive waste repository. It is shown that the proposed fractal model can characterize the creep behavior of granite especially in accelerating stage which the classical models cannot predict. The parametric sensitivity analysis is also conducted to investigate the effects of model parameters on the creep strain of granite. Keywords: Beishan granite, Fractal derivative, Damage evolution, Scaling transformation

  16. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  17. Migration of fluids as a tool to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of geological radioactive wastes repositories (RARN) in granitoid rocks: tests on granites submitted to natural deformation vs. not deformed; A migração de fluidos como ferramenta de avaliação da viabilidade da implantação de repositórios de rejeitos radioativos geológicos (RARN) em rochas granitoides: testes em granitos submetidos a deformação natural vs. não deformados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Nilo Henrique Balzani; Barbosa, Pedro Henrique Silva; Santos, Alanna Leite dos; Amorim, Lucas Eustáquio Dias; Freitas, Mônica Elizetti de; Rios, Francisco Javier, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Caracterização Mineralógica e Metalogênese

    2017-07-01

    Fluid composition and migration studies in granitoid rocks subjected to deformation events are a factor that should be considered in the selection of geologically favorable areas for RANR construction, and may be an excellent complement to engineering barrier designs. The research objective was to develop an academic approach, comparing the behavior of deformed and non-deformed granites, not being related to any CNEN project of deploying repositories. It is concluded that in the choice of suitable sites for the construction of repositories, granite bodies that are submitted to metamorphic / deformation / hydrothermal events or that are very fractured should be disregarded. The domes of granite batholith that have undergone hydraulic billing should also be discarded. It has been found that, because of the warming caused by radioactive decay reactions, there is a real possibility that the release of potentially abrasive fluids contained in the minerals can reach and corrode the walls of the repositories and / or packaging.

  18. Determination of uranium concentrations and "2"3"4U/"2"3"8U activity ratio in some granitic rock samples by alpha spectrometry: application of a radiochemical procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, Mahmoud R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is an application of a radiochemical procedure using alpha spectrometry technique for determination of uranium isotopes "2"3"8U, "2"3"4U and "2"3"5U on 13 granitic samples. These samples were collected from Gabal Gattar area, Northeastern Desert, Egypt. The collected samples were digested using microwave technique with aqua regia and spiked with "2"3"2U for chemical yield and activity calculation. Separation of uranium isotopes from the samples was done by Dowex 1 x 4 (50-100 mesh) resin followed by source preparation using microprecipitation technique. The concentrations of "2"3"8U were ranged between 28.9±0.9 and 134.8±1.8 Bq/g, and the "2"3"4U concentrations were between 24±0.6 and 147.7±2.2 Bq/g. For the "2"3"5U, the activity concentrations were between 1.3±0.2 and 6.7±1.2 Bq/g. The activity ratio of "2"3"4U/"2"3"8U was calculated and varied from 0.80 to 1.30. (author)

  19. A genetic model of progressively partial melting for uranium-bearing granites in south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Jianping.

    1989-01-01

    A genetic model of progressively partial and enrichment mechanism of uranium during partial melting of the sources of material studied and the significance of the genetic model in search of uranium deposits is elaborated. This model accounts better for some geological and geochemical features of uranium-bearing granties and suspects the traditional idea that igneous uranium-bearing granites were formed by fusion of U-rich strata surrounding these granites. Finally this paper points out that the infuence of U-rich strata of wall rocks of granites over uranium-bearing granites depends on variation of water solubility in the magma and assimilation of magma to wall rocks during its ascending and crystallization

  20. Empirical model to estimate the thermal conductivity of granite with various water contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Win Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki; Lee, Jae Owan

    2010-01-01

    To obtain the input data for the design and long-term performance assessment of a high-level waste repository, the thermal conductivities of several granite rocks which were taken from the rock cores from the declined borehole were measured. The thermal conductivities of granite were measured under the different conditions of water content to investigate the effects of the water content on the thermal conductivity. A simple empirical correlation was proposed to predict the thermal conductivity of granite as a function of effective porosity and water content which can be measured with relative ease while neglecting the possible effects of mineralogy, structure and anisotropy. The correlation could predict the thermal conductivity of granite with the effective porosity below 2.7% from the KURT site with an estimated error below 10%.

  1. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  2. Mineralogy, geochemistry and petrophysics of red coloured granite adjacent to fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, T.

    1993-03-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical investigations were conducted of red-coloured alteration rims and of the neighbouring unaltered equivalents along fractures within granite from Aespoe. An investigation was made also of a weak to rather strong, red-coloured granite from the Stripa mine, as well as a weak brownish-red colouration, definitely no hydrothermal in origin, of weathered rinds at a glacial polished rock surface in the Bohus granite. When approaching the fracture planes in the Aespoe granite, the most diagnostic alteration features are * the saussuritisation and Fe-oxyhydroxide staining of plagioclase, * the crystallisation chlorite pseudomorphs after biotite and * the hematisation of magnetite. The porosity within the alteration zones increases generally 2 to 3 times compared with the protolith rock, whereas the densities decrease by some 5 to 10%. The oxidation of magnetite gives as much as a tenfold lowering of the magnetic susceptibility. The red colouration of the Stripa granite is caused by hematite ± Fe-oxyhydroxide formation along microfractures, grain boundaries and, subordinately, the main minerals. Oxidation and re-precipitation of iron liberated during a retrograde muscovitisation of principally chlorite is interpreted to be the cause of the formation of the ferric oxides. The rather homogeneous density and porosity values of the grey and of the red-coloured granites reflect the minor change in the mineralogy when going from fresh into altered granite. Weathering and whitening of plagioclase in the bleached, outer zone and precipitation of small quantities of Fe-oxyhydroxides/hydroxides in the brownish-red zone cause the macroscopic colouration of the weathering rind below the glacial polished rock surface of Bohus granite. There is a marked increase in porosity from the interior fresh (c. 0.4-0.5%) towards the exterior bleached zone (c.1.5-2%) of the subaerialy, weathered Bohus granite surface. The incipient decomposition of

  3. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  4. Study of backfilling of fissures in granite by precipitation of silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribstein, A.; Ledoux, E.; Bourg, A.; Oustriere, P.; Sureau, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The discharge of high-activity radioactive wastes in granitic formations heats the rock in the area of the waste repository. Silica, a constituent of granite, may be dissolved by subterranean water in the heated area and reprecipitated in the colder outer zone. The aim of this study is to quantify this phenomenon experimentally and to assess its extent and effects by means of a numerical model

  5. Geochemical geochronology and genesis of granite from Coronel Murta, Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.C.P.; Siga Junior, O.

    1987-01-01

    Geological, petrographic, geochemical (including rare-earth elements) and geochronological data of the Coronel Murta (Northeast Minas Gerais State) post-tectonic intrusive alkalic granites were summarized in order to discuss their genesis. This paper shows that Coronel Murta granites were generated by anatexis of dominantly metasedimentary rocks, in an ensialic environment, as the late results of an intraplate A-type subduction during the Brazilian Cycle. (author) [pt

  6. U-Pb ages in meta-rhyolite zircon from Arai Group and associated granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, M.M.; Fuck, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Geochronology results by V-Pb method in zircon of granite rocks from staniferous province of Goias and rhyolite Arai groups are revealed. Two distinct episode of acid magmatism in Paleo-and Meso proterozoic are presented. V-Pb data in zircon from Sucuri and Soledade granites of the province from Parana River with ages of higher intercepted are also defined. This ages are consider mistakes, similar the V-Pb age of a rhyolite from Arai group. (author)

  7. Heat transfer experiment in a granite formation at Cornwall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Hodgkinson, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment simulating a waste package was started in 1978 in Cornish granite. To obtain measurable temperature rises through large volumes of rock, an electrical heater at 50m depth was run for four years. The heater was then switched off and the cooling was monitored for another year. The results show that most of the heat transfer was by conduction but that some convection occurred and that temperatures can be predicted with some confidence

  8. Geology and geochronology of Mata Surrao granites - South-West of Rio Maria - Para State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, K.D.; Pereira, E.D.; Dall'Agnol, R.; Lafon, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarize the preliminary data about a geological mapping on the scale 1:50.000 located at an area in the southeastern part of the Para State. The recognized units comprise the Mata Surrao granite, which is within the typical Archean Granite-Greenstone Terrain of Rio Maria, and has mainly a monzogranitic composition. Its foliation is restricted to the north and east borders. The mapped host rocks are represented by Tonalitic Ortho gneisses, Gneisses with Pegmatites, Migmatite Gneisses, both latter show different deformation rates. Rb/Sr on whole rock systematics had been applied for the Mata Surrao granite and yield an age of 2541 ± 74 Ma with Sr initial ratio of 0.71040 ± 343 (MSWD = 2.81). This data revealed another Archean granitic body (strictu sensu) related to the Rio Maria Granite-Greenstone Terrain. Such age can be interpreted either as the crystallization age of this granitic body, or a renewed one caused by the thermo tectonic event that affected the region at the end of Archean time. It can be deduced from the initial ratio that an important crustal contribution controlled the Mata Surrao granite genesis. (author)

  9. A 3D Magnetotelluric Perspective on the Galway Granite, Western Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas; Muller, Mark; Vozar, Jan; Feely, Martin; Hogg, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) and audi-magnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired at 75 locations across the exposed calc-alkaline Caledonian Galway granite batholith and surrounding country rocks into which the granite intruded. The Galway granite is located in western Ireland on the north shore of Galway bay, and has an ESE-WNW long axis. The granite is cut by trans-batholith faults, the Shannawona Fault Zone (SFZ) in the western part of the batholith, which has a NE-SW trend, and the Bearna Fault Zone (BFZ) in the eastern sector that has a NW-SE trend. Geobarometry data indicate that the central granite block between these fault zones has been uplifted, with the interpretation being that the granite in this central block is thinned. To the west of the SFZ, much of the Galway granite is below sea level, with the majority of the southern granite contact also beneath the sea in Galway bay. To the east of the batholith, the Carboniferous successions, consisting of mainly limestone with shale, overlie the basement rocks. The country rock to the north includes the metagabbro-gneiss suite, which itself intruded the deformed Dalradian successions that were deposited on the Laurentian margin of the Iapetus Ocean. The deformation of the Dalradian rocks, the intrusion of the metagabbro-gneiss suite and the intrusion of the Galway granite were major events in the protracted closure of the Iapetus Ocean. It is clear from geological mapping, from geobarometry and from the present submergence by the sea of a large part of the Galway granite, that inversion of MT data in this structurally complex geology is likely to require a 3D approach. We present a summary of 3D inversion of the Galway MT and AMT data. The study shows that the structure of the Galway granite is quite different from the pre-existing perspective. The central block, thought by its uplifting to be thinned, is shown to be the thickest part of the batholith. A geological model of granite intrusion is offered to explain this

  10. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10-0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years.

  11. Ultramafic rocks of the western Idaho suture zone: Asbestos Peak and Misery Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godchaux, M.M. (Mount Holyoke Coll., South Hadley, MA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Bonnichsen, B. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The Western Idaho Ultramafic Belt extends northward from the town of Weiser to the northern end of Dworshak Reservoir; in its northern portion most of the ultramafic bodies are localized along the suture zone where the Mesozoic oceanic accreted terranes meet the continental craton. Of the twenty bodies investigated, all are small, all are in fault contact with their metavolcanic and metasedimentary host rocks, all have been metamorphosed, and all display deformational fabrics in at least some portion of the outcrop area, suggesting that deformation continued after peak metamorphism. The degree of metamorphism ranges from incipient serpentinization to attainment of equilibrium in the upper amphibolite facies. Some bodies have been intruded by granitic dikes or pegmatite veins after emplacement, and have locally undergone contact metasomatism. Two particularly complex bodies, Asbestos Peak and Misery Ridge, were chosen for detailed petrographic and chemical study. Asbestos Peak is composed mostly of decussate anthophyllite-talc rock containing isolated patches of harzburgite protolith, and has blackwall border zones. Misery Ridge is composed mostly of coarse-grained sheared tremolite-talc schist without remnant protolith, and lacks true blackwall zones. Both bodies exhibit an unusual and enigmatic hornblende-poikiloblastic garnet-green spinel-skeletal ilmenite assemblage, present in some places as well-defined border zones and in other places as cross-cutting bodies.

  12. Warren Hunt to test granite well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, W.

    1996-01-01

    Various theories which purport to explain the existence of the Alberta oil sands, were discussed briefly. One theory, held among others by Warren Hunt, speculates that oil is formed deep in the Precambrian basement and not in the higher sedimentary rock. According to this theory, methane in the crust is the abiogenic product that results from hydrogen reacting with silicon carbide in the lower mantle. As it rises through the fractures, it encounters the microbiota, and hydrogen is stripped away making larger molecules until only bitumen remains. Hunt and other adherents of this theory believe that hydrocarbon reservoirs are replenished as oil is produced, hence there is no end to the world's oil supply. This theory is about to be tested by retesting a granite well near Fort McMurray, which was suspended in September 1994, when funding dried up. Kaleeda Enterprises, owners of the well, believe that the well bottom is currently in a granite pool, and oil will be found by deepening the well to 2,150 metres from the current 1,650 metres. While this is not universally accepted, if true, the abiogenic theory would go a long way towards explaining the origin of the oil sands

  13. Pre-Cenozoic basement rocks of the Proto-Philippine Sea Plate: Constraints for the birthplace of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Horie, K.; Barth, A. P.; Harigane, Y.; Ueda, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc is widely regarded to be a typical intra-oceanic arc, with the oceanic Pacific Plate subducting beneath the Philippine Sea Plate, an evolving complex of active and inactive arcs and back-arc basins. However, little is known about the origin of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate, which existed along with the Pacific Plate at the time of subduction initiation in the Eocene. To investigate the crustal structures of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate, we conducted manned-submersible and dredge surveys in the Daito Ridges and the Kyushu-Palau Ridge. The Daito Ridges comprise the northwestern Philippine Sea Plate along with what are regarded as remnants of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate. Submersible observations and rock sampling revealed that the Daito Ridges expose deep crustal sections of gabbroic, granitic, metamorphic, and ultra-mafic rocks, along with volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to andesite. Mesozoic magmatic zircon U-Pb ages have been obtained from the plutonic rocks, and whole-rock geochemistry of the igneous rocks indicates arc origins. Furthermore, mafic schist collected from the Daito Ridge has experienced amphibolite facies metamorphism, with phase assemblages suggesting that the crust was thicker than 20 km at the time. Similar amphibolite-facies metamorphic rocks with Proterozoic zircons have been recovered in the southern Kyushu-Palau Ridge, indicating that such distinctively older basement rocks exist as isolated tectonic blocks within the present Philippine Sea Plate. These finds show that the parts of the Daito Ridges and Kyushu-Palau Ridge represent developed crustal sections of the Pre-Cenozoic arc that comprises part of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate, and, together with the tectonic reconstruction of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate (Deschamps and Lallemand 2002, JGR), they suggest that subduction of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc initiated at the continental margin of the Southeast Asia.

  14. Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern and central Alaska Range: Progressive basin development and deformation in a suture zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, K.D.; Trop, J.M.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Davidson, C.M.; Eastham, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of late Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, metamorphic rocks, and major faults in the eastern and central Alaska Range documents the progressive development of a suture zone that formed as a result of collision of an island-arc assemblage (the Wrangellia composite terrane) with the former North American continental margin. New basin-analysis, structural, and geochronologic data indicate the following stages in the development of the suture zone: (1) Deposition of 3-5 km of Upper Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous marine strata (the Kahiltna assemblage) recorded the initial collision of the island-arc assemblage with the continental margin. The Kahiltna assemblage exposed in the northern Talkeetna Mountains represents a Kimmeridgian-Valanginian backarc basin that was filled by northwestward-flowing submarine-fan systems that were transporting sediment derived from Mesozoic strata of the island-arc assemblage. The Kahiltna assemblage exposed in the southern Alaska Range represents a Valanginian-Cenomanian remnant ocean basin filled by west-southwestward-flowing submarine-fan systems that were transporting sediment derived from Paleozoic continental-margin strata uplifted in the along-strike suture zone. A belt of retrograde metamorphism and a regional anticlinorium developed along the continental margin from 115 to 106 Ma, roughly coeval with the end of widespread deposition in the Kahiltna sedimentary basins. (2) Metamorphism of submarine-fan deposits of the Kahiltna basin, located near the leading edge of the island-arc assemblage, occurred at ca. 74 Ma, as determined from a new U-Pb zircon age for a synkinematic sill. Coeval with metamorphism of deposits of the Kahiltna basin in the southern part of the suture zone was development of a thrust-top basin, the Cantwell basin, in the northern part of the suture zone. Geologic mapping and compositional data suggest that the 4 km of Upper Cretaceous nonmarine and marginal marine sedimentary strata in this basin

  15. Review of geomechanics data from French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar granite, with some comparisons to tests in US granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1983-05-01

    Numerous unclassified reports on the French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar (1961-1966) were reviewed from the standpoint of geomechanics. The following aspects of the tests are summarized: spectral content of the tests compared to U.S. results; shock front positions with time; cavity radius as a function of yield, coupling, density of rock, rock shear strength, and overburden; radial pressure, tangential pressure and peak velocity as a function of distance and yield; pressure vs. time at various distances; mechanical properties of granite; scaling laws for acceleration, velocity and displacement as a function of yield and distance for all Hoggar shots; extent of tunnel damage as a function of distance and yield; time to collapse of chimney as a function of yield, or cavity radius; extent of granite crushing and disking as a function of distance and yield cavity height relation to cavity radius; faulting and jointing on the Taourirt Tan Afella massif; and influence of water content on cavity radius vs. yield. Whenever possible, these French data are compared to corresponding data obtained in the U.S. granite events Hard Hat, Shoal, and Piledriver. The following results emerge from the comparison: (1) agreement is found between the French and U.S. experience for: mechanical properties of the granites, rock damage due to the blast, and yield-scaled peak values of acceleration, velocity and displacement; and (2) lack of agreement exists for: cavity size, chminey height, and time to cavity collapse. Average spacing of rock joints also was about 5 times greater in the Hoggar

  16. Thermomechanical studies in granite at Stripa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.; Myer, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Media other than rock salt are being considered for the deep, geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a deep, underground repository will subject the rock to a thermal pulse that will induce displacements, strains, and stresses in the rock. Thermomechanical experiments, with electrical heaters simulating the thermal output of waste canisters, were carried out in granite at a depth of 340 m below surface adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden. Changes in temperature, displacement, and stress in the rock around these heaters were measured, and the measurements were compared with predictions calculated from the theory of linear thermoelasticity. Measured temperature changes agreed well with predictions, but measured displacements and stresses were consistently less than those predicted with constant values for the coefficient of thermal expansion and elastic properties of the rock. A laboratory test program to measure these coefficients over ranges of stress and temperature representing those in the field experiment has been initiated. Test specimens were taken from cores recovered from the instrumentation holes in the Stripa experiments. Preliminary results from laboratory tests on specimens free of joints indicate that the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase from about 60 to 80 MPa and from 0.15 to 0.22, respectively, as the confining stress is increased from 2 to 55 MPa; these values decrease with increasing temperature, more so at 2 MPa than at 55 MPa. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion at a confining stress of 30 MPa increases from about 10 x 10 - 6 / 0 C at 40 0 C to about 14 x 10 - 6 / 0 C. The magnitudes of these changes are not sufficient to resolve the disparity between measured and predicted results. Perhaps the properties of test specimens containing joints will show greater variations in the values of the thermomechanical coefficients with temperature and pressure

  17. Mapping the sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments in the western part of Narmada-Tapti region of Deccan Volcanic Province, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, A. S. N.; Sarkar, Dipankar; Sen, Mrinal K.; Sridher, V.; Prasad, A. S. S. S. R. S.

    2014-10-01

    Deccan Traps spread over large parts of south, west and central India, possibly hiding underneath sediments with hydrocarbon potential. Here, we present the results of seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiments along three profiles, and analyze them together the results from all other refraction profiles executed earlier in the western part of Narmada-Tapti region of the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP). We employ travel time modelling to derive the granitic basement configuration, including the overlying Trap and sub-trappean sediment thickness, if any. Travel time skips and amplitude decay in the first arrival refraction data are indicative of the presence of low velocity sediments (Mesozoic), which are the low velocity zones (LVZ) underneath the Traps. Reflection data from the top of LVZ and basement along with the basement refraction data have been used to derive the Mesozoic sediment thickness. In the middle and eastern parts of the study region between Narmada and Tapti, the Mesozoic sediment thickness varies between 0.5 and 2.0 km and reaches more than 2.5 km south of Sendhwa between Narmada and Tapti Rivers. Thick Mesozoic sediments in the eastern parts are also accompanied by thick Traps. The Mesozoic sediments along the present three profiles may not be much prospective in terms of its thickness, except inside the Cambay basin, where the subtrappean sediment thickness is about 1000-1500 m. In the eastern part of the study area, the deepest section (>4 km) has thick (∼2 km) Mesozoic sediments, but with almost equally thick Deccan Trap cover. Results of the present study provide important inputs for future planning for hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  18. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanling, E-mail: whl_hm@163.com [Key Laboratory of Coastal Disaster and Defence, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); LML, University of Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing [Institutes of Geotechnical Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO{sub 2,} shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10{sup −19} m{sup 2}; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens’ permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  19. The spatial variation of initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Toki granite, Central Japan. Implications for the intrusion and cooling processes of a granitic pluton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuguchi, Takashi; Tsuruta, Tadahiko; Hama, Katsuhiro; Nishiyama, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    The spatial variation in initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios (SrI) in the Toki granite, Central Japan, shows heterogeneity ranging from 0.708942 to 0.710069, which provides information on the intrusion and cooling processes of plutons. The Toki granite has three mineralogy-based rock facies: muscovite-biotite granite (MBG), hornblende-biotite granite (HBG) and biotite granite (BG). Large SrI values were found to be distributed at the western margin (west MBG) and the lithologically central region (central BG), while small SrI values were found at the northeast margin (northeast MBG). Regions with high and low Sr concentrations were also found in the Toki granite. In the Sr-rich samples, SrI (0.708942-0.709789) increases with 100/Sr (0.7-1.5). This geochemical trend extends towards the country sedimentary rocks of the Mino Terrane, which can be interpreted to result from assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) between the original granitic magma and the Mino sedimentary rocks. The SrI values in the Sr-rich regions show a correlation with the Alumina Saturation Index (ASI). In particular, the west MBG, with large SrI values, is classified as a peraluminous granitoid with large ASI, suggesting that the western margin of the pluton was strongly affected by assimilation during the intrusion process. The Sr-poor samples are present both in the central BG, with large SrI values, and in the northeast MBG, with small SrI values. The Sr-poor samples have small ASI and large differentiation indices, indicating that the central BG and the northeast MBG were generated either by different AFC process with different amounts of contaminants or by the intrusion and fractionation of different source magma with different SrI values. Overall, the geochemical spatial variations found in the Toki granite can be explained by various degrees of assimilation and fractional crystallization in the magma chamber and/or multi-stage intrusions with different degrees of crystallization of

  20. Recent discoveries of Uruguayan Mesozoic vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M.; Perea, D.; Rinderknetch, A.; Ubilla, M.; Da Silva, J.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, new discoveries of Uruguayan Mesozoic vertebrates have been made, as well as the reinterpretation of already known remains. Its taxonomical and biostratigraphical significance justifies this communication. Concerning the Tacuarembo Formation, on one hand a dipnoan prearticular tooth plate has been reinterpreted as belonging to Ceratodus africanus Haug 1905, a species typical of Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous deposits of Saharan Africa. This is the second dipnoan taxon recorded in the Tacuarembo Formation, uncovering a previously unrecognized dipnoan diversity in the mid-Mesozoic of South America. On the other hand, a few theropod tooth were confidently identified at the familial level for the first time in our country. The remains include two striated premaxillary tooth crowns, the characters of which, close to Ceratosaurus Marsh 1884, allow to refer them to the family Ceratosauridae, this being the oldest South American record of the family. The striated teeth show strong affinities with those of Late Jurassic ceratosaurids from North America, Iberian Peninsula and Tanzania, which is in accordance with recent proposals about the age of the Lower Member of the Tacuarembo Formation. Concerning the Guichon Formation, we comunicate here in the most important discovery of dinosaur remains in Uruguay. It consist in spatially associated remains from several individuals, including fifty caudal vertebra and several epiphysis, metatarsals and astragali. These materials belong to a titanosaurid sauropod, the characters of which are similar to those of certain Campanian-Maastrichtian titanosaurids. Close to the bones, several eggshell fragments referable to Sphaerovum Mones 1980 - a typical Campanian-Maastrichtian oogenus- were found. This finding represents the first record of sauropod dinosaurs from the Guichon Formation, and suggests a younger age for this unit than early proposed

  1. Geochronology and geochemistry of the granites from the Zhuxi W-Cu ore deposit in South China: Implication for petrogenesis, geodynamical setting and mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaofei; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Miao; Chen, Guohua; Rao, Jianfeng; Li, Yan; Wei, Jin; Ouyang, Yongpeng

    2018-04-01

    The giant Zhuxi tungsten deposit is located in the Taqian-Fuchun Ore Belt in northeastern Jiangxi province, and genetically associated with the Zhuxi granitic stocks and dykes. Three mineralization-related granites including granite porphyry dykes (GP), biotite granitic stocks (BG), and white granitic dykes (WG), were identified in the Zhuxi deposit. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb analysis for the three granitic rocks present ages ranging from 153.5 ± 1.0 Ma to 150.4 ± 1.0 Ma. The BG mainly contains quartz, microcline, albite, biotite and muscovite with minor accessory minerals including zircon, apatite, monazite, Ti/Fe oxides, and dolerite. However, the WG is mainly composed of quartz, microcline and albite with minor muscovite and accessory minerals. The GP is a medium-grained porphyritic granite and its phenocrysts include quartz, alkali feldspar, muscovite and plagioclase. All the Zhuxi granites have high SiO2 content (71.97 wt%-81.19 wt%) and total alkali (3.25 wt%-9.42 wt%), and their valid aluminum saturation index (ASI) values show a wide range of 1.03 to 2.49. High Rb/Sr ratios, low Sr content (data suggest that these highly fractionated I-S transform-type granites were originated from magmas which showed affinity with the Proterozoic continent and the Shuangqiaoshan Group and little mantle contribution was involved during the generation of Zhuxi granitic rocks. Extreme fractional crystallization resulted in further enrichment of tungsten in the evolved granitic magma. New data, presented together with previously published data, suggest that the Zhuxi granitic complex was likely to be formed during lithospheric compression setting during the late Jurassic to early Cretaceous. The biotite granite stock predominately contributed to the production of skarn alteration and mineralization, followed by the white granite dyke; the granite porphyry dykes have little effect.

  2. A Mesozoic orogenic cycle from post-collision to subduction in the southwestern Korean Peninsula: New structural, geochemical, and chronological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Sung Won; Hong, Paul S.; Santosh, M.

    2018-05-01

    The Early to Middle Mesozoic basins, distributed sporadically over the Korean Peninsula, preserve important records of the tectonic history of some of the major orogenic belts in East Asia. Here we present a comprehensive study of the structural, geochemical, geochronological, and paleontological features of a volcano-sedimentary package, belonging to the Oseosan Volcanic Complex of the Early to Middle Mesozoic Chungnam Basin, within the Mesozoic subduction-collision orogen in the southwestern Korean Peninsula. The zircon U-Pb data from rhyolitic volcanic rocks of the complex suggest Early to Middle Jurassic emplacement age of ca. 178-172 Ma, harmonious with plant fossil taxa found from the overlying tuffaceous sedimentary rock. The geochemical data for the rhyolitic volcanic rocks are indicative of volcanic arc setting, implying that the Chungnam Basin has experienced an intra-arc subsidence during the basin-expanding stage by subduction of the Paleo-Pacific (Izanagi) Plate. The Jurassic arc-related Oseosan Volcanic Complex was structurally stacked by the older Late Triassic to Early Jurassic post-collisional basin-fill of the Nampo Group by the Jangsan fault during basin inversion. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous K-feldspar and illite K-Ar ages marked the timing of inversion tectonics, contemporaneous with the magmatic quiescence in the southern Korean Peninsula, likely due to flat-lying or low-angle subduction. The basin evolution history preserved in the Mesozoic Chungnam Basin reflects a Mesozoic orogenic cycle from post-collision to subduction in the southwestern Korean Peninsula. This, in turn, provides a better understanding of the spatial and temporal changes in Mesozoic tectonic environments along the East Asian continental margin.

  3. Selection of the host rock for high level radioactive waste repository in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuanxin; Wang Wenguang; Chen Zhangru

    2001-01-01

    The authors has briefly introduced the experiences of the host rock selection and the host rock types in other countries for high level radioactive waste repository. The potential host rocks in China are investigated. They include granite, tuff, clay, basalt, salt, and loess. The report has expounded the distributions, scale, thickness, mineral and chemical composition, construction, petrogenesis and the ages of the rock. The possibility of these rocks as the host rock has been studied. The six pieces of distribution map of potential rocks have been made up. Through the synthetical study, it is considered that granite as the host rock of high level radioactive waste repository is possible

  4. Bluish granites from Extremadura (Spain): a radiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dolores; Neves, Luís.; Peinado, Mercedes; Pereira, Alcides; Rodríguez, Leticia; António Blanco, José

    2010-05-01

    We have found in the area of Trujillo (Extremadura, Spain) a variety of striking bluish granites, outcropping within the Plasenzuela pluton. They are all quarried under different names and are characterized by leucocratic minerals such as quartz, feldspar (both potassium and plagioclase), sometimes giving a fenocrystic texture and muscovite, with some biotite. As accessory phases, idiomorphic tourmaline is found. Recently a bluish phosphate distributed in the whole rock was detected, included within most mineral phases and fillings from stressed structures that are cutting the rock. We attribute the bluish color of the granites to this phosphate. Although biotite is almost always transformed to chlorite, the rock gives an excellent response to be polished. Physico-mechanical properties make this bluish granite a perfect option for most applications. Absorption coefficient is rather low and alteration by thermal changes has not been observed. A secondary facies with yellow colour also occurs, spatially close to the topographic surface, and probably represents an alteration product of the original granite. This facies is also commercialized as ornamental stone. A radiological survey was carried out in the field, using a gamma ray spectrometer. The radiological background is quite homogeneous in the pluton, without significant differences between gamma ray fluxes of both facies (altered and non altered). The average contents of U, Th and K2O determined in situ with the spectrometer are 7.4 ppm, 0.8 ppm and 3.67%, respectively (n=15). Using U as a Ra proxy, the I index of the EU technical document 112 can be determined, and results in a value of 0.64 for the referred composition. This implies that the rock can be used without any restrictions for building purposes. However, a marked difference was observed in radon exhalation tests carried out in laboratorial facilities. The dominant blue variety shows radon exhalation rates comprised between 0.02 and 0.04 Bq.kg-1.h-1

  5. A transitional alkalic dolerite dike suite of Mesozoic age in Southeastern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, O. Don; Rao, J. M.; Dickenson, M. P.; Pierce, T. A.

    1984-12-01

    Dike rocks from the New England platform of Rhode Island and adjacent Massachusetts consist of premetamorphic and post-metamorphic suites. The older group includes metamorphosed dolerite, minette, and schistose dioritic rocks. Post-metamorphic dikes consist of dolerite and sparse monchiquite. The post-metamorphic dolerites are of comparable age to the Eastern North American dolerite suite associated with the Mesozoic basins along the eastern seaboard of North America. However, the southeastern New England dolerites exhibit mineralogy and chemistry more typical of a transitional alkalic suite compared to the more subalkalic tholeiitic dolerites of the Eastern North American suite. Both suites are compatible with a rift tectonic setting, but the more alkalic dolerites may represent a deeper source of small volume melts compared to the Eastern North American dolerites. These more alkaline melts may have concentrated at local centers, or they may be typical of flank dolerites as opposed to the less alkalic varieties that occur within the central axial rift.

  6. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina; Poteri, Antti

    2007-01-01

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, 36 Cl, 131 I, 22 Na and 85 Sr at flow rates of 1-50 μL.min -1 . Rock matrix was characterized using 14 C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 μL.min -1 . The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  7. Assessment of radioactivity in building material(granite) in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Z. A; Salih, I; Albadwai, K. A; Salih, A. M; Salih, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work radioactivity in building materials (granite) central Sudan was evaluated. In general the building materials used in Sudan are derived either from rocks or soil. These contain trace amounts of naturally occurring radioactive materials(NORMs), so it contains radionuclides from uranium and thorium series and natural potassium. The levels of these radionuclides vary according to the geology of their site of origin. High levels increase the risk of radiation exposure in homes(especially exposure due to radon). Investigation of radioactivity in granite used of the building materials in Sudan is carried out, a total of 18 major samples of granite have been collected and measured using X- ray fluorescence system (30 mci). The activity concentrations have been determined for uranium ("2"3"8U), thorium ('2"3"2Th) and potassium("4"0K) in each sample. The concentrations of uranium have been found to range from 14.81 Bq/kg to 24.572 Bq/kg, thorium between 10.02 Bq/kg and 10.020-84.79 Bq/kg and the potassium concentration varies between 13.33 Bq/kg to 82.13 Bq/kg. Limits of radioactivity in the granite are based on dose criteria for controls. This study can be used as a reference for more extensive studies of the same subject in future. (Author)

  8. Crustal development in relation to granitic magmatism in regard to D/H partition between coexisting hornblende and biotite in the Svecofennian belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda, Y.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Tie-lines in the σD-XFe diagram of hornblende and biotite in Japanese island arc granites give commonly a similar slope to that derived from the equation of Suzuoki-Epstein's experimental work ( 1976. This indicates that in the process of granite intrusion in the island arc environment, the water/rock ratio is high enough to allow the presence of molecular water within and around the rock mass crystallizing from the magma. However, the tie-lines of the anorogenic rapakivi granites of Finland (age 1.65-1.54 Ga are quite different from those of island arc granites, i.e. the σD of hornblende is much lower than that of biotite and the XFe values of both of the minerals are almost the same and high (0.8-0.9. Thus, the tie-lines are nearly vertical. Moreover, the OH contents of hornblende and biotite are very low and this suggests the absence of molecular water in the ascending and crystallizing granitic magma. This probably suggests that the D/H fractionation factor between the hydrous silicates and hydroxyl (OH in the magma without molecular water is different from that of the island arc granites with plenty of molecular water. For the Svecofennian granitic rocks which are older than the rapakivi, e.g. the Turku, Uppsala, Vänge and Revsund masses, the σD-XFe relationships of hornblende and biotite change systematically following the chronological order of the intrusion. The σD-XFe relationships of the granitic rocks around Turku are close to those of the island arc granites, those of the Uppsala and Vänge granites show the intermediate patterns between the Turku and Revsund, and those of the Revsund granites are rather similar to rapakivi. It is considered that the geological settings of granitic magmatism in the Svecofennian belt of the Baltic shield developed from a more mobile to a more continental one.

  9. Investigation of Alaska's uranium potential. Part 1. Reconnaissance program, West-Central Alaska and Copper River basin. Part 2. Uranium and thorium in granitic and alkaline rocks in Western Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eakins, G.R.; Jones, B.K.; Forbes, R.B.

    1977-02-01

    A 6-week reconnaissance program was conducted in west-central Alaska and in the Copper River basin--Chitina River valley area to aid in determining the uranium potential of the state. Division personnel also submitted samples from the Healy, Eagle, and Charley River quadrangles. Collected were 916 stream-sediment samples and 427 bedrock samples for uranium, thorium, and potassium oxide determinations, and 565 water samples for uranium analyses. A statistical analysis of the determinations was made using a computer at the University of Alaska. Thresholds, anomalies, and U:Th ratios were calculated for eight separate regions. Anomalous values of the U, Th, and K 2 O, and radiometric measurements are discussed. A combination of all uranium exploration techniques is needed to locate potential uranium deposits in Alaska. Correlations between aerial and ground radiometric surveys and geochemical surveys were often lacking, indicating that each method may or may not be effective, depending on local conditions. One hundred and eight rock samples were selected from traverses across five plutons in western Alaska and analyzed for uranium, thorium, and potassium. The highest uranium concentrations detected were 86 and 92 ppM from a mineralized dike intrusion zone in the Selawik Lake Complex. Analysis of individual plutons yields strong correlations between mineralogy and radioactivity. The mineralogical variable that correlates with uranium or thorium varies from one pluton to the next. Based on these correlations, mineralogical guidelines are offered for the selection of uranium enriched variants in four of the five plutons

  10. Application-oriented testing and advancement of numerical models for the simulation of flow and transport processes granite rocks; Anwendungsorientierte Erprobung und Weiterentwicklung numerischer Modelle zur Simulation von Stroemungs- und Transportprozessen in granitoiden Gesteinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrenholz, Christine

    2011-07-01

    The presented study has been carried out against the background of problems and questions, which are discussed within long-term safety analysis with regard to the deposition of radionuclide waste within a deep repository in fractured rock. The main research consists in the analysis of - general transport processes within a fractured aquifer by means of 2d and 3d model calculations of different scales, with the objective of determining sensitive parameters, - the influence of heat-fields, with regard to groundwater flow and mass transport within an fractured aquifer, - the new modules of the FEFLOW 5.2 program version, called ''Multi- Species Transport'' and ''Discrete Feature Elements'' for the implementation of radionuclide decay chains, as well as the implementation of explicit fractures in local and regional scale. Additionally it should be asked whether and to what extent the hydrogeological programme FEFLOW provides an opportunity to deliver additional information to the one-dimensional far-field CHETMAD module of the EMOS programme. The models have been tested with increasing complexity as far as possible by using field data from the Itatskij investigation area in the Nishnekanskij Granitoidmassif, near the city of Krasnojarsk in Siberia. The model results show that it is possible to demonstrate the general behaviour of flow and transport processes for different scales and dimensions by using the FEFLOW programme and to detect the essential parameters on the basis of simplified fracture systems. In addition to the Darcy velocity of the solid stone matrix, the various fractures and their characteristics, such as aperture, amount, connectivity and orientation, with regard to the flow-field, are the most important factors. The radionuclide transport also depends to a high degree on the solubility and sorption coefficients of radionuclides on the different rock components. In addition it becomes obvious, that the heat

  11. Etude de la diagraphie neutron du granite de Beauvoir. Effet neutron des altérations et de la matrice du granite. Calibration granite. Porosité totale à l'eau et porosité neutron Analysis of the Beauvoir Granite Neutron Log. Neutron Effect of Alterations and of the Granite Matrix. Granite Calibration. Total Water Porosity and Neutron Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galle C.

    2006-11-01

    carottes (n. Nous montrons que, pour le granite de Beauvoir, l'effet neutron de la matrice est important (en moyenne proche de 7% et ne peut être négligé lorsque l'on mesure des porosités voisines de 0,5% sur carottes. La calibration de l'outil neutron dans le granite et non pas dans des calcaires est d'autre part capitale quant à la précision quantitative des résultats. This article describes the research done on the Beauvoir granite (Echassières GPF 1 borehole, French Massif Central range. The aim of this project was to obtain representative values of the water saturation (n total free water porosity of the Beauvoir granite from PorosityN neutron porosity (BRGM neutron log. The exact knowledge of the porosity of a crystalline block is effectively fundamental to determine its possibilities for being used as a waste storage site. With this goal, neutron logging provides indispensable information concerning the characterization of a porous medium. Our procedure was experimental, and we tried to go more deeply into various problems linked to the use of neutron logging in a granitic rock. Two main factors governed the neutron response : (i the hydrogen concentration of the formation (free water and combined water of various minerals and (ii the presence of absorber elements with a large capture cross-section such as gadolinium, cadmium, boron as well as lithium for the Beauvoir granite. After measuring the Beauvoir granite n total (free water porosity on core samples, we evaluated the combined water content of each sample tested on the basis of fire loss tests on rock powder at 900°C. From the hydrogen atoms volumic concentration, we determined a hydrogen index that we directly converted into the PorosityN(OH- neutron porosity, (by definition, pure water at 20°C has a hydrogen index of 1 which is equivalent to a 100% porosity. For the Beauvoir granite, the matrix combined water represents an average neutron porosity (Table 1 of about 4%. In the second phase, we used

  12. The Sao Jose do Rio Pardo mangeritic-granitic suite, south eastern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Neto, M.C.; Figueiredo, M.C.H.; Janasi, V.A.; Basei, M.A.S.; Fryer, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the Sao Jose do Rio Pardo region, Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais States, occur some intrusive, folded tabular bodies of mangerites associated with hornblende granitoids. The country rocks correspond to a complex association of gneisses and migmatites, locally with granulite facies assemblages. Both the magnerites and hornblende granitoids present a tectonic foliation with mineral flattening and stretching. Petrographically the mangeritic rocks are mainly dark green quartz mangerites with mesoperthite, plagioclase, quartz, hypersthene, clinopyroxene and variable amounts of hornblende, with zircon as conspicuous acessory. The pink hornblende granitoids are mainly granite s.s. exhibiting higher quartz and amphibole contents and lacking pyroxenes. Hololeucocratic alkali feldspar granites are locally associated to the hornblende granites. The textures of the mangerites and granites almost always show an important metamorphic overprinting, with relictic mesoperthite and pyroxene crystal into a granoblastic matrix. The magneritic-granitic suite is characterized by relatively high Fe/(Fe + Mg), K and HFS elements and low Ca contents, being comparable to typical anorogenic magneritic-granitic suites from Svcandinavia and North America. The Rb/Sr data indicate a Late Proterozoic metamorphic isotopic rehomogenization (930 Ma, Ro = 0.706). Geological evidence suggest that the intrusive age could be Middle Proterozoic, wich is reinforced by another Rb-Sr value of about 1300 Ma. (author) [pt

  13. Hydrothermally-induced changes in mineralogy and magnetic properties of oxidized A-type granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, Anne; Trindade, Ricardo; Peschler, Anne; Archanjo, Carlos; Macouin, Mélina; Poitrasson, Franck; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The changes in magnetic mineralogy due to the hydrothermal alteration of A-type granitic rocks have been thoroughly investigated in samples from the granite of Tana (Corsica, France), and compared with other A-type granites: Meruoca (NE Brazil), Bushveld (South Africa), Mount Scott (Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, USA) and the stratoid hypersolvus granites of Madagascar. The altered red-colored samples and their non-altered equivalents were magnetically characterized by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, hysteresis loops, remanent coercivity spectra, and Lowrie test. It is shown that hydrothermalization in magnetite-bearing granites is related to the formation of fine-grained magnetite and hematite, and to coeval depletion in the content of primary low-coercive coarse-grained magnetite. These mineralogical changes give typical rock magnetic signatures, namely lower susceptibility magnitudes and anisotropy degrees, prolate AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) fabrics and increased coercivities. Optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electronic microscopy) images suggest that the orientation of the secondary magnetic minerals is related to fluid-pathways and micro-fractures formed during the hydrothermal event and therefore may be unrelated to magma emplacement and crystallization fabrics. Changes in magnetic mineralogy and grain-size distribution have also to be considered for any paleomagnetic and iron isotope studies in granites.

  14. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  15. Mesozoic basins and associated palaeogeographic evolution in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qing Liu

    2015-04-01

    Besides, during the Late Mesozoic, a huge terrestrial biota, mainly dinosaur fauna, dominated in North China. The Yanliao biota of the Middle–Late Jurassic and the Jehol biota of the Early Cretaceous are characterized by feathered dinosaurs, primitive birds, mammals, pterosaur, insects and plants (angiosperms. In northeastern Asia, this Late Mesozoic tectonic background , palaeogeoraphy and palaeoecology were shared by East China, Korean Peninsula, Japan and the Far East of Russia.

  16. Release of uranium through cataclastic deformation of Mansehra granite gneiss and its precipitation in the overlying intramontane basin in northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Mansehra pluton belongs to a discontinuous belt of two mica granites of the Lesser Himalayas. The Mansehra granite is generally foliated except in the area around Mansehra. Several phases of granitic activity have been reported from the Mansehra Complex. Shams and Rahman have demonstrated that the younger phases tend to be enriched in Na 2 O. Ashraf extensively studied minor bodies ranging from albitites through aplites to pegmatites and suggested a late stage albitization event. The northern edge of this sheet-like granitic mass has undergone extensive cataclastic deformation, resulting in the formation of shear zones, mylonites and cataclasites. A chemical comparison of crushed granite with granite outside the shear zone suggests little chemical reconstitution in terms of major elements during cataclastic deformation. A huge shear zone in albitized granite gneiss has yielded secondary uranium minerals at water seepages, suggesting a liberation of uranium. Hydrogeochemical surveys of the crushed granite and adjoining areas suggest that uranium from crushed granite was easily leachable in comparison with rocks outside the shear zone. The uranium thus liberated was trapped in a Pleistocene sequence of clays and unsorted fluviatile sand overlying the granite and country rock metamorphics. (author). 17 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Evaluation of color and radon exhalation rate in granite rocks between accelerated aging cycles; Avaliacao da cor e taxa de exalacao de radonio em rochas graniticas entre ciclos de envelhecimento acelerado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Francisco Diones Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    Data used for the assessment of the analyzes performed on three types of dimension stone (Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Artico), in natural state and after several cycles of accelerated aging are presented, correlating them with the gas exhalation rate radon issued by the analyzed lithologies. In the samples were conducted permeability, porosity, colorimetry, image analysis, petrographic and exhalation rate of radon, accompanied by aging tests on climate simulation chamber which simulates change situations of materials by weathering agents, accelerating wear and tear samples. The measurements were performed on samples in natural state, with 50 and 100 cycles of aging acceleration, where each cycle corresponds to variations in temperature and humidity in climatic simulation chamber, with the addition of an internal atmosphere of SO{sub 2} with 25 concentration ppm. The results obtained during the tests were related to better analysis of the changes observed on the samples and the variation rate of exhalation radon emitted. The rocks have radon concentration values above the limits suggested by relevant international agencies (200-400 Bq/m³), with average values in the natural state, in 6149, 1619 and 866 Bq/m³ for Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Arctic, respectively. The other aging cycles (50 and 100 cycles) showed an average increase of 0.8% for Juparana Bordeaux, 6.9% for White Blizzard and -23.87% for the Golden Arctic, with 50 cycles. From 50 to 100 cycles, there was reduction of 3.43% for Juparana Bordeaux and 22.15% for Branco Nevasca and an increase of 13.82% in the Golden Artico. The porosity results in the natural state obtained values an average of 0.696% for Juparana Bordeaux, 0.919% for Branco Nevasca and 0.830% for Golden Artico, and after 50 cycles of accelerated aging, obtained 0.621% to Juparana Bordeaux, 0.910% for Branco Nevasca and 0.840% for Golden Artico. The permeability of the samples showed values in the natural

  18. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of Archean core complex formatio and pancratonic strike-slip deformation in the East Pilbara Granite-Greenstone Terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, T.E.; Nelson, D.R.; Wijbrans, J.R.; White, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb dating of zircons from granitic rocks in the East Pilbara Granite-Greenstone Terrain has provided time constraints for main tectonic events in the Shaw Granitoid Complex and has shown that deformation was intricately related to granitoid

  19. Structural and petrophysical characterisation of granite: intended for radioactive waste stocking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Structural and petrophysical analysis have been conducted within the Melechov massif with focus on structures controlling the porosity, permeability and thermal conductivity of the rock. The structure of the massif has been constrained based on extensive dataset including AMS and field structural measurements of ductile and brittle structures. The fracture system of the massif has been described by four sets of fractures. The measured petrophysical data have been used to characterize the effect of fracturing and alteration on pore space geometry and in turn on permeability, thermal conductivity and elastic properties of the studied granite. Distinct petrophysical properties have been identified for pristine granite, for fractured fresh granite as well as for fractured granite altered by Fe-oxide, chlorite and clay minerals. A detailed microstructural study combined with multidirectional P-wave velocity measurements at high confining pressure and with AMS analysis has been conducted on a Schlieren bearing sample of Lipnice granite. The granite VP anisotropy at low confining pressure was controlled by intergranular cracks interconnecting Schlieren-sub parallel cleavage cracks in micas and feldspars and by exfoliation fracture-sub parallel intra- or trans-granular cracks in cleavage-free quartz. Major closing of the crack porosity linked to the Schlieren granite below depth of 500 m has been interpreted in terms of crack compliance reflected by rapid increase in VP with confining pressure. (author)

  20. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  1. Permeability of Granite Including Macro-Fracture Naturally Filled with Fine-Grained Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Kato, Masaji; Niri, Ryuhei; Kohno, Masanori; Sato, Toshinori; Fukuda, Daisuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Information on the permeability of rock is essential for various geoengineering projects, such as geological disposal of radioactive wastes, hydrocarbon extraction, and natural hazard risk mitigation. It is especially important to investigate how fractures and pores influence the physical and transport properties of rock. Infiltration of groundwater through the damage zone fills fractures in granite with fine-grained minerals. However, the permeability of rock possessing a fracture naturally filled with fine-grained mineral grains has yet to be investigated. In this study, the permeabilities of granite samples, including a macro-fracture filled with clay and a mineral vein, are investigated. The permeability of granite with a fine-grained mineral vein agrees well with that of the intact sample, whereas the permeability of granite possessing a macro-fracture filled with clay is lower than that of the macro-fractured sample. The decrease in the permeability is due to the filling of fine-grained minerals and clay in the macro-fracture. It is concluded that the permeability of granite increases due to the existence of the fractures, but decreases upon filling them with fine-grained minerals.

  2. REE Comparison Between Muncung Granite Samples and their Weathering Products, Lingga Regency, Riau Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Irzon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.3.149-161The increasing demand for Rare Earth Elements (REE is related to the continous development of technology, and these elements are used in modern equipments. REE can occur in igneous and sedimentary rocks in significant amounts as primary deposits, whereas the secondary REE deposit can be produced by intensive lateritic weathering of bedrocks under the tropical or subtropical climate. Lateritic process can increase REE concentration from sub-economic levels in host rocks to be more valuable. Muncung Granite is located in a tropical area of Lingga Regency, Riau Islands Province. REE occurs in the Muncung Granite and in weathered layers (saprolite, laterite, and soil. ICP-MS was applied to measure the REE content in all samples of this study. The average REE content of the Muncung Granite is 265 ppm with Eu anomaly in REE’s spider diagrams. Lateritization process has increased REE content by more than four times compared to that in the Muncung Granite. Ce and Eu anomalies in weathered layers can be associated with weathering process and initial REE contents in the host rock. Ce anomaly in a laterite layer is found to have a negative correlation to REE total enrichment. The REE level in the Muncung Granite is higher than the content in the soil and saprolite layers, but lower than that in the laterite.

  3. A study on the uranium sorption properties of a domestic granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Kang, Mun Ja; Keum, Dong Kwon; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we selected a domestic granite rock as a studying medium. Granite rock is considered as candidate rock for a high-level radioactive waste repository site and as a representative system of the composite mineral systems. We performed sorption experiments for crushed particles, intact rock surfaces, and natural fracture surfaces of the domestic granite rock and investigated the effects of important geochemical parameters such as pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration. Fracture surfaces showed higher sorption capacities than intact rock surfaces due to the higher content of secondary minerals and the amount of sorbed uranium was greatly dependent on pH, surface types, and carbonate concentration but little on ionic strength. Besides, we tried to investigate the nuclide sorption behaviors of composite mineral systems in terms of mineralogy in order to evaluate the contribution of constituent minerals and to analyze the sorption properties using sequential chemical extraction and XRD, and EPMA methods. It was found that one dominant mineral(mica in case of intact rock surfaces and chlorite in case of fracture surfaces) controls the uranium sorption and nuclide sorption behavior of composite mineral systems are quite different with that of single mineral systems.

  4. Questioning the Sedimentary Paradigm for Granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, A. F.; Bartley, J. M.; Coleman, D. S.; Boudreau, A.; Walker, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    A critical question regarding volcano-pluton links is whether plutons are samples of magma that passed through on its way to eruption, or residues left behind after volcanic rocks were extracted. A persistent theme of recent work on granites sensu lato is that many are sedimentary accumulations of crystals that lost significant volumes of magmatic liquid. This view is based on observations of structures that clearly seem to reflect deposition on a magma chamber floor (e.g., flows of chilled mafic magma into silicic magma) and on the inference that many other structures, such as modal layering, truncated layering, and crystal accumulations, reflect crystal sedimentation on such chamber floors. There are significant physical and geochemical reasons to question this view, based on observations in the Sierra Nevada of California and similar results from other batholiths. First, few granites show the enrichments in Ba, Sr, and relative Eu that feldspar accumulation should produce. Second, sedimentary features such as graded bedding and cross-bedding form in highly turbulent flows, but turbulence is unachievable in viscous silicic liquids, where velocities on the order of 104 m/s would be required to induce turbulence in a liquid with η=104 Pa s. Third, tabular modally layered domains commonly cut surrounding modal layering on both sides, and orientations of modal layering and of the troughs of "ladder dikes" commonly scatter widely within hectare-sized areas; it is difficult to reconcile these features with gravity-driven settling. Fourth, accumulations of K-feldspar megacrysts are typically inferred to be depositional, but this is precluded by crystallization of most K- feldspar after rheologic lock-up occurs. Finally, accumulations of K-feldspar and hornblende are typically packed too tightly to be depositional. With analogy to layered mafic intrusions, many features attributed to crystal sedimentation in granites may be better explained by crystal aging and other in

  5. Pre-impact tectonothermal evolution of the crystalline basement-derived rocks in the ICDP-USGS Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R.L.; Townsend, G.N.; Horton, J. Wright; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-impact crystalline rocks of the lowermost 215 m of the Eyreville B drill core from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure consist of a sequence of pelitic mica schists with subsidiary metagraywackes or felsic metavolcanic rocks, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock that is intruded by muscovite (??biotite, garnet) granite and granite pegmatite. The schists are commonly graphitic and pyritic and locally contain plagioclase porphyroblasts, fi brolitic sillimanite, and garnet that indicate middle- to upper-amphibolite-facies peak metamorphic conditions estimated at ??0.4-0.5 GPa and 600-670 ??C. The schists display an intense, shallowly dipping, S1 composite shear foliation with local micrometer- to decimeter-scale recumbent folds and S-C' shear band structures that formed at high temperatures. Zones of chaotically oriented foliation, resembling breccias but showing no signs of retrogression, are developed locally and are interpreted as shear-disrupted fold hinges. Mineral textural relations in the mica schists indicate that the metamorphic peak was attained during D1. Fabric analysis indicates, however, that subhorizontal shear deformation continued during retrograde cooling, forming mylonite zones in which high-temperature shear fabrics (S-C and S-C') are overprinted by progressively lower- temperature fabrics. Cataclasites and carbonate-cemented breccias in more competent lithologies such as the calc-silicate unit and in the felsic gneiss found as boulders in the overlying impactite succession may refl ect a fi nal pulse of low-temperature cataclastic deformation during D1. These breccias and the shear and mylonitic foliations are cut by smaller, steeply inclined anastomosing fractures with chlorite and calcite infill (interpreted as D2). This D2 event was accompanied by extensive chlorite-sericitecalcite ?? epidote retrogression and appears to predate the impact event. Granite and granite pegmatite veins display local discordance to the S1 foliation, but elsewhere

  6. Petrogenesis of Karamaili alkaline A-type granites from East Junggar, Xinjiang (NW China) and their relationship with tin mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yuping; Tang Hongfeng; Liu Congqiang; Hou Guangshun; Cong Feng; Sylvester, Paul J.; Qu Wenjun

    2007-01-01

    Several types of granites including alkaline granites and alkali feldspar granites are distributed in the Karamaili tectonic belt of East Junggar, Xinjiang, China. Some medium-small tin deposits are located within or near the contact zones of the granitic intrusions. The alkaline granites share all the features commonly observed in peralkaline A-type granites. They contain alkalic mafic minerals such as riebeckite and aegirine; have high contents of SiO 2 , alkalis, Rb, Th, Zr, Hf, REE (except Eu), and high ratios of FeO/MgO and Ga/Al; and show strong depletions in Ba, Sr, Eu in the spidergrams. Laser ablation-ICPMS U-Pb zircon geochronology indicates a crystallization age of ca. 305 Ma for the granites; TIMS analyses of the granites found high ε Nd (T) values of +5.9 to +6.5. Considering their geochemical features, alkaline granites most likely formed by fractional crystallization of graodioritic magmas, which were probably produced by partial melting of lower crustal basaltic to andesitic rocks formed from oceanic crustal materials that were deeply buried during late Palezoic subduction and accretion. Six molybdenite samples from the Sareshike tin deposit in East Junggar yielded an isochron age of 307±11 Ma (2σ) and a weighted mean model age of 306.5±3.4 Ma, consistent with zircon U-Pb ages of the alkaline granites. Low Re contents (0.323-0.961 ppm) in the molybdenite suggest that they originated from crustal sources related to the alkaline granites. Considering their identical ages, close spatial distribution, and similar sources, we argue that the A-type granites have a genetic relationship with the tin mineralization, and that the same association may be important elsewhere. (author)

  7. Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

    2011-08-01

    This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site

  8. Charnockites and granites of the western Adirondacks, New York, USA: a differentiated A-type suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Granitic rocks in the west-central Adirondack Highlands of New York State include both relatively homogeneous charnockitic and hornblende granitic gneisses (CG), that occur in thick stratiform bodies and elliptical domes, and heterogeneous leucogneisses (LG), that commonly are interlayered with metasedimentary rocks. Major- and trace-element geochemical analyses were obtained for 115 samples, including both types of granitoids. Data for CG fail to show the presence of more than one distinct group based on composition. Most of the variance within the CG sample population is consistent with magmatic differentiation combined with incomplete separation of early crystals of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and pyroxenes or amphibole from the residual liquid. Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, P, Sr, Ba, and Zr decrease with increasing silica, while Rb and K increase. Within CG, the distinction between charnockitic (orthopyroxene-bearing) and granitic gneisses is correlated with bulk chemistry. The charnockites are consistently more mafic than the hornblende granitic gneisses, although forming a continuum with them. The leucogneisses, while generally more felsic than the charnockites and granitic gneisses, are otherwise geochemically similar to them. The data are consistent with the LG suite being an evolved extrusive equivalent of the intrusive CG suite. Both CG and LG suites are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous and display an A-type geochemical signature, enriched in Fe, K, Ce, Y, Nb, Zr, and Ga and depleted in Ca, Mg, and Sr relative to I- and S-type granites. Rare earth element patterns show moderate LREE enrichment and a negative Eu anomaly throughout the suite. The geochemical data suggest an origin by partial melting of biotite- and plagioclase-rich crustal rocks. Emplacement occurred in an anorogenic or post-collisional tectonic setting, probably at relatively shallow depths. Deformation and granulite-facies metamorphism with some partial melting followed during the Ottawan phase

  9. Geochemistry of biotite granites from the Lamas de Olo Pluton, northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Susana; Gomes, Maria; Teixeira, Rui; Corfu, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    In the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) extensive crustal recycling occurred during the post-thickening extension stage of the Variscan orogeny (~330-290 Ma). After the ductile deformation phase D3 (~320-300 Ma), characterized by the intrusion of large volumes of highly peraluminous granitic magmas, rapid and drastic tectonic changes at about 300 Ma gave rise to the brittle phase of deformation D4 that controlled the emplacement of Fe-K subalkaline granites (296-290 Ma; Dias et al. 1998). The Lamas de Olo Pluton (LOP) is controlled by NE-SW and NW-SE fracture systems, probably related to the Régua-Verin fault zone (Pereira, 1989). The LOP is a medium to coarse-grained, porphyritic biotite granite, accompanied by medium- to fine grained, porphyritic biotite granite (Alto dos Cabeços- AC) and a more leucocratic, fine-grained, slightly porphyritic biotite-muscovite granite (Barragens- BA). The contacts between LO and AC are generally diffuse, whereas those to BA are sharp. In fact, the BA granite can occur in dykes and sills cutting LO and AC. Microgranular enclaves and xenoliths are very rare. The LOP intrudes the Douro Group, presumably of Precambrian to Cambrian age, and two-mica granites from the Vila Real composite massif. The LOP granites consist of quartz, microcline, plagioclase, biotite, zircon, titanite, tourmaline apatite, fluorite, ilmenite, magnetite, and rutile, with muscovite in BA granite and rare allanite in the LO and AC granites. The plagioclase composition is of oligoclase (An12) - andesine (An35) for LO granite, albite (An9) - andesine (An30) for CA granite and albite (An5) - oligoclase (An20) for BA granite. There are decreases in: a) anorthite content from phenocryst to matrix plagioclase; b) Ba content from phenocryst to matrix microcline in all granites. The Fe2+ biotite has a composition similar to that of biotite from calc-alkaline to sub-alkaline rock series. The LO and AC granites are meta- to peraluminous with ASI variable between 1.05 and 1

  10. Geochemistry, geochronology, and tectonic setting of Early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the northern segment of the Tan-Lu Fault region, northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi-Yun; Zhang, Jin-Jiang; Liu, Kai; Ge, Mao-Hui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jia-Min

    2017-08-01

    We present new geochemical and geochronological data for volcanic and related rocks in the regions of the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults, in order to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the northern segment of the Tan-Lu Fault. Zircon U-Pb dating shows that rhyolite and intermediate-mafic rocks along the southern part of the Jia-Yi Fault formed at 124 and 113 Ma, respectively, whereas the volcanic rocks along the northern parts of the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults formed at 100 Ma. The rhyolite has an A-type granitoid affinity, with high alkalis, low MgO, Ti, and P contents, high rare earth element (REE) contents and Ga/Al ratios, enrichments in large-ion lithophile (LILEs; e.g., Rb, Th, and U) and high-field-strength element (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, and Y), and marked negative Eu anomalies. These features indicate that the rhyolites were derived from partial melting of crustal material in an extensional environment. The basaltic rocks are enriched in light REEs and LILEs (e.g., Rb, K, Th, and U), and depleted in heavy REEs, HFSEs (e.g., Nb, Ta, Ti, and P), and Sr. These geochemical characteristics indicate that these rocks are calc-alkaline basalts that formed in an intraplate extensional tectonic setting. The dacite is a medium- to high-K, calc-alkaline, I-type granite that was derived from a mixed source involving both crustal and mantle components in a magmatic arc. Therefore, the volcanic rocks along the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults were formed in an extensional regime at 124-100 Ma (Early Cretaceous), and these faults were extensional strike-slip faults at this time.

  11. The Taitao Granites: I-type granites formed by subduction of the Chile Ridge and its implication in growth of continental crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anma, Ryo

    2016-04-01

    Late Miocene to Early Pliocene granite plutons are exposed at the tip of the Taitao peninsula, the westernmost promontory of the Chilean coast, together with a contemporaneous ophiolite with a Penrose-type stratigraphy. Namely, the Taitao granites and the Taitao ohiolite, respectively, are located at ~30 km southeast of the Chile triple junction, where a spreading center of the Chile ridge system is subducting underneath the South America plate. This unique tectonic setting provides an excellent opportunity to study the generation processes of granitic magmas at a ridge subduction environment, and the complex magmatic interactions between the subducting ridge, overlying crust and sediments, and mantle. This paper reviews previous studies on the Taitao ophiolite/granite complex and use geochemical data and U-Pb age distributions of zircons separated from igneous and sedimentary rocks from the area to discuss the mechanism that formed juvenile magma of calc-alkaline I-type granites during ridge subduction. Our model implies that the magmas of the Taitao granites formed mainly due to partial melting of hot oceanic crust adjacent to the subducting mid-oceanic ridge that has been under influence of deep crustal contamination and/or metasomatized sub-arc mantle through slab window. The partial melting took place under garnet-free-amphibolite conditions. The juvenile magmas then incorporated a different amount of subducted sediments to form the I-type granites with various compositions. The Taitao granites provide an ideal case study field that shows the processes to develop continental crusts out of oceanic crusts through ridge subduction.

  12. Geological environment and mineralizations associated to granite from Serra Dourada (meridional edge) - Goias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macambira, M.J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Serra Dourada granite is related to one of the various large tin-bearing domic structures that occur in central-eastern Goias, where rocks of Uruacu and Brasilia folded belts and of Goias median massif crop out. The present study was undertaken in the southern part of Serra Dourada as an attempt to contribute to the petrologic, metallogenetic and stratigraphic aspects of the granitic rocks present in that region. The methodological approach consisted of the preparation of a 1:45.000 geological map and included the obtention of petrographic, ore microscopic and geochronological data, as well as the determination of major element concentrations in rocks and some minerals. Trace elements were only determined for rocks. (author)

  13. Study of the mineralogical transformations of granite by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, Jean

    1970-01-01

    The object of the following communication is to prove new data about the petrographic effects of the underground nuclear explosions. It is founded on the results of trench tests in granite rock. The samples are collected by drilling and the temperature of the rock was measured in the hole. Four types of melted rocks can be sorted, grey-green glass and pumices, beige to red-brown pumices, dark lavas, dark veinlets and crushed granite. The distribution of these rocks is studied. Optical microscopy, X-rays and chemical analysis, study by electron probe, are made. The results complete previously published data. They are interesting as far as the use of nuclear explosions for industrial applications is concerned. (author)

  14. Study of the mineralogical transformations of granite by underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Jean [Commissariat a I' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    1970-05-15

    The object of the following communication is to prove new data about the petrographic effects of the underground nuclear explosions. It is founded on the results of trench tests in granite rock. The samples are collected by drilling and the temperature of the rock was measured in the hole. Four types of melted rocks can be sorted, grey-green glass and pumices, beige to red-brown pumices, dark lavas, dark veinlets and crushed granite. The distribution of these rocks is studied. Optical microscopy, X-rays and chemical analysis, study by electron probe, are made. The results complete previously published data. They are interesting as far as the use of nuclear explosions for industrial applications is concerned. (author)

  15. Effects of explosions in hard rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.; Walton, O.R.; Maddix, D.M.; Shaffer, R.J.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    This work relates to explosions in hard rocks (ex: basalt, granite, limestone...). Hard rock masses typically have a blocky structure created by the existence of geologic discontinuities such as bedding contacts, faults, and joints. At very high pressure - hundreds of kilobars and above - these discontinuities do not act separately, and the rock appears to be an equivalent continuous medium. At stress of a few tens of kilobars and below, the geologic discontinuities control the kinematics of the rock masses. Hence, the simulation of rock dynamics, anywhere but in the very-near source region, should account for those kinematics

  16. Recent progress of the NEA Stripa project on in situ experiments in granite associated with the disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlyle, S.G.; Carlsson, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The NEA Stripa project has devoted considerable effort to the measurement and assessment of the hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and migration phenomena of the stripa granite and to the simulation of conditions likely to be found within an engineered repository in granitic rock. These include refining existing, and developing new, geophysical and hydraulic techniques for the mapping and characterization of fractures in crystalline rocks; conducting field experiments to assess the migration of tracers in single-and multiple-fracture systems; and studying the behaviour of bentonite clay as the back-filling and sealing material in a granitic environment. This paper summarizes the most important findings and outlines the main aims of possible future research under any phase 3 of the project. The latter may include making mathematical predictions of the hydrogeological behavior of the Stripa granite and their subsequent validation by field measurements

  17. A study of the Eocene S-type granites of Chapedony metamorphic core complex (northeast of Yazd province, Central Iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakipour, A.; Torabi, Gh.

    2016-01-01

    The Eocene Chapedony metamorphic core complex, is located in western part of the Posht-e-Badam block. This complex is consisting of migmatite, gneiss, amphibolite, marble, micaschist and various types of granitoids. In middle part of this complex (Kalut-e-Chapedony), an Eocene granitic rock unit cross cuts the other rocks. The minerals of this granite are plagioclase (An 9 Ab 8 7O r 4), potassium feldspars (orthoclase), quartz, euhedral garnet (Alm 7 7Sps 1 3Prp 9 Grs 1 ), zircon, apatite, fibrolitic sillimanite and muscovite. Petrology and geochemical studies reveal calc-alkaline, peraluminous and S-type nature of the studied granites. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns represent evident negative anomaly of Eu and low values of the REEs. Continental crust and North American shale composite (NASC) - normalized multi-elements spider diagrams indicate trace elements depletion. These granites are formed by melting of continental crust sedimentary rocks, resulted by emplacement of mantle-derived magma at the bottom of continental crust which formed the Chapedony metamorphic core complex. The source rock of these granites should be a clay-rich sedimentary rock with low amount of plagioclase and CaO/Na 2 O ratio.

  18. Temporal evolution of granitic magmas in the Luanchuan metallogenic belt, east Qinling Orogen, central China: Implications for Mo metallogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Han, Jiangwei; Zhang, Shouting; Yan, Changhai; Cao, Huawen; Song, Yaowu

    2015-11-01

    The Luanchuan metallogenic belt, located within the eastern part of the Qinling Orogen, central China, hosts a number of world-class Mo deposits that are closely related to small late Mesozoic granitic plutons. Zircon U-Pb dating of distinct plutons in the Luanchuan metallogenic belt has yielded ages of 153 ± 1, 154 ± 2, 152 ± 2, and 148 ± 1 Ma. Molybdenite Re-Os isotopic compositions of Yuku ore district in the southern part of Luanchuan metallogenic belt has yielded an isochron age of 146 ± 1 Ma, which is consistent with the large-scale mineralization ages in the northern part of the Luanchuan metallogenic belt. A combination of previous studies and new geochronological and isotopic data show a concordant temporal and genetic link between granitic magmatism and Mo mineralization in the Luanchuan metallogenic belt, suggesting that this mineralization episode formed the most extensive Mo mineralization belt in the east Qinling Orogen. Zircon grains from Mo-related granitic plutons show similar trace element distributions. High-precision Multi Collector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) Pb isotope analysis of K-feldspar megacrysts from mineralization-related granites suggest that they were derived from the lower crust. Similarly, the Pb isotopic compositions of pyrite coprecipitated with molybdenite also suggest that the metals were derived form the lower crust, with probably minor mantle contribution. A continuum mineralization model that describes the sourcing of Mo from an evolving granitic magma over successive differentiation events, possibly in separate but connected magma chambers, could explain the remarkable Mo enrichment in the Luanchuan metallogenic belt. The volatile- and Mo-bearing granitic magmas ascended as diapirs from the deep crust, and were emplaced as dikes in the upper crust. Lithological differences between these Mo-bearing granites may relate to different stages in the evolution of individual magmas. Finally, ore

  19. Radioactivity of rocks from the geological formations belonging to the Tibagi River hydrographic basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This work is a study of the 40 K and the 238 U and 232 Th series radioactivity in rocks measured with high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The rocks were taken from the geologic formations in the region of the Tibagi river hydrographic basin. The course of this river cuts through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences of the Parana sedimentary basin. In order to take into account the background radiation attenuation by the samples, a technique was developed that eliminated the need to measure a blank sample. The effects of the radiation's self-attenuation in the sample matrix were taken into account by using a gamma ray direct transmission method. The results for 87 rock samples, taken from 14 distinct formations, and their corresponding radioactivity variations are presented and discussed according to the possible geological processes from which they originated. Among the most discussed results are: an outcrop that profiles shale, limestone and rhythmite in the Irati Formation; a sandstone and siltstone sequence from the Rio do Rasto Formation; and a profile sampled in a coal mine located in the Rio Bonito Formation. The calculations of the rocks' contributions to the outdoor gamma radiation dose rate agree with the values presented by other authors for similar rocks. The highest dose values were obtained from felsic rocks (rhyolite of the Castro group, 129.8 ± 3.7 nGy.h -1 , and Cunhaporanga granite, 167 ± 37 nGy.h -1 ). The other highest values correspond to the shale rocks from the Irati Formation (109 ± 16 nGy.h -1 ) and the siltic shale rocks from the Ponta Grossa Formation (107.9 ± 0.7 nGy.h -1 ). The most recent geological formations presented the lowest dose values (e.g. the Botucatu sandstone, 3.3 ± 0.6 nGy.h -1 ). The average value for sedimentary rocks from seven other formations is equal to 59 ± 26 nGy.h -1 . The Rio Bonito Formation presented the highest dose value (334 ± 193 nGy.h -1 ) mainly due to the anomalous 226 Ra

  20. Petrogenesis of Malaysian tin granites: geochemistry, fractional crystallization, U-Pb zircon geochronology and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-Pan Ng, Samuel; Searle, Mike; Whitehouse, Martin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Ghani, Azman; Robb, Laurence; Sone, Masatoshi; Oliver, Grahame; Gardiner, Nick; Roselee, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    The Malaysian tin granites forming the backbone of the Thai-Malay Peninsula has been long recognized with two distinct granitic provinces:- 1. Early Permian to Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly "I-type" (Hbl)-Bt granites with associated Cu-Au deposits, with subordinate Bt granites hosting limited Sn-W deposits, and 2. Late Triassic Main Range Province with mainly "S-type" Bt granites with associated Sn-W deposits, and subordinate (Hbl)-Bt granites. New geochemical data show that Chappell and White's (1974) I-S granite classification adopted in the existing model does not adequately distinguish the granites from one another as previously implied. Trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions show that the Malaysian tin granites in both provinces have transitional I-S characteristics. In addition, they inherited within-plate signature from Cambro-Ordovician Gondwana-related source rocks. Previous ages were obtained by whole rock Rb-Sr and biotite K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, dating methods that may not accurately represent the crystallization age of granites. We re-sampled the entire Malaysian Peninsula and 40 samples were collected for high-precision U-Pb SIMS dating on extracted zircon grains in order to better constrain the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The crystallization ages of the Eastern Province granitoids have been constrained ranging from 220 to 290 Ma, while the Main Range (Western) Province granitoids have ages ranging from 200 to 230 Ma. A progressive westward younging trend is apparent across the Eastern Province, but becomes less obvious in the Main Range Province. Our model suggests two east dipping subduction zones. We suggest that subduction roll-back along the Bentong-Raub suture might account for the westward younging trend, in the Eastern province. A second Late Triassic east-dipping subduction zone beneath western Malaysia is proposed in order to explain the "I-type" components to the Main

  1. Geometrical properties of tension-induced fractures in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hisashi; Sawada, Atsushi; Yasuhara, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    Considering a safe, long-term sequestration of energy byproducts such as high level radioactive wastes, it is of significant importance to well-constrain the hydraulic and transport behavior of targeted permeants within fractured rocks. Specifically, fluid flow within low-permeability crystalline rock masses (e.g., granite) is often dominated by transport in through-cutting fractures, and thus careful considerations are needed on the behavior. There are three planes along that granites fail most easily under tension, and those may be identified as the rift, grain, and hardway planes. This anisotropic fabric may be attributed to preferentially oriented microcrack sets contained within intact rock. In this research, geometrical properties of tension-induced fractures are evaluated as listed below; (1) Creation of tension-induced fractures considering the anisotropy clarified by elastic wave measurements. (2) Evaluation of geometrical properties in those fractures characterized by the anisotropy. In the item (1), the three planes of rift, grain and hardway were identified by measuring elastic wave. In the item (2), JRC, variogram, fractal dimension and distributions of elevations in the fracture surfaces were evaluated using digitized data of the fracture surfaces measured via a laser profilometry. Results show that rift planes are less rougher than the other planes of grain and hardway, and grain planes are generically rougher than the other planes of rift and hardway. It was also confirmed that the fracture shape anisotropy was correlated with the direction of the slit which constructed during tensile tests. On the other hand, the tendency peculiar to the direction of slit and granites fail about the estimated aperture distribution from fracture shape was not seen. (author)

  2. Mesozoic to Eocene ductile deformation of western Central Iran: From Cimmerian collisional orogeny to Eocene exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargaranbafghi, Fariba; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Faghih, Ali; Kusky, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    To advance our understanding of the Mesozoic to Eocene tectonics and kinematics of basement units exposed in the south-western Central Iran plateau, this paper presents new structural and thermochronological data from the Chapedony metamorphic core complex and hangingwall units, particularly from the Posht-e-Badam complex. The overall Paleogene structural characteristics of the area are related to an oblique convergent zone. The Saghand area represents part of a deformation zone between the Arabian and Eurasian plates, and can be interpreted to result from the Central Iran intracontinental deformation acting as a weak zone during Mesozoic to Paleogene times. Field and microstructural evidence reveal that the metamorphic and igneous rocks suffered a ductile shear deformation including mylonitization at the hangingwall boundary of the Eocene Chapedony metamorphic core complex. Comparison of deformation features in the mylonites and other structural features within the footwall unit leads to the conclusion that the mylonites were formed in a subhorizontal shear zone by NE-SW stretching during Middle to Late Eocene extensional tectonics. The Chapedony metamorphic core complex is characterized by amphibolite-facies metamorphism and development of S and S-L tectonic fabrics. The Posht-e-Badam complex was deformed by two stages during Cimmerian tectonic processes forming the Paleo-Tethyan suture.

  3. Strontium and oxygen isotopic variations in mesozoic and tertiary plutons of central Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, R.J.; Criss, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Regional variations in initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios (rsub(i)) of Mesozoic plutons in central Idaho locate the edge of Precambrian continental crust at the boundary between the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic accreted terranes and Precambrian sialic crust in western Idaho. The rsub(i) values increase abruptly but continuously from less than 0.704 in the accreted terranes to greater than 0.708 across a narrow, 5 to 15 km zone, characterized by elongate, lens-shaped, highly deformed plutons and schistose metasedimentary and metavolcanic units. The chemical and petrologic character of the plutons changes concomitantly from ocean-arc-type units to a weakly peraluminous, calcit to calcalkalic suite. Plutons in both suites yield Late Cretaceous ages, but Permian through Early Cretaceous bodies are confined to the accreted terranes and early Tertiary intrusions are restricted to areas underlain by Precambrian crust. The two major terranes were juxtaposed between 75 and 130 m.y. ago, probably between 80 and 95 m.y. Oxygen and strontium isotopic ratios and Rb and Sr concentrations of the plutonic rocks document a significant upper-crustal contribution to the magmas that intrude Precambrian crust. Magmas intruding the arc terranes were derived from the upper mantle/subducted oceanic lithosphere and may have been modified by anatexis of earlier island-arc volcanic and sedimentary units. (orig./PW)

  4. Mechanical properties of Stripa granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.; Swan, G.; Leijon, B.

    1978-01-01

    For the determination of the mechanical properties of Stripa Granite samples were taken from the boreholes in the vicinity of the test site. The granite type taken from these different sources is of variable character. For the purpose of numerical calculations performed in projects related to the waste storage research program the following parameters have been determined: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, compressive fracture stress and expansion coefficient as a function of temperature 20< T<200C; Young's modulus and compressive fracture stress as a function of confining pressure; Brazilian tensile fracture stress; residual shear stress as a function of normal stress; anisotropy ratio for Young's modulus and compressive fracture stress; dilatational wave velocity and deduced dynamic Young's modulus. A brief description of the test methods and the results for each test are presented

  5. Genesis of Uranium in the younger granites of gabal abu hawis area, central eastern desert of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, F.Y.; Moharem, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    The younger granites cropping out in gabal abu hawis area are considered as uraniferous (fertile) granites (the fertile is mainly is mainly attributed to presence of radioactive zircon). Abu hawis granitic pluton is dissected by joints faults of different trends forming two mineralized shear zones in the northern peripheries and southern border. The younger granites hosting uranium mineralizations along the two mineralized shear zones. The uranium minerals include uranophane and carnotite. The altered granites have much lower Th/U ratios (0.03-0.10) than those of the fresh granites (1.69-2.05), indicating strong mobilization of uranium in this pluton by super-heated solutions that resulted from supergence meteoric water as well as U-addition by hypogene fluids. These solutions could pass through the structural network of fractures, joints and fault planes and have leached some of labile uranium from the surrounding rocks and/or the younger granites themselves. Then, changing in the physicochemical conditions of these solutions caused uranium precipitation as uranium minerals filling the cracks in the rock and/or adsorbed on the surface of clay minerals and iron oxides in the two shear zones

  6. Formation and uranium explorating prospect of sub-volcanic granitic complex and rich uranium ore deposit in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yusheng

    1997-01-01

    The rich uranium ore deposits are all closely related to tecto-magmatism of late-magmatic cycle whether volcanic types or granitic types in south China. Volcanic type rich uranium deposit has closely relationship with sub-volcanic activity, and granitic type rich uranium deposit is also closely related to mid-fine, unequal particle small massif in late main invasion stage. Based on characteristics of magmatism, we name the rock sub-volcanic granite complex, which is a unique style and closely related to the formation of rich uranium ore deposit

  7. Intrusion of basaltic magma into a crystallizing granitic magma chamber: The Cordillera del Paine pluton in southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Peter J.

    1991-10-01

    The Cordillera del Paine pluton in the southernmost Andes of Chile represents a deeply dissected magma chamber where mafic magma intruded into crystallizing granitic magma. Throughout much of the 10x15 km pluton, there is a sharp and continuous boundary at a remarkably constant elevation of 1,100 m that separates granitic rocks (Cordillera del Paine or CP granite: 69 77% SiO2) which make up the upper levels of the pluton from mafic and comingled rocks (Paine Mafic Complex or PMC: 45 60% SiO2) which dominate the lower exposures of the pluton. Chilled, crenulate, disrupted contacts of mafic rock against granite demonstrate that partly crystallized granite was intruded by mafic magma which solidified prior to complete crystallization of the granitic magma. The boundary at 1,100 m was a large and stable density contrast between the denser, hotter mafic magma and cooler granitic magma. The granitic magma was more solidified near the margins of the chamber when mafic intrusion occurred, and the PMC is less disrupted by granites there. Near the pluton margins, the PMC grades upward irregularly from cumulate gabbros to monzodiorites. Mafic magma differentiated largely by fractional crystallization as indicated by the presence of cumulate rocks and by the low levels of compatible elements in most PMC rocks. The compositional gap between the PMC and CP granite indicates that mixing (blending) of granitic magma into the mafic magma was less important, although it is apparent from mineral assemblages in mafic rocks. Granitic magma may have incorporated small amounts of mafic liquid that had evolved to >60% SiO2 by crystallization. Mixing was inhibited by the extent of crystallization of the granite, and by the thermal contrast and the stable density contrast between the magmas. PMC gabbros display disequilibrium mineral assemblages including early formed zoned olivine (with orthopyroxene coronas), clinopyroxene, calcic plagioclase and paragasite and later-formed amphibole

  8. Hydrothermal alteration and permeability changes in granitic intrusions related to Sn-W deposits : case study of Panasqueira (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Gaetan; Sizaret, Stanislas; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gloaguen, Eric; Melleton, Jérémie; Pichavant, Michel; Champallier, Rémi; Pinto, Filipe

    2017-04-01

    The Panasqueira Sn-W deposit occurs as a dense network of flat wolframite and cassiterite-bearing quartz veins concentrated in the vicinity of a hidden greisen cupola, and to a lesser extent as disseminated cassiterites in the greisen. Previous studies (Thadeu 1951; 1979) have suggested that the Panasqueira deposit is genetically related to magmatic activity for which the most part is unexposed, and being only represented by the greisen cupola. Hydrothermal fluid circulation during the final stages of granite crystallisation has probably led to the greisenisation of the cupola followed by the deposition of the mineralization in the veins system. Mineral replacement reactions that occurred during the greisenisation could affect rock properties (porosity, density and permeability) which control fluid circulation in the granite. This study aims to investigate effects of greisenisation reactions on the dynamic (time varying) permeability that ultimately leads to fluid circulation in the greisen cupola. To do so, petrological study and experimental determinations of hydrodynamic features (porosity and permeability) for different granite alteration levels and petrographic types (unaltered granite to greisen) are combined and then integrated in coupled numerical models of fluid circulation around the granitic intrusion. Greisen occurs in the apical part of the granitic body and results in the pervasive alteration of the granite along the granite-schist contact. This greisen consists mainly of quartz and muscovite formed by the replacement of feldspars and bleaching of biotites of the initial granite. Otherwise, greisen is generally vuggy which suggests a porosity increase of the granite during hydrothermal alteration processes. This porosity increase has a positive effect on the permeability of the granitic system. Indeed, experimental measurements of permeability with the Paterson press indicate that the initial granite is impermeable (10-20 m2) whereas the greisen is

  9. Thermal expansion behaviour of granites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plevová, Eva; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kožušníková, Alena; Ritz, M.; Simha Martynková, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 2 (2016), s. 1555-1561 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : thermomechanical analysis * differential thermal analysis * granites Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10973-015-4996-z

  10. Hydrological characteristics of Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate the hydrogeological characteristics of rock in Japan in order to assess the performance of geosphere. This report summarizes the hydrogeological characteristics of various rock types obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields experiments at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at the Tono mine in central Japan. It is found that the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -8 m/s, whereas the hydraulic conductivity of fault zone ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -3 m/s. It is also found that the hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease with depth. Therefore, the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass at the depth of a repository will be smaller than above values. From the investigations at outcrops and galleries throughout the country, fractures are observed as potential pathways in all rock types. All kinds of crystalline rocks and pre-Neogene sedimentary rocks are classified as fractured media where fracture flow is dominant. Among these rocks, granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media. On the other hand, andesite, tuff and Neogene sedimentary rocks are considered as intermediate between fractured media and porous media where flow in fractures as well as in rock matrix are significant. (author)

  11. Effect of confining pressure on permeability behavior of Beishan granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Like; Li Yunfeng; Zhao Xingguang; Tan Guohuan

    2012-01-01

    By using of the Electro-Hydraulic Servo-controlled Rock Mechanics Testing System (MTS 815.04) in the University of Hong Kong, a series of permeability tests were performed on specimens of Beishan granite at different confining pressures. The result indicates that: (1) there is a decrease of permeability due to progressive closure of initial microcracks and the corresponding volumetric strain is compressive when the confining pressures increase from 2.5 MPa to 15 MPa, (2) when the confining pressures decrease from 15 MPa to 2.5 MPa, there is an increase of permeability in this stage in relation with the volumetric dilation. (authors)

  12. Heat transfer in underground heating experiments in granite, Stipa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Javandel, I.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    Electrical heater experiments have been conducted underground in granite at Stripa, Sweden, to investigate the effects of heating associated with nuclear waste storage. Temperature data from these experiments are compared with closed-form and finite-element solutions. Good agreement is found between measured temperatures and both types of models, but especially for a nonlinear finite-element heat conduction model incorporating convective boundary conditions, measured nonuniform initial rock temperature distribution, and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. In situ thermal properties, determined by least-squares regression, are very close to laboratory values. A limited amount of sensitivity analysis is undertaken

  13. The ammonium content in the Malayer igneous and metamorphic rocks (Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Western Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadnejad, Vahid; Hirt, Ann Marie; Valizadeh, Mohammad-Vali; Bokani, Saeed Jabbari

    2011-04-01

    The ammonium (NH4+) contents of the Malayer area (Western Iran) have been determined by using the colorimetric method on 26 samples from igneous and metamorphic rocks. This is the first analysis of the ammonium contents of Iranian metamorphic and igneous rocks. The average ammonium content of metamorphic rocks decreases from low-grade to high-grade metamorphic rocks (in ppm): slate 580, phyllite 515, andalusite schist 242. In the case of igneous rocks, it decreases from felsic to mafic igneous types (in ppm): granites 39, monzonite 20, diorite 17, gabbro 10. Altered granitic rocks show enrichment in NH4+ (mean 61 ppm). The high concentration of ammonium in Malayer granites may indicate metasedimentary rocks as protoliths rather than meta-igneous rocks. These granitic rocks (S-types) have high K-bearing rock-forming minerals such as biotite, muscovite and K-feldspar which their potassium could substitute with ammonium. In addition, the high ammonium content of metasediments is probably due to inheritance of nitrogen from organic matter in the original sediments. The hydrothermally altered samples of granitic rocks show highly enrichment of ammonium suggesting external sources which intruded additional content by either interaction with metasedimentary country rocks or meteoritic solutions.

  14. Rock strength under explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimer, N.; Proffer, W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation emphasizes the importance of a detailed description of the nonlinear deviatoric (strength) response of the surrounding rock in the numerical simulation of underground nuclear explosion phenomenology to the late times needed for test ban monitoring applications. We will show how numerical simulations which match ground motion measurements in volcanic tuffs and in granite use the strength values obtained from laboratory measurements on small core samples of these rocks but also require much lower strength values after the ground motion has interacted with the rock. The underlying physical mechanisms for the implied strength reduction are not yet well understood, and in fact may depend on the particular rock type. However, constitutive models for shock damage and/or effective stress have been used successfully at S-Cubed in both the Geophysics Program (primarily for DARPA) and the Containment Support Program (for DNA) to simulate late time ground motions measured at NTS in many different rock types

  15. Characteristics and geneses of rossing type uranium mineralization in Chenjiazhuang granite, Danfeng, Shanxi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhan; Du Letian.

    1988-01-01

    According to the study of field geology and Rb-Sr isotopic system (initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7130, isochron age = 378Ma), oxygen isotope (δ 18 O = 12.772/1000), rare earth elements (ΣREE = 370ppm, δEu = 0.14-0.67) and the structure state of K-feldspar (t 1 = 0.93-0.98, t 10 = 0.90-0.97) of Chenjiazhuang granite, it is recognized that Chenjiazhuang granite is a continental crust-transformation type granite, mainly derived from terrigenous clastic sediment rather than intermediate-basic volcanic rocks in Qinling group. Uranium mineralization occurs as disseminated within the granite. Uraninite is the only ore mineral. U-Pb isotopic system of uraninite gives a mineralization age of 407 Ma ±, this is similar to the whole-rock isochron age of Rb-Sr. These, combined with the observation of thin sections and the study of other aspects, come to the conclusion that this uranium mineralization is a syngenetic one, that is ,Rossing type U-mineralization The study of genesis and mineralization of Chenjiazhuang granite is of significance not only to the exploration of uranium in this area, but also to the regional geology of Qinling area

  16. New contributions to granite characterization by ultrasonic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, C; Jiménez, A; Rufo, M; Paniagua, J; Pachón, F T

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound evaluation permits the state of rocks to be determined quickly and cheaply, satisfying the demands faced by today's producers of ornamental stone, such as environmental sustainability, durability and safety of use. The basic objective of the present work is to analyse and develop the usefulness of ultrasound testing in estimating the physico-mechanical properties of granite. Various parameters related to Fast Fourier Transform (FFTs) and attenuation have been extracted from some of the studies conducted (parameters which have not previously been considered in work on this topic, unlike the ultrasonic pulse velocity). The experimental study was carried out on cubic specimens of 30 cm edges using longitudinal and shear wave transducers and equipment which extended the normally used natural resonance frequency range up to 500 kHz. Additionally, a validation study of the laboratory data has been conducted and some methodological improvements have been implemented. The main contribution of the work is the analysis of linear statistical correlations between the aforementioned new ultrasound parameters and physico-mechanical properties of the granites that had not previously been studied, i.e., resistance to salt crystallization and breaking load for anchors. Being properties that directly affect the durability and safety of use of granites, these correlations consolidate ultrasonics as a nondestructive method well suited to this type of material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Paleozoic subduction complex and Paleozoic-Mesozoic island-arc volcano-plutonic assemblages in the northern Sierra terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Harwood, David S.; Schweickert, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    This field trip provides an overview of the stratigraphic and structural evolution of the northern Sierra terrane, which forms a significant part of the wall rocks on the western side of the later Mesozoic Sierra Nevada batholith in California. The terrane consists of a pre-Late Devonian subduction complex (Shoo Fly Complex) overlain by submarine arc-related deposits that record the evolution of three separate island-arc systems in the Late Sevonian-Early Mississippian, Permian, and Late Triassic-Jurassic. The two Paleozoic are packages and the underlying Shoo Fly Complex have an important bearing on plate-tectonic processes affecting the convergent margin outboard of the Paleozoic Cordilleran miogeocline, although their original paleogeographic relations to North America are controversial. The third arc package represents an overlap assemblage that ties the terrane to North America by the Late Triassic and helps constrain the nature and timing of Mesozoic orogenesis. Several of the field-trip stops examine the record of pre-Late Devonian subduction contained in the Shoo Fly Complex, as well as the paleovolcanology of the overlying Devonian to Jurassic arc rocks. Excellent glaciated exposures provide the opportunity to study a cross section through a tilted Devonian volcano-plutonic association. Additional stops focus on plutonic rocks emplaced during the Middle Jurassic arc magmatism in the terrane, and during the main pulse of Cretaceous magmatism in the Sierra Nevada batholith to the east.

  18. Geochronological investigation of the Ingerdal granite gneiss and discordant pegmatites from the western gneiss region, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, R.D.; Krogh, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    A seven-point (three zircon and four titanite ) U-Pb discordia-line from the Ingdal granite gneiss defines upper- and lover-intercept ages of 1653 ±2 Ma and 396 ±5 Ma interpreted as the time of Ingdal granite emplacement, and the time of gneiss formation and partial Pb-loss from zircon and titanite during a regional metamorphic event, respectively. These isotopic data suggest that this part of the western gneiss region was heated and cooled very quickly at both the upper- and lower-intercept ages, and that it did not experience significant Sveconorwegian (appr. 1250-900 Ma) or Finnmarkian (appr. 530-480 Ma) isotopic disturbance. A six-point Rb-Sr whole-rock errorchron (MSWD=11) from the same body of the Ingdal granite gneiss defines a date of 1665 ±49 Ma interpreted as a less precise age of granite emplacement. Rb-Sr mineral dates from three strongly discordant, non-foliated granite pegmatites fall in the age range of 415-379 Ma. A Rb-Sr biotite date of 372 ±4 Ma from the Ingdal granite gneiss establishes a minimum age of isotopic disturbance in the region

  19. ASSESSING LAND COVER CHANGES CAUSED BY GRANITE QUARRYING USING REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Moeletsi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dimension stone quarrying in the area between Rustenburg and Brits in the North West Province of South Africa has been in existence for over 70 decades. The unique characteristics of the granite deposits in South Africa resulted in making the country a global producer of the granite rocks. This led to intensified quarrying activities between Rustenburg and Brits town. However, this surface mining method, has a potential to impact the environment in a negative way causing loss in vegetation, depletion of natural resources, loss of scenic beauty and contamination of surface water resources. To assess the land cover changes caused by granite quarrying activities, remotely sensed data in the form of Landsat images between 1998 and 2015 were used. Supervised classification was used to create maps. Accuracy assessment using Google EarthTM as a reference data yielded an overall accuracy of 78 %. The post classification change detection method was used to assess land cover changes within the granite quarries. Granite quarries increased by 1174.86 ha while formation of quarry lakes increased to 5.3 ha over the 17-year period. Vegetation cover decreased by 1308 ha in area while 18.3 ha bare land was lost during the same period. This study demonstrated the utility of remote sensing to detect changes in land cover within granite quarries.

  20. Uraniferous alaskitic granites with special reference to the Damara Orogenic Belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.; Corner, B.

    1980-10-01

    The control and patterns of uranium mineralisation in the alaskitic granites of the Damara Orogenic Belt are discussed. The polyphase Damara metamorphism produced high-grade metamorphic assemblages, migmatites and syn-, late-, and post-tectonic anatectic granites through reactivation of the basement and overlying Damara rocks. During anatexis the incompatible elements, particularly the uranium derived from these formations, were incorporated into the melts which then rose, in an attempt to attain gravitational equilibrium, by varying distances depending on the depth of origin of the melts, on their water content and on the availability of tensional environments. Fractional crystallisation during ascent and increased water content concentrated the uranium into residual melts which finally crystallised as alaskitic pegmatitic granite. Structural episodes played an important part in the emplacement of the uraniferous granites and the presence of marble bands was an important factor in not only providing a structural trap for the alaskitic melts and associated uranium-rich volatiles, but also by leading to the boiling of the magma and the subsequent deposition of uranium. The present-day level of erosion is considered to be an important factor contributing to the preservation of many of the uraniferous granite bodies. In addition it is suggested that secondary enrichment occurring above the water-table in the prevailing desert environment is an important criterion in enriching the tenor of mineralisation to ore grades. The exploration techniques necessary for the location of uraniferous granite bodies are briefly outlined [af

  1. Were sauropod dinosaurs responsible for the warm Mesozoic climate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. (Tom van Loon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It was recently postulated that methane production by the giant Mesozoic sauropod dinosaurs was larger than the present-day release of this greenhouse gas by nature and man-induced activities jointly, thus contributing to the warm Mesozoic climate. This conclusion was reached by correct calculations, but these calculations were based on unrealistic assumptions: the researchers who postulated this dinosaur-induced warm climate did take into account neither the biomass production required for the sauropods' food, nor the constraints for the habitats in which the dinosaurs lived, thus neglecting the palaeogeographic conditions. This underlines the importance of palaeogeography for a good understanding of the Earth's geological history.

  2. Quality control chart for crushed granite concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa E. DESMOND

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A chart for assessing in-situ grade (strength of concrete, has been developed in this study. Four grades of concrete after the Nigerian General Specification for Roads and bridges (NGSRB-C20, C25, C30 and C35, is studied at different water-cement ratios for medium and high slump range. The concrete mixes are made from crushed granite rock as coarse aggregate with river sand as fine aggregate. Compression test on specimens are conducted at curing age of 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 days. Results on concrete workability from slump values, and water-cement ratios revealed that specimens with lower water-cement ratio were less workable but had higher strength, compared to mixes with higher water cement ratio. A simple algorithm using nonlinear regression analysis performed on each experimental data set produced Strength-Age (S-A curves which were used to establish a quality control chart. The accuracy of these curves were evaluated by computing average absolute error (AAS, the error of estimate (EoE and the average absolute error of estimate (Abs EoE for each concrete mix. These were done based on the actual average experimental strengths to measure how close the predicted values are to the experimental data set. The absolute average error of estimate (Abs. EoE recorded was less than ±10% tolerance zone for concrete works.

  3. Groundwater evolution of the granite area, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.; Bae, D.S.; Koh, Y.K.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, G.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The geochemistry and environmental isotopes of groundwater in the Cretaceous granite of the Yeongcheon area has been investigated. The hydrochemistry of groundwater belongs to the Ca-HCO 3 type. The oxygen-18 and deuterium data are clustered along the meteoric water line, indicating that the groundwater is of meteoric water origin. Tritium data show that the groundwaters were mostly recharged before pre-thermonuclear period and have been mixed with younger surface water flowing rapidly along fractured zones. Based on the mass balance and reaction simulation approaches using both the hydrochemistry of groundwater and the secondary mineralogy of fracture-filling materials, the low-temperature hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in the area has been modeled. The results of geochemical simulation show that the concentrations of Ca, Na and HCO 3 and pH of waters increase progressively owing to the dissolution of reactive minerals in flow paths. The concentrations of Mg and K first increase with the dissolution of reactant minerals, but later decrease when montmorillonite and illitic material are precipitated respectively. The continuous adding of reactive minerals, i. e. the progressively larger degrees of water/rock interaction, causes the formation of secondary minerals with the following sequence: hematite > gibbsite > kaolinite > montmorillonite > illitic material > microcline. The results of reaction simulation agree well with the observed water chemistry and secondary mineralogy, indicating the successful applicability of this simulation technique to delineate the complex hydrogeochemistry of bedrock groundwaters. (author)

  4. Brittleness and Packing Density Effects on Blast-hole Cuttings Yield of Selected Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Adebayo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates brittleness and packing density to analysis their effects on blast-hole cutting yield for three selected rocks in Nigeria. Brittleness test (S20 was carried out in accordance with Norwegian Soil and Rock Engineering and the Brittleness Index (BI for the selected rocks were estimated. The packing density determined from the photomicrograph of the rock samples. The grain size of 45 blast-holes drill cuttings collected from three selected while drilling of these rocks were determined using standard method of America Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D 2487. The brittleness values are 50%, 44% and 42% for micro granite, porphyritic granite and medium biotite granite respectively. The result of BI varied from 10.32 – 11.59 and they are rated as moderately brittle rocks. The values of packing density varied from 92.20 – 94.55%, 91.00 -92.96% and 92.92 – 94.96% for all the rocks. The maximum weights of blast-hole particle size retained at 75 µm are 106.00g, 103.28 g and 99.76 g for medium biotite granite, micro granite and porhyritic granite respectively. Packing density values have correlation to some extent with (S20 values hence, this influence the yield of blast-hole cuttings as drilling progresses. The minimum weight of blast-hole cuttings particle size retained at 150 µm agrees with brittleness index classification for micro granite.

  5. Archean inheritance in zircon from late Paleozoic granites from the Avalon zone of southeastern New England: an African connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartman, R.E.; Don, Hermes O.

    1987-01-01

    In southeastern New England the Narragansett Pier Granite locally intrudes Carboniferous metasedimentary rocks of the Narragansett basin, and yields a monazite UPb Permian emplacement age of 273 ?? 2 Ma. Zircon from the Narragansett Pier Granite contains a minor but detectable amount of an older, inherited component, and shows modern loss of lead. Zircon from the late-stage, aplitic Westerly Granite exhibits a more pronounced lead inheritance -permitting the inherited component to be identified as Late Archean. Such old relict zircon has not been previously recognized in Proterozoic to Paleozoic igneous rocks in New England, and may be restricted to late Paleozoic rocks of the Avalon zone. We suggest that the Archean crustal component reflects an African connection, in which old Archean crust was underplated to the Avalon zone microplate in the late Paleozoic during collision of Gondwanaland with Avalonia. ?? 1987.

  6. Sm-Nd isotope system of the Ukrainian shield (Korosten'sky massif) anorthosite-granite formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogatikov, O A; Karpenko, S F; Sukhanov, M K; Spiridonov, V G

    1988-01-01

    The results of Sm-Nd isotope investigation of rocks of the Ukrainian shield anorthosite-granite association are described; this association, according to the geologic data, is the latest association in a seriesof self-contained anorthosited. The latters are connected with considerable masses of rapakiwi-granited. Isotope analysis is carried out by mass spectrometry. Isotope ratios /sup 147/Sm//sup 144/Nd and /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd for five samples investigated are presented. Isotope data obtained are marked to be important information about the origin of rocks studied. Evident age difference of granite and basic components of the association is established, that idnores the possibility of the rock formation during crystallization differentiation. The basic value of the radiometric 1.89-1.74 milliared years age of the Ukrainian shield anorthosites lied in the fact that these data confirm once more the specific nature of the earth's crust evolution especially at early stages of its formation.

  7. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the Tectonic History of the Mesozoic Ophiolite and Arc Terranes of Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, L.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Langereis, C. G.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The North American Cordillera has been shaped by a long history of accretion of arcs and other buoyant crustal fragments to the western margin of the North American Plate since the Early Mesozoic. Accretion of these terranes resulted from a complex tectonic history interpreted to include episodes of both intra-oceanic subduction within the Panthalassa/Pacific Ocean, as well as continental margin subduction along the western margin of North America. Western Mexico, at the southern end of the Cordillera, contains a Late Cretaceous-present day long-lived continental margin arc, as well as Mesozoic arc and SSZ ophiolite assemblages of which the origin is under debate. Interpretations of the origin of these subduction-related rock assemblages vary from far-travelled exotic intra-oceanic island arc character to autochthonous or parautochthonous extended continental margin origin. We present new paleomagnetic data from four localities: (1) the Norian SSZ Vizcaíno peninsula Ophiolite; (2) its Lower Jurassic sedimentary cover; and (3) Barremian and (4) Aptian sediments derived from the Guerrero arc. The data show that the Mexican ophiolite and arc terranes have a paleolatitudinal plate motion history that is equal to that of the North American continent. This suggests that these rock assemblages were part of the overriding plate and were perhaps only separated from the North American continent by temporal fore- or back-arc spreading. These spreading phases resulted in the temporal existence of tectonic plates between the North American and Farallon Plates, and upon closure of the basins, in the growth of the North American continent without addition of any far-travelled exotic terranes.

  8. Fracture patterns and stresses in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    If granite bodies are to be used as receptacles for toxic waste materials, the presence or absence of barren fractures and the virgin stresses in the granite are of fundamental importance. Unfortunately, very little is known regarding the incidence of fractures, or stresses, which exist at depths (of about 1 km) in granite bodies. A simple analysis is presented of a hypothetical intrusion which indicates the magnitudes of stresses and the possible fracture development which may be expected in such bodies. (auth)

  9. Geochemical study of volcanic and associated granitic rocks from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Geology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2Institute of Biological ... of the Johor National Park, Endau Rompin are different and probably have different sources. The geo- ...... University Press). Masuda A ...

  10. Water–rock interaction on the development of granite gneissic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eral factors such as lowering of greenhouse gas. (CO2), keeping the ... the collision between Indian and Eurasian plates. The region is ... of sediments in the large drainage system, viz., .... to minimize the effects of surface contamination and.

  11. Disc cutter wear and rock texture in hard rock TBM tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yu; Tsusaka, Kimikazu; Tanimoto, Chikaosa; Nakagawa, Shigeo; Fujita, Naoya

    2008-01-01

    Disc cutter wear in TBM tunneling is caused by initial fragmentation of a solid rock face (the primary fragmentation) and fragmentation of residual rock pieces between a cutterhead and the face (the secondary fragmentation). In two projects through sedimentary and granitic rocks, the authors investigated the relationships between the rate of cutter wear caused by the primary fragmentation, point load index and the grain size and contents of abrasive minerals. As a result, it was found that the tensile strength and the mineral contents of rocks significantly influenced the cutter wear in both projects and thus it is necessary to take into account of rock type. (author)

  12. A simple approach to determine the diffusivity of americium in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, L.; Feng, X.; Liang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J.

    2009-01-01

    The diffusivities of the key radionuclides in host rock are important for the performance assessment of repositories. One of the conventional methods for determining the diffusivities of radionuclides is to grind the rock tablet layer by layer and then to measure the radioactivity remaining on the rock tablet before each grinding cycle. Since grinding hard rock samples, especially those with radioactivity, is very difficult, we developed a new approach to determine the diffusivity of americium in granite. The new approach mainly includes two parts: one is to measure the radioactivities from both sides of a rock disk sample by autoradiography with phosphor imaging technique; the other is to study the relationship between the radioactivities and the apparent diffusivity of americium in granite by computer modelling. Because the high contamination risk of grinding radioactive rock samples has been avoided, the new approach is much simpler than the conventional method. It may be a better choice of measuring the diffusivities of radionuclides in rock, especially for those laboratories in which grinding radioactive rock samples is inconvenient. (orig.)

  13. Determination of low concentrations of thorium in granites using X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, H.M.; Sato, I.M.; Iyer, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    An analytical method for the accurate determination of low concentrations of thorium in rocks using X-ray fluorescence technique, was developed. A tungsten tube was utilized for the production of X-rays. The samples were prepared in the form of double layer pressed pellets using boric acid as a binding agent. The concentration of thorium was determined by measuring the intensity of the characteristic first order Th L α line. The calibration was carried out with USGS rock standards AGV-1, GSP-1 and G-2. Seven granite rocks samples from Granite Mountains of Wyoming, USA, supplied by Dr. Stuckless. Also were analysed. The results obtained were compared with values obtained in others laboratories using different analytical methods. The analyses show that the thorium is concentrated in accessory minerals and presented a non-uniform distribution, making sampling an important factor in the analysis of thorium. A discussion of the precision and accuracy of the method is presented. (Author) [pt

  14. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  15. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Elci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb, the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin and volumetric joint count (Jvi values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  16. Petrogenesis of the Baishan granite stock, Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Geodynamic setting and implications for potential mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, MingJian; Qin, KeZhang; Li, GuangMing; Evans, Noreen J.; McInnes, Brent I. A.; Lu, WeiWei; Deng, Gang

    2017-11-01

    Located in a region rich in Cu-Ni and Mo mineralization, the Baishan granitic stock is barren for reasons that remain enigmatic. Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope analysis, major element analysis of a number of minerals, and zircon trace element, U-Pb and Hf isotope analysis were undertaken in order to reveal the petrogenesis of the granites. All granites show typical I-type characteristics including metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, calc-alkaline signatures with a strong depletion of Nb, Ta, Ti and P, enrichment of light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Cs, Rb, Th, U, K). In addition, a strong depletion in Ti and P, highly fractionated light rare earth element patterns and less fractionated heavy rare earth element patterns, and negative correlations between SiO2 and TiO2, Al2O3, MgO, FeOT, P2O5, Zr and Hf suggest significant fractional crystallization of amphibole, apatite, zircon and Ti-bearing minerals. Whole rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions show wide variations with (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.70358 to 0.70505, εNd (t) of 3.8 to 7.2, and εHf (t) of 2.4 to 12.2 indicating derivation from partial melting of juvenile lower crust with obvious addition of ancient crust. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate a formation age of 292 Ma, significantly older than the ore-forming granite porphyry and slightly older than the regional mafic-ultramafic, A-type and diabase magmatism of Eastern Tianshan. The granite stocks were likely derived during heating of ascending asthenospheric mantle above a mantle plume in the Early Permian. Mineral chemistry, saturation thermometry, mineral species and whole rock Fe2O3/FeO ratios indicate a crystallization temperature of > 980 to 665 °C, pressure of 1.6 kbar and oxygen fugacity of ≤ NNO for the granite stock. Comparing the geochemistry, magma source and crystallization environment for the Early Permian barren granite and Late Triassic ore-related granite porphyry, the low ratios of Sr/Y and

  17. Geochemistry of the uranium mineralized Achala granitic complex, Argentina: Comparison with Hercynian peraluminous leucogranites of western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Leroy, J.; Valdiviezo, P.A.; Daziano, C.; Gamba, M.; Zarco, A.J.; Morello, O.; Ninci, C.; Molina, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Achala granitic complex belongs to the Sierras Pampeanas Hercynian belt, located west of the city of Cordoba, Argentina. This complex is very large (about 100 km N-S and 40 km E-W) and is composed of biotite, biotite with muscovite and muscovite with tourmaline granites intruded in amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks, along a main N 20 deg. E structural direction. Numerous uranium mineralizations are located within the granitic massif and tungsten mineralizations are present both in the enclosing metamorphic rocks and in the granite. The geochemistry of the granite has been studied in four test areas (Southern, Copina, Median and Don Vincente). Two test areas (Median and Don Vicente) present clear evidence of hydrothermal alteration: albitization and dequartzification similar to the French 'episyenites', silicification and argillic alteration. Potassic alteration is rare and weakly developed. The two test areas with hydrothermal alteration present a high uranium geochemical background (5-30 ppm). High thorium contents (up to 65 ppm) are essentially observed in the less differentiated granites of the Copina and Median areas. Thorium/uranium ratios are highly variable (1-10). Uranium minerals are related to different environments - (1) apatite-biotite enclave mineralized with uraninite and uranothorite, (2) gneiss from the contact metamorphism rim, (3) granite with incipient dequartzification, (4) granite associated with albitic episyenites and (5) silicified granite - but are all located in the two test areas presenting clear evidence of hydrothermal alteration. The three petrogenetic events are clearly related to very different mechanisms, separated from each other by several tens of millions of years in the west European Hercynian chain. In the same period the same succession of events leading to uranium deposits is observed in Argentina. 34 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  18. The natural analogous study of the migration of radionuclides in granite for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinsheng

    1995-01-01

    Granite is one of the optimum types of surround rock for radioactive waste geological disposal. The study of natural analogues could provide very useful reference materials for selecting validating and designing site of repository in granite. The basic research substances are as follows: the fracture system and the circulation paths of the fluid, the hydrothermal alteration, the evolution of hydrothermal solution, the U, Th, REE element geochemical behaviours, the secondary mineral phases and its retention capacity for the concerned radioactive nuclides and the mass transfer modelling

  19. Geology of the Northern part of the Strath Ossian Granite, Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, W.G.

    1982-12-01

    The Strath Ossian Granite is made up of granodiorite, dark, variable 'granodiorites' interpreted as mobilised diorite or basic material, appinite and porphyritic granodiorite. Huge rafts of psammitic metasediments occur within the mass and three fracture-zones and numerous dykes, dominantly of porphyrite, cut across it in a north-easterly direction. Granite emplacement may have occurred in stages, early batches being xenolith-rich and later ones xenolith-poor. New batches were intruded centrally, which created strong radial stresses, sufficiently strong to make room for the intrusion by forcing the metasedimentary country rocks downwards and aside. (author)

  20. Factors affecting neutron measurements and calculations. Part E. Hydrogen content in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Sasa, Kimikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    For evaluation of radiation doses from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, many systematic measurements have been made of the residual activities of activation products in rocks and concrete. For the Motoyasu Bridge, which is located close to the bomb hypocenter, the depth profile of 152 Eu was measured in a granite core (Hasai et al. 1987; Shizuma et al. 1997). In order to reproduce the depth profile of the activities, it is important to calculate the neutron scattering and absorption (Endo et al. 1999). In this section, the first result of hydrogen analysis by proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry for the granite samples is described. (author)

  1. Influence of the properties of granite and sandstone in the desalination process by electrokinetic technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feijoo, J.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pozo-Antonio, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    ) achieved in both stones.From the results obtained, it was possible to find those inherent factors to each stone which could have an influence on the efficacy of the treatment. With this technique it was possible to reduce the salt concentration in the granite almost to 100%. However, in the sandstone...... samples the decreases were not equally high, mainly at the intermediate levels where slight enrichments were observed. The results indicate that although the used technique is efficient for salt removal regardless of the porosimetric distribution of the rock, the better interconnection between the pores...... in the granite samples (favored a faster desalination process)....

  2. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrášik Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite.

  3. The fragmentation of Pangaea and Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrek, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    During the Mesozoic (242-66 million years ago), terrestrial regions underwent a massive shift in their size, position and connectivity. At the beginning of the era, the land masses were joined into a single supercontinent called Pangaea. However, by the end of the Mesozoic, terrestrial regions had become highly fragmented, both owing to the drifting apart of the continental plates and the extremely high sea levels that flooded and divided many regions. How terrestrial biodiversity was affected by this fragmentation and large-scale flooding of the Earth's landmasses is uncertain. Based on a model using the species-area relationship (SAR), terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity would be expected to nearly double through the Mesozoic owing to continental fragmentation, despite a decrease of 24% in total terrestrial area. Previous studies of Mesozoic vertebrates have generally found increases in terrestrial diversity towards the end of the era, although these increases are often attributed to intrinsic or climatic factors. Instead, continental fragmentation over this time may largely explain any observed increase in terrestrial biodiversity. This study demonstrates the importance that non-intrinsic effects can have on the taxonomic success of a group, and the importance of geography to understanding past biodiversity. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Greater Caucasus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saintot, A.N.; Brunet, M.F.; Yakovlev, F.; Sébrier, M.; Stephenson, R.A.; Ershov, A.V.; Chalot-Prat, F.; McCann, T.

    2006-01-01

    The Greater Caucasus (GC) fold-and-thrust belt lies on the southern deformed edge of the Scythian Platform (SP) and results from the Cenoozoic structural inversion of a deep marine Mesozoic basin in response to the northward displacement of the Transcaucasus (lying south of the GC subsequent to the

  5. Permeability testing of fractures in climax stock granite at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Permeability tests conducted in the Climax stock granitic rock mass indicate that the bulk rock permeability can be highly variable. If moderately to highly fractured zones are encountered, the permeability values may lie in the range of 10 -4 to 10 -1 darcies. If, on the other hand, only intact rock or healed fractures are encountered, the permeability is found to be less than 10 -9 darcies. In order to assess the thermomechanical effect on fracture permeability, discrete fractures will be packed off and tested periodically throughout the thermal cycle caused by the emplacement of spent nuclear fuel in the Climax stock

  6. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  7. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  8. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10–0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years. PMID:23419636

  9. Rock mechanics studies for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haimson, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems capable of storing thousands of MWh develop tremendous magnetically induced forces when charged. To prevent rutpure of the magnets these forces must be confined. Bedrock offers a practical and relatively inexpensive magnet containment structure. This paper examines the need for rock mechanics research in connection with the construction and use of SMES rock caverns; the unique problems related to housing superconducting magnets in bedrock; site investigations of granite, quartzite and dolomite deposits in Wisconsin; and cavern design requirements to assure cavern stability and limited deformation under the expected mechanical leads. Recommendations are made for siting SMES caverns

  10. Landscape response to tipping points in granite weathering: The case of stepped topography in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessup, Barbara S.; Jesse Hahm, W.; Miller, Scott N.; Kirchner, James W.; Riebe, Clifford S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This work tests a decades-old hypothesis in which relief development in the southern Sierra Nevada is attributed to differential weathering of bare and soil-mantled granite. → Terrain analysis shows that the landscape is organized into a sequence of steep steps and gentle treads, consistent with the hypothesis. → Cosmogenic nuclides show that bare granite erodes more slowly than its soil-mantled counterparts, as required by the hypothesis.However, steps erode more quickly than treads, undermining the explanation for the origins of the stepped topography. - Abstract: The dynamics of granitic landscapes are modulated by bimodal weathering, which produces patchy granular soils and expanses of bare rock ranging from meter-scale boulders to mountain-scale domes. We used terrain analysis and with cosmogenic nuclide measurements of erosion rates to quantitatively explore Wahrhaftig's decades-old hypothesis for the development of 'stepped topography' by differential weathering of bare and soil-mantled granite. According to Wahrhaftig's hypothesis, bare granite weathers slower than soil-mantled granite; thus random erosional exposure of bare rock leads to an alternating sequence of steep, slowly weathering bedrock 'steps' and gently sloped, but rapidly weathering, soil-mantled 'treads.' Our investigation focused on the terrain surrounding the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), which is underlain by granitic bedrock and lies outside the limits of recent glaciation, in the heart of the stepped topography described by Wahrhaftig. Our digital terrain analysis confirms that steep steps often grade into gentle treads, consistent with Wahrhaftig's hypothesis. However, we observe a mix-and-match of soil and bare rock on treads and steps, contrary to one of the hypothesis' major underpinnings - that bare rock should be much more common on steps than on treads. Moreover, the data show that bare rock is not as common as expected at step tops

  11. An integrated geological, geochemical, and geophysical investigation of uranium metallogenesis in selected granitic plutons of the Miramichi Anticlinorium, New Brunswick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.H.; McAllister, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated geological, geochemical, and geophysical data for the post-tectonic granitic rocks of the North Pole, Burnthill, Dungarvon, Trout Brook, and Rocky Brook plutons and surrounding areas were examined to assess their potential for uranium mineralization. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical criteria that are thought to be useful guides for uranium exploration were also established for the host granites. The granitic plutons were emplaced discordantly, late in the tectonomagmatic sequence and at shallow depths within the metasedimentary rocks of the Miramichi Anticlinorium. Geochemically, the host granites are highly evolved (Si0 2 > 75 wt. %), peraluminous and have strong similarities with ilmenite-series 'S-type' and 'A-type' granitoids. Uranium occurrences are spatially and perhaps temporally associated with late-phase differentiates of the plutons where elevated levels of other lithophile elements such as Sn, W, Mo, and F were also detected. Geophysically, the granitic plutons are associated with distinctively high aeroradiometric eU, eTh, and K anomalies that coincide with strong negative Bouguer anomalies and low magnetic values. Conceptual models involving magmatic and hydrothermal processes have been adopted to explain the concentration of uranium and associated metals in the granitic plutons

  12. A geochemical and Pb, Sr isotopic study of the evolution of granite-gneisses from the Bastar craton, Central India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, G.; Paul, D.K.; Misra, V.P.; de Laeter, J.R.; Mc Naughton, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary Pb-Pb and Rb-Sr geochronology of granitic and gneissic rocks from the Sukma area of the Bastar craton, Central India, provides important constraints on crustal evolution. Much of the craton is made up of felsic orthogneisses and younger granitic intrusives, compositionally ranging from tonalite to granite. Pb-Pb isotopic data suggest the presence of ca. 3.0 Ga old gneisses. Younger granitic intrusives have been dated at ca. 2.6 Ga which represents a widespread resetting and/or emplacement event. Comparison of the Pb-Pb and Rb-Sr whole rock ages suggests that the latter were more perturbed after the gneiss-forming or emplacement events. All rock suites show significant geological scatter of isotopic data probably because of sampling on a regional scale, and reflect multi-stage isotopic evolution in a complex terrain. The present isotopic data indicate the presence of Archaean rock in the Bastar craton and suggest temporal similarity with the oldest crustal rocks in the Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons. (author). 18 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  13. Geochemical and chronological characteristics of Xiangcaoping granite pluton in Miaoershan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wuwei; Wang Gan; Chen Weifeng; Zhao Kuidong

    2010-01-01

    Xiangcaoping granite pluton is mainly composed of medium-macro grain porphyritic biotite. The age of signle zircon dated by SHRIMP U-Pb is 211 ± 2 Ma, which suggest s that this pluton was formed during Indosinan. The geochemical characteristics is A > CNK, trace elements spider chart is slightly oblique to the right, enriched in LREE and bears obvious negative Eu anomaly which is similar to that of the S-type granite in South China. High ("8"7Sr/"8"6Sr)_i and low ε_N_d (t) suggest that this pluton was derived from partial melting of middle maturity Precambrian basement rock, which was rich in uranium and had supplied enough U element to the formation of Xiangcaoping granite pluton. (authors)

  14. Mineralogical Control on Microbial Diversity in a Weathered Granite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, D.; Clipson, N.; McDermott, F.

    2003-12-01

    Mineral transformation reactions and the behaviour of metals in rock and soils are affected not only by physicochemical parameters but also by biological factors, particularly by microbial activity. Microbes inhabit a wide range of niches in surface and subsurface environments, with mineral-microbe interactions being generally poorly understood. The focus of this study is to elucidate the role of microbial activity in the weathering of common silicate minerals in granitic rocks. A site in the Wicklow Mountains (Ireland) has been identified that consists of an outcrop surface of Caledonian (ca. 400 million years old) pegmatitic granite from which large intact crystals of variably weathered muscovite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz were sampled, together with whole-rock granite. Culture-based microbial approaches have been widely used to profile microbial communities, particularly from copiotrophic environments, but it is now well established that for oligotrophic environments such as those that would be expected on weathering faces, perhaps less than 1% of microbial diversity can be profiled by cultural means. A number of culture-independent molecular based approaches have been developed to profile microbial diversity and community structure. These rely on successfully isolating environmental DNA from a given environment, followed by the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the typically small quantities of extracted DNA. Amplified DNA can then be analysed using cloning based approaches as well as community fingerprinting systems such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Community DNA was extracted and the intergenic spacer region (ITS) between small (16S) and large (23S) bacterial subunit rRNA genes was amplified. RISA fragments were then electrophoresed on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Banding patterns suggest that

  15. Re-Os molybdenite dating of granite-related Sn-W-Mo mineralization at Hnilec, Gemeric Superunit, Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, M.; Stein, H.

    2005-01-01

    Re-Os molybdenite ages from the exocontact of the Hnilec granite-greisen body provide temporal constraints for tin, tungsten and molybdenite mineralization in the Gemeric Superunit, Slovakia. Two molybdenite separates were taken from a representative sample of the Sn-W-Mo mineralization at Hnilec and their Re-Os ages of 262.2 ± 0.9 and 263.8 ± 0.8 Ma (2-sigma) are in excellent agreement. The obtained Re-Os molybdenite ages are similar to recent but less precise electron microprobe monazite (276 ± 13 Ma) and U-Pb single zircon (250 ± 18 Ma) ages from the Hnilec granite intrusion, supporting a granite-related greisen origin for the Sn-W-Mo mineralization. Our precise Re-Os molybdenite ages resolve the long time controversy over the timing of high-temperature mineralization in the Gemeric Superunit. These Permian ages eliminate suggestions of an Alpine age. The sulphur isotope composition of the studied molybdenite is δ 34 S (CDT) = 1.71 ± 0.2 %o and is consistent with a magmatic sulphur source. Field observations indicate the lack of a broad contact aureole in the vicinity of the Hnilec granite body. Shallow level granite emplacement in schistose host rocks was accompanied by alteration and formation of tin-tungsten greisen in the upper part of the granite and exocontact molybdenite mineralization, both commonly lacking in other granite bodies within the Gemeric Superunit. (author)

  16. An overview of the regional, geological and structural setting of the uraniferous granites in the Damara Orogen, Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.; Andreoli, M.A.G.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium-bearing granites, comprising both potentially economic deposits and source rocks for uranium deposits in duricrustal and sedimentary sequences, occur in the Damara Orogen of Namibia. The economically important uraniferous granites are mainly confined to the Central Zone, delimited by the Omaruru and Okahandja lineaments, which demarcate the boundary between two markedly different magnetic and hence depositional and/or tectonic regimes. Various models to explain the origin and evolution of the uranium-enriched granites have been proposed to date, none of which are found to explain the observed petrological phenomena adequately. The paper critically reviews the existing literature on the origin of the granites and some criteria for exploration are discussed. (author). 24 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  17. U-Pb and K-Ar isotopic dating of Sinec (Rimavica) granites (Kohut zone of veporides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibikova, E.V.; Grachema, T.V.; Makarov, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    New results of radiometric dating of Sinec (Rimavica) granites by U-Pb and K-Ar method are presented. The K-Ar method (muscovite and biotite) gives the age of 94 m.y., which can be interpreted by tectonics. The U-Pb dating of zircons gave a concordant age of 350±5 m.y., which is a more reliable age than the one obtained from the same samples by Rb-Sr isochrone. The increased age of the Sinec (Rimavica) granites determined by the Sb-Sr method could be caused by the supply of radiogenic Sr from the surrounding older metamorphic rocks to the granites during retrograde metamorphism synchronous with granite autometasomatism. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  18. Study on the behavior of naturally occurring radioactivity originated from heavy minerals in weathering process of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Mass fraction of biotite and of heavy minerals originally in granite rocks at Naegi granite area are 3% and 1 x 10 -4 %, respectively. Though their values are very small, specific activities of 238 U is 1.3 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g, respectively. Their values are much higher than that of gross granite (0.1 Bq/g). Therefore, they play important roles in the weathering process. Authors separated biotite and heavy minerals from less-weathered and weathered (outcrop, plastic materials) granite samples by using heavy liquid, and determined each specific activities and activity ratios. Furthermore, the surface of heavy minerals were washed in 6 N HCl for 20 minutes. And lost fraction of activity in the heavy minerals was determined. The result suggested that activity around heavy mineral's surface was removed into surroundings or external environment through weathering process. (5 figs.)

  19. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.

    2014-04-01

    The mass distribution coefficient K d is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R d is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R d values to K d values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs + and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was 134 Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  20. Uranium in granites from the Southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. First year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, L T; Williams, I S; Woodhead, J A

    1980-10-01

    Some of the principal findings of the study on the Lawler Peak Granite are: the granite is dated precisely by this work at 1411 +- 3 m.y., confirming its synchroneity with a great regional terrane of granites. Uranium is presently 8-10 times crustal abundance and thorium 2-3 times in this granite. Uranium is found to be enriched in at least eight, possibly ten, primary igneous mineral species over the whole-rock values. Individual mineral species show distinct levels in, and characteristics ranges of, uranium concentration. It appears that in a uraniferous granite such as this, conventional accuracy mineral suites probably cannot account for most of the uranium in the rock, and more rare, high U-concentration phases also are present and are significant uranium hosts. It appears that at least two different geological episodes have contributed to the disturbance of the U-Th-Pb isotope systems. Studies of various sites for transient dispersal of uranium, thorium, and radiogenic lead isotopes indicate a non-uniform dispersal of these components. It appears that the bulk rock has lost at least 24 percent of its original uranium endowment, accepting limited or no radiogenic lead or thorium migration from the sample.

  1. Uranium in granites from the Southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. First year report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, L.T.; Williams, I.S.; Woodhead, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    Some of the principal findings of the study on the Lawler Peak Granite are: the granite is dated precisely by this work at 1411 +- 3 m.y., confirming its synchroneity with a great regional terrane of granites. Uranium is presently 8-10 times crustal abundance and thorium 2-3 times in this granite. Uranium is found to be enriched in at least eight, possibly ten, primary igneous mineral species over the whole-rock values. Individual mineral species show distinct levels in, and characteristics ranges of, uranium concentration. It appears that in a uraniferous granite such as this, conventional accuracy mineral suites probably cannot account for most of the uranium in the rock, and more rare, high U-concentration phases also are present and are significant uranium hosts. It appears that at least two different geological episodes have contributed to the disturbance of the U-Th-Pb isotope systems. Studies of various sites for transient dispersal of uranium, thorium, and radiogenic lead isotopes indicate a non-uniform dispersal of these components. It appears that the bulk rock has lost at least 24 percent of its original uranium endowment, accepting limited or no radiogenic lead or thorium migration from the sample

  2. Musa's granite and Rio Maria's granodiorite Rb/Sr isotopic ages and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastal, M.C.P.; Macambira, M.J.B.; Medeiros, H.; Dall'Agnol, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Musa Granite and the Rio Maria Granodiorite are located at the eastern margin of the Amazonian craton, in the Rio Maria region, where a typical granite-greenstone terrain is characterized. Rb-Sr dating of six samples from different facies of Rio Maria Granodiorite furnished an age of 2564 ± 68 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr radio (IR) of 0.70288 ± 0.00092 (whole rock isochron; 1 ο error; MSWD = 2.26). Thirteen samples from the three facies of Musa Granite (monzogranites, syenogranites and intermediate to felsic hypabyssal rocks) gave Rb-Sr whole rock isochron with an age of 1692 ± 11 Ma and IR of 0.70777 ± 0.00023 (1 ο error, MSWD = 1.89). A preliminary attempt to individualize geochronologically the three facies was done resulting different ages and IRs. There is a coincidence between these ages and the emplacement sequence of these facies of the pluton. The actual meaning of the Rio Maria Granodiorite Rb-Sr age is still uncertain. It could be related to the end of the magmatic crystallization of the batholith as well as to the metamorphic-mylonitic event that affect it. Considering that the Jamon and Musa Granites are petrologically similar that they occur in the same area, it is interesting to note that latter is apparently a little older than the former. The IRs obtained for the two plutons are also not coincident. The isotopic Rb-Sr available data show that the exposed rocks of the Rio Maria Granodiorite have not been able to generate magmas with the compositions of the monzongranitic and the hypabyssal facies of the Musa pluton. On the other hand, rocks isotopically similar to the Rio Maria Granodiorite would theorically be able to generate the Jamon and a magma with the characteristics of the syenogranitic facies of the Musa pluton. (author) [pt

  3. Granite ascent and emplacement during contractional deformation in convergent orogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Solar, Gary S.

    1998-09-01

    Based on a case study in the Central Maine Belt of west-central Maine, U.S.A., it is proposed that crustal-scale shear zone systems provide an effective focussing mechanism for transfer of granite melt through the crust in convergent orogens. During contractional deformation, flow of melt in crustal materials at depths below the brittle-plastic transition is coupled with plastic deformation of these materials. The flow is driven by pressure gradients generated by buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. Within the oblique-reverse Central Maine Belt shear zone system, stromatic migmatite and concordant to weakly discordant irregular granite sheets occur in zones of higher strain, which suggests percolative flow of melt to form the migmatite leucosomes and viscous flow of melt channelized in sheet-like bodies, possibly along fractures. Cyclic fluctuations of melt pressure may cause instantaneous changes in the effective permeability of the flow network if self-propagating melt-filled tensile and/or dilatant shear fractures are produced due to melt-enhanced embrittlement. Inhomogeneous migmatite and schlieric granite occur in zones of lower strain, which suggests migration of partially-molten material through these zones en masse by granular flow, and channelized flow of melt carrying entrained residue. Founded on the Central Maine Belt case study, we develop a model of melt extraction and ascent using the driving forces, stress conditions and crustal rheologies in convergent, especially transpressive orogens. Ascent of melt becomes inhibited with decreasing depth as the solidus is approached. For intermediate a(H 2O) muscovite-dehydration melting, the water-saturated solidus occurs between 400 and 200 MPa, near the brittle-plastic transition during high- T-low- P metamorphism, where the balance of forces favors (sub-) horizontal fracture propagation. Emplacement of melt may be accommodated by ductile flow and/or stoping of wall rock, and inflation may be accommodated

  4. Automated tone grading of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalina Hernández, J.C.; Fernández Ramón, G.

    2017-01-01

    The production of a natural stone processing plant is subject to the intrinsic variability of the stone blocks that constitute its raw material, which may cause problems of lack of uniformity in the visual appearance of the produced material that often triggers complaints from customers. The best way to tackle this problem is to classify the product according to its visual features, which is traditionally done by hand: an operator observes each and every piece that comes out of the production line and assigns it to the closest match among a number of predefined classes, taking into account visual features of the material such as colour, texture, grain, veins, etc. However, this manual procedure presents significant consistency problems, due to the inherent subjectivity of the classification performed by each operator, and the errors caused by their progressive fatigue. Attempts to employ automated sorting systems like the ones used in the ceramic tile industry have not been successful, as natural stone presents much higher variability than ceramic tiles. Therefore, it has been necessary to develop classification systems specifically designed for the treatment of the visual parameters that distinguish the different types of natural stone. This paper describes the details of a computer vision system developed by AITEMIN for the automatic classification of granite pieces according to their tone, which provides an integral solution to tone grading problems in the granite processing and marketing industry. The system has been designed to be easily trained by the end user, through the learning of the samples established as tone patterns by the user. [es

  5. Indoor radon risk associated to post-tectonic biotite granites from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, northern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, L M O; Gomes, M E P; Teixeira, R J S; Pereira, A J S C; Neves, L J P F

    2016-11-01

    At Vila Pouca de Aguiar area, northern Portugal, crops out a post-tectonic Variscan granite pluton, related with the Régua-Vila Real-Verín fault zone, comprising three types of biotite granites. Among these granites, PSG granite yield the highest average contents of U, probably due to its enrichment in accessory U-bearing minerals such as zircon. In the proximity of faults and joints, these granites are often affected by different degrees of hydrothermal alteration, forming reddish altered rocks, commonly known as "episyenites". These altered rocks are probably associated to the occurrence of hydrothermal processes, which led to uranium enrichment in the most advanced stages of episyenitization. In these granites, both average gamma absorbed dose rates in outdoor and indoor air are higher than those of the world average. Furthermore, even in the worst usage scenario, all these granites can be used as a building material, since their annual effective doses are similar to the limit defined by the European Commission. The geometric mean of radon activity of 91 dwellings located at the Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton is 568Bqm(-3), exceeding that of other northern Portuguese granites. Measurements carried out during a winter season, indicate that 62.6% of the analysed dwellings yield higher indoor radon average values than the Portuguese legislation limit (400Bqm(-3)), and annual effective doses due higher than the world's average value (1.2mSvy(-1)). The interaction of geogenic, architectural and anthropogenic features is crucial to explain the variance in the geometric mean of radon activity of dwellings from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, but the role of geologic faults is probably the most important decisive factor to increase the indoor radon concentration in dwellings. Hence, the development of awareness campaigns in order to inform population about the incurred radiological risks to radon exposure are highly recommended for this specific area. Copyright © 2016

  6. Geochemical characteristics and origin of the Lebowa Granite Suite, Bushveld Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M.; Barker, F.; Hunter, D.; Knight, R.

    1996-01-01

    rocks and formed siliceous melting-precipitating cells (SMPCs) (see, e.g., Huppert and Sparks, 1988). This mass of siliceous magma blocked ascent of denser mafic magmas to higher levels in the crust; hence the RLS is confined to a series of circumferential lobes around the periphery of the Bushveld Complex. Diapirs rose from the SMPCs to form sheets of Nebo Granite, which ascended in the center of the Bushveld Complex and spread laterally along the upper contacts of the RLS lenses.

  7. Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. Kelly; Daniel F. McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Throughout human global history, people have purposely altered natural rock surfaces by drilling, drawing, painting, incising, pecking, abrading and chiseling images into stone. Some rock types that present suitable media surfaces for these activities are fine-grained sandstones and granites, basalts, volcanic tuff, dolomites, and limestones. Commonly called rock...

  8. Generation of post-collisional normal calc-alkaline and adakitic granites in the Tongbai orogen, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Zhu, Liu-Qin; Wang, Hao; Wu, Yuan-Bao

    2018-01-01

    Post-collisional granites are generally generated by partial melting of continental crust during orogenic extension. The occurrence of normal calc-alkaline granites following adakitic granites in a collisional orogen is frequently supposed as a sign of tectonic regime transition from compression to extension, which has been debated yet. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of zircon U-Pb ages, Hf-O isotopes, as well as whole-rock major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes, for Tongbai and Jigongshan post-collisional granitic plutons in the Tongbai orogen. Zircon U-Pb dating yields intrusion ages of ca. 140 and 135 Ma for the Tongbai and Jigongshan plutons, respectively, suggesting they are post-collisional granites. These granites are high-K calc-alkaline series, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous with A/CNK ratios of 0.85-1.08. The Tongbai gneissic granites are normal calc-alkaline granite, having variable SiO2 (61.93-76.74 wt%) and Sr/Y (2.9-38.9) and (La/Yb)N (1.7-30.1) ratios with variably negative Eu anomalies (0.41-0.92). They have relatively high initial Sr isotope ratios of 0.707571 to 0.710317, and low εNd(t) (- 15.74 to - 11.09) and εHf(t) (- 17.6 to - 16.9) values. Their Nd and Hf model ages range from 2.2 to 1.8 Ga and 2.3 to 2.2 Ga. On the contrary, the Jigongshan granites show higher SiO2 (66.56-72.11 wt%) and Sr/Y (30.1-182.0) and (La/Yb)N (27.4-91.4) ratios with insignificant Eu anomalies (0.73-1.00), belonging to adakitic granite. They have Isr = 0.707843-0.708366, εNd(t) = - 19.83 to - 17.59, and εHf(t) = - 26.0 to - 23.5. Their Nd and Hf model ages vary from ca. 2.5 to 2.4 Ga and ca. 2.8 to 2.6 Ga. The Tongbai and Jigongshan granites are characterized by mantle-like zircon δ18O values (5.17-5.46‰). These geochemical features suggest that the Tongbai and Jigongshan granites were derived from partial melting of Paleoproterozoic and Archean continental crust, respectively. Fractional crystallization affected the geochemical

  9. Hydrothermal alteration of deep fractured granite: Effects of dissolution and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shoji; Yoshida, Hidekazu

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the mineralogical effects of hydrothermal alteration at depth in fractures in granite. A fracture accompanied by an alteration halo and filled with clay was found at a depth of 200 m in a drill core through Toki granite, Gifu, central Japan. Microscopic observation, XRD, XRF, EPMA and SXAM investigations revealed that the microcrystalline clays consist of illite, quartz and pyrite and that the halo round the fracture can be subdivided into a phyllic zone adjacent to the fracture, surrounded by a propylitic zone in which Fe-phyllosilicates are present, and a distinctive outer alteration front characterized by plagioclase breakdown. The processes that result in these changes took place in three successive stages: 1) partial dissolution of plagioclase with partial chloritization of biotite; 2) biotite dissolution and precipitation of Fe-phyllosilicate in the dissolution pores; 3) dissolution of K-feldspar and Fe-phyllosilicate, and illite precipitation associated with development of microcracks. These hydrothermal alterations of the granite proceed mainly by a dissolution-precipitation process resulting from the infiltration of hydrothermal fluid along microcracks. Such infiltration causes locally high mobility of Al and increases the ratio of fluid to rock in the alteration halo. These results contribute to an understanding of how granitic rock becomes altered in orogenic fields such as the Japanese island arc.

  10. Isotopic data revaluation from Cabo province, with base in Cabo granite petrographic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.M.; Figueiredo Filho, O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Sto Agostinho's Cape granite (NE-Brazil) is formed by two successive instrusions: the first riolitic or migmatitic, replaced by the alkali granite. This process is indicated by the potassic feldspar phenocrystals porpliroblastic assimilation of the riolites, conglobating the re-cristalized matrix minerals. This two times formation is confirmed by geochronological studies in magmatic province. The diagram of the different rocks with alkaline differentiation is distributed in two isochrons. The first isochron age of 135 m.y +- 0,7 λ=1,42x10 -11 ) with a Ri = 0,7023, the second determine to the Cape granite 104 m.y +- 0,7 (λ=1,42x10 -11 ) with a Ri=0,7058. The first pulsation value of 0,7023, indicate a crust origin to the granite. The more elevated value in the second magmatic dike can be explain by the mixture of more or less 99% of crust magma and 1% of plutonic rocks. (C.D.G.) [pt

  11. Uranium-enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by the anatexis of continental crust or processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichment in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (author)

  12. Microscopic study of rock for estimating long-term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    2002-03-01

    Micro-structure of rock plays a essential role for their long-term behavior. For elucidating long-term characteristics of granite we here present the followings: 1) Conforcal Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) observation of joint surfaces of granite and Fourier analysis, 2) characterization of the mechanism of microcrack initiation and propagation observed by stereoscopic microscope under uniaxial/triaxial compression and relaxation tests, 3) observation of microcrack initiation and propagation by LSM under uniaxial compression, and 4) a viscoelastic homogenization theory to predict the long-term behavior of micro/macro-level stress for granite. Rock image processing and analysis become a fundamental procedure to determine rock surface discontinuities. But the complexity of rock surface discontinuities seems beyond the manual image processing method. In Chapter 2 a Conforcal Laser Scanning Microscope that can acquire three-dimensional images is introduced to observe the rock roughness of a discontinuity. Then, scanning three-dimensional images are changed its data form in order to adapt various image analysis programs, and granitic rock roughness of discontinuities are displayed by graphic images. For example, these datas are analyzed by Discrete Fourier Transformation (DFT) program and Inverse Discrete Fourier Transformation (IDFT) program. Microcrack generation and propagation play an essential role to predict the long-term behavior of rock. In Chapter 3 a progressive development of cracking in granite is revealed by using stereoscopic microscope under triaxial compression condition and by using LSM under uniaxial compression condition. With a viscoelastic theory applied in homogenization method, we can calculate macro behavior of medium influenced by its micro structure by analyse the long-term time-dependent behavior of granite under the same condition to the relaxation experiment. (author)

  13. Study on precursory characteristics of granite failure based on infrasonic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ping Wei

    Full Text Available To study signal characteristics of precursory infrasound of granite failure, coal-rock stress loading device and infrasound acquisition device were adopted to perform infrasound test in uniaxial loading process for granite samples. Wavelet filtering, infrasonic energy methods were used to process and analyze the test results. The results show that the infrasonic waves caused by the failure of rock samples are mainly in the middle and low frequency. Moreover, in the loading process, the ratio of relative energy of infrasound in different frequency sections and the total relative energy of the whole low frequency section both exhibit significant regularity of stage change, which is in consistent with the compaction stage, elastic stage, plastic stage of rock deformation. Additionally, the precursory characteristics of infrasound before rock failures are prominent and easy to be recognized. Meanwhile, infrasonic wave has the advantage of low attenuation in propagation process, which grants the superiority of infrasound prediction technology. A new method of rock failure prediction based on infrasound is formed, which provides an important reference for rock damage prediction in coal mining process. Keywords: Infrasonic energy, Wavelet filtering, Precursory characteristics, Failure prediction

  14. Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2004-01-01

    A series of analytical tests was conducted on a suite of granitic rock samples from the Daya Bay region of southeast China. The objective of these analyses was to determine key rock properties that would affect the suitability of this location for the siting of a neutrino oscillation experiment. This report contains the results of chemical analyses, rock property measurements, and a calculation of the mean atomic weight

  15. Intensive low-temperature tectono-hydrothermal overprint of peraluminous rare-metal granite: a case study from the Dlhá dolina valley (Gemericum, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breiter Karel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of low-temperature metamorphic (hydrothermal overprint of peraluminous, highly evolved rare-metal S-type granite is described. The hidden Dlhá dolina granite pluton of Permian age (Western Carpathians, eastern Slovakia is composed of barren biotite granite, mineralized Li-mica granite and albitite. Based on whole-rock chemical data and evaluation of compositional variations of rock-forming and accessory minerals (Rb-P-enriched K-feldspar and albite; biotite, zinnwaldite and di-octahedral micas; Hf-(Sc-rich zircon, fluorapatite, topaz, schorlitic tourmaline, the following evolutionary scenario is proposed: (1 Intrusion of evolved peraluminous melt enriched in Li, B, P, F, Sn, Nb, Ta, and W took place followed by intrusion of a large body of biotite granites into Paleozoic metapelites and metarhyolite tuffs; (2 The highly evolved melt differentiated in situ forming tourmaline-bearing Li-biotite granite at the bottom, topaz-zinnwaldite granite in the middle, and quartz albitite to albitite at the top of the cupola. The main part of the Sn, Nb, and Ta crystallized from the melt as disseminated cassiterite and Nb-Ta oxide minerals within the albitite, while disseminated wolframite appears mainly within the topaz-zinnwaldite granite. The fluid separated from the last portion of crystallized magma caused small scale greisenization of the albitite; (3 Alpine (Cretaceous thrusting strongly tectonized and mylonitized the upper part of the pluton. Hydrothermal low-temperature fluids enriched in Ca, Mg, and CO2 unfiltered mechanically damaged granite. This fluid-driven overprint caused formation of carbonate veinlets, alteration and release of phosphorus from crystal lattice of feldspars and Li from micas, precipitating secondary Sr-enriched apatite and Mg-rich micas. Consequently, all bulk-rock and mineral markers were reset and now represent the P-T conditions of the Alpine overprint.

  16. Intensive low-temperature tectono-hydrothermal overprint of peraluminous rare-metal granite: a case study from the Dlhá dolina valley (Gemericum, Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, Karel; Broska, Igor; Uher, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    A unique case of low-temperature metamorphic (hydrothermal) overprint of peraluminous, highly evolved rare-metal S-type granite is described. The hidden Dlhá dolina granite pluton of Permian age (Western Carpathians, eastern Slovakia) is composed of barren biotite granite, mineralized Li-mica granite and albitite. Based on whole-rock chemical data and evaluation of compositional variations of rock-forming and accessory minerals (Rb-P-enriched K-feldspar and albite; biotite, zinnwaldite and di-octahedral micas; Hf-(Sc)-rich zircon, fluorapatite, topaz, schorlitic tourmaline), the following evolutionary scenario is proposed: (1) Intrusion of evolved peraluminous melt enriched in Li, B, P, F, Sn, Nb, Ta, and W took place followed by intrusion of a large body of biotite granites into Paleozoic metapelites and metarhyolite tuffs; (2) The highly evolved melt differentiated in situ forming tourmaline-bearing Li-biotite granite at the bottom, topaz-zinnwaldite granite in the middle, and quartz albitite to albitite at the top of the cupola. The main part of the Sn, Nb, and Ta crystallized from the melt as disseminated cassiterite and Nb-Ta oxide minerals within the albitite, while disseminated wolframite appears mainly within the topaz-zinnwaldite granite. The fluid separated from the last portion of crystallized magma caused small scale greisenization of the albitite; (3) Alpine (Cretaceous) thrusting strongly tectonized and mylonitized the upper part of the pluton. Hydrothermal low-temperature fluids enriched in Ca, Mg, and CO2 unfiltered mechanically damaged granite. This fluid-driven overprint caused formation of carbonate veinlets, alteration and release of phosphorus from crystal lattice of feldspars and Li from micas, precipitating secondary Sr-enriched apatite and Mg-rich micas. Consequently, all bulk-rock and mineral markers were reset and now represent the P-T conditions of the Alpine overprint.

  17. Research on supplying potential of uranium source from rocks in western provenance area of Hailaer basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yuliang; Liu Hanbin; Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing

    2006-01-01

    Using U-Pb isotope composition evolution, this paper expounds the initial uranium content in volcanic rocks of provenance area of Xihulitu basin and in granites of provenance area of Kelulun sag, western Hailaer basin. The initial uranium content (U 0 ) in volcanic rocks of provenance area is higher, the average initial uranium content of volcanic rocks is 10.061 x 10 -6 , the average uranium variation coefficient (ΔU) is -49.57%; the average initial uranium content of granites is 18.381 x 10 -6 , the average uranium variation coefficient (ΔU) is -80%. The results indicate that rocks in provenance area could provide the pre-enrichment of uranium in deposited sandstone. U-Ra equilibrium coefficients of rocks indicate that there is obvious U-Ra disequilibrium phenomenon in volcanic rocks, and the time when granites provided uranium source occurred 16000 a ago. (authors)

  18. Geochronology of granitic magmatism from Caraculo-Bibala region (SW Angola) and its correlation with Ribeira fold belt (SE Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heitor de; Tassinari, Colombo C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole-rock analyses of representative granitic rocks from the Bibala-Caraculo region, southwestern Angola, are used to determine the age and evolution of the acid plutonic events in this segment of the Angolan continental crust. The granitoids present a wide range of lithological types and compositions. Three time-intervals have been defined for the magmatism: 1,950 - 1,900 Ma; 1,750 - 1,700 Ma; 1,550 - 1,500 Ma. The oldest, though not very well defined, was obtained for the Chicalengue granitoid, the second one represents the Serra dos Gandarengos and Chonga granitoids and Luchipa-Pungue Granitic Complex and the youngest one comprises the Chicate and Caraculo granitic bodies and Numhino Granitic Complex. The initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios show characteristic values for each time-interval, as follows; 1,950 -1,900 Ma = 0,7015; 1,750 - 1,700 Ma = 0,7060 to 0,7075; 1,550 - 1,500 Ma 0,7048 - 0,7057, suggesting different sources for the granitoids within each geological period. In addition are presented two K-Ar ages for the basic rocks in SW Angola, with values of 1700 and 600 Ma, which represent a minimum ages for these rocks and are probably related to the Damara Orogeny. (author). 24 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists

  20. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.