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Sample records for mesostigmatid mite genus

  1. Trophic habits of mesostigmatid mites associated with bark beetles in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Patricia Chaires-Grijalva; Edith G. Estrada-Venegas; Armando Equihua-Martinez; John C. Moser; Stacy R. Blomquist

    2016-01-01

    Samples of bark and logs damaged by bark beetles were collected from 16 states of Mexico from 2007 to 2012. Fifteen bark beetle species were found within the bark and log samples and were examined for phoretic mites and arthropod associates. Thirty-three species of mesostigmatid mites were discovered within the samples. They were identified in several trophic guilds...

  2. Fossil mesostigmatid mites (Mesostigmata: Gamasina, Microgyniina, Uropodina), associated with longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Baltic amber

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    Dunlop, Jason A.; Kontschán, Jenő; Zwanzig, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fossil mesostigmatid mites are extremely rare. Inclusions assignable to the tortoise mites (Mesostigmata, Uropodina) are described here for the first time from Eocene (ca. 44-49 Ma) Baltic amber. This is the oldest record of Uropodina and documents the first unequivocal amber examples potentially assignable to the extant genus Uroobovella Berlese, 1903 (Uropodoidea: Urodinychidae). Further mites in the same amber pieces are tentatively assigned to Microgynioidea (Microgyniina) and Ascidae (Gamasina), both potentially representing the oldest records of their respective superfamily and family groups. This new material also preserves behavioural ecology in the form of phoretic deutonymphs attached to their carriers via a characteristic anal pedicel. These deutonymphs in amber are intimately associated with longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), probably belonging to the extinct species Nothorhina granulicollis Zang, 1905. Modern uropodines have been recorded phoretic on species belonging to several beetle families, including records of living Uroobovella spp. occurring on longhorn beetles. Through these amber inclusions, a uropodine-cerambycid association can now be dated back to at least the Eocene.

  3. The Mesostigmatid mite (Acari, Mesostigmata community in canopies of Sitka spruce in Ireland and a comparison with ground moss habitats

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    Arroyo, J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the communities of mesostigmatid mites occurring in Irish Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis canopies or inhabiting moss, either in the canopy or on the soil surface, and to discover whether a characteristic assemblage of species occurs in particular habitat patches (ground vs. aerial. Twenty two species of Mesostigmata were recorded, of which five occurred exclusively in arboreal microhabitats. All three species of Zerconidae collected were unique to the canopy and moss mats on the tree branches. Trachytes aegrota (C.L. Koch, 1841 was recorded for the first time in Ireland and some comments about its distribution are made. Multivariate analysis indicated that the arboreal mesostigmatid community is not just a subset of the assemblage occurring in moss on soil or trunks and that it appears to be more homogeneous than those occurring on the soil surface.

    El objetivo principal de este trabajo fue estudiar en Irlanda las comunidades de ácaros Mesostigmata del dosel arbóreo de bosques de Picea sitchensis y en el musgo desarrollado tanto en zonas aéreas como en la superficie edáfica, con el fin de determinar si la estructura y composición de éstas comunidades variaba entre los hábitats diferenciales (edáficos vs. aéreos. Se obtuvieron 22 especies de ácaros Mesostigmata, de las cuales 5 aparecieron solamente en micro-hábitats arbóreos. Las especies de la familia Zerconidae recogidas en este estudio se encontraron exclusivamente en ramas y musgos desarrollados en el dosel. Trachytes aegrota (C.L. Koch, 1841, es citado por primera vez para Irlanda. Se ofrecen asimismo comentarios sobre la distribución de esta especie. El análisis multivariante de los resultados indicó que las poblaciones arbóreas de ácaros Mesostigmata no son un mero subconjunto estructural sino que forman una comunidad diferencial respecto a las presentes en hábitats muscícolas del tronco o del

  4. The oribatid mite genus Benoibates (Acari, Oribatida, Oripodidae).

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    Ermilov, Sergey G; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Olman; Kontschán, Jenő; Retana-Salazar, Axel P

    2014-01-01

    Two species of oribatid mites of the genus Benoibates (Oribatida, Oripodidae), i.e., Benoibatesbolivianus Balogh & Mahunka, 1969(a) and Benoibatesminimus Mahunka, 1985, are recorded for the first time in Costa Rica. Both are redescribed in details, using drawings, images and SEM micrographs, on the basis of Costa Rican specimens. An identification key to the known species of Benoibates is given.

  5. Oribatid mites of the genus Allonothrus (Acari: Oribatida: Crotonioidea)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary data on oribatid mites of the genus Allonothrus (Trhypochthoniidae) of the Ethiopian region are presented. A new subspecies, Allonothrus schuilingi seychelli nov. subsp., is described from Seychelles. It is distinguished on the basis of the shape and length of the notogastral and ventral setae. An identification key ...

  6. The oribatid mite genus Benoibates (Acari, Oribatida, Oripodidae

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two species of oribatid mites of the genus Benoibates (Oribatida, Oripodidae, i.e., B. bolivianus Balogh & Mahunka, 1969(a and B. minimus Mahunka, 1985, are recorded for the first time in Costa Rica. Both are redescribed in details, using drawings, images and SEM micrographs, on the basis of Costa Rican specimens. An identification key to the known species of Benoibates is given.

  7. Wolbachia-induced parthenogenesis in a genus of phytophagous mites.

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    Weeks, A. R.; Breeuwer, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The vertically transmitted endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia modifies host reproduction in several ways in order to enhance its own spread. One such modification results in the induction of parthenogenesis, where males, which are unable to transmit Wolbachia, are not produced. Interestingly, parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia have only been found within haplodiploid insects and it is not known whether this exclusivity is the result of functional constraints of Wolbachia. Here we find a unique pattern of Wolbachia infection that is associated with parthenogenesis in six species within the phytophagous mite genus Bryobia. Through antibiotic treatment we show that, in two species, Bryobia praetiosa and an unidentified species, the Wolbachia infection is strictly associated with parthenogenesis. Microsatellite loci show the mechanism of parthenogenesis to be functionally apomictic and not gamete duplication, with progeny identical to their infected mother. Crossing experiments within B. praetiosa showed no evidence of sexual reproduction. These results are discussed with reference to the distribution of parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia and the diversification of the Bryobia genus. PMID:11674872

  8. Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Truncozetes (Acari, Oribatida, Epactozetidae from Ecuador

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new oribatid mite species of the genus Truncozetes (Oribatida, Epactozetidae, T. ecuadoriensis sp. n. and T. monodactylus sp. n., are described from the Ecuadorian soils. The morphology of the gnathosoma and the legs is presented in detail for the first time for the species of Truncozetes. An identification key to all known species of the family Epactozetidae is given.

  9. The Oribatid Mite Genus Lopholiodes (Acari, Oribatida) with Description of a New Species.

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    Ermilov, S G; Shtanchaeva, U Ya; Bayartogtokh, B; Subías, L S

    2015-12-01

    A new species of oribatid mites, Lopholiodes tolstikovi n. sp., is described from soil litter of the Atlantic forest of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This species differs from all the representatives of the genus by relatively long setae h 1 and h 2, and the antero-lateral orientation of h 2. Data on geographical distribution as well as habitat ecology of known species are given. An identification key to all known species of Lopholiodes is provided.

  10. Mites of the genus Neharpyrhynchus Fain (Acariformes, Harpirhynchidae from Neotropical birds

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    Andre Bochkov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of parasitic mites of the genus Neharpyrhynchus Fain (Acariformes, Harpirhynchidae are described from Neotropical birds, N. chlorospingus sp. n. from Chlorospingus pileatus (Passeriformes, Emberizidae from Costa Rica, N. mironovi sp. n. from Dacnys cayana (Passeriformes, Thraupidae and N. tangara sp. n. from Tangara cayana (Thraupidae both from Brazil. Neharpyrhynchus trochilinus (Fain is recorded from 3 new hosts of the family Trochilidae (Apodiformes, Panterpe insignis and Eugenes fulgens from Costa Rica, and Amazilia lactea from Brazil. Emended diagnosis of the genus and a key to species are provided; all records of Neharpyrhynchus species are summarized.

  11. Giselia arizonica, a new genus and species of mite (Acaria: Tarsonemidae) associated with bark beetles of the genus Pseudopityophthorus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America

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    Wojciech L. Magowski; Evert E. Lindquist; John C. Moser

    2005-01-01

    A new genus and species of the mite family Tarsonemidae, subfamily Tarsoneminae, is described and illustrated. Its systematic position among genera of Tarsoneminae and its host association with bark beetles of the genus Pseudopityophthorus Swaine, 1918 in North America are briefly discussed.

  12. Mites of the genus Trichorhynchiella (Acariformes: Harpirhynchidae): A new example of ovoviviparity in acariform mites.

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    Bochkov, Andre V; OConnor, Barry M

    2014-03-01

    The small genus Trichorhynchiella Fain, 1995, including two species of permanent bird ectoparasites belonging to the family Harpirhynchidae (Acariformes: Cheyletoidea), is revised. The generic diagnosis is emended. The type species, Trichorhynchiella paddae Fain, 1995 from Lonchura oryzivora (L, 1758) (Passeriformes: Estrildidae) from Southeast Asia and Trichorhynchiella phleocryptes sp. n. from Phleocryptes melanops (Viellot, 1817) (Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from Argentina are redescribed and described, respectively. The phenomenon of ovoviviparity inherent to females of this genus is briefly discussed. In almost immobile physogastric females of Trichorhynchiella, ovoviviparity eliminates necessity to attach eggs to the host body.

  13. Mites (Acari: Trombidiformes) parasitizing mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in an Atlantic Forest area in southern Brazil with a new mite genus country record.

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    Dos Santos, Emili Bortolon; Favretto, Mario Arthur; Dos Santos Costa, Samuel Geremias; Navarro-Silva, Mario Antonio

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a total of 4146 culicids collected in an Atlantic Forest area in Paraná state, southern Brazil were examined for the presence of mites. Forty larval Parasitengone mites (Arrenurus spp., Arrenuridae; Durenia spp., Trombellidae; Microtrombidium spp., Microtrombidiidae) parasitized 25 specimens of mosquitoes, with the intensity varying from one to nine mites attached. Most mites were found on Aedes serratus/nubilus, Culex vomerifer, Cx. pedroi and Cx. sacchettae. The overall percentage of parasitized mosquitoes was 0.6 %. The highest intensity of mites encountered was in an individual of Cx. pedroi with nine attached mites. Regarding the attachment site, most mite specimens were attached to the abdomen (n = 25), whereas 15 were located on the thorax. Specimens of Arrenurus spp. were only found on the abdomen of mosquitoes, and the same was observed for Microtrombidium spp., while Durenia spp. attached to both the thorax (n = 15) and abdomen (n = 4). This is the first record for the genus Durenia in Brazil. Additionally, some species of mosquitoes were, for the first time, reported as being parasitized by mites.

  14. The soil mite genus Conchogneta (Acari, Oribatida, Autognetidae), with new findings from Mongolia.

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    Bayartogtokh, Badamdorj

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with taxonomy, geographical distribution as well as known ecology of oribatid mites of the genus Conchogneta Grandjean, 1963 in the world. The majority of species belonging to this genus is known to be widely distributed in Europe, but only three of them are found in other areas of the northern hemisphere. Most species of Conchogneta are inhabitants of litter of various types of forestas, terricolous and epiphytic bryophytes, epiphytic lichens, and soil of steppe, river valleys, moor, oligotrophic bogs, floodland assemblages etc. A new species, Conchogneta glabrisensillatasp. n. is described, and another species, Conchogneta traegardhi (Forsslund, 1947) is redescribed from the northern and western parts of Mongolia, respectively. Conchogneta is recorded for the first time for the fauna of Mongolia. The species status of Conchogneta dalecarlica (Forsslund, 1947) is discussed. Species descriptions are accompanied with detailed illustrations. Furthermore, a key is provided for the identification of adults of the known species of Conchogneta in the world.

  15. The oribatid mite genus Macrogena (Acari, Oribatida, Ceratozetidae), with description of two new species from New Zealand.

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    Ermilov, Sergey G; Minor, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Macrogena (Oribatida, Ceratozetidae) are described from alpine soils of the South Island of New Zealand. Macrogenabrevisensilla sp. n. and Macrogenaabbreviata sp. n. differ from all species of this genus by the tridactylous legs and by the comparatively short interlamellar setae, respectively. New generic diagnosis and an identification key to the known species of Macrogena are provided.

  16. Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Truncozetes (Acari, Oribatida, Epactozetidae) from Ecuador.

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    Ermilov, Sergey G; Sandmann, Dorothee; Marian, Franca; Maraun, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Two new oribatid mite species of the genus Truncozetes (Oribatida, Epactozetidae), Truncozetes ecuadoriensis sp. n. and Truncozetes monodactylus sp. n., are described from the Ecuadorian soils. The morphology of the gnathosoma and the legs is presented in detail for the first time for the species of Truncozetes. An identification key to all known species of the family Epactozetidae is given.

  17. The genus Galumna in Nepalese oribatid mite fauna, with notes on systematic placement of some species (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae).

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    Ermilov, Sergey G; Martens, Jochen; Tolstikov, Andrei V

    2014-01-01

    The oribatid mite genus Galumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) is recorded for the first time in Nepal. A new species, Galumna tetraporosa sp. n., is described from soil of secondary mixed broadleaved forest. It is most similar morphologically to G. tokyoensis Aoki, 1966 and G. valida Aoki, 1994, however, it differs from both by the absence of interlamellar setae and the presence of two pairs of notogastral porose areas Aa. Galumna granalata Aoki, 1984 is redescribed on the basis of specimens from Nepal. Galumna floridae (Jacot, 1929) and G. hexagona Balogh, 1960 are transferred to the genus Notogalumna; G. mauritii Mahunka, 1978 is transferred to the genus Dimidiogalumna.

  18. The genus Galumna in Nepalese oribatid mite fauna, with notes on systematic placement of some species (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The oribatid mite genus Galumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae is recorded for the first time in Nepal. A new species, Galumna tetraporosa sp. n., is described from soil of secondary mixed broadleaved forest. It is most similar morphologically to G. tokyoensis Aoki, 1966 and G. valida Aoki, 1994, however, it differs from both by the absence of interlamellar setae and the presence of two pairs of notogastral porose areas Aa. Galumna granalata Aoki, 1984 is redescribed on the basis of specimens from Nepal. Galumna floridae (Jacot, 1929 and G. hexagona Balogh, 1960 are transferred to the genus Notogalumna; G. mauritii Mahunka, 1978 is transferred to the genus Dimidiogalumna.

  19. Site-Specific Insertion Polymorphism of the MITE Alex-1 in the Genus Coffea Suggests Interspecific Gene Flow.

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    Dubreuil-Tranchant, Christine; Guyot, Romain; Guellim, Amira; Duret, Caroline; de la Mare, Marion; Razafinarivo, Norosoa; Poncet, Valérie; Hamon, Serge; Hamon, Perla; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs) are small nonautonomous class-II transposable elements distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes. We identified a novel family of MITEs (named Alex) in the Coffea canephora genome often associated with expressed sequences. The Alex-1 element is inserted in an intron of a gene at the CcEIN4 locus. Its mobility was demonstrated by sequencing the insertion site in C. canephora accessions and Coffea species. Analysis of the insertion polymorphism of Alex-1 at this locus in Coffea species and in C. canephora showed that there was no relationship between the geographical distribution of the species, their phylogenetic relationships, and insertion polymorphism. The intraspecific distribution of C. canephora revealed an original situation within the E diversity group. These results suggest possibly greater gene flow between species than previously thought. This MITE family will enable the study of the C. canephora genome evolution, phylogenetic relationships, and possible gene flows within the Coffea genus.

  20. Peruvian oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida from the German Biological Expedition, with description of a new species of the genus Pergalumna

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on oribatid mite material (Acari, Oribatida collected during the German Expedition in 2011 in Peru. An annotated checklist of identified oribatid mites, including 16 species from 14 genera and 8 families, is provided. Thirteen species and two genera (Notohermannia, Zetomimus are recorded for the first time in Peru; the genus Notohermannia and species Notohermannia obtusa are recorded for the first time in the Neotropical region. A new species of the genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae, P. paraboliviana sp. n., is described. The new species is most similar to Pergalumna boliviana Ermilov, 2013 from Bolivia, however, it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of porose areas A1 and the presence of interlamellar setae.

  1. Peruvian oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) from the German Biological Expedition, with description of a new species of the genus Pergalumna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is based on oribatid mite material (Acari, Oribatida) collected during the German Expedition in 2011 in Peru. An annotated checklist of identified oribatid mites, including 16 species from 14 genera and 8 families, is provided. Thirteen species and two genera (Notohermannia, Zetomimus) are recorded for the first time in Peru; the genus Notohermannia and species Notohermanniaobtusa are recorded for the first time in the Neotropical region. A new species of the genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae), Pergalumnaparaboliviana sp. n., is described. The new species is most similar to Pergalumnaboliviana Ermilov, 2013 from Bolivia, however, it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of porose areas A1 and the presence of interlamellar setae.

  2. A new subgenus and two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Neoribates (Acari, Oribatida, Parakalummidae) from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Corpuz-Raros, Leonila

    2015-05-08

    The oribatid mite family Parakalummidae (Oribatida, Oripodoidea) is recorded for the first time from the Philippines. A new subgenus of the genus Neoribates, N. (Pseudoneoribates) subgen. nov., is proposed and two new species, N. (Ps.) negrosensis sp. nov. and N. (Ps.) kontschani sp. nov., are described. The new subgenus differs from the other subgenera and genera of Parakalummidae by the morphology and structure of prolamellae, which are smoothly fused to lamellae basally and curving backwards in medio-anterior parts. An identification key to all known subgenera of Neoribates is given. Neoribates (N.) corticis (Ewing, 1913) combined in the subgenus Neoribates (Parakalumma): N. (Par.) corticis comb. nov..

  3. [Mites associated with two species of the genus Odontotaenius (Coleoptera: Passalidae) in Mexico].

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    Barrios-Torres, Pilar Liliana; Villegas-Guzmán, Gabriel A

    2015-09-01

    Mites can establish association with different arthropods as coleopterans tamites scaraoaeicae ana Passalidae. Passalids are distributed in tropical and templates zones, and until now, more than 200 species of mites have been associated to them. One of the relationships between passalids and mites is the phoresy where one small animal (the phoretic) seeks out and attaches to another animal (the host) for transportation. Herein, we studied the mites associated to O. zodiacus and O. striatopunctatus; for this, 80 Odontotaenius with mites were reviewed; passalids were collected in and under decaying logs from six states of Mexico, and were individually kept in vials with 80% ethanol. The specimens were carried to the laboratory and mites removed with fine-pointed forceps under stereo microscope. The mites were stored with 80 % alcohol until some were cleared with lacto-phenol and mounted in Hoyer's solution. We found 1,945 mites belonging to 13 families (Acaridae, Ascidae, Diarthrophallidae, Digamasellidae, Diplogyniidae, Euzerconidae, Heterocheylidae, Histiostomatidae, Klinckowstroemiidae, Laelapidae, Megisthanidae, Trematuridae, and Uropodidae) and 42 species, being the most abundant species Anoelus sp. For O. striatopunctatus (16 specimens) we found 562 mites (95 female female, 34 male male, 197 hypopus, 234 deutonymph, 2 tritonymph) of 11 families and 22 species; the most abundant were Uropodidae (42 %) and Histiostomatidae (26 %). While for 0. zodiacus (64 specimens) were found 1,383 mites (300 female female, 204 male male, 608 hypopus, 139 deutonymphs, 133 tritonymphs) of 10 families and 30 species; the most abundant were: Diartrophallidae, Acaridae, and Histiostomatidae (23 % for the two first and 21 % for third). The high abundance and richness was in O. zodiacus, likewise Margalef (S') and Shanon-Winner (H') indexes were higher in this species (O. zodiacus S' = 4.05, H' = 2.2; O. striatopunctatus S' = 3.34, H' = 1.94), while Equity (EH) was similar to both

  4. A new genus and species of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Mesostigmata) from the Brazilian Atlantic forest

    OpenAIRE

    Kreiter, Serge; Tixier, Marie-Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    The phytoseiid mite Ragusaseius ferraguti n. gen., n. sp. is described from the primary Atlantic Forest Mata Atlantica in Brazil, based on specimens collected on Cyphomandra calycina Sendth (Solanaceae). This mite is unique in the following combination of characters: setae J3 and J4 present; dorsal setae medium to long, except for J5, and serrated; ventrianal shield anteriorly eroded, containing only JV2 and occasionally ZV2 in addition to circumanal setae.

  5. Contribution to the knowledge of the oribatid mite genus Eurostocepheus (Acari, Oribatida, Otocepheidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ermilov, S.G.; Starý, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2017), s. 640-652 ISSN 1362-1971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Eurostocepheus * generic diagnosis * morphology * otocepheid mites * Tam Dao National Park * systematics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2016

  6. New records of water mites of the genus Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Hygrobatidae) from Thailand, Malaysia and Sulawesi (Indonesia), with the description of four new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesic, V.; Smit, H.

    2009-01-01

    New records of water mites of the genus Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Hygrobatidae) from Thailand, Malaysia and Sulawesi are presented. Four species new to science, Atractides siamis, A. malayensis, A. tahanensis and A. sulawesiensis, are described; a first description of the male is

  7. A new genus and species in the mite family Eupodidae (Acari, Eupodoidea) from Crimea.

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    Khaustov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    A new genus Pseudoeupodes Khaustov, gen. n. and new species Pseudoeupodes porosus sp. n. are described from moss in Crimea. The taxonomy of the Eupodidae and some other families and genera of Eupodoidea is reviewed. The genus Turanopenthalodes Barilo, 1988 is transferred from Penthalodidae to Penthaleidae. The family Cocceupodidae Jesionowska, 2010 and the genus Filieupodes Jesionowska, 2010 are considered as junior synonyms of Eupodidae Koch, 1842 and Cocceupodes Thor, 1934, respectively. A key to genera of the family Eupodidae is provided.

  8. The genus Scapheremaeus (Acari, Oribatida, Cymbaeremaeidae in the oribatid mite fauna of New Zealand, with description of two new species

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    Sergey G. Ermilov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Scapheremaeus (Oribatida, Cymbaeremaeidae, S. gibbus sp. n. and S. luxtoni sp. n., are described from New Zealand. Scapheremaeus gibbus sp. n. is morphologically most similar to S. humeratus Balogh & Mahunka, 1967, but differs from the latter by the number of notogastral, genital and adanal setae, morphology of bothridial setae, position of adanal lyrifissures and absence of humeral processes. Scapheremaeus luxtoni sp. n. is morphologically most similar to S. yamashitai Aoki, 1970, but differs from the latter by the morphology of notogastral and rostral setae, morphology of leg solenidia φ2 and development of humeral processes. The species Scapheremaeus zephyrus Colloff, 2010 is recorded for the first time in New Zealand. An identification key to the known New Zealand species of Scapheremaeus is provided.

  9. The genus Scapheremaeus (Acari, Oribatida, Cymbaeremaeidae) in the oribatid mite fauna of New Zealand, with description of two new species.

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    Ermilov, Sergey G; Minor, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Scapheremaeus (Oribatida, Cymbaeremaeidae), Scapheremaeusgibbus sp. n. and Scapheremaeusluxtoni sp. n., are described from New Zealand. Scapheremaeusgibbus sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Scapheremaeushumeratus Balogh & Mahunka, 1967, but differs from the latter by the number of notogastral, genital and adanal setae, morphology of bothridial setae, position of adanal lyrifissures and absence of humeral processes. Scapheremaeusluxtoni sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Scapheremaeusyamashitai Aoki, 1970, but differs from the latter by the morphology of notogastral and rostral setae, morphology of leg solenidia φ2 and development of humeral processes. The species Scapheremaeuszephyrus Colloff, 2010 is recorded for the first time in New Zealand. An identification key to the known New Zealand species of Scapheremaeus is provided.

  10. The first records of mites of the genus Neharpyrhynchus (Acariformes: Harpyrhynchidae) from birds in Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Literák, I.; Bochkov, A. V.; Cárdenas-Callirgos, J.; Čapek, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2012), s. 109-114 ISSN 2218-6425 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601690901; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Amazilia * birds * Ectoparasites * mites * Neharpyrhynchus * Thraupis Subject RIV: EG - Zoology http://sisbib.unmsm.edu.pe/bvrevistas/neohel/v6n1/pdf/a11v06n1.pdf

  11. A new genus and species of phytoseiid mite (Acari: phytoseiidae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Marina Ferraz De Camargo; Rocha, Matheus Dos Santos; Ferla, Noeli Juarez

    2014-05-09

    A new genus, Ingaseius nov. gen., and a new species, Ingaseius silvaticus nov. sp., Phytoseiidae, collected from Inga edulis Martius and Inga marginata Wild. (Fabaceae) are described from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. This species is unique in the following characteristics: females and males with few teeth on fixed cheliceral digit and short Jv5, without J2, Z1 and leg macrosetae. In addition, females lack Jv3 and Zv3, and have a reduced ventrianal shield. 

  12. A new genus and two new species of chigger mites (Acari: Trombiculidae) from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekolnikov, Alexandr A

    2014-01-01

    A new chigger mite genus Laotrombicula n. g. and two new species, Laotrombicula khunboromi n. sp. (type-species) and L. fangumi n. sp., are described from the Laotian rock-rat Laonastes aenigmamus Jenkins, Kilpatrick, Robinson & Timmins (Rodentia: Diatomyidae). The new genus is most similar to Trombiculindus Radford, 1948 and Leptotrombidium Nagayo, Miyagawa, Mitamura & Imamura, 1916 and differs from these genera by having the scutum of subhexagonal or semicircular shape vs widely rectangular; pinnatifid dorsocentral idiosomal setae vs foliaceous in Trombiculindus and unexpanded in Leptotrombidium; and by the presence of serrated longitudinal crests in the middle part of scutum.

  13. A new water mite of the genus Torrenticola Piersig, 1896 (Acari, Torrenticolidae from central Spain

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    Valdecasas, A. G.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The water mite Torrenticola eureka n. sp. is described from streams of the Sierra de Guadarrama, in the center of the Iberian Peninsula. This species belongs to the subgenus Megapalpis Halbert, 1944, characterized by a long, curved rostrum and P-II longer than PIV. T. eureka n. sp. can be separated from the other species of the subgenus by the proportions of the palp segments, the size of the palp in relation to body size and the length of the cheliceral claw.El ácaro acuático Torrenticola eureka n. sp. se describe de arroyos de la Sierra de Guadarrama, en el centro de la Península Ibérica. Esta especie pertenece al subgénero Megapalpis Halbert, 1944, caracterizado por un rostro largo y curvado dorsalmente y PII más largo que PIV. T. eureka n. sp. se diferencia de las otras especies del subgénero por la combinación de los siguientes caracteres: proporción de los segmentos del palpo, tamaño del palpo en relación al cuerpo y la longitud de la uña del quelícero, entre otros caracteres.

  14. Contribution to the knowledge of the oribatid mite genus Aeroppia (Acari, Oribatida, Oppiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G

    2016-07-15

    Two new species of the genus Aeroppia (Oribatida, Oppiidae) are described from upper soil and leaf litter in the primary evergreen lowland rainforest in Peru. Aeroppia friedrichi sp. nov. differs from A. nasalis Mahunka, 1984 by the absence of striate ornamentation on the notogaster and notogastral setae h1, and the presence of setiform adanal setae ad1. Aeroppia longisensilla sp. nov. differs from A. adjacens Mahunka, 1985 by the smaller body size and long bothridial setae. The supplementary descriptions of Aeroppia consimilis (Banks, 1910) and A. magnipilosa (Ewing, 1909) are presented, based on material from U.S.A. A new generic diagnosis for Aeroppia is given. The taxonomic status of the subgenus Aeroppia (Paraeroppia) Sanyal, 2009 is discussed, resulting in the following taxonomic proposal: Aeroppia Hammer, 1961 (=Aeroppia (Paraeroppia) Sanyal, 2009 syn. nov.).

  15. Review of the mite subfamily Arctoseiinae Evans with a key to its genera and description of a new genus and species from Siberia (Parasitiformes, Mesostigmata, Ascidae

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    Evert E. Lindquist

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We redefine the subfamily Arctoseiinae of the family Ascidae, and describe a new genus, Maxinia gen. n., based on a new species, Maxinia arctomontana sp. n., whose adults display a combination of attri-butes uniquely different from other genera of the subfamily. The geographical range of M. arctomontana is limited by arctic and mountain landscapes of Siberia. This description provides further data on the arctic distribution and morphological diversity of the subfamily Arctoseiinae, which is unusually well represented in that region (26–83 % in local gamasid mite faunas. Conceptual problems with the genus Iphidonopsis Gwiazdowicz, 2004 are reviewed, and a new combination, Iphidonopsis magnanalis (Ma & Yin, 1999 comb. n., is presented for Iphidozercon magnanalis Ma & Yin, 1999 from China. The genus Diseius Lindquist & Evans, 1965 is provisionally moved from the family Ascidae to the Digamasellidae. A new key to the genera of Arctoseiinae is presented.

  16. Two new species and new records of nasal mites of the genus Sternostoma (Acarina: Rhinonyssinae) from birds in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, D B; Casto, S

    1975-04-01

    Two new species and new host and locality records are established for nasal mites of the genus Sternostoma from birds in Texas. Sternostoma tracheacolum Lawrence is reported for the first time from Pipilo fuscus and Pyrrhuloxia sinuata, respectively. Additionally, a new host record for Sternostoma porteri Hyland from Centurus aurifrons and a new locality record for Sternostoma pirangae Pence from Piranga rubra are established. A redescription is provided for Sternostoma augei Amaral from Speotyto cunicularia. Sternostoma crotophagae sp. n. is described from Crotophaga sulcirostris. It differs from the other species of the genus by the heavily sclerotized margins of the anal plate and tiny cribrum, the two small rounded bifuractions of the movable digit of the chelicerae, abscence of dorsal opisthosomal setae (J, Z, and R series), and chaetotaxy of tarsi II, III, and IV which have only 3 ventral club-shaped setae in the distal row (al1, av2, and pl1 with pv1 apparently absent) and 2 club-shaped setae in the more proximal row (al2 and av3 with pv3 modified into a spinelike seta in the more proximal row and al2 and av3 with pv3 modified into a spinelike seta having an enlarged base and pl2 shorter and with a rounded tip). Sternostoma sayornis sp. n. is described from Sayornis nigricans. The new species is most similar to Sternostoma hedonophilum Fain but differs in the absence of enlarged punctate areas around the stigmata, 5 additional pairs of seta on dorsal opisthosoma (Z and R series), absence of gnathosomal and capitular setae, and slight differences in the leg chaetotaxy with al1 and pl1 on tarsi II, III, and IV very long and whip-like and slight differences in the solenidia on and adjacent to the sensorial area of tarsus I. The host-parasite relationships and affinities of the species of Sternostoma from the host family Tyrannidae are briefly discussed and Sternostoma callithrix Fain and Aitken is reduced as a synonym of Sternostoma longisetosa Hyland on the

  17. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Indonesia. 3. The genus Galumna (Galumnidae) with description of a new subgenus and seven new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Seven new species of oribatid mites of the genus Galumna are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. A new subgenus, Galumna (Atypicogalumna) subgen. n., is proposed; it differs from all galumnid genera and subgenera by the simultaneous presence of porose areas and sacculi on the notogaster (vs. either porose areas or sacculi present). Galumna (Galumna) calva Starý, 1997 is recorded for the first time in the Oriental region, and Galumna (Galumna) sabahna Mahunka, 1995 is recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna.

  18. A new species of the gamasid mite genus Arctoseius Thor, 1930 (Parasitiformes, Mesostigmata, Ascidae from Russia with a key to the multidentatus species-group

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    Olga Makarova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new gamasid mite species belonging to the genus Arctoseius Thor, 1930 is described from Russia. Arctoseius koltschaki sp. n. is distributed in the plain and mountain tundras from Khibiny Mountains to Chukotka on the north and to West Sayan Mountains on the south. A diagnosis and a key for identification of species comprising the multidentatus species-group (A. multidentatus Evans, 1955; Arctoseius wisniewskii Gwiazdowicz & Kamczyc, 2009; A. sexsetus Lindquist & Makarova, 2011; A. haarlovi Lindquist & Makarova, 2011; and A. koltschaki sp. n. are given.

  19. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites of Indonesia. 1. The genus Allogalumna (Galumnidae) with descriptions of two new species (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Allogalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. Allogalumna indonesiensis sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Allogalumna borhidii Balogh & Mahunka, 1979, Allogalumna quadrimaculata (Mahunka, 1988), Allogalumna rotundiceps Aoki, 1996 and Allogalumna plowmanae Balogh & Balogh, 1983; however, the new species differs by having densely ciliate bothridial heads, larger body size and absence of a median pore. Allogalumna paranovazealandica sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Allogalumna novazealandica Hammer, 1968; however, the new species differs by the shorter body length and barbed and curving postero-laterad bothridial setae. The genus Allogalumna is recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna.

  20. Convergent and unidirectional evolution of extremely long aedeagi in the largest feather mite genus, Proctophyllodes (Acari: Proctophyllodidae): Evidence from comparative molecular and morphological phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Pavel B; Mironov, Sergey V; OConnor, Barry M

    2017-09-01

    Proctophyllodid feather mites (400+ species) are permanent (full-time) symbionts commonly occurring on passerine birds. Phenotypic evolution of these mites appears to be greatly influenced by characters related to reproduction (>87.5% of a total of 32 taxonomically important discrete characters) and male genitalic characters (21.9%). Because sexual selection could the major evolutionary driver in this system, we test the theoretical expectation that genitalic or sexually dimorphic characters should evolve more rapidly and divergently then other characters. We inferred a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny (6 genes, 8571 nt aligned, no missing data) for 133 taxa of proctophyllodid mites and 40 outgroups. Comparisons of the average number of character state changes inferred on 10,696 Bayesian stationary trees indicate that male genitalic or sexually dimorphic characters do not evolve significantly faster than other characters (p=0.537 and p=0.819, respectively). However, among the male genitalic characters, a trait related to the relative length of the aedeagus experienced extremely fast rates of evolution and was detected as a statistical outlier. In this character, the transitions between short, long, and several intermediate states occurred in both directions. In contrast, the evolution of extremely long aedeagi (nearly as long as the body) occurred unidirectionally and irreversibly. This surprising result may be due to constraints imposed by the female spermathecal canal, which, in species where males have extremely long aedeagi, is also very long and may impede pumping sperm by short aedeagi. In proctophyllodid mites, extremely long aedeagi evolved independently five times in five different monophyletic lineages. Several of these lineages were lumped together by taxonomists to form easy-to-distinguish but apparently artificial species-groups. Male genitalic characters, thus, can introduce false synapomorphies that could affect morphology-based phylogenetic

  1. Mites and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo; Caraballo, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases triggered by mite allergens include allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases. Since the early discovery of the allergenic role of mites of the genus Dermatophagoides in the mid 1960s, numerous species have been described as the source of allergens capable of sensitizing and inducing allergic symptoms in sensitized and genetically predisposed individuals. The main sources of allergens in house dust worldwide are the fecal pellets of the mite species D. pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Euroglyphus maynei and the storage mites Blomia tropicalis, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyropahgus putrescentiae. Group 1 and 2 allergens are major house dust mite allergens. The main allergens in storage mites include fatty acid-binding proteins, tropomyosin and paramyosin homologues, apolipophorin-like proteins, α-tubulins and others, such as group 2, 5 and 7 allergens. Cross-reactivity is an important and common immunological feature among mites. Currently, purified native or recombinant allergens, epitope mapping, proteomic approaches and T cell proliferation techniques are being used to assess cross-reactivity. Mites contain potent enzymes capable of degrading a wide range of substrates. Most mite allergens are enzymes. Advances in genomics and molecular biology will improve our ability to understand the genetics of specific IgE responses to mites. Mite allergen avoidance and immunotherapy are the only two allergen-specific ways to treat mite-induced respiratory and cutaneous diseases. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Two new species of oribatid mites of Lasiobelba (Acari, Oribatida, Oppiidae from Nepal, including a key to all species of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Lasiobelba (Oribatida, Oppiidae, Lasiobelba (Lasiobelba daamsae sp. n. and Lasiobelba (Antennoppia nepalica sp. n., are described from eastern Nepal. Lasiobelba (L. daamsae sp. n. is most similar to L. (L. remota Aoki, 1959 and L. (L. gibbosa (Mahunka, 1985, however, it differs from both by the anterior part of pedotecta I specifically curved, rostrum pointed and exobothridial setae not shorter than bothridial setae. Lasiobelba (Antennoppia nepalica sp. n. is most similar to L. (A. granulata (Mahunka, 1986, however, it differs from the latter by the larger body size, exobothridial setae longer than rostral setae and bothridial setae not longer than interlamellar setae. An identification key to known species of Lasiobelba is given.

  3. Two new species of oribatid mites of Lasiobelba (Acari, Oribatida, Oppiidae) from Nepal, including a key to all species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Shtanchaeva, Umukusum Ya; Subías, Luis S; Martens, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Lasiobelba (Oribatida, Oppiidae), Lasiobelba (Lasiobelba) daamsae sp. n. and Lasiobelba (Antennoppia) nepalica sp. n., are described from eastern Nepal. Lasiobelba (L.) daamsae sp. n. is most similar to L. (L.) remota Aoki, 1959 and L. (L.) gibbosa (Mahunka, 1985), however, it differs from both by the anterior part of pedotecta I specifically curved, rostrum pointed and exobothridial setae not shorter than bothridial setae. Lasiobelba (Antennoppia) nepalica sp. n. is most similar to L. (A.) granulata (Mahunka, 1986), however, it differs from the latter by the larger body size, exobothridial setae longer than rostral setae and bothridial setae not longer than interlamellar setae. An identification key to known species of Lasiobelba is given.

  4. Possibilities of using soil microarthropods, with emphasis on mites (Arachnida, Acari, Mesostigmata, in assessment of successional stages in a reclaimed coal mine dump (Pszów, S Poland

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    MADEJ GRAŻYNA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of 2 methods for biomonitoring of the effects of land rehabilitation were compared in Pszów (Upper Silesian Coal Basin, south of Poland. Thirty-one species of mesostigmatid mites were collected from 3 study plots representing different stages of restoration of the mine dump Wrzosy in Pszów and community structure of the mites was analysed. There was a general trend for mesostigmatid species richness, diversity, and density to increase with the development of vegetation. The dominant early successional mesostigmatid species was the phoretic Hypoapis claviger. During this study, 4616 specimens of soil microarthropods were extracted in total. They were classified according to the Biological Soil Quality Index (QBS. We tested the sensitivity and usefulness of this index for monitoring of soil quality and found its good relationship with successional stages in the reclaimed mine dump. Thus the QBS index seems to be an efficient index for monitoring the effects of restoration in mine dumps. It is a simpler, quicker, and cheaper bioindicator method than the earlier method based on community structure analysis of mesostigmatid mites.

  5. Revision of the status of some genus-level water mite taxa in the families Pionidae Thor, 1900, Aturidae Thor, 1900, and Nudomideopsidae Smith, 1990 (Acari: Hydrachnidiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian M; Cook, David R; Gerecke, Reinhard

    2015-02-16

    A number of changes to the status of genus group names in water mites are proposed to foster a more consistent and phylogenetically defensible approach to the ranking of taxa at this level of the classification. The water mite taxa Acercopsis Viets, 1926 (Pionidae: Tiphyinae), Madawaska Habeeb, 1954 (Pionidae: Foreliinae), Brachypodopsis Piersig, 1903, Cubanaxonopsis Orghidan & Gruia, 1981, Hexaxonopsis Viets, 1926, Paraxonopsis Motaş & Tanasachi, 1947, Vicinaxonopsis Cook, 1974, Parabrachypoda Viets, 1929, and Ocybrachypoda Cook, 1974 (Aturidae: Axonopsinae), Ameribrachypoda Smith, 1991 (Aturidae: Aturinae), and Allomideopsis Smith, 1990 (Nudomideopsidae) are elevated in rank from subgenera to full genera to reflect current knowledge of their species diversity, morphological distinctness, relationships and apparent age. In light of the above changes in the subfamily Axonopsinae, the subgenera Kalobrachypoda Viets, 1929 and Navinaxonopsis Cook, 1967 are transferred from the genus Axonopsis to the genus Brachypodopsis, the subgenus Plesiobrachypoda Viets, 1942 is transferred from the genus Axonopsis to the genus Hexaxonopsis, and the species formerly placed in the subgenus Hemibrachypoda Viets, 1937 are transferred from the genus Brachypoda to the genus Parabrachypoda Viets, 1929, and Hemibrachypoda is placed in synonymy with Parabrachypoda. The family group taxa to which all of these genera belong are reviewed to provide context for the proposed changes.

  6. The oribatid mite genus Papillocepheus (Acari, Oribatida, Tetracondylidae), with description of a new species from southern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G.; Anichkin, Alexander E.; Tolstikov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Papillocepheus is recorded in the Oriental region for the first time. A new species, Papillocepheus primus sp. n., is described from southern Vietnam; the description is based on specimens collected from semidecayed leaves and litter of Dong Nai Biosphere Reserve and Bu Gia Map National Park. The new generic diagnosis of Papillocepheus and an identification key to the known species of this genus are given. PMID:24624013

  7. The oribatid mite genus Papillocepheus (Acari, Oribatida, Tetracondylidae, with description of a new species from southern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Papillocepheus is recorded in the Oriental region for the first time. A new species, Papillocepheus primus sp. n., is described from southern Vietnam; the description is based on specimens collected from semidecayed leaves and litter of Dong Nai Biosphere Reserve and Bu Gia Map National Park. The new generic diagnosis of Papillocepheus and an identification key to the known species of this genus are given.

  8. New species and new records of mites of the genus Stigmaeus(Acari: Prostigmata: Stigmaeidae) from Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, Alexander A

    2014-05-06

    Three new species of the genus Stigmaeus Koch, 1836 (Acari: Stigmaeidae) are described from various habitats in Crimea: Stigmaeus kuznetsovi sp. nov. from nests of Microtus socialis (Rodentia: Cricetidae); S. mitrofanovi sp. nov. from galleries of Pityogenes bistridentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the bark of Pinus pallasiana, and S. silvestris sp. nov. from rotten log of Pinus pallasiana. Stigmaeus corticeus Kuznetsov and Wainstein, 1977 and S. maraghehiensis Bagheri and Ueckermann, 2012 are recorded for the first time in Crimea. A key to species of the genus Stigmaeus of Crimea is provided.

  9. Oribatid mites (Acarina, Oribatida) from French Guyana: review of the genus Rhynchoribates and description of three new specie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, Ladislav

    2016-01-05

    One new genus (Eurhynchoribates n. gen.) and three new subgenera (Rhynchoribatodes n. subgen., Parhynchoribates n. subgen. and Tectorhynchoribates n. subgen.) are proposed on the basis of review of known species of genus Rhynchoribates Grandjean, 1929 and on the basis of description of three new species-Rhynchoribates (s. str.) danbartai n. sp., Rhynchoribates (Tectorhynchoribates) jurobales n. sp. and Rhynchoribates (Rhynchoribatodes) dynastes n. sp.-from the territory of French Guyana. All known species of Rhynchoribates are discussed and their position into newly defined genera and subgenera proposed. Detailed differential diagnoses are given for all new taxons.

  10. A new genus and species of pterygosomatid mite (Acari: Pterygosomatidae) parasitizing Callopistes maculatus (Squamata: Teiidae) from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, María Carolina Silva-de La; Paredes-León, Ricardo; Casanueva, María Eugenia; Escobar-Huerta, Gustavo; Salas, Lucila Moreno

    2015-06-10

    A new genus and species Callopistiella atacamensis gen. nov. and sp. nov. (Acariformes: Pterygosomatidae) are described from Callopistes maculatus (Squamata: Teiidae) in Chile. In this species, both sexes are characterized by the hypostome without a velum, the chelicerae proximally globose and very thin distally, ending in a movable digit curved outward, the fixed cheliceral digit reduced to a membranous and sparsely serrate structure, presence of seta 2c, tarsus I with seta ft nude and 2 times longer than solenidion ω2; larvae have solenidion ω1 on tarsus I and tibia I without solenidion φ and moderate hypertrichy present around the genital area. Some biological aspects of this new species are discussed.

  11. Phylogenetic diversity of cassava green mite, Mononychellus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava green mite (CGM) of the Mononychellus genus is an invasive species in Africa, introduced from South America. Its phylogenetic diversity over geographical localities has never been assessed in East Africa, where mite density dynamics oscillate from few individuals to a peak of hundreds. The objective of this study ...

  12. PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY OF CASSAVA GREEN MITE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Cassava green mite (CGM) of the Mononychellus genus is an invasive species in Africa, introduced from South. America. Its phylogenetic diversity over geographical localities has never been assessed in East Africa, where mite density dynamics oscillate from few individuals to a peak of hundreds. The objective of this study ...

  13. Records of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of the families Galumnidae, Galumnellidae and Parakalummidae from Japan with description of two new species of the genus .i.Pergalumna./i

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2005), s. 107-111 ISSN 0006-3088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Oribatid mites * West Honshu Island * taxonomy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2005

  14. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites of Indonesia. 2. The genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae) with description of a new species and key to known species in the Oriental region (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A new species of oribatid mite of the genus Pergalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) is described from litter and soil materials in Sumatra, Indonesia. Pergalumna paraindistincta sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Pergalumna indistincta Ermilov & Anichkin, 2011, Pergalumna pertrichosa Mahunka, 1995 and Pergalumna sura Balogh, 1997; however, the new species differs from Pergalumna indistincta by the smaller body size, presence of long adanal setae ad 1, and large, single median pore in females and males; from Pergalumna pertrichosa by the smaller body size, presence of three pairs of notogastral porose areas, elongated A1 and minute anal setae; from Pergalumna sura by the presence of strong adanal setae ad 1, large, single median pore in females and males, and shorter bothridial setae. Furthermore, Pergalumna hawaiiensis hawaiiensis (Jacot, 1934) and Pergalumna panayensis Ermilov & Corpuz-Raros, 2015 are recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna. An identification key to the known species of Pergalumna in the Oriental region is given.

  15. Are soil mite assemblages structured by the identity of native and invasive alien grasses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Mark G; Wall, Diana H; Hunt, H William

    2006-05-01

    Associations between plants and animals in aboveground communities are often predictable and specific. This has been exploited for the purposes of estimating the diversity of animal species based on the diversity of plant species. The introduction of invasive alien plants into an ecosystem can result in dramatic changes in both the native plant and animal assemblages. Few data exist at the species level to determine whether belowground animal assemblages share the same degree of association to plants. The hypotheses that soil mites (Acari) form assemblages specifically associated with different native grass species in an unmanipulated natural ecosystem and that invasive alien grasses will impact soil mite assemblage composition in this setting were tested. Soil mites sampled beneath five native and two invasive alien species of grasses at the Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas, USA, were similarly abundant, species rich, diverse, and taxonomically distinct. No mite species had affinities for a specific grass species. There was no evidence from analysis of similarity, canonical correspondence analysis, or a nonparametric assemblage analysis that the assemblage composition of soil mites was specific to grass species. Results suggest that soil mite assemblages were more related to characteristics of the plant assemblage as a whole or prevailing soil conditions. The most recent invasive alien grass did not support a successionally younger mite fauna, based on the ratio of mesostigmatid to oribatid mites, and neither of the two invasive grasses influenced mite assemblage structure, possibly because they had not yet substantially altered the soil environment. Our results suggest that extrapolations of soil mite diversity based on assumptions of plant specificity would be invalid.

  16. An opilioacarid mite in Cretaceous Burmese amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A.; de Oliveira Bernardi, Leopoldo Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    A fossil opilioacarid mite (Parasitiformes: Opilioacarida) in Burmese amber is described as ? Opilioacarus groehni sp. nov. This ca. 99 Ma record (Upper Cretaceous: Cenomanian) represents only the third fossil example of this putatively basal mite lineage, the others originating from Eocene Baltic amber (ca. 44-49 Ma). Our new record is not only the oldest record of Opilioacarida, but it is also one of the oldest examples of the entire Parasitiformes clade. The presence of Opilioacarida—potentially Opiloacarus—in the Cretaceous of SE Asia suggests that some modern genus groups were formerly more widely distributed across the northern hemisphere, raising questions about previously suggested Gondwanan origins for these mites.

  17. Ecology, life history and management of tropilaelaps mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasitic mites are the major threat of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera. For much of the world, Varroa destructor single-handedly inflicts unsurmountable problems to A. mellifera beekeeping. However, A. mellifera in Asia is also faced with another genus of destructive parasitic mite, Tropilae...

  18. [Ecological data on house dust mites in the city of Semipalatinsk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iagofarov, F F; Galikeev, Kh L

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of mites of the genus Dermatophagoides in flats of allergic patients depending on the type of the building structure, relative air humidity and season of the year was studied. The mites are most frequently encountered in houses of wood or adobe with high air humidity. Autumn is an optimum season for reproduction of mites.

  19. Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is a determinant for vector transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus; family Potyviridae), is transmitted by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The requirement of coat protein (CP) for WSMV transmission by the wheat curl mite was examined using a series of viable deletion and point mutations. Mite trans...

  20. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  1. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A I A; Fadini, M A M; Pikart, T G; Zanuncio, J C; Serrão, J E

    2012-08-01

    New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones). Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mite are presented.

  2. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIA. Pereira

    Full Text Available New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones. Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mite are presented.

  3. Observations on the mite Schizosthetus lyriformis (Acari: Parasitidae) preying on bark beetle eggs and larve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hofstetter; J. C. Moser; R. McGuire

    2009-01-01

    Many species of mite that live exclusively in decaying wood and subcortical environments have intricate relationships with bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) (e.g., in the genus Dendroctonus, Ips, Scolytus) (Lindquist, 1969; Moser, 1975; Hirschmann and Wisniewski, 1983; Karg, 1993). These mites depend on bark beetles or other subcorticolous insects...

  4. Nitric oxide fumigation for control of bulb mites on flower bulbs and tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide fumigation was studied for efficacy to control bulb mites in the genus Rhizoglyphus and effects on germination and growth of flower bulbs and tubers. Bulb mites on infested peanuts were fumigated with nitric oxide at different concentrations under ultralow oxygen conditions in 1.9L jar...

  5. A revised classification of the mites (Arachnidea, Acarida) with diagnoses, a key, and notes on phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1972-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In 1961 I published a paper on a species of the genus Holothyrus, in which I paid also some attention to the general classification of the mites. Before that time I had chiefly studied Oribatid mites, and I was surprised by the neglect of important discoveries made in the field of

  6. Structure of Phoretic Mite Assemblages Across Subcortical Beetle Species at a Regional Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Jesse A; Coyle, David R; Gandhi, Kamal J K; Hernandez, Natalie; Hofstetter, Richard W; Moser, John C; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-02-01

    Mites associated with subcortical beetles feed and reproduce within habitats transformed by tree-killing herbivores. Mites lack the ability to independently disperse among these habitats, and thus have evolved characteristics that facilitate using insects as transport between resources. Studies on associations between mites and beetles have historically been beetle-centric, where an assemblage of mite species is characterized on a single beetle species. However, available evidence suggests there may be substantial overlap among mite species on various species of beetles utilizing similar host trees. We assessed the mite communities of multiple beetle species attracted to baited funnel traps in Pinus stands in southern Wisconsin, northern Arizona, and northern Georgia to better characterize mite dispersal and the formation of mite-beetle phoretic associations at multiple scales. We identified approximately 21 mite species totaling 10,575 individuals on 36 beetle species totaling 983 beetles. Of the mites collected, 97% were represented by eight species. Many species of mites were common across beetle species, likely owing to these beetles' common association with trees in the genus Pinus. Most mite species were found on at least three beetle species. Histiostoma spp., Iponemus confusus Lindquist, Histiogaster arborsignis Woodring and Trichouropoda australis Hirschmann were each found on at least seven species of beetles. While beetles had largely similar mite membership, the abundances of individual mite species were highly variable among beetle species within each sampling region. Phoretic mite communities also varied within beetle species between regions, notably for Ips pini (Say) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff). © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Oribatid mite fossils from pre-Quaternary sediments in Slovenian caves II. Amiracarus pliocennatus n.gen., n.sp. (Microzetidae) from Pliocene, with comments on the other species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, Ladislav; Mourek, Jan; Meleg, Ioana N; Moldovan, Oana T

    2013-01-01

    Amiracarus pliocennatus n. gen., n. sp. is described based on fossils found in Pliocene and Pleistocene clastic sediments in caves of the Slovenian Classical Karst (Kras). Diagnosis and relationships of the new genus are given and relationships within the extant species of the genus are discussed as well as variability and reliability of some characters, used for species differentiation. Amiracarus senensis (Bernini 1975) n. comb. is proposed as a type species of the new genus, and other four extant species are newly placed in Amiracarus n. gen.: A. abeloosi (Lions 1978) n. comb., A. discrepans (Mahunka 1966) n. comb., A. grootaerti (Wauthy &Ducarme 2011) n. comb. and A. similis (Subìas & Iturrondobeitia 1978) n. comb. Finding of a fossil individual of M. senensis Bernini 1975 in Ponicova Cave of South-West Carpathians in Romania is reported and a description of this individual is given. Relationships with the genus Miracarus Kunst 1959 are discussed and a new diagnosis of this genus is also given, along with the redescription of its type species, M. hurkai Kunst 1959.

  8. Ptyctimous mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Victoria (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbała, Wojciech; Szywilewska-Szczykutowicz, Anetta

    2017-11-06

    A list of 37 species of ptyctimous mites from the State of Victoria, Australia, is provided. Seven species new for science are described and further seven are recorded for the first time in Victoria. The genus Arphthicarus has been discovered in Victoria and is represented by two new species. Zoogeographical distribution of each species is provided. Analysis of the ptyctimous fauna from four Victorian areas (Otway Ranges, Yarra Ranges, Errinundra Plateau and Strzelecki Ranges) has revealed that four species occur in a large number of specimens in one of the areas. Similarity analyses indicate that the faunas of Errinundra Plateau and Yarra Ranges are the most similar. An overview of state of knowledge on the ptyctimous mites from State of Victoria, Australia and Australasian Region is presented.

  9. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,AIA.; Fadini,MAM.; Pikart,TG.; Zanuncio,JC.; Serrão,JE.

    2012-01-01

    New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones). Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mi...

  10. Three Species of Ectoparasite Mites (Acari: Pterygosomatidae Infested Geckos in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARUNI SRI PRAWASTI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Limited data is hitherto available on the diversity and dispersal of parasitic mites of geckos in Indonesia. Here, we collected three species of geckos, namely Cosymbotus platyurus, Hemidactylus frenatus, and H. garnotii throughout Indonesia to study the distribution and diversity of its parasitic mites. We conducted detail morphological analysis of the mites using whole mount polyvinyl lactophenol and scanning electron microscope preparation. Three species of ectoparasite mites from genus Geckobia were identified in a total of 221 individuals out of 448 geckos collected from 25 sites in Indonesia. Two species were G. glebosum and G. bataviensis, and the other one was designated as Geckobia sp 1. Based on our result, the three mites species were spread randomly and live sympatrically. The G. bataviensis mite showed the widest distribution, because it was found in almost all gecko collection sites, hence the most cosmopolitan mites. We also found that C. platyurus gecko had the lowest mite prevalence which might due to the fact that it has the least number of skin folds, an important site for mite protection. This result implies that further research on the relationship of anatomy of gecko skin with chelicera and claw structure of mites is necessary in the future.

  11. Evaluation of the presence of house dust mites in horse rugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica C; Vogelnest, Linda J

    2010-12-01

    A sample of fourteen horse rugs and two saddle blankets stored in south western Sydney, Australia, an area of known high dust mite prevalence in the human environment, were analysed for the presence of house dust mites. Dust samples from the rugs, blankets and 16 control sites were collected using a vacuum cleaner with a modified attachment and filter. Dust mites were extracted using an adapted floatation technique. Eight rugs and all control samples were positive for mites, which were confirmed to be house dust mites of the genus Dermatophagoides. This study confirms that exposure to house dust mites from horse rugs can occur, indicating that house dust mite allergen reactivity on intradermal and serum allergy testing in atopic horses may represent true dust mite hypersensitivity. Nevertheless, quantification studies will be necessary to ensure that there is adequate mite exposure for development of hypersensitivity, and further evaluation of immunological responses, avoidance and provocation, and specific immunotherapy are required to confirm the clinical relevance. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to document the presence of house dust mites in the equine environment. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 ESVD and ACVD.

  12. Scabies mite, photomicrograph (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a photomicrograph of the scabies mite. This animal burrows in the skin, depositing both eggs and feces. Scabies infestation causes intense itching (pruritus) which leads to scratching and damage ...

  13. Phoretic uropodine mites (Acari: Mesostigmata associated with the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Farmahiny Farahani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During an investigation on phoretic mite associates of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, in Sistan and Balouchestan Province of Iran, two uropodine species were collected and identified as Centrouropoda almerodai (Uropodidae and Uroobovella marginata (Dinychidae. This is the first record of the genus Centrouropoda from Iran and the first record of phoretic mites associated with this weevil from the country.

  14. Alkaloids in the mite Scheloribates laevigatus: further alkaloids common to oribatid mites and poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Ralph A; Norton, Roy A; Andriamaharavo, Nirina R; Garraffo, Hugo Martin; Spande, Thomas F

    2011-02-01

    Poison frogs are chemically defended from predators by diverse alkaloids, almost all of which are sequestered unchanged from alkaloid-containing arthropods in the frog diet. Oribatid mites recently have been proposed as a major dietary source of poison frog alkaloids. Here, we report on alkaloids common to an oribatid mite and poison frogs. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of methanol extracts of adult Scheloribates laevigatus (Oribatida: Scheloribatidae) revealed nine alkaloids. Five of these have been detected previously in the skin glands of poison frogs: two isomers of the pumiliotoxin 291G, two isomers of the 5,6,8-trisubstituted indolizidine 209C, and the 5,6,8-trisubstituted indolizidine 195G. The other four alkaloids, a pumiliotoxin, a tricyclic (coccinelline-like), and two isomers of an izidine, were not previously known, but are similar in structure to alkaloids found in poison frogs. Alkaloids were not detected in immature S. laevigatus, suggesting that they are adult-specific and possibly the result of mite biosynthesis. Although most of the alkaloids detected in S. laevigatus are common to poison frogs, the geographic distributions of these organisms are not sympatric. The findings of this study indicate that oribatid mites, and in particular, members of the genus Scheloribates, represent a relatively unexplored arthropod repository for alkaloids and a significant dietary source of alkaloids in poison frogs.

  15. Water mites: predators and parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Gledhill, T.

    1985-01-01

    The majority of water mites found in freshwater belong to the Hydrachnellae, a group which exhibit striking morphological diversity. This paper reviews work on the structure, morphology and taxonomy. The role of water mites as predators, their life history and their parasitic associations with aquatic insect or freshwater mollusc hosts is discussed along with the distribution of water mites in the British Isles.

  16. Richness, infestation and specificity of spinturnicid mites (Acari: Spinturnicidae) on bats in southern Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-Martínez, Helisama; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Studies of mites on bats in the Mexican state Oaxaca are scarce. Our objective was therefore to evaluate the richness, infestation, and specificity of spinturnicid mites on bats in southern Oaxaca, Mexico. Bats were monthly captured from April 2010 to February 2011, in four sites using four mist-nets; also, we visited natural (crevices) and artificial roosts (tunnel). Of each bat we account the number of spinturnicid mites, considering the area of the body where they were collected. Mites were preserved in 70 % ethanol and later they were mounted on microscope slides in Hoyer's medium. We captured bats of 15 species, of which eight species were infested. We recorded seven spinturnicid mites: five of the genus Periglischrus, one of the genus Cameronieta, and one of the genus Mesoperiglischrus. Periglischrus caligus, P. iheringi, and Periglischrus sp. are new records on Artibeus lituratus, Glossophaga soricina, and G. commissarisi, respectively. More infested bat species were Artibeus jamaicensis (93.8 %), A. lituratus (88.9 %), G. commissarisi and Sturnira parvidens (both 66.7 %). Prevalence of A. jamaicensis and A. lituratus was significantly higher than most other bat species. Although prevalence percentage was high, mean and median intensity were low. Spinturnicid mites were recorded in particular areas of a bat's body; therefore, they could be an additional tool for the taxonomic identification of bats.

  17. Allergens of mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Siwak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mite allergens belong to the group of inhalant allergens and represent antigenic substances which are particutlarly important in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases and skin diseases. The most common diseases associated with chronic exposure to these aeroallergens include: allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis. Mite allergens are simple proteins or glycoproteins with different molecular structures and various biochemical functions. The sensitizing capacity of these proteins is connected from their physicochemical properties. Individual allergens perform, among others, the functions of structural proteins, act as enzymes, transport lipids, bind metal ions, and are capable of glycosylation. In addition, mite allergenic proteases degrade proteins of the skin epithelium-resulting in a weakening of its natural protective barrier-and induce the immune response. The proteases also induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin 6 (IL-6, interleukin 8 (IL-8, eotaxin, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-GM-CSF. The article presents the tertiary structure of major and mid-range mite allergens and their classification. Based on literature reports concerning the chemical structure of allergenic proteins, it was emphasized that the structural differences between homologous proteins with allergenic pozoproperties relate to the distribution of amino acid residues on the surface of the molecule. IgE binding affinity and the similarities and differences in the amino acid sequence of the allergens were also the basis for determining cross-reactivity of allergenic proteins. The paper shows an example of this phenomenon, describing the existence of common allergens for various mite species.

  18. On the identity of two new species of the genus coleoscirus (acari: cunaxidae) with annotations on the genus from pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M.H.; Ashfaq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Adult females of two new Cunaxid mites, Coleoscirus raviensis n.sp. and Coleoscirus tobaensis n.sp. were collected during the taxonomic exploration of the mite fauna of the family Cunaxidae from Punjab- Pakistan. The new species were compared with 9 already describes species of the same genus from Pakistan. A Comprehensive key of all the known species of this genus from Pakistan has been prepared to incorporate the new species. A ceremonial description and illustration of main body characteristics, geographical distribution, host range and distinguishing remarks are also given. (author)

  19. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata associated with birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HM Silva

    Full Text Available AbstractThe present study reports associations between feather mites (Astigmata and birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Rio Grande do Norte state, in Brazil. In the laboratory, mites were collected through visual examination of freshly killed birds. Overall, 172 individuals from 38 bird species were examined, between October 2011 and July 2012. The prevalence of feather mites was 80.8%, corresponding to 139 infested individuals distributed into 30 species and 15 families of hosts. Fifteen feather mite taxa could be identified to the species level, sixteen to the genus level and three to the subfamily level, distributed into the families Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae, Pteronyssidae, Xolalgidae, Trouessartiidae, Falculiferidae and Gabuciniidae. Hitherto unknown associations between feather mites and birds were recorded for eleven taxa identified to the species level, and nine taxa were recorded for the first time in Brazil. The number of new geographic records, as well as the hitherto unknown mite-host associations, supports the high estimates of diversity for feather mites of Brazil and show the need for research to increase knowledge of plumicole mites in the Neotropical region.

  20. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) associated with birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H M; Hernandes, F A; Pichorim, M

    2015-08-01

    The present study reports associations between feather mites (Astigmata) and birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Rio Grande do Norte state, in Brazil. In the laboratory, mites were collected through visual examination of freshly killed birds. Overall, 172 individuals from 38 bird species were examined, between October 2011 and July 2012. The prevalence of feather mites was 80.8%, corresponding to 139 infested individuals distributed into 30 species and 15 families of hosts. Fifteen feather mite taxa could be identified to the species level, sixteen to the genus level and three to the subfamily level, distributed into the families Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae, Pteronyssidae, Xolalgidae, Trouessartiidae, Falculiferidae and Gabuciniidae. Hitherto unknown associations between feather mites and birds were recorded for eleven taxa identified to the species level, and nine taxa were recorded for the first time in Brazil. The number of new geographic records, as well as the hitherto unknown mite-host associations, supports the high estimates of diversity for feather mites of Brazil and show the need for research to increase knowledge of plumicole mites in the Neotropical region.

  1. [Allergenic mites (Acariformes, Pyroglyphidae) in house dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhëltikova, T M; Petrova-Nikitina, A D; Kanchurin, A Kh; Berzhets, V M; Muzylëva, I L

    1987-01-01

    Paper is the second part of the literature review on house dust mites (including 1985). It deals with the diagnosis of the dust mite allergy, the nature of the mite allergens, distribution and population density of the mites in various premises, seasonal population dynamics and population age structure of the dermatophagoid mites, life cycle and breeding of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae on different food substrates. The methods of the house dust mite control are discussed. The original data on the house dust mite distribution in Moscow is shown. A comparative estimation of the results of mite antigens in the house dust discovering by the acarological and three immunological methods are given.

  2. Umashtanchaeviella plethotricha, a new genus and species of the family Tetracondylidae (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Anichkin, Alexander E; Tolstikov, Andrei V

    2014-01-01

    A new genus of oribatid mites of the family Tetracondylidae, Umashtanchaeviella gen. n., with type species Umashtanchaeviella plethotricha sp. n., is proposed and described from forest litter, the Bu Gia Map National Park, southern Vietnam. The new genus is distinguishable from other otocepheoid genera by the presence of notogastral plethotrichy.

  3. The NRL MITE Air Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellogg, James; Bovais, Christopher; Dahlburg, Jill; Foch, Richard; Gardner, John; Gordon, Diana; Hartley, Ralph; Kamgar-Parsi, Behrooz; McFarlane, Hugh; Pipitone, Frank; Ramamurti, Ravi; Sciambi, Adam; Spears, William; Srull, Donald; Sullivan, Carol

    2001-01-01

    .... The NRL Micro Tactical Expendable "MITE" air vehicle is a result of this research. The operational MITE is a hand-launched, dual-propeller, fixed-wing air vehicle, with a 9-inch chord and a wingspan of 8 to 18 inches, depending on payload weight...

  4. Morphometric variations of laelapine mite (Acari: Mesostigmata populations infesting small mammals (Mammalia in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Martins-Hatano

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the morphometric variation of laelapine populations (Acari, Mesostigmata associated with neotropical oryzomyine rodents at different geographic localities in Brazil. Three nominal mite species were selected for study, all infesting the pelage of small mammals at different localities in Rio de Janeiro, Espírito Santo, Bahia, and the Federal District, Brazil. To analyse morphometric characteristics, thirty-seven morphological characters distributed across the whole body of each specimen were measured. We use the Analysis of Principal Components, extracting the three first axes and projecting each mite in these axes. Major species level changes in the taxonomy of the host mammals allows an independent examination of morphometric variation of mites infesting a set of distinctly different host species at different geographic localities. Gigantolaelaps vitzthumi and Laelaps differens are associated with oryzomyine rodents of the genus Cerradomys, and consistently showed a tendency to cluster by host phylogeny. Laelaps manguinhosi associated with Nectomys rattus in central Brazil is morphometrically distinct from mites infesting N. squamipes in the coastal restingas of Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo. The results obtained here indicate that laelapine mite populations can vary among geographic areas and among phylogenetically related host species. Clearly, the study of these mites at the population level can be an important tool for clarifying the taxonomy of both mites and hosts.

  5. Changes in Gene Expression and Viral Titer in Varroa Jacobsoni Mites After a Host Shift Asian to European Honey Bees

    OpenAIRE

    Andino Bautista, Gladys K.

    2014-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are the most important insects for the pollination of crops and wildflowers. However, they have experienced increasing colony die-offs during the past two decades. Multiple species of parasitic mites have been described that affect honey bees. The most important species in beekeeping belong to the genus Varroa ( Varroa jacobsoniand Varroa destructor). Varroa mite parasitism of honey bees is thought to be the most significant cause of colony mortality worldwide, ...

  6. Molecular identification of house dust mites and storage mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shew Fung; Chong, Ai Ling; Mak, Joon Wah; Tan, Jessie; Ling, Suk Jiun; Ho, Tze Ming

    2011-10-01

    Mites are known causes of allergic diseases. Currently, identification of mites based on morphology is difficult if only one mite is isolated from a (dust) sample, or when only one gender is found, or when the specimen is not intact especially with the loss of the legs. The purpose of this study was to use polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the ITS2 gene, to complement the morphological data for the identification of mites to the species level. For this, six species were cultured: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Aleuroglyphus ovatus and Glycycometus malaysiensis. Genomic DNA of the mites was extracted, quantified, amplified and digested individually with restriction enzymes. Hinf I and Ple I differentiated the restriction patterns of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. Bfa I and Alu I enzymes differentiated B. tropicalis and G. malaysiensis. Ple I enzyme was useful for the differentiation between T. putrescentiae and A. ovatus. Bfa I was useful for the differentiation of G. malaysiensis from the rest of the species. In conclusion, different species of mites can be differentiated using PCR-RFLP of ITS2 region. With the established PCR-RFLP method in this study, identification of these mites to the species level is possible even if complete and intact adult specimens of both sexes are not available. As no study to date has reported PCR-RFLP method for the identification of domestic mites, the established method should be validated for the identification of other species of mites that were not included in this study.

  7. Wolbachia-induced parthenogenesis in a genus of phytophagous mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeks, A.R.; Breeuwer, J.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The vertically transmitted endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia modifies host reproduction in several ways in order to enhance its own spread. One such modification results in the induction of parthenogenesis, where males, which are unable to transmit Wolbachia, are not produced. Interestingly,

  8. First records and descriptions of the marine littoral mite genus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with closely set fine punctations, especially over the central region. Dorsal shield is not very distinct. It is wider than long. (length = 34 ~m, width =..: 90 ~Lm), not extending to the verti- cal oil channels. Vertical setae (vi) long and thick, arising an~ teriad of dorsal shield. External scapular setae (see) longer than vertical setae.

  9. Control of poultry red mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpinen, Ole; Steenberg, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae, is the most important ectoparasite in European egg production. The mites hide in cracks and crevices in the near vicinity of the resting places of the birds, coming out to feed mainly during the night. Under favourable conditions the population can...... grow rapidly, leading to serious problems. Large mite populations may cause anaemia or even death to the poultry, but also in lower numbers mites may be a nuisance to the birds causing decreased egg production and egg quality. Furthermore, they may have the potential of acting as reservoir......-pathogenic fungi and desiccant dust. The dust is diatomaceous earth (of natural origin), synthetic silica products or combinations of the two. The progress of the work with desiccant dusts will be reported. So far, 7 different products have been tested in the laboratory with regard to their efficacy, speed...

  10. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  11. [House dust mites and their allergens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessot, J-C; Pauli, G

    2011-02-01

    The taxonomy, anatomy, life cycle and ecology of Pyroglyphidae mites and storage mites (Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, B. tropicalis) are described. Pyroglyphidae and storage mites have similar morphologies: they are octopods, with characteristic gnathosoma and sensory hairs. Salivary glands and the mid gut produce most of the allergens excreted, which are enzymatic proteins. Biological cycles and development are similar, although fecundity is superior in storage mites compared to the Pyroglyphides. Relative humidity is the main parameter, which regulates mite development, with a higher degree of temperature and humidity required for storage mites. Bedding is the ecological niche of Pyroglyphidae, which feed on human skin. Moulds and food products are the storage mite biotope from which they spread in the dwelling. Initially considered as rural mites, storage mites are also present in urban dwellings. B. tropicalis, in tropical regions is a true domestic mite. Because of this, it is justified to denominate Pyroglyphidae "house dust mites" and storage mites "domestic mites". In addition to the respiratory allergic symptoms, the storage mites can also cause occupational contact dermatoses. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. DIVERSITY OF FEATHER MITES (ACARI: ASTIGMATA) ON DARWIN’S FINCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Scott M.; Le Bohec, Céline; Koop, Jennifer A. H.; Proctor, Heather C.; Clayton, Dale H.

    2014-01-01

    Feather mites are a diverse group of ectosymbionts that occur on most species of birds. Although Darwin’s finches are a well-studied group of birds, relatively little is known about their feather mites. Nearly 200 birds across 9 finch species, and from 2 locations on Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos, were dust-ruffled during the 2009 breeding season. We found 8 genera of feather mites; the most prevalent genus was Mesalgoides (53–55%), followed by Trouessartia (40–45%), Amerodectes and Proctophyllodes (26–33%), Xolalgoides (21–27%), Analges and Strelkoviacarus (0–6%), and Dermoglyphus (2–4%). There was no evidence for microclimatic effects (ambient temperature and relative humidity) on mite diversity. Host body mass was significantly correlated with mean feather mite abundance across 7 of 8 well-sampled species of finches. Certhidea olivacea, the smallest species, did not fit this pattern and had a disproportionately high number of mites for its body mass. PMID:23691947

  13. Ear Mite Infestation in Four Imported Dogs from Thailand; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Maazi

    2010-12-01

    Clinical examinations showed an excessive dark brown discharge in both ears. No signs of other clinical situations were observed. White moving mites were seen during otoscopy examination. The specimen of ear discharge was sent to parasitology laboratory for precise identification of genus and species. Mites were identified as Otodectes cynotis and the presence of concurrent yeast and bacterial infection was showed by laboratory examinations. Topical Ami­traz solution in combination with otic antibacterial and antifungal agents were administered as the treatment. Since, all the reported cases were imported from Thailand, careful clinical examination and quarantine strategies are highly recommended at the borders.

  14. Dust-mites: effect on lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atambay, Metin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Aycan, Ozlem Makbule; Kilic, Eser; Yazar, Suleyman; Saraymen, Recep; Karaman, Ulku; Daldal, Nilgun

    2006-01-01

    Dust-mites are present in our homes, feed on dead exfoliated skin and other organic material. It is also known that oxidative stress may lead to cellular damage that can be confirmed by markers of cellular disruption. Oxidative stress in various infective processes has been documented. We investigated whether house dust-mites cause oxidative stress in patients. Products of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes and lymphocytes were assessed by measuring malondialdehyde concentration. Our results showed that patients who had a positive skin test for dust-mite antigens and had dust-mites present in their houses (dust-mite positive) had increased erythrocyte malondialdehyde levels (62.39 [18.56] nmol/g-Hb) compared with those who were skin test positive, dust-mite negative (45.45 [10.82]) or skin test negative, dust-mite negative (42.20 [5.68]). They also had significantly higher levels of lymphocyte malondialdehyde (4.22 [0.55] nmol/g-protein) compared with those who were skin test positive, dust-mite negative (3.46 [0.29]) or skin test negative, dust-mite negative (1.25 [0.31]; p dust-mite negative/skin test positive and dust-mite negative/skin test negative patients. Increased malondialdehyde activity in lymphocytes and erythrocytes in the dust-mite positive/skin test positive group shows the presence of the oxidative stress in patients with dust-mite infestation.

  15. House dust mite control measures for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite...... antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites.......07), or in medication usage (standardised mean difference -0.06, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.07). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Chemical and physical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens cannot be recommended. It is doubtful whether further studies, similar to the ones in our review, are worthwhile. If other...

  16. Human Demodex Mite: The Versatile Mite of Dermatological Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz Anwar Rather

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Demodex mite is an obligate human ecto-parasite found in or near the pilo-sebaceous units. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two species typically found on humans. Demodex infestation usually remains asymptomatic and may have a pathogenic role only when present in high densities and also because of immune imbalance. All cutaneous diseases caused by Demodex mites are clubbed under the term demodicosis or demodicidosis, which can be an etiological factor of or resemble a variety of dermatoses. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion about the etiological role of Demodex in various dermatoses can help in early diagnosis and appropriate, timely, and cost effective management.

  17. Detection, Prevalence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Demodex spp and further Skin Prostigmata Mites (Acari, Arachnida in Wild and Domestic Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Sastre

    Full Text Available This study was conceived to detect skin mites in social mammals through real-time qPCR, and to estimate taxonomic Demodex and further Prostigmata mite relationships in different host species by comparing sequences from two genes: mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear 18S rRNA. We determined the mite prevalence in the hair follicles of marmots (13% and bats (17%. The high prevalence found in marmots and bats by sampling only one site on the body may indicate that mites are common inhabitants of their skin. Since we found three different mites (Neuchelacheles sp, Myobia sp and Penthaleus sp in three bat species (Miotis yumanensis, Miotis californicus and Corynorhinus townsendii and two different mites (both inferred to be members of the Prostigmata order in one marmot species (Marmota flaviventris, we tentatively concluded that these skin mites 1 cannot be assigned to the same genus based only on a common host, and 2 seem to evolve according to the specific habitat and/or specific hair and sebaceous gland of the mammalian host. Moreover, two M. yumanensis bats harbored identical Neuchelacheles mites, indicating the possibility of interspecific cross-infection within a colony. However, some skin mites species are less restricted by host species than previously thought. Specifically, Demodex canis seems to be more transmissible across species than other skin mites. D. canis have been found mostly in dogs but also in cats and captive bats. In addition, we report the first case of D. canis infestation in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius. All these mammalian hosts are related to human activities, and D. canis evolution may be a consequence of this relationship. The monophyletic Demodex clade showing closely related dog and human Demodex sequences also supports this likely hypothesis.

  18. Detection, Prevalence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Demodex spp and further Skin Prostigmata Mites (Acari, Arachnida) in Wild and Domestic Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Natalia; Francino, Olga; Curti, Joseph N; Armenta, Tiffany C; Fraser, Devaughn L; Kelly, Rochelle M; Hunt, Erin; Silbermayr, Katja; Zewe, Christine; Sánchez, Armand; Ferrer, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    This study was conceived to detect skin mites in social mammals through real-time qPCR, and to estimate taxonomic Demodex and further Prostigmata mite relationships in different host species by comparing sequences from two genes: mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear 18S rRNA. We determined the mite prevalence in the hair follicles of marmots (13%) and bats (17%). The high prevalence found in marmots and bats by sampling only one site on the body may indicate that mites are common inhabitants of their skin. Since we found three different mites (Neuchelacheles sp, Myobia sp and Penthaleus sp) in three bat species (Miotis yumanensis, Miotis californicus and Corynorhinus townsendii) and two different mites (both inferred to be members of the Prostigmata order) in one marmot species (Marmota flaviventris), we tentatively concluded that these skin mites 1) cannot be assigned to the same genus based only on a common host, and 2) seem to evolve according to the specific habitat and/or specific hair and sebaceous gland of the mammalian host. Moreover, two M. yumanensis bats harbored identical Neuchelacheles mites, indicating the possibility of interspecific cross-infection within a colony. However, some skin mites species are less restricted by host species than previously thought. Specifically, Demodex canis seems to be more transmissible across species than other skin mites. D. canis have been found mostly in dogs but also in cats and captive bats. In addition, we report the first case of D. canis infestation in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius). All these mammalian hosts are related to human activities, and D. canis evolution may be a consequence of this relationship. The monophyletic Demodex clade showing closely related dog and human Demodex sequences also supports this likely hypothesis.

  19. House dust mite control measures for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites...

  20. PARASITIC MITES IN BACKYARD TURKEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Camacho-Escobar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To describe the parasitic mites in backyard turkeys, was did this work. The mites were obtain by hand for 30 backyard turkeys in Oaxaca’s Coast region, Mexico; the mites were mount in adhesive paper and wash with the 200X lent in a computer optical microscopy, the parasites size were determinate in the pictures obtained by the microscopy software, the images were sized using a specialist software for it, which relate the number of pixels in the picture with the size of the observation field. Were indentified the species Dermanyssus gallinae, Megninia ginglymura and Ornithonyssus sylviarum, the last two described for first time in backyard turkeys in Mexico. Â

  1. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palopoli, Michael F.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Minot, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries...... and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin...... American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years...

  2. Water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia) from the hyporheic waters of the Selwyn River (New Zealand), with descriptions of nine new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesic, V.; Smit, H.; Datry, T.

    2010-01-01

    New records of water mite species (Acari: Hydrachnidia) from hyporheic waters of Selwyn River (South Island, New Zealand) are reported. One new genus, Canterburaturus Pesic & Smit n. gen. (Aturidae) and nine new species are described: Taintaturus selwynus Pesic & Smit n. sp., T. rostratus Pesic &

  3. Why do Varroa mites prefer nurse bees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianbing; Huang, Zachary Y; Zeng, Zhijiang

    2016-06-15

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an acarine ecto-parasite on Apis mellifera. It is the worst pest of Apis mellifera, yet its reproductive biology on the host is not well understood. In particular, the significance of the phoretic stage, when mites feed on adult bees for a few days, is not clear. In addition, it is not clear whether the preference of mites for nurses observed in the laboratory also happens inside real colonies. We show that Varroa mites prefer nurses over both newly emerged bees and forgers in a colony setting. We then determined the mechanism behind this preference. We show that this preference maximizes Varroa fitness, although due to the fact that each mite must find a second host (a pupa) to reproduce, the fitness benefit to the mites is not immediate but delayed. Our results suggest that the Varroa mite is a highly adapted parasite for honey bees.

  4. Contrasting structures of plant-mite networks compounded by phytophagous and predatory mite species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Daud, Rodrigo Damasco

    2018-04-01

    Differences in the feeding habits between phytophagous and predatory species can determine distinct ecological interactions between mites and their host plants. Herein, plant-mite networks were constructed using available literature on plant-dwelling mites from Brazilian natural vegetation in order to contrast phytophagous and predatory mite networks. The structural patterns of plant-mite networks were described through network specialization (connectance) and modularity. A total of 187 mite species, 65 host plant species and 646 interactions were recorded in 14 plant-mite networks. Phytophagous networks included 96 mite species, 61 host plants and 277 interactions, whereas predatory networks contained 91 mite species, 54 host plants and 369 interactions. No differences in the species richness of mites and host plants were observed between phytophagous and predatory networks. However, plant-mite networks composed of phytophagous mites showed lower connectance and higher modularity when compared to the predatory mite networks. The present results corroborate the hypothesis that trophic networks are more specialized than commensalistic networks, given that the phytophagous species must deal with plant defenses, in contrast to predatory mites which only inhabit and forage for resources on plants.

  5. House dust mites, our intimate associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadchatram, M

    2005-06-01

    House dust mites have lived in human contact from time immemorial. Human dander or dead skin constitutes the major organic component of the house dust ecosystem. Because the mites feed on dander, dust mites and human association will continue to co-exist as part of our environment. Efficient house-keeping practice is the best form of control to reduce infestation. However, special precautions are important when individuals are susceptible or sensitive to dust mites. House dust mites are responsible for causing asthma, rhinitis and contact dermatitis. The respiratory allergies are caused by the inhalation of dead or live mites, their faecal matter or other byproducts. Immune factors are of paramount importance in the development of dust related or mite induced respiratory diseases. House dust mites were found in some 1,000 samples of dust taken from approximately 330 dwellings in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore. Mattresses, carpets, corners of a bedroom, and floor beneath the bed are favourable dust mite habitats. The incriminating species based on studies here and elsewhere, as well as many other species of dust mites of unknown etiological importance are widely distributed in Malaysian homes. Density of dust mites in Malaysia and Singapore is greater than in temperate countries. Prevention and control measures with reference to subjects sensitive to dust mite allergies, including chemical control described in studies conducted in Europe and America are discussed. However, a cost free and most practical way to remove mites, their faecal matter and other products is to resort to sunning the bedding and carpets to kill the living mites, and then beaten and brushed to remove the dust and other components.

  6. Honey Bees: Sweetness and Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bee colony losses have been in the news lately and the potential reasons for these losses have taken up much space in the news media. In order to clarify what role mites play in the current loss (2006-2007) of bee colonies, called Colony Collapse Disorder, a better understanding of what a mit...

  7. [The phenomenon of phylogenetic synhospitality in acariform mites (acari: acariformes)--the permanent parasites of vertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, A V; Mironov, S V

    2008-01-01

    The term synhospitality means the association of two or more closely related parasite species with one host species (Eichler, 1966). The cases of two or three synhospitalic species are known from the same host species, and especially ones where parasites were recorded from different parts of the host range, are quite common. The most ordinary reason causing synhospitality in permanent parasites is the host switching. Nevertheless, there are a number of synhospitality cases, where the parasite complex is monophyletic because evolved on a single host species. The special term--"phylogenetic synhospitality" (FS) is proposed for these cases of synhospitality. Most known cases of FS in acariform mites, permanent parasites of vertebrates, are analysed. It is found out that both astigmatan and prostigmatan parasite mites demonstrate a numbers of FS. The majority of these examples represent parasitism of two or three synhospitalic parasite species. Impressive examples of FS involving a number of synhospitalic species is shown by only astigmatan mites inhabiting the fur of mammals or plumage of birds. Most known examples involving four or more mite species are discussed: 51 mite species of the genus Schizocarpus (Chirodiscidae) parasitizing Castor fiber and C. canadensis (Castoridae); 6 species of Listrophorus spp. (Listrophoridae) from Ondatra zibethicus (Cricetidae); 23 species of Listrophoroides s. 1. (Atopomelidae) from Maxomys surifer (Muridae); 21 species of Cytostethum (Atomelidae) from Potorous tridactylus (Potoridae); 4 species of Listrophoroides (Afrolistrophoroides) from Malacomys longipes (Muridae); 7 species of Fainalges (Xolalgidae) from Aratinga holochlora (Psittacidae); 4 species of Zygepigynia (Pteronyssidae) from Chrysocolaptes lucidus (Picidae). The main reason of FS is that, in spite of the Fahrenholz's rule, the speciation of many parasites proceeds much more intensively than in their hosts because of the more rapid replacement of the parasitic

  8. Some oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida from the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Ramadan Oliveira

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted in three sites from northern and mid-eastern regions of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, to determine oribatid mite composition in patches of seasonal semideciduous forest and soybean crop plantation. A list of 52 taxa, 24 at the species level and 28 only at the genus level, is given, 27 of which are new records for the region.

  9. Some oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) from the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Anibal Ramadan; Prieto, Dania; Moraes, Gilberto José de

    2001-01-01

    A survey was conducted in three sites from northern and mid-eastern regions of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, to determine oribatid mite composition in patches of seasonal semideciduous forest and soybean crop plantation. A list of 52 taxa, 24 at the species level and 28 only at the genus level, is given, 27 of which are new records for the region.

  10. New records and some interesting findings of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida from Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murvanidze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Six species of oribatid mites are found first time for Georgian fauna: Eobrachychthonius latior (Berlese, 1910, Graptoppia paraanalis Subias & Rodrigues, 1985, Mongaillardia grandjeani Calugar & Vasiliu 1984, Tritegeus bisulcatus Grandjean 1953, Podoribates longipes (Berlese, 1887, Chamobates birulai Kuiczinsky, 1092 and Oribatula (Zygoribatula skrjabini (Bulanova-Zachvatkina 1967. M. grandjeani is new finding for Caucasus area. New locations for some rare oribatid species are also registered. Remarks on the replacement of genus Berndamerus to family Ctenobelbidae Grandjean, 1965 are given.

  11. Mite and cockroach sensitisation in patients with allergic rhinitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No studies have been conducted on sensitisation to the other storage mites, spider mites or cockroaches. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sensitisation to various housedust mites, storage mites, spider mites and cockroaches in patients with allergic rhinitis living in the Free State. Methods. Fifty consecutive patients ...

  12. Description of a new caloglyphus berlese mite (acari: acaridae) infesting pulses in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.; Ashfaq, M.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 13 mite species in genus Caloglyphus Berlese (family Acaridae) found in Pakistan, Caloglyphus arbelos was identified as a new species. The characters of apodeme 3 (ap3) which is reduced and broken medially enable the taxonomic separation of this new species from the other described taxa of genus Caloglyphus recorded from different geographical areas. A concise key on hypopus traits usable in taxonomy to discern this species from local and global specimens is made available. These studies on accurate diagnosis and identification of pest species are helpful in their successful management. (author)

  13. Improved tRNA prediction in the American house dust mite reveals widespread occurrence of extremely short minimal tRNAs in acariform mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Pavel B; Oconnor, Barry M

    2009-12-11

    Atypical tRNAs are functional minimal tRNAs, lacking either the D- or T-arm. They are significantly shorter than typical cloverleaf tRNAs. Widespread occurrence of atypical tRNAs was first demonstrated for secernentean nematodes and later in various arachnids. Evidence started to accumulate that tRNAs of certain acariform mites are even shorter than the minimal tRNAs of nematodes, raising the possibility that tRNAs lacking both D- and T-arms might exist in these organisms. The presence of cloverleaf tRNAs in acariform mites, particularly in the house dust mite genus Dermatophagoides, is still disputed. Mitochondrial tRNAs of Dermatophagoides farinae are minimal, atypical tRNAs lacking either the T- or D-arm. The size (49-62, 54.4 +/- 2.86 nt) is significantly (p = 0.019) smaller than in Caenorhabditis elegans (53-63, 56.3 +/- 2.30 nt), a model minimal tRNA taxon. The shortest tRNA (49 nt) in Dermatophagoides is approaching the length of the shortest known tRNAs (45-49 nt) described in other acariform mites. The D-arm is absent in these tRNAs, and the inferred T-stem is small (2-3 bp) and thermodynamically unstable, suggesting that it may not exist in reality. The discriminator nucleotide is probably not encoded and is added postranscriptionally in many Dermatophagoides tRNAs. Mitochondrial tRNAs of acariform mites are largely atypical, non-cloverleaf tRNAs. Among them, the shortest known tRNAs with no D-arm and a short and unstable T-arm can be inferred. While our study confirmed seven tRNAs in Dermatophagoides by limited EST data, further experimental evidence is needed to demonstrate extremely small and unusual tRNAs in acariform mites.

  14. Learned predation risk management by spider mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHackl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Predation is a prime selective force shaping prey behavior. Investment in anti-predator behavior is traded-off against time and energy for other fitness-enhancing activities such as foraging or reproduction. To optimize this benefit/cost trade-off, prey should be able to innately and/or by experience modulate their behavior to the level of predation risk. Here, we assessed learned predation risk management in the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. We exposed spider mites coming from benign (naïve or high immediate predation risk (experienced environments to latent and/or no risk and assessed their site choice, activity and oviposition. Benign environments were characterized by the absence of any predator cues, high immediate risk environments by killed spider mites, physical presence of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis and associated chemosensory traces left on the surface, and latent risk environments by only predator traces. In the no-choice experiment both naïve and experienced spider mites laid their first egg later on leaves with than without predator traces. Irrespective of predator traces presence/absence, experienced mites laid their first egg earlier than naïve ones did. Naïve spider mites were more active, indicating higher restlessness, and laid fewer eggs on leaves with predator traces, whereas experienced mites were less active and laid similar numbers of eggs on leaves with and without predator traces. In the choice experiment both naïve and experienced spider mites preferentially resided and oviposited on leaves without predator traces but experienced mites were less active than naïve ones. Overall, our study suggests that spider mites experienced with high predation risk behave bolder under latent risk than naïve spider mites. Since predator traces alone do not indicate immediate risk, we argue that the attenuated anti-predator response of experienced spider mites represents adaptive learned

  15. Is it time to retire the genus Rymovirus from the family Potyviridae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Colin W

    2017-07-01

    In the most recent Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (9 th Report, 2011) (King et al., Virus Taxonomy, Elsevier, New York, 2011) the family Potyviridae is described as comprising seven genera - Potyvirus, Ipomovirus, Macluravirus, Rymovirus, Tritimovirus, Brambyvirus and Bymovirus - despite previous suggestions questioning the validity of the taxonomic status of the genus Rymovirus. Since then the ICTV website records that an eighth genus Poacevirus has been approved for the Potyviridae family. The creation of the genus Rymovirus at the 1990 Potyvirus Taxonomy Workshop in Braunschweig, Germany was based on two things: (i) the incorrect assumption that the genomes of all mite-transmitted members of the Potyviridae would have strong sequence similarity to that of wheat streak mosaic virus, the only mite-transmitted member of this genus for which sequence data were available at that time, and (ii) that the genus should be named Rymovirus (based on a virus for which there was no sequence information) rather than a name based on wheat streak mosaic virus (e.g., "Whestremovirus") because ryegrass mosaic virus (RGMV) was the first mite-transmitted virus to be described and thus should take precedence. When sequence data for RGMV became available in 1995, these data showed that RGMV was very different from wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and should not be assigned to the same genus. WSMV was subsequently re-assigned to a new genus, Tritimovirus, while the genus Rymovirus was retained. In this author's opinion, this retention is not justified, and the removal of Rymovirus as a distinct genus in the family Potyviridae is recommended. There may be merit when assigning it to the genus Potyvirus in sequestering these viruses in a rymovirus subgroup, as is done with other potyviruses, to reflect their different mode of transmission.

  16. Sensitization to house dust mites in Reykjavik, Iceland, in the absence of domestic exposure to mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, T E; Gislason, D; Björnsdottir, U S; Jörundsdottir, K B; Janson, C; Luczynska, C M; Gislason, T

    2004-05-01

    House dust mites are common sources of indoor allergens. In Reykjavik, Iceland, 9% of the young adult population had serum-specific IgE to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Sensitization to mites is usually assumed to be due to exposure to house dust mites in the indoor environment. This investigation was carried out to measure the concentrations of house dust mite allergens and to investigate which species of mites were present in beds in Iceland. A total of 197 randomly selected adults were visited at home using the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) II Indoor protocol. Dust samples were collected from mattresses for measurement of house dust mite allergen concentrations and to estimate the number and type of house dust mites. Additional samples from mattresses and floors were collected from the homes of 10 patients with positive skin prick tests (SPT) to D. pteronyssinus. House dust mite allergen concentrations were measured using ELISA and examination of mite species was carried out using microscopy. Climatic parameters were assessed using psychrometer readings in the bedrooms and outdoors. We found two single mite specimens, both D. pteronyssinus, in two dust samples. Mite allergen analyses indicated that two other dust samples had Der f 1 results close to the cut-off of 0.1 microg/g of dust. No samples were positive for Der p 1. In an additional collection of dust from the homes of 10 SPT-positive patients no Dermatophagoides spp. were found. Reykjavik citizens are exposed to extremely low amounts of house dust mite allergens in their homes. Possible alternative sources for sensitization are discussed, such as bird nests, exposure from travelling abroad, or other mites or invertebrates that cross-react with house dust mite allergens. Our findings suggest that exposures other than to house dust mites indoors are possible sources of mite allergen exposure.

  17. A new species of the genus Neogalumna (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang, Wenqin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of oribatid mites of the family Galumnidae, Neogalumna longiporosa sp. nov., is described from dark loamy soil collected under moss in North Eastern China. It is the first identified member of the genus Neogalumna recorded for China. An identification key to the known species of Neogalumna is also given.

  18. First report on the entomopathogenic genus Neozygites (Entomophthoromycota) and Neozygites osornensis on aphids in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Neozygites has been known in Brazil until now only on mites, and this is its first report on aphids in Brazil. Tree-dwelling aphids (Cinara sp.) on a cypress tree were regularly monitored for entomopathogenic fungi in the city of Terezópolis de Goiás in Central Brazil between July 2014 and...

  19. House Dust Mites in Erzincan Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytun, Erhan; Doğan, Salih; Aykut, Medeni; Özçiçek, Fatih; Ünver, Edhem; Özçiçek, Adalet

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to determine the species of the house dust mites seen in Erzincan, the number of mites per gram of dust in the houses, and the relationship between temperature and the number of mite specimens. For this purpose, 54 dust samples collected from 18 houses located in different districts of Erzincan province between November 2013 and January 2014. These samples were examined by a lactic acid precipitation method. Of the houses in which the dust samples were collected, 94.44% were found to be positive in terms of mites. A total of 844 mite specimens were isolated from the dust samples, and the mean number of mites per gram of dust was found to be 18.34. The most common species was found to be Acarus siro (55.55%) and was followed by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (50.00%), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (22.22%), Histiostoma sp. (22.22%), Lepidoglyphus destructor (16.66%), T. perniciosus(11.11%), Euroglyphus maynei (11.11%), Glycyphagus privatus (11.11%), Cheyletus sp. (11.11%), Tarsonemus sp. (11.11%), and Tetranychus sp. (11.11%). Mite-holding rate of the houses in Erzincan province was found to be 94.44%. The mean number of mites per gram of dust was found to be 18.34. The most common mite species was A. siro, which was followed by D. pteronyssinus.

  20. Why do Varroa mites prefer nurse bees?

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xianbing; Huang, Zachary Y.; Zeng, Zhijiang

    2016-01-01

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an acarine ecto-parasite on Apis mellifera. It is the worst pest of Apis mellifera, yet its reproductive biology on the host is not well understood. In particular, the significance of the phoretic stage, when mites feed on adult bees for a few days, is not clear. In addition, it is not clear whether the preference of mites for nurses observed in the laboratory also happens inside real colonies. We show that Varroa mites prefer nurses over both newly emer...

  1. [Recent experience with mites in stored products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, G; Ceccarelli, M T; Mellino, M; Marinelli, P

    1989-01-01

    The A.A. refer a recent experience about the isolation and identification of same species of storaged timber mites. They believe that these mites are responsible of dermatitis at the trunk and the arms of timber workers. Mites are the most elderly living species on the earth, they can live and grow in different environments, such as plants, flowers, animals, men, earth, lake and sea waters, organical rubles, houses, mattresses, old books etc. There are free-living, saprophitic, parasitic and predator mites. Generally, primary mites live either freely or as commensals feeding on conserved foodstuff and on what they find available. Secondary mites, i.e. parasites and predators, live off primary mites and insects infesting foodstuff. Direct damage to foodstuff are not to be considered important, whereas indirect damages are more serious, due to the contamination of bodies and stools of mites that are rich in nitrogen. Some secondary mites may attack foodstuff workers causing characteristic dermatitis: they can act either directly, by sting and bites, or indirectly, provoking on allergic hypersensitivity. In this study the A.A. used the floating method to isolate timber mites, and then, these have been photographed at the microscope to obtain an easier and more complete identification. The A.A. describe a heterogeneous fauna consisting of both adult and larval-status insects, some species of free-living mites (Oribatula Tibialis) and, in particular, of two species secondary mites, predator, belonging to the Prostigmata sub-order. The Cheyletus Eruditus (Cheylatidae family) is a whitish mite feeding mostly on insect larva and primary mites living in foodstuff. When no prey is available, the Cheyletus Eruditus eats individuals of its own species. The Pyemotes Herfsi (Pyemotidae family) is a little white mite feeding on insect larva. It lives in conserved foodstuff and may attack man causing characteristic dermatitis such as those described by the A.A. The A.A. conclude

  2. Inactivation of dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold from carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Lewis, Roger D; Dixit, Anupma; MacDonald, Maureen; Yang, Mingan; Qian, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Carpet is known to be a reservoir for biological contaminants, such as dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold, if it is not kept clean. The accumulation of these contaminants in carpet might trigger allergies or asthma symptoms in both children and adults. The purpose of this study is to compare methods for removal of dust mites, dust mite allergens, and mold from carpet. Carpets were artificially worn to simulate 1 to 2 years of wear in a four-person household. The worn carpets were inoculated together with a common indoor mold (Cladosporium species) and house dust mites and incubated for 6 weeks to allow time for dust mite growth on the carpet. The carpets were randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups. Available treatment regimens for controlling carpet contaminants were evaluated through a literature review and experimentation. Four moderately low-hazard, nondestructive methods were selected as treatments: vacuuming, steam-vapor, Neem oil (a natural tree extract), and benzalkonium chloride (a quaternary ammonium compound). Steam vapor treatment demonstrated the greatest dust mite population reduction (p mite allergens (p = 0.084), but have higher efficacy when compared to the chemical method on dust mite allergens (p = 0.002). There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy for reducing mold in carpet (p > 0.05) for both physical and chemical methods. The steam-vapor treatment effectively killed dust mites and denatured dust mite allergen in the laboratory environment.

  3. Bacteria detected in the honeybee parasitic mite Varroa destructor collected from beehive winter debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, J; Erban, T; Kamler, M; Kopecky, J; Nesvorna, M; Hejdankova, S; Titera, D; Tyl, J; Zurek, L

    2015-09-01

    The winter beehive debris containing bodies of honeybee parasitic mite Varroa destructor is used for veterinary diagnostics. The Varroa sucking honeybee haemolymph serves as a reservoir of pathogens including bacteria. Worker bees can pick up pathogens from the debris during cleaning activities and spread the infection to healthy bees within the colony. The aim of this study was to detect entomopathogenic bacteria in the Varroa collected from the winter beehive debris. Culture-independent approach was used to analyse the mite-associated bacterial community. Total DNA was extracted from the samples of 10 Varroa female individuals sampled from 27 different sites in Czechia. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified using universal bacterial primers, cloned and sequenced, resulting in a set of 596 sequences representing 29 operational taxonomic units (OTU97). To confirm the presence of bacteria in Varroa, histological sections of the mites were observed. Undetermined bacteria were observed in the mite gut and fat tissue. Morganella sp. was the most frequently detected taxon, followed by Enterococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Rahnella sp., Erwinia sp., and Arsenophonus sp. The honeybee putative pathogen Spiroplasma sp. was detected at one site and Bartonella-like bacteria were found at four sites. PCR-based analysis using genus-specific primers enabled detection of the following taxa: Enterococcus, Bartonella-like bacteria, Arsenophonus and Spiroplasma. We found potentially pathogenic (Spiroplasma) and parasitic bacteria (Arsenophonus) in mites from winter beehive debris. The mites can be reservoirs of the pathogenic bacteria in the apicultures. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. The genus Bipolaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manamgoda, D.S.; Rossman, A.Y.; Castlebury, L.A.; Crous, P.W.; Madrid, H.; Chukeatirote, E.; Hyde, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Bipolaris includes important plant pathogens with worldwide distribution. Species recognition in the genus has been uncertain due to the lack of molecular data from ex-type cultures as well as overlapping morphological characteristics. In this study, we revise the genus Bipolaris based on

  5. Scheloribatid mites as the source of pumiliotoxins in dendrobatid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Wataru; Sakata, Tomoyo; Shimano, Satoshi; Enami, Yoshinari; Mori, Naoki; Nishida, Ritsuo; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2005-10-01

    The strawberry poison frog Dendrobates pumilio (Anura: Dendrobatidae) and related poison frogs contain a variety of dendrobatid alkaloids that are considered to be sequestered through the consumption of alkaloid-containing arthropods microsympatrically distributed in the habitat. In addition to ants, beetles, and millipedes, we found that adults of two species of oribatid mites belonging to the cohort Brachypylina, trophically a lower level of animal than ants and beetles, contain dendrobatid alkaloids. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of hexane extracts of adult Scheloribates azumaensis (Oribatida: Acari) revealed the presence of not only pumiliotoxin 251D (8-hydroxy-8-methyl-6-(2'-methylhexylidene)-1-azabicyclo[4.3.0]nonane), but also precoccinelline 193C and another coccinelline-type alkaloid. From the corresponding extracts of an unidentified Scheloribates sp., pumiliotoxin 237A (8-hydroxy-8-methyl-6-(2'-methylpentylidene)-1-azabicyclo[4.3.0]nonane) was detected as a minor component, and identified by synthesis. The presence of related alkaloids, namely deoxypumiliotoxin 193H, a 6,8-diethyl-5-propenylindolizidine, and tentatively, a 1-ethyl-4-pentenynylquinolizidine, were indicated by the GC/MS fragmentation patterns, along with at least another six unidentified alkaloid components. Thus, one possible origin of pumiliotoxins, coccinellid alkaloids, and certain izidines found in poison frogs may be mites of the genus Scheloribates and perhaps related genera in the suborder Oribatida.

  6. A synthetic review of notoedres species mites and mange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Janet E.; Serieys, L.E.; Stephenson, N.; Riley, S.; Foley, C.; Jennings, M.; Wengert, G.; Vickers, W.; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa L.; Moriarty, J.; Clifford, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    Notoedric mange, caused by obligately parasitic sarcoptiform Notoedres mites, is associated with potentially fatal dermatitis with secondary systemic disease in small mammals, felids and procyonids among others, as well as an occasional zoonosis. We describe clinical spectra in non-chiropteran hosts, review risk factors and summarize ecological and epidemiological studies. The genus is disproportionately represented on rodents. Disease in felids and procyonids ranges from very mild to death. Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the mites is highly inadequate, with focal hot spots known for Notoedres cati in domestic cats and bobcats. Predisposing genetic and immunological factors are not known, except that co-infection with other parasites and anticoagulant rodenticide toxicoses may contribute to severe disease. Treatment of individual animals is typically successful with macrocytic lactones such as selamectin, but herd or wildlife population treatment has not been undertaken. Transmission requires close contact and typically is within a host species. Notoedric mange can kill half all individuals in a population and regulate host population below non-diseased density for decades, consistent with frequency-dependent transmission or spillover from other hosts. Epidemics are increasingly identified in various hosts, suggesting global change in suitable environmental conditions or increased reporting bias.

  7. Genus four superstring measures

    OpenAIRE

    Cacciatori, Sergio L.; Piazza, Francesco Dalla; van Geemen, Bert

    2008-01-01

    A main issue in superstring theory are the superstring measures. D'Hoker and Phong showed that for genus two these reduce to measures on the moduli space of curves which are determined by modular forms of weight eight and the bosonic measure. They also suggested a generalisation to higher genus. We showed that their approach works, with a minor modification, in genus three and we announced a positive result also in genus four. Here we give the modular form in genus four explicitly. Recently S...

  8. Control of poultry red mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpinen, Ole; Steenberg, Tove

    2008-01-01

    /carriers for various micro-organisms e.g. Salmonella. In SAFEHOUSE, an EU-project running from 2006-2009, partners from 11 European countries aim at developing new methods for prevention and control of Salmonella in egg production systems with particular focus on the transition to enriched cages in the EU. Enriched...... cages contain perches, nest boxes and dust bathing areas. This improves the welfare of the hens but also provides more hiding places for the PRM and may thus lead to increased ectoparasite problems. The approach taken against the PRM is to develop new control methods based on a combination of mite...

  9. Mite allergen extracts and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Iraola, Víctor; Cho, Seong H; Esch, Robert E

    2017-03-01

    To provide physicians, researchers, and other interested health care professionals with information about how mite source materials and allergen extracts are manufactured, including the critical process parameters that can affect the final composition of allergenic extracts available for clinical use. A PubMed search was performed using focused keywords combined with relevant regulatory documents and industry guidelines. The information obtained through literature and specialized books was evaluated and combined with the personal expertise and experience of the authors. Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus are the primary species responsible for allergen sensitizations and allergy symptoms in genetically predisposed individuals. Storage mites belonging to the families Glycyphagidae, Echimyopodidae, and Acaridae can also be relevant sources of indoor mite allergens. The cultivation and purification processes used to produce mite raw materials play a critical role in the final composition of mite allergen extracts. Mite extract standardization in the United States is based on total allergenic activity with respect to a single national standard, whereas in Europe consistency is ensured by in-house standards and international references. Because of the limitation of allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy for patients with severe allergic rhinitis and asthma, house dust mite subcutaneous immunotherapy or sublingual immunotherapy can be an invaluable treatment option for them. Differences in manufacturing processes and extract standardization approaches may lead to differences in extract quality and potency. Physicians should be aware of these potential sources of mite extract variability. Use of well-standardized house dust mite extracts would be critical for success in the diagnosis and treatment of house dust mite allergy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Permanent Ectoparasites; Recent Advances on Biology and Clinical Significance of Demodex Mites: Narrative Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota LITWIN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Demodex is a genus of mites living predominantly in mammalian pilosebaceous units. They are commonly detected in the skin of face, with increasing numbers in inflammatory lesions. Causation between Demodex mites and inflammatory diseases, such as rosacea, blepharitis, perioral and seborrhoeic dermatitis or chalazion, is controversially discussed. Clinical observations indicate a primary form of human Demodex infection. The aim of this review was to highlight the biological aspects of Demodex infestation and point out directions for the future research.Methods: We conducted a broad review based on the electronic database sources such as MEDLINE, PubMed and Scopus with regard to the characteristics of the Demodex species, methods of examination and worldwide epidemiology, molecular studies and its role in the complex human ecosystem.Results: Demodex mites are organisms with a worldwide importance as they act in indicating several dermatoses, under certain conditions. However, correlations between Demodex and other parasites or microorganisms occupying one host, as well as interactions between these arachnids and its symbiotic bacteria should be considered. There are few methods of human mites' examination depending on purpose of the study. Nevertheless, paying attention must be needed as polymorphism of Demodex species has been reported.Conclusion: Overall, the present review will focus on different aspects of Demodex mites’ biology and significance of these arachnids in human’s health.

  11. Phytoseiid mites from tropical fruit trees in Bahia State, Brazil (Acari, Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Izabel Vieira; Sá Argolo, Poliane; Júnior, Manoel Guedes Correa Gondim; de Moraes, Gilberto José; Bittencourt, Maria Aparecida Leão; Oliveira, Anibal Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of tropical fruit trees has grown considerably in the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Some of these have been severely attacked by phytophagous mites, which are usually controlled by the use of chemical pesticides. However, there is today a growing interest for the adoption of less aggressive measures of pest control, as for example the use of predatory mites. Most of the plant-inhabiting predatory mites belong to the family Phytoseiidae. The objective of this paper is to report the phytoseiid species found in an intensive survey conducted on cultivated tropical fruit trees in fifteen localities of the southern coast of Bahia. Measurements of relevant morphological characters are provided for each species, to complement the understanding of the morphological variation of these species. Twenty-nine species of sixteen genera were identified. A key was elaborated to assist in the separation of these species. Fifteen species are reported for the first time in the state, raising to sixty-six the number of species of this family now known from Bahia. Seventy-two percent of the species collected belong to Amblyseiinae, followed by Typhlodrominae (21%) and Phytoseiinae (7%). The most diverse genus was Amblyseius. Amblyseius operculatus De Leon was the most frequent and abundant species. Studies should be conducted to evaluate the possible role of the most common predators as control agents of the phytophagous mites co-occurring with them.

  12. Seasonal exposure to drought and air warming affects soil Collembola and mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Liang Xu

    Full Text Available Global environmental changes affect not only the aboveground but also the belowground components of ecosystems. The effects of seasonal drought and air warming on the genus level richness of Collembola, and on the abundance and biomass of the community of Collembola and mites were studied in an acidic and a calcareous forest soil in a model oak-ecosystem experiment (the Querco experiment at the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL in Birmensdorf. The experiment included four climate treatments: control, drought with a 60% reduction in rainfall, air warming with a seasonal temperature increase of 1.4 °C, and air warming + drought. Soil water content was greatly reduced by drought. Soil surface temperature was slightly increased by both the air warming and the drought treatment. Soil mesofauna samples were taken at the end of the first experimental year. Drought was found to increase the abundance of the microarthropod fauna, but reduce the biomass of the community. The percentage of small mites (body length ≤ 0.20 mm increased, but the percentage of large mites (body length >0.40 mm decreased under drought. Air warming had only minor effects on the fauna. All climate treatments significantly reduced the richness of Collembola and the biomass of Collembola and mites in acidic soil, but not in calcareous soil. Drought appeared to have a negative impact on soil microarthropod fauna, but the effects of climate change on soil fauna may vary with the soil type.

  13. Mange mite infestation in small ruminants in Ethiopia: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmare, Kassahun; Abebe, Rahmeto; Sheferaw, Desie; Krontveit, Randi I; Barbara, Wieland

    2016-03-15

    Mange mites are economically important ectoparasites of sheep and goats responsible for rejection or downgrading of skins in tanneries or leather industries in Ethiopia. The objective of this systematic review was to compute the pooled prevalence estimate and identify factors influencing mange mite prevalence in sheep and goats at national level based on the available research evidence. Articles on mange mite infestation of small ruminants in Ethiopia were searched in PubMed, Web of Science, Google scholar and African journals on-line. The review was based on 18 cross-sectional studies carried out between 2003 and 2015 in four administrative states of Ethiopia. Accordingly, the pooled prevalence estimate in a random effects meta-analysis was estimated to be 4.4% (95% CI 3.0, 6.3) although there were evidence of a substantial amount of between-study variance (I(2)=98.4%). In subgroup and multivariable meta-regression analyses, animal species, agro-ecology and administrative state were found to have significant effect on the prevalence estimate (Pmites of the genus Sarcoptes, Demodex and Psoroptes are the most prevalent mites infesting small ruminants in Ethiopia. Valid studies were lacking from five regional states. As some of these regions are known for their large small ruminant population, further studies are warranted to produce better picture of the infestation at a national level. Meanwhile, the need for monitoring the ongoing control intervention is suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of mites in insect-fungus associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. W. Hofstetter; J. C. Moser

    2014-01-01

    The interactions among insects, mites, and fungi are diverse and complex but poorly understood in most cases. Associations among insects, mites, and fungi span an almost incomprehensible array of ecological interactions and evolutionary histories. Insects and mites often share habitats and resources and thus interact within communities. Many mites and insects rely on...

  15. Oribatid mites as potential vectors for soil microfungi: study of mite-associated fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renker, C; Otto, P; Schneider, K; Zimdars, B; Maraun, M; Buscot, F

    2005-11-01

    The ability of soil-living oribatid mites to disperse fungal propagules on their bodies was investigated. Classical plating methods were applied to cultivate these fungi and to study their morphology. Molecular markers were used for further determination. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer of DNA extracts of the cultured fungi as well as total DNA extracts of the mites themselves, also containing fungal DNA, were amplified and sequenced. Based on phylogenetic analysis, a total of 31 fungal species from major fungal groups were found to be associated with oribatid mites, indicating that mites do not selectively disperse specific species or species groups. The detected taxa were mainly saprobiontic, cosmopolitan (e.g., Alternaria tenuissima), but also parasitic fungi (Beauveria bassiana) for whose dispersal oribatid mites might play an important role. In contrast, no mycorrhizal fungi were detected in association with oribatid mites, indicating that their propagules are dispersed in a different way. In addition, fungi that are known to be a preferred food for oribatid mites such as the Dematiacea were not detected in high numbers. Results of this study point to the potential of oribatid mites to disperse fungal taxa in soil and indicate that co-evolutionary patterns between oribatid mites and their associated fungi might be rare or even missing in most cases, since we only detected ubiquitous taxa attached to the mites.

  16. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...

  17. Comparison of thread-cutting behaviour in three specialist predatory mites to cope with complex webs of Tetranychus spider mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimoda, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Takabayashi, J.; Amano, H.; Dicke, M.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-predator defenses provided by complex webs of Tetranychus mites can severely impede the performance of generalist predatory mites, whereas this may not be true for specialist predatory mites. Although some specialist predatory mites have developed morphological protection to reduce the adverse

  18. Haematophagus Mites in Poultry Farms of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahbari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood sucking mites are important avian ectoparasites which being found on bird species worldwide. Their presence are problematic for the producers either through potential direct effects on weight gain, egg produc­tion, sperm production in roosters or as nuisance pests on worker handle hens and eggs. The aim of this study was pointing out of the status of haematophagus mites.Methods: Eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were visited, monitoring for the presence of chicken mites per­formed by removing and examining debris from poultry house, infested nesting material collected into zip lock plas­tic bags and at least 20 birds were also randomly selected to examine the presence of chicken mites. Mites obtained from each population were mounted in Hoyer,s medium on microscope slides and identified. All eight caged layer and four breeder flocks were inspected, which were infested with chicken blood feeding mites.Results: Massive infestations of Dermanyssus gallinae were common with huge numbers of parasites on birds, cages and the conveyor belts for egg. Only one farm from Mazandaran Province was infested to Ornithonyssus bursa.Conclusion: Dermanyssus gallinae was the most prevalent blood feeder mite in the breeder and caged layer flocks in Iran, while O. bursa was reported as a first record, which found only in a breeder flock in Mazanderan Province. It seems that its presence is limited into the area which affected by both warm and humid environmental conditions.

  19. Heterochromatin and molecular characterization of DsmarMITE transposable element in the beetle Dichotomius schiffleri (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Crislaine; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; de Moura, Rita Cássia

    2014-12-01

    Cytogenetic studies of the Neotropical beetle genus Dichotomius (Scarabaeinae, Coleoptera) have shown dynamism for centromeric constitutive heterochromatin sequences. In the present work we studied the chromosomes and isolated repetitive sequences of Dichotomius schiffleri aiming to contribute to the understanding of coleopteran genome/chromosomal organization. Dichotomius schiffleri presented a conserved karyotype and heterochromatin distribution in comparison to other species of the genus with 2n = 18, biarmed chromosomes, and pericentromeric C-positive blocks. Similarly to heterochromatin distributional patterns, the highly and moderately repetitive DNA fraction (C 0 t-1 DNA) was detected in pericentromeric areas, contrasting with the euchromatic mapping of an isolated TE (named DsmarMITE). After structural analyses, the DsmarMITE was classified as a non-autonomous element of the type miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) with terminal inverted repeats similar to Mariner elements of insects from different orders. The euchromatic distribution for DsmarMITE indicates that it does not play a part in the dynamics of constitutive heterochromatin sequences.

  20. Allergy to house dust mites and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián, Evelyn; Díaz, Ana María

    2004-03-01

    House dust mites have been shown to be important sources of indoor allergens associated with asthma and other allergic conditions. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects millions of people worldwide, and numerous scientific studies have shown that the prevalence of asthma is increasing. The most common dust mite species around the world include Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), Euroglyphus maynei (Em) and Blomia tropicalis (Bt). Over the past three decades, many important allergens from these species have been identified and characterized at the molecular level. The biological function of several house dust mite allergens has been elucidated, with many of them showing enzymatic activity. However, Bt allergens remain the least studied, even though this mite is very common in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, including Puerto Rico. Therefore, it is very important to include Bt in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for house dust mite induced allergy and asthma, particularly in areas where Bt exposure and sensitization is high. Recombinant DNA technology, as well as other molecular biology and immunological techniques, have played a fundamental role in advances towards a better understanding of the biology of house dust mites and their role in allergic diseases. This kind of study also contributes to the understanding of the complex immunologic mechanisms involved in allergic reactions. The development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches depends on the continuity of research of house dust mite allergens. The objectives of this review are to describe the most important aspects of house dust mite allergy and to acquaint the scientific community with the latest findings pertaining to house dust mite allergens, particularly those derived from Bt.

  1. Minimal barcode distance between two water mite species from Madeira Island: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jiménez, Ricardo; Horreo, Jose Luis; Valdecasas, Antonio G

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we compare morphological and molecular data in their ability to distinguish between species of water mites (Acari, Prostigmata, Hydrachnidia). We have focused on the two species of the genus Lebertia inhabiting the island of Madeira. While traditional morphological traits were initially sufficient to distinguish between these two species, the molecular data were more dependable on the kind of analysis carried out. Single arbitrary genetic distance (e.g. a K2P distance below 2%) may lead to the conclusion that the specimens under study belong to the same species. Analysing the same specimens with the coalescent model has proved the evolutionary independence of both Lebertia clades in Madeira. Furthermore, multi-rate Poisson Tree Process analysis confirmed both lineages as independent species. Our results agree with previous studies warning of the dangers of rigid species delimitation based on arbitrary molecular distances. In addition, the importance of different molecular data approaches for correct species delimitation in water mites is highlighted.

  2. Two new species of feather mites (Acarina: Analgoidea) from the Moustached Warbler, Acrocephalus melanopogon (Passeriformes, Acrocephalidae), in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Ioana Cristina; Chişamera, Gabriel; Pocora, Viorel; Stanciu, Cătălin; Adam, Costică

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of feather mites Ingrassiella melanopogoni Constantinescu sp. nov. (Xolalgidae) and Trouessartia mironovi Constantinescu sp. nov. (Trouessartiidae) are described from Acrocephalus melanopogon (Passeriformes: Acrocephalidae) from the South-East of Romania. Ingrassiella melanopogoni differs from all species of the genus by having extensions of the posterolateral angles of the prodorsal shield shorter than in other species and not extending to the hysteronotal shield. Trouessartia mironovi is readily distinguished by having an unique combination of characters within the genus: epimerites I are fused in both sexes and epimerites IVa are highly developed in male (coxal fields IV are almost closed).

  3. Scabies mite, eggs, and stool photomicrograph (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... photomicrograph of a skin scraping that contains a scabies mite, eggs, and feces. This animal burrows into the skin, depositing both eggs and feces. A scabies infestation causes intense itching (pruritus) which leads to ...

  4. [Determination of house dust mites in Eskisehir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Nihal; Aycan, Ozlem Makbule; Miman, Ozlem; Atambay, Metin; Daldal, Nilgün

    2008-01-01

    House dust contains various organic and inorganic materials. The most important parts of the house dust are dust mites causing allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and seasonal keratoconjunctivitis. In this study, a total of 72 random house dust samples collected from various regions of Eskisehir were examined. The dust samples were examined by the lactic acid precipitation method which was modified from the Spieksma-Boezaman's method. The mite positive house dust rate was 16.67% including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Chortoglyphus arcuatus and Tyrophagus sp. It was concluded that investigation of a greater number of samples would lead to more precise rate of detection of mite positive dust and also that more mite species would be found.

  5. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic...... consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search...... in the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention measures...

  6. The role of mites in insect-fungus associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, R W; Moser, J C

    2014-01-01

    The interactions among insects, mites, and fungi are diverse and complex but poorly understood in most cases. Associations among insects, mites, and fungi span an almost incomprehensible array of ecological interactions and evolutionary histories. Insects and mites often share habitats and resources and thus interact within communities. Many mites and insects rely on fungi for nutrients, and fungi benefit from them with regard to spore dispersal, habitat provision, or nutrient resources. Mites have important impacts on community dynamics, ecosystem processes, and biodiversity within many insect-fungus systems. Given that mites are understudied but highly abundant, they likely have bigger, more important, and more widespread impacts on communities than previously recognized. We describe mutualistic and antagonistic effects of mites on insect-fungus associations, explore the processes that underpin ecological and evolutionary patterns of these multipartite communities, review well-researched examples of the effects of mites on insect-fungus associations, and discuss approaches for studying mites within insect-fungus communities.

  7. [House dust mites at Icelandic farms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Sigurdarson, Sigurdur Thór; Tómasson, Kristinn; Gíslason, Davíd; Hallas, Thorkill

    2008-11-01

    Sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus) occurs in 9% of the Reykjavik population, despite the fact that no Der p 1 antigen has been found in the area. A recent study revealed that sensitized persons more often had a childhood history of work or holiday stay in rural areas than controls. As a follow up we studied the risk of exposure to mites in farmland dwellings. In a survey of work-related lung disorders among farmers in the south and west of Iceland, 80 samples of house dust, representing 42 farms, were collected from bedroom mattresses and the floors in living rooms and examined for mites. Treatment of samples was identical with the method used earlier in the Reykjavik investigation (ECRHS II). In contrast to the Reykjavik results, dust from farm dwellings showed a large diversity of mites. Seventeen taxons were found, with Acarus siro and D. pteronyssinus in 13 and 8 farms respectively, but the samples did not show signs that any of the taxons actually had lived or reproduced where they were collected. The finding of D. pteronyssinus in farmland dwellings provides a possible explanation of why some Reykjavik citizens might have developed sensitization to this mite, even though cross sensitization to other species of mites could give a false positive reaction to D. pteronyssinus in at least some of those cases. Our observations did not support the idea that the mites were living in the dwellings and an explanation for their occurrence must be sought in the outdoor environment.

  8. Genotypic variability and relationships between mite infestation levels, mite damage, grooming intensity, and removal of Varroa destructor mites in selected strains of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Emsen, Berna; Unger, Peter; Espinosa-Montaño, Laura G; Petukhova, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate genotypic variability and analyze the relationships between the infestation levels of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, the rate of damage of fallen mites, and the intensity with which bees of different genotypes groom themselves to remove mites from their bodies. Sets of paired genotypes that are presumably susceptible and resistant to the varroa mite were compared at the colony level for number of mites falling on sticky papers and for proportion of damaged mites. They were also compared at the individual level for intensity of grooming and mite removal success. Bees from the "resistant" colonies had lower mite population rates (up to 15 fold) and higher percentages of damaged mites (up to 9 fold) than bees from the "susceptible" genotypes. At the individual level, bees from the "resistant" genotypes performed significantly more instances of intense grooming (up to 4 fold), and a significantly higher number of mites were dislodged from the bees' bodies by intense grooming than by light grooming (up to 7 fold) in all genotypes. The odds of mite removal were high and significant for all "resistant" genotypes when compared with the "susceptible" genotypes. The results of this study strongly suggest that grooming behavior and the intensity with which bees perform it, is an important component in the resistance of some honey bee genotypes to the growth of varroa mite populations. The implications of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The genus Bipolaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamgoda, D S; Rossman, A Y; Castlebury, L A; Crous, P W; Madrid, H; Chukeatirote, E; Hyde, K D

    2014-09-01

    The genus Bipolaris includes important plant pathogens with worldwide distribution. Species recognition in the genus has been uncertain due to the lack of molecular data from ex-type cultures as well as overlapping morphological characteristics. In this study, we revise the genus Bipolaris based on DNA sequence data derived from living cultures of fresh isolates, available ex-type cultures from worldwide collections and observation of type and additional specimens. Combined analyses of ITS, GPDH and TEF gene sequences were used to reconstruct the molecular phylogeny of the genus Bipolaris for species with living cultures. The GPDH gene is determined to be the best single marker for species of Bipolaris. Generic boundaries between Bipolaris and Curvularia are revised and presented in an updated combined ITS and GPDH phylogenetic tree. We accept 47 species in the genus Bipolaris and clarify the taxonomy, host associations, geographic distributions and species' synonymies. Modern descriptions and illustrations are provided for 38 species in the genus with notes provided for the other taxa when recent descriptions are available. Bipolaris cynodontis, B. oryzae, B. victoriae, B. yamadae and B. zeicola are epi- or neotypified and a lectotype is designated for B. stenospila. Excluded and doubtful species are listed with notes on taxonomy and phylogeny. Seven new combinations are introduced in the genus Curvularia to accomodate the species of Bipolaris transferred based on the phylogenetic analysis. A taxonomic key is provided for the morphological identification of species within the genus.

  10. Life cycle and reproduction of house-dust mites: environmental factors influencing mite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, B J

    1998-01-01

    An understanding of the life cycle of house-dust mites, as well as environmental factors influencing mite populations, can be exploited in mite control. The most important limiting factor for house-dust-mite populations is air humidity. House-dust mites osmoregulate through the cuticle and therefore require a high ambient air humidity to prevent excessive water loss. In addition, the supracoxal glands actively take up ambient water vapour, and the protonynph stage of the life cycle is resistant to desiccation. Larger house-dust-mite populations are found when the absolute indoor air humidity is above 7 g/kg (45% relative humidity at 20 degrees C). Consequently, ventilation by air-conditioning systems is being developed as a means of control. A number of other aspects of the domestic environment are also being manipulated in an integrated approach to render the habitat less suitable for mites. The potential exists for developing models for house-dust mite populations, environmental characteristics, and the effects of various approaches to control.

  11. Salivary proteins of spider mites suppress defenses in Nicotiana benthamiana and promote mite reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarroel, C.A.; Jonckheere, W.; Alba Cano, J.M.; Glas, J.J.; Dermauw, W.; Haring, M.A.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Schuurink, R.C.; Kant, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Spider mites (Tetranychidae sp.) are widely occurring arthropod pests on cultivated plants. Feeding by the two-spotted spider mite T. urticae, a generalist herbivore, induces a defense response in plants that mainly depends on the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA). On tomato

  12. Characterization of a new high copy Stowaway family MITE, BRAMI-1 in Brassica genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are expected to play important roles in evolution of genes and genome in plants, especially in the highly duplicated plant genomes. Various MITE families and their roles in plants have been characterized. However, there have been fewer studies of MITE families and their potential roles in evolution of the recently triplicated Brassica genome. Results We identified a new MITE family, BRAMI-1, belonging to the Stowaway super-family in the Brassica genome. In silico mapping revealed that 697 members are dispersed throughout the euchromatic regions of the B. rapa pseudo-chromosomes. Among them, 548 members (78.6%) are located in gene-rich regions, less than 3 kb from genes. In addition, we identified 516 and 15 members in the 470 Mb and 15 Mb genomic shotgun sequences currently available for B. oleracea and B. napus, respectively. The resulting estimated copy numbers for the entire genomes were 1440, 1464 and 2490 in B. rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus, respectively. Concurrently, only 70 members of the related Arabidopsis ATTIRTA-1 MITE family were identified in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BRAMI-1 elements proliferated in the Brassica genus after divergence from the Arabidopsis lineage. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) was inspected for 50 BRAMI-1 members, revealing high levels of insertion polymorphism between and within species of Brassica that clarify BRAMI-1 activation periods up to the present. Comparative analysis of the 71 genes harbouring the BRAMI-1 elements with their non-insertion paralogs (NIPs) showed that the BRAMI-1 insertions mainly reside in non-coding sequences and that the expression levels of genes with the elements differ from those of their NIPs. Conclusion A Stowaway family MITE, named as BRAMI-1, was gradually amplified and remained present in over than 1400 copies in each of three Brassica species. Overall, 78% of the members were identified in

  13. Contribution to the knowledge of the oribatid mite family Nesozetidae (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Hugo-Coetzee, Elizabeth A; Theron, Pieter D; Behan-Pelletier, Valerie M

    2017-11-29

    A new oribatid mite species of the genus Nesozetes (Oribatida, Nesozetidae) is described from moss (Sphagnum sp.) on the seepage area below a permanent spring in South Africa. Nesozetes membranus sp. nov. differs from its only congener, Nesozetes rostropterus, described from Fiji, by the presence of a second pair of membranes located in the podosomal region, setiform bothridial setae and striate subcapitular mentum. A revised diagnosis of Nesozetidae, discussion on its taxonomic status, and information on distribution and ecology of Nesozetes species are given.

  14. New species and records of ptyctimous mites (Acari, Oribatida) from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbała, Wojciech; Ermilov, Sergey G

    2017-02-09

    A list of identified oribatid ptyctimous mites from the Philippine Islands Luzon, Mindanao, Polillo and Samar Islands, including 16 species, 10 genera and 5 families, is provided. The genus Mesotritia and species Atropacarus (Atropacarus) griseus (Niedbała, 1984), A. (Atropacarus) striculus (C. L. Koch, 1835) and A. (Hoplophorella) stilifer (Hammer, 1961) are recorded for the Philippine fauna for the first time. Two new species, Mesotritia paraflagelliformis Niedbała sp. nov. (Oribotritiidae) and Plonaphacarus leonilae Niedbała sp. nov. (Steganacaridae), are described from leaf litter. The supplementary descriptions of Oribotritia aokii Mahunka, 1987 and Hoplophthiracarus illinoisensis (Ewing, 1909) are presented based on the materials from the Philippines.

  15. Two new oribatid mite species with auriculate pteromorphs from Southern Vietnam (Acari: Oribatida: Parakalummidae, Galumnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermilov, S.G.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new oribatid mite species, Neoribates spindleformis sp. nov. and Globogalumna biporosa sp. nov. are described from soil and litter of pine and acacias artificial plantations of Dong Nai Culture and Nature Reserve (Southern Vietnam. First new species is differs from all other species of Neoribates by combination of the following characters; mor¬phology of sensilli, number of leg claws and genital setae. Second new species differs from type-species of Globogalumna by the body surface and number of notogastral porose areas. The genus Globogalumna is recorded for the first time from the Oriental region.

  16. Minimal genus one curves

    OpenAIRE

    Sadek, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we consider genus one equations of degree $n$, namely a (generalised) binary quartic when $n=2$, a ternary cubic when $n=3$, and a pair of quaternary quadrics when $n=4$. A new definition for the minimality of genus one equations of degree $n$ over local fields is introduced. The advantage of this definition is that it does not depend on invariant theory of genus one curves. We prove that this definition coincides with the classical definition of minimality for all $n\\le4$. As a...

  17. Mite (Acari) fauna of some cultivated plants from Kahramanmaras ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytophagous mites, Tetranychus turkestani (Ugarov and Nikolski) and Tetranychus cinnabarinus Boisduval, were obtained from eggplant, bean, and cucumber. Predatory mites Phytoseius finitimus Ribaga and Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) were identified from eggplant and cucumber, respectively.

  18. Ecological correlates of feather mite prevalence in passerines

    OpenAIRE

    Figuerola, Jordi

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between host ecology and feather mite prevalence was analysed in birds. Feather mites are small arthropods (fam. Pterolichoidea and Analgoidea) commonly found on birds, although the nature of their interactions with the host (commensalism, mutualism or parasitism), still remains unclear. Host body mass and migratory behaviour were unrelated to feather mite prevalence. Contrary to expecta- tion, there was no differences in mite prevalence between colonial and so...

  19. The genus Baijiania (Cucurbitaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.; Duyfjes, B.E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The genus Baijiania, originally thought to be indigenous in China and Borneo, appears to be restricted to Borneo. The only species is Baijiania borneensis, with two varieties, the type variety and var. paludicola Duyfjes, var. nov.

  20. Acaricides and predatory mites against the begonia mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae), on Hedera helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenaert, Joachim; Vissers, Marc; Haleydt, Bart; Verhoeven, Ruth; Goossens, Frans; Gobin, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the begonia mite (Polyphagotarsonemus lotus) has become an important threat to different ornamental cultures in warm greenhouses. At present there are no professional plant protection products registered in Belgium for the control of mites of the Tarsonemidae family. In a screening trial, we evaluated the efficacy of a range of different acaricides: abamectin, milbemectin, pyridaben, spirodiclofen. Based on the results of the screening trial several products were selected for a full efficacy trial following EPPO guidelines. The best control results were obtained with two products from the avermectine group: abamectin and milbemectin. As growers currently have to rely solely on the use of natural enemies there is a strong need for practical evaluation of efficacies of the various predatory mite species (Amblyseius swirskii, A. cucumeris, A. andersoni) used in biological mite control. In a series of experiments, we screened the use of different species of predatory mites. The first efficacy trials on heavily infested plants at different rates of dosage and under different circumstances (temperature, dose rate, application technique) were started in May 2008. In these experiments Amblyseius swirskii showed good efficacy. But temperature was the limiting factor: the predatory mite needed a minimal temperature of 18 degrees C to obtain good results. Further research is necessary to search for predatory mites that can be used in winter conditions (lower temperatures, less light).

  1. Infection of army ant pupae by two new parasitoid mites (Mesostigmata: Uropodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Brückner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of parasites and parasitoids exploit ant societies. Among them are the Mesostigmata mites, a particularly common and diverse group of ant-associated arthropods. While parasitism is ubiquitous in Mesostigmata, parasitoidism has only been described in the genus Macrodinychus. Yet information about the basic biology of most Macrodinychus species is lacking. Out of 24 formally described species, information about basic life-history traits is only available for three species. Here we formally describe two new Macrodinychus species, i.e. Macrodinychus hilpertae and Macrodinychus derbyensis. In both species, immature stages developed as ecto-parasitoids on ant pupae of the South-East Asian army ant Leptogenys distinguenda. By piercing the developing ant with their chelicera, the mites apparently suck ant hemolymph, ultimately killing host individuals. We compare infection rates among all studied Macrodinychus species and discuss possible host countermeasures against parasitoidism. The cryptic lifestyle of living inside ant nests has certainly hampered the scientific discovery of Macrodinychus mites and we expect that many more macrodinychid species await scientific discovery and description.

  2. Mites associated with bark beetles and their hyperphoretic ophiostomatoid fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hofstetter; John Moser; Stacy Blomquist

    2014-01-01

    The role that mites play in many ecosystems is often overlooked or ignored. Within bark beetle habitats, more than 100 mite species exist and they have important impacts on community dynamics, ecosystem processes, and biodiversity of bark beetle systems. Mites use bark beetles to access and disperse among beetle-infested trees and the associations may range from...

  3. House dust mites in Brazil - an annotated bibliography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binotti Raquel S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available House dust mites have been reported to be the most important allergen in human dwellings. Several articles had already shown the presence of different mite species at homes in Brazil, being Pyroglyphidae, Glycyphagidae and Cheyletidae the most important families found. This paper is an annotated bibliography that will lead to a better knowledge of house dust mite fauna in Brazil.

  4. Limiting factors for growth and development of domestic mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynden, A.M.T. van; Kort, H.S.M.; Koren, L.G.H.; Pernot, C.E.E.; Bronswijk, J.E.M.H. van

    1996-01-01

    A quarter to half of European households are at risk of health damage due to mites in their home. House dust mites (family Pyroglyphidae) and storage mites (families Acaridae and Gly-cyphagidae) are present; both groups being specific for different ecosystems: house-dust ecosystem of textiles

  5. Does the removal of mite-infested brood facilitate grooming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between the removal of mite-infested brood and mite drop was compared using Russian (RHB, n = 9) and Italian (IHB, n = 9) honey bee colonies. A cloake board was used to isolate test brood frame on the top hive body and the metal sheet served as a varroa trap. Inoculum mites were col...

  6. P-MITE: a database for plant miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiongjiong; Hu, Qun; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Chen; Kuang, Hanhui

    2013-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are prevalent in eukaryotic species including plants. MITE families vary dramatically and usually cannot be identified based on homology. In this study, we de novo identified MITEs from 41 plant species, using computer programs MITE Digger, MITE-Hunter and/or Repetitive Sequence with Precise Boundaries (RSPB). MITEs were found in all, but one (Cyanidioschyzon merolae), species. Combined with the MITEs identified previously from the rice ...

  7. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the storage mite pest Tyrophagus longior (Gervais) (Acari: Acaridae) and comparative mitogenomic analysis of four acarid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Banghe; Li, Chaopin

    2016-02-01

    Mites of the genus Tyrophagus are economically important polyphagous pest commonly living on stored products and also responsible for allergic reactions to humans. Complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) and the gene features therein are widely used as molecular markers in the study of population genetics, phylogenetics as well as molecular evolution. However, scarcity on the sequence data has greatly impeded the studies in these areas pertaining to the Acari (mites and ticks). Information on the Tyrophagus mitogenomes is quite critical for phylogenetic evaluation and molecular evolution of the mitogenomes within Acariformes. Herein, we reported the complete mitogenome of the allergenic acarid storage mite Tyrophagus longior (Astigmata: Acaridae), an important member of stored food pests, and compared with those of other three acarid mites. The complete mitogenome of T. longior was a circular molecule of 13,271 bp. Unexpectedly, only 19 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs) were present, lacking trnF, trnS1 and trnQ. Furthermore, it also contained 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 2 genes for rRNA (rrnS and rrnL) commonly detected in metazoans. The four mitogenomes displayed similar characteristics with respect to the gene content, nucleotide comparison, and codon usages. Yet, the gene order of T. longior was different from that in other Acari. The J-strands of the four mitogenomes possessed high A+T content (67.4-70.0%), and exhibited positive GC-skews and negative AT-skews. Most inferred tRNAs of T. longior were extremely truncated, lacking either a D- or T-arm, as found in other acarid mites. In T. longior mitogenome the A+T-rich region was just 50 bp in length and can be folded as a stable stem-loop structure, whereas in the region some structures of microsatellite-like (AT)n and palindromic sequences was not present. Besides, reconstructing of the phylogenetic relationship based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 13 PCGs supported that monophyly of the family

  8. Do mites phoretic on elm bark beetles contribute to the transmission of Dutch elm disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, John C.; Konrad, Heino; Blomquist, Stacy R.; Kirisits, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED) is a destructive vascular wilt disease of elm ( Ulmus) trees caused by the introduced Ascomycete fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. In Europe, this DED pathogen is transmitted by elm bark beetles in the genus Scolytus. These insects carry phoretic mites to new, suitable habitats. The aim of this study was to record and quantify conidia and ascospores of O. novo-ulmi on phoretic mites on the three elm bark beetle species Scolytus multistriatus, Scolytus pygmaeus, and Scolytus scolytus. Spores of O. novo-ulmi were found on four of the ten mite species phoretic on Scolytus spp. These included Elattoma fraxini, Proctolaelaps scolyti, Pseudotarsonemoides eccoptogasteri, and Tarsonemus crassus. All four species had spores attached externally to their body surfaces. However, T. crassus carried most spores within its sporothecae, two paired pocket-like structures adapted for fungal transmission. Individuals of Pr. scolyti also had O. novo-ulmi conidia and ascospores frequently in their digestive system, where they may remain viable. While E. fraxini and P. eccoptogasteri rarely had spores attached to their bodies, large portions of Pr. scolyti and T. crassus carried significant numbers of conidia and/or ascospores of O. novo-ulmi. P. scolyti and T. crassus, which likely are fungivores, may thus contribute to the transmission of O. novo-ulmi, by increasing the spore loads of individual Scolytus beetles during their maturation feeding on twigs of healthy elm trees, enhancing the chance for successful infection with the pathogen. Only S. scolytus, which is the most efficient vector of O. novo-ulmi in Europe, carried high numbers of Pr. scolyti and T. crassus, in contrast to S. multistriatus and S. pygmaeus, which are known as less efficient vectors. The high efficiency of S. scolytus in spreading Dutch elm disease may be partly due to its association with these two mites and the hyperphoretic spores of O. novo-ulmi they carry.

  9. Mites in cat ears: a source of cross antigenicity with house dust mites. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, A D; Gaillard, G E

    1981-06-01

    Dermatophagoides had been established as an antigen in house dust by many investigators. An untapped source of cross antigenicity is presented in this paper, namely, Otodectes cyanotis, the mite found in the ears of millions of cats. House dust samples for mite species in other parts of the world may not be similar to samples in the United States since in most other countries the cat exists outdoors, whereas in this country it is a household pet.

  10. Cassava green mite intervention technologies | Yaninek | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar) (Acari: Tetranychidae), became a conspicuous pest of cassava soon after its accidental introduction into Africa in the early 1970s. It has since spread across the entire cassava belt of the continent causing an estimated 30 to 80 percent reduction in yield and ...

  11. Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, D S; Otman, F; Lundqvist, L; Höglund, J; Engström, A; Chirico, J

    2014-12-01

    Haematophagous mites were collected from the vent region and plumage of chickens in six hobby flocks of ornamental breeds in Sweden, one of which included turkeys. Soiled vent skin and feathers, dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, skin necroses and ulcers were observed in 12 necropsied birds from two of the flocks. The mites were identified as the northern fowl mite Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Mesostigmata: Macronyssidae). This was supported by sequence analysis of a 642-bp region in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene (COI) in mites collected from five flocks, which showed 97-99% sequence similarity to O. sylviarum by blast analysis. Pairwise sequence comparisons revealed nucleotide variations in the range of 0-2.8%, whereas amino acid sequences were highly conserved. This paper represents one of very few records of O. sylviarum in European poultry, and is the first to report COI sequence data for O. sylviarum from poultry in Europe. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  12. Tyrophagus putrescentiae mites grown in dog food cultures and the effect mould growth has on mite survival and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Michael S; Wrenn, William J

    2010-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's((R)) yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae.

  13. New records of mites (Acari: Spinturnicidae) associated with bats (Mammalia, Chiroptera) in two Brazilian biomes: Pantanal and Caatinga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Juliana Cardoso; Martins, Mayara Almeida; Guedes, Patrícia Gonçalves; Peracchi, Adriano Lucio; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maues

    2016-01-01

    A first survey of mite species that ectoparasitize bats in the states of Ceará and Mato Grosso was conducted. The specimens of bats and their mites were collected in areas of the Caatinga and Pantanal biomes. A total of 450 spinturnicids representing two genera and ten species was collected from 15 bat species in the Private Reserve of the Natural Patrimony Serra das Almas, Ceará State, Northeast Brazil and 138 spinturnicids represented by two genera and four species were found in seven bats species collected in Private Reserve of the Natural Patrimony Sesc Pantanal, Mato Grosso State, Central-Western Brazil. The occurrence of Cameronieta genus and the species Mesoperiglischrus natali as well as four new associations (Periglischrus iheringi - Chiroderma vizottoi; P. micronycteridis - Micronycteris sanborni; P. paracutisternus - Trachops cirrhosus; Spinturnix americanus - Myotis riparius) are registered for the first time in Brazil.

  14. Provisional checklist of the astigmatic mites of the netherlands (acari: oribatida: astigmatina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siepel, H.; Cremers, H.; Vierbergen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Astigmatic mites probably form the most diverse cohort of mites. At present the
    former order of Astigmatina is ranked within the suborder Oribatida or moss mites.
    However astigmatic mites occupy a much wider range of habitats than other oribatid
    mites: from marine coasts to stored food,

  15. P-MITE: a database for plant miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiongjiong; Hu, Qun; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Chen; Kuang, Hanhui

    2014-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are prevalent in eukaryotic species including plants. MITE families vary dramatically and usually cannot be identified based on homology. In this study, we de novo identified MITEs from 41 plant species, using computer programs MITE Digger, MITE-Hunter and/or Repetitive Sequence with Precise Boundaries (RSPB). MITEs were found in all, but one (Cyanidioschyzon merolae), species. Combined with the MITEs identified previously from the rice genome, >2.3 million sequences from 3527 MITE families were obtained from 41 plant species. In general, higher plants contain more MITEs than lower plants, with a few exceptions such as papaya, with only 538 elements. The largest number of MITEs is found in apple, with 237 302 MITE sequences. The number of MITE sequences in a genome is significantly correlated with genome size. A series of databases (plant MITE databases, P-MITE), available online at http://pmite.hzau.edu.cn/django/mite/, was constructed to host all MITE sequences from the 41 plant genomes. The databases are available for sequence similarity searches (BLASTN), and MITE sequences can be downloaded by family or by genome. The databases can be used to study the origin and amplification of MITEs, MITE-derived small RNAs and roles of MITEs on gene and genome evolution.

  16. The cyanobacterial genus Macrospermum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2008), s. 79-86 ISSN 1802-5439 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : cyanobacteria * taxonomy * pantropical genus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  17. Genus I. Leptospira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptospira comprise a diverse group of bacteria. Some species cause serious infections in animals and humans. These bacteria are aerobes that consume long-chain fatty acids and alcohols as carbon and energy sources. This genus is distinguished from Leptonema or Turneriella by lack of similarity u...

  18. The genus Lagenophora (Compositae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, Angel L.

    1966-01-01

    The genus Lagenophora was first described by Cassini under the name Lagenifera (in Bull. Soc. Philomat. 12, 1816, 199) with the following diagnosis: ‘Ce genre, de la tribus des astérées, comprend le calendula magellanicá, Willd. et le bellis stipitata, Labill. Son principal caractère reside dans la

  19. The amphipod genus Acidostoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahl, E.

    1964-01-01

    The genus Acidostoma was established by Lilljeborg (1865, p. 24) to receive Anonyx obesus Sp. Bate (1862, p. 74). Afterwards two further species have been added, viz. A. laticorne G. O. Sars (1879, p. 440) and A. nodiferum Stephensen (1923, p. 40). In the present paper it will be shown that A.

  20. Pyroglyphid mites as a source of work-related allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macan, Jelena; Kanceljak-Macan, Božica; Milković-Kraus, Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Pyroglyphid mites are primarily associated with allergen exposure at home; hence the name house dust mites. However, we have found numerous studies reporting pyroglyhid mite levels in public and occupational settings. This review presents the findings of house dust mite allergens (family Pyroglyphidae, species Dermatophagoides) as potential work-related risk factors and proposes occupations at risk of house dust mite-related diseases. Pyroglyphid mites or their allergens are found in various workplaces, but clinically relevant exposures have been observed in hotels, cinemas, schools, day-care centres, libraries, public transportation (buses, trains, taxies, and airplanes), fishing-boats, submarines, poultry farms, and churches. Here we propose a classification of occupational risk as low (occasional exposure to mite allergen levels up to 2 μg g(-1)), moderate (exposure between 2 μg g(-1) and 10 μg g(-1)), and high (exposure >10 μg g(-1)). The classification of risk should include factors relevant for indoor mite population (climate, building characteristics, and cleaning schedule). To avoid development or aggravation of allergies associated with exposure to house dust mites at work, occupational physicians should assess exposure risk at work, propose proper protection, provide vocational guidance to persons at risk and conduct pre-employment and periodic examinations to diagnose new allergy cases. Protection at work should aim to control dust mite levels at work. Measures may include proper interior design and regular cleaning and building maintenance.

  1. Molecular, Structural and Immunological Characterization of Der p 18, a Chitinase-Like House Dust Mite Allergen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Resch

    Full Text Available The house dust mite (HDM allergen Der p 18 belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinases. The relevance of Der p 18 for house dust mite allergic patients has only been partly investigated.To perform a detailed characterization of Der p 18 on a molecular, structural and immunological level.Der p 18 was expressed in E. coli, purified to homogeneity, tested for chitin-binding activity and its secondary structure was analyzed by circular dichroism. Der p 18-specific IgG antibodies were produced in rabbits to localize the allergen in mites using immunogold electron microscopy and to search for cross-reactive allergens in other allergen sources (i.e. mites, crustacea, mollusca and insects. IgE reactivity of rDer p 18 was tested with sera from clinically well characterized HDM-allergic patients (n = 98 and its allergenic activity was analyzed in basophil activation experiments.Recombinant Der p 18 was expressed and purified as a folded, biologically active protein. It shows weak chitin-binding activity and partial cross-reactivity with Der f 18 from D. farinae but not with proteins from the other tested allergen sources. The allergen was mainly localized in the peritrophic matrix of the HDM gut and to a lower extent in fecal pellets. Der p 18 reacted with IgE from 10% of mite allergic patients from Austria and showed allergenic activity when tested for basophil activation in Der p 18-sensitized patients.Der p 18 is a rather genus-specific minor allergen with weak chitin-binding activity but exhibits allergenic activity and therefore should be included in diagnostic test panels for HDM allergy.

  2. Genus g temperature string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.; Sen, S.

    1989-01-01

    The geometric approach to bosonic temperature string theory for genus g is formulated in the operator approach of Vafa. It is shown that the Hagedorn temperature exists for all genus g and a conjectured genus g expression for superstring theories with temperature is constructed. (orig.)

  3. Acarine ectoparasites of Panti Forest Reserve in Johore, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, A; Mohd, Kulaimi B; Halimaton, I; Suhaili, Z A; Shahrul-Anuar, M S; Nor, Zalipah M; Ho, T M

    2011-01-01

    To identify the presence of acarine ectoparasites and determine whether there is any potential public health risk in Panti Forest Reserve, Johore, Malaysia. Trapping of animals and avifauna was conducted simultaneously along 5 expedition trails using 150 wire traps, 10 harp traps and 30 mist nets for 6 consecutive nights. A total of 140 animals consisting of 7 species of birds, 19 species of bats, 6 species of rodents and 1 species of tree-shrew as well as 8 myriapods were examined. Infestation rates of ticks, mesostigmatid mites and chiggers on animals examined were 24.3%, 28.6% and 27.9%, respectively. Infestation on bats was low (1.5%) and none occurred on birds. Majority of ticks extracted were at immature stages (78.9%). Genera of ticks on animals were Amblyomma, Dermacentor, Haemaphysalis and Ixodes. Ixodes granulatus was the only species of ticks identified from the animals. Examination of ticks under vegetation revealed 54% adults leading to identification of 3 species of ticks. A total of 7 species of mesostigmatid mites were found. 6 species were on rodent, Maxomys surifer and another one species, Laelaps nuttalli was found only on Leopoldamys sabanus. Laelaps sanguisugus was the only mesostigmatid found infesting tree-shrews. Seven genera of chiggers were identified. From this, 5 genera were on rodents, 4 genera on tree-shrews and 1 genus on a bat. A total of 16 genera, 2 sub-genus and 14 species of acarine ectoparasites were found in this area. Findings of the survey demonstrate the presence of three spesies of acarine ectoparasites which have potential health risk i.e. Ixodes granulatus, Laelaps nuttalli and Leptotrombidium deliense.

  4. Quantitation of house dust mites and house dust mite allergens in the microenvironment of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Amy; Hillier, Andrew; Cole, Lynette K; Kwochka, Kenneth W; Needham, Glen; Wassom, Donald L

    2003-10-01

    To quantitate the density of Dermatophagoides farinae and D pteronyssinus and concentrations of house dust mite (HDM) allergens (Der f 1, Der p 1, and Group 2 allergens) in the indoor microenvironment of dogs. Sample Population-50 homes in Columbus, Ohio. n each home, samples of dust were collected from 3 locations in which dogs spent most time. Whenever possible, the species of mites collected was identified. Mite density (mites/g of dust) was assessed, and allergen concentrations were assayed by standardized ELISAs. Relative humidity and temperature in each home were monitored during a 5-day period. Characteristics of homes and sample sources were evaluated. Dust samples from all 50 homes contained > or = 1 HDM allergen; Der f 1 and Der p 1 were detected in 100 and 74% of homes, respectively. Fifteen homes had HDMs; compared with D pteronyssinus, D farinae was found more commonly (14/15 homes) and at a higher density. Basements, homes without central air-conditioning, and dog beds that were > or = 1 year old had high HDM allergen concentrations. Homes with > or = 2 microg of Der f 1 or Group 2 allergens/g of dust or > or = 100 mites/g of dust were significantly more likely to have a maximum relative humidity > or = 75%. Results indicate the presence of HDMs and HDM allergens in the specific microenvironment of dogs in homes. Factors associated with high levels of exposure were identified, which may be associated with increased risk for sensitization and development of atopic diseases.

  5. Remote sensing of spider mite damage in California peach orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeling, Eike; Hale, Adam; Zhang, Minghua; Bentley, Walter J.; Dharmasri, L. Cecil

    2009-08-01

    Remote sensing techniques can decrease pest monitoring costs in orchards. To evaluate the feasibility of detecting spider mite damage in orchards, we measured visible and near infrared reflectance of 1153 leaves and 392 canopies in 11 peach orchards in California. Pairs of significant wavelengths, identified by Partial Least Squares regression, were combined into normalized difference indices. These and 9 previously published indices were evaluated for correlation with mite damage. Eight spectral regions for leaves and two regions for canopies (at blue and red wavelengths) were significantly correlated with mite damage. These findings were tested by calculating normalized difference indices from the Red and Blue bands of six multispectral aerial images. Index values were linearly correlated with mite damage ( R2 = 0.47), allowing identification of mite hotspots in orchards. However, better standardization of aerial imagery and accounting for perturbing environmental factors will be necessary for making this technique applicable for early mite detection.

  6. Relationship between the ability to penetrate complex webs of Tetranychus spider mites and the ability of thread-cutting behavior in phytoseiid predatory mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimoda, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Takabayashi, J.; Amano, H.; Dicke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Predatory mites, that are important natural enemies of Tetranychus spider mites, are less hindered by complex webs of the spider mites than are other predatory mites that are natural enemies of other pest herbivores. This can be partly explained by their chaetotaxy, a morphological protection

  7. Health effects of predatory beneficial mites and wasps in greenhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper; Enkegaard, Annie; Doekes, Gert

    A three-year study of 579 greenhouse workers in 31 firms investigated the effect of four different beneficial arthropods. It was shown that the thrips mite Amblyseeius cucumeris and the spider mite predator Phytoseiulus persimilis may cause allergy measured by blood tests as well as eye and nose...... symptoms. No effect was seen by the predator wasp Aphidius colemani nor the predator mite Hypoaspis miles and no effect on lung diseases were seen....

  8. What is the genus?

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu-Pampu, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Exploring several of the evolutionary branches of the mathematical notion of genus, this book traces the idea from its prehistory in problems of integration, through algebraic curves and their associated Riemann surfaces, into algebraic surfaces, and finally into higher dimensions. Its importance in analysis, algebraic geometry, number theory and topology is emphasized through many theorems. Almost every chapter is organized around excerpts from a research paper in which a new perspective was brought on the genus or on one of the objects to which this notion applies. The author was motivated by the belief that a subject may best be understood and communicated by studying its broad lines of development, feeling the way one arrives at the definitions of its fundamental notions, and appreciating the amount of effort spent in order to explore its phenomena.

  9. Spiky higher genus strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Bellini, A.; Johnston, D.

    1990-10-01

    It is clear from both the non-perturbative and perturbative approaches to two-dimensional quantum gravity that a new strong coupling regime is setting in at d=1, independent of the genus of the worldsheet being considered. It has been suggested that a Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase transition in the Liouville theory is the cause of this behaviour. However, it has recently been pointed out that the XY model, which displays a KT transition on the plane and the sphere, is always in the strong coupling, disordered phase on a surface of constant negative curvature. A higher genus worldsheet can be represented as a fundamental region on just such a surface, which might seem to suggest that the KT picture predicts a strong coupling region for arbitrary d, contradicting the known results. We resolve the apparent paradox. (orig.)

  10. Spiky higher genus strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjorn, J.; Bellini, A.; Johnston, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that it is clear from both the non-perturbative and perturbative approaches to two-dimensional quantum gravity that a new strong coupling regime is setting in at d = 1, independent of the genus of the worldsheet being considered. It has been suggested that a Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase transition in the Liouville theory is the cause of this behavior. However, it has recently been pointed out that the XY-model, which displays a KT transition on the plane and the sphere, is always in the strong coupling, disordered phase on a surface of constant negative curvature. A higher genus worldsheet can be represented as a fundamental region on just such a surface, which might seem to suggest that the KT picture predicts a strong coupling region for arbitrary d, contradicting the known results. The authors resolve the apparent paradox

  11. Draft genome of the scabies mite

    OpenAIRE

    Rider, S. Dean; Morgan, Marjorie S.; Arlian, Larry G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The disease scabies, caused by the ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei, causes significant morbidity in humans and other mammals worldwide. However, there is limited data available regarding the molecular basis of host specificity and host-parasite interactions. Therefore, we sought to produce a draft genome for S. scabiei and use this to identify molecular markers that will be useful for phylogenetic population studies and to identify candidate protein-coding genes that are crit...

  12. Oribatid mites in a changing world

    OpenAIRE

    De la Riva Caballero, Arguitxu

    2011-01-01

    The main scope of this thesis is to illustrate the validity of oribatid mites as tools for palaeoecological reconstructions. Palaeoecology studies the responses of past organisms to past environmental changes. This can be accomplished through the use of biological proxies, which are indicators of past conditions. The search for additional means of distinguishing climate change has only recently led to the use of other commonly found biological proxies such ...

  13. Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Burke, Daniel; Gormally, Michael; Byrne, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is largely presumed as being the mechanism by which house dust mites are distributed among locations in homes, yet little research to date has investigated the capacity with which various clothing fabric types serve as vectors for their accumulation and dispersal. Although previous research has indicated that car seats provide a habitat for mite populations, dynamics involved in the transfer of mites to clothing via car seat material is still unknown. To investigate the dynamics involved in the transfer of house dust mites from car seat material to modern clothing fabrics. A total of 480 samples of car seat material were seeded with mites and subjected to contact with plain woven cotton, denim, and fleece. Contact forces equivalent to the mass of a typical adult and child were administered for different durations of contact. Mean transfer efficiencies of mites from car seat material to receiving clothing fabrics ranged from 7.2% to 19.1%. Fabric type, mite condition (live or dead), and the force applied all revealed a significant effect (P clothing type can have important implications for the colonization of other biotopes by house dust mites, with potential for affecting an individuals' personal exposure to dust mite allergens. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Five observations of a third morphologically distinct feline Demodex mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriello, Karen A; Newbury, Sandra; Steinberg, Howard

    2013-08-01

    Feline demodicosis is caused by infestation with Demodex cati and/or Demodex gatoi. These two mites have distinctive morphological appearances. To describe five observations of a morphologically distinct feline Demodex mite in 10 cats. All cats were in or adopted from an animal shelter. A mite with blunted ends longer than D. gatoi but shorter than D. cati was observed in one or multiple cats from animal shelters. Mean mite size was 139 ± 4.5 μm (n = 41 mites). Similar features among the cases included a history of recent recovery or presence of concurrent illness at the time of diagnosis. Pruritus was variable. Hairs were easily epilated in large amounts, and mites were found on either skin scrapings or hair trichograms; mites were most commonly found on the proximal third of hairs examined via trichogram. Reports of this mite are uncommon but when present tend to be in cats with concurrent illnesses. Awareness of this mite morphology will hopefully provide other investigators with specimens for molecular testing to determine whether this is a third species or a variant of D. gatoi or D. cati. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  15. House dust mite control measures for asthma: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. We performed a systematic review of the randomized trials that had assessed the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma, and had compared active interventions with placebo...... improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80-1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardized mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.07) or in medication usage (standardized mean difference -0.06, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.07). Chemical and physical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens cannot...

  16. HOUSE DUST MITE ALLERGY IN VIEW OF MOLECULAR ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Korovkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Incidence of allergic diseases is increased over last years. House dust is considered a major risk factor of allergic sensitization which plays an important role in development of allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis. Dust mites in the home comprise a large part of domestic allergens. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Euroglyphus maynei, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Blomia tropicalis are most important in this respect. Der p 1 and Der p 2 are regarded as major house dust mite allergens. Recent studies concerned induction of IgE responses against mite tropomyosin (Der p 10, an allergen occurring in mites which exhibits high cross-reactivity with tropomyosins from a variety of sea foods (e.g. shrimps, as well as human tropomyosins. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT represents the only causative approach to allergy treatment in such cases. From this viewpoint, a quantitation of specific IgЕ against major house dust mite allergens would be necessary to predict ASIT efficiency. Treatment by house dust mites allergen extracts is effective in management of allergic rhinitis and mild asthma. A component-resolved diagnostic (CRD with purified house-dust mites allergens allows to discriminate patients who were mostly sensitized to the major house dust mites allergens (e.g. Der p 10, tropomyosin. The component-resolved diagnostics could be performed before starting the allergen-specific immunotherapy by mite allergens, in order to avoid unresponsiveness to this mode of therapy.

  17. Genus Ranges of Chord Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    2015-04-01

    A chord diagram consists of a circle, called the backbone, with line segments, called chords, whose endpoints are attached to distinct points on the circle. The genus of a chord diagram is the genus of the orientable surface obtained by thickening the backbone to an annulus and attaching bands to the inner boundary circle at the ends of each chord. Variations of this construction are considered here, where bands are possibly attached to the outer boundary circle of the annulus. The genus range of a chord diagram is the genus values over all such variations of surfaces thus obtained from a given chord diagram. Genus ranges of chord diagrams for a fixed number of chords are studied. Integer intervals that can be, and those that cannot be, realized as genus ranges are investigated. Computer calculations are presented, and play a key role in discovering and proving the properties of genus ranges.

  18. Identification, characterization, and cloning of a complementary DNA encoding a 60-kd house dust mite allergen (Der f 18) for human beings and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Eric; Hunter, Shirley; Stedman, Kim; Dreitz, Steve; Olivry, Thierry; Hillier, Andrew; McCall, Catherine

    2003-07-01

    House dust mites of the Dermatophagoides genus are the most important cause of perennial allergic disease in both humans and companion animals. Although the major mite allergens for humans are proteins of relatively low molecular weight, this is not the case for dogs. Western blotting shows that canine anti-mite IgE responses are directed primarily toward proteins in the molecular weight range of 50 to 120 kd. The objectives of this study were to characterize a D farinae allergen with a molecular weight of approximately 60 kd and to isolate the cDNA coding for this allergen. A protein of apparent molecular weight of 60 kd was identified by Western blotting by using canine serum IgE from house dust mite-sensitized atopic dogs. The protein was purified from homogenized D farinae mite bodies by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation exchange HPLC. The presence of IgE directed to the 60-kd protein in sera from humans and dogs with dust mite allergy was measured by FcepsilonRIalpha-based ELISA. A cDNA encoding a full-length 60-kd protein was isolated from a D farinae cDNA library by a combination of both PCR amplification and hybridization screening. A panel of mAbs specific for the 60-kd protein was generated and used to localize the protein in whole body sections of D farinae mites. ELISA showed that the purified protein bound IgE in 54% of the sera from patients with D farinae allergy. In addition, the 60-kd protein was able to bind IgE in 57% to 77% of D farinae -sensitized dogs. A cDNA was isolated that encoded a protein of 462 amino acids, consisting of a 25 amino acid signal sequence and a 437 amino acid mature protein. The calculated molecular weight of the mature protein is 50 kd, and the amino acid sequence contains a single N-glycosylation site. A protein database search showed homology with multiple chitinases. A mAb specific for the 60-kd chitinase recognized the allergen in the mite digestive system, but fecal pellets did not

  19. New Uropodine mites from Tanzania (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3683, č. 3 (2013), s. 267-279 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Mesostigmata * Uropodina * new genus * new species * Tanzania Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2013

  20. Early-life house dust mite allergens, childhood mite sensitization, and respiratory outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, L; Sunyer, J; Tischer, C; Gehring, U|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831344; Wickman, M; Garcia-Esteban, R; Lehmann, I; Kull, I; Reich, A; Lau, S; Wijga, A; Antó, J M; Nawrot, T S; Heinrich, J; Keil, T; Torrent, M

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to indoor allergens during early life may play a role in the development of the immune system and inception of asthma. OBJECTIVE: To describe the house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentrations in bedroom dust during early life and to evaluate its associations with HDM

  1. Bee Mite ID - an online resource on identification of mites associated with bees of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasitic mites are known to be a factor in recent declines in bee pollinator populations. In particular, Varroa destructor, an introduced parasite and disease vector, has decimated colonies of the western honey bee, one of the most important agricultural pollinators in the world. Further, global tr...

  2. Size of predatory mites and refuge entrance determine success of biological control of the coconut mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Silva, F.R.; de Moraes, G.J.; Lesna, I.; Sato, Y.; Vasquez, C.; Hanna, R.; Sabelis, M.W.; Janssen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Predators face the challenge of accessing prey that live in sheltered habitats. The coconut mite Aceriaguerreronis Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae) lives hidden beneath the perianth, which is appressed to the coconut fruit surface, where they feed on the meristematic tissue. Its natural enemy, the

  3. Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date, more than 55,000 mite species have been described and only a few of them have been studied. Some mites are adapted to live deep in soil, others in fresh or sea water, some are on plants, algae, fungi or animals, and others are able to survive in both extreme cold and hot temperatures. The...

  4. House dust mites in the city of Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, M; Costa-Manso, E; Baggio, D; Croce, J

    2000-01-01

    Since mites are the most common house dust allergens, knowledge about the species most prevalent in a region is important for diagnostic and specific immunotherapy purposes. In order to establish the prevalence of house dust mites in different city districts, 100 house dust samples were collected from different parts of Lima. Lima is a city of tropical climate located along the coast of the Pacific Ocean. The relative air humidity is 80-90% and the various districts studied are located at altitudes ranging from 37-355 meters. The mite Blomia tropicalis was the organism most frequently detected, being present in 59% of the house dust samples. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus occupied second place (15.9%), followed by Chortoglyphus arcuatus and Tyrophagus putrescentiae. These four mites, taken together, represented more than 90% of the mites detected. No specimen of the species Dermatophagoides farinae was detected. We conclude that B. tropicalis and D. pteronyssinus are the most common house dust mites in Lima. Considering the high prevalence of B. tropicalis in Lima and the fact that its cross-reactivity with antigens of the mites of the family Pyroglyphidae is minimal, we conclude that sensitization to this mite should be investigated separately in allergic patients living in Lima.

  5. Alleviation of oxidative stress induced by spider mite invasion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spider mite invasion induces oxidative stress on bean plants and increased soluble sugars, phenole, proline and peroxidase activity, but decreased catalase activity and ascorbic acid and carotenoid concentration. Application of elicitors significantly enhanced spider mite tolerance by decreasing hydrogen peroxide, ...

  6. Allergy to mites : relation to lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, S; Dubois, AEJ; Kauffman, HF; de Monchy, JGR

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to house-dust-mite allergens is an important cause of allergic reactions in sensitized patients. In community-based studies, sensitization to house-duct mites, as ascertained by a positive skin test or by an increased allergen-specific IgE level in serum, is associated with both diminished

  7. Invasion of Varroa mites into honey bee brood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa-jacobsoni is one of the most serious pests of Western honey bees, Apis mellifera. The mites parasitize adult bees, but reproduction only occurs while parasitizing on honey bee brood. Invasion into a

  8. Checklist of the oribatid mites of the Netherlands (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siepel, H.; Zaitsev, A.; Berg, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    More than fifty years ago Van der Hammen published the last checklist of oribatid mites (or moss mites) for the Netherlands. Since then the species number has almost doubled to 318 species, of which 100 are presented here for the first time. Brief data on occurrence and nomenclature are provided for

  9. Checklist of the Oribatid Mites of the Netherlands (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siepel, H.; Zaitsev, A.; Berg, M.

    2009-01-01

    More than fifty years ago Van der Hammen published the last checklist of oribatid mites (or moss mites) for the Netherlands. Since then the species number has almost doubled to 318 species, of which 100 are presented here for the first time. Brief data on occurence and nomenclature are provided for

  10. Induction of atopic dermatitis by inhalation of house dust mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tupker, RA; DeMonchy, JGR; Coenraads, PJ; vanderMeer, JB

    Background: The pathogenetic role of house dust mite in atopic dermatitis remains controversial. Recent studies have shown that intensive epicutaneous contact of house dust mite allergen with premanipulated skin may induce dematitis. It is, however, uncertain whether such conditions are met during

  11. Resistance of the predacious mite, euseius kenyae (acari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess whether the predacious phytoseiid mite, Euseius kenyae (Swirski and Ragusa), commonly found in major coffee growing regions in Kenya has developed resistance to Chlorpyrifos. Mite populations were collected from coffee farms harbouring E. kenyae and where Chlorpyrifos or other ...

  12. RNA-interference gene knockdown in the poultry red mite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... interference; dsRNA, double stranded RNA; FEC, faecal egg counts; siRNAs ... resistance, residues in meat and eggs and other environmental .... 1352 Afr. J. Biotechnol. Table 1. Total RNA extracted from varying number of mites. Number of mite. Concentration of RNA (ng/µl. Total RNA (ng). 1. 14.6. 146. 1.

  13. Sampling Methods for Varroa Mites on the Domesticated Honeybee

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, Vonny M.; Fell, Richard D. (Richard Douglas), 1950-

    2006-01-01

    Varroa mites are serious pests of the apiculture industry throughout the Americas. Various methods have been used to determine if a colony is infested with varroa mites necessitating some type of control. This publication presents various varroa sampling methods and compares their relative effectiveness.

  14. Chemistry of the Genus Plectranthus

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Batterjee; H. A. Albar; M. Abdel-Mogib

    2002-01-01

    This review presents the phytochemical constituents of the genus Plectranthus reported up to 1999. Only a tetrameric derivative of caffeic acid was isolated from P. japonicus, but a group of long-chain alkylphenols, of possible taxonomic significance in the genus, was also isolated. As a genus of the subfamily Nepetoideae, Plectranthus is free from iridoid glycosides and rich in essential oil (i.e. > 0.5% volatile oil on a dry weight basis). Diterpenoids are the more common secondary metaboli...

  15. Mites (acari) infesting commensal rats in Suez Canal zone, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Kady, G A; Shoukry, A; Ragheb, D A; el Said, A M; Habib, K S; Morsy, T A

    1995-08-01

    Mites are arthropods distinguished from ticks by usually being microscopical in size and have a hypostome unarmed with tooth-like anchoring processes. They are group in a number of suborders, each with super-families and families including many genera of medical and economic importance. In this paper, commensal rodents (Rattus norvegicus, R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorous) were surveyed in the Suez Canal Zone for their acari ectoparasites. Four species of mites were recovered. In a descending order of mite indices, they were Eulaelaps stabularis (4.83 on 6 rats), Laelaps nuttalli (3.11 on 27 rats), Ornithonyssus bacoti (1.66 on 9 rats) and Dermanyssus gallinae (0.66 on 24 rats). The overall mite indices in the three governorates were 3.66 in Suez, 2.82 in Ismailia and zero in Port Said. The medical and economic importance of the mites were discussed.

  16. Nasal mites of Tyrannidae (Aves in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM. Mendes

    Full Text Available A total of 81 Tyraniidae birds were examined, 80 Pitangus sulphuratus (Linnaeus, 1766 (Great kiscadee, and one Machetornis rixosa (Vieilot, 1819 (Cattle tyrant, for collection of nasal mites, which were identified as Ptilonyssus spinosus (Brooks & Strandtmann, 1960 and Sternostoma longisetosae (Hyland, 1961 (Rhinonyssidae. This finding characterises the first report of P. spinosus and S. longisetosae in P. sulphuratus, and the first record of P. spinosus in M. rixosa, and expands the geographic distribution of these species. It is the first occurrence of S. longisetosae in the Neotropics, and the first citation of P. spinosus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

  17. [House dust mite allergy: myths and realities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Christine; Ducommun, Julien

    2009-04-15

    Since 1967, house dust mites have been shown to be the main allergens to be blamed in household dust allergy. In our countries, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae are predominant. We find them by millions in our bedding. They are responsible of allergic reactions like asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Different treatments are available of which some have proved there effectiveness, like subcutaneous immunotherapy and standard symptomatic treatments. On the other hand, the control measures remain controversial and led recently to a lively debate in the medical literature. We felt therefore that it was necessary to set the record straight.

  18. [Domestic dust mites in the dwellings of Penza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltikova, T M; Manzhos, M V; Antropova, A B; Mitereva, D E; Arkhipova, N V; Petrova-Nikitina, A D

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-seven mite species belonging to 23 genera, 13 families, and 2 orders were identified. The mites of the family Pyroglyphidae, amounting to 91.1% of the total number of mites, were found to dominate in the acarocomplex of Penza dwellings. Pyroglyphid mites were represented by 3 species with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae absolutely prevailing in both their abundance (20.0 and 68.5%) and frequency (39 and 75%). The maximum number of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae reached 2.867 and 3.400 mites per g of dust, respectively. Mites of the families Acaridae and Glycyphagidae were registered in 27 and 15% of the apartments, respectively; and their abundance was about 4%. G. destructor is most frequently encountered. The specific abundance and detection rate of other mites were not high. The influence of various socioeconomic factors on the number of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae was analyzed using statistical methods. A significant correlation was found between the number of mites, the air moisture of a premise, the building material used for the construction of a house, the type of a housing estate (a private or tenement house) and heating (central or self-contained). No significant relationship was established between the number of mites, the ventilation of premises, the presence of domestic animals and plants or flowers, and the number of dwellers. Out of 81 patients with allergic diseases (allergic rhinitis (73%), bronchial asthma (4%), and allergic rhinitis concurrent with asthma (23%)), 44 and 25% patients had positive skin tests for D. pteronyssinus and allergens of D. farinae, respectively. There was no positive correlation between the number of pyroglyphid mites, positive skin tests, and the diagnosis.

  19. Mattress encasings and mite allergen levels in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, RT; Koopman, LP; Kerkhof, M; Oldenwening, M; de Jongste, JC; Gerritsen, J; Neijens, HJ; Aalberse, RC; Smit, HA; Brunekreef, B

    Background Reduction of allergen exposure from birth may reduce sensitization and subsequent allergic disease. Objective To measure the influence of mite allergen-impermeable mattress encasings and cotton placebo encasings on the amount of dust and mite allergen in beds. Methods A total of 810

  20. Mattress encasings and mite allergen levels in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, R. T.; Koopman, L. P.; Kerkhof, M.; Oldenwening, M.; de Jongste, J. C.; Gerritsen, J.; Neijens, H. J.; Aalberse, R. C.; Smit, H. A.; Brunekreef, B.

    2003-01-01

    Reduction of allergen exposure from birth may reduce sensitization and subsequent allergic disease. To measure the influence of mite allergen-impermeable mattress encasings and cotton placebo encasings on the amount of dust and mite allergen in beds. A total of 810 children with allergic mothers

  1. Feather mite abundance varies but symbiotic nature of mite-host relationship does not differ between two ecologically dissimilar warblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix E. Matthews; Jeffery L. Larkin; Douglas W. Raybuck; Morgan C. Slevin; Scott H. Stoleson; Than J. Boves

    2017-01-01

    Feather mites are obligatory ectosymbionts of birds that primarily feed on the oily secretions from the uropygial gland. Feather mite abundance varies within and among host species and has various effects on host condition and fitness, but there is little consensus on factors that drive variation of this symbiotic system. We tested hypotheses regarding how within-...

  2. House dust mites and their allergens at selected locations in the homes of house dust mite-allergic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, K E; Hallas, T E; Brygge, T

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the occurrence of house dust mites (HDM) and their allergens in domestic locations is important when planning intervention.......Knowledge of the occurrence of house dust mites (HDM) and their allergens in domestic locations is important when planning intervention....

  3. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrzik, Karel, E-mail: petrzik@umbr.cas.cz [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Sarkisova, Tatiana [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Starý, Josef [Institute of Soil Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Koloniuk, Igor [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-02-15

    A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites. - Highlights: • A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris. • A new virus genus Phlegivirus is proposed. • The mycovirus was firstly detected in oribatid mites.

  4. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzik, Karel; Sarkisova, Tatiana; Starý, Josef; Koloniuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites. - Highlights: • A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris. • A new virus genus Phlegivirus is proposed. • The mycovirus was firstly detected in oribatid mites.

  5. Strong indirect interactions of Tarsonemus mites (Acarina: Tarsonemidae) and Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria J. Lombardero; Matthew P. Ayres; Richard W. Hofstetter; John C. Moser; Kier D. Lepzig

    2003-01-01

    Phoretic mites of bark beetles are classic examples of commensal ectosymbionts. However, many such mites appear to have mutualisms with fungi that could themselves interact with beetles. We tested for indirect effects of phoretic mites on Dendroctonus frontalis, which auacks and kills pine trees in North America. Tarsonemus mites...

  6. Decay of house-dust mite allergen Der f 1 at indoor climatic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, Kirsten E; Hallas, Thorkil E; Stenderup, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The decay of house-dust mite allergens is important for the outcome of avoidance measures for house-dust mite-allergic patients.......The decay of house-dust mite allergens is important for the outcome of avoidance measures for house-dust mite-allergic patients....

  7. Accumulation of house- dust mite (Der-p-1) levels on mattress covers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mattresses serve as a large reservoir for house-dust mite antigens and harbour the highest mite levels within the household. Mite reduction measures have previously been shown to be unsuccessful. The effect of mattress covers and acaracides on Der-p-1 levels in the mattresses of 60 patients with mite-allergic asthma was ...

  8. A new species of the genus Epidamaeus (Acari, Oribatida, Damaeidae from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Xie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oribatid mite genus Epidamaeus Bulanova-Zachvatkina, 1957 from China is reviewed, and a list and key to all known species from China are provided. A new species, Epidamaeus conjungenus, sp. n. is identified, and its morphological descriptions and illustrations are also given. The distinct characteristics of E. conjungenus sp. n. is the coterminous ridge connected to the base of the notogastral setae. Pseudanal setae undulating attenuate, the proximal half with obvious, thorn-like barbs, the distal half smooth.

  9. A new species of the genus Epidamaeus (Acari, Oribatida, Damaeidae) from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lixia; Yang, Maofa; Huang, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The oribatid mite genus Epidamaeus Bulanova-Zachvatkina, 1957 from China is reviewed, and a list and key to all known species from China are provided. A new species, Epidamaeus conjungenus sp. n. is identified, and its morphological descriptions and illustrations are also given. The distinct characteristics of Epidamaeus conjungenus sp. n. is the coterminous ridge connected to the base of the notogastral setae. Pseudanal setae undulating attenuate, the proximal half with obvious, thorn-like barbs, the distal half smooth. PMID:21998515

  10. Review: Fitokimia genus Baccaurea spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunawan Gunawan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Genus BaccaureaLour. adalah salah satu anggota dari famili Phyllanthaceae, merupakan genus yang cukup besar dengan anggota mencapai 43 spesies. Pada pengobatan tradisional genus Baccaurea telah dimanfaatkan masyarakat untuk mengobati  sembelit, pembengkakan pada mata, radang sendi, abses, sakit perut, memperlancar haid serta buang air kecil. Beberapa anggota genus Baccaureamemiliki potensi sebagai tumbuhan obat karena mengandung metabolit sekunder seperti alkaloid, flavonoid, karotenoid, antosianin, tanin, asam rosmarinik dan fenolik. Kandungan metabolit sekunder tersebut berpotensi sebagai antioksidan, antikanker, antimikroba, antidiabetes, antiinflamasi, antitripanosoma. B. ramiflora, B. lanceolata, B. macrocarpa, B. angulata, B. motleyana, B. brevipes, B. hookeri, B.recemosa, B. sapida, B. polyneura, B.parviflora dan B.dulcis adalah anggota genus Baccaurea yang berpotensi sebagai tumbuhan obat.

  11. Global associations between birds and vane-dwelling feather mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doña, Jorge; Proctor, Heather; Mironov, Sergey; Serrano, David; Jovani, Roger

    2016-11-01

    Understanding host-symbiont networks is a major question in evolutionary ecology. Birds host a great diversity of endo- and ectosymbiotic organisms, with feather mites (Arachnida: Acariformes: Analgoidea, Pterolichoidea) being among the most diverse of avian symbionts. A global approach to the ecology and evolution of bird-feather-mite associations has been hampered because of the absence of a centralized data repository. Here we present the most extensive data set of associations between feather mites and birds. Data include 12 036 records of 1887 feather mite species located on the flight feathers of 2234 bird species from 147 countries. Feather mites typically located inside quills, on the skin, or on downy body feathers are not included. Data were extracted from 493 published sources dating from 1882 to 2015. Data exploration shows that although most continents and bird families are represented, most bird species remain unexplored for feather mites. Nevertheless, this is the most comprehensive data set available for enabling global macroecological analyses of feather mites and their hosts, such as ecological network analyses. This metadata file outlines the structure of these data and provides primary references for all records used. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. The use of soil mites in ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguier, Pierre; Manier, Nicolas; Owojori, Olugbenga John; Bauda, Pascale; Pandard, Pascal; Römbke, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mites, and especially soil-inhabiting ones, have been less studied than the other invertebrates used in bio-assays for the assessment of soil quality and the hazards of chemicals, although these organisms are included in the regulatory assessment scheme of pesticides. The recent advances in the development of test methods for soil mites groups have provided more information on their sensitivities towards chemicals, which needs to be presented for a more robust assessment of the current trends in soil mite ecotoxicology. Moreover, interestingly mite is the only taxa for which test methods were developed and standardized on predatory organisms. This review summarizes the different protocols for the assessment of chemicals using soil-inhabiting mites, including laboratory, semi-field and field studies. Among the data found in the literature, most of the chemicals assessed with mites were pesticides, while a few environmental samples were assessed with these organisms. Their sensitivities towards chemicals were then compared and discussed regarding other soil invertebrates. Finally, we conclude on the usefulness of soil mites in ecotoxicology, and provide future research trail in this area.

  13. Pheromonal Communication in the European House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes L.M. Steidle

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the sanitary importance of the European house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897, the pheromonal communication in this species has not been sufficiently studied. Headspace analysis using solid phase micro extraction (SPME revealed that nerol, neryl formate, pentadecane, (6Z,9Z-6,9-heptadecadiene, and (Z-8-heptadecene are released by both sexes whereas neryl propionate was released by males only. Tritonymphs did not produce any detectable volatiles. In olfactometer experiments, pentadecane and neryl propionate were attractive to both sexes as well as to tritonymphs. (Z-8-heptadecene was only attractive to male mites. Therefore it is discussed that pentadecane and neryl propionate are aggregation pheromones and (Z-8-heptadecene is a sexual pheromone of the European house dust mite D. pteronyssinus. To study the potential use of pheromones in dust mite control, long-range olfactometer experiments were conducted showing that mites can be attracted to neryl propionate over distances of at least 50 cm. This indicates that mite pheromones might be useable to monitor the presence or absence of mites in the context of control strategies.

  14. Species diversity of house dust mites in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin-Lu; Shen, Lian; Chen, Jun; Yu, Jin-Miao; Yin, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Even though house dust mites are one of the most important allergens, there have been few studies in China for their identification and diversity. In this study, we reported that Dermatophagoides siboney was found for the first time in Beijing, China, in a temperate zone and it was also the first reported in Asia. This survey of mite prevalence was carried out in several districts of Beijing, a city of thirty million people. House dust samples were collected from 38 homes of mite-allergic patients who visited our Allergy Department from December 2008 to January 2010. Out of 345 house dust samples collected, 64% contained mites. Dermatophagoides farinae was the predominant species in the mite population found and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was second, and Dermatophagoides siboney was the third. The positive rates of samples were higher in single-story homes and lower buildings. The seasonal density distribution of house dust mites showed the highest mite concentration in September through October, followed by May through July, December to next January; and lowest in March and November.

  15. Phytophagous mites on genetically modified maize with Bacillus thuringiensis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Esteves Ferreira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The study of non-target organisms such as mites, can provide information about the possible effects of transgenic maize cultivars on the arthropod community. This study aimed to evaluate the abundance of phytophagous mites in the area of Bt maize and evaluate the instantaneous population growth rate, and food preference of phytophagous mites on Bt maize. We registered the species occurrence and the number of adult mite individuals on four maize cultivars, one non-Bt 30F35, and three containing the proteins Cry1Ab (30F35 Yg, Cry1F (30F35 Hx and Vip3a (Impacto Viptera. Cry proteins disrupt the midgut epithelium of insect pests. The food preference and instantaneous population growth rate (ri were evaluated using the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae as model. The species Catarhinus tricholaenae and Aceria zeala were recorded. The Bt maize cultivars did not significantly affect the average number of C. tricholaenae and A. zeala mites compared to conventional cultivar. The population growth rates of T. urticae were similar for the different maize cultivars. T. urticae showed no preference between the leaf of Bt or conventional cultivars. Bt maize did not affect the abundance of species in phytophagous mite.

  16. Demodex mites in acne rosacea: reflectance confocal microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut Erdemir, Asli; Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Koku Aksu, Ayse Esra; Falay, Tugba; Inan Yuksel, Esma; Sarikaya, Ebru

    2017-05-01

    Demodex mite density is emphasised in the aetiopathogenesis of acne rosacea. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been shown to be a good method for determining demodex mite density. The objective was to determine demodex mite density using RCM in acne rosacea patients and compare them with controls. In all, 30 papulopustular rosacea (PPR) and 30 erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) totally 60 acne rosacea patients and 40 controls, were enrolled in the study. The right cheek was selected for imaging and RCM was used for scanning. Ten images of 1000 × 1000 μm (total 10 mm 2 ) area were scanned from adjacent areas. The numbers of follicles, infested follicles and mites were counted. The mean numbers of mites per follicle and infested follicles were calculated and compared in the patients and control groups. The mean number of mites was 44.30 ± 23.22 in PPR, 14.57 ± 15.86 in ETR and 3.55 ± 6.48 in the control group (P rosacea aetiopathogenesis. Demodex mite treatment may reduce the severity of the disease and slow its progressive nature. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  17. Phoretic mites identified on andean hummingbirds (Trochilidae of Caldas, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia López-Orozco

    Full Text Available Within the bird-plant-mite system, the relationship between hummingbirds, flowers, and mites remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the degree of association between nasal mites and eight species of Andean hummingbirds in Colombia (Amazilia saucerrottei,A. tzacatl, Chalybura buffonii,Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Florisuga mellivora, Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis guy and P. striigularis. Over a five-month period (trapping effort 360 hours/month, a total of 178 birds were captured, from which 81 mite specimens were collected and identified as belonging to three genera (Proctolaelaps, Rhinoseius andTropicoseius spanning eleven species. This is the first report of its kind from Colombia on the identification of the mite speciesP. rabulatus, R. luteyni, R. rafinskii, T. berryi, T. colwelli, T. erro and T. uniformisand the first record of P. guy as phoretic host forProctolaelaps rabulatus. Morphological characteristics (length of the dorsal plate, width of the dorsal plate and setae z5 length alone failed to distinguish between mite species. The ecologic impact of this relationship on flowers with respect to nectar and pollen availability and the effect of mites on pollination by hummingbirds needs to be determined.

  18. Phoretic mites identified on Andean hummingbirds (Trochilidae) of Caldas, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Orozco, Natalia; Cañón-Franco, William Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Within the bird-plant-mite system, the relationship between hummingbirds, flowers, and mites remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the degree of association between nasal mites and eight species of Andean hummingbirds in Colombia (Amazilia saucerrottei, A. tzacatl, Chalybura buffonii, Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Florisuga mellivora, Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis guy and P. striigularis). Over a five-month period (trapping effort 360 hours/month), a total of 178 birds were captured, from which 81 mite specimens were collected and identified as belonging to three genera (Proctolaelaps, Rhinoseius and Tropicoseius) spanning eleven species. This is the first report of its kind from Colombia on the identification of the mite species P. rabulatus, R. luteyni, R. rafinskii, T. berryi, T. colwelli, T. erro and T. uniformis and the first record of P. guy as phoretic host for Proctolaelaps rabulatus. Morphological characteristics (length of the dorsal plate, width of the dorsal plate and setae z5 length) alone failed to distinguish between mite species. The ecologic impact of this relationship on flowers with respect to nectar and pollen availability and the effect of mites on pollination by hummingbirds needs to be determined.

  19. Toxicity of hiba oil constituents and spray formulations to American house dust mites and copra mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Ran; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Kwon, Min Jung; Chae, Se Um; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2015-05-01

    Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae are recognised as an important source of allergens. An assessment was made of the toxicity of hiba, Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai, oil and 13 organic compounds and the control efficacy of four experimental spray formulations containing the oil (5-30 g L(-1) spray) against both mite species. In a contact + fumigant mortality bioassay, (-)-thujopsene was the most toxic constituent against D. farinae and T. putrescentiae (24 h LC50 9.82 and 10.92 µg cm(-2)), and the toxicity of the compound was nearly identical to that of benzyl benzoate (9.33 and 10.14 µg cm(-2)). The toxicity was more pronounced in carvacrol, (+)-terpinen-4-ol, β-thujaplicin, (-)-terpinen-4-ol, cedrol and α-terpineol (LC50 12.05-15.20 and 12.74-16.48 µg cm(-2)) than in N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (LC50 35.53 and 38.42 µg cm(-2)) against both mite species. The hiba oil 30 g L(-1) spray and commercial permethrin (cis:trans 25:75) 2.5 g L(-1) spray treatment resulted in 100 and 11% mortality against the two mite species respectively. In vapour-phase mortality tests, the two compounds were consistently more toxic in closed versus open containers, indicating that toxicity was achieved mainly through the action of vapour. Reasonable mite control in indoor environments can be achieved by a spray formulation containing the 30 g L(-1) hiba oil as a potential contact-action fumigant. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Gas, dust, and fumes exposure is associated with mite sensitization and with asthma in mite-sensitized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerg, A; Rönmark, E P; Hagstad, S; Eriksson, J; Andersson, M; Wennergren, G; Torén, K; Ekerljung, L

    2015-05-01

    Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of asthma and eczema. We investigated the role of sensitization in the association between GDF and allergic conditions. A population-based sample of 788 adults from the West Sweden Asthma Study completed questionnaires and skin prick tests. After adjustment for confounders, GDF exposure was associated with a doubled risk of sensitization to mites, but not with other allergens. Mite sensitization also modified the effect of GDF on asthma. In mite-sensitized subjects, GDF was associated with physician-diagnosed asthma, adjusted OR 2.9 (1.2-7.2), and with wheeze, OR 2.4 (1.1-5.3). In non-mite-sensitized subjects, the corresponding ORs were 1.1 (0.5-2.6) and 0.6 (0.3-1.3). GDF was independently associated with eczema regardless of mite sensitization, but not with rhinitis. These novel findings suggest that components of GDF may act as adjuvants that facilitate sensitization to mites and that mite-sensitized individuals may be especially susceptible to inhalant occupational exposures. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Biological control of spider mites on grape by phytoseiid mites (Acari: Tetranychidae, Phytoseiidae): emphasis on regional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prischmann, D A; Croft, B A; Luh, H K

    2002-04-01

    Leaf samples were taken from 34 (1998) and 10 (1999) vineyards in five valleys in western Oregon to assess spider mite pests and biological control by predaceous phytoseiid mites. A leaf at a coordinate of every 10 m of border, 5 m into a vineyard, was taken to minimize edge effects; 20 leaves were taken at regular intervals from vineyard centers. Variables recorded at each site included grape variety and plant age, chemicals used, and vegetation next to vineyards. Sites were rated as occurring in agricultural versus riparian settings based on surrounding vegetation types. Multiple linear regressions and a computer genetic algorithm with an information content criterion were used to assess variables that may explain mite abundances. Typhlodromus pyri Scheuten was the dominant phytoseiid mite species and Tetranychus urticae Koch the dominant tetranychid mite species. High levels of T. urticae occurred when phytoseiid levels were low, and low levels of T. urticae were present when phytoseiid levels were high to moderate. T. urticae densities were higher in vineyards surrounded by agriculture, but phytoseiid levels did not differ between agricultural and riparian sites. Phytoseiids had higher densities on vineyard edges; T. urticae densities were higher in centers. Biological control success of pest mites was rated excellent in 11 of 44 vineyards, good in 27, and poor in only six sites. Predaceous mites appeared to be the principal agents regulating spider mites at low levels in sites where pesticides nontoxic to predators were used. Effects of surrounding vegetation, grape variety, growing region, and other factors on mites are discussed.

  2. THE GENUS DERMATOPHILUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris A.

    1964-01-01

    Gordon, M. A. (New York State Department of Health, Albany). The genus Dermatophilus. J. Bacteriol. 88:509–522. 1964.—Seventeen strains of Dermatophilus originating in skin lesions of cattle, sheep, horses, deer, and man were compared as to conditions for growth, colonial characteristics under varying conditions, microscopic morphology, and biochemical reactions. All grew well aerobically at 37 C and were facultatively anaerobic. They were morphologically similar in both gross and microscopic appearance, and most produced motile spores. Stable gray variants often appeared among the orange-yellow “wild-type” colonies. Acid without gas was produced consistently from glucose and fructose, and transitorily from galactose, but was produced from none of eight other carbohydrates except belatedly by some strains from maltose. Almost all strains hydrolyzed casein, most of them digested BCP milk with varying rapidity, and the majority liquefied gelatin, but there was considerable variation in this last property. Differences crossed both host and geographic lines. It is concluded that all isolates can be accommodated in the species D. congolensis Van Saceghem 1915, emend. 1916, 1934, with D. dermatonomus and D. pedis falling into synonymy. Images PMID:14203370

  3. THE GENUS DERMATOPHILUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GORDON, M A

    1964-08-01

    Gordon, M. A. (New York State Department of Health, Albany). The genus Dermatophilus. J. Bacteriol. 88:509-522. 1964.-Seventeen strains of Dermatophilus originating in skin lesions of cattle, sheep, horses, deer, and man were compared as to conditions for growth, colonial characteristics under varying conditions, microscopic morphology, and biochemical reactions. All grew well aerobically at 37 C and were facultatively anaerobic. They were morphologically similar in both gross and microscopic appearance, and most produced motile spores. Stable gray variants often appeared among the orange-yellow "wild-type" colonies. Acid without gas was produced consistently from glucose and fructose, and transitorily from galactose, but was produced from none of eight other carbohydrates except belatedly by some strains from maltose. Almost all strains hydrolyzed casein, most of them digested BCP milk with varying rapidity, and the majority liquefied gelatin, but there was considerable variation in this last property. Differences crossed both host and geographic lines. It is concluded that all isolates can be accommodated in the species D. congolensis Van Saceghem 1915, emend. 1916, 1934, with D. dermatonomus and D. pedis falling into synonymy.

  4. A taxonomic study on the genus Tectodamaeus Aoki (Acari, Oribatida, Damaeidae, with description of two new species from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Xie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Tectodamaeus from Yunnan and Anhui Province respectively, China are described, Tectodamaeus daliensis sp. n., Tectodamaeus longus sp. n. Nine new combinations, Tectodamaeus costanotus (Wang & Norton comb. n., Tectodamaeus exspinosus (Wang & Norton comb. n., Tectodamaeus wulongensis (Wang & Cui comb. n., Tectodamaeus brevisetus (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus spiniger (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus exsertus (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus yaoi (Wang comb. n., Tectodamaeus furcatus (Wang & Lu comb. n., Tectodamaeus cuii (Wang & Lu comb. n. are presented. The subgenus Damaeus (Tectodamaeus as a genus in the oribatid mite family Damaeidae was reestablished. A key is given to distinguish all the species of the genus. Th e type specimens of the new species are deposited in the Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University (IEGU.

  5. Chemodiversity in the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2015-01-01

    to be characterized. The genus Aspergillus is cladistically holophyletic but phenotypically polythetic and very diverse and is associated to quite different sexual states. Following the one fungus one name system, the genus Aspergillus is restricted to a holophyletic clade that include the morphologically different...... biosynthetic family isoextrolites. However, it appears that secondary metabolites from one Aspergillus section have analogous metabolites in other sections (here also called heteroisoextrolites). In this review, we give a genus-wide overview of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus species. Extrolites...

  6. Detection methods for irradiated mites and insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the study on the following tests for separation of irradiated pests from untreated ones are reported: (a) test for identification of irradiated mites (Acaridae) based on lack of fecundity of treated females; (b) test for identification of irradiated beetles based on their locomotor activity; (c) test for identification of irradiated pests based on electron spin resonance (ESR) signal derived from treated insects; (d) test for identification of irradiated pests based on changes in the midgut induced by gamma radiation; and (e) test for identification of irradiated pests based on the alterations in total proteins of treated adults. Of these detection methods, only the test based on the pathological changes induced by irradiation in the insect midgut may identify consistently either irradiated larvae or adults. This test is simple and convenient when a rapid processing technique for dehydrating and embedding the midgut is used. (author)

  7. Un mundo sin límites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba, Joaquín Mª

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A comienzos del siglo XVI, las nuevas ediciones del Atlas de Ptolomeo publicadas en Roma o Venecia solían incluir un mapamundi modificado sin cesara a medida que descubridores y navegantes alcanzaban nuevos y antes desconocidos horizontes. La temprana circunnavegación de Magallanes y Elcano (1519-1522 confirmaba con su esferidad, que el mundo no tenía límites. Durante aquel siglo magnífico, la literatura española de viajes al Oriente Próximo islámico tenía que ser menos señalada. La casi perenne guerra contra el Imperio Otomano, señor de una buena parte de las costas mediterráneas, y sobre todo la empresa de América y los viajes de exploración y conquista que aquella demandaba, …

  8. Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aratchige, N.S.; Lesna, I.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract

  9. [Storage mite sensitivity and related factors in asthmatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Serdar; Canbakan, Sema; Mungan, Dilşad; Başer, Yılmaz; Akpınar, Evrim Eylem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the storage mite sensitivity and related factors in patients with asthma or asthma and rhinitis. 149 patients with asthma or asthma and rhinitis were included to the study. Prick test was performed after addition of Acarus siro (A. siro), Lepidoglyphus destructor (L. destructor), Glycophagus domesticus (G. domesticus) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (T. putrescentiae) to the standart prick test. Living conditions, smoking history, allergic diseases status, seasonal variations in symptoms were evaluated by a questionnaire. Besides, respiratory screening spesific IgE, L. destructor spesific IgE was examined in a group of patients who were allergic to storage mites according to prick tests. Prick test results showed that; 115 of the patients were sensitized while 34 of them were not. House dust mite sensitivity was detected as mite 58.3%.The storage mite sensitivity for at least one of the studied species was detected in 61.7% of patients. The sensitivity rates were 50.4%, 48.7%, 47%, %40 for A. siro, L. destructor, G. domesticus and T. putrescentiae, respectively. The storage mite sensivity was found higher in the patients from the rural areas (pmite species in %22.7 of the patients who were considered as not sensitized according to the results of the standart prick tests. As a result, storage mites are important allergens in subjects who live in rural areas and close contact with barn, haymow, bin and pantry. Addition of storage mite allergens to the standart prick test panel of patients living in rural area is suitable.

  10. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie S Morgan

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  11. Assessing hygienic behavior and attraction to Varroa mite (Acari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-07

    Feb 7, 2011 ... cerana is grooming behavior. A worker bee is able to groom herself with her legs and mandibles to get rid of a mite. If worker bee cannot get rid of it, she performs a dance to attract other workers that may help her remove the mite from her body (Peng and Fang, 1987). Worker bees of A. cerana also have ...

  12. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G; Markey, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs) that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  13. Age and reproductive status of adult Varroa mites affect grooming success of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Maria J; de Guzman, Lilia I; Rinderer, Thomas E; Frake, Amanda M; Wagnitz, Jeremy; Whelan, Pádraig M

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated for the first time the grooming response of honey bees to Varroa mites of different ages and reproductive statuses in the laboratory. Plastic cages containing a section of dark comb and about 200 bees were inoculated with groups of four classes of mites: gravid, phoretic foundresses, phoretic daughters and a combination of gravid and phoretic foundress mites. Each cage received 20 mites belonging to one of these classes. Our results showed that, 1 day after mite inoculation, phoretic daughter mites were the most prone to grooming by honey bees with an average mite drop of 49.8 ± 2.6 %. The lowest mite drop was recorded for bees inoculated with phoretic foundresses (30.3 ± 3.6 %) but was comparable to bees inoculated with gravid mites (31.8 ± 3.8 %) and the combination of gravid and phoretic foundress mites (34.2 ± 3.2 %). No differences among mite types were detected during the second and third days of observation. Regardless of mite type, the highest mite drop was recorded on the first day (35 ± 2.1 %) compared to the drop for any subsequent day (grooming behaviour may increase our insight into the importance of grooming in mite resistance.

  14. The genus Vitex: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Anita; Sharma, Anupam

    2013-07-01

    The review includes 161 references on the genus Vitex, and comprises ethnopharmacology, morphology and microscopy, phytoconstituents, pharmacological reports, clinical studies, and toxicology of the prominent species of Vitex. Essential oils, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides, diterpenoides and ligans constitute major classes of phytoconstituents of the genus. A few species of this genus have medicinal value, among these, leaves and fruits of V. agnus-castus Linn. (Verbenaceae) has been traditionally used in treatment of women complaints. V. agnus-castus has also been included in herbal remedies, which are in clinical use to regulate the menstrual cycle, reduce premenstrual symptom tension and anxiety, treat some menopausal symptoms as well as to treat hormonally induced acne. Despite a long tradition of use of some species, the genus has not been explored properly. In the concluding part, the future scope of Vitex species has been emphasized with a view to establish their multifarious biological activities and mode of action.

  15. Riemann surfaces of infinite genus

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Joel S; Trubowitz, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    In this book, Riemann surfaces of infinite genus are constructed geometrically by pasting together plane domains and handles. To achieve a meaningful generalization of the classical theory of Riemann surfaces to the case of infinite genus, one must impose restrictions on the asymptotic behavior of the Riemann surface. In the construction carried out here, these restrictions are formulated in terms of the sizes and locations of the handles and in terms of the gluing maps. The approach used in this book has two main attractions. The first is that much of the classical theory of Riemann surfaces, including the Torelli theorem, can be generalized to this class. The second is that solutions of Kadomcev-Petviashvilli equations can be expressed in terms of theta functions associated with Riemann surfaces of infinite genus constructed in the book. Both of these are developed here. The authors also present in detail a number of important examples of Riemann surfaces of infinite genus (hyperelliptic surfaces of infinit...

  16. Revision of the genus Phaeanthus (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.B.; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2000-01-01

    A revision of the genus Phaeanthus Hook.f. & Thomson (Annonaceae) is presented. The genus comprises 8 species. A key to the fruiting and/or flowering specimens of the genus is included. The genus consists of shrubs to small-sized trees from Malesia and Vietnam. It is characterised by sepals and

  17. Mite fauna and mite antigen detection in house dust found in residential areas in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanghal, Ronan Aldous M; Paller, Vachel Gay V

    2012-09-01

    Dust mites are a medically important group of animals commonly found in carpets and mattresses in houses. Antigens in their feces cause allergic reactions such as asthma and contact dermatitis. Dust samples were vacuum-collected in a special collecting bag from a one square meter area of living room floors of 100 randomly sampled houses in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines for one minute. Chromato-immunoassay ELISA (Mitey Checker) was used to detect mite antigenicity. Twenty-three species of mites were identified belonging to 7 families. Of these, Blomia tropicalis (265 mites/g of dust in 87% of households) of Family Glycyphagidae and Dermatophagoides farinae (71 mites/g of dust in 58% of households) of Family Pyroglyphidae were the most prevalent and abundant species. Forty-eight percent of households were detected to have low levels of antigen (mite intensity and antigen level (r = 0.129). Mean Dermatophagoides intensity and antigen levels were also found to have a weak linear relationship. More mites were found in carpeted living rooms (822 mites/g) when compared to non-carpeted living rooms (645 mites/g). Different floor types did not show any difference in mean mite intensity. Likewise, mite intensity did not show correlation with household size.

  18. Different sensitization to storage mites depending on the co-exposure to house dust mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María; Iraola, Victor; Leonor, José Ramón; Bartra, Joan; Rodríguez, Fernando; Boquete, Manuel; Huertas, Ángel Julio; Paniagua, María Josefa; Pinto, Helder; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Co-sensitization to house dust mites (HDMs) and storage mites (SMs) is very frequent, although the clinical relevance is not well established. To describe the pattern of sensitization and immunologic characterization of patients with positive skin prick test reactions to HDMs and SMs in 4 areas of Spain, selected according to high exposure to HDMs and variable exposure to SMs. One hundred sixty-nine individuals with positive skin prick test reactions to HDMs and SMs were included. Specific IgE levels to different mite species and to Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 10 were determined. Immunoblots to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Lepidoglyphus destructor, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae extracts were carried out, and allergograms were obtained. Results of different areas were compared. A high rate of polysensitization to SMs was observed, although 12% of participants did not have specific IgE to any SM species. Sensitization to Dermatophagoides species, Der p 2, and L destructor were predominant, although significant differences were observed among areas depending on the grade of exposure to SMs. In areas with high exposure, the SM allergogram showed greater recognition of group 2 allergen. Sensitization patterns to SMs in patients sensitized to HDMs and SMs differ depending on the exposure to SMs. Sensitization, mainly to L destructor, seems to exist in areas with high exposure, possibly with group 2 allergens mainly involved. However, in areas with low SM populations, sensitizations observed by skin prick testing appear to be related to HDM exposure. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii between first instar western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and nymphs of the twospotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuenong; Enkegaard, Annie

    2010-01-01

    The prey preference of polyphagous predators plays an important role in suppressing different species of pest insects. In this study the prey preference of the predatory mite, Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was examined between nymphs of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and first instar larvae of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), as well as between active and chrysalis spider mite protonymphs and active and chrysalis spider mite deutonymphs. The study was done in the laboratory on bean leaf discs at 25 ± 1° C and 70 ± 5% RH. Amblyseius swirskii had a clear preference for thrips compared to both spider mite protonymphs and deutonymphs. About twice as many thrips as spider mites were consumed. Amblyseius swirskii did not show a preference between active and chrysalis stages of spider mites.

  20. A descendent relation in genus 2

    OpenAIRE

    Belorousski, Pasha; Pandharipande, Rahul

    1998-01-01

    A new codimension 2 relation among descendent strata in the moduli space of stable, 3-pointed, genus 2 curves is found. The space of pointed admissible double covers is used in the calculation. The resulting differential equations satisfied by the genus 2 gravitational potentials of varieties in Gromov-Witten theory are described. These are analogous to the WDVV-equations in genus 0 and Getzler's equations in genus 1. As an application, genus 2 descendent invariants of the projective plane ar...

  1. Mite species inhabiting commercial bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) nests in Polish greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożej, Elżbieta; Witaliński, Wojciech; Szentgyörgyi, Hajnalka; Wantuch, Marta; Moroń, Dawid; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2012-03-01

    Nests of social insects are usually inhabited by various mite species that feed on pollen, other micro-arthropods or are parasitic. Well-known negative effects of worldwide economic importance are caused by mites parasitizing honeybee colonies. Lately, attention has focused on the endoparasitic mite Locustacarus buchneri that has been found in commercial bumblebees. However, little is known of other mites associated with commercial bumblebee nests. Transportation of commercial bumblebee colonies with unwanted residents may introduce foreign mite species to new localities. In this study, we assessed the prevalence and species composition of mites associated with commercial bumblebee nests and determined if the mites are foreign species for Poland and for Europe. The study was conducted on 37 commercial bumblebee nests from two companies (Dutch and Israeli), originating from two greenhouses in southern Poland, and on 20 commercial bumblebee colonies obtained directly from suppliers. The species composition and abundance of mites inhabiting commercial bumblebee nests were determined. Seven mite species from three families were found in nests after greenhouse exploitation. The predominant mite species was Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acaridae) that was a 100-fold more numerous than representatives of the family Laelapidae (Hypoaspis marginepilosa, H. hyatti, H. bombicolens). Representatives of Parasitidae (Parasitellus fucorum, P. crinitus, P. ignotus) were least numerous. All identified mite species are common throughout Europe, foreign species were not found. Mites were not detected in nests obtained directly from suppliers. We conclude that probably bumblebee nests are invaded by local mite species during greenhouse exploitation.

  2. Post harvest control of insects and mites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, A.K.H.

    1986-01-01

    At the Research Station for Floriculture, Aalsmeer, research is conducted to control insects and mites after harvest. Investigations include treatment with gamma radiation and fumigation with methylbromide. In many species of insects mortality or sterility can be induced by low doses of gamma radiation (10–15 krad). Reactions of cut-flowers to gamma radiation differ widely; some species tolerate radiation levels of 50 krad, others are damaged already at 5 krad. There are also indications for a seasonal variation in sensitivity. Symptoms of damage most frequently found after radiation are: flowers fail to open or open only partially; a lighter colour of the leaves and/or petals; a shorter vaselife. Fumigation with methylbromide (30 g/m 3 for 1 ½ hours at 18–23°C) results in a high mortality of thrips and lepidopterous larvae. Many cut-flowers, including liatris and iris, tolerate this treatment. In some species damage was found after fumigation; the occurrence of damage often was positively correlated with the temperature. A small group of species was very sensitive to the treatment, showing damage after fumigations at lower temperatures. Also differences in sensitivity occurred between cultivars (e.g., Rosa). Symptoms of damage most frequently found after fumigation with methylbromide are: a shorter vaselife, leaf scorching, and failure of flowers to open. (author)

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND ENERGY IMPACTS OF MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFS) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. he MITE Program is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protecti...

  4. Irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for mites of the specie Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Valter; Mineiro, Jeferson L.C.

    2009-01-01

    In great populations mites of the specie Tyrophagus putrescentiae can cause damages in stored products. The work had as objective to evaluate the effects of the gamma radiation of the Cobalt-60 to control the mites of the specie T. putrescentiae. The mites were irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 Gy, in a source of Cobalt-60 type Gammacell-220, with a dose rate of 0.718 kGy/hour. Each treatment consisted of four repetitions containing 10 mites each, in a total of approximately 40 mites for treatment. The evaluations were daily, being counted the number of mites died, put eggs and emerged larvae. Based on the obtained results it was concluded that the dose sterilizing for the mites of this specie was of 300 Gy. Already the dose of 600 Gy induced the total mortality of the mites after 11 days of the irradiation process. (author)

  5. Mite (Arthropoda, Acari associates of palms (Arecaceae in Brazil I: present status and new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva L. Q. Santana

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents 72 new records and 10 records from literature on the distribuition of nine species of phytophagous mites and nine species of predatory mites from 13 species of palms in 13 Brazilian States.

  6. Chemistry of the Genus Plectranthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Batterjee

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the phytochemical constituents of the genus Plectranthus reported up to 1999. Only a tetrameric derivative of caffeic acid was isolated from P. japonicus, but a group of long-chain alkylphenols, of possible taxonomic significance in the genus, was also isolated. As a genus of the subfamily Nepetoideae, Plectranthus is free from iridoid glycosides and rich in essential oil (i.e. > 0.5% volatile oil on a dry weight basis. Diterpenoids are the more common secondary metabolites in Plectranthus. The majority of them are highly modified abietanoids. This seems to be similar to the pattern of diterpenoids observed for Salvia, but no clerodane diterpenoids were found in Plectranthus.

  7. Studies on house dust mites in Great Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koraiem, M K; Fahmy, I A

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, house dust mites have showed themselves as one of the health problem worldwide. They have to be considered in the differential diagnosis of allergy particularly in children. House dust mites were collected from eight different areas in Great Cairo. Nine species of mites were recovered from indoors. In order of abundance, they were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Tyrophagous putrescentiae, Acarus siro, Cheyletus malaccensis, Blomia kulagini, Acheles graciles, Ornithonyssus bacoti and Lepidoglyphus destructor. All these mites were collected mainly from Bolak Al Dakrour (28.8%) and Al Wayly (27.6%). The least number (1.8%) and species (only three) were collected from Madent Al Salam. Pet and stray dogs and cats, domestic birds and commensal rodents were more or less reported in the majority of the examined areas. Also, patients with history of allergy of unknown cause, were reported in ten out of 80 houses examined (12.5%). The role played by house dust mites in causing allergic manifestations was important environmental disease agents.

  8. Acaricidal activity of eugenol based compounds against scabies mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cielo Pasay

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Human scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the "itch mite" Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to identify potential new acaricides. In this study, we screened three essential oils and four pure compounds based on eugenol for acaricidal properties.Contact bioassays were performed using live permethrin-sensitive S. scabiei var suis mites harvested from pigs and permethrin-resistant S. scabiei var canis mites harvested from rabbits. Results of bioassays showed that clove oil was highly toxic against scabies mites. Nutmeg oil had moderate toxicity and ylang ylang oil was the least toxic. Eugenol, a major component of clove oil and its analogues--acetyleugenol and isoeugenol, demonstrated levels of toxicity comparable to benzyl benzoate, the positive control acaricide, killing mites within an hour of contact.The acaricidal properties demonstrated by eugenol and its analogues show promise as leads for future development of alternative topical acaricides to treat scabies.

  9. Acaricidal activity of eugenol based compounds against scabies mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasay, Cielo; Mounsey, Kate; Stevenson, Graeme; Davis, Rohan; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Vyszenski-Moher, Diann; Andrews, Kathy; McCarthy, James

    2010-08-11

    Human scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the "itch mite" Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to identify potential new acaricides. In this study, we screened three essential oils and four pure compounds based on eugenol for acaricidal properties. Contact bioassays were performed using live permethrin-sensitive S. scabiei var suis mites harvested from pigs and permethrin-resistant S. scabiei var canis mites harvested from rabbits. Results of bioassays showed that clove oil was highly toxic against scabies mites. Nutmeg oil had moderate toxicity and ylang ylang oil was the least toxic. Eugenol, a major component of clove oil and its analogues--acetyleugenol and isoeugenol, demonstrated levels of toxicity comparable to benzyl benzoate, the positive control acaricide, killing mites within an hour of contact. The acaricidal properties demonstrated by eugenol and its analogues show promise as leads for future development of alternative topical acaricides to treat scabies.

  10. Rewired RNAi-mediated genome surveillance in house dust mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Pavel; Flynt, Alex Sutton

    2018-01-01

    House dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history, being descendants of a parasitic ancestor. Transition to parasitism is frequently accompanied by genome rearrangements, possibly to accommodate the genetic change needed to access new ecology. Transposable element (TE) activity is a source of genomic instability that can trigger large-scale genomic alterations. Eukaryotes have multiple transposon control mechanisms, one of which is RNA interference (RNAi). Investigation of the dust mite genome failed to identify a major RNAi pathway: the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathway, which has been replaced by a novel small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-like pathway. Co-opting of piRNA function by dust mite siRNAs is extensive, including establishment of TE control master loci that produce siRNAs. Interestingly, other members of the Acari have piRNAs indicating loss of this mechanism in dust mites is a recent event. Flux of RNAi-mediated control of TEs highlights the unusual arc of dust mite evolution. PMID:29377900

  11. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTIVE GROWTH GROUPS (SPGG: INNOVATION ON PAPAYA MITE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marycruz Abato-Zárate

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Grower’s previous experience and their ability to communicate technical information to other growers, allows greater adoption of technologies. Thus, appropriation of technologies of mite management and sampling was evaluated, based on the “Simultaneous Productive Growth Groups (SPGG” technology transfer model. A preliminary diagnosis was made, evaluating the technology transfer achieved by six leading growers showing up continuously to seven meetings carried out from March to July 2010, and also by 19 growers showing up on a more irregular basis. All growers were from the municipality of Cotaxtla and belonged to the Papaya-Product-System of Veracruz, Mexico. Participation, attitude and efficacy of training were evaluated with a survey. Forty-two percent of growers considered the papaya ring spot virus as the main problem and 48 % revealed spider mites as the second one; 96 % used pesticides on spider mites. Participation of the SPGG basic group was 71 %, who agreed on sampling, recording data in sampling forms and using selective acaricides. Seventy percent were able to recognize spider mites from predatory mites and 83 % recognized selective acaricides. Growers considered that sampling can help reduce control costs. The SPGG model allowed building collective knowledge and better decision making by the working group.

  12. Rewired RNAi-mediated genome surveillance in house dust mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Mosharrof; Klimov, Pavel; Flynt, Alex Sutton

    2018-01-01

    House dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history, being descendants of a parasitic ancestor. Transition to parasitism is frequently accompanied by genome rearrangements, possibly to accommodate the genetic change needed to access new ecology. Transposable element (TE) activity is a source of genomic instability that can trigger large-scale genomic alterations. Eukaryotes have multiple transposon control mechanisms, one of which is RNA interference (RNAi). Investigation of the dust mite genome failed to identify a major RNAi pathway: the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathway, which has been replaced by a novel small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-like pathway. Co-opting of piRNA function by dust mite siRNAs is extensive, including establishment of TE control master loci that produce siRNAs. Interestingly, other members of the Acari have piRNAs indicating loss of this mechanism in dust mites is a recent event. Flux of RNAi-mediated control of TEs highlights the unusual arc of dust mite evolution.

  13. Rewired RNAi-mediated genome surveillance in house dust mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharrof Mondal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available House dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history, being descendants of a parasitic ancestor. Transition to parasitism is frequently accompanied by genome rearrangements, possibly to accommodate the genetic change needed to access new ecology. Transposable element (TE activity is a source of genomic instability that can trigger large-scale genomic alterations. Eukaryotes have multiple transposon control mechanisms, one of which is RNA interference (RNAi. Investigation of the dust mite genome failed to identify a major RNAi pathway: the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA pathway, which has been replaced by a novel small-interfering RNA (siRNA-like pathway. Co-opting of piRNA function by dust mite siRNAs is extensive, including establishment of TE control master loci that produce siRNAs. Interestingly, other members of the Acari have piRNAs indicating loss of this mechanism in dust mites is a recent event. Flux of RNAi-mediated control of TEs highlights the unusual arc of dust mite evolution.

  14. Repeatability of feather mite prevalence and intensity in passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Diaz-Real

    Full Text Available Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance components. We compiled the largest dataset so far available: 119 Paleartic passerine bird species, 75,944 individual birds, ca. 1.8 million mites, seven countries, 23 study years. Several analyses and approaches were made to estimate R and adjusted repeatability (R(adj after controlling for potential confounding factors (breeding period, weather, habitat, spatial autocorrelation and researcher identity. The prevalence of feather mites was moderately repeatable (R = 0.26-0.53; R(adj = 0.32-0.57; smaller values were found for intensity (R = 0.19-0.30; R(adj = 0.18-0.30. These moderate repeatabilities show that prevalence and intensity of feather mites differ among species, but also that the high variation within species leads to considerable overlap among bird species. Differences in the prevalence and intensity of feather mites within bird species were small among habitats, suggesting that local factors are playing a secondary role. However, effects of local climatic conditions were partially observed for intensity.

  15. Patterns of parasitism by tracheal mites (Locustacarus buchneri) in natural bumble bee populations

    OpenAIRE

    Otterstatter , Michael; Whidden , Troy

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Parasitic mites are among the most destructive enemies of social bees. However, aside from mites of honey bees, virtually nothing is known about the prevalence and effects of parasitic mites in natural bee populations. In this paper, we report on parasitism of bumble bees (Bombus spp.) by the tracheal mite Locustacarus buchneri Stammer in south-western Alberta, Canada. Parasitism of bumble bees by L. buchneri occurred at many sites and in several host species. However,...

  16. Chemotaxonomy of the genus Stemphylium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Andersen, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungal genus Stemphylium (Anamophic Pleospora) is often found on various crops, and especially the common animal feed plant Medicago sativa (alfalfa) is often infected by this plant pathogen. With this in mind it is important to consider what consequences such a contamination can...... via HPLC-UV/VIS-MS analysis as a third method for identification and to investigate the chemical potential of the genus Stemphylium. A total of 253 unique compounds were used for chemotaxonomy and the majority of these were unknown compounds....

  17. Description of Medwayella independencia (Siphonaptera, Stivaliidae, a new species of flea from Mindanao Island, the Philippines and their phoretic mites, and miscellaneous flea records from the Malay Archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hastriter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Medwayella independencia, a new species of flea, is described from the tupaiid host Urogale everetti (Thomas from Mindanao Island, Philippines. Several other species of fleas are also recorded from the Philippines including a single male of Lentistivalius philippinensis Hastriter & Bush, 2013 (previously known only from two males, the bat fleas Thaumapsylla breviceps orientalis Smit and Thaumapsylla longiforceps Traub, a single unidentified female species of Macrostylophora Ewing collected from the murid Bullimus bagobos Mearns, and a pair of Medwayella robinsoni ssp. from Sundasciurus hoogstraali (Sanborn from Busuanga Island, Philippines. Representatives of Medwayella Traub, 1972 and Macrostylophora have not previously been recorded from the Philippines. A key to the male sex of Medwayella is provided. Phoretic mites of the genus Psylloglyphus (family Winterschmidtiidae were present under the abdominal sclerites of several male and female specimens of M. independencia. This is the second report of a phoretic mite on a species of Medwayella Traub. The co-evolutionary implications between phoretic mites and fleas are discussed.

  18. Candidate predators for biological control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesna, I.; Wolfs, P.; Faraji, F.; Roy, L.; Komdeur, J.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, is currently a significant pest in the poultry industry in Europe. Biological control by the introduction of predatory mites is one of the various options for controlling poultry red mites. Here, we present the first results of an attempt to identify

  19. Candidate predators for biological control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesna, Izabela; Wolfs, Peter; Faraji, Farid; Roy, Lise; Komdeur, Jan; Sabelis, Maurice W.

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, is currently a significant pest in the poultry industry in Europe. Biological control by the introduction of predatory mites is one of the various options for controlling poultry red mites. Here, we present the first results of an attempt to identify

  20. Mechanisms of insecticide resistance in field populations of varroa mite (Acari: Mesostigmata: Varroidae)in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destuctor is a serious threat to beekeeping and crops that rely on honey bee for pollination. The Varroa mite not only causes significant damage to honey bees by feeding on their haemolymph, but also serves as a vector of disease. In addition, the Varroa mite has develo...

  1. Heritability of defence and life-history traits in the two-spotted spider mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tien, N.S.H.; Sabelis, M.W.; Egas, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two-spotted spider mites hide against predatory mites in a web of self-produced sticky silk. The proteins invested in this shelter may reduce investment in reproduction. Questions: Do spider mite populations harbor genetic variation for web production, thereby enabling a response to

  2. Influence of spatio-temporal resource availability on mushroom mite diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kimiko

    2013-11-01

    Although biodiversity in nature is of fundamental importance because it improves the sustainability of ecosystems, communities of microscopic organisms are generally excluded from conservation targets for biodiversity. Here, I hypothesize that mushroom mite species richness is correlated with both spatial (i.e., mushroom size) and temporal (i.e., longevity of fruiting bodies) resource availability. I collected fruiting bodies in an old-growth forest over 4 years to collect mites and insects inhabiting the mushrooms. Mites were collected from 47 % of the fruiting bodies and approximately 60 % of the mite species were collected only once. Mite species richness was significantly correlated with the availability of long-lasting fruiting bodies. For example, bracket fungi contained more mite species than ephemeral fruiting bodies. Insect presence was also correlated with mushroom mite richness, probably as phoretic hosts and food resources for predacious mites. On the other hand, mushroom size seemed to be less important; small fruiting bodies sometimes harbored several mite species. Although mite species richness was correlated with mushroom species richness, mushroom specificity by mites was not clear except for a preference for long-lasting fruiting bodies. Therefore, I suggest that a constant supply of coarse woody debris is crucial for maintaining preferred resources for mushroom mites (e.g., bracket fungi) and their associated insects (mycophilous and possibly saproxylic insects).

  3. A review of the water mite fauna from the Australasian and Pacific region (Acari: Hydrachnidia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.

    2005-01-01

    A review is given of the water mite fauna of the Australasian and Pacific region. Within the Australasian region, New Zealand has the highest percentage of endemism. It is concluded that the water mite fauna of the islands in the South Pacific is of Australasian origin, while the water mite fauna of

  4. Prey preference of the phytoseiid mite Typhlodromus pyri. 1. Response to volatile kairomones.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.

    1988-01-01

    Using a Y-tube olfactometer, a study has been made of the response of females of the predatory miteTyphlodromus pyri Scheuten (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) to volatile kairomones of three prey species: the European red spider mite (Panonychus ulmi (Koch)), the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae

  5. The water mite family Pontarachnidae, with new data on its peculiar morphological structures (Acari: Hydachnidia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.; Alberti, G.; Sabelis, M.W.; Bruin, J.

    2010-01-01

    The water mite family Pontarachnidae Koenike is the only family of the water mites (Hydrachnidia) occurring in the marine environment. Two genera of this family are known, Pontarachna Philippi and Litarachna Walter. Until now, this has been one of the least known water mite families. This paper

  6. A new species of Neoseiulus (Acari: Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae with a key for the Brazilian species of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus dos Santos Rocha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neoseiulus HUGHES, 1948 is currently one of the largest genus of Phytoseiidae Berlese. Neoseiulus demitei sp. nov., a new species of phytoseiid mite from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, is illustrated and described based on specimens collected on Tibouchina sp. (Melastomataceae plants. This new species differs from others by having most of propodossomal setae reaching the base of nearby setae and a constriction of ventrianal shield at level of preanal pores. Nevertheless, this new species is the first of the species subgroup kennetti described from Brazil. A key of Neoseiulus species reported in Brazil is also included.

  7. mites y control constitucional en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arminda Balbuena Cisneros

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los límites a la reforma constitucional es un tema siempre vigente en el derecho constitucional, ello es así por las posibles arbitrariedades que pueden cometer los órganos detentadores del poder mediante las modificaciones a la constitución. En México, hoy en día este tema cobra particular relevancia por el profundo proceso de reforma que se vive, y por la controvertida posición que la corte mexicana ha adoptado en relación con los límites a la reforma. El presente artículo trata de dar una visión general de los límites al poder de reforma y, en particular, de la posición que la suprema corte de justicia de la nación ha adoptado respecto a los mismos.

  8. Environmental Engineering Approaches toward Sustainable Management of Spider Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2012-10-26

    Integrated pest management (IPM), which combines physical, biological, and chemical control measures to complementary effect, is one of the most important approaches to environmentally friendly sustainable agriculture. To expand IPM, we need to develop new pest control measures, reinforce existing measures, and investigate interactions between measures. Continued progress in the development of environmental control technologies and consequent price drops have facilitated their integration into plant production and pest control. Here I describe environmental control technologies for the IPM of spider mites through: (1) the disturbance of photoperiod-dependent diapause by artificial light, which may lead to death in seasonal environments; (2) the use of ultraviolet radiation to kill or repel mites; and (3) the use of water vapor control for the long-term cold storage of commercially available natural enemies. Such environmental control technologies have great potential for the efficient control of spider mites through direct physical effects and indirect effects via natural enemies.

  9. Additions to the genus Acoridium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ames, Oakes

    1937-01-01

    The genus Acoridium is characterized by an extraordinary history. The original species, A. tenellum, a native of the Philippine Islands, was described at length from a fruiting specimen in 1843 by Nees von Esenbeck and referred to the Philydraceae. This treatment was prompted by the aspect of the

  10. The genus Babylonia (Prosobranchia, Buccinidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regteren Altena, van C.O.; Gittenberger, E.

    1981-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The members of the Ivory Shell genus Babylonia Schlüter, 1838, belonging to the Buccinidae, are characterized by more or less slender buccinoid shells, mostly ornamented with a beautiful colour-pattern. Some species, e.g. the type species B. spirata, have a conspicuous sutural canal

  11. Air-conditioner filters enriching dust mites allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Li, Chaopin; Xu, Haifeng; Xu, Pengfei; Zhu, Haibin; Diao, Jidong; Li, Na; Zhao, Beibei

    2015-01-01

    We detected the concentration of dust mites allergen (Der f1 & Der p1) in the air of different places before and after the starting of air-conditioners in Wuhu City, Anhui, China, and to discuss the relation between the dust mites allergen in air-conditioner filters and the asthma attack. The dust samples were collected from the air-conditioner filters in dining rooms, shopping malls, hotels and households respectively. Concentrations of dust mites major group allergen 1 (Der f 1, Der p1) were detected with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the dust mite immune activities were determined by dot-ELISA. The concentration of Der f1 in dining rooms, shopping malls, hotels and households was 1.52 μg/g, 1.24 μg/g, 1.31 μg/g and 1.46 μg/g respectively, and the concentration of Der p1 in above-mentioned places was 1.23 μg/g, 1.12 μg/g, 1.16 μg/g and 1.18 μg/g respectively. The concentration of Der f1 & Der p1 in air was higher after the air-conditioners starting one hours later, and the difference was significant (Pair-conditioner filters can enrich dust mites major group allergen, and the allergens can induce asthma. The air-conditioner filters shall be cleaned or replaced regularly to prevent or reduce accumulation of the dust mites and its allergens.

  12. Host finding behaviour of the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, J W S; Lima, D B; Sabelis, M W; Pallini, A; Gondim, M G C

    2014-12-01

    For the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, its host plant, the coconut palm, is not merely a source of food, but more generally a habitat to live in for several generations. For these minute organisms, finding a new plant is difficult and risky, especially because their main mode of dispersal is passive drifting with the wind and because they are highly specialized on their host plant. Consequently, the probability of landing on a suitable host is very low, let alone to land in their specific microhabitat within the host. How coconut mites manage to find their microhabitat within a host plant is still underexplored. We tested the hypothesis that they use volatile chemical information emanating from the plant to find a specific site within their host plants and/or use non-volatile plant chemicals to stay at a profitable site on the plant. This was investigated in a Y-tube olfactometer (i.e. under conditions of a directed wind flow) and on cross-shaped arenas (i.e. under conditions of turbulent air) that either allowed contact with odour sources or not. The mites had to choose between odours from specific parts (leaflet, spikelet or fruit) of a non-infested coconut plant and clean air as the alternative. In the olfactometer experiments, no mites were found to reach the upwind end of the Y-tube: coconut mites was found only when the arm of the arena contained discs of fruit epidermis and contact with these discs was allowed. The results suggest that coconut mites on palm trees are not attracted to specific sites on the plant by volatile plant chemicals, but that they arrested once they contact the substrate of specific sites. Possibly, they perceive non-volatile chemicals, but these remain to be identified.

  13. Asynchronous development of honey bee host and Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) influences reproductive potential of mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Maria J; De Guzman, Lilia I; Rinderer, Thomas E; Frake, Amanda M; Wagnitz, Jeremy; Whelan, Pádraig M

    2011-08-01

    A high proportion of nonreproductive (NR) Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Mesostigmata: Varroidae), is commonly observed in honey bee colonies displaying the varroa sensitive hygienic trait (VSH). This study was conducted to determine the influence of brood removal and subsequent host reinvasion of varroa mites on mite reproduction. We collected foundress mites from stages of brood (newly sealed larvae, prepupae, white-eyed pupae, and pink-eyed pupae) and phoretic mites from adult bees. We then inoculated these mites into cells containing newly sealed larvae. Successful reproduction (foundress laid both a mature male and female) was low (13%) but most common in mites coming from sealed larvae. Unsuccessful reproductive attempts (foundress failed to produce both a mature male and female) were most common in mites from sealed larvae (22%) and prepupae (61%). Lack of any progeny was most common for mites from white-eyed (83%) and pink-eyed pupae (92%). We also collected foundress mites from sealed larvae and transferred them to cells containing newly sealed larvae, prepupae, white-eyed pupae, or pink-eyed pupae. Successful reproduction only occurred in the transfers to sealed larvae (26%). Unsuccessful reproductive attempts were most common in transfers to newly sealed larvae (40%) and to prepupae (25%). Unsuccessful attempts involved the production of immature progeny (60%), the production of only mature daughters (26%) or the production of only a mature male (14%). Generally, lack of progeny was not associated with mites having a lack of stored sperm. Our results suggest that mites exposed to the removal of prepupae or older brood due to hygiene are unlikely to produce viable mites if they invade new hosts soon after brood removal. Asynchrony between the reproductive status of reinvading mites and the developmental stage of their reinvasion hosts may be a primary cause of NR mites in hygienic colonies. Even if reinvading mites use hosts having the proper age

  14. The development of the princial genus theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmermeyer, Franz

    2002-01-01

    In this article we sketch the development of the principal genus theorem from its conception by Gauss in the case of binary quadratic forms to the cohomological formulation of the principal genus theorem of class field theory by Emmy Noether.

  15. Oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of plain area of the Southern European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Natalia V; Poltavskaya, Marina P

    2013-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the fauna of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) mostly of a plain area of the Southern European Russia. The most updated taxonomic list of oribatid mite taxa compiled from the original authors' data collected after sam- pling soil, nests and plumage of birds, as well as published sources is presented. It includes 256 species of oribatid mites belonging to 72 families. Twenty species and one family of oribatid mites are recorded for the first time at the research territory. The abundance of mites in the soil is also provided for selected species.

  16. Differential water mite parasitism, phenoloxidase activity, and resistance to mites are unrelated across pairs of related damselfly species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia J Mlynarek

    Full Text Available Related host species often demonstrate differences in prevalence and/or intensity of infection by particular parasite species, as well as different levels of resistance to those parasites. The mechanisms underlying this interspecific variation in parasitism and resistance expression are not well understood. Surprisingly, few researchers have assessed relations between actual levels of parasitism and resistance to parasites seen in nature across multiple host species. The main goal of this study was to determine whether interspecific variation in resistance against ectoparasitic larval water mites either was predictive of interspecific variation in parasitism for ten closely related species of damselflies (grouped into five "species pairs", or was predicted by interspecific variation in a commonly used measure of innate immunity (total Phenoloxidase or potential PO activity. Two of five species pairs had interspecific differences in proportions of individuals resisting larval Arrenurus water mites, only one of five species pairs had species differences in prevalence of larval Arrenurus water mites, and another two of five species pairs showed species differences in mean PO activity. Within the two species pairs where species differed in proportion of individuals resisting mites the species with the higher proportion did not have correspondingly higher PO activity levels. Furthermore, the proportion of individuals resisting mites mirrored prevalence of parasitism in only one species pair. There was no interspecific variation in median intensity of mite infestation within any species pair. We conclude that a species' relative ability to resist particular parasites does not explain interspecific variation in parasitism within species pairs and that neither resistance nor parasitism is reflected by interspecific variation in total PO or potential PO activity.

  17. Differential water mite parasitism, phenoloxidase activity, and resistance to mites are unrelated across pairs of related damselfly species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarek, Julia J; Iserbyt, Arne; Nagel, Laura; Forbes, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Related host species often demonstrate differences in prevalence and/or intensity of infection by particular parasite species, as well as different levels of resistance to those parasites. The mechanisms underlying this interspecific variation in parasitism and resistance expression are not well understood. Surprisingly, few researchers have assessed relations between actual levels of parasitism and resistance to parasites seen in nature across multiple host species. The main goal of this study was to determine whether interspecific variation in resistance against ectoparasitic larval water mites either was predictive of interspecific variation in parasitism for ten closely related species of damselflies (grouped into five "species pairs"), or was predicted by interspecific variation in a commonly used measure of innate immunity (total Phenoloxidase or potential PO activity). Two of five species pairs had interspecific differences in proportions of individuals resisting larval Arrenurus water mites, only one of five species pairs had species differences in prevalence of larval Arrenurus water mites, and another two of five species pairs showed species differences in mean PO activity. Within the two species pairs where species differed in proportion of individuals resisting mites the species with the higher proportion did not have correspondingly higher PO activity levels. Furthermore, the proportion of individuals resisting mites mirrored prevalence of parasitism in only one species pair. There was no interspecific variation in median intensity of mite infestation within any species pair. We conclude that a species' relative ability to resist particular parasites does not explain interspecific variation in parasitism within species pairs and that neither resistance nor parasitism is reflected by interspecific variation in total PO or potential PO activity.

  18. Early-life house dust mite allergens, childhood mite sensitization, and respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, L; Sunyer, J; Tischer, C; Gehring, U; Wickman, M; Garcia-Esteban, R; Lehmann, I; Kull, I; Reich, A; Lau, S; Wijga, A; Antó, J M; Nawrot, T S; Heinrich, J; Keil, T; Torrent, M

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens during early life may play a role in the development of the immune system and inception of asthma. To describe the house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentrations in bedroom dust during early life and to evaluate its associations with HDM sensitization, wheezing, and asthma, from birth to school age, in 5 geographically spread European birth cohorts. We included 4334 children from INMA-Menorca (Spain), BAMSE (Sweden), LISAplus and MAS (Germany), and PIAMA-NHS (the Netherlands). Dust samples were collected from bedrooms during early life and analyzed for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f1). HDM concentrations were divided into four categories. Sensitization was determined by specific IgE. Wheezing and asthma information up to 8/10 years was collected through questionnaires. We performed mixed-effects logistic regression models and expressed associations as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. House dust mite concentrations varied across cohorts. Mean allergen concentrations were highest in INMA-Menorca (geometric mean (GM) Der p1 = 3.3 μg/g) and LISAplus (GM Der f1 = 2.1 μg/g) and lowest in BAMSE (GM Der p1 = 0.1 μg/g, Der f1 = 0.3 μg/g). Moderate and high HDM concentrations were significantly (P-values life plays a role in the development of allergic sensitization but not in the development of respiratory outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fatal attraction: Male spider mites prefer females killed by the mite-pathogenic fungus Neozygites floridana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trandem, Nina; Bhattarai, Upendra Raj; Westrum, Karin; Knudsen, Geir Kjølberg; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2015-06-01

    Exploring prospective mates can be risky. Males of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae approach and guard immobile (quiescent) female nymphs to increase their chances of fathering offspring, this being a first-male sperm priority species. We investigated the behaviour of male T. urticae towards females killed by the mite pathogenic fungus Neozygites floridana, letting them choose between a fungal killed and a healthy quiescent female. The dead female (called cadaver) was in one of three stages: (1) non-sporulating; (2) sporulating with primary conidia (non-infective); (3) surrounded/partly covered by secondary capilliconidia (infective). When the cadaver was in stage 1 or 2, males were significantly more often observed near the cadaver than near the healthy female. When the cadaver was in stage 3 (infective capilliconidia), males preferred the vicinity of healthy females. The frequency of two male behaviours, touching and guarding, was also recorded. Touching the cadaver tended to decrease as cadaver developed, whereas touching the healthy females increased. Guarding of non-sporulating cadavers and healthy females was equally common, while guarding of sporulating cadavers was only observed once (stage 2) or not at all (stage 3). To differentiate between the effect of fungal infection and sex, we also let males choose between a non-sporulating cadaver of each sex. Males then preferred to approach the female cadaver. Touching behaviour followed the same pattern, and guarding of male cadavers was not observed. Our results indicate that T. urticae males are more attracted to non-infective female cadavers than to healthy females, only detecting their mistake when very close. Moreover, males approach and explore cadavers surrounded by infective conidia. Whether the results of host manipulation by the pathogen or just sensory constraints in the host, this inability to detect unsuitable and indeed infective mates promotes transmission of the pathogen. Copyright © 2015 The

  20. Symbiotic diversity in the cosmopolitan genus Acacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James K. Leary; Paul W. Singleton; Paul G. Scowcroft; Dulal Borthakur

    2006-01-01

    Acacia is the second largest genus within the Leguminosae, with 1352 species identified. This genus is now known to be polyphyletic and the international scientific community will presumably split Acacia into five new genera. This review examines the diversity of biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis within Acacia as a single genus. Due to its global importance, an...

  1. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes: lower species richness compared to European mainland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae. A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai.

  2. Wheat curl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) dispersal and its relationship with kernel red streaking in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Lee, E A; Sears, M K; Schaafsma, A W

    2005-10-01

    Wheat curl mites, Aceria tosichella Keifer, dispersing from wheat (Triticum spp.) to nearby corn (Zea mays L.) fields play a role in the development of kernel red streaking in corn. These studies were undertaken to verify the relationship of wheat curl mite to kernel red streaking, to determine whether wheat is the main source of curl mites dispersing into corn and to determine whether planting corn in temporal or spatial isolation of wheat is a valid management strategy. These studies were conducted on farm fields using sticky traps to monitor mites, followed by sampling mature grain for kernel streaking in southwestern Ontario from 1999 to 2002. The dominant source mites were winter wheat. Mite dispersal occurred during the first 3 wk of winter wheat maturation after the wheat had reached Zadoks stage 87. Mite dispersal corresponded to prevailing winds in the area with the lowest number of mites and the lowest severity of kernel red streaking occurring 60 m from wheat fields planted to the north, south, and east of cornfields and 90 m from wheat fields planted to the west of cornfields. The severity of kernel red streaking was positively correlated with the density of wheat curl mites in corn; however, the correlation was weak and kernel red streaking was still high in many cornfields when few or no mites were present. These findings suggest that wheat curl mite migration into corn is not entirely predictive of the incidence and severity of kernel red streaking.

  3. Diversity of House Dust Mite Species in Xishuangbanna Dai, a Tropical Rainforest Region in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Miao Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the species diversity of home dust mites (HDM in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China. Methods. From August 2010 to January 2011, mite-allergic patients and healthy controls were invited to participate. Dust samples from the patients’ homes were collected, and mites in the samples were isolated. Permanent slides were prepared for morphologically based species determination. Results. In total, 6316 mite specimens of morphologically identifiable species were found in 233 dust samples taken from 41 homes. The result shows that the mite family of Pyroglyphidae occupied the highest percentage of the total amount of mites collected, followed by Cheyletidae family. The most common adult Pyroglyphidae mites were Dermatophagoides (D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and D. siboney. The most common mites found from other families were Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Aleuroglyphus ovatus. Four main allergenic dust mite species D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, D. siboney, and Blomia tropicalis were found to be coinhabiting in 6/41 homes. Conclusion. The HDM population in homes in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China, has its own characteristics. It has rich dust mite species and the dust mite densities do not show significant variation across seasons.

  4. Weed management practices affect the diversity and relative abundance of physic nut mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Althiéris de Sousa; Sarmento, Renato A; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; de Souza, Danival José; Teodoro, Adenir V; Silva, Daniella G

    2015-03-01

    Crop management practices determine weed community, which in turn may influence patterns of diversity and abundance of associated arthropods. This study aimed to evaluate whether local weed management practices influence the diversity and relative abundance of phytophagous and predatory mites, as well as mites with undefined feeding habits--of the families Oribatidae and Acaridae--in a physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) plantation subjected to (1) within-row herbicide spraying and between-row mowing; (2) within-row herbicide spraying and no between-row mowing; (3) within-row weeding and between-row mowing; (4) within-row weeding and no between-row mowing; and (5) unmanaged (control). The herbicide used was glyphosate. Herbicide treatments resulted in higher diversity and relative abundance of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit on physic nut shrubs. This was probably due to the toxic effects of the herbicide on mites or to removal of weeds. Within-row herbicide spraying combined with between-row mowing was the treatment that most contributed to this effect. Our results show that within-row weeds harbor important species of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit. However, the dynamics of such mites in the system can be changed according to the weed management practice applied. Among the predatory mites of the family Phytoseiidae Amblydromalus sp. was the most abundant, whereas Brevipalpus phoenicis was the most frequent phytophagous mite and an unidentified oribatid species was the most frequent mite with undefined feeding habit.

  5. A feeding protocol for delivery of agents to assess development in Varroa mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Cabrera

    Full Text Available A novel feeding protocol for delivery of bio-active agents to Varroa mites was developed by providing mites with honey bee larva hemolymph supplemented with cultured insect cells and selected materials delivered on a fibrous cotton substrate. Mites were starved, fed on treated hemolymph to deliver selected agents and then returned to bee larvae. Transcript levels of two reference genes, actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, as well as for nine selected genes involved in reproductive processes showed that the starvation and feeding protocol periods did not pose a high level of stress to the mites as transcript levels remained comparable between phoretic mites and those completing the protocol. The feeding protocol was used to deliver molecules such as hormone analogs or plasmids. Mites fed with Tebufenozide, an ecdysone analog, had higher transcript levels of shade than untreated or solvent treated mites. In order to extend this feeding protocol, cultured insect cells were incorporated to a final ratio of 1 part cells and 2 parts hemolymph. Although supplementation with Bombyx mori Bm5 cells increased the amount of hemolymph consumed per mite, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of mites that fed and survived. On the other hand, Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells reduced significantly the percentage of mites that fed and survived as well as the amount of hemolymph consumed. The feeding protocol provides a dynamic platform with which to challenge the Varroa mite to establish efficacy of control agents for this devastating honey bee pest.

  6. A feeding protocol for delivery of agents to assess development in Varroa mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Ana R; Shirk, Paul D; Teal, Peter E A

    2017-01-01

    A novel feeding protocol for delivery of bio-active agents to Varroa mites was developed by providing mites with honey bee larva hemolymph supplemented with cultured insect cells and selected materials delivered on a fibrous cotton substrate. Mites were starved, fed on treated hemolymph to deliver selected agents and then returned to bee larvae. Transcript levels of two reference genes, actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), as well as for nine selected genes involved in reproductive processes showed that the starvation and feeding protocol periods did not pose a high level of stress to the mites as transcript levels remained comparable between phoretic mites and those completing the protocol. The feeding protocol was used to deliver molecules such as hormone analogs or plasmids. Mites fed with Tebufenozide, an ecdysone analog, had higher transcript levels of shade than untreated or solvent treated mites. In order to extend this feeding protocol, cultured insect cells were incorporated to a final ratio of 1 part cells and 2 parts hemolymph. Although supplementation with Bombyx mori Bm5 cells increased the amount of hemolymph consumed per mite, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of mites that fed and survived. On the other hand, Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells reduced significantly the percentage of mites that fed and survived as well as the amount of hemolymph consumed. The feeding protocol provides a dynamic platform with which to challenge the Varroa mite to establish efficacy of control agents for this devastating honey bee pest.

  7. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) from Azorean passerines (Aves, Passeriformes): lower species richness compared to European mainland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Mironov, Sergey; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Literak, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ten passerine species were examined on three islands of the Azores (North Atlantic) during 2013 and 2014 in order to identify their feather mite assemblages. We recorded 19 feather mite species belonging to four families of the superfamily Analgoidea (Analgidae, Proctophyllodidae, Psoroptoididae and Trouessartiidae). A high prevalence of feather mite species was recorded on the majority of the examined host species. Only three passerine species (Sylvia atricapilla, Regulus regulus and Serinus canaria) presented the same full complex of mite species as commonly occurs in the plumage of their closest relatives in continental Europe. Passer domesticus presented the same limited fauna of feather mites living in the plumage as do its co-specifics in continental Europe. Carduelis carduelis bears the same feather mite species as do most of its continental populations in Europe, but it lacks one mite species occurring on this host in Egypt. Turdus merula, Pyrrhula murina and Fringilla coelebs are missing several mite species common to their continental relatives. This diminution could be explained by the founder effect, whereby a limited number of colonizing individuals did not transport the full set of feather mite species, or by the extinction of some mite species after initially having reached the Azores. The only individual of Motacilla cinerea sampled in this study presented a new host record for the mite species Trouessartia jedliczkai. © P. Rodrigues et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.

  8. Peak expiration flow variations may reflect house-dust-mite exposure and patient reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, T E; Korsgaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Peak expiration flow records from patients allergic to house-dust mites (Dermatophagoides spp.) may show a characteristic variation from week to week due to the general life cycle of these mites in dwellings. This was demonstrated from the combined records of 10 patients recorded in their own homes, covering a period of 30 consecutive weeks and comprising 973 peak flows. The levels of house-dust mites were predicted from published data for floor-dust samples from Danish dwellings. Peak flow increased or decreased in accordance with weekly changes in the concentration of mites, rather than as an immediate reaction to the current concentration of live, active mites. A dose-response relation was demonstrated. This suggests that the patients' peak flow variations might be linked to molting in mites. As such, peak flow measurements have a potential as a tool for the specific diagnosis of, monitoring of, and research in asthma caused by domestic mites.

  9. House-dust mites in our homes are a contamination from outdoor sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Thorkil E.

    2010-01-01

    there and that the stages between them, the inactive moulting stages, are absent. Therefore the mites probably do not carry out their life cycles in our dwellings, but are more likely contaminations from the open. Findings of low level concentrations can be explained by mites coming from outdoors and sedimented......Avoidance advices for house-dust mite sensitized persons are currently based upon the idea, that the mites (Dermatophagoides spp.) are part of the indoor fauna. A closer look at development stages in the house-dust samples shows, however, that only the mites' active stages are present...... in accordance with known physical laws. The occasional finding of higher concentrations is the result of synchronized populations of the mites developing outdoors and being passively transported into our homes by wind and dust. The hypothesis explains why we find mites in our homes but nonetheless have...

  10. Nasal mites (Mesostigmata, Rhinonyssidae in Sternidae (Aves: Charadriiformes on the southern Coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Silva da Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Six species of birds of the family Sternidae are often found on the southern coast of South America. Sterna trudeaui, S. hirundinacea, Thalasseus maximus, T. acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris are South American residents and Sterna hirundo, a Nearctic migrant. At least 500 species of nasal mites have been described around the world, and Rhinonyssidae is the most diverse family. These mites are bloodsucking endoparasites that inhabit the respiratory system of birds. This study aimed to report on occurrences of nasal mites in Sternidae on the southern coast of Brazil. Of the 106 birds analyzed, 8.5% (9 birds were parasitized by nasal mites. This report provides the first record in the Neotropical region for two mite species, Sternostoma boydi and Larinyssus orbicularis parasitizing Thalasseus acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris. No nasal mites were found in Sterna trudeaui or Thalasseus maximus. One host individual (T. acuflavidus was parasitized by two species of nasal mites, S. boydi and L. orbicularis.

  11. Nasal mites (Mesostigmata, Rhinonyssidae) in Sternidae (Aves: Charadriiformes) on the southern Coast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego Silva da; Scheer, Simone; Muller, Gertrud

    2018-02-19

    Six species of birds of the family Sternidae are often found on the southern coast of South America. Sterna trudeaui, S. hirundinacea, Thalasseus maximus, T. acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris are South American residents and Sterna hirundo, a Nearctic migrant. At least 500 species of nasal mites have been described around the world, and Rhinonyssidae is the most diverse family. These mites are bloodsucking endoparasites that inhabit the respiratory system of birds. This study aimed to report on occurrences of nasal mites in Sternidae on the southern coast of Brazil. Of the 106 birds analyzed, 8.5% (9 birds) were parasitized by nasal mites. This report provides the first record in the Neotropical region for two mite species, Sternostoma boydi and Larinyssus orbicularis parasitizing Thalasseus acuflavidus and Sternula superciliaris. No nasal mites were found in Sterna trudeaui or Thalasseus maximus. One host individual (T. acuflavidus) was parasitized by two species of nasal mites, S. boydi and L. orbicularis.

  12. Study on mange mite of camel in Raya-Azebo district, northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesibu Awo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and species of camel mange mite infestation in Raya-Azebo district, Northern part of Ethiopia. Accordingly, Three hundred and eighty-four camels were examined and mange mite infestation was detected on 64 of camels. Only Sarcoptes scabiei var. cameli was identified as the only mite species in all skin scraping samples collected from the suspected mange mite lesions. There was significant difference in the prevalence of mange mite infestation between male and female camels (p 0.05. The result indicated that camel mange mite infestation was a problem in northern part of Ethiopia, hence, further studies and strategic control measures are recommended to reduce the effect of mange mite infestation on camel husbandry.

  13. Hidden in the mangrove forest: the cryptic intertidal mite Carinozetes mangrovi sp. nov. (Acari, Oribatida, Selenoribatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingstl, Tobias; Lienhard, Andrea; Jagersbacher-Baumann, Julia

    2014-08-01

    The small archipelago of Bermuda is a geologically young landmass in the Western Atlantic Ocean and recently turned out to be inhabited by a number of intertidal oribatid mites. One newly described species, Carinozetes bermudensis, showed an unusual vast range of habitats like sandy beaches, rocky substrate and mangroves. In the present study, 13 Bermudian populations of C. bermudensis were analysed to verify species integrity of specimens from different microhabitats. A morphometric analysis of 17 continuous variables as well as a molecular genetic investigation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I revealed the existence of a new species Carinozetes mangrovi sp. nov., inhabiting exclusively intertidal algae growing on mangrove roots. Although both species are morphologically nearly identical, the configuration of the genus-specific ventral carinae represents a clear diagnostic character. The high genetic divergence of approximately 12 % of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene sequence between C. bermudensis and C. mangrovi sp. nov. suggests that these two species diverged before the emergence of the Bermuda islands. Accordingly, both of them are older than the geologically young archipelago of Bermuda.

  14. New species of oribatid mites with auriculate pteromorphs (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Corpuz-Raros, Leonila

    2015-01-14

    Three new species of oribatid mites of the family Galumnidae (Acari, Oribatida), Galumna (Cosmogalumna) vladopesici sp. nov., Carinogalumna philippinensis sp. nov. and Setogalumna luzonica sp. nov., are described from the Philippines. Galumna (Cosmogalumna) vladopesici sp. nov. is most similar morphologically to G. (C.) dongnaiensis Ermilov & Anichkin, 2013, but it differs from the latter by the surface of body, genital and anal plates, and by the number and size of notogastral porose areas. Carinogalumna philippinensis sp. nov. differs from all species of Carinogalumna by the number of notogastral porose areas and structure of lamellar and sublamellar lines. Setogalumna luzonica sp. nov. is most similar morphologically to S. excellens P. Balogh, 1985, but it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of bothridial setae, anterior notogastral margin and notogastral porose areas Aa, and structure of lamellar and sublamellar lines. The genera Galumna and Carinogalumna are recorded for the first time in Philippines, and the genus Setogalumna in the Oriental region. Identification keys to known species of Galumna (Cosmogalumna) and Setogalumna are given. 

  15. Studies on European species of the water mite family Aturidae Thor (Acari: Hydrachnidia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecke, Reinhard

    2014-07-24

    Selected water mite species of the family Aturidae are revised. The following synonyms are established: Aturus intermedius serrata K. Viets, 1922 = A. asserculatus Walter, 1906; A. lelgioensis Rensburg, 1971 = A. natangensis Protz, 1900; A. oudemansi Besseling, 1932 = A. intermedius Protz, 1900. The proposal of E. Angelier (1965), to synonymize A. paucisetus Motaş & Tanasachi, 1946 with A. brachypus K. Viets, 1934 is rejected. Aturus elongatus Walter, 1927 (described after females, type material heavily damaged) and Ljania bipapillata subterranea Schwoerbel, 1964 (no type material available, no type locality defined) are considered as species incertae. Ljania macilenta longissima Schwoerbel, 1962 is redescribed and elevated to species rank. Two species of the genus Kongsbergia are described as new to science from interstitial habitats in the Central Mediterranean: K. albanorum sp. nov. from Western Sicily and K. jaentschi sp. nov. from Sicily and Sardinia. Woolastookia basilicalabrica sp. nov. is described from mountain streams in Southern Italy. Numerous new records are given, extending noteworthy the known distribution area of several species in Southern Europe. Aturus rotundus Romijn, 1921, Kongsbergia dentata Walter, 1947 and K. simillima K. Viets, 1949 are recorded for the first time from Italy, K. pectinigera Motaş & Tanasachi, 1946 from France and Italy; first records from Corsica are given for Aturus intermedius and A. spatulifer Piersig, 1904. Lectotypes are designated for Aturus asserculatus Walter, 1906; A. asserculatus serratus K. Viets, 1922; A. oudemansi Besseling, 1932.

  16. The role of onion-associated fungi in bulb mite infestation and damage to onion seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Tal; Gal, Shira; Inbar, Moshe; Lebiush-Mordechai, Sara; Tsror, Leah; Palevsky, Eric

    2014-04-01

    In Israel Rhizoglyphus robini is considered to be a pest in its own right, even though the mite is usually found in association with fungal pathogens. Plant protection recommendations are therefore to treat germinating onions seedlings, clearly a crucial phase in crop production, when mites are discovered. The aim of this study was to determine the role of fungi in bulb mite infestation and damage to germinating onion seedlings. Accordingly we (1) evaluated the effect of the mite on onion seedling germination and survival without fungi, (2) compared the attraction of the mite to species and isolates of various fungi, (3) assessed the effect of a relatively non-pathogenic isolate of Fusarium oxysporum on mite fecundity, and (4) determined the effects of the mite and of F. oxysporum separately and together, on onion seedling germination and sprout development. A significant reduction of seedling survival was recorded only in the 1,000 mites/pot treatment, after 4 weeks. Mites were attracted to 6 out of 7 collected fungi isolates. Mite fecundity on onion sprouts infested with F. oxysporum was higher than on non-infested sprouts. Survival of seedlings was affected by mites, fungi, and their combination. Sprouts on Petri dishes after 5 days were significantly longer in the control and mite treatments than both fungi treatments. During the 5-day experiment more mites were always found on the fungi-infected sprouts than on the non-infected sprouts. Future research using suppressive soils to suppress soil pathogens and subsequent mite damage is proposed.

  17. Microbiota of Demodex mites from rosacea patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Nathalia; Aubert, Jérome; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of Demodex mites is associated with rosacea. Furthermore, Demodex-associated bacteria were suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of rosacea. We decided to analyze Demodex microbiota. Mites were collected by standardized skin surface biopsies from patients with erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular rosacea or from control subjects. The microbiota from each mite was characterized by 16S rRNA clone library approach. The 16S rRNA clone library consisted of 367 clones obtained from 73 extracts originating from 5 samples per study group (ETR, PPR or healthy subjects). A total of 86 species were identified with 36 as Demodex-specific microbiota. In the papulopustular group, proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased whereas proportion of Actinobacteria decreased. Here, we report preliminary results on the microbiota of Demodex mites based on a molecular approach showing an unexpected diversity. Differences according to the host status need to be confirmed but open new perspectives for diagnostic of rosacea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acaricidal Activity of Eugenol Based Compounds against Scabies Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasay, Cielo; Mounsey, Kate; Stevenson, Graeme; Davis, Rohan; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Vyszenski-Moher, DiAnn; Andrews, Kathy; McCarthy, James

    2010-01-01

    Backgound Human scabies is a debilitating skin disease caused by the “itch mite” Sarcoptes scabiei. Ordinary scabies is commonly treated with topical creams such as permethrin, while crusted scabies is treated with topical creams in combination with oral ivermectin. Recent reports of acaricide tolerance in scabies endemic communities in Northern Australia have prompted efforts to better understand resistance mechanisms and to identify potential new acaricides. In this study, we screened three essential oils and four pure compounds based on eugenol for acaricidal properties. Methodology/Principal Findings Contact bioassays were performed using live permethrin-sensitive S. scabiei var suis mites harvested from pigs and permethrin-resistant S. scabiei var canis mites harvested from rabbits. Results of bioassays showed that clove oil was highly toxic against scabies mites. Nutmeg oil had moderate toxicity and ylang ylang oil was the least toxic. Eugenol, a major component of clove oil and its analogues –acetyleugenol and isoeugenol, demonstrated levels of toxicity comparable to benzyl benzoate, the positive control acaricide, killing mites within an hour of contact. Conclusions The acaricidal properties demonstrated by eugenol and its analogues show promise as leads for future development of alternative topical acaricides to treat scabies. PMID:20711455

  19. Numerical changes and evolution in Actinotrichid Mites (Chelicerata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is given of the evolutionary aspects of numerical changes in Actinotrichid mites. Numerical variations are studied in clones, in populations and in supraspecific taxa. Two particular aspects of the evolutionary changes (ontophylogeny and priority) are also dealt with. The changes are

  20. Predatory mites avoid ovipositing near counter-attacking prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraji, F.; Janssen, A.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Attacking prey is not without risk; predators may endure counterattackby the prey. Here, we study the oviposition behaviour of a predatory mite(Iphiseius degenerans) in relation to its prey, thewesternflower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). This thrips iscapable of killing the eggs of the

  1. Six new species of ptyctimous mites (Acari: Oribatida) from Madagascar

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niedbala, W.; Starý, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2016), s. 485-496 ISSN 0044-586X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Euphthiracaroidea * Madagascar * morphology * new species * ptyctimous mites * taxonomy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2016

  2. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Poza Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47 with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT, while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis.

  3. New hosts for the mite Ornithonyssus bursa in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán, M Á; Grande, J M; Liébana, M S; Martínez, P; Díaz, L A; Bragagnolo, L A; Solaro, C; Galmes, M A; Sarasola, J H

    2015-12-01

    The mite Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese) (Mesostigmata: Macronyssidae) is considered a poultry pest causing important infestations in chickens and it is considered a potential vector of arbovirus. Despite being considered a common parasite in wild birds, there is scarce published information about its potential hosts and effects on them. Here we present new bird hosts for O. bursa, assess the presence of Alphavirus, Flavivirus and Bunyavirus in mites from three host species, and discuss its potential impact on wild bird populations. We found O. bursa infecting five raptor and six passerine wild bird species. For nine of these species, this is the first record of infection by O. bursa. Although all analysed mites were negative for the examined arboviruses, the small sample size of mites does not allow further conclusions at the present moment. Because of the general nature of this ectoparasite, its presence in migratory long dispersal and endangered bird species, and the seropositivity for arboviruses in some of the species studied here, we consider it critical to assess the role of O. bursa and other ectoparasites as vectors and reservoirs of pathogens and as potential deleterious agents in wild bird populations. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. High mite burdens in an island population of Cape Wagtails ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mite infection of birds captured on the island was explored graphically against the morphometrics of individuals using cubic splines. Formal statistics were then applied using generalised linear mixed models, with observation and unique ring number as random effects within a two-level hierarchical mixed binomial model, ...

  5. Symbiosis and competition: complex interactions among beetles, fungi, and mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; J.C. Moser; F.J. Lombardero; R.W. Hofstetter; M.P. Ayres

    2001-01-01

    Symbioses among bark beetles and their fungal and mite associates involve complex, multi-level interactions. Dendroctonus frontalis attacks and kills southern pines, introducing fungi into the tree. Ophiostoma minus may initially aid beetles in killing trees, but later this "bluestain" fungus becomes an antagonist,...

  6. Ubiquity and diversity of human-associated Demodex mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S Thoemmes

    Full Text Available Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sebaceous gland-dwelling species. The species of these mites found on humans are arguably the animals with which we have the most intimate interactions. Yet, their prevalence and diversity have been poorly explored. Here we use a new molecular method to assess the occurrence of Demodex mites on humans. In addition, we use the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Demodex lineages. Within our samples, 100% of people over 18 years of age appear to host at least one Demodex species, suggesting that Demodex mites may be universal associates of adult humans. A phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA reveals intraspecific structure within one of the two named human-associated Demodex species, D. brevis. The D. brevis clade is geographically structured, suggesting that new lineages are likely to be discovered as humans from additional geographic regions are sampled.

  7. House-dust mite species in Bloemfontein, South Africa | Sinclair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indoor factors that may have promoted mite proliferation in some houses were artificial heating (especially under-floor heating), en-suite bathrooms and lack of adequate ventilation during the winter months. Conclusion. HDMs do occur in central South Africa, owing to a microclimate created indoors. Adequate ventilation, to ...

  8. Two new species of ptyctimous mites (Acari: Oribatida) from Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve species of ptyctimous mites (Acari: Oribatida) are recorded from Ghana for the first time. Two new species are described and illustrated: Phthiracarus bicarinatus sp. nov. and Austrophthiracarus lacunosus sp. nov. Three species are recorded fromWest Africa for the first time. Key words: Acari, Oribatida, ...

  9. A list of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    A species list of identified oribatid mite taxa (Acari, Oribatida) in the fauna of Vietnam is provided. During 1967-2015, a total of 535 species/subspecies from 222 genera and 81 families was registered. Of these, 194 species/subspecies were described as new for science from Vietnam.

  10. Three holarctic new species of ptyctimous mites (Acari, Oribatida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niedbala, W.; Starý, Josef

    -, č. 2625 (2010), s. 63-68 ISSN 1175-5326 Grant - others:MNiSW(PL) N N303 201935 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : new species * oribatid * ptyctimous mites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  11. Oribatid mites in the Flevopark in Amsterdam (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doğan, S.; Ayyıldız, N.; Faraji, F.; Dilkaraoğlu, S.; Zeytun, E.; Ersin, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Flevopark is one of the most special green areas of Amsterdam with a rich nature. Twelve oribatid mite species were collected here in 2014 from bark and mosses on trees. Liacarus acutus and Perlohmannia dissimilis are reported for the first time from the Netherlands. It is not clear if the newly

  12. Three eriophyoid mite species (Acari: Eriophyoidea: Eriophyidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiao-Feng; Sadeghi, Hussein; Honarmand, Arash

    2016-06-30

    Three mite species of the family Eriophyidae from Iran are described and illustrated. They are: Tegolophus marrubiumer sp. nov. on Marrubium vulgare L. (Lamiaceae); Phyllocoptes sp. cf. balasi Farkas, 1962 on Sanguisorba minor Scop. subsp. minor (Rosaceae) and Aceria fasciculifolis sp. nov. on Astragalus fasciculifolius Boiss. (Fabaceae). Both new species described herein are vagrants on their respective host plants.

  13. Host Finding Behaviour of the Coconut Mite Aceria Guerreronis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.W.S.; Lima, D.B.; Sabelis, M.W.; Pallini, A.; Gondim Jr., M.G.C.

    2014-01-01

    For the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, its host plant, the coconut palm, is not merely a source of food, but more generally a habitat to live in for several generations. For these minute organisms, finding a new plant is difficult and risky, especially because their main mode of dispersal

  14. Female mating strategy during precopulatory mate guarding in spider mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.

    2009-01-01

    In some taxa, females choose their mates indirectly by using male combat. In the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai, adult males guard prereproductive quiescent females. In a dual choice experiment, more males first approached females already guarded by a conspecific male than approached

  15. Sampling plans for pest mites on physic nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jander F; Sarmento, Renato A; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Marques, Renata V; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Picanço, Marcelo C

    2014-08-01

    The starting point for generating a pest control decision-making system is a conventional sampling plan. Because the mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi are among the most important pests of the physic nut (Jatropha curcas), in the present study, we aimed to establish sampling plans for these mite species on physic nut. Mite densities were monitored in 12 physic nut crops. Based on the obtained results, sampling of P. latus and T. bastosi should be performed by assessing the number of mites per cm(2) in 160 samples using a handheld 20× magnifying glass. The optimal sampling region for T. bastosi is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the middle third of the canopy. On the abaxial surface, T. bastosi should then be observed on the side parts of the middle portion of the leaf, near its edge. As for P. latus, the optimal sampling region is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the apical third of the canopy on the abaxial surface. Polyphagotarsonemus latus should then be assessed on the side parts of the leaf's petiole insertion. Each sampling procedure requires 4 h and costs US$ 7.31.

  16. Molecular sabotage of host plant defenses by spider mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarroel Figueroa, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Plants constitute an ample source of nutrients for a diversity of organisms that include viruses, microbes, nematodes, insects, and mites. To protect their resources, plants possess a robust immune system that establishes structural and biochemical defenses to fight invaders. Some of these defenses

  17. Effects of Different Plant Products against Pig Mange Mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mägi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the antiparasitic efficiency of herbal-based products. Four medicinal plant species extracts in 10% ethanol solutions (hogweed Heracleum sosnowskyi Manden, mugwort Artemisia vulgaris L., tansy Tanacetum vulgare L., wormwood Artemisia absinthium L., and seven essential medicinal ethereal oils used in 1% emulsions (garlic Allium sativum L., black pepper Piper nigrum L., juniper Juniperus communis L., citronella grass Cymbopogon nardus Rendle, pennyroyal Mentha pulegium L., eucalyptus Eucalyptus globulus Labill., tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia Gheel were tested a on pig farm in Estonia to control swine sarcoptic mange mites (Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis (L. 1758 Latreille, 1802. Trial groups (6 pigs each were treated over the whole body twice, with one week interval in between; one group was left as untreated control. All the preparations used inhibited the development of and were more or less lethal to mange mites. Tea tree and citronella volatile oil preparations proved to be the most effective (viability of mites < 5% in 4 weeks. The most active extract of tested ethanol solutions was obtained from hogweed seeds: after two treatments of pigs, 57-93% of parasites died in 2-4 weeks. The extracts of local plants tansy and wormwood diminished the number of mites up to 44% within the first week after treatments. The results indicate that plant extracts may be further tested in practice as alternatives to drugs of synthetic origin.

  18. Isolation of oxalotrophic bacteria associated with Varroa destructor mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddaloni, M; Pascual, D W

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria associated with varroa mites were cultivated and genotyped by 16S RNA. Under our experimental conditions, the cultivable bacteria were few in number, and most of them proved to be fastidious to grow. Cultivation with seven different media under O2 /CO2 conditions and selection for colony morphology yielded a panel of species belonging to 13 different genera grouped in two different phyla, proteobacteria and actinobacteria. This study identified one species of actinobacteria that is a known commensal of the honey bee. Some isolates are oxalotrophic, a finding that may carry ramifications into the use of oxalic acid to control the number of phoretic mites in the managed colonies of honey bees. Oxalic acid, legally or brevi manu, is widely used to control phoretic Varroa destructor mites, a major drive of current honey bees' colony losses. Unsubstantiated by sanctioned research are rumours that in certain instances oxalic acid is losing efficacy, forcing beekeepers to increase the frequency of treatments. This investigation fathoms the hypothesis that V. destructor associates with bacteria capable of degrading oxalic acid. The data show that indeed oxalotrophy, a rare trait among bacteria, is common in bacteria that we isolated from V. destructor mites. This finding may have ramifications in the use of oxalic acid as a control agent. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Stability evaluation of house dust mite vaccines for sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA GAVROVIĆ-JANKULOVIĆ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy with house dust mite (HDM allergen extracts can effectively alleviate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The efficacy of the immunotherapeutic treatment is highly dependent on the quality of house dust mite vaccines. This study was performed to assess the stability of house dust mite allergen vaccines prepared for sublingual immunotherapy. Lyophilized Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt mite bodies were the starting material for the production of sublingual vaccines in four therapeutic concentrations. The stability of the extract for vaccine production, which was stored below 4 °C for one month, showed consistence in the protein profile in SDS PAGE. ELISA-inhibition showed that the potencies of Dpt vaccines during a 12 month period were to 65–80 % preserved at all analyzed therapeutic concentrations. This study showed that glycerinated Dpt vaccines stored at 4 °C preserved their IgE-binding potential during a 12 month period, implying their suitability for sublingual immunotherapeutic treatment of HDM allergy.

  20. Bioaktivitas dan Kandungan Genus Callicarpa

    OpenAIRE

    -, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Callicarpa L is one genus of the family Lamiaceae. Callicarpa consisting of approximately 150 species such as shrubs and trees. Various species of Callicarpa is widely used in traditional medicine and it was potentially as antinociceptive, antioxidant, antimicrobial and thrombolytic drugs. Based on various reports results of previous studies have found various types of secondary metabolites from plants Callicarpa such as terpenoids, steroids and flavonoids. Some of these compounds can be deve...

  1. On the concordance genus of topologically slice knots

    OpenAIRE

    Hom, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot K is the minimum Seifert genus of all knots smoothly concordant to K. Concordance genus is bounded below by the 4-ball genus and above by the Seifert genus. We give a lower bound for the concordance genus of K coming from the knot Floer complex of K. As an application, we prove that there are topologically slice knots with 4-ball genus equal to one and arbitrarily large concordance genus.

  2. Natural medicine: the genus Angelica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, S D; Nahar, L

    2004-06-01

    More than 60 species of medicinal plants belong to the genus Angelica (Family: Apiaceae). Many of these species have long been used in ancient traditional medicine systems, especially in the far-east. Various herbal preparations containing Angelica species are available over-the-counter, not only in the far-eastern countries, but also in the western countries like USA, UK, Germany, etc. For centuries, many species of this genus, e.g. A. acutiloba, A. archangelica, A. atropupurea, A. dahurica, A. japonica, A. glauca, A. gigas, A. koreana, A. sinensis, A. sylvestris, etc., have been used traditionally as anti-inflammatory, diuretic, expectorant and diaphoretic, and remedy for colds, flu, influenza, hepatitis, arthritis, indigestion, coughs, chronic bronchitis, pleurisy, typhoid, headaches, wind, fever, colic, travel sickness, rheumatism, bacterial and fungal infections and diseases of the urinary organs. Active principles isolated from these plants mainly include various types of coumarins, acetylenic compounds, chalcones, sesquiterpenes and polysaccharides. This review evaluates the importance of the genus Angelica in relation to its traditional medicinal uses, alternative medicinal uses in the modern society and potential for drug development, and summarises results of various scientific studies on Angelica species or Angelica-containing preparations for their bioactivities including, antimicrobial, anticancer, antitumour, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, etc.

  3. Biodiversity of the genus Cladophialophora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badali, H.; Gueidan, C.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Bonifaz, A.; van den Ende, A.H.G. Gerrits; de Hoog, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Cladophialophora is a genus of black yeast-like fungi comprising a number of clinically highly significant species in addition to environmental taxa. The genus has previously been characterized by branched chains of ellipsoidal to fusiform conidia. However, this character was shown to have evolved several times independently in the order Chaetothyriales. On the basis of a multigene phylogeny (nucLSU, nucSSU, RPB1), most of the species of Cladophialophora (including its generic type C. carrionii) belong to a monophyletic group comprising two main clades (carrionii- and bantiana-clades). The genus includes species causing chromoblastomycosis and other skin infections, as well as disseminated and cerebral infections, often in immunocompetent individuals. In the present study, multilocus phylogenetic analyses were combined to a morphological study to characterize phenetically similar Cladophialophora strains. Sequences of the ITS region, partial Translation Elongation Factor 1-α and β-Tubulin genes were analysed for a set of 48 strains. Four novel species were discovered, originating from soft drinks, alkylbenzene-polluted soil, and infected patients. Membership of the both carrionii and bantiana clades might be indicative of potential virulence to humans. PMID:19287540

  4. CYANOBACTERIA OF THE GENUS PROCHLOROTHRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vasilievich Pinevich

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Green cyanobacteria are distinguished from blue-green ones by the possession of a chlorophyll-containing light harvesting antenna. Three genera of green cyanobacteria, namely Acaryochloris, Prochlorococcus and Prochloron, are unicellular and of marine habitat; Prochlorococcus marinus attracts most attention due to its outstanding role in prime productivity. The fourth genus, Prochlorothrix, is represented by filamentous freshwater strains. Unlike the rest of green cyanobacteria, Prochlorothrix is paradoxically rare: it has been isolated from two European locations only. Taking into account fluctuating blooms, morphological resemblance with Planktothrix and Pseudanabaena, and unsuccessful enrichment of Prochlorothrix, the preferred strategy of search for this cyanobacterium is based on PCR with natural DNA and specific primers. This approach already demonstrates a broader distribution of Prochlorothrix: marker genes have been found in at least two additional locations. Despite the growing evidence for naturally occurring Prochlorothrix, there are only a few cultivated strains, and only one of them (PCC 9006 is claimed to be axenic. In multixenic cultures, Prochlorothrix is accompanied by heterotrophic bacteria, indicating a consortium-type association. The genus Prochlorothrix includes two species: P. hollandica and P. scandica based on distinctions in genomic DNA, cell size, temperature optimum, and fatty acid composition of membrane lipids. In this short review, the properties of cyanobacteria of the genus Prochlorothrix are described, and the evolutionary scenario of green cyanobacteria, especially taking into account their role in the origin of simple chloroplast is given.

  5. On genus expansion of superpolynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Andrei; Morozov, Alexei; Sleptsov, Alexei; Smirnov, Andrey

    2014-12-01

    Recently it was shown that the (Ooguri-Vafa) generating function of HOMFLY polynomials is the Hurwitz partition function, i.e. that the dependence of the HOMFLY polynomials on representation R is naturally captured by symmetric group characters (cut-and-join eigenvalues). The genus expansion and expansion through Vassiliev invariants explicitly demonstrate this phenomenon. In the present paper we claim that the superpolynomials are not functions of such a type: symmetric group characters do not provide an adequate linear basis for their expansions. Deformation to superpolynomials is, however, straightforward in the multiplicative basis: the Casimir operators are β-deformed to Hamiltonians of the Calogero-Moser-Sutherland system. Applying this trick to the genus and Vassiliev expansions, we observe that the deformation is fully straightforward only for the thin knots. Beyond the family of thin knots additional algebraically independent terms appear in the Vassiliev and genus expansions. This can suggest that the superpolynomials do in fact contain more information about knots than the colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials. However, even for the thin knots the beta-deformation is non-innocent: already in the simplest examples it seems inconsistent with the positivity of colored superpolynomials in non-(anti)symmetric representations, which also happens in I. Cherednik's (DAHA-based) approach to the torus knots.

  6. On genus expansion of superpolynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, Andrei; Morozov, Alexei; Sleptsov, Alexei; Smirnov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Recently it was shown that the (Ooguri–Vafa) generating function of HOMFLY polynomials is the Hurwitz partition function, i.e. that the dependence of the HOMFLY polynomials on representation R is naturally captured by symmetric group characters (cut-and-join eigenvalues). The genus expansion and expansion through Vassiliev invariants explicitly demonstrate this phenomenon. In the present paper we claim that the superpolynomials are not functions of such a type: symmetric group characters do not provide an adequate linear basis for their expansions. Deformation to superpolynomials is, however, straightforward in the multiplicative basis: the Casimir operators are β-deformed to Hamiltonians of the Calogero–Moser–Sutherland system. Applying this trick to the genus and Vassiliev expansions, we observe that the deformation is fully straightforward only for the thin knots. Beyond the family of thin knots additional algebraically independent terms appear in the Vassiliev and genus expansions. This can suggest that the superpolynomials do in fact contain more information about knots than the colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials. However, even for the thin knots the beta-deformation is non-innocent: already in the simplest examples it seems inconsistent with the positivity of colored superpolynomials in non-(anti)symmetric representations, which also happens in I. Cherednik's (DAHA-based) approach to the torus knots

  7. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  8. Management of apple orchards to conserve generalist phytoseiid mites suppresses two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Ken; Komatus, Michiyo; Sonoda, Shoji; Takahashi, Isao; Hara, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    To improve the success of integrated pest management (IPM) in apple orchards, we investigated whether generalist phytoseiid mites have suppressed the occurrence of Tetranychus urticae. In Akita Prefecture, northern Japan, in 2012 and 2013, two types of experimental plot were compared. Conservation plots had been managed for the conservation of generalist phytoseiid mites by selective chemical spraying without mowing since 2009. Conventional plots were managed by non-selective chemical spraying with regular mowing. The conservation plots had significantly fewer T. urticae adult females per tree in both years. Two species of generalist phytoseiid mites-Typhlodromus vulgaris and Amblyseius tsugawai-were continuously present in the conservation plots, with only a few T. urticae. The conservation plots had significantly more A. tsugawai adult females in the undergrowth in both years, and significantly more T. vulgaris adult females on apple leaves in 2012. Typhlodromus vulgaris was continuously present in the conservation plots but was scarce from late May to early August in the conventional plots. In the presence of T. vulgaris, low numbers of T. urticae did not increase on apple leaves. These results indicate that the generalist phytoseiid mites serve as important biological control agents in IPM in apple orchards.

  9. [Morphological adaptations of acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes) to permanent parasitism on mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The external morphological adaptations to parasitism in acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes), permanently parasiting mammals, are briefly summated and analyzed. According to several external morphological criteria (structures of gnathosoma, idiosoma, setation, legs and life cycle), the following six morphoecotypes were established: skin mites (i)-- Cheyletidae, Chirorhynchobiidae, Lobalgidae, Myobiidae, Myocoptidae (the most part), Rhyncoptidae, Psoroptidae; fur mites (ii)--Atopomelidae, Clirodiscidae, Listrophoridae, Myocoptidae (Trichoecius only); skin burrowing mites (iii)--Sarcoptidae; intradermal mites (iv) - sorergatidae and Demodicidae; interstitial mites (v) - pimyodicidae; respiratory mites (vi) - reynetidae, Gastronyssidae, Lemurnyssidae, Pneumocoptidae. In the case of prostigmatic mites, the detailed reconstruction of the origin and evolution of "parasitic" morphoecotypes is possible due to the tentative phylogenetic hypotheses, which were proposed for the infraorder Eleutherengon, a, including the most part of the permanent mammalian parasites among prostigmatic mites (Kethley in Norton, 1993; Bochkov, 2002). The parasitism of Speleognathinae (Ereynetidae) in the mammalian respiratory tract arose independently of the other prostigmats. It is quite possible that these mites switched on mammals from birds, because they are more widely represented on these hosts than on mammals. The prostigmatic parasitism on mammalian skin seems to be originated independently in myobiids, in the five cheyletid tribes, Cheyletiellini, Niheliini, and Teinocheylini, Chelonotini, Cheyletini, and, probably, in a cheyletoid ansector of the sister families Psorergatidae-Demodicidae (Bochkov, Fain, 2001; Bochkov, 2002). Demodicids and psorergatids developed adaptations to parasitism in the skin gland ducts and directly in the epithelial level, respectively in the process of the subsequent specialization. Mites of the family Epimyodicidae belong to the phylogenetic line

  10. Schusteria marina sp. nov. (Acari, Oribatida, Selenoribatidae) an intertidal mite from Caribbean coasts, with remarks on taxonomy, biogeography, and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingstl, Tobias; Lienhard, Andrea

    2017-08-18

    Schusteria marina sp. nov. is a newly discovered intertidal mite species found on the Lesser Antillean Islands of Martinique and Grenada. It represents the first record of the genus Schusteria within the Caribbean area. Schusteria marina sp. nov. is very similar to the type species, S. littorea from Brazil, but can be distinguished by its smaller body size, a median sternal dark sclerotized small ridge on epimeron I and a few other less pronounced differences. Both species are closely related and form a Western Atlantic Schusteria clade, which is characterized by the possession of a pair of faint anterior epimeral ridges. Schusteria marina sp. nov. occurs on different littoral substrates, e.g. mangrove roots, anthropogenic concrete structures, but seems to be associated with an intertidal red alga belonging to the genus Bostrychia Montagne, 1842 growing on these substrates. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:C246533E-D108-4F2C-8577-545C059D46CE.

  11. Host-parasite interaction and impact of mite infection on mosquito population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atwa A. Atwa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT During the present study, the host-parasite relationship between mosquitoes and parasitic mites was investigated. The 8954 individuals of male and female mosquitoes belonging to 26 genera: seven each of Aedes and Culex, six of Anopheles and one each of Toxorhynchites, Coquillettidia and Uranotaenia were collected from 200 sites. The male and female mosquitoes were collected from the State of Uttar Pradesh, located at 26.8500° N, 80.9100° E in North India by deploying Carbon dioxide-baited and gravid traps. The intensity of mite's infection, type and number of mites attached to mosquitoes, mite's preference for body parts and host sexes were the parameters used to determine host-parasite relationship. Eight species of mites: Arrenurus acuminatus, Ar. gibberifrons, Ar. danbyensis, Ar. madaraszi, Ar. kenki, Parathyas barbigera, Leptus sp., and Anystis sp., parasitized mosquitoes. Parasitic mites preferred host's thorax for attachment as compared to the head, pre-abdomen or appendages. The present study suggests phoretic relationship between parasitic mites and mosquitoes. Wide occurrence, intensity of infection, parasitic load, and attachment preferences of the mites suggested their positive role in biological control of adult mosquitoes. The present study will set the path of future studies on host-parasite relationships of mites and mosquitoes and define the role of parasitic mites in the biological control of mosquitoes.

  12. Protocols for the delivery of small molecules to the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, is a chelicerate herbivore with an extremely wide host range and an extraordinary ability to develop pesticide resistance. Due to its responsiveness to natural and synthetic xenobiotics, the spider mite is becoming a prime pest herbivore model for studies of the evolution of host range, plant-herbivore interactions and mechanisms of xenobiotic resistance. The spider mite genome has been sequenced and its transcriptional responses to developmental and various biotic and abiotic cues have been documented. However, to identify biological and evolutionary roles of T. urticae genes and proteins, it is necessary to develop methods for the efficient manipulation of mite gene function or protein activity. Here, we describe protocols developed for the delivery of small molecules into spider mites. Starting with mite maintenance and the preparation of the experimental mite populations of developmentally synchronized larvae and adults, we describe 3 methods for delivery of small molecules including artificial diet, leaf coating, and soaking. The presented results define critical steps in these methods and demonstrate that they can successfully deliver tracer dyes into mites. Described protocols provide guidelines for high-throughput setups for delivery of experimental compounds that could be used in reverse genetics platforms to modulate gene expression or protein activity, or for screens focused on discovery of new molecules for mite control. In addition, described protocols could be adapted for other Tetranychidae and related species of economic importance such as Varroa, dust and poultry mites.

  13. Child car seats – a habitat for house dust mites and reservoir for harmful allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clarke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objective[/b]. House dust mites produce allergens which can cause or aggravate diseases such as asthma, eczema and rhinitis. The objectives of this study are to quantify typical house dust mite and Der p 1 allergen levels in child car seats, and to determine external variables that may influence mite populations in cars. [b]Materials and Methods[/b]. Dust samples were collected from the child car seats and driver seats of 106 cars using a portable vacuum sampling pump over a two minute sampling period. Mites were counted and identified and results were expressed as mites per gram (mites/g of dust, while Der p 1 content of samples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Questionnaires were completed by participants to identify environmental and behavioural effects on mite populations. Results were analysed using General Linear Model (GLM procedures. [b]Results[/b]. Twelve species of mites, of which nine are known to produce harmful allergens, were recorded from 212 dust samples. Over 80% of drivers’ seats and over 77% of child car seats harboured dust mites with a significant correlation (p = 0.001 between the mites/g of dust and Der p 1 content recovered from each seat. A mean of 53 mites/g of dust per seat was recovered, with a mean Der p 1 level of 1.1µg/g. Over 12% of driver seats and 15% of child car seats contained house dust mite levels sufficient to be risk factors for sensitisation and allergic reactions. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Child car seats and driver seats are habitats to a range of mite species which can be present in sufficient concentrations to cause or aggravate allergen related illnesses in individuals who are genetically predisposed.

  14. [Exposure and allergy to dust mites in general and working environment in Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macan, Jelena; Mustac, Marko; Talijancić, Ante; Cvitanović, Slavica; Milković-Kraus, Sanja

    2004-06-01

    This paper gives a review of the most important impacts of exposure to dust mites in general and working environment on human health. The Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, Croatia, has been investigating the frequency and exposure levels of allergies to pyroglyphid and non-pyroglyphid mites in Croatia for the last 10 years. Investigations were performed in general urban and rural population from the inland and coastal Croatia, and several industrial inland populations occupationally exposed to organic dusts. Mite species and levels of pyroglyphid mites allergens (Der p 1, Der f 1) were established in house dust samples taken from the floors of bedrooms and living rooms and in several industrial dust samples. The frequency of allergies to pyroglyphid mites in general urban population of inland Croatia is about 20%, with significant general indoor exposure to these mites (median value for Der p 1: 0.85 microg/g of dust). General adult population of the coastal region had a significantly higher exposure to pyroglyphid mites (median value for Der p 1: 4.5 microg/g of dust), yet showed a significantly lower frequency of allergies to these mites (about 5%). New studies are necessary to investigate possible genetic and environmental factors involved in the mechanisms which protect coastal population from the development of mite allergy. Acarological and statistical analyses have shown that the high frequency of sensitisation to non-pyroglyphid mites found in the general and working populations of the inland region is not related to environmental exposure to these mites, but to the cross-reactivity between pyroglyphid and non-pyroglyphid mites and to false positive skin reactions in prick testing, particularly to T. putrescentiae. So far, results do not indicate that pyroglyphid mites are occupational allergens in paper-recycling, fish-processing and tobacco-processing.

  15. Child car seats - a habitat for house dust mites and reservoir for harmful allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Gormally, Michael; Sheahan, Jerome; Byrne, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    House dust mites produce allergens which can cause or aggravate diseases such as asthma, eczema and rhinitis. The objectives of this study are to quantify typical house dust mite and Der p 1 allergen levels in child car seats, and to determine external variables that may influence mite populations in cars. Dust samples were collected from the child car seats and driver seats of 106 cars using a portable vacuum sampling pump over a two minute sampling period. Mites were counted and identified and results were expressed as mites per gram (mites/g) of dust, while Der p 1 content of samples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Questionnaires were completed by participants to identify environmental and behavioural effects on mite populations. Results were analysed using General Linear Model (GLM) procedures. Twelve species of mites, of which nine are known to produce harmful allergens, were recorded from 212 dust samples. Over 80% of drivers' seats and over 77% of child car seats harboured dust mites with a significant correlation (p = 0.001) between the mites/g of dust and Der p 1 content recovered from each seat. A mean of 53 mites/g of dust per seat was recovered, with a mean Der p 1 level of 1.1µg/g. Over 12% of driver seats and 15% of child car seats contained house dust mite levels sufficient to be risk factors for sensitisation and allergic reactions. Child car seats and driver seats are habitats to a range of mite species which can be present in sufficient concentrations to cause or aggravate allergen related illnesses in individuals who are genetically predisposed.

  16. Evolutionary genomics of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouroz, Faisal; Noreen, Shumaila; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2015-12-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are truncated derivatives of autonomous DNA transposons, and are dispersed abundantly in most eukaryotic genomes. We aimed to characterize various MITEs families in Brassica in terms of their presence, sequence characteristics and evolutionary activity. Dot plot analyses involving comparison of homoeologous bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences allowed identification of 15 novel families of mobile MITEs. Of which, 5 were Stowaway-like with TA Target Site Duplications (TSDs), 4 Tourist-like with TAA/TTA TSDs, 5 Mutator-like with 9-10 bp TSDs and 1 novel MITE (BoXMITE1) flanked by 3 bp TSDs. Our data suggested that there are about 30,000 MITE-related sequences in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes. In situ hybridization showed one abundant family was dispersed in the A-genome, while another was located near 45S rDNA sites. PCR analysis using primers flanking sequences of MITE elements detected MITE insertion polymorphisms between and within the three Brassica (AA, BB, CC) genomes, with many insertions being specific to single genomes and others showing evidence of more recent evolutionary insertions. Our BAC sequence comparison strategy enables identification of evolutionarily active MITEs with no prior knowledge of MITE sequences. The details of MITE families reported in Brassica enable their identification, characterization and annotation. Insertion polymorphisms of MITEs and their transposition activity indicated important mechanism of genome evolution and diversification. MITE families derived from known Mariner, Harbinger and Mutator DNA transposons were discovered, as well as some novel structures. The identification of Brassica MITEs will have broad applications in Brassica genomics, breeding, hybridization and phylogeny through their use as DNA markers.

  17. Poor alkaloid sequestration by arrow poison frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebs, Dietrich; Alvarez, Joseph Vargas; Pogoda, Werner; Toennes, Stefan W; Köhler, Gunther

    2014-03-01

    Frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Colombia are known to contain the highly toxic alkaloid batrachotoxin, but species from Central America exhibit only very low levels or are entirely free of this toxin. In the present study alcohol extracts from 101 specimens of Phyllobates lugubris and Phyllobates vittatus and 21 of three sympatric species (Dendrobates pumilio, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates granuliferus) from Costa Rica were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Whereas the extracts of the Dendrobates species exhibited typical profiles of toxic alkaloids, those of the two Phyllobates species contained low levels of few alkaloids only, batrachotoxin was not detected. Although the feeding pattern of the Dendrobates and Phyllobates species are similar as revealed by examination of their stomach content (mainly ants and mites), the Phyllobates species are poorly sequestering alkaloids from their food source in contrast to the Dendrobates frogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of direct and indirect plant responses by jasmonic acid, low spider mite densities, or a combination of jasmonic acid treatment and spider mite infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gols, G.J.Z.; Roosjen, M.; Dijkman, H.; Dicke, M.

    2003-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and the octadecanoid pathway are involved in both induced direct and induced indirect plant responses. In this study, the herbivorous mite, Tetranychus urticae, and its predator, Phytoseiulus persimilis, were given a choice between Lima bean plants induced by JA or spider mites

  19. Comparing densities of spider mites (Tetranychidae and predatory mites (Phytoseiidae on the common oak (Quercus robur L. in forests of natural and industrial areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubiarz Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of studies conducted in the forest areas of the Polesie National Park and in the surroundings of the chemical producer Zakłady Azotowe in the town of Puławy on the abundance of mites from the families Tetranychidae and Phytoseiidae. These studies were conducted on eight different sites in the years 2002–2004 and aimed at answering the question of whether mite abundance is related to factors such as area, site and year. In total, 8894 specimen of the spider mite family and 1835 specimen of the predatory mite family were collected. Spider mites were more abundant in Puławy than in the Polesie National Park, whilst the abundances of predatory mites were similar in both study areas. For spider mites, statistically significant differences were found in terms of study area and site, but also in terms of the study area in relation to the year of investigation. In the case of predatory mites, statistically significant differences were also found in terms of the study area in relation to the year of investigation.

  20. The influence of household pets on the composition and quantity of allergenic mite fauna within Irish homes: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D; Dix, E; Liddy, S; Gormally, M; Byrne, M

    2016-03-01

    Allergenic mites are responsible for inducing hypersensitive reactions in genetically predisposed people worldwide. Mites in dust from 30 Irish homes with pets (dogs, n = 23; cats, n = 7) were compared with those in 30 homes without pets. House dust mites constituted 78% of all mites recorded, with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acariformes: Pyroglyphidae) representing 57-72% of mites in furniture and mattresses in both home types compared with only 22% of mites in pet beds. Although storage mites accounted for just 13% of all mites recorded, they represented 46% of mites recorded in pet beds. Median levels of the dust mite allergen Der p 1 (µg/g) in dust samples from mattresses in homes without pets were significantly greater than in mattresses from homes with pets, reflecting the greater densities of D. pteronyssinus found in the former home category. Mite species richness was greater in homes with pets (17 species) than in homes without pets (13 species). This suggests that although the presence of pets can result in a wider variety of epidemiologically important mite species within households, increased competition among mite species may result in a more balanced mite fauna in the home, inhibiting the dominance of any one species and hence lowering allergen-associated risks. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  1. Nanohystricidae n. fam., an unusual, plesiomorphic enarthronote mite family endemic to New Zealand (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Roy A; Fuangarworn, Marut

    2015-10-02

    Nanohystrix hammerae n. gen., n. sp.--proposed on the basis of numerous adults and a few juveniles--is a new oribatid mite of the infraorder Enarthronota that appears to be phylogenetically relictual and endemic to northern New Zealand, in habitats ranging from native shrublands to native and semi-native forests. With an adult body length of 1-1.2 mm, the species is the largest known enarthronote mite outside Lohmanniidae, and it has an unusual combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. Plesiomorphies include: a well-formed median (naso) eye and pigmented lateral eyes; a bothridial seta with a simple, straight base; a vertically-oriented gnathosoma; a peranal segment; adanal sclerites partially incorporated in notogaster (uncertain polarity); three genu I solenidia and a famulus on tarsus II. Autapomorphies include: five pairs of pale cuticular disks on the notogaster, with unknown function; six pairs of long, erectile notogastral setae, including pair h2 incorporated in the second transverse scissure along with the f-row, and pair h1 in a third scissure; chelicerae that are unusually broad, creating a flat-faced appearance; legs I that are inferred to have an unusually wide range of motion. Further, it is the only enarthronote species known to have an elongated ovipositor, and one of few to have glassy, luminous notogastral setae. The gastronotum of juveniles lacks transverse scissures, but has isolated sclerites supporting setae, including erectile setae. The large character gaps between N. hammerae and other enarthronote taxa justifies proposal of a monotypic new family--Nanohystricidae n. fam.--which is tentatively grouped with several other relictual families in the paraphyletic Heterochthonioidea. Small muscles appear to be involved in the operation of all erectile setae, but seem to be only depressors, with erection effected by hysterosomal distension. Based on gut contents, its food is primarily fungal hyphae and spores, though ingestion of small

  2. NSR superstring measures in genus 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, Petr; Sleptsov, Alexey; Stern, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are two proposed ansätze for NSR superstring measures: the Grushevsky ansatz and the OPSMY ansatz, which for genera g⩽4 are known to coincide. However, neither the Grushevsky nor the OPSMY ansatz leads to a vanishing two-point function in genus four, which can be constructed from the genus five expressions for the respective ansätze. This is inconsistent with the known properties of superstring amplitudes. In the present paper we show that the Grushevsky and OPSMY ansätze do not coincide in genus five. Then, by combining these ansätze, we propose a new ansatz for genus five, which now leads to a vanishing two-point function in genus four. We also show that one cannot construct an ansatz from the currently known forms in genus 6 that satisfies all known requirements for superstring measures

  3. The First Report of Eustigmaeus Johnstoni (Acari: Stigmaeidae Parasitic Mite of Phlebotominae Sand Flies from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Badakhshan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stigmaeids mites have been recorded only on Phlebotominae sand flies up to now. Five species of Eustigmaeus, and three of Stigmaeus were reported on infested sandflies in different country up to the present.Methods: Sand flies collection was done using CDC light trap and sticky paper. The mites were isolated from in­fested specimens, mounted in Puri’s medium and identified using reliable keys.Results: A mite infested Phlebotomus papatasi was observed during a study on sandflies of one of the southern provinces of Iran, near to the Persian Gulf. Several scars resulting from mite attachment were found on abdominal tergites of this female sand fly. The mites were identified as Eustigmaeus johnstoni.Conclusion: This parasitic mite is one of the eyeless species, which has a great distribution over the world, reported from Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Yemen, Cyprus and Palestine. But, this is the first record of this species from Iran.

  4. Contamination of passenger trains with Dermatophagoides (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) mite antigen in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, K; Toyoda, Y; Konishi, E

    2000-01-01

    Passenger trains were surveyed for contamination with Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouesart) mites in Japan. A total of 492 dust samples were collected from upholstered seats in six commuter trains, one long-distance express train and three night trains in October, 1996 and January, April, and July, 1997. Mite antigen levels contained in fine dust fractions of these samples were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Most samples obtained from commuter trains showed relatively high mite antigen levels of > 10 microgm(-2) (corresponding to > 100 mites). Express and night trains showed lower antigen levels per square meter, but higher mite antigen levels per gram of fine dust than commuter trains, indicating relatively high mite antigen densities. Seasonal comparisons indicated that commuter trains showed the highest mean antigen level per square meter in winter (January), whereas the highest antigen level per gram of fine dust was observed in summer (July) in express and night trains.

  5. The First Report of Eustigmaeus johnstoni (Acari: Stigmaeidae) Parasitic Mite of Phlebotominae Sand Flies from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badakhshan, Mehdi; Sadraei, Javid; Moin-Vaziri, Vahideh

    2013-01-01

    Stigmaeids mites have been recorded only on Phlebotominae sand flies up to now. Five species of Eustigmaeus, and three of Stigmaeus were reported on infested sandflies in different country up to the present. Sand flies collection was done using CDC light trap and sticky paper. The mites were isolated from infested specimens, mounted in Puri's medium and identified using reliable keys. A mite infested Phlebotomus papatasi was observed during a study on sandflies of one of the southern provinces of Iran, near to the Persian Gulf. Several scars resulting from mite attachment were found on abdominal tergites of this female sand fly. The mites were identified as Eustigmaeus johnstoni. This parasitic mite is one of the eyeless species, which has a great distribution over the world, reported from Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Yemen, Cyprus and Palestine. But, this is the first record of this species from Iran.

  6. The First Report of Eustigmaeus johnstoni (Acari: Stigmaeidae Parasitic Mite of Phlebotominae Sand Flies from Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Badakhshan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Stigmaeids mites have been recorded only on Phlebotominae sand flies up to now. Five species of Eustigmaeus, and three of Stigmaeus were reported on infested sandflies in different country up to the present.Sand flies collection was done using CDC light trap and sticky paper. The mites were isolated from infested specimens, mounted in Puri's medium and identified using reliable keys.A mite infested Phlebotomus papatasi was observed during a study on sandflies of one of the southern provinces of Iran, near to the Persian Gulf. Several scars resulting from mite attachment were found on abdominal tergites of this female sand fly. The mites were identified as Eustigmaeus johnstoni.This parasitic mite is one of the eyeless species, which has a great distribution over the world, reported from Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Yemen, Cyprus and Palestine. But, this is the first record of this species from Iran.

  7. Intraspecific variation of body size in a gamasid mite Laelaps clethrionomydis: environment, geography and host dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korallo-Vinarskaya, Natalia P; Vinarski, Maxim V; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Krasnov, Boris R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated intraspecific variation in body size of an ectoparasitic gamasid mite, Laelaps clethrionomydis, across 12 localities in the Palearctic. We asked whether mites collected from the same host species in different localities or from different host species in the same locality vary in body size. Within host species, mites collected in different localities differed significantly in body size, tending to be larger in northern than in southern localities. In addition, mite body size correlated negatively with mean annual temperature in a locality. Mites collected from different hosts in the same locality differed significantly in body size when hosts belonged to different genera but did not differ when collected from congeneric hosts. We conclude that intraspecific variation in mite body size is caused by interplay of environmental and host-related factors.

  8. Activated Charcoal Suppresses Breeding of the House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus, in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hae-Seon; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Han; Crane, Julian

    2007-01-01

    House dust mite sensitized asthmatics are advised to practice allergen avoidance. Charcoal pillows are used in Korea with unsubstantiated claims regarding their efficacy in alleviating asthma symptoms. We tested the effects of activated charcoal on breeding of house dust mites in culture. Twenty live adult house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) were inoculated, 10 replicates, on culture media containing 0%, 1%, 3%, 5%, 10%, and 20% activated charcoal and incubated at 25℃ and a relative humidity of 75%. After four weeks, the mean numbers of live house dust mites were 286, 176, 46, 16, 7, and 0 for the 0%, 1%, 3%, 5%, 10%, and 20% charcoal-containing culture media, respectively. Thus, activated charcoal suppresses breeding of house dust mites and offers a new promising method for house dust mite control. PMID:17449957

  9. 2+1 gravity for genus >1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.E.; Regge, T.

    1991-01-01

    We analysed the algebra of observables for the simple case of a genus 1 initial data surface Σ 2 for 2+1 De Sitter gravity. Here we extend the analysis to higher genus. We construct for genus 2 the group of automorphisms H of the homotopy group π 1 induced by the mapping class group. The group H induces a group D of canonical transformations on the algebra of observables which is related to the braid group for 6 threads. (orig.)

  10. Integrable systems in the infinite genus limit

    OpenAIRE

    Gesztesy, Fritz

    2001-01-01

    We provide an elementary approach to integrable systems associated with hyperelliptic curves of infinite genus. In particular, we explore the extent to which the classical Burchnall-Chaundy theory generalizes in the infinite genus limit, and systematically study the effect of Darboux transformations for the KdV hierarchy on such infinite genus curves. Our approach applies to complex-valued periodic solutions of the KdV hierarchy and naturally identifies the Riemann surface familiar from stand...

  11. An annotated checklist of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Mohammad Ali

    2015-05-28

    Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) are one of the largest and dominating groups of soil inhabitants that play an important role in the formation and fertilization processes of the soils. In the present paper, a list of oribatid mites of Iran (excluding Astigmata) is present based mainly on the collected and identified species and on literature records since 1961. In total, 380 species belonging to 191 genera and 86 families have been recorded and these are listed along with their known geographical distributions and localities in Iran. The following seven species Sellnickochthonius cricoides (Weis-Fogh, 1948), Hypochthoniella minutissima (Berlese, 1904), Nothrus silvestris Nicolet, 1855, Hemileius (Hemileius) initialis (Berlese, 1908), Punctoribates (Punctoribates) punctum (C. L. Koch, 1839), Ceratozetes conjunctus Mihelčič, 1956, Eupelops tardus (C. L. Koch, 1835) and Pelopsis Hall, 1911 are recorded for the first time from Iran. The closing date for publications included in this list was 15 January 2015.

  12. Mites infesting commensal rodents in Shebin El Kom, Menoufia G., Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, M E; Morsy, T A; Nassef, N E; el Meligi, M A

    1995-12-01

    Rodent populations markedly increased in many Egyptian Governorates particularly commensal ones which live in close association with man and his domestic animals. In this paper, commensal rodents; M. musculus R. r. alexandrinus, and R. norvegicus were examined for the mites infesting them. Four species of mites were recovered; Ornithonyssus bacoti; Laelaps nuttalli, Dermanyssus gallinae and Allodermanyssus sanguineus. The medical and economic importance was discussed. It was concluded that mites and their environmental problem should be tackled.

  13. Mites and other indoor allergens ? from exposure to sensitization and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Raulf, Monika; Bergmann, K. C.; Kull, S.; Sander, I.; Hilger, Ch.; Br?ning, T.; Jappe, U.; M?sken, H.; Sperl, A.; Vrtala, S.; Zahradnik, E.; Klimek, L.

    2015-01-01

    House dust mites, cats and dogs are amongst the most frequent sources of indoor allergens in Europe. The fact that the allergens of house dust mites cause allergic disease through inhalation of house dust was discovered in 1964. The diagnosis of mite allergy is regularly complicated by its often nonspecific symptoms, which frequently develop insidiously and by no means always include attacks of paroxysmal sneezing and itching. Antibody-based immunological detection methods can be used to meas...

  14. Prevalence and pathology of mite infestation in street dogs at Dinajpur municipality area

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, M.H.; Begum, M.G; Azam, M.G; Roy, B.C

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and pathology of mite infestation in the street dog at Dinajpur municipality area, Dinajpur, Bangladesh, during June to September, 2010 using simultaneous clinical and histopathological examination and identification. A total of 48 street dogs (27 male and 21 female) were examined, among them 30(62.5%) were infested with one or more species of mites. Two species of mites were identified as Sarcoptes scabiei var.canis and Demodex canis. The...

  15. Feather mites (Acari, Astigmata) associated with birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,HM; Hernandes,FA; Pichorim,M

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThe present study reports associations between feather mites (Astigmata) and birds in an Atlantic Forest fragment in Rio Grande do Norte state, in Brazil. In the laboratory, mites were collected through visual examination of freshly killed birds. Overall, 172 individuals from 38 bird species were examined, between October 2011 and July 2012. The prevalence of feather mites was 80.8%, corresponding to 139 infested individuals distributed into 30 species and 15 families of hosts. Fiftee...

  16. Comparative morphological analysis of apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nal., a new pest in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Vidović Biljana; Marinković Slavica; Marić Ivana; Petanović Radmila

    2014-01-01

    The apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nalepa, 1926 (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea), has been recently found in Serbia as a new pest of apple. The history of its research, the results of a morphological analysis and degree of infestation are presented. A comparison of the main morphological features of mites from different populations of remote geographical origin has shown that the apple blister mite from Serbia is most similar to another European popul...

  17. Activation of lung epithelial cells by group 2 mite allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Österlund, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Throughout many parts of the world house dust mites (HDM) are considered as a major source of indoor aeroallergens and they are powerful inducers of allergic diseases. Proteolytic HDM allergens are recognised as being able to directly activate respiratory epithelial cells and thereby actively participate in innate immune responses. Although several major HDM allergens lack proteolytic activity, their possible ability to similarly interact with epithelial cells is not known. The overall aim of...

  18. Numerical changes and evolution in Actinotrichid Mites (Chelicerata)

    OpenAIRE

    Hammen, van der, L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is given of the evolutionary aspects of numerical changes in Actinotrichid mites. Numerical variations are studied in clones, in populations and in supraspecific taxa. Two particular aspects of the evolutionary changes (ontophylogeny and priority) are also dealt with. The changes are associated here, for the first time, with the regulatory system of the genome and its evolution. A general survey is, moreover, given of the main numerical changes in the Oribatid superfamily Nothroidea....

  19. Repeatability of Feather Mite Prevalence and Intensity in Passerine Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Real, Javier; Serrano, David; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Fernández-González, Sofía; Bermejo, Ana; Calleja, Juan A.; De la Puente, Javier; De Palacio, Diana; Martínez, José L.; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Ponce, Carlos; Frías, Óscar; Tella, José L.; Møller, Anders P.; Figuerola, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R) of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance compo...

  20. Analysis of the effect of ultraviolet irradiation on varroa mite

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchenko, Mykola; Kundenko, Nikolay; Sanin, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    We presented theoretical and experimental material on the influence of UV irradiation on a Varroa mite in the range of UVB and UVC in the study. We obtained mathematical expressions that simulate dependencies of electrical and structural characteristics of protective devices. Such devices implement the operation of HEA-1 hive entrance attachments equipped with LED modules of UV radiation powered by solar photocells. We substantiated parameters of protective devices, which provide a harmful ef...

  1. Mite Pests in Plant Crops – Current Issues, Inovative Approaches and Possibilities for Controlling Them (1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Petanović

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of the last century, mites moved into the focus of attention as pests relevantto agriculture, forestry and landscape horticulture, presumably in direct reactionto the “green revolution” that involved plant cultivation in large-plot monocropping systems,improved methods of cultivation, selection of high-yielding cultivars and intensifieduse of pesticides and mineral fertilizers. Agroecosystems in which phytophagous miteshave become harmful organisms are primarily orchards, vineyards, greenhouses, urbangreeneries, plant nurseries and stored plant products, as well as annual field crops to asomewhat lesser degree. Phytophagous mite species belong to a variety of spider mites(Tetranychidae, false spider mites (Tenuipalpidae, gall and rust mites (Eriophyoidae, tarsonemidmites (Tarsonemidae and acarid mites (Acaridae. Most of these harmful speciesare widespread, some of them having more economic impact than others and being moredetrimental as depending on various specificities of each outdoor agroecosystem in anyparticular climatic region.The first segment of this overview focuses on the most significant mite pests ofagroecosystemsand urban horticultural areas in European countries, our own region andin Serbia today, primarily on species that have caused problems in recent years regardingplant production, and it also discusses various molecular methods available for investigatingdifferent aspects of the biology of phytophagous mites. Also, acaricides are discussedas a method of controlling mite pests in the light of the current situation and trends on pesticidemarkets in Serbia and the European Union member-countries

  2. Diversity and significance of eriophyoid mites (Acari: Eriophyoidea associated with coniferous trees in Poland: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiedrowicz Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the approximately 200 eriophyoid mite species associated with coniferous trees worldwide, 33 species (of the families Eriophyidae and Phytoptidae infest conifers in Poland, and 24 of them can cause visible feeding symptoms. In this paper we discuss the importance of eriophyoid mites to coniferous plants in Poland and their potential impact on the decorative value of ornamental plants. We emphasize the general lack of knowledge about the diversity of eriophyoid mites associated with coniferous trees and its role in the management and control of this economically important mite group.

  3. The density and species of mite breeding in stored products in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaopin; Zhan, Xiaodong; Sun, Entao; Zhao, Jinhong; Wang, Huiyong; He, Ji; Wang, Jiajia; He, Lianping

    2014-09-12

    The aim of our study was to investigate the species and breeding density of acaroid mites in stored products in China. We tentatively harvested the samples from the products stored in warehouses, commercial stores and civilian houses, and the products. The results suggested the mites varied a lot in species regarding their ecological habitus and habitat. Still, the breeding density in different samples was associated with the sampling conditions. These discrepancies may be associated with the samples collected in diverse environment for the mites, and the findings easily suggest that acaroid mites are in universal distribution. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Mites (Acari Associated with the Desert Seed Harvester Ant, Messor pergandei (Mayr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin A. Uppstrom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites (Acari associated with the seed harvester ant Messor pergandei were investigated in the Sonoran desert of Arizona. At least seven representatives of the mite genera Armacarus, Lemanniella, Petalomium, Forcellinia, Histiostoma, Unguidispus, and Cosmoglyphus are phoretically associated with M. pergandei. Most of these morphospecies show preference for specific phoretic attachment sites and primarily use female alates rather than male alates for dispersal. Five mite morphospecies were found in low numbers inhabiting the chaff piles: Tydeidae sp., Procaeculus sp., Anystidae sp., Bakerdania sp., and Tetranychidae sp. The phoretic Petalomium sp. was observed consuming fungus growing on a dead queen, but the roles of the other mite species remain mostly unresolved.

  5. Interpretacions del mite d'El polític (Nota bibliogràfica)

    OpenAIRE

    Monserrat i Molas, Josep, 1967-

    1999-01-01

    Fent un repas de les principals interpretacions del mite d'El polític platonic, que, en general, no donen importancia a la multiplicitat de finalitats que el mite presenta, fem notar que quan el mite no és interpretat en relació amb el dialeg que el conté en resulten interpretacions divergents. En segon lloc, quan s'interpreta conjuntament amb la resta del dialeg, normalment el mite no acaba de ser ben situat. Com a resultat obtenim I'obertura d'una nova possibilitat interpretativa que respec...

  6. [Sensitization to house dust and storage mites in allergic adults from the South of Mexico city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Heredia, Jennifer; Oífarrill-Romanillos, Patricia María; Guidos-Fogelbach, Guillermo; Miyagui-Nakamura, Roberto Ken; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Mites are the most common cause of respiratory allergy. Sensitization to house dust mites is estimated at 30%. Families Euroglyphus and Dermatophagoides, are the most important. Recently, storage mites, from the families Acaridae and Glyciphagidae, have become more important as a cause of allergic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to identify sensitization to house dust and storage mites by skin tests in adult patients with allergic respiratory diseases. This is a descriptive study in patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis, with the approval of the local research committee 2009-3601-46. Patients underwent skin prick tests, with seven standardized extracts of mites (IPI ASACR). The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. A total of 150 patients, 109 women and 41 men, with an average age 31 years (±11) were studied. The more common allergic diseases in this group of patients were: asthma and rhinitis 72 and 26%, respectively, and asthma plus rhinitis 3.2%. Positive skin tests for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae were 82.1% 71.5%, respectively, and for storage mites: A. siro 51.7%, Tyrophagus 47.4%, Glycyphagus 47.7%, B. tropicalis 39.7% and Lepidoglyphus 39.1%. Storage mites produced greater sensitization than house dust mites, 32% vs 10%. The results show that adult patients with respiratory allergy, in southern Mexico City, have a higher rate of sensitization to storage mites than the one reported in the literature.

  7. [The relationship between the skin allergy test and house dust mites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atambay, Metin; Aycan, Ozlem M; Yoloğlu, Saim; Karaman, Ulkü; Daldal, Nilgün

    2006-01-01

    Since 1960 it has been known that house dust mites are related to allergy and that they cause pulmonary tract diseases. There are various house dust mites and among these Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Hughes, 1961) are best known with regard to their medical importance and morphological characteristics. Skin tests are used to determine the role of mites in allergic diseases. The tests are performed by using D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae antigens. In order to study, the concordance between the skin test results and the presence of house dust mites, dust samples from the houses of 49 patients diagnosed with allergic diseases who underwent skin tests were taken to investigate the presence of mites in dust. House dust mites were determined in 23 (46.3%) of the houses. Mites were found in the houses of 15 (50.0%) of 30 patients with positive skin test results and 8 (42.0%) of 19 patients with negative skin test results. There was no significant difference between the skin test positivity and negativity in the presence of house dust mites (P>0,005). In conclusion, we thought that it was necessary to evaluate the presence of mites in the houses of people who have allergic symptoms even if they had negative skin test results.

  8. Seasonal changes of house dust mite population in Bitlis and Muş provinces of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Medeni; Erman, Omer Köksal; Doğan, Salih

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the dust mite fauna of houses in Bitlis and Muş provinces, the monthly value of mite numbers/g dust, as well as the impact of temperature, humidity and altitude on their numbers. Dust samples were collected monthly from May 2010 to April 2011 from six houses belonging to three settlements; two of the houses were located in Bitlis, while another four were in Muş province. All 72 examined dust samples were found to be positive with regard to mites. The number of mites found in 1 g dust varied from 25 to 2,740. Overall, 1,167 house dust mites belonging to the orders Astigmata, Mesostigmata and Prostigmata were isolated. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was the predominant mite (83.2%), followed by Lepidoglyphus destructor (6.3%), Acarus siro (2.7%) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (1.9%). The mite numbers were higher in the warmer months of the year. The dominant mite in the Bitlis and Muş provinces is Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and the highest mite numbers were found in months in which the outside humidity was low.

  9. First record of the olive bud mite Oxycenus maxwelli (Keifer) (Acari: Eriophyidae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Paulo R; de Oliveira, A F; Navia, D

    2011-10-01

    The mite Oxycenus maxwelli (Keifer) (Eriophyidae) is reported for the first time in Brazil infesting olive trees, Olea europaea. Specimens were found on seedlings at Maria da Fé, state of Minas Gerais, in 2007. Although minor symptoms were not noticed, significant damage to plants were observed. There is no reliable evidence of when the mite could have been introduced. It is believed that the mite occurs since the first introductions of olive trees, around 1820, through vegetative propagating material, but the mite remained unnoticed due to the lack of studies with olive trees in Brazil.

  10. Geostatistics as a tool to study mite dispersion in physic nut plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, J F; Picanço, M C; Sarmento, R A; Pereira, R M; Pedro-Neto, M; Galdino, T V S; de Sousa Saraiva, A; Erasmo, E A L

    2015-08-01

    Spatial distribution studies in pest management identify the locations where pest attacks on crops are most severe, enabling us to understand and predict the movement of such pests. Studies on the spatial distribution of two mite species, however, are rather scarce. The mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi are the major pests affecting physic nut plantations (Jatropha curcas). Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the spatial distributions of P. latus and T. bastosi in the physic nut plantations. Mite densities were monitored over 2 years in two different plantations. Sample locations were georeferenced. The experimental data were analyzed using geostatistical analyses. The total mite density was found to be higher when only one species was present (T. bastosi). When both the mite species were found in the same plantation, their peak densities occurred at different times. These mites, however, exhibited uniform spatial distribution when found at extreme densities (low or high). However, the mites showed an aggregated distribution in intermediate densities. Mite spatial distribution models were isotropic. Mite colonization commenced at the periphery of the areas under study, whereas the high-density patches extended until they reached 30 m in diameter. This has not been reported for J. curcas plants before.

  11. Tetranychus urticae mites do not mount an induced immune response against bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Matos, Gonçalo; Wybouw, Nicky; Martins, Nelson E.; Zélé, Flore; Riga, Maria; Leitão, Alexandre B.; Vontas, John; Grbić, Miodrag; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Magalhães, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The genome of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, a herbivore, is missing important elements of the canonical Drosophila immune pathways necessary to fight bacterial infections. However, it is not known whether spider mites can mount an immune response and survive bacterial infection. In other chelicerates, bacterial infection elicits a response mediated by immune effectors leading to the survival of infected organisms. In T. urticae, infection by either Escherichia coli or Bacillus megaterium did not elicit a response as assessed through genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. In line with this, spider mites died within days even upon injection with low doses of bacteria that are non-pathogenic to Drosophila. Moreover, bacterial populations grew exponentially inside the infected spider mites. By contrast, Sancassania berlesei, a litter-dwelling mite, controlled bacterial proliferation and resisted infections with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria lethal to T. urticae. This differential mortality between mite species was absent when mites were infected with heat-killed bacteria. Also, we found that spider mites harbour in their gut 1000-fold less bacteria than S. berlesei. We show that T. urticae has lost the capacity to mount an induced immune response against bacteria, in contrast to other mites and chelicerates but similarly to the phloem feeding aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Hence, our results reinforce the putative evolutionary link between ecological conditions regarding exposure to bacteria and the architecture of the immune response. PMID:28592670

  12. Population growth of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee colonies is affected by the number of foragers with mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Zazueta, Victor; Chambers, Mona; Hidalgo, Geoffrey; deJong, Emily Watkins

    2016-05-01

    Varroa mites are a serious pest of honey bees and the leading cause of colony losses. Varroa have relatively low reproductive rates, so populations should not increase rapidly, but often they do. Other factors might contribute to the growth of varroa populations including mite migration into colonies on foragers from other hives. We measured the proportion of foragers carrying mites on their bodies while entering and leaving hives, and determined its relationship to the growth of varroa populations in those hives at two apiary sites. We also compared the estimates of mite population growth with predictions from a varroa population dynamics model that generates estimates of mite population growth based on mite reproduction. Samples of capped brood and adult bees indicated that the proportion of brood cells infested with mites and adult bees with phoretic mites was low through the summer but increased sharply in the fall especially at site 1. The frequency of capturing foragers with mites on their bodies while entering or leaving hives also increased in the fall. The growth of varroa populations at both sites was not significantly related to our colony estimates of successful mite reproduction, but instead to the total number of foragers with mites (entering and leaving the colony). There were more foragers with mites at site 1 than site 2, and mite populations at site 1 were larger especially in the fall. The model accurately estimated phoretic mite populations and infested brood cells until November when predictions were much lower than those measured in colonies. The rapid growth of mite populations particularly in the fall being a product of mite migration rather than mite reproduction only is discussed.

  13. Presensitization to Ascaris antigens promotes induction of mite-specific IgE upon mite antigen inhalation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Ichikawa, Saori; Kamijo, Seiji; Nakazawa, Takuya; Hatanaka, Hideki; Akiyama, Kazuo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with house dust mite (HDM) allergy or Ascariasis produce serum IgE specific to the antigens of HDM or nematode Ascaris, respectively. Although human IgE cross-reactivity has been reported between HDM and Ascaris antigens, it remains unclear whether it contributes to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. We herein investigated the induction of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells in mice and effects of airway exposure to HDM antigens after preimmunization with Ascaris an...

  14. House-dust mite and mite-and pet-allergens in indoor environment; Dani oyobi dani-allergen, pet-allergen no jittai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, T. [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan)

    1998-05-31

    In this paper, the actual state of mite and mite-allergen, and the actual state of pet-allergen that the researches thereof proceed gradually in recent years are described. The following findings are obtained as the results of the actual state investigations. In respect to the mite-allergen, airborne mite, particularly I with high allergen activity shows high concentration from fall to winter. The reasons thereof are considered from two aspects, I.e., the fragmentation and suspension of mite-allergen, and the decrease of ventilation frequency, while it can also be explained from a fact that the fit of infantile asthma is most frequent during a period from October to November. Mite-allergen contained in futon dust is about 10 times more than that contained in floor dust. In respect to pet-allergen, although the indoor accumulative amount and airborne concentration of main pet-allergen such as cat-, and dog-allergen varies greatly depending on whether pet is kept indoor or outdoor, the quantities of dog- and cat-allergen are almost of the same order, but 2 to 3-order higher than the quantity of mite-allergen. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Immunoinformatics and Similarity Analysis of House Dust Mite Tropomyosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Ranjbar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus are house dust mites (HDM that they cause severe asthma and allergic symptoms. Tropomyosin protein plays an important role in mentioned immune and allergic reactions to HDMs. Here, tropomyosin protein from Dermatophagoides spp. was comprehensively screened in silico for its allergenicity, antigenicity and similarity/conservation.Materials and Methods: The amino acid sequences of D. farinae tropomyosin, D. pteronyssinus and other mites were retrieved. We included alignments and evaluated conserved/ variable regions along sequences, constructed their phylogenetic tree and estimated overall mean distances. Then, followed by with prediction of linear B-cell epitope based on different approaches, and besides in-silico evaluation of IgE epitopes allergenicity (by SVMc, IgE epitope, ARPs BLAST, MAST and hybrid method. Finally, comparative analysis of results by different approaches was made.Results: Alignment results revealed near complete identity between D. farina and D. pteronyssinus members, and also there was close similarity among Dermatophagoides spp. Most of the variations among mites' tropomyosin were approximately located at amino acids 23 to 80, 108 to 120, 142 to 153 and 220 to 230. Topology of tree showed close relationships among mites in tropomyosin protein sequence, although their sequences in D. farina, D. pteronyssinus and Psoroptes ovis are more similar to each other and clustered. Dermanyssus gallinae (AC: Q2WBI0 has less relationship to other mites, being located in a separate branch. Hydrophilicity and flexibility plots revealed that many parts of this protein have potential to be hydrophilic and flexible. Surface accessibility represented 7 different epitopes. Beta-turns in this protein are with high probability in the middle part and its two terminals. Kolaskar and Tongaonkar method analysis represented 11 immunogenic epitopes between amino acids 7-16. From

  16. THE GENUS TEIJSMANNIODENDRON KOORDERS (VERBENACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. The present notes on Teijsmanniodendron are based on a study of the spec- imens from Herbarium Bogoriense and the Herbarium of the Singapore Botanic Garden. 2. The taxonomic value of the principal characters and their variation are discussed. Each of the species recognized is annotated. 3. A delimitation and subdivision of the genus in two sections,  Plurifoliolatae Kosterm.  and 'Unifoliolatae Kosterm  is proposed. 4. A key to the 12 species and 1 variety distinguished, is included. 5. One new species is provisionally described (but not named, and one new variety, Teijsmanniodendron pteropodum var. auriculatum Kosterm, is published. 6. The following new combinations are made: Teijsmanniodendron coriaceum B. Clarke Kosterm,, T. hollrungii (Warb. Kosterm. T. holophyllum (Bak. Kos- term, T.novoguineense (Kan. & Hatus. Kosterm., T. sarawakanum (H. H. W. Pears. Kosterm., T. smilacifolium (H. H. W. Pears. Kosterm., and T. subspieatum (Hallier f. Kosterm. 7. The genus Xerocarpa H. 3. Lam (non Spach is rejected; its only species, X. avicenniaefoliola H. J. Lam, is referred to Teijsmanniodendron ahernianum (Merr. Bakh. In addition, the following reductions are made: Teijsmanniodendron mono- phyllum Kurata = T. hollrungii (Warb. Kosterm.; Vitex bankae H. J. Lam = T. ahernianum (Merr. Bakh., V. bogoriensis H. J. Lam = T. ahernianum (Merr. Bakh.; V. koordersii H. J. Lam t= T. pteropodum (Miq. Bakh.; V. tetragona Hallier f. = T. sarawakanum (H. H. W. Pears. Kosterm.; V. venosa H. J. Lam = T. coriaceum (C. B. Clarke Kosterm. Possible identity of T. longifolium (Merr. Merr. and T. bogoriense is suggested: the identity of T. simplicifolium Merr. and T. smilacifolium (H. H-, W. Pears. Kosterm. is indicated as probable. 8. Vitex subspicata Hallier f. and V. holophylla Bak. included by Lam in vitex hollrungii Warb. are reinstated as distinct species of Teijsmanniodendron.

  17. Evolution of the Genus Homo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Ian; Schwartz, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    Definition of the genus Homo is almost as fraught as the definition of Homo sapiens. We look at the evidence for “early Homo,” finding little morphological basis for extending our genus to any of the 2.5-1.6-myr-old fossil forms assigned to “early Homo” or Homo habilis/rudolfensis. We also point to heterogeneity among “early African Homo erectus,” and the lack of apomorphies linking these fossils to the Asian Homo erectus group, a cohesive regional clade that shows some internal variation, including brain size increase over time. The first truly cosmopolitan Homo species is Homo heidelbergensis, known from Africa, Europe, and China following 600 kyr ago. One species sympatric with it included the >500-kyr-old Sima de los Huesos fossils from Spain, clearly distinct from Homo heidelbergensis and the oldest hominids assignable to the clade additionally containing Homo neanderthalensis. This clade also shows evidence of brain size expansion with time; but although Homo neanderthalensis had a large brain, it left no unequivocal evidence of the symbolic consciousness that makes our species unique. Homo sapiens clearly originated in Africa, where it existed as a physical entity before it began (also in that continent) to show the first stirrings of symbolism. Most likely, the biological underpinnings of symbolic consciousness were exaptively acquired in the radical developmental reorganization that gave rise to the highly characteristic osteological structure of Homo sapiens, but lay fallow for tens of thousands of years before being “discovered” by a cultural stimulus, plausibly the invention of language.

  18. Revision of the African genus Annickia (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, C.P.C.; Sosef, M.S.M.

    2007-01-01

    complete revision, including a key to the species, drawings and distribution maps, of the tropical African Annonaceae genus Annickia (= Enantia Oliv., non Falc.) is presented. The exact phylogenetic position of this genus within the family has long been, and in fact still is, unclear. The status of

  19. Typification of the genus Macropsidium Bl. (Myrtaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1971-01-01

    In revising Myrtaceae Blume correctly concluded in 1849 that Psidium rubrum Lour, from Indo-China could not belong to that neotropical genus. He erected a new genus Macropsidium Bl., to accommodate it, adding at the same time the description of a second new species from the Moluccas. It is desirable

  20. A revision of the genus Dillenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, R.D.

    1952-01-01

    The present paper is an extension of my revision of the Malaysian species of the genus Dillenia L. (Wormia Rottb. included) inserted in the revision of the Dilleniaceae in the Flora Malesiana ser. I, vol. 4, part 3, pp. 141—174, published in December 1951. A critical revision of the whole genus has

  1. Phenetic relationships in the genus Myotis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Findley, James S.

    1970-01-01

    The genus Myotis is of interest to the evolutionist because of its diversity and because of its nearly cosmopolitan distribution. An understanding of the biology of this remarkable genus may provide insight into its success, as well as the success of other expansive groups of mammals. As part of an

  2. The acaricidal speed of kill of orally administered fluralaner against poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae) on laying hens and its impact on mite reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauneis, Maria D; Zoller, Hartmut; Williams, Heike; Zschiesche, Eva; Heckeroth, Anja R

    2017-12-02

    Dermanyssus gallinae, the poultry red mite, is a growing threat to chickens in poultry farms. This nocturnal hematophagous ectoparasite has a rapid rate of proliferation with a negative impact on the birds' health, welfare and productivity resulting in severe economic consequences for poultry farmers. A study was performed with fluralaner, a novel systemic ectoparasiticide, to evaluate its effect on mite vitality and reproduction after oral administration to laying hens. Sixteen healthy hens were randomly allocated to two study groups (n = 8). One group was orally treated with fluralaner by gavage at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight twice 7 days apart. The negative control group received no treatment. Hens in each group were repeatedly infested with approximately 200 unfed adult D. gallinae at 1, 5, 8, 12, 15, 19, 22 and 26 days after the initial administration. After infestation and feeding for 2.5 h, 25 engorged mites per hen were collected and incubated in tubes. Mites were assessed for vitality (dead/live) at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after each infestation. Tubes containing eggs and/or living mites were incubated another 8 days for assessment of mite reproductive capacity. Fluralaner demonstrated a fast speed of kill in mites within 4 h post-infestation for 12 days after treatment initiation. An efficacy (mite mortality) of 98.7-100% was achieved. At 15 days after treatment initiation, 100% efficacy was achieved within 24 h post-infestation, and no mite oviposition occurred during this period. Nineteen days after treatment initiation, the mites' ability to generate nymphs was reduced by 90.8%, which decreased to < 24.1% at later infestations. Fluralaner administered orally to hens twice, 7 days apart, provides efficacy against experimental poultry red mite infestation for at least 2 weeks. The demonstrated rapid speed of kill results in substantial depletion of the mites' oviposition and suggests that fluralaner can be an effective tool in the control

  3. Influence of leaf pubescence on the behavior of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae and the European red mite (Panonychus ulmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Warabieda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Movement behavior of two mite species: two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae and European red mite (Panonychus ulmi on leaves of some apple cultivars (´Greensleeves´, ´Spartan' and SA 455-2 selection with different density of pubescence was analysed. Assessment of the leaf pubescence density was performed using an originally developed quick method based on digital pubescence mage analysis. For P.ulmi, both stop time and average speed did not depend on kind of leaf. In contrary. T.urticae revealed higher movement activity on slight pubescent leaves compared to leaves with high leaf hair density.

  4. 226 Analysis of an After-Care Questionnaire in Allergic People to Dust Mites Using Anti-Dust Mites Bed Covers

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhettala, Nabile; Bourgeon, Solveig

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of the study was to assess in a declarative way, the symptoms felt by the patients and the impact of micro-woven cotton (MWC) and a non woven polyester polyamide (NWP) anti-dust mites bed covers on allergic volunteers to dust mites. Methods This study is a descriptive survey based on an after-care questionnaire handed out to a group of 419 volunteers allergic to dust mites. 109 questionnaires have been used. Regarding the allergy, we asked questions in order to assess the ...

  5. The effect of antibiotics on associated bacterial community of stored product mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopecky

    Full Text Available Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata. The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria.Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mg g(-1 of diet for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor.The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mg g(-1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet.

  6. HOUSE DUST MITE CONTAMINATION IN HOTELS AND INNS IN BANDAR ABBAS, SOUTH OF IRAN

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    M. Soleimani, J. Rafinejad

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available House dust mites have been shown to be strongly associated with allergic respiratory diseases such as, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis in the world. The climatic conditions of Bandar-Abbas, which is located in a coastal area and has a humid subtropical climate, provide a suitable place to proliferate mites. The aim of this study was to determine the contamination rate and analyze the house dust mite fauna in hotels and inns in Bandar-Abbas that had not been investigated previously. In this study 6 hotels and 6 inns were selected randomly in six areas of Bandar-Abbas. Two dust samples were collected from each place with a vacuum cleaner. One square meter of carpets and mattresses were vacuumed for a period of 1 min. Then the samples were cleared in lactic acid and then mites were mounted in Hoyer's medium for study and identification. A total of 2644 mites were collected and identified. The major mite family was Pyroglyphidae (98%. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was the most frequent and most numerous species recorded, occurring in 91% of samples examined and forming 88% of the Pyroglyphidae and 86% of the total mite populations. The family Cheyletidae was less commonly found with Cheyletus malaccensis (2%. Most of the mites were isolated from the carpets (57.5%, and a smaller number from mattresses (42.5%. Mites were present in 96% of the dust samples. Results revealed that all inns and 83% of hotels were contaminated by more than one species of mite and 34% of them had a population of more than 100 mites /g dust. This rate of contamination can be a major risk factor in asthma and other respiratory allergic diseases

  7. [Investigation of chigger mites on small mammals in a flatland area of Menghan, Xishuangbanna, Yunnan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao-Hua; Shi, Ai-Min; Guo, Xian-Guo; Song, Wen-Yu; Zhao, Nan; Dong, Wen-Ge

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the species composition and distribution of chigger mites on small mammals in flatland area in Menghan, Xishuangbanna of Yunnan Province. The field investigation was made in a flatland area near Lancangjiang River in Menghan, Xishuangbanna of Yunnan Province. Small mammals were captured with mouse cages and traps. All mites on the hosts were collected and preserved in 70% ethanol. Hoyer's solution was used to mount the chiggers on glass slides. The specimens of the chigger mites on the slides were finally identified into species under microscope. The constituent ratio, infestation rate, mean abundance and mean intensity of chigger mites in different habitats or on different hosts were used to measure the community structure. The species richness and community diversity were analyzed. A total of 233 small mammal hosts were captured (belonging to 2 families, 3 genera and 5 species). 5 763 individuals of chigger mites were identified as 2 subfamilies, 7 genera, and 45 species. Rattus tanezumi (R. flavipectus) was the dominant species among the captured hosts, accounting for 97.4% (227/233). The mite infestation rate, average ectoparasite abundance, and mean mite intensity on R. tanezumi was 56.4% (128/227), 24.7 (5 600/227) and 43.8 (5 600/128), respectively. Leptotrombidium deliense was dominant chigger mite species and account for 57.9% (3 337/5 763), mainly infested R. tanezumi. Compared with indoor and cultivated field habitats, the species richness and community diversity of chigger mites in shrub habitat were higher, and 41 species of chigger mites were collected. The species composition and community structure is relatively simple in the flatland area in Xishuangbanna. L. deliense is the most dominant species of chigger mites and its main host is R. tanezumi.

  8. Cheyletus eruditus (taurrus): an effective candidate for the biological control of the snake mite (Ophionyssus natricis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel H; Morel, Damien; Bonwitt, Jesse H; Marquis, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    The most commonly encountered ectoparasite in captive snakes is the hematophagous snake mite (Ophionyssus natricis). Infected snakes often exhibit lethargy, dysecdysis, pruritus, crusting dermatitis (sometimes progressing to abscesses), and behavioral changes (increased bathing time, rubbing against objects). Anemia and septicemia are occasional complications. Eliminating snake mites from a collection is frustrating. Insecticidal and acaricidal compounds used in mammals can be used against O. natricis infestation in reptiles, but they all are potentially neurotoxic to reptiles. The use of a biological agent to control the snake mite was first developed by using the predatory mites Hypoaspis miles and Hypoaspis aculeifer. However, no data are available regarding the potential of these mites to control O. natricis. Furthermore, the survival and predatory behavior of H. aculeifer and H. miles decreases above 28 degrees C, which is the lower value of the optimal temperature zone range required for rearing snakes. The aim of this study is to identify the ability of the predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus to control O. natricis. In the first experiment, 125 O. natricis mites where placed in separate plastic tubes together with the same number of C. eruditus mites. After 48 hr, the survival rate of snake mites was 6% compared with 92% in the control group (n = 125, P snake) ball pythons, with an average of 13 O. natricis per individual, were placed in separate cages with 1,000 C. eruditus mites + vermiculite After 15 days, only an average of two mites per snake remained, compared with 48 per snake in the control group (t-test, P < 0,01).

  9. Diagnosis of house dust mite allergy in asthmatic children: what constitutes a positive history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A B; Ferguson, A C; Morrison, B J

    1983-01-01

    Standardized questions were put to the parents of 530 children, referred consecutively for evaluation of asthma, to determine which features in the history were associated with house-dust mite allergy. Bronchial challenge tests performed on 19 of the children confirmed that there is a highly significant association between a positive skin prick test and a positive bronchial challenge test to Dermatophagoides farinae mite antigen. One hundred and eighteen (23%) of the children had positive prick tests to the mite. There is a highly significant association between a positive prick test to mite and a history that the subject's respiratory symptoms become worse when there is exposure to domestic activity that stirs up house dust (vacuuming, dusting, sweeping, making the bed, or shaking out blankets) or that the symptoms improve when out of doors. Seasonal variation and other features in the history are of little value in distinguishing mite-sensitive from mite-insensitive asthmatics. Although the 4% whose only positive prick test reaction was to mite had significant worsening of asthma during the colder months compared with the remainder, most mite-positive subjects had multiple allergies and had no characteristic seasonal pattern. The presence of a positive prick test to mite was not associated with aggravation of asthma either at night in bed or in the morning on awakening. A history similar to that of mite-sensitive subjects was elicited in those with a positive prick test to house dust. A positive history of house dust or house-dust mite allergy in asthmatics is one in which respiratory symptoms become worse during domestic activity that stirs up house dust or improve when outdoors.

  10. Norwegian honey bees surviving Varroa destructor mite infestations by means of natural selection

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    Melissa A.Y. Oddie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Managed, feral and wild populations of European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera, are currently facing severe colony losses globally. There is consensus that the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, that switched hosts from the Eastern honey bee Apis cerana to the Western honey bee A. mellifera, is a key factor driving these losses. For >20 years, breeding efforts have not produced European honey bee colonies that can survive infestations without the need for mite control. However, at least three populations of European honey bees have developed this ability by means of natural selection and have been surviving for >10 years without mite treatments. Reduced mite reproductive success has been suggested as a key factor explaining this natural survival. Here, we report a managed A. mellifera population in Norway, that has been naturally surviving consistent V. destructor infestations for >17 years. Methods Surviving colonies and local susceptible controls were evaluated for mite infestation levels, mite reproductive success and two potential mechanisms explaining colony survival: grooming of adult worker bees and Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH: adult workers specifically detecting and removing mite-infested brood. Results Mite infestation levels were significantly lower in surviving colonies and mite reproductive success was reduced by 30% when compared to the controls. No significant differences were found between surviving and control colonies for either grooming or VSH. Discussion Our data confirm that reduced mite reproductive success seems to be a key factor for natural survival of infested A. mellifera colonies. However, neither grooming nor VSH seem to explain colony survival. Instead, other behaviors of the adult bees seem to be sufficient to hinder mite reproductive success, because brood for this experiment was taken from susceptible donor colonies only. To mitigate the global impact of V. destructor, we suggest learning

  11. Sarcoptes scabiei mites in humans are distributed into three genetically distinct clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriantsoanirina, V; Ariey, F; Izri, A; Bernigaud, C; Fang, F; Charrel, R; Foulet, F; Botterel, F; Guillot, J; Chosidow, O; Durand, R

    2015-12-01

    Scabies is an ectoparasitic infestation caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. Currently, S. scabiei is taxonomically divided into different varieties on the basis of host origin. Genetics-based research on scabies has been conducted, but the data on genetic diversity of populations of this mite in humans in Europe are lacking. We evaluated the genetic diversity of populations of S. scabiei. A large series of mites obtained from humans in France and the data of mites from various hosts and geographical areas retrieved from GenBank were included to investigate whether mites are divided into distinct populations. The study of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene polymorphisms were found to be best suited for phylogenetic analysis. S. scabiei mites were distributed into three genetically distinct clades, with most mites clustering in clades B and C. The Fst value and the Nm value calculated for mites included in clades B and C indicated a strong population structure and a very low gene flow between mites of those clades. The results of the present study not only support the rejection of the hypothesis of panmixia for S. scabiei in humans but also suggest that mites belonging to different clades are genetically isolated. Moreover, the results suggest that the subdivision of S. scabies in varieties according to animal or human hosts is not warranted. In conclusion, S. scabiei mites in humans do not constitute a homogeneous population. Further investigations are now required to assess whether different clinical forms of scabies are associated with particular haplotypes or clades. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) infestation levels and management practices on insecticide sensitivity in the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because Varroa mites may cause devastating losses of honey bees through direct feeding, transmitting diseases, and increasing pathogen susceptibility, chemical and mechanical practices commonly are used to reduce mite infestation. While miticide applications are typically the most consistent and eff...

  13. The elliptic genus and Hidden symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the elliptic genus (a partition function) in certain interacting, twist quantum field theories. Without twists, these theories have N=2 supersymmetry. The twists provide a regularization, and also partially break the supersymmetry. In spite of the regularization, one can establish a homotopy of the elliptic genus in a coupling parameter. Our construction relies on a priori estimates and other methods from constructive quantum field theory; this mathematical underpinning allows us to justify evaluating the elliptic genus at one endpoint of the homotopy. We obtain a version of Witten's proposed formula for the elliptic genus in terms of classical theta functions. As a consequence, the elliptic genus has a hidden SL(2,Z) symmetry characteristic of conformal theory, even though the underlying theory is not conformal. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of Microbiomes between Red Poultry Mite Populations (Dermanyssus gallinae): Predominance of Bartonella-like Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Erban, Tomas; Kopecky, Jan; Sopko, Bruno; Nesvorna, Marta; Lichovnikova, Martina; Schicht, Sabine; Strube, Christina; Sparagano, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    Blood feeding red poultry mites (RPM) serve as vectors of pathogenic bacteria and viruses among vertebrate hosts including wild birds, poultry hens, mammals, and humans. The microbiome of RPM has not yet been studied by high-throughput sequencing. RPM eggs, larvae, and engorged adult/nymph samples obtained in four poultry houses in Czechia were used for microbiome analyses by Illumina amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene V4 region. A laboratory RPM population was used as positive control for transcriptome analysis by pyrosequencing with identification of sequences originating from bacteria. The samples of engorged adult/nymph stages had 100-fold more copies of 16S rRNA gene copies than the samples of eggs and larvae. The microbiome composition showed differences among the four poultry houses and among observed developmental stadia. In the adults' microbiome 10 OTUs comprised 90 to 99% of all sequences. Bartonella-like bacteria covered between 30 and 70% of sequences in RPM microbiome and 25% bacterial sequences in transcriptome. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed two distinct groups of Bartonella-like bacteria forming sister groups: (i) symbionts of ants; (ii) Bartonella genus. Cardinium, Wolbachia, and Rickettsiella sp. were found in the microbiomes of all tested stadia, while Spiroplasma eriocheiris and Wolbachia were identified in the laboratory RPM transcriptome. The microbiomes from eggs, larvae, and engorged adults/nymphs differed. Bartonella-like symbionts were found in all stadia and sampling sites. Bartonella-like bacteria was the most diversified group within the RPM microbiome. The presence of identified putative pathogenic bacteria is relevant with respect to human and animal health issues while the identification of symbiontic bacteria can lead to new control methods targeting them to destabilize the arthropod host.

  15. Effect of Activated Charcoal Fibers on the Survival of the House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Hae-Seon; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Choi, Young-Jin; Park, Joon-Soo; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Lee, Sang-Han; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Robert

    2012-01-01

    House dust mites produce potent allergens that exacerbate asthma in sensitized patients, whom are recommended to practice allergen avoidance within their home environment. We tested the effect of activated charcoal impregnated fibers on house dust mite survival. One hundred live adult house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) were added to eight culture dishes preequilibrated at room temperature (n = 4) and 70% humidity (n = 4) containing house dust mite food and active charcoal fiber...

  16. Emaravirus: A Novel Genus of Multipartite, Negative Strand RNA Plant Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke-Ehret, Nicole; Mühlbach, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ringspot symptoms in European mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.), fig mosaic, rose rosette, raspberry leaf blotch, pigeonpea sterility mosaic (Cajanus cajan) and High Plains disease of maize and wheat were found to be associated with viruses that share several characteristics. They all have single-stranded multipartite RNA genomes of negative orientation. In some cases, double membrane-bound virus-like particles of 80 to 200 nm in diameter were found in infected tissue. Furthermore, at least five of these viruses were shown to be vectored by eriophyid mites. Sequences of European mountain ash ringspot-associated virus (EMARaV), Fig mosaic virus (FMV), rose rosette virus (RRV), raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus and High Plains virus strongly support their potential phylogenetic relationship. Therefore, after characterization of EMARaV, the novel genus Emaravirus was established, and FMV was the second virus species assigned to this genus. The recently sequenced RRV and RLBV are supposed to be additional members of this new group of plant RNA viruses. PMID:23170170

  17. Emaravirus: A Novel Genus of Multipartite, Negative Strand RNA Plant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Mühlbach

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ringspot symptoms in European mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L., fig mosaic, rose rosette, raspberry leaf blotch, pigeonpea sterility mosaic (Cajanus cajan and High Plains disease of maize and wheat were found to be associated with viruses that share several characteristics. They all have single-stranded multipartite RNA genomes of negative orientation. In some cases, double membrane-bound virus-like particles of 80 to 200 nm in diameter were found in infected tissue. Furthermore, at least five of these viruses were shown to be vectored by eriophyid mites. Sequences of European mountain ash ringspot-associated virus (EMARaV, Fig mosaic virus (FMV, rose rosette virus (RRV, raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV, pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus and High Plains virus strongly support their potential phylogenetic relationship. Therefore, after characterization of EMARaV, the novel genus Emaravirus was established, and FMV was the second virus species assigned to this genus. The recently sequenced RRV and RLBV are supposed to be additional members of this new group of plant RNA viruses.

  18. Higher rank BN-theory for curves of genus 4

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, H.; Newstead, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Higher rank Brill-Noether theory is completely known for curves of genus $\\leq 3$. In this paper, we investigate the theory for curves of genus 4. Some of our results apply to curves of arbitrary genus.

  19. Diversity of Quill Mites of the Family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) Parasitizing Owls (Aves: Strigiformes) With Remarks on the Host-Parasite Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Marciniak, Natalia; Sikora, Bozena

    2016-07-01

    The quill mite fauna of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) associated with owls (Aves: Strigiformes) is reviewed. A new genus is proposed, Neobubophilus Skoracki & Unsoeld gen. nov. It differs from closely related Bubophilus (Bubophilus Philips and Norton, 1978) by the absence of leg setae vsII in the both sexes. In addition, four new species are described: (1) Neobubophilus cunicularius Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene cunicularia (Molina, 1782) (Strigidae) from Paraguay; (2) Neobubophilus atheneus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene noctua (Scopoli, 1769) and Athene brama (Temminck, 1821) (Strigidae), both from India; (3) Bubophilus tytonus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Tyto alba affinis (Blyth, 1862) (Tytonidae) from Cameroon, and (4) Megasyringophilus dalmas Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Megascops choliba (Vieillot, 1817) (Strigidae) from Venezuela. The following new host species are given: Bubo bubo (Linnaeus, 1758) (Strigidae) from Nepal for Bubophilus ascalaphus (Philips and Norton 1978) and Strix woodfordii (Smith, 1834) (Strigidae) from Tanzania for Bubophilus aluconis (aluconis Nattress and Skoracki 2009). A key for syringophilid genera and species associated with owls is constructed. The host-parasite relationships of syringophilid mites and owls are discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Version of Record, first published online May 24, 2016 with fixed content and layout in compliance with Art. 8.1.3.2 ICZN.

  20. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrzik, Karel; Sarkisova, Tatiana; Starý, Josef; Koloniuk, Igor; Hrabáková, Lenka; Kubešová, Olga

    2016-02-01

    A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproductive biology of varroa mites in colonies of Africanized honey bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderon Fallas, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the reproductive biology of V. destructor in Africanized honeybees (AHB) in Central American conditions, specifically in Costa Rica. Attention was paid to mite fertility and production of viable female mites in worker and drone brood cells. Other reproduction parameters, like

  2. Allergen-induced bronchial inflammation in house dust mite-allergic patients with or without asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopuhaä, C. E.; Out, T. A.; Jansen, H. M.; Aalberse, R. C.; van der Zee, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Background It is presently unknown which factors determine the occurrence and persistence of asthma in house dust mite-allergic individuals. The level of allergen-specific IgE antibodies does not seem to be decisive for asthmatic symptoms. Moreover, levels of exposure to mite allergens do not seem

  3. Physicochemical and nutritional alterations induced by two-spotted spider mite infestation on strawberry plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Livinali

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that TSSM infestation decreases fruit quality and that the biological control of TSSM using a predatory mite is a suitable alternative to organic production, since the presence of predatory mite does not affect fruit quality and development.

  4. Increased transcription of Glutathione S-transferases in acaricide exposed scabies mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currie Bart J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis mites collected from scabies endemic communities in northern Australia show increasing tolerance to 5% permethrin and oral ivermectin. Previous findings have implicated detoxification pathways in developing resistance to these acaricides. We investigated the contribution of Glutathione S-transferase (GST enzymes to permethrin and ivermectin tolerance in scabies mites using biochemical and molecular approaches. Results Increased in vitro survival following permethrin exposure was observed in S. scabiei var. hominis compared to acaricide naïve mites (p in vitro permethrin susceptibility, confirming GST involvement in permethrin detoxification. Assay of GST enzymatic activity in mites demonstrated that S. scabiei var. hominis mites showed a two-fold increase in activity compared to naïve mites (p S. scabiei var. canis- mu 1 (p S. scabiei var. hominis mites collected from a recurrent crusted scabies patient over the course of ivermectin treatment. Conclusions These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that increased drug metabolism and efflux mediate permethrin and ivermectin resistance in scabies mites and highlight the threat of emerging acaricide resistance to the treatment of scabies worldwide. This is one of the first attempts to define specific genes involved in GST mediated acaricide resistance at the transcriptional level, and the first application of such studies to S. scabiei, a historically challenging ectoparasite.

  5. The effect of insecticide synergists on the response of scabies mites to pyrethroid acaricides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasay, Cielo; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Gunning, Robin; Rossiter, Louise; Holt, Deborah; Walton, Shelley; Beckham, Simone; McCarthy, James

    2009-01-01

    Permethrin is the active component of topical creams widely used to treat human scabies. Recent evidence has demonstrated that scabies mites are becoming increasingly tolerant to topical permethrin and oral ivermectin. An effective approach to manage pesticide resistance is the addition of synergists to counteract metabolic resistance. Synergists are also useful for laboratory investigation of resistance mechanisms through their ability to inhibit specific metabolic pathways. To determine the role of metabolic degradation as a mechanism for acaricide resistance in scabies mites, PBO (piperonyl butoxide), DEF (S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate) and DEM (diethyl maleate) were first tested for synergistic activity with permethrin in a bioassay of mite killing. Then, to investigate the relative role of specific metabolic pathways inhibited by these synergists, enzyme assays were developed to measure esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (cytochrome P450) activity in mite extracts. A statistically significant difference in median survival time of permethrin-resistant Sarcoptes scabiei variety canis was noted when any of the three synergists were used in combination with permethrin compared to median survival time of mites exposed to permethrin alone (presistant mites compared to sensitive mites. These findings indicate the potential utility of synergists in reversing resistance to pyrethroid-based acaricides and suggest a significant role of metabolic mechanisms in mediating pyrethroid resistance in scabies mites.

  6. Seasonal dynamics of mites and fungi and their interaction with southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hofstetter; Keir D. Klepzig; John C. Moser; Matthew P. Ayres

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated whether Dendroctonus fiontalis Zimmermann populations were influenced by nontrophic interactions involving commensal mites, their mutualistic bluestain fungus Ophiostoma minus (Hedgc.) H. and P. Sydow, and beetle-mutualistic mycangial fungi. We tested for effects of delayed, nonlinear, or positive feedback from O. minus and mites on

  7. The Tropilaelaps mites threat: An examination of the injuries inflicted on Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropilaelaps spp. are the most serious parasites of Apis mellifera in Asia. However, much of their biology and ecology are largely unexplored (de Guzman et al., 2017 J. Econ. Entomol. 1-14). Like varroa mites, tropilaelaps mites puncture through the integuments of their bee hosts to feed on hemolymp...

  8. Four new records of mites (Acari: Astigmata phoretic on insects in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed W. Negm

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out to investigate astigmatid mites associated with four unrelated insect species, belonging to four families. The four insect species, Musca domestica (Linnaeus, 1785 (Diptera: Muscidae, Labidura riparia (Pallas, 1773 (Dermaptera: Labiduridae, Gryllus bimaculatus (DeGeer, 1773 (Orthoptera: Gryllidae, and Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattaria: Blattidae, collected from different localities in Riyadh, were observed. Four astigmatid mites (Caloglyphus csibbii Eraky, Histiostoma camphori Eraky, Histiostoma pickaxei Eraky and Shoker, and Myianoetus lili Eraky belonging to two families, Acaridae and Histiostomatidae, were recorded on G. bimaculatus, L. riparia, P. americana, and M. domestica, respectively. All recorded mites are considered new to Saudi Arabian mite fauna. One individual of Copronomoia sphaerocerae (Vitzthum (Histiostomatidae mite, previously recorded in Saudi Arabia, was found on M. domestica. For each mite species found, notes on density and attachment sites are given. An identification key, based on deutonymphal stages, for the five mite species reported in this study and other phoretic astigmatid mites previously recorded on insects in Saudi Arabia is provided.

  9. Differences among plant species in acceptance by the spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, van den C.E.M.; Beek, van T.A.; Dicke, M.

    2003-01-01

    The spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch has a broad range of host plants. However, the spider mite does not accept all plants to the same degree because of differences in nutritive and toxic constituents. Other factors, such as the induction of secondary metabolites, the morphology of a leaf

  10. The Scotch Broom gall mite: Accidental introduction to classical biological control agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Andreas; T. Wax; E. Coombs; J. Gaskin; G. Markin; S. Sing

    2013-01-01

    The gall mite, Aceria genistae (Nal.) Castagnoli s.l., an accidentally introduced natural enemy of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link), was first discovered in the Portland OR and Tacoma WA region in 2005. It has since been reported from southern British Columbia to southern Oregon. Observationally, the mite appears to reduce Scotch broom seed production and at...

  11. Mite communities (Acari: Mesostigmata) in young and mature coniferous forests after surface wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamczyc, Jacek; Urbanowski, Cezary; Pers-Kamczyc, Emilia

    2017-06-01

    Density, diversity and assemblage structure of Mesostigmata (cohorts Gamasina and Uropodina) were investigated in Scots pine forests differing in forest age (young: 9-40 years and mature: 83-101 years) in which wildfire occurred. This animal group belongs to the dominant acarine predators playing a crucial role in soil food webs and being important as biological control agents. In total, six forests (three within young and three within mature stands) were inspected in Puszcza Knyszyńska Forest Complex in May 2015. At each forest area, sampling was done from burned and adjacent control sites with steel cylinders for heat extraction of soil fauna. Data were analyzed statistically with nested ANOVA. We found a significant effect on mite density of both fire and forest age, with more mites in mature forests and control plots. In total, 36 mite taxa were identified. Mite diversity differed significantly between forest ages but not between burned versus control. Our study indicated that all studied forests are characterized by unique mite species and that the mite communities are dominated by different mite species depending on age forest and surface wildfire occurrence. Finally, canonical correspondence analysis ranked the mite assemblages from control mature, through burned young and burned mature, away from the control young.

  12. [Dust mites as occupational allergens in two bakeries of La Habana, Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Duro, Bárbara I; Alvarez-Castelló, Mirta; Mateo-Morejón, Mayteé; Luis-Rodríguez, Bárbara; Labrada-Rosado, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Occupational allergies are becoming more frequent. The allergens present in the working environment of bakeries, such as mites, are not well identified despite being known risk factors of respiratory diseases. To isolate and identify the species of mites present in two bakeries in La Habana, Cuba, with high sensitization of mites on their workers. A descriptive study was done in which samples were taken by tripled from potential sources of mites in bakeries -as flourin use, spills of wheat on the floors, wheat flour stored in sealed bags, sugar, yeast, granulated baker- that were processed, according to the method of flotation of Hart and Fain (1987) to isolate, identify and count the mites present. Mites were found in samples of wheat flourin use, spills on the floorsand in the wheat flourstored in sealed bags. The species identified were Blomia tropicalis (70%), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (20%) and to a lesser degree Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides siboney. There is a high exposure to house dust mites, particularly to store mites, which constitute a risk factor of occupational allergy to consider.

  13. Effect of mattress and pillow encasings on children with asthma and house dust mite allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne; Høst, Arne; Niklassen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma in children. Reduction of exposure seems to be the most logical way to treat these patients.......House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma in children. Reduction of exposure seems to be the most logical way to treat these patients....

  14. Ex-ante analysis of economic returns from biological control of coconut mite in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oleke, J.M.; Manyong, V.; Mignouna, D.; Isinika, A.; Mutabazi, K.; Hanna, R.; Sabelis, M.

    2013-01-01

    The coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, has been identified as one of the pests that pose a threat to the coconut industry in Benin. The study presents the simulation results of the economic benefits of the biological control of coconut mites in Benin using a standard economic surplus model. In

  15. Behaviour of Coconut Mites Preceding Take-off to Passive Aerial Dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.W.S.; Lima, D.B.; Sabelis, M.W.; Pallini, A.; Gondim Jr., M.G.C.

    2014-01-01

    For more than three decades the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer is one of the most important pests of coconut palms and has recently spread to many coconut production areas worldwide. Colonization of coconut palms is thought to arise from mites dispersing aerially after take-off from other

  16. Population dynamics of thrips prey and their mite predators in a refuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magalhaes, S.; van Rijn, P.C.J.; Montserrat Larrosa, M.; Pallini, A.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prey refuges are expected to affect population dynamics, but direct experimental tests of this hypothesis are scarce. Larvae of western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis use the web produced by spider mites as a refuge from predation by the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris. Thrips incur a

  17. Population dynamics of thrips prey and their mite predators in a refuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magalhães, S.; Van Rijn, P.C.J.; Montserrat, M.; Pallini, A.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    Prey refuges are expected to affect population dynamics, but direct experimental tests of this hypothesis are scarce. Larvae of western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis use the web produced by spider mites as a refuge from predation by the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris. Thrips incur a

  18. House-dust mites in our homes are a contamination from outdoor sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Thorkil E

    2010-05-01

    Avoidance advices for house-dust mite sensitized persons are currently based upon the idea, that the mites (Dermatophagoides spp.) are part of the indoor fauna. A closer look at development stages in the house-dust samples shows, however, that only the mites' active stages are present there and that the stages between them, the inactive moulting stages, are absent. Therefore the mites probably do not carry out their life cycles in our dwellings, but are more likely contaminations from the open. Findings of low level concentrations can be explained by mites coming from outdoors and sedimented in accordance with known physical laws. The occasional finding of higher concentrations is the result of synchronized populations of the mites developing outdoors and being passively transported into our homes by wind and dust. The hypothesis explains why we find mites in our homes but nonetheless have no effect of avoidance measures. The verification of the entire hypothesis or part of it may have great impact on the management of the disease house-dust mite allergy.

  19. Effect of cassava leaf harvest on a cassava green mite predator in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of cassava leaf harvest on a cassava green mite predator in the Democratic Republic of Congo. K Tata-Hangy, R Hanna, M Toko, M Solo. Abstract. Typhlodromallus aripo, a predatory phytoseiid species of the cassava green mite Mononychellus tanajoa was introduced to the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1998.

  20. Conditional immune-gene suppression of honeybees parasitized by Varroa mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Pamela G.; Evans, Jay D.; Rinderer, Thomas; de Guzman, Lilia

    2005-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most destructive parasite of managed honeybee colonies worldwide. Since V. destructor transfers pathogens to honeybees, it may be adaptive for bees to respond to mite infestation by upregulating their immune responses. Mites, however, may overcome the host's immune responses by suppressing them, which could facilitate the mite's ability to feed on hemolymph. A humoral immune response of bees parasitized by V. destructor may be detected by studying the expression levels of antibacterial peptides, such as abaecin and defensin, known to be immune-responsive. Expression levels for these two antibacterial peptides changed non-linearly with respect to the number of mites parasitizing honeybee pupae. Bees exposed to low or moderate number of mites had fewer immune-related transcripts than pupae that were never parasitized or pupae with high mite loads. Although many of the pupae tested indicated the presence of bacteria, no correlation with mite numbers or immune-response levels existed. All bees tested negative for acute paralysis and Kashmir bee viruses known to be vectored by V. destructor. PMID:16299597

  1. Characterization of a group of MITEs with unusual features from two coral genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs, which are common in eukaryotic genomes, are small non-coding elements that transpose by utilizing transposases encoded by autonomous transposons. Recent genome-wide analyses and cross-mobilization assays have greatly improved our knowledge on MITE proliferation, however, specific mechanisms for the origin and evolution of MITEs are still unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A group of coral MITEs called CMITE were identified from two corals, Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata. CMITEs conform to many common characteristics of MITEs, but also present several unusual features. The most unusual feature of CMITEs is conservation of the internal region, which is more conserved between MITE families than the TIRs. The origin of this internal region remains unknown, although we found one CMITE family that seems to be derived from a piggyBac-like transposon in A. millepora. CMITEs can form tandem arrays, suggesting an unconventional way for MITEs to increase copy numbers. We also describe a case in which a novel transposable element was created by a CMITE insertion event. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first report of identification of MITEs from coral genomes. Proliferation of CMITEs seems to be related to the transposition machinery of piggyBac-like autonomous transposons. The highly conserved internal region of CMITEs suggests a potential role for this region in their successful transposition. However, the origin of these unusual features in CMITEs remains unclear, and thus represents an intriguing topic for future investigations.

  2. Characterization of a group of MITEs with unusual features from two coral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Meyer, Eli; Matz, Mikhail V

    2010-05-18

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), which are common in eukaryotic genomes, are small non-coding elements that transpose by utilizing transposases encoded by autonomous transposons. Recent genome-wide analyses and cross-mobilization assays have greatly improved our knowledge on MITE proliferation, however, specific mechanisms for the origin and evolution of MITEs are still unclear. A group of coral MITEs called CMITE were identified from two corals, Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata. CMITEs conform to many common characteristics of MITEs, but also present several unusual features. The most unusual feature of CMITEs is conservation of the internal region, which is more conserved between MITE families than the TIRs. The origin of this internal region remains unknown, although we found one CMITE family that seems to be derived from a piggyBac-like transposon in A. millepora. CMITEs can form tandem arrays, suggesting an unconventional way for MITEs to increase copy numbers. We also describe a case in which a novel transposable element was created by a CMITE insertion event. To our knowledge, this is the first report of identification of MITEs from coral genomes. Proliferation of CMITEs seems to be related to the transposition machinery of piggyBac-like autonomous transposons. The highly conserved internal region of CMITEs suggests a potential role for this region in their successful transposition. However, the origin of these unusual features in CMITEs remains unclear, and thus represents an intriguing topic for future investigations.

  3. Pyemotes herfsi (Acari: Pyemotidae), a mite new to North America as the cause of bite outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto B. Broce; Ludek Zurek; James A. Kalisch; Robert Brown; David L. Keith; David Gordon; Janis Geodeke; Cal Welbourn; John Moser; Ronald Ochoa; Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner; Fuyuen Yip; Jacob Weber

    2006-01-01

    High incidences of red, itching, and painful welts on people in the midwestern United States led to the discovery of a European species of mite, Pyemotes herfsi (Oudemans) (Acari: Pyemotidae), preying on gall-making midge larvae on oak leaves. The mites' great reproductive potential, small size, and high capacity for dispersal by wind make them...

  4. Tomato whole genome transcriptional response to Tetranychus urticae identifies divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martel, C.; Zhurov, V.; Navarro, M.; Martinez, M.; Cazaux, M.; Auger, P.; Migeon, A.; Santamaria, M.E.; Wybouw, N.; Diaz, I.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Navajas, M.; Grbic, M.; Grbic, V.

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite

  5. First plant-parasitic mites (acari: eriophyoidea) recorded from Svalbard, including the description of a new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriophyoidea are minute phytophagous mites with great economic importance and great invasive potential. In spite of their impact on ecosystem functions, the knowledge of eriophyoid mites fauna in Arctic is lacking. Until now, only eight eriophyoid mite species were known from this region. Svalbard a...

  6. House dust-mite allergen exposure is associated with serum specific IgE but not with respiratory outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakolis, I.; Heinrich, J.; Zock, J.P.; Norbäck, D.; Svanes, C.; Chen, C.M.; Accordini, S.; Verlato, G.; Olivieri, M.; Jarvis, D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to house dust has been associated with asthma in adults, and this is commonly interpreted as a direct immunologic response to dust-mite allergens in those who are IgE sensitized to house dust-mite. Mattress house dust-mite concentrations were measured in a population-based sample of 2890

  7. Phoretic mites and their hyperphoretic fungi associated with flying Ips typographus japonicus Niijima (Col., Scolytidae) in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.C. Moser; T.J. Perry; K. Furuta

    1997-01-01

    Flying Ips typographus japonicus from Hokkaido (Japan) carried 12 species of phoretic mites, three of which were not previously recorded in Europe. The mite biologies were diverse, including specialists feeding on microorganisms, beetle eggs, and nematodes which were common under beetle elytra. Hyperphoretic on these mites were seven distinct species of fungal spores...

  8. Identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and biogenesis of their siRNAs in the Solanaceae: New functional implications for MITEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs regulate the genome by guiding transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing machinery to specific target sequences, including genes and transposable elements (TEs). Although miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are closely associated with euchromatic genes, the br...

  9. Sequence tag catalogs of dust mite-expressed genomes: utility in allergen and acarologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Aaron Chen; Ong, Seow Theng; Chew, Fook Tim

    2004-01-01

    Dust mites are a major source of indoor allergens. They contain a large number of components that react with immunoglobulin (Ig) E in individuals with allergies and are capable of inducing sensitization, and allergic respiratory and cutaneous diseases. With a significant proportion of the population affected in some way by mite allergies, it is essential that we improve our understanding of these organisms so that control strategies could be defined and its allergens better understood. Thus, we have initiated a project using the expressed sequence tagging (EST) strategy to study the major species of dust mites associated with allergic diseases, in particular, the American house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, as well as Blomia tropicalis, the most prevalent mite in domestic tropical dwellings. The work has recently been expanded to include 'storage' mites such as Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Suidasia medanensis, and Aleuroglyphus ovatus. More than 50% of the initial 3000 ESTs from the D. farinae and B. tropicalis dust mites showed significant matches to known genes and were categorized into eight functional groups (such as proteins involved in metabolism, gene expression, protein synthesis, cell signaling, etc.). Of specific interest, however, were the homologs to known mite allergens, in addition to a number of sequences bearing significant homology to allergens from non-mite sources previously not known to exist in mites. The availability of these allergen sequences has facilitated their expression and subsequent characterization in our laboratory in terms of their IgE-binding reactivity. The wealth of sequence information, generated via the EST project, has also facilitated the identification of polymorphic forms of allergens, the investigation of differential gene expression under various environmental conditions via DNA microarrays, as well as the analysis of protein level expression profiling

  10. [Role of the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) in the transmission of avian influenza A virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, D; Heffels-Redmann, U; Köhler, K; Lierz, M; Kaleta, E F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus [D.] gallinae) in the horizontal transmission of avian influenza A virus (AIV) to chickens. This mite is the most common ectoparasite in poultry worldwide, and may play a role in the spread of infectious agents including AIV. Currently, the control of mites is difficult due to frequently developed resistance to many acaricides, their nocturnality and their ability to survive hidden without feeding for months. D. gallinae were collected in a commercial layer farm and housed in self-made fibreboard boxes. SPF chickens were intravenously infected with AIV strain A/turkey/Ontario/7732/1966 (H5N9). The viraemia in chickens was monitored and at an appropriate time point about 1000 mites were allowed to suck on the AIV infected chickens. Re-isolation of the virus from blood-filled mites was tried daily for 14 days using chicken embryo fibroblast cultures and embryonated chicken eggs. Subsequently, the virus containing mites were placed into boxes that contained naïve SPF chickens to enable virus transmission from mites to chickens. Possible transmission to the chickens was examined using clinical signs, serology, gross lesions, histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Chickens developed a dose-dependent viraemia one day after infection, therefore this day was chosen for the bloodmeal of the mites. AIV was detected in mites after bloodsucking on AIV-infected chickens over a 10-day period. Naïve SPF chickens were infected during bloodsucking of AIV carrying mites. AIV isolates in mites and in chickens were undistinguishable from the original AIV inoculum by RT-PCR. D. gallinae ingested AIV during bloodmeals on AIV infected chickens and are able to transmit AIV to SPF chickens. Therefore, mites serve as mechanical vector of AIV and may play a major role in the circulation of AIV within a facility or area although the life span of infectious virus in the mite is limited. The proven

  11. Varroa destructor Mites Can Nimbly Climb from Flowers onto Foraging Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, David T; Smith, Michael L; Seeley, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Varroa destructor, the introduced parasite of European honey bees associated with massive colony deaths, spreads readily through populations of honey bee colonies, both managed colonies living crowded together in apiaries and wild colonies living widely dispersed in natural settings. Mites are hypothesized to spread between most managed colonies via phoretically riding forager bees when they engage in robbing colonies or they drift between hives. However, widely spaced wild colonies show Varroa infestation despite limited opportunities for robbing and little or no drifting of bees between colonies. Both wild and managed colonies may also exchange mites via another mechanism that has received remarkably little attention or study: floral transmission. The present study tested the ability of mites to infest foragers at feeders or flowers. We show that Varroa destructor mites are highly capable of phoretically infesting foraging honey bees, detail the mechanisms and maneuvers by which they do so, and describe mite behaviors post-infestation.

  12. MITEE: A new nuclear engine concept for ultra fast, lightweight solar system exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James; Paniagua, John; Ludewig, Hans; Maise, George; Todosow, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new ultra compact nuclear engine concept, MITEE (MIniature R_eactor E_nginE_), is described, and its performance evaluated for various solar system exploration missions. The MITEE concept is based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), with modifications that enable a smaller, lighter nuclear engine. A range of MITEE Engine designs is described. Representative design parameters for the baseline MITEE reactor are: 75MW(th) power level, 1000 second Isp, 100 kilogram mass, 10 MW/Liter fuel element power density, 39 cm core diameter/height. Total engine mass, including turbo pump assembly, nozzles, controls, and contingency, is estimated to be 200 kilograms. Using the MITEE engine, ultra fast, lightweight solar system exploration missions are enabled. A range of such missions has been analyzed using the MULIMP code, and are described.

  13. Seasonal changes in nasal cytology in mite-allergic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelardi M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Gelardi,1 Diego G Peroni,2 Cristoforo Incorvaia,3 Nicola Quaranta,1 Concetta De Luca,1 Salvatore Barberi,4 Ilaria Dell'Albani,5 Massimo Landi,6 Franco Frati,5 Olivier de Beaumont7 1Otolaryngology Unit, Department of Neuroscience and Sensory Organs, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 3Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, Italy; 4Department of Pediatrics, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 6Department of Pediatrics, National Healthcare System, ASL TO1, Turin, Italy; 7Medical Affairs Department, Stallergenes, Antony, France Background: House dust mites (HDMs are a major cause of allergic rhinitis (AR and asthma worldwide. Recent studies suggested that the allergen load presents seasonal modifications, giving rise to seasonal variation in nasal inflammation and symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate by nasal cytology whether nasal inflammation in mite-allergic patients changes with the seasons of the year. Methods: The study included 16 patients (seven males and nine females, mean age 38.1 years with persistent AR caused by monosensitization to HDMs. Nasal cytology was performed in all patients once monthly for 1 year. Results: Nasal cytology showed that the cells most commonly detected in the nasal mucosa were neutrophils. During the period from October to April, a peak in the number of neutrophils and also the presence of significant numbers of eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes/plasma cells were found, which shows the occurrence of more intense inflammation during these months. Conclusion: Nasal cytology provides useful data in detecting nasal inflammation and its association with the clinical stage of AR. The seasonal variations in nasal cytology are likely to be induced by the fluctuations in the HDM allergen that have been uncovered in recent investigations. Keywords: allergens

  14. Heavy metal sensitivity and bioconcentration in oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skubala, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.skubala@us.edu.pl [Department of Ecology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zaleski, Tomasz [Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Agricultural University in Krakow, Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Cracow (Poland)

    2012-01-01

    In this study we aimed to identify different reactions of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution and to measure concentrations of cadmium, zinc and copper in oribatid species sampled along a gradient. Oribatid mites were sampled seasonally during two years in five meadows located at different distances from the zinc smelter in the Olkusz District, southern Poland. Oribatids were shown to withstand critical metal concentration and established comparatively abundant and diverse communities. The highest abundance and species richness of oribatids were recorded in soils with moderate concentrations of heavy metals. Four different responses of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution were recognized. Heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni) and various physical (bulk density, field capacity, total porosity) and chemical (K{sub av}, P{sub av}, N, C, pH) factors were recognized as the structuring forces that influence the distribution of oribatid species. Analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry revealed large differences in metal body burdens among species. None of the species can be categorized as accumulators or non-accumulators of the heavy metals - the pattern depends on the metal. The process of bioconcentration of the toxic metal (regulated) and essential elements (accumulated) was generally different in the five oribatid species studied. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Responses of oribatid mites to metal contamination along a gradient in meadow soils were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small concentrations of heavy metals positively influenced the abundance of oribatid mites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four different responses of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution were recognised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioaccumulation of the toxic metal and essential elements proceeded differently in oribatid species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five studied oribatid species were deconcentrators of cadmium.

  15. Heavy metal sensitivity and bioconcentration in oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skubała, Piotr; Zaleski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    In this study we aimed to identify different reactions of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution and to measure concentrations of cadmium, zinc and copper in oribatid species sampled along a gradient. Oribatid mites were sampled seasonally during two years in five meadows located at different distances from the zinc smelter in the Olkusz District, southern Poland. Oribatids were shown to withstand critical metal concentration and established comparatively abundant and diverse communities. The highest abundance and species richness of oribatids were recorded in soils with moderate concentrations of heavy metals. Four different responses of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution were recognized. Heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni) and various physical (bulk density, field capacity, total porosity) and chemical (K av , P av , N, C, pH) factors were recognized as the structuring forces that influence the distribution of oribatid species. Analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry revealed large differences in metal body burdens among species. None of the species can be categorized as accumulators or non-accumulators of the heavy metals — the pattern depends on the metal. The process of bioconcentration of the toxic metal (regulated) and essential elements (accumulated) was generally different in the five oribatid species studied. - Highlights: ► Responses of oribatid mites to metal contamination along a gradient in meadow soils were studied. ► Small concentrations of heavy metals positively influenced the abundance of oribatid mites. ► Four different responses of oribatid species to heavy metal pollution were recognised. ► Bioaccumulation of the toxic metal and essential elements proceeded differently in oribatid species. ► Five studied oribatid species were deconcentrators of cadmium.

  16. Constructing and detecting a cDNA library for mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, YaE; Cheng, Juan; Yang, YuanJun; Li, Chen; Lu, ZhaoHui

    2015-10-01

    RNA extraction and construction of complementary DNA (cDNA) library for mites have been quite challenging due to difficulties in acquiring tiny living mites and breaking their hard chitin. The present study is to explore a better method to construct cDNA library for mites that will lay the foundation on transcriptome and molecular pathogenesis research. We selected Psoroptes cuniculi as an experimental subject and took the following steps to construct and verify cDNA library. First, we combined liquid nitrogen grinding with TRIzol for total RNA extraction. Then, switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique was used to construct full-length cDNA library. To evaluate the quality of cDNA library, the library titer and recombination rate were calculated. The reliability of cDNA library was detected by sequencing and analyzing positive clones and genes amplified by specific primers. The results showed that the RNA concentration was 836 ng/μl and the absorbance ratio at 260/280 nm was 1.82. The library titer was 5.31 × 10(5) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/ml and the recombination rate was 98.21%, indicating that the library was of good quality. In the 33 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of P. cuniculi, two clones of 1656 and 1658 bp were almost identical with only three variable sites detected, which had an identity of 99.63% with that of Psoroptes ovis, indicating that the cDNA library was reliable. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that the 553-bp Pso c II gene sequences of P. cuniculi had an identity of 98.56% with those of P. ovis, confirming that the cDNA library was not only reliable but also feasible.

  17. Using an in vitro system for maintaining Varroa destructor mites on Apis mellifera pupae as hosts: studies of mite longevity and feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egekwu, Noble I; Posada, Francisco; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Cook, Steven

    2018-03-01

    Varroa destructor mites (varroa) are ectoparasites of Apis mellifera honey bees, and the damage they inflict on hosts is likely a causative factor of recent poor honey bee colony performance. Research has produced an arsenal of control agents against varroa mites, which have become resistant to many chemical means of their control, and other means have uncertain efficacy. Novel means of control will result from a thorough understanding of varroa physiology and behavior. However, robust knowledge of varroa biology is lacking; mites have very low survivability and reproduction away from their natural environment and host, and few tested protocols of maintaining mites in vitro are available as standardized methods for varroa research. Here, we describe the 'varroa maintenance system' (VMS), a tool for maintaining in vitro populations of varroa on its natural host, and present best practices for its use in varroa and host research. Additionally, we present results using the VMS from research of varroa and host longevity and varroa feeding behavior. Under these conditions, from two trials, mites lived an average of 12 and 14 days, respectively. For studies of feeding behavior, female mites inflicted wounds located on a wide range of sites on the host's integument, but preferred to feed from the host's abdomen and thorax. Originally in the phoretic-phase, female mites in VMS had limited reproduction, but positive instances give insights into the cues necessary for initiating reproduction. The VMS is a useful tool for laboratory studies requiring long-term survival of mites, or host-parasite interactions.

  18. Sexual dimorphism in Autogneta, with description of three new species from North America and new diagnosis of the genus (Acari, Oribatida, Autognetidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan-Pelletier, Valerie M

    2015-04-08

    Species in the oribatid mite genus Autogneta are primarily Palaearctic, with a few, mainly unidentified records from North America. Strong sexual dimorphism is reported in the genus for the first time; it is expressed by a posterior porose region on the male notogaster that in some species is associated with modifications of notogastral setae h1 and p1. Herein, I describe 3 new dimorphic Autogneta species from North America, based on adult specimens: A. aokii sp. nov. and A. schusteri sp. nov., from California, USA, and A. flaheyi sp. nov., from British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. New diagnoses for 2 other dimorphic species, the type species Autogneta longilamellata (Michael) and A. amnica Jacot, are presented that accommodate their previously unreported dimorphic males. Autogneta flumengalei Jacot is recombined as Conchogneta flumengalei (Jacot) comb. nov. Finally, I give a key to adults of Autogneta species known from North America.

  19. The family Ctenobelbidae (Acari, Oribatida), with description of a new species and discussion on systematic placement and taxonomic status of the genus Berndamerus Mahunka, 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G.; Shtanchaeva, Umukusum Ya.; Subías, Luis S.; Anichkin, Alexander E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The oribatid mite genus Berndamerus Mahunka, 1977 is transferred into the family Ctenobelbidae as the subgenus Ctenobelba (Berndamerus) Mahunka, 1977, stat. n. from the family Amerobelbidae. The known species of Berndamerus combined: C. (B.) bicostata (Berlese, 1910), comb. n., C. (B.) eremuloides (Berlese, 1910), comb. n., C. (B.) hellenica (Mahunka, 1977), comb. n. A new species, Ctenobelba (Berndamerus) bugiamapensis sp. n., is described from soil, Bu Gia Map National Park, southern Vietnam. It differs from the other species of the subgenus by the heterotrichy of notogastral setae, presence of adanal neotrichy and localization of adanal lyrifissures. Ctenobelbidae is recorded in Vietnam for the first time. A new diagnosis of the family Ctenobelbidae and the identification keys to the known subgenera of the genus Ctenobelba and species of the subgenus Ctenobelba (Berndamerus) are provided. PMID:24715785

  20. Trastorno borderline o límite de la personalidad

    OpenAIRE

    Lebrero Los Arcos, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    En este trabajo se analiza el “Trastorno borderline” o “Límite de la personalidad” (TLP), actualmente uno de los más frecuentes entre la población. Las personas que padecen este trastorno sufren profundos cambios cognitivos, emocionales y de comportamiento que no sólo condicionan sus vidas sino también la vida de sus familiares y amigos. En este trabajo se intenta establecer una definición completa que explique las diferentes características de este heterogéneo concepto. Se analizan también s...

  1. Allergens with Protease Activity from House Dust Mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Reithofer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, house dust mites (HDM are one of the main sources of allergens causing Type I allergy, which has a high risk of progressing into a severe disabling disease manifestation such as allergic asthma. The strong protease activities of a number of these allergens are thought to be involved in several steps of the pathophysiology of this allergic disease. It has been a common notion that protease activity may be one of the properties that confers allergenicity to proteins. In this review we summarize and discuss the roles of the different HDM proteases in the development of Type I allergy.

  2. House dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for treating eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankervis, Helen; Pynn, Emma V; Boyle, Robert J; Rushton, Lesley; Williams, Hywel C; Hewson, Deanne M; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2015-01-19

    Eczema is an inflammatory skin disease that tends to involve skin creases, such as the folds of the elbows or knees; it is an intensely itchy skin condition, which can relapse and remit over time. As many as a third of people with eczema who have a positive test for allergy to house dust mite have reported worsening of eczema or respiratory symptoms when exposed to dust. To assess the effects of all house dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for the treatment of eczema. We searched the following databases up to 14 August 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 8), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the GREAT database. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of included and excluded studies for further references to relevant studies. We handsearched abstracts from international eczema and allergy meetings. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any of the house dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for the treatment of eczema, which included participants of any age diagnosed by a clinician with eczema as defined by the World Allergy Organization. We included all non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions that sought to reduce or avoid exposure to house dust mite and their allergenic faeces. The comparators were any active treatment, no treatment, placebo, or standard care only. Two authors independently checked the titles and abstracts identified, and there were no disagreements. We contacted authors of included studies for additional information. We assessed the risk of bias using Cochrane methodology. We included seven studies of 324 adults and children with eczema. Overall, the included studies had a high risk of bias. Four of the seven trials tested interventions with multiple components, and three tested a single intervention. Two of the seven trials included only children, four included children and adults, and one

  3. Una alternativa para trabajar con límites especiales

    OpenAIRE

    García, María del Socorro; Navarro, Catalina

    2010-01-01

    El presente trabajo propone una alternativa enfocada a alumnos de Nivel Medio Superior, por medio de la cual podrían visualizar y deducir los límites especiales: el limite cuando x tiende a cero de (sen(x)/x) y el limite cuando x tiende a cero de (l-cos(x)/x), al momento en que son vistos en clase, utilizando para ello recursos tales como, gráficas de funciones y tablas de valores. Ésta fue desarrollada con dos grupos de estudiantes de los estados de Oaxaca y Guerrero, México,respectivamente....

  4. Structure of the house dust mite allergen Der f 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Birthe R; Skov, Lars; Kastrup, Jette S

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the group 2 major allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 2) was determined to 1.83 A resolution. The overall Der f 2 structure comprises a single domain of immunoglobulin fold with two anti-parallel beta-sheets. A large hydrophobic cavity is formed in the interior...... of Der f 2. Structural comparisons to distantly related proteins suggest a role in lipid binding. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity between group 2 house dust mite major allergens can be explained by conserved surface areas representing IgE binding epitopes....

  5. Trastorno límite de la personalidad y bulimia

    OpenAIRE

    López Rodríguez, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Se persigue determinar la comorbilidad del trastorno límite de la personalidad con los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria. Se han revisado diversos estudios de diferentes autores que reflejan esta relación, aún no consiguiendo esclarecerla por completo. Una de las hipótesis que se baraja es que la causante de esta relación sea la impulsividad, sobre todo en los trastornos purgativos, pero se sigue sin determinar cuál es la relación exacta entre ambos desórdenes

  6. Genomic Diversity in the Genus of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo

    Aspergillus is a highly important genus of saprotrophic filamentous fungi. It is a very diverse genus that is inextricably intertwined with human a↵airs on a daily basis, holding species relevant to plant and human pathology, enzyme and bulk chemistry production, food and beverage biotechnology......, and scientific model organisms. The phenotypic diversity in this genus is extraordinary and identifying the genetic basis for this diversity has great potential for academia and industry. When the genomic era began for Aspergillus in 2005 with the genome sequences of A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A. fumigatus...

  7. CLIMATE CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE WITHIN-PLANT SPREAD OF BROAD MITES ON AZALEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechant, E; Pauwels, E; Gobin, B

    2014-01-01

    The broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Banks) is considered a major pest in potted azalea, Flanders' flagship ornamental crop of Rhododendron simsii hybrids. In addition to severe economic damage, the broad mite is dreaded for its increasing resistance to acaricides. Due to restrictions in the use of broad spectrum acaricides, Belgian azalea growers are left with only three compounds, belonging to two mode of action groups and restricted in their number of applications, for broad mite control: abamectin, milbemectin and pyrethrin. Although P. latus can be controlled with predatory mites, the high cost of this system makes it (not yet) feasible for integration into standard azalea pest management systems. Hence, a maximum efficacy of treatments with available compounds is essential. Because abamectin, milbemectin and pyrethrin are contact acaricides with limited trans laminar flow, only broad mites located on shoot tips of azalea plants will be controlled after spraying. Consequently, the efficacy of chemical treatments is influenced by the location and spread of P. latus on the plant. Unfortunately, little is known on broad mites' within-plant spread or how it is affected by climatic conditions like temperature and relative humidity. Therefore, experiments were set up to verify whether climate conditions have an effect on the location and migration of broad mites on azalea. Broad mite infected azalea plants were placed in standard growth chambers under different temperature (T:2.5-25°C) and relative humidity (RH:55-80%) treatments. Within-plant spread was determined by counting mites on the shoot tips and inner leaves of azalea plants. Results indicate that temperature and relative humidity have no significant effect on the within-plant spread of P. latus. To formulate recommendations for optimal spray conditions to maximize the efficacy of broad mite control with acaricides, further experiments on the effect of light intensity and rain are scheduled.

  8. Identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and biogenesis of their siRNAs in the Solanaceae: new functional implications for MITEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Hanhui; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Li, Feng; Kamei, Ayako; Bhaskar, Pudota B; Ouyang, Shu; Jiang, Jiming; Buell, C Robin; Baker, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Small RNAs regulate the genome by guiding transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing machinery to specific target sequences, including genes and transposable elements (TEs). Although miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are closely associated with euchromatic genes, the broader functional impact of these short TE insertions in genes is largely unknown. We identified 22 families of MITEs in the Solanaceae (MiS1-MiS22) and found abundant MiS insertions in Solanaceae genomic DNA and expressed sequence tags (EST). Several Solanaceae MITEs generate genome changes that potentially affect gene function and regulation, most notably, a MiS insertion that provides a functionally indispensable alternative exon in the tobacco mosaic virus N resistance gene. We show that MITEs generate small RNAs that are primarily 24 nt in length, as detected by Northern blot hybridization and by sequencing small RNAs of Solanum demissum, Nicotiana glutinosa, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Additionally, we show that stable RNAi lines silencing DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3) in tobacco and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) in potato cause a reduction in 24-nt MITE siRNAs, suggesting that, as in Arabidopsis, TE-derived siRNA biogenesis is DCL3 and RDR2 dependent. We provide evidence that DICER-LIKE4 (DCL4) may also play a role in MITE siRNA generation in the Solanaceae.

  9. Comparison of IgE test results with intradermal skin tests for dust mites and storage mites in atopic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popiel, J; Cekiera, A

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most frequent allergic diseases in dogs. There are many methods of treating its symptoms but specific immunotherapy has recently gained high popularity. Before the application of specific immunotherapy, it is necessary to identify the allergens provoking the reaction of hypersensitivity in the selected animal. This raises a question about the method of allergen identification the medical practitioner decides to use in order to obtain the most credible result. The authors of the present study decided to compare the results of intradermal allergic tests and the results of an IgE screening test carried out using the FcɛRIα receptor method. The aim of the study was to compare the results of both tests directed to dust and storage mites. The study proves that in case of the IgE screening tests (for a group of allergens), the sensitivity is quite high (85 to 90.69%) but the specificity of these tests is insufficient (25 to 50%). In case of antibodies for the selected mites the sensitivity and specificity was too low (65.1 to 89.4% for the sensitivity, with only 14.2 to 33.3% for the specificity). Only in case of D. petronyssinus the results were higher with the sensitivity calculated at 65.1% and the specificity at 80%. The IgE screening test carried out using the FcɛRIα receptor method is reliable only in case of screening test for mites and the intradermal allergic test remains the gold standard for allergy testing.

  10. Gamma irradiation as a quarantine treatment for spider mites (Acarina: tetranychidae) in horticultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.; Banasik-Solgala, K.

    1999-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisd.), and the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, are closely related species of tetranychid mites (Acarina, Tetranychidae) that respond to gamma irradiation in a similar way. Eggs of both species exposed to gamma radiation early in embryonic development were considerably more susceptible to irradiation than older eggs. The tolerance of eggs to gamma radiation increased in 3-4-day-old eggs, when eye-spots were formed. Nymphs were more resistant to gamma radiation than eggs and larvae. Deteriorative effects of irradiation treatment were reflected in the immatures by their mortality in subsequent developmental stages. A positive relationship between dosage and the percent egg mortality or the mortality of subsequent stages was usually found when the immature stages were irradiated. The sex ratio of adults developed from irradiated eggs, larvae, and nymphs was affected by the irradiation treatment; the ratio was usually skewed towards males. Irradiation of females resulted in increased mortality, lowered fecundity, reduced egg viability, and sex ratio distortion in their progeny. Two-day-old females of the carmine spider mite and the two-spotted spider mite irradiated with 200 or 300 Gy lived as long as the controls. Mortality occurred after 3 weeks. The number of eggs laid by irradiated females of spider mites was considerably lower than in the control, and it decreased as the absorbed dose increased. The higher the dose of gamma radiation applied to adults of the spider mites (the parental generation, P), the higher the mortality of the F1 mites during their embryonic development. Viability of eggs laid by irradiated females of spider mites mated with irradiated males was significantly reduced. Young females treated with a dose of 0.2 kGy produced 40-50% nonviable eggs, while control mites produced only 6.0-6.6% nonviable eggs. A dose of 0.3 kGy caused high mortality of eggs; 88% and 97% nonviable

  11. Infinite genus surfaces and irrational polygonal billiards

    OpenAIRE

    Valdez, Ferrán

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the natural invariant surface associated with the billiard game on an irrational polygonal table is homeomorphic to the Loch Ness monster, that is, the only orientable infinite genus topological real surface with exactly one end.

  12. Genus Pouteria: chemistry and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia A. M. Silva

    Full Text Available The genus Pouteria belongs to the family Sapotaceae and can be widely found around the World. These plants have been used as building material, as food, because the eatable fruits, as well as remedies in folk medicine. Some biological activities have been reported to species of this genus such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antifungal. However, the real potential of this genus as source of new drugs or phytomedicines remains unknown. Therefore, a review of the so far known chemical composition and biological activities of this genus is presented to stimulate new studies about the species already reported moreover that species have no reference about chemistry or biological activities could be found until now.

  13. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gliocephalotrichum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Serrato-Diaz, L. M.; Cheewangkoon, R.; French-Monar, R. D.; Decock, C.; Crous, P. W.

    Species in the genus Gliocephalotrichum (= Leuconectria) (Hypocreales, Nectriaceae) are soilborne fungi, associated with post-harvest fruit spoilage of several important tropical fruit crops. Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the

  14. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gliocephalotrichum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Serrato-Diaz, L.M.; Cheewangkoon, R.; French-Monar, R.D.; Decock, C.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Species in the genus Gliocephalotrichum (= Leuconectria) (Hypocreales, Nectriaceae) are soilborne fungi, associated with post-harvest fruit spoilage of several important tropical fruit crops. Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the

  15. Cladistic relationships within the genus Cinnamomum (Lauraceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cladistic relationships within the genus Cinnamomum (Lauraceae) in Taiwan based on analysis of leaf morphology and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) molecular markers.

  16. Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Thomas L P

    2014-01-01

    The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

  17. Witten Genus and String Complete Intersections

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingtao; Han, Fei

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we prove that the Witten genus of nonsingular string complete intersections in product of complex projective spaces vanishes. Our result generalizes a known result of Landweber and Stong (cf. [HBJ]).

  18. The genus Hafnia: from soup to nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon L

    2006-01-01

    The genus Hafnia, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, consists of gram-negative bacteria that are occasionally implicated in both intestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. Despite the fact that the genus currently contains only a single species (H. alvei), more extensive phylogenetic depth (two or more species) is apparent based upon DNA relatedness and 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies. Hafnia causes a variety of systemic infections, including septicemia and pneumonia; however, its role as a gastrointestinal pathogen is controversial. Many of the data supporting a role for hafniae as enteric pathogens were incorrectly attributed to this genus rather than to the actual pathogen, Escherichia albertii. There are numerous gaps in our understanding of this genus, including ecologic habitats and population genetics, disease-producing role in animals, phenetic and genetic methods useful in distinguishing genomospecies within the H. alvei complex, and bona fide pathogenicity factors.

  19. Leucosphaera, a new genus of the Pseudeurotiaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arx, von J.A.; Mukerji, K.G.; Singh, N.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of a study of herbivore dung collected in the Zoological Garden in Delhi, an ascomycete was observed and isolated which could not be accomodated in any known genus. It is therefore described below.

  20. A Brief Chronicle of the Genus Cordyceps Fr., the Oldest Valid Genus in Cordycipitaceae (Hypocreales, Ascomycota)

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Bhushan; Tanaka, Eiji; Han, Jae-Gu; Oh, Junsang; Han, Sang-Kuk; Lee, Kang-Hyo; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The earliest pre-Linnaean fungal genera are briefly discussed here with special emphasis on the nomenclatural connection with the genus Cordyceps Fr. Since its valid publication under the basidiomycetous genus Clavaria Vaill. ex L. (Clavaria militaris L. Sp. Pl. 2:1182, 1753), the genus Cordyceps has undergone nomenclatural changes in the post-Linnaean era, but has stood firmly for approximately 200 years. Synonyms of Cordyceps were collected from different literature sources and analyzed bas...

  1. Kops genus - en værkstedsrapport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Asgerd

    2008-01-01

     Inden for Ømålsområdet optræder ordet kop både i genus femininum, masku­linum og neutrum. På Sjælland, hvor trekønssystemet er under af­vikling, kan ordet desuden være genus commune. Der kan konstateres en vis dialektgeografisk fordeling af de tre (fire) genera, men især på Sjælland er...

  2. Remarks on superstring amplitudes in higher genus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati Manni, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Very recently, Grushevsky continued D'Hoker and Phong's program of finding the chiral superstring measure from first principles by constructing modular forms satisfying certain factorization constraints. He has proposed an ansatz in genus 4 and conjectured a possible formula for the superstring measure in any genus, subject to the condition that certain modular forms admit holomorphic roots. In this note we want to give some evidence that Grushevsky's approach seems to be very fruitful

  3. The Genus Hafnia: from Soup to Nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Janda, J. Michael; Abbott, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Hafnia, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, consists of gram-negative bacteria that are occasionally implicated in both intestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. Despite the fact that the genus currently contains only a single species (H. alvei), more extensive phylogenetic depth (two or more species) is apparent based upon DNA relatedness and 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies. Hafnia causes a variety of systemic infections, including septicemia and pneumonia; howev...

  4. Vectorial role of some dermanyssoid mites (Acari, Mesostigmata, Dermanyssoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiente Moro C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Among transmissible diseases, vectorial diseases represent a major problem for public health. In the group of acarina, while ticks are the most commonly implicated vectors, other arthropods and notably Dermanyssoidea are also involved in the transmission of pathogenic agents. Since the role of this superfamily is at present largely unknown, we have reviewed the vectorial role of these mites in the appearance, survival and propagation of pathogens. Various authors have shown that Dermanyssoidea are implicated in the transmission of both bacteria (Salmonella, Spirocheta, Rickettsia or Pasteurella and viruses (equine encephalitis viruses, West Nile virus, Fowl pox virus, the virus causing Newcastle disease and tick borne encephalitis viruses or hantaviruses. Finally, some authors have also shown their role in the transmission of some protozoa and filaria. As the vectorial character of such mites has been more clearly demonstrated (Dermanyssus gallinae, Ornithonyssus bacoti and Allodermanyssus sanguineus, it would be interesting to continue studies to better understand the role of this superfamily in the epidemiology of certain zoonoses.

  5. The sejugal furrow in camel spiders and acariform mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop, Jason A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae are one of the arachnid groups characterised by a prosomal dorsal shield composed of three distinct elements: the pro-, meso- and metapeltidium. These are associated respectively with prosomal appendages one to four, five, and six. What is less well known, although noted in the historical literature, is that the coxae of the 4th and 5th prosomal segments (i.e. walking legs 2 and 3 of camel spiders are also separated ventrally by a distinct membranous region, which is absent between the coxae of the other legs. We suggest that this essentially ventral division of the prosoma specifically between coxae 2 and 3 is homologous with the so-called sejugal furrow (the sejugal interval sensu van der Hammen. This division constitutes a fundamental part of the body plan in acariform mites (Arachnida: Acariformes. If homologous, this sejugal furrow could represent a further potential synapomorphy for (Solifugae + Acariformes; a relationship with increasing morphological and molecular support. Alternatively, outgroup comparison with sea spiders (Pycnogonida and certain early Palaeozoic fossils could imply that the sejugal furrow defines an older tagma, derived from a more basal grade of organisation. In this scenario the (still divided prosoma of acariform mites and camel spiders would be plesiomorphic. This interpretation challenges the textbook arachnid character of a peltidium (or ‘carapace’ covering an undivided prosoma.

  6. House-dust community (Fungi, mites) in different climatic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijckaert, G; van Bronswijk, J E M H; Linskens, H F

    1981-03-01

    House-dust flora and fauna were compared in the maritime cool temperate climate (in three degrees of continentality), the mediterranean warm temperate climate, the arctic climate and the tropical climate.An inverse relationship exists between continentality of the temperate climate and the numbers of arthropods and fungi (mesophilic as well as xerophilic) in the dust of the houses.The numbers of arthropods and fungi were lowest in mediterranean and arctic climates, most likely because of the limiting effect of the drier indoor climate. Fungi are more tolerant of dry conditions than house-dust inhabiting mites. Generally the highest numbers of fungal diaspores and arthropods were found in the tropics, where, however, the lowest number of positive samples was also found, especially for the species of the Aspergillus glaucus group and for Wallemia sebi. Maritime cool temperate climate showed the highest numbers of positive samples for fungi and mites.In general, a relationship exists between relative humidity and the density of fungal diaspores and arthropods.

  7. Vulnerability and behavioral response to ultraviolet radiation in the components of a foliar mite prey-predator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Fuyuki; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation impacts plant-dwelling arthropods including herbivorous and predatory mites. However, the effects of UVB on prey-predator systems, such as that between the herbivorous spider mite and predatory phytoseiid mite, are poorly understood. A comparative study was conducted to determine the vulnerability and behavioral responses of these mites to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. First, we analyzed dose-response (cumulative irradiance-mortality) curves for the eggs of phytoseiid mites ( Neoseiulus californicus, Neoseiulus womersleyi, and Phytoseiulus persimilis) and the spider mite ( Tetranychus urticae) to UVB radiation from a UV lamp. This indicated that the phytoseiid mites were more vulnerable than the spider mite, although P. persimilis was slightly more tolerant than the other two phytoseiid mites. Second, we compared the avoidance behavior of adult female N. californicus and two spider mite species ( T. urticae, a lower leaf surface user; Panonychus citri, an upper leaf surface user) in response to solar UV and visible light. N. californicus actively avoided both types of radiation, whereas P. citri showed only minimal avoidance behavior. T. urticae actively avoided UV as well as N. californicus but exhibited a slow response to visible light as well as P. citri. Such variation in vulnerability and avoidance behavior accounts for differences in the species adaptations to solar UVB radiation. This may be the primary factor determining habitat use among these mites on host plant leaves, subsequently affecting accessibility by predators and also intraguild competition.

  8. The effect of queen pheromone status on Varroa mite removal from honey bee colonies with different grooming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Rassol; Currie, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) with different grooming ability and queen pheromone status on mortality rates of Varroa mites (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman), mite damage, and mortality rates of honey bees. Twenty-four small queenless colonies containing either stock selected for high rates of mite removal (n = 12) or unselected stock (n = 12) were maintained under constant darkness at 5 °C. Colonies were randomly assigned to be treated with one of three queen pheromone status treatments: (1) caged, mated queen, (2) a synthetic queen mandibular pheromone lure (QMP), or (3) queenless with no queen substitute. The results showed overall mite mortality rate was greater in stock selected for grooming than in unselected stock. There was a short term transitory increase in bee mortality rates in selected stock when compared to unselected stock. The presence of queen pheromone from either caged, mated queens or QMP enhanced mite removal from clusters of bees relative to queenless colonies over short periods of time and increased the variation in mite mortality over time relative to colonies without queen pheromone, but did not affect the proportion of damaged mites. The effects of source of bees on mite damage varied with time but damage to mites was not reliably related to mite mortality. In conclusion, this study showed differential mite removal of different stocks was possible under low temperature. Queen status should be considered when designing experiments using bioassays for grooming response.

  9. House dust mites: a risk factor to be considered for occupational safety or source of work-related allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahmed Megahed Ahmed; Ali, Hisham Abd El-Raouf; Ahmed, Salwa Abdalla Mohamed; Mohammad, Naema Mahmoud; Morsy, Tosson A

    2013-12-01

    House dust mites (HDM) can be found worldwide where human beings live independent from the climate and are a major source of multiple allergens. Mite allergens sensitize and induce perennial rhinitis, asthma, or atopic dermatitis in a large portion of patients with allergic disease particularly children. There is convincing evidence that avoidance of mite allergen can effectively reduce allergic symptoms. This study examined dust from a military hospital and the private home of some nursing staff. A total of seven species of mites belonging to six genera were recovered. The commonest species was Dermatophagoides farinae followed by D. pteronyssinus and the lowest Laelaps nuttalli. Besides, the 7th mite or Parasitus consanguineous live free on dust as a bio-control agent of mites. The presence of mites in and out doors in a hospital and dwellings of medical personnel pave the way to consider HDM as occupational or nosocomial Allergens.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  11. The presence of quill mites (Gabucinia bicaudata and lice (Struthiolipeurus struthionis in ostrich wing feathers

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    R.G. Cooper

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Quill mites (Gabucinia bicaudata and lice (Struthiolipeurus struthionis may infest ostrich feathers, resulting in skin damage, pruritis and excessive feather preening and loss. Four different feather types (prime white, femina extra wide, femina class 1, and femina short; n = 10 were collected. The quill mites and lice were removed with fine forceps, studied using a photographic optical microscope and counted microscopically at ×100 magnification following collection by sedimentation. They were placed in separate Petri dishes containing lactophenol solution and examined (×40 magnification. Anatomical features are described. The density of quill mites in all feather types of both wings was higher than that of the lice. There was no significant difference between the counts of both arthropods on the left wing and the right wing, respectively, except for the femina class 1 quill mites (P = 0.01. The femina extra wide feathers were a preferred habitat in both wings. Large standard deviations (quill mites left wing: 73 + 8; quill mites right wing: 69 + 7 suggested variations in the degree of migration between feather shafts or as a response to escape preening. It is recommended that ostriches be treated with an oral preparation of Ivermectin administered per os at a dosage rate of 0.2 mg / kg at 30-day intervals for quill mites, and with a 1-5 % Malathion dust at 14-day intervals for lice.

  12. High diversity and low genetic structure of feather mites associated with a phenotypically variable bird host.

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    Fernández-González, Sofía; Pérez-Rodríguez, Antón; Proctor, Heather C; De la Hera, Iván; Pérez-Tris, Javier

    2018-01-17

    Obligate symbionts may be genetically structured among host individuals and among phenotypically distinct host populations. Such processes may in turn determine within-host genetic diversity of symbionts, which is relevant for understanding symbiont population dynamics. We analysed the population genetic structure of two species of feather mites (Proctophyllodes sylviae and Trouessartia bifurcata) in migratory and resident blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla that winter sympatrically. Resident and migratory hosts may provide mites with habitats of different qualities, what might promote specialization of mite populations. We found high genetic diversity of within-host populations for both mite species, but no sign of genetic structure of mites between migratory and resident hosts. Our results suggest that, although dispersal mechanisms between hosts during the non-breeding season are unclear, mite populations are not limited by transmission bottlenecks that would reduce genetic diversity among individuals that share a host. Additionally, there is no evidence that host phenotypic divergence (associated with the evolution of migration and residency) has promoted the evolution of host-specialist mite populations. Unrestricted dispersal among host types may allow symbiotic organisms to avoid inbreeding and to persist in the face of habitat heterogeneity in phenotypically diverse host populations.

  13. Influence of heat and vibration on the movement of the northern fowl mite (Acari: Macronyssidae).

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    Owen, Jeb P; Mullens, Bradley A

    2004-09-01

    Heat and vibration are common host-generated cues that ectoparasites use to orient to hosts. Three experiments evaluated effects of heat and vibration on the movement of northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago). Individual arrested mites in an isolation chamber always initiated movement (walking) after substrate vibration (7.8-min walking duration), but only initiated movement 50% of the time (2.8-min walking duration) upon exposure to a 3 degrees C heat fluctuation. Heat fluctuation in combination with vibration extended the period of activity by approximately 50% (11.6-min walking duration) compared with activity initiated by vibration alone. Mites with longer time off-host moved for shorter durations. In a choice test, individual mites consistently moved closer to a 35 degrees C heat source 1 or 6 mm away, but not to a heat source 11 mm away. In a circular arena, mites were able to orient accurately to a 35 degrees C heat source and reached the arena edge almost 4 times faster (11.2 s) than mites without a heat source (41.2 s). These results suggest that northern fowl mite is capable of directed thermo-orientation, as well as modulation of activity depending on the type of sensory information perceived. The adaptive significance of this orientation for a "permanent" ectoparasite is discussed.

  14. Molecular Prevalence of Acarapis Mite Infestations in Honey Bees in Korea.

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    Ahn, Ah-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Noh, Jin-Hyeong; Kim, Young-Ha; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Kang, Seung-Won; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Shin, Sung Shik

    2015-06-01

    Acarapis mites, including Acarapis woodi, Acarapis externus, and Acarapis dorsalis, are parasites of bees which can cause severe damage to the bee industry by destroying colonies and decreasing honey production. All 3 species are prevalent throughout many countries including UK, USA, Iran, Turkey, China, and Japan. Based on previous reports of Acarapis mites occurring in northeast Asia, including China and Japan, we investigated a survey of Acarapis mite infestations in honey bees in Korean apiaries. A total of 99 colonies of Apis mellifera were sampled from 5 provinces. The head and thorax of 20 bees from each colony were removed for DNA extraction. PCR assays were performed with 3 primer sets, including T, A, and K primers. Results indicated that 42.4% (42/99) of samples were Acarapis-positive by PCR assay which were sequenced to identify species. Each sequence showed 92.6-99.3% homology with reference sequences. Based on the homology, the number of colonies infected with A. dorsalis was 32 which showed the highest infection rate among the 3 species, while the number of colonies infected with A. externus and A. woodi was 9 and 1, respectively. However, none of the Acarapis mites were morphologically detected. This result could be explained that all apiaries in the survey used acaricides against bee mites such as Varroa destructor and Tropilaelaps clareae which also affect against Acarapis mites. Based on this study, it is highly probable that Acarapis mites as well as Varroa and Tropilaelaps could be prevalent in Korean apiaries.

  15. Variability in Population Density of House Dust Mites of Bitlis and Muş, Turkey.

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    Aykut, M; Erman, O K; Doğan, S

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the number of house dust mites/g dust and different physical and environmental variables. A total of 1,040 house dust samples were collected from houses in Bitlis and Muş Provinces, Turkey, between May 2010 and February 2012. Overall, 751 (72.2%) of dust samples were mite positive. The number of mites/g dust varied between 20 and 1,840 in mite-positive houses. A significant correlation was detected between mean number of mites and altitude of houses, frequency of monthly vacuum cleaning, number of individuals in the household, and relative humidity. No association was found between the number of mites and temperature, type of heating, existence of allergic diseases, age and structure of houses. A maximum number of mites were detected in summer and a minimum number was detected in autumn. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [Distribution of house dust mites in Hasköy town, Muş].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Medeni; Yilmaz, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the distribution of house dust mites and the role of the mites on allergic diseases in Haskoy town, Muş. In the study, dust samples were collected from 50 houses in May and July months of 2002 year. Twenty eight (56%) of 50 mites samples examined in May and 20 (40%) of 50 mites samples examined in July were found positive. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was found to be the predominant species with 36.34% in May and 34.21%in July. Lepidoglyphus destructor, Cheyletus spp, Acarus spp, Acarus farris, Acotyledon tjidobas, Blomia tjidobas, Rhizoglyphus robini and Chartoglyphus arcuatus had 18.18%, 6.81%, 4.54%, 4.54%, 4.54%, 2.27%, 2.27% and 2.27% percentages in May respectively. On the other hand, L. destructor, Cheyletus spp, Acarus spp, Acarus farris, Allocalvolia habrocytes, A. tjidobas and R. robini had 18.42%, 10.52%, 7.89%, 2.63%, 5.26%, 5.26% and 5.26% in July respectively. Positivity rates of the mites collected from houses of people with allergic disorders was 55.5% while this rate was 56.25% for houses of those without allergic disorders. No statistical relationship was found between encounter with the mites and the patients with allergy. In addition, the number of adobes detected dust mites was higher than the other types of houses.

  17. Three Halloween genes from the Varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman) and their expression during reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Evans, J D; Hung, K; Sims, J; Alborn, H; Teal, P E A

    2015-06-01

    The ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway involves sequential enzymatic hydroxylations by a group of enzymes collectively known as Halloween gene proteins. Complete sequences for three Halloween genes, spook (Vdspo), disembodied (Vddib) and shade (Vdshd), were identified in varroa mites and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of predicted amino acid sequences for Halloween orthologues showed that the acarine orthologues were distantly associated with insect and crustacean clades indicating that acarine genes had more ancestral characters. The lack of orthologues or pseudogenes for remaining genes suggests these pathway elements had not evolved in ancestral arthropods. Vdspo transcript levels were highest in gut tissues, while Vddib transcript levels were highest in ovary-lyrate organs. In contrast, Vdshd transcript levels were lower overall but present in both gut and ovary-lyrate organs. All three transcripts were present in eggs removed from gravid female mites. A brood cell invasion assay was developed for acquiring synchronously staged mites. Mites within 4 h of entering a brood cell had transcript levels of all three that were not significantly different from mites on adult bees. These analyses suggest that varroa mites may be capable of modifying 7-dehydro-cholesterol precursor and hydroxylations of other steroid precursors, but whether the mites directly produce ecdysteroid precursors and products remains undetermined. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

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    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  19. The effect of three species of mites upon fungal growth on wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, D M; George, C L

    1986-06-01

    Every week, for 20 weeks, the growth of naturally occurring grain storage fungi on wheat infested with the three commonest British grain storage mites, Acarus siro, Glycyphagus destructor and Tyrophagus longior, was compared with that on uninfested wheat. The number of colonies of the Aspergillus glaucus group per gram were always less on grain infested with mites than on uninfested grain. Penicillium spp. were also less numerous on grain which was infested with A. siro but did not appear to be affected by the other mites. In contrast, two fungi which are pathogenic to mites, Aspergillus restrictus and Wallemia sebi, were more abundant in the presence of certain mites. The former was associated with G. destructor, the latter with G. destructor and A. siro. The three species of mites either feed on the A. glaucus group and Penicillium spp., or inhibit them by an unknown secretion. Pathogenic fungi are probably avoided. Mites are therefore an important variable in studies on fungal growth during grain drying and storage.

  20. Stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata) infesting food in various types of packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Volek, Vlado

    2015-02-01

    From 2008 to 2014, stored product mites have been reported from prepackaged dried food on the market in the Czech Republic. The infestation was by Carpoglyphus lactis (L.) in dried fruits and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) in dog feed. The infestation is presumably caused by poor protection of the packages. We compared various packaging methods for their resistance to mites using dried apricots and dog feed in laboratory experiments. The trial packages included nine different plastic films, monofilm, duplex and triplex, and one type of plastic cup (ten replicates per packaging type). All packaging materials are available on the Czech market for dried food products. The samples of dried food were professionally packed in a factory and packaged dried apricots were exposed to C. lactis and dog food to T. putrescentiae. After 3 months of exposure, the infestation and mite density of the prepackaged food was assessed. Mites were found to infest six types of packages. Of the packaging types with mites, 1-5 samples were infested and the maximum abundance was 1,900 mites g(-1) of dried food. Mites entered the prepackaged food by faulty sealing. Inadequate sealing is suggested to be the major cause of the emerged infestation of dried food.