WorldWideScience

Sample records for mesoscopic biochemical system

  1. Quantum Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    voltage bias, the tunneling of the electron from the lead to the dot and vice versa will happen very rarely. Then two successive ..... A typical mesoscopic quantum dot system (a small drop- .... dynamical behavior of the distribution function of the.

  2. Quantum fluctuations in mesoscopic and macroscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerdeira, H.A.; Guinea Lopez, F.; Weiss, U.

    1991-01-01

    The conference presentations have been grouped in three chapters; Quantum Transport (4 papers), Dissipation in Discrete Systems (7 papers) and Mesoscopic Junction, Rings and Arrays (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs and figs

  3. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  4. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    2001-02-01

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the space of magnetic fields, known as diabolical points. This phenomena is explained in terms of two approaches, one based on spin-coherent-state path integrals, and the other on a generalization of the phase integral (or WKB) method to difference equations. Explicit formulas for the diabolical points are obtained for a model Hamiltonian.

  5. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means......, such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states. which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance...

  6. X-ray diffraction from mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, W.; Bahr, D.; Tolan, M.; Burandt, B.; Mueller, M.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Nitz, V.; Stettner, J.

    1994-01-01

    Two activities of our group concerning structures on mesoscopic length scales are presented: (1) CoSi 2 layers buried in Si-wafers have been studied with many scattering geometries; the emphasis is on diffuse scattering from rough interfaces and diffuse scattering from atomic scale defects. (2) The other example is an investigation of laterally structured surfaces in the region of total external reflection and around Bragg peaks. In both cases extensions of the presently available models are necessary. ((orig.))

  7. From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past ...

  8. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  9. Dynamics of mesoscopic systems: Non-equilibrium Green's functions approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špička, Václav; Kalvová, Anděla; Velický, B.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2010), s. 525-538 ISSN 1386-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : mesoscopic systems * NGF * initial condition * correlations * Ward identities * transients Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.304, year: 2010

  10. Resonances: from nuclear physics to mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lidia S.; Maglione, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Resonances are one of the most interesting phenomena in many fields of physics which lead to important findings. In the quantum world, systems with electrons, hadrons or atoms provide enormous amount of data on resonances, leading to the discovery of new states of matter. In nuclear physics, the recent findings on exotic nuclei, added to the list many new examples, which are important not only as direct data on resonances, but also for the production of new isotopes in regions of the nuclear chart which were 'terra incognita', until recently. With recent developments in microelectronics it is possible to create in the laboratory almost two dimensional wave guides where the motion of the electrons can exhibit typical quantum effects. The geometry of systems, such as bends, corners or crosses, has a strong influence on the conduction properties of the electrons, since it can create the appropriate conditions required for the formation of bound states or resonances in the conduction channels. Therefore it is quite important to have an accurate description of the relation between geometry and observables, which in a theoretical perspective emerges naturally from the solution of a multichannel eigenvalue problem. The study of resonances and their behaviour in these domains of physics, will be the purpose of the lecture. (Author)

  11. Transport in low-dimensional mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syzranov, Sergey

    2011-05-05

    The work is devoted to the physics of graphene-based optoelectronics and arrays of Josephson junctions. The first part deals with transport in a graphene p-n junction irradiated by an electromagnetic field. The photocurrent in such device is calculated analytically and compared to those observed in the recent experiments on graphene photodetectors. It is shown that in a clean effectively one-dimensional junction the photocurrent oscillates as a function of gate voltages due to the interference between electron paths accompanied by the resonant photon absorption. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the construction of a Drude-like theory for the transport of Cooper pairs in weakly disordered Josephson networks and to finding the conductivity and the characteristic temperature of the commencement of strong localization. Also, it is shown that the low-temperature superconductor-insulator transition is necessarily of the first order in all 3D and in most 2D systems.

  12. Reaction-Transport Systems Mesoscopic Foundations, Fronts, and Spatial Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Horsthemke, Werner; Mendez, Vicenc

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems, with a focus on fronts and stationary spatial patterns. Emphasis is on systems that are non-standard in the sense that either the transport is not simply classical diffusion (Brownian motion) or the system is not homogeneous. A important feature is the derivation of the basic phenomenological equations from the mesoscopic system properties. Topics addressed include transport with inertia, described by persistent random walks and hyperbolic reaction-transport equations and transport by anomalous diffusion, in particular subdiffusion, where the mean square displacement grows sublinearly with time. In particular reaction-diffusion systems are studied where the medium is in turn either spatially inhomogeneous, compositionally heterogeneous or spatially discrete. Applications span a vast range of interdisciplinary fields and the systems considered can be as different as human or animal groups migrating under external influences, population...

  13. Mesoscopic organization reveals the constraints governing Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Pan

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how activity at the cellular level of neurons, as a result of their mutual interactions, leads to the observed behavior of an organism responding to a variety of environmental stimuli. Investigating the intermediate or mesoscopic level of organization in the nervous system is a vital step towards understanding how the integration of micro-level dynamics results in macro-level functioning. The coordination of many different co-occurring processes at this level underlies the command and control of overall network activity. In this paper, we have considered the somatic nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the entire neuronal connectivity diagram is known. We focus on the organization of the system into modules, i.e., neuronal groups having relatively higher connection density compared to that of the overall network. We show that this mesoscopic feature cannot be explained exclusively in terms of considerations such as, optimizing for resource constraints (viz., total wiring cost and communication efficiency (i.e., network path length. Even including information about the genetic relatedness of the cells cannot account for the observed modular structure. Comparison with other complex networks designed for efficient transport (of signals or resources implies that neuronal networks form a distinct class. This suggests that the principal function of the network, viz., processing of sensory information resulting in appropriate motor response, may be playing a vital role in determining the connection topology. Using modular spectral analysis we make explicit the intimate relation between function and structure in the nervous system. This is further brought out by identifying functionally critical neurons purely on the basis of patterns of intra- and inter-modular connections. Our study reveals how the design of the nervous system reflects several constraints, including

  14. Nonlinear stochastic dynamics of mesoscopic homogeneous biochemical reaction systems—an analytical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of biochemical reactions in a small-sized system on the order of a cell are stochastic. Assuming spatial homogeneity, the populations of n molecular species follow a multi-dimensional birth-and-death process on Z n . We introduce the Delbrück–Gillespie process, a continuous-time Markov jump process, whose Kolmogorov forward equation has been known as the chemical master equation, and whose stochastic trajectories can be computed via the Gillespie algorithm. Using simple models, we illustrate that a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations on R n emerges in the infinite system size limit. For finite system size, transitions among multiple attractors of the nonlinear dynamical system are rare events with exponentially long transit times. There is a separation of time scales between the deterministic ODEs and the stochastic Markov jumps between attractors. No diffusion process can provide a global representation that is accurate on both short and long time scales for the nonlinear, stochastic population dynamics. On the short time scale and near deterministic stable fixed points, Ornstein–Uhlenbeck Gaussian processes give linear stochastic dynamics that exhibit time-irreversible circular motion for open, driven chemical systems. Extending this individual stochastic behaviour-based nonlinear population theory of molecular species to other biological systems is discussed. (invited article)

  15. Effect of mesoscopic fluctuations on equation of state in cluster-forming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ciach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Equation of state for systems with particles self-assembling into aggregates is derived within a mesoscopic theory combining density functional and field-theoretic approaches. We focus on the effect of mesoscopic fluctuations in the disordered phase. The pressure - volume fraction isotherms are calculated explicitly for two forms of the short-range attraction long-range repulsion potential. Mesoscopic fluctuations lead to an increased pressure in each case, except for very small volume fractions. When large clusters are formed, the mechanical instability of the system is present at much higher temperature than found in mean-field approximation. In this case phase separation competes with the formation of periodic phases (colloidal crystals. In the case of small clusters, no mechanical instability associated with separation into dilute and dense phases appears.

  16. PREFACE: Advanced many-body and statistical methods in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Dragos Victor; Sabin Delion, Doru; Sorin Paraoanu, Gheorghe

    2012-02-01

    It has increasingly been realized in recent times that the borders separating various subfields of physics are largely artificial. This is the case for nanoscale physics, physics of lower-dimensional systems and nuclear physics, where the advanced techniques of many-body theory developed in recent times could provide a unifying framework for these disciplines under the general name of mesoscopic physics. Other fields, such as quantum optics and quantum information, are increasingly using related methods. The 6-day conference 'Advanced many-body and statistical methods in mesoscopic systems' that took place in Constanta, Romania, between 27 June and 2 July 2011 was, we believe, a successful attempt at bridging an impressive list of topical research areas: foundations of quantum physics, equilibrium and non-equilibrium quantum statistics/fractional statistics, quantum transport, phases and phase transitions in mesoscopic systems/superfluidity and superconductivity, quantum electromechanical systems, quantum dissipation, dephasing, noise and decoherence, quantum information, spin systems and their dynamics, fundamental symmetries in mesoscopic systems, phase transitions, exactly solvable methods for mesoscopic systems, various extension of the random phase approximation, open quantum systems, clustering, decay and fission modes and systematic versus random behaviour of nuclear spectra. This event brought together participants from seventeen countries and five continents. Each of the participants brought considerable expertise in his/her field of research and, at the same time, was exposed to the newest results and methods coming from the other, seemingly remote, disciplines. The talks touched on subjects that are at the forefront of topical research areas and we hope that the resulting cross-fertilization of ideas will lead to new, interesting results from which everybody will benefit. We are grateful for the financial and organizational support from IFIN-HH, Ovidius

  17. Application of the Wigner-Function Formulation to Mesoscopic Systems in Presence of Electron-Phonon Interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacoboni, C

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical and computational analysis of the quantum dynamics of charge carriers in presence of electron-phonon interaction based on the Wigner function is here applied to the study of transport in mesoscopic systems...

  18. Mesoscopic pairing without superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    We discuss pairing signatures in mesoscopic nanowires with a variable attractive pairing interaction. Depending on the wire length, density, and interaction strength, these systems realize a simultaneous bulk-to-mesoscopic and BCS-BEC crossover, which we describe in terms of the parity parameter that quantifies the odd-even energy difference and generalizes the bulk Cooper pair binding energy to mesoscopic systems. We show that the parity parameter can be extracted from recent measurements of conductance oscillations in SrTiO3 nanowires by Cheng et al. [Nature (London) 521, 196 (2015), 10.1038/nature14398], where it marks the critical magnetic field that separates pair and single-particle currents. Our results place the experiment in the fluctuation-dominated mesoscopic regime on the BCS side of the crossover.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of biochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Y.; Fan, L.T.; Shieh, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction of the concepts of the availability (or exergy), datum level materials, and the dead state has been regarded as some of the most significant recent developments in classical thermodynamics. Not only the available energy balance but also the material and energy balances of a biological system may be established in reference to the datum level materials in the dead state or environment. In this paper these concepts are illustrated with two examples of fermentation and are shown to be useful in identifying sources of thermodynamic inefficiency, thereby leading naturally to the rational definition of thermodynamic efficiency of a biochemical process

  20. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological ...

  1. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  2. Semiclassical approach to mesoscopic systems classical trajectory correlations and wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Waltner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This volume describes mesoscopic systems with classically chaotic dynamics using semiclassical methods which combine elements of classical dynamics and quantum interference effects. Experiments and numerical studies show that Random Matrix Theory (RMT) explains physical properties of these systems well. This was conjectured more than 25 years ago by Bohigas, Giannoni and Schmit for the spectral properties. Since then, it has been a challenge to understand this connection analytically.  The author offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. He extends previous semiclassical approaches that treated spectral and conductance properties. He shows that RMT results can in general only be obtained semiclassically when taking into account classical configurations not considered previously, for example those containing multiply traversed periodic orbits. Furthermore, semiclassics is capable of describing effects beyond RMT. In this context he studies the effect of a non-zero Eh...

  3. Quantum solitonic wave-packet of a meso-scopic system in singularity free gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoninfante, Luca; Lambiase, Gaetano; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we will discuss how to localise a quantum wave-packet due to self-gravitating meso-scopic object by taking into account gravitational self-interaction in the Schrödinger equation beyond General Relativity. In particular, we will study soliton-like solutions in infinite derivative ghost free theories of gravity, which resolves the gravitational 1 / r singularity in the potential. We will show a unique feature that the quantum spread of such a gravitational system is larger than that of the Newtonian gravity, therefore enabling us a window of opportunity to test classical and quantum properties of such theories of gravity in the near future at a table-top experiment.

  4. Effects of internal noise in mesoscopic chemical systems near Hopf bifurcation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Tiejun; Ma Juan; Hou Zhonghuai; Xin Houwen

    2007-01-01

    The effects of internal noise in mesoscopic chemical oscillation systems have been studied analytically, in the parameter region close to the deterministic Hopf bifurcation. Starting from chemical Langevin equations, stochastic normal form equations are obtained, governing the evolution of the radius and phase of the stochastic oscillation. By stochastic averaging, the normal form equation can be solved analytically. Stationary distributions of the radius and auto-correlation functions of the phase variable are obtained. It is shown that internal noise can induce oscillation; even no deterministic oscillation exists. The radius of the noise-induced oscillation (NIO) becomes larger when the internal noise increases, but the correlation time becomes shorter. The trade-off between the strength and regularity of the NIO leads to a clear maximum in its signal-to-noise ratio when the internal noise changes, demonstrating the occurrence of internal noise coherent resonance. Since the intensity of the internal noise is inversely proportional to the system size, the phenomenon also indicates the existence of an optimal system size. These theoretical results are applied to a circadian clock system and excellent agreement with the numerical results is obtained

  5. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xuan; Dempsey, William P; Goutsias, John

    2009-09-07

    Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems as well as for designing optimal approaches for selective perturbation and intervention. Deterministic sensitivity analysis techniques, using derivatives of the system response, have been extensively used in the literature. However, these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, which must be carefully considered before using them in problems of systems biology. We develop here a probabilistic approach to sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems. The proposed technique employs a biophysically derived model for parameter fluctuations and, by using a recently suggested variance-based approach to sensitivity analysis [Saltelli et al., Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 105, 2811 (2005)], it leads to a powerful sensitivity analysis methodology for biochemical reaction systems. The approach presented in this paper addresses many problems associated with derivative-based sensitivity analysis techniques. Most importantly, it produces thermodynamically consistent sensitivity analysis results, can easily accommodate appreciable parameter variations, and allows for systematic investigation of high-order interaction effects. By employing a computational model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade, we demonstrate that our approach is well suited for sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems and can produce a wealth of information about the sensitivity properties of such systems. The price to be paid, however, is a substantial increase in computational complexity over derivative-based techniques, which must be effectively addressed in order to make the proposed approach to sensitivity analysis more practical.

  6. Mesoscopic phenomena in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Altshuler, BL; Webb, RA

    1991-01-01

    The physics of disordered systems has enjoyed a resurgence of interest in the last decade. New concepts such as weak localization, interaction effects and Coulomb gap, have been developed for the transport properties of metals and insulators. With the fabrication of smaller and smaller samples and the routine availability of low temperatures, new physics has emerged from the studies of small devices. The new field goes under the name ""mesoscopic physics"" and has rapidly developed, both experimentally and theoretically. This book is designed to review the current status of the field.

  7. Long-time integration methods for mesoscopic models of pattern-forming systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Katsoulakis, Markos; Plexousakis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Spectral methods for simulation of a mesoscopic diffusion model of surface pattern formation are evaluated for long simulation times. Backwards-differencing time-integration, coupled with an underlying Newton-Krylov nonlinear solver (SUNDIALS-CVODE), is found to substantially accelerate simulations, without the typical requirement of preconditioning. Quasi-equilibrium simulations of patterned phases predicted by the model are shown to agree well with linear stability analysis. Simulation results of the effect of repulsive particle-particle interactions on pattern relaxation time and short/long-range order are discussed.

  8. Development and characterization of a handheld hyperspectral Raman imaging probe system for molecular characterization of tissue on mesoscopic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Arnaud, Karl; Aubertin, Kelly; Strupler, Mathias; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Petrecca, Kevin; Trudel, Dominique; Leblond, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising cancer detection technique for surgical guidance applications. It can provide quantitative information relating to global tissue properties associated with structural, metabolic, immunological, and genetic biochemical phenomena in terms of molecular species including amino acids, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acid (DNA). To date in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems mostly included probes and biopsy needles typically limited to single-point tissue interrogation over a scale between 100 and 500 microns. The development of wider field handheld systems could improve tumor localization for a range of open surgery applications including brain, ovarian, and skin cancers. Here we present a novel Raman spectroscopy implementation using a coherent imaging bundle of fibers to create a probe capable of reconstructing molecular images over mesoscopic fields of view. Detection is performed using linear scanning with a rotation mirror and an imaging spectrometer. Different slits widths were tested at the entrance of the spectrometer to optimize spatial and spectral resolution while preserving sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to detect the principal Raman tissue features. The nonbiological samples, calcite and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), were used to characterize the performance of the system. The new wide-field probe was tested on ex vivo samples of calf brain and swine tissue. Raman spectral content of both tissue types were validated with data from the literature and compared with data acquired with a single-point Raman spectroscopy probe. The single-point probe was used as the gold standard against which the new instrument was benchmarked as it has already been thoroughly validated for biological tissue characterization. We have developed and characterized a practical noncontact handheld Raman imager providing tissue information at a spatial resolution of 115 microns over a field of view >14 mm 2 and a spectral resolution of 6 cm -1 over

  9. Stochastic analysis of biochemical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David F

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on counting processes and continuous-time Markov chains motivated by examples and applications drawn from chemical networks in systems biology.  The book should serve well as a supplement for courses in probability and stochastic processes.  While the material is presented in a manner most suitable for students who have studied stochastic processes up to and including martingales in continuous time, much of the necessary background material is summarized in the Appendix. Students and Researchers with a solid understanding of calculus, differential equations, and elementary probability and who are well-motivated by the applications will find this book of interest.    David F. Anderson is Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin and Thomas G. Kurtz is Emeritus Professor in the Departments of Mathematics and Statistics at that university. Their research is focused on probability and stochastic processes with applications in biology and other ar...

  10. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...

  11. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...

  12. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ping

    celebrated Marcus' inversion and Kramers' turnover behaviors, the new theory also shows some distinct quantum solvation effects that can alter the ET mechanism. Moreover, the present theory predicts further for the ET reaction thermodynamics, such as equilibrium Gibbs free-energy and entropy, some interesting solvent-dependent features that are calling for experimental verification. In Chapter 6, we discuss the constructed QDTs, in terms of their unified mathematical structure that supports a linear dynamics space, and thus facilitates their applications to various physical problems. The involving details are exemplified with the CODDE form of QDT. As the linear space is concerned, we identify the Schrodinger versus Heisenberg picture and the forward versus backward propagation of the reduced, dissipative Liouville dynamics. For applications we discuss the reduced linear response theory and the optimal control problems, in which the correlated effects of non-Markovian dissipation and field driving are shown to be important. In Chapter 7, we turn to quantum transport, i.e., electric current through molecular or mesoscopic systems under finite applied voltage. By viewing the nonequilibrium transport setup as a quantum open system, we develop a reduced-density-matrix approach to quantum transport. The resulting current is explicitly expressed in terms of the molecular reduced density matrix by tracing out the degrees of freedom of the electrodes at finite bias and temperature. We propose a conditional quantum master equation theory, which is an extension of the conventional (or unconditional) QDT by tracing out the well-defined bath subsets individually, instead of the entire bath degrees of freedom. Both the current and the noise spectrum can be conveniently analyzed in terms of the conditional reduced density matrix dynamics. By far, the QDT (including the conditional one) has only been exploited in second-order form. A self-consistent Born approximation for the system

  13. Universal mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of conductance fluctuations in disordered metallic systems with size large compared to the mean free path of the electron but small compared to localization length is considered. It is demonstrates that fluctuations have an universal character and are due to repulsion between levels and spectral rigidity. The basic fluctuation measures for the energy spectrum in the mesoscopic regime of disordered systems are consistent with the Gaussian random matrix ensemble predictions. Although our disordered electron random matrix ensemble does not belong to the Gaussian ensemble the two ensembles turn out to be essentially similar. The level repulsion and the spectral rigidity found in nuclear spectra should also be observed in the metallic regime of Anderson localization. 7 refs. (orig.)

  14. Photon side-bands in mesoscopics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews several applications of photonic side bands, used by Buttiker and Landauer (Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1739 (1982)) in their theory of traversal time in tunneling, in transport and optics of mesoscopic systems. Topics include generalizations of the transmission theory of transport...... to time-dependent situations, optics and transport of mesoscopic systems in THz electromagnetic fields, and phase-measurements of photon-assisted tunneling through a quantum dot. (C) 1998 Academic Press Limited....

  15. Identifying optimal models to represent biochemical systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Apri

    Full Text Available Biochemical systems involving a high number of components with intricate interactions often lead to complex models containing a large number of parameters. Although a large model could describe in detail the mechanisms that underlie the system, its very large size may hinder us in understanding the key elements of the system. Also in terms of parameter identification, large models are often problematic. Therefore, a reduced model may be preferred to represent the system. Yet, in order to efficaciously replace the large model, the reduced model should have the same ability as the large model to produce reliable predictions for a broad set of testable experimental conditions. We present a novel method to extract an "optimal" reduced model from a large model to represent biochemical systems by combining a reduction method and a model discrimination method. The former assures that the reduced model contains only those components that are important to produce the dynamics observed in given experiments, whereas the latter ensures that the reduced model gives a good prediction for any feasible experimental conditions that are relevant to answer questions at hand. These two techniques are applied iteratively. The method reveals the biological core of a model mathematically, indicating the processes that are likely to be responsible for certain behavior. We demonstrate the algorithm on two realistic model examples. We show that in both cases the core is substantially smaller than the full model.

  16. Quantum dynamical effects as a singular perturbation for observables in open quasi-classical nonlinear mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G.P.; Borgonovi, F.; Dalvit, D.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    We review our results on a mathematical dynamical theory for observables for open many-body quantum nonlinear bosonic systems for a very general class of Hamiltonians. We show that non-quadratic (nonlinear) terms in a Hamiltonian provide a singular 'quantum' perturbation for observables in some 'mesoscopic' region of parameters. In particular, quantum effects result in secular terms in the dynamical evolution, that grow in time. We argue that even for open quantum nonlinear systems in the deep quasi-classical region, these quantum effects can survive after decoherence and relaxation processes take place. We demonstrate that these quantum effects in open quantum systems can be observed, for example, in the frequency Fourier spectrum of the dynamical observables, or in the corresponding spectral density of noise. Estimates are presented for Bose-Einstein condensates, low temperature mechanical resonators, and nonlinear optical systems prepared in large amplitude coherent states. In particular, we show that for Bose-Einstein condensate systems the characteristic time of deviation of quantum dynamics for observables from the corresponding classical dynamics coincides with the characteristic time-scale of the well-known quantum nonlinear effect of phase diffusion.

  17. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  18. Applications of mesoscopic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shechao.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities in the area ''applications of mesoscopic physics to novel correlations and fluctuations of speckle patterns: imaging and tomography with multiply scattered classical waves'' are briefly summarized. The main thrust in fundamental research is in the general areas of mesoscopic effects in disordered semiconductors and metals and the related field of applications of mesoscopic physics to the subject matter of classical wave propagation through disordered scattering media. Specific topics are Fabry-Perot interferometer with disorder: correlations and light localization; electron-phonon inelastic scattering rate and the temperature scaling exponent in integer quantum Hall effect; and transmission and reflection correlations of second harmonic waves in nonlinear random media. Research in applied physics centered on far infrared photon-assisted transport through quantum point contact devices and photon migration distributions in multiple scattering media. 7 refs

  19. Intrinsic noise analyzer: a software package for the exploration of stochastic biochemical kinetics using the system size expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philipp; Matuschek, Hannes; Grima, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The accepted stochastic descriptions of biochemical dynamics under well-mixed conditions are given by the Chemical Master Equation and the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm, which are equivalent. The latter is a Monte-Carlo method, which, despite enjoying broad availability in a large number of existing software packages, is computationally expensive due to the huge amounts of ensemble averaging required for obtaining accurate statistical information. The former is a set of coupled differential-difference equations for the probability of the system being in any one of the possible mesoscopic states; these equations are typically computationally intractable because of the inherently large state space. Here we introduce the software package intrinsic Noise Analyzer (iNA), which allows for systematic analysis of stochastic biochemical kinetics by means of van Kampen's system size expansion of the Chemical Master Equation. iNA is platform independent and supports the popular SBML format natively. The present implementation is the first to adopt a complementary approach that combines state-of-the-art analysis tools using the computer algebra system Ginac with traditional methods of stochastic simulation. iNA integrates two approximation methods based on the system size expansion, the Linear Noise Approximation and effective mesoscopic rate equations, which to-date have not been available to non-expert users, into an easy-to-use graphical user interface. In particular, the present methods allow for quick approximate analysis of time-dependent mean concentrations, variances, covariances and correlations coefficients, which typically outperforms stochastic simulations. These analytical tools are complemented by automated multi-core stochastic simulations with direct statistical evaluation and visualization. We showcase iNA's performance by using it to explore the stochastic properties of cooperative and non-cooperative enzyme kinetics and a gene network associated with

  20. Fiscal 1998 research report. R and D on super metal (Al system mesoscopic texture-controlled material); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Super metal no gijutsu kaihatsu (aluminium kei mesoscopic soshiki seigyo zairyo no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For development of Al materials with superior industrial characteristics (strength, corrosion resistance), this research has promoted development of large-size Al system materials with mesoscopic crystalline texture by high- strain accumulation control technology, and recovery and recrystallization control technology. In this fiscal year, (1) basic study on high-strain accumulation control technology, (2) study on a formation mechanism of ultra- fine crystal grains, and (3) development of a machining process were made. In (1), basic study on low-temperature rolling and study on rolling by rollers having different peripheral speeds were made. In (2), study on refining of recrystallized grains of 5000-base and 7000-base alloys was made. In (3), a low-temperature rolling equipment, and a ultra-rapid heating device were introduced. For the whole R and D project on super metal, the main research facilities such as a low-temperature rolling body for high- strain accumulation and a high-strain accumulative structure formation equipment (melt rolling equipment) for uniform nucleus formation in recrystallization were introduced to gain a firm foothold for the future application research. (NEDO)

  1. Networks as a Privileged Way to Develop Mesoscopic Level Approaches in Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Giuliani

    2014-01-01

    The methodologies advocated in computational biology are in many cases proper system-level approaches. These methodologies are variously connected to the notion of “mesosystem” and thus on the focus on relational structures that are at the basis of biological regulation. Here, I describe how the formalization of biological systems by means of graph theory constitutes an extremely fruitful approach to biology. I suggest the epistemological relevance of the notion of graph resides in its multil...

  2. Elastic tunneling identification through crossings, anti-crossings and splitting of states in the complex electronic current of systems based on mesoscopic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Luis I. A.; Mendoza, Michel; Ujevic, Sebastian

    2013-09-01

    We have systematically studied the conductance σ( E,B) and the electronic current line shapes J( V ex ) through complex mesoscopic molecules in an elastic resonant tunneling regime. The studied systems are based on GaAs/AlGaAs hetero-structures, with several discrete states in each coupled mesoscopic molecule. The molecules were formed using different wells and barrier widths. These systems allow effective couplings and uncouplings that lead to elastic processes as a function of the electronic potential V ex and magnetic field B. In this situation, the J( V ex ) and σ( E, B) curves exhibit a sequence of peaks of difficult interpretation, in which crossings and anti-crossings (a splitting if it is generated in the resonance condition) of states contribute in a way that they cannot be easily identified. Performing a systematic analysis of the evolution of these states (before the resonance condition), we were able to determine the origin of these current peaks. We have found that the coupling of states (anti-crossing) around the resonance region can be identified as a broad mirrored- D line shape in the J( V ex ) curves. The mirrored- D line shape peaks can be clearly differentiated from the neighboring peaks because the last ones follow a very defined increasing sequence in their intensities and widths. Also, this behavior (fingerprint) can be used to identify possible splitting of states in the J( V ex ). The splittings that are generated between states with different quantum numbers (quantum numbers associated to the individual well) follow an unexpected opposite behavior when compared with those generated between states with the same quantum numbers (quasi-miniband). All these results are also observed in the conductance σ( E, B) associated with complex mesoscopic molecules based on a two-dimensional electron gas.

  3. Quantum switching of polarization in mesoscopic ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa de Melo, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A single domain of a uniaxial ferroelectric grain may be thought of as a classical permanent memory. At the mesoscopic level this system may experience considerable quantum fluctuations due to tunneling between two possible memory states, thus destroying the classical permanent memory effect. To study these quantum effects the concrete example of a mesoscopic uniaxial ferroelectric grain is discussed, where the orientation of the electric polarization determines two possible memory states. The possibility of quantum switching of the polarization in mesoscopic uniaxial ferroelectric grains is thus proposed. To determine the degree of memory loss, the tunneling rate between the two polarization states is calculated at zero temperature both in the absence and in the presence of an external static electric field. In addition, a discussion of crossover temperature between thermally activated behavior and quantum tunneling behavior is presented. And finally, environmental effects (phonons, defects, and surfaces) are also considered. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Quantum Effect in the Mesoscopic RLC Circuits with a Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianxin; Yan Zhanyuan

    2005-01-01

    The research work on the quantum effects in mesoscopic circuits has undergone a rapid development recently, however the whole quantum theory of the mesoscopic circuits should consider the discreteness of the electric charge. In this paper, based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete values, the finite-difference Schroedinger equation of the mesoscopic RLC circuit with a source is achieved. With a unitary transformation, the Schroedinger equation becomes the standard Mathieu equation, then the energy spectrum and the wave functions of the system are obtained. Using the WKBJ method, the average of currents and square of the current are calculated. The results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes noise in the circuits. This paper is an application of the whole quantum mesoscopic circuits theory to the fundamental circuits, and the results will shed light on the design of the miniation circuits, especially on the purpose of reducing quantum noise coherent controlling of the mesoscopic quantum states.

  5. Mesoscopic quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: sergei.molotkov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Since a strictly single-photon source is not yet available, in quantum cryptography systems, one uses, as information quantum states, coherent radiation of a laser with an average number of photons of μ ≈ 0.1–0.5 in a pulse, attenuated to the quasi-single-photon level. The linear independence of a set of coherent quasi-single-photon information states leads to the possibility of unambiguous measurements that, in the presence of losses in the line, restrict the transmission range of secret keys. Starting from a certain value of critical loss (the length of the line), the eavesdropper knows the entire key, does not make errors, and is not detected—the distribution of secret keys becomes impossible. This problem is solved by introducing an additional reference state with an average number of photons of μ{sub cl} ≈ 10{sup 3}–10{sup 6}, depending on the length of the communication line. It is shown that the use of a reference state does not allow the eavesdropper to carry out measurements with conclusive outcome while remaining undetected. A reference state guarantees detecting an eavesdropper in a channel with high losses. In this case, information states may contain a mesoscopic average number of photons in the range of μ{sub q} ≈ 0.5–10{sup 2}. The protocol proposed is easy to implement technically, admits flexible adjustment of parameters to the length of the communication line, and is simple and transparent for proving the secrecy of keys.

  6. cellPACK: a virtual mesoscope to model and visualize structural systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham T; Autin, Ludovic; Al-Alusi, Mostafa; Goodsell, David S; Sanner, Michel F; Olson, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    cellPACK assembles computational models of the biological mesoscale, an intermediate scale (10-100 nm) between molecular and cellular biology scales. cellPACK's modular architecture unites existing and novel packing algorithms to generate, visualize and analyze comprehensive three-dimensional models of complex biological environments that integrate data from multiple experimental systems biology and structural biology sources. cellPACK is available as open-source code, with tools for validation of models and with 'recipes' and models for five biological systems: blood plasma, cytoplasm, synaptic vesicles, HIV and a mycoplasma cell. We have applied cellPACK to model distributions of HIV envelope protein to test several hypotheses for consistency with experimental observations. Biologists, educators and outreach specialists can interact with cellPACK models, develop new recipes and perform packing experiments through scripting and graphical user interfaces at http://cellPACK.org/.

  7. Analysing improvements to on-street public transport systems: a mesoscopic model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvardson, Jesper Bláfoss; Kornerup Jensen, Jonas; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2017-01-01

    and other advanced public transport systems (APTS), the attractiveness of such systems depends heavily on their implementation. In the early planning stage it is advantageous to deploy simple and transparent models to evaluate possible ways of implementation. For this purpose, the present study develops...... headway time regularity and running time variability, i.e. taking into account waiting time and in-vehicle time. The approach was applied on a case study by assessing the effects of implementing segregated infrastructure and APTS elements, individually and in combination. The results showed...... that the reliability of on-street public transport operations mainly depends on APTS elements, and especially holding strategies, whereas pure infrastructure improvements induced travel time reductions. The results further suggested that synergy effects can be obtained by planning on-street public transport coherently...

  8. Mesoscopic Field-Effect-Induced Devices in Depleted Two-Dimensional Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachsoliani, N.; Platonov, S.; Wieck, A. D.; Ludwig, S.

    2017-12-01

    Nanoelectronic devices embedded in the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) of a GaAs /(Al ,Ga )As heterostructure enable a large variety of applications ranging from fundamental research to high-speed transistors. Electrical circuits are thereby commonly defined by creating barriers for carriers by the selective depletion of a preexisting 2DES. We explore an alternative approach: we deplete the 2DES globally by applying a negative voltage to a global top gate and screen the electric field of the top gate only locally using nanoscale gates placed on the wafer surface between the plane of the 2DES and the top gate. Free carriers are located beneath the screen gates, and their properties can be controlled by means of geometry and applied voltages. This method promises considerable advantages for the definition of complex circuits by the electric-field effect, as it allows us to reduce the number of gates and simplify gate geometries. Examples are carrier systems with ring topology or large arrays of quantum dots. We present a first exploration of this method pursuing field effect, Hall effect, and Aharonov-Bohm measurements to study electrostatic, dynamic, and coherent properties.

  9. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  10. Mesoscopic simulations of crosslinked polymer networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megariotis, G.; Vogiatzis, G.G.; Schneider, L.; Müller, M.; Theodorou, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology and the corresponding C++ code for mesoscopic simulations of elastomers are presented. The test system, crosslinked ds-1'4-polyisoprene' is simulated with a Brownian Dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm as a dense liquid of soft, coarse-grained beads, each representing 5-10 Kuhn

  11. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya, E-mail: vijaykumar@amolf.nl [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); van ’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94157, 1090 GD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bolhuis, Peter G. [van ’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94157, 1090 GD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rein ten Wolde, Pieter, E-mail: p.t.wolde@amolf.nl [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-07

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  12. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level

  13. Dynamic magnetoconductance fluctuations and oscillations in mesoscopic wires and rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, D. Z.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Stafford, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    Using a finite-frequency recursive Green's-function technique, we calculate the dynamic magnetoconductance fluctuations and oscillations in disordered mesoscopic normal-metal systems, incorporating interparticle Coulomb interactions within a self-consistent potential method. In a disorderd metal ...

  14. Biochemical markers predictive for bone marrow involvement in systemic mastocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, Marjolein L.; van Doormaal, Jasper J.; van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Kluin, Philip M.; van der Veer, Eveline; de Monchy, Jan G. R.; Kema, Ido P.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by bone marrow involvement, which requires a bone marrow biopsy for diagnostic work-up. We questioned whether bone marrow involvement could be predicted using biochemical markers. We selected patients with various symptoms suggestive of indolent systemic

  15. Nonequilibrium mesoscopic transport: a genealogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mukunda P; Green, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Models of nonequilibrium quantum transport underpin all modern electronic devices, from the largest scales to the smallest. Past simplifications such as coarse graining and bulk self-averaging served well to understand electronic materials. Such particular notions become inapplicable at mesoscopic dimensions, edging towards the truly quantum regime. Nevertheless a unifying thread continues to run through transport physics, animating the design of small-scale electronic technology: microscopic conservation and nonequilibrium dissipation. These fundamentals are inherent in quantum transport and gain even greater and more explicit experimental meaning in the passage to atomic-sized devices. We review their genesis, their theoretical context, and their governing role in the electronic response of meso- and nanoscopic systems. (topical review)

  16. Dynamic theory for the mesoscopic electric circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bin; Shen Xiaojuan; Li Youquan; Sun LiLy; Yin Zhujian

    2005-01-01

    The quantum theory for mesoscopic electric circuit with charge discreteness is briefly described. The minibands of quasienergy in LC design mesoscopic electric circuit have been found. In the mesoscopic 'pure' inductance design circuit, just like in the mesoscopic metallic rings, the quantum dynamic characteristics have been obtained explicitly. In the 'pure' capacity design circuit, the Coulomb blockade had also been addressed

  17. Mesoscopic Self-Assembly: A Shift to Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eMastrangeli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the construction of thermodynamically stable structures, the self-assembly of mesoscopic systems has proven capable of formidable achievements in the bottom-up engineering of micro- and nanosystems. Yet, inspired by an analogous evolution in supramolecular chemistry, synthetic mesoscopic self-assembly may have a lot more ahead, within reach of a shift toward fully three-dimensional architectures, collective interactions of building blocks and kinetic control. All over these challenging fronts, complexity holds the key.

  18. Systems biology solutions for biochemical production challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Sofie Lærke; Lennen, Rebecca M; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need to significantly accelerate the development of microbial cell factories to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable feedstocks in order to facilitate the transition to a biobased society. Methods commonly used within the field of systems biology including omics...... characterization, genome-scale metabolic modeling, and adaptive laboratory evolution can be readily deployed in metabolic engineering projects. However, high performance strains usually carry tens of genetic modifications and need to operate in challenging environmental conditions. This additional complexity...... compared to basic science research requires pushing systems biology strategies to their limits and often spurs innovative developments that benefit fields outside metabolic engineering. Here we survey recent advanced applications of systems biology methods in engineering microbial production strains...

  19. Systems biology solutions for biochemical production challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne Sofie Lærke; Lennen, Rebecca M; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Herrgård, Markus J

    2017-06-01

    There is an urgent need to significantly accelerate the development of microbial cell factories to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable feedstocks in order to facilitate the transition to a biobased society. Methods commonly used within the field of systems biology including omics characterization, genome-scale metabolic modeling, and adaptive laboratory evolution can be readily deployed in metabolic engineering projects. However, high performance strains usually carry tens of genetic modifications and need to operate in challenging environmental conditions. This additional complexity compared to basic science research requires pushing systems biology strategies to their limits and often spurs innovative developments that benefit fields outside metabolic engineering. Here we survey recent advanced applications of systems biology methods in engineering microbial production strains for biofuels and -chemicals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Intrinsic noise analyzer: a software package for the exploration of stochastic biochemical kinetics using the system size expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Thomas

    Full Text Available The accepted stochastic descriptions of biochemical dynamics under well-mixed conditions are given by the Chemical Master Equation and the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm, which are equivalent. The latter is a Monte-Carlo method, which, despite enjoying broad availability in a large number of existing software packages, is computationally expensive due to the huge amounts of ensemble averaging required for obtaining accurate statistical information. The former is a set of coupled differential-difference equations for the probability of the system being in any one of the possible mesoscopic states; these equations are typically computationally intractable because of the inherently large state space. Here we introduce the software package intrinsic Noise Analyzer (iNA, which allows for systematic analysis of stochastic biochemical kinetics by means of van Kampen's system size expansion of the Chemical Master Equation. iNA is platform independent and supports the popular SBML format natively. The present implementation is the first to adopt a complementary approach that combines state-of-the-art analysis tools using the computer algebra system Ginac with traditional methods of stochastic simulation. iNA integrates two approximation methods based on the system size expansion, the Linear Noise Approximation and effective mesoscopic rate equations, which to-date have not been available to non-expert users, into an easy-to-use graphical user interface. In particular, the present methods allow for quick approximate analysis of time-dependent mean concentrations, variances, covariances and correlations coefficients, which typically outperforms stochastic simulations. These analytical tools are complemented by automated multi-core stochastic simulations with direct statistical evaluation and visualization. We showcase iNA's performance by using it to explore the stochastic properties of cooperative and non-cooperative enzyme kinetics and a gene network

  1. Intrinsic Noise Analyzer: A Software Package for the Exploration of Stochastic Biochemical Kinetics Using the System Size Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The accepted stochastic descriptions of biochemical dynamics under well-mixed conditions are given by the Chemical Master Equation and the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm, which are equivalent. The latter is a Monte-Carlo method, which, despite enjoying broad availability in a large number of existing software packages, is computationally expensive due to the huge amounts of ensemble averaging required for obtaining accurate statistical information. The former is a set of coupled differential-difference equations for the probability of the system being in any one of the possible mesoscopic states; these equations are typically computationally intractable because of the inherently large state space. Here we introduce the software package intrinsic Noise Analyzer (iNA), which allows for systematic analysis of stochastic biochemical kinetics by means of van Kampen’s system size expansion of the Chemical Master Equation. iNA is platform independent and supports the popular SBML format natively. The present implementation is the first to adopt a complementary approach that combines state-of-the-art analysis tools using the computer algebra system Ginac with traditional methods of stochastic simulation. iNA integrates two approximation methods based on the system size expansion, the Linear Noise Approximation and effective mesoscopic rate equations, which to-date have not been available to non-expert users, into an easy-to-use graphical user interface. In particular, the present methods allow for quick approximate analysis of time-dependent mean concentrations, variances, covariances and correlations coefficients, which typically outperforms stochastic simulations. These analytical tools are complemented by automated multi-core stochastic simulations with direct statistical evaluation and visualization. We showcase iNA’s performance by using it to explore the stochastic properties of cooperative and non-cooperative enzyme kinetics and a gene network associated with

  2. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  3. A Systems Model of Parkinson's Disease Using Biochemical Systems Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharakurup, Hemalatha; Melethadathil, Nidheesh; Nair, Bipin; Diwakar, Shyam

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder, affects millions of people and has gained attention because of its clinical roles affecting behaviors related to motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although studies on PD from various aspects are becoming popular, few rely on predictive systems modeling approaches. Using Biochemical Systems Theory (BST), this article attempts to model and characterize dopaminergic cell death and understand pathophysiology of progression of PD. PD pathways were modeled using stochastic differential equations incorporating law of mass action, and initial concentrations for the modeled proteins were obtained from literature. Simulations suggest that dopamine levels were reduced significantly due to an increase in dopaminergic quinones and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) relating to imbalances compared to control during PD progression. Associating to clinically observed PD-related cell death, simulations show abnormal parkin and reactive oxygen species levels with an increase in neurofibrillary tangles. While relating molecular mechanistic roles, the BST modeling helps predicting dopaminergic cell death processes involved in the progression of PD and provides a predictive understanding of neuronal dysfunction for translational neuroscience.

  4. Contact Geometry of Mesoscopic Thermodynamics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Grmela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution during which macroscopic systems reach thermodynamic equilibrium states proceeds as a continuous sequence of contact structure preserving transformations maximizing the entropy. This viewpoint of mesoscopic thermodynamics and dynamics provides a unified setting for the classical equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics. One of the illustrations presented in the paper is a new version of extended nonequilibrium thermodynamics with fluxes as extra state variables.

  5. Intermittency route to chaos in a biochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, I M; Martinez, L; Veguillas, J

    1996-01-01

    The numerical analysis of a glycolytic model performed through the construction of a system of three differential-delay equations reveals a phenomenon of intermittency route to chaos. In our biochemical system, the consideration of delay time variations under constant input flux as well as frequency variations of the periodic substrate input flux allows us, in both cases, to observe a type of transition to chaos different from the 'Feigenbaum route'.

  6. Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daigle Bernie J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prerequisite for the mechanistic simulation of a biochemical system is detailed knowledge of its kinetic parameters. Despite recent experimental advances, the estimation of unknown parameter values from observed data is still a bottleneck for obtaining accurate simulation results. Many methods exist for parameter estimation in deterministic biochemical systems; methods for discrete stochastic systems are less well developed. Given the probabilistic nature of stochastic biochemical models, a natural approach is to choose parameter values that maximize the probability of the observed data with respect to the unknown parameters, a.k.a. the maximum likelihood parameter estimates (MLEs. MLE computation for all but the simplest models requires the simulation of many system trajectories that are consistent with experimental data. For models with unknown parameters, this presents a computational challenge, as the generation of consistent trajectories can be an extremely rare occurrence. Results We have developed Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization with Modified Cross-Entropy Method (MCEM2: an accelerated method for calculating MLEs that combines advances in rare event simulation with a computationally efficient version of the Monte Carlo expectation-maximization (MCEM algorithm. Our method requires no prior knowledge regarding parameter values, and it automatically provides a multivariate parameter uncertainty estimate. We applied the method to five stochastic systems of increasing complexity, progressing from an analytically tractable pure-birth model to a computationally demanding model of yeast-polarization. Our results demonstrate that MCEM2 substantially accelerates MLE computation on all tested models when compared to a stand-alone version of MCEM. Additionally, we show how our method identifies parameter values for certain classes of models more accurately than two recently proposed computationally efficient methods

  7. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-07

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High-resolution and high sensitivity mesoscopic fluorescence tomography based on de-scanning EMCCD: System design and thick tissue imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet Saadeddin

    Optical microscopy has been one of the essential tools for biological studies for decades, however, its application areas was limited to superficial investigation due to strong scattering in live tissues. Even though advanced techniques such as confocal or multiphoton methods have been recently developed to penetrate beyond a few hundreds of microns deep in tissues, they still cannot perform in the mesoscopic regime (millimeter scale) without using destructive sample preparation protocols such as clearing techniques. They provide rich cellular information; however, they cannot be readily employed to investigate the biological processes at larger scales. Herein, we will present our effort to establish a novel imaging approach that can quantify molecular expression in intact tissues, well beyond the current microscopy depth limits. Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (MFMT) is an emerging imaging modality that offers unique potential for the non-invasive molecular assessment of thick in-vitro and in-vivo live tissues. This novel imaging modality is based on an optical inverse problem that allows for retrieval of the quantitative spatial distribution of fluorescent tagged bio-markers at millimeter depth. MFMT is well-suited for in-vivo subsurface tissue imaging and thick bio-printed specimens due to its high sensitivity and fast acquisition times, as well as relatively large fields of view. Herein, we will first demonstrate the potential of this technique using our first generation MFMT system applied to multiplexed reporter gene imaging (in-vitro) and determination of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) agent bio-distribution in a mouse model (in-vivo). Second, we will present the design rationale, in silico benchmarking, and experimental validation of a second generation MFMT (2GMFMT) system. We will demonstrate the gain in resolution and sensitivity achieved due to the de-scanned dense detector configuration implemented. The potential of this novel platform will be

  9. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN CHERNOZEM SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Emnova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the evaluation of the intensity of certain soil biochemical processes (e.g. soil organic C mineralization at Organic and mixed Mineral+Organic fertilization of typical chernozem in crop rotation dynamics (for 6 years by use of eco-physiological indicators of biological soil quality: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, as well as, microbial and metabolic quotients. Soil sampling was performed from a long-term field crop experiment, which has been established in 1971 at the Balti steppe (Northern Moldova. The crop types had a more considerable impact on the soil microbial biomass accumulation and community biochemical activity compared to long-term Organic or mixed Mineral + Organic fertilizers amendments. The Org fertilization system doesn’t make it possible to avoid the loss of organic C in arable typical chernozem. The organic fertilizer (cattle manure is able to mitigate the negative consequences of long-term mineral fertilization.

  10. Mesoscopic spin-flip transport through a hybrid system with a single molecular dot system applied with ac magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Qiao, E-mail: cqhy1127@yahoo.com.c [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Liu Jin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhiyong [School of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2011-01-17

    We have investigated the current for the system of vibrating quantum dot irradiated with a rotating magnetic field and an oscillating magnetic field by nonequilibrium Green's function. The rotating magnetic field rotates with the angular frequency {omega}{sub r} around the z-axis with the tilt angle {theta}, and the time-oscillating magnetic field is located in the z-axis with the angular frequency {omega}. Different behaviors have been shown in the presence of electron-phonon interaction (EPI) which plays a significant role in the transport. The current displays asymmetric behavior as the source-drain bias eV=0, novel side peaks or shoulders can be found due to the phonon absorption and emission procedure, and the negative differential resistance becomes stronger as the parameter g increases. Furthermore, the strong EPI also destroys the quasiperiodic oscillations of current in the region {mu}{sub 0}B{sub 1}>2.5{Delta}. The electron transport properties are also significantly influenced by the linewidth function {Gamma}.

  11. What can we learn from noise? - Mesoscopic nonequilibrium statistical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic systems - small electric circuits working in quantum regime - offer us a unique experimental stage to explorer quantum transport in a tunable and precise way. The purpose of this Review is to show how they can contribute to statistical physics. We introduce the significance of fluctuation, or equivalently noise, as noise measurement enables us to address the fundamental aspects of a physical system. The significance of the fluctuation theorem (FT) in statistical physics is noted. We explain what information can be deduced from the current noise measurement in mesoscopic systems. As an important application of the noise measurement to statistical physics, we describe our experimental work on the current and current noise in an electron interferometer, which is the first experimental test of FT in quantum regime. Our attempt will shed new light in the research field of mesoscopic quantum statistical physics.

  12. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  13. Estimating rare events in biochemical systems using conditional sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on development of variance reduction strategies to estimate rare events in biochemical systems. Obtaining this probability using brute force Monte Carlo simulations in conjunction with the stochastic simulation algorithm (Gillespie's method) is computationally prohibitive. To circumvent this, important sampling tools such as the weighted stochastic simulation algorithm and the doubly weighted stochastic simulation algorithm have been proposed. However, these strategies require an additional step of determining the important region to sample from, which is not straightforward for most of the problems. In this paper, we apply the subset simulation method, developed as a variance reduction tool in the context of structural engineering, to the problem of rare event estimation in biochemical systems. The main idea is that the rare event probability is expressed as a product of more frequent conditional probabilities. These conditional probabilities are estimated with high accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations, specifically the Markov chain Monte Carlo method with the modified Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Generating sample realizations of the state vector using the stochastic simulation algorithm is viewed as mapping the discrete-state continuous-time random process to the standard normal random variable vector. This viewpoint opens up the possibility of applying more sophisticated and efficient sampling schemes developed elsewhere to problems in stochastic chemical kinetics. The results obtained using the subset simulation method are compared with existing variance reduction strategies for a few benchmark problems, and a satisfactory improvement in computational time is demonstrated.

  14. Statewide mesoscopic simulation for Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This study developed a mesoscopic simulator which is capable of representing both city-level and statewide roadway : networks. The key feature of such models are the integration of (i) a traffic flow model which is efficient enough to : scale to larg...

  15. Quantum Spin Transport in Mesoscopic Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein W. A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent conductance of ballistic mesoscopic interferometer is investigated. The quantum interferometer is in the form of ring, in which a quantum dot is embedded in one arm. This quantum dot is connected to one lead via tunnel barrier. Both Aharonov- Casher and Aharonov-Bohm e ects are studied. Our results confirm the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and quantum interference e ects in such confined quantum systems. This investigation is valuable for spintronics application, for example, quantum information processing.

  16. Mesoscopic NbSe3 wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zant, H.S.J. van der; Kalwij, A.; Mantel, O.C.; Markovic, N.

    1999-01-01

    We have fabricated wire structures with (sub)micron sizes in the charge-density wave conductor NbSe 3 . Electrical transport measurements include complete mode-locking on Shapiro steps and show that the patterning has not affected the CDW material. Our mesoscopic wires show strong fluctuation and hysteresis effects in the low-temperature current-voltage characteristics, as well as a strong reduction of the phase-slip voltage. This reduction can not be explained with existing models. We suggest that single phase-slip events are responsible for a substantial reduction of the CDW strain in micron-sized systems. (orig.)

  17. Fluctuations and localization in mesoscopic electron

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The quantum phenomena of tunneling and interference show up not only in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, but also in cold materials of the real world, such as metals and semiconductors. Though not fully macroscopic, such mesoscopic systems contain a huge number of particles, and the holistic nature of quantum mechanics becomes evident already in simple electronic measurements. The measured quantity fluctuates as a function of applied fields in an unpredictable, yet reproducible way. Despite this fingerprint character of fluctuations, their statistical properties are universal, i.e

  18. A Comparison of Deterministic and Stochastic Modeling Approaches for Biochemical Reaction Systems: On Fixed Points, Means, and Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahl, Sayuri K; Kremling, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In the mathematical modeling of biochemical reactions, a convenient standard approach is to use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that follow the law of mass action. However, this deterministic ansatz is based on simplifications; in particular, it neglects noise, which is inherent to biological processes. In contrast, the stochasticity of reactions is captured in detail by the discrete chemical master equation (CME). Therefore, the CME is frequently applied to mesoscopic systems, where copy numbers of involved components are small and random fluctuations are thus significant. Here, we compare those two common modeling approaches, aiming at identifying parallels and discrepancies between deterministic variables and possible stochastic counterparts like the mean or modes of the state space probability distribution. To that end, a mathematically flexible reaction scheme of autoregulatory gene expression is translated into the corresponding ODE and CME formulations. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, deterministic stable fixed points usually correspond well to the modes in the stationary probability distribution. However, this connection might be disrupted in small systems. The discrepancies are characterized and systematically traced back to the magnitude of the stoichiometric coefficients and to the presence of nonlinear reactions. These factors are found to synergistically promote large and highly asymmetric fluctuations. As a consequence, bistable but unimodal, and monostable but bimodal systems can emerge. This clearly challenges the role of ODE modeling in the description of cellular signaling and regulation, where some of the involved components usually occur in low copy numbers. Nevertheless, systems whose bimodality originates from deterministic bistability are found to sustain a more robust separation of the two states compared to bimodal, but monostable systems. In regulatory circuits that require precise coordination, ODE modeling is thus still

  19. Improved methods for the mathematically controlled comparison of biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwacke John H

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The method of mathematically controlled comparison provides a structured approach for the comparison of alternative biochemical pathways with respect to selected functional effectiveness measures. Under this approach, alternative implementations of a biochemical pathway are modeled mathematically, forced to be equivalent through the application of selected constraints, and compared with respect to selected functional effectiveness measures. While the method has been applied successfully in a variety of studies, we offer recommendations for improvements to the method that (1 relax requirements for definition of constraints sufficient to remove all degrees of freedom in forming the equivalent alternative, (2 facilitate generalization of the results thus avoiding the need to condition those findings on the selected constraints, and (3 provide additional insights into the effect of selected constraints on the functional effectiveness measures. We present improvements to the method and related statistical models, apply the method to a previously conducted comparison of network regulation in the immune system, and compare our results to those previously reported.

  20. Quantum Effect in a Diode Included Nonlinear Inductance-Capacitance Mesoscopic Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhanyuan; Zhang Xiaohong; Ma Jinying

    2009-01-01

    The mesoscopic nonlinear inductance-capacitance circuit is a typical anharmonic oscillator, due to diodes included in the circuit. In this paper, using the advanced quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits, which based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value, the diode included mesoscopic circuit is firstly studied. Schroedinger equation of the system is a four-order difference equation in p-circumflex representation. Using the extended perturbative method, the detail energy spectrum and wave functions are obtained and verified, as an application of the results, the current quantum fluctuation in the ground state is calculated. Diode is a basis component in a circuit, its quantization would popularize the quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits. The methods to solve the high order difference equation are helpful to the application of mesoscopic quantum theory.

  1. Final Technical Report "Multiscale Simulation Algorithms for Biochemical Systems"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Linda R.

    2012-10-25

    Biochemical systems are inherently multiscale and stochastic. In microscopic systems formed by living cells, the small numbers of reactant molecules can result in dynamical behavior that is discrete and stochastic rather than continuous and deterministic. An analysis tool that respects these dynamical characteristics is the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA, Gillespie, 1976), a numerical simulation procedure that is essentially exact for chemical systems that are spatially homogeneous or well stirred. Despite recent improvements, as a procedure that simulates every reaction event, the SSA is necessarily inefficient for most realistic problems. There are two main reasons for this, both arising from the multiscale nature of the underlying problem: (1) stiffness, i.e. the presence of multiple timescales, the fastest of which are stable; and (2) the need to include in the simulation both species that are present in relatively small quantities and should be modeled by a discrete stochastic process, and species that are present in larger quantities and are more efficiently modeled by a deterministic differential equation (or at some scale in between). This project has focused on the development of fast and adaptive algorithms, and the fun- damental theory upon which they must be based, for the multiscale simulation of biochemical systems. Areas addressed by this project include: (1) Theoretical and practical foundations for ac- celerated discrete stochastic simulation (tau-leaping); (2) Dealing with stiffness (fast reactions) in an efficient and well-justified manner in discrete stochastic simulation; (3) Development of adaptive multiscale algorithms for spatially homogeneous discrete stochastic simulation; (4) Development of high-performance SSA algorithms.

  2. Predictive hypotheses are ineffectual in resolving complex biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Michael

    2018-03-20

    Scientific hypotheses may either predict particular unknown facts or accommodate previously-known data. Although affirmed predictions are intuitively more rewarding than accommodations of established facts, opinions divide whether predictive hypotheses are also epistemically superior to accommodation hypotheses. This paper examines the contribution of predictive hypotheses to discoveries of several bio-molecular systems. Having all the necessary elements of the system known beforehand, an abstract predictive hypothesis of semiconservative mode of DNA replication was successfully affirmed. However, in defining the genetic code whose biochemical basis was unclear, hypotheses were only partially effective and supplementary experimentation was required for its conclusive definition. Markedly, hypotheses were entirely inept in predicting workings of complex systems that included unknown elements. Thus, hypotheses did not predict the existence and function of mRNA, the multiple unidentified components of the protein biosynthesis machinery, or the manifold unknown constituents of the ubiquitin-proteasome system of protein breakdown. Consequently, because of their inability to envision unknown entities, predictive hypotheses did not contribute to the elucidation of cation theories remained the sole instrument to explain complex bio-molecular systems, the philosophical question of alleged advantage of predictive over accommodative hypotheses became inconsequential.

  3. Novel interference effects and a new quantum phase in mesoscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mesoscopic systems have provided an opportunity to study quantum effects beyond the ... tance [2], normal electron persistent currents [3], non-local current and voltage relations .... If both Б½ and Б¾ are positive or flow in the same direction of the potential drop then the ..... Fermi distribution function ¼(¯) = (1 + exp[(¯ - ) М]).

  4. Design of supramolecular ordered systems for mesoscopic colloids and molecular composites. Progress report, November 10, 1993--June 10, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    During this reporting period, the authors group has been active in five areas of research: (1) improvements on their x-ray instrumentation at the SUNY Beamline, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) so that they can perform new experiments which are not accessible otherwise; (2) characterization of functionalized hairy rod polymers designed for studying the macromolecular structures in molecular composites; (3) investigation of supramolecular ordered systems composed mainly of block copolymers from dilute to concentrated solutions, including the gel state; (4) evolution of crystalline structures in polymer blends and melts; and (5) multiphase structure of segment polyurethanes.

  5. Discrete and mesoscopic regimes of finite-size wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, V. S.; Nazarenko, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bounding volume results in discreteness of eigenmodes in wave systems. This leads to a depletion or complete loss of wave resonances (three-wave, four-wave, etc.), which has a strong effect on wave turbulence (WT) i.e., on the statistical behavior of broadband sets of weakly nonlinear waves. This paper describes three different regimes of WT realizable for different levels of the wave excitations: discrete, mesoscopic and kinetic WT. Discrete WT comprises chaotic dynamics of interacting wave 'clusters' consisting of discrete (often finite) number of connected resonant wave triads (or quarters). Kinetic WT refers to the infinite-box theory, described by well-known wave-kinetic equations. Mesoscopic WT is a regime in which either the discrete and the kinetic evolutions alternate or when none of these two types is purely realized. We argue that in mesoscopic systems the wave spectrum experiences a sandpile behavior. Importantly, the mesoscopic regime is realized for a broad range of wave amplitudes which typically spans over several orders on magnitude, and not just for a particular intermediate level.

  6. A second-order, unconditionally positive, mass-conserving integration scheme for biochemical systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); H. Burchard; B. Kooi; B.P. Sommeijer (Ben)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBiochemical systems are bound by two mathematically-relevant restrictions. First, state variables in such systems represent non-negative quantities, such as concentrations of chemical compounds. Second, biochemical systems conserve mass and energy. Both properties must be reflected in

  7. Nonequilibrium steady state and induced currents of a mesoscopically glassy system: interplay of resistor-network theory and Sinai physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, Daniel; Rahav, Saar; Cohen, Doron

    2013-12-01

    We introduce an explicit solution for the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) of a ring that is coupled to a thermal bath, and is driven by an external hot source with log-wide distribution of couplings. Having time scales that stretch over several decades is similar to glassy systems. Consequently there is a wide range of driving intensities where the NESS is like that of a random walker in a biased Brownian landscape. We investigate the resulting statistics of the induced current I. For a single ring we discuss how sign of I fluctuates as the intensity of the driving is increased, while for an ensemble of rings we highlight the fingerprints of Sinai physics on the distribution of the absolute value of I.

  8. Design of a scanning gate microscope for mesoscopic electron systems in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccione, M; Sciambi, A; Bartel, J; Keller, A J; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2013-03-01

    We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design. Using Coulomb blockade thermometry on a GaAs/AlGaAs gate-defined quantum dot, we demonstrate an electron temperature of 45 mK.

  9. Spin dynamics in mesoscopic size magnetic systems: A 1HNMR study in rings of iron (III) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Borsa, F.; Cornia, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two magnetic molecular clusters containing almost coplanar rings of iron (III) ions with spinS=5/2 have been investigated by 1 H NMR and relaxation measurements. The first system, which will be referred to as Fe6, is a molecule of general formula [NaFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 17 O 4 H 15 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - or [NaFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 15 H 11 O 2 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - or [LiFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 15 H 11 O 2 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - while the second type of ring, denoted Fe10, corresponds to the molecule [Fe 10 (OCH 3 ) 20 (C 2 H 2 O 2 Cl) 10 ]. The 1 H NMR linewidth is broadened by the nuclear dipolar interaction and by the dipolar coupling of the protons with the iron (III) paramagnetic moment. It is found that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T 1 -1 , of the proton is a sensitive probe of the Fe spin dynamics. In both clusters, T 1 -1 decreases with decreasing temperatures from room temperature, goes through a peak just below about 30 K in Fe6 and 10 K in Fe10, and it drops exponentially to very small values at helium temperature. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate is discussed in terms of the fluctuations of the local spins within the allowed total spin configurations in the framework of the weak collision theory to describe the nuclear relaxation. We use the calculated energy levels for the Fe6 ring based on a Heisenberg Hamiltonian and the value of J obtained from the fit of the magnetic susceptibility to describe semiquantitatively the behavior of T 1 -1 vs T. The exponential drop of T 1 -1 at low temperature is consistent with a nonmagnetic singlet ground state separated by an energy gap from the first excited triplet state. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Rapid Discrimination Among Putative Mechanistic Models of Biochemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    2016-08-31

    An overarching goal in molecular biology is to gain an understanding of the mechanistic basis underlying biochemical systems. Success is critical if we are to predict effectively the outcome of drug treatments and the development of abnormal phenotypes. However, data from most experimental studies is typically noisy and sparse. This allows multiple potential mechanisms to account for experimental observations, and often devising experiments to test each is not feasible. Here, we introduce a novel strategy that discriminates among putative models based on their repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes, without relying on knowledge of specific values for rate constants and binding constants. As an illustration, we apply this strategy to two synthetic gene circuits exhibiting anomalous behaviors. Our results show that the conventional models, based on their well-characterized components, cannot account for the experimental observations. We examine a total of 40 alternative hypotheses and show that only 5 have the potential to reproduce the experimental data, and one can do so with biologically relevant parameter values.

  11. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coherent-state path integrals, and ... 0 33 K, and ¾. 0 22 K. The -factor of the net spin is very close to ...... Quantum Theory, S. N. Bose Centre, Calcutta, in January 2000. I am grateful ... [19] G Herzberg and H C Longuet-Higgins, Discuss. Faraday ...

  12. Mesoscopic Simulations of Crosslinked Polymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megariotis, Grigorios; Vogiatzis, Georgios G.; Schneider, Ludwig; Müller, Marcus; Theodorou, Doros N.

    2016-08-01

    A new methodology and the corresponding C++ code for mesoscopic simulations of elastomers are presented. The test system, crosslinked ds-1’4-polyisoprene’ is simulated with a Brownian Dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm as a dense liquid of soft, coarse-grained beads, each representing 5-10 Kuhn segments. From the thermodynamic point of view, the system is described by a Helmholtz free-energy containing contributions from entropic springs between successive beads along a chain, slip-springs representing entanglements between beads on different chains, and non-bonded interactions. The methodology is employed for the calculation of the stress relaxation function from simulations of several microseconds at equilibrium, as well as for the prediction of stress-strain curves of crosslinked polymer networks under deformation.

  13. Hierarchical graphs for rule-based modeling of biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rule-based modeling, graphs are used to represent molecules: a colored vertex represents a component of a molecule, a vertex attribute represents the internal state of a component, and an edge represents a bond between components. Components of a molecule share the same color. Furthermore, graph-rewriting rules are used to represent molecular interactions. A rule that specifies addition (removal of an edge represents a class of association (dissociation reactions, and a rule that specifies a change of a vertex attribute represents a class of reactions that affect the internal state of a molecular component. A set of rules comprises an executable model that can be used to determine, through various means, the system-level dynamics of molecular interactions in a biochemical system. Results For purposes of model annotation, we propose the use of hierarchical graphs to represent structural relationships among components and subcomponents of molecules. We illustrate how hierarchical graphs can be used to naturally document the structural organization of the functional components and subcomponents of two proteins: the protein tyrosine kinase Lck and the T cell receptor (TCR complex. We also show that computational methods developed for regular graphs can be applied to hierarchical graphs. In particular, we describe a generalization of Nauty, a graph isomorphism and canonical labeling algorithm. The generalized version of the Nauty procedure, which we call HNauty, can be used to assign canonical labels to hierarchical graphs or more generally to graphs with multiple edge types. The difference between the Nauty and HNauty procedures is minor, but for completeness, we provide an explanation of the entire HNauty algorithm. Conclusions Hierarchical graphs provide more intuitive formal representations of proteins and other structured molecules with multiple functional components than do the regular graphs of current languages for

  14. Systematic parameter inference in stochastic mesoscopic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Li, Zhen [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george_karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method to efficiently determine the optimal coarse-grained force field in mesoscopic stochastic simulations of Newtonian fluid and polymer melt systems modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (eDPD). The response surfaces of various target properties (viscosity, diffusivity, pressure, etc.) with respect to model parameters are constructed based on the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion using simulation results on sampling points (e.g., individual parameter sets). To alleviate the computational cost to evaluate the target properties, we employ the compressive sensing method to compute the coefficients of the dominant gPC terms given the prior knowledge that the coefficients are “sparse”. The proposed method shows comparable accuracy with the standard probabilistic collocation method (PCM) while it imposes a much weaker restriction on the number of the simulation samples especially for systems with high dimensional parametric space. Fully access to the response surfaces within the confidence range enables us to infer the optimal force parameters given the desirable values of target properties at the macroscopic scale. Moreover, it enables us to investigate the intrinsic relationship between the model parameters, identify possible degeneracies in the parameter space, and optimize the model by eliminating model redundancies. The proposed method provides an efficient alternative approach for constructing mesoscopic models by inferring model parameters to recover target properties of the physics systems (e.g., from experimental measurements), where those force field parameters and formulation cannot be derived from the microscopic level in a straight forward way.

  15. From chemical or biochemical microsensors to fast detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistre, J.; Dejous, C.; Rebiere, D.

    2011-01-01

    The market of chemical and biochemical sensors is increasing and represents a large opportunity. The problem of chemical and biochemicaldetection involves the use of one/several transducing layer/interface. Several types of detection exist. Among them, acoustic wave devices present many advantages. The paper deals with surface acoustic waves devices and their implementation. The role and properties of the sensing layer are discussed for chemical sensors and biochemical sensors as well. Examples of realizations are presented taking into account the microfluidic approach.

  16. Mesoscopic effects in the quantum Hall regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . When band mixing between multiple Landau levels is present, mesoscopic effects cause a crossover from a sequence of quantum Hall transitions for weak disorder to classical behavior for strong disorder. This behavior may be of relevance ...

  17. Fibre optic system for biochemical and microbiological sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penwill, L A; Slater, J H; Hayes, N W; Tremlett, C J

    2007-01-01

    This poster will discuss state-of-the-art fibre optic sensors based on evanescent wave technology emphasising chemophotonic sensors for biochemical reactions and microbe detection. Devices based on antibody specificity and unique DNA sequences will be described. The development of simple sensor devices with disposable single use sensor probes will be illustrated with a view to providing cost effective field based or point of care analysis of major themes such as hospital acquired infections or bioterrorism events. This presentation will discuss the nature and detection thresholds required, the optical detection techniques investigated, results of sensor trials and the potential for wider commercial application

  18. Strategy-Driven Exploration for Rule-Based Models of Biochemical Systems with Porgy

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei , Oana; Fernández , Maribel; Kirchner , Hélène; Pinaud , Bruno

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Porgy – an interactive visual environment for rule-based modelling of biochemical systems. We model molecules and molecule interactions as port graphs and port graph rewrite rules, respectively. We use rewriting strategies to control which rules to apply, and where and when to apply them. Our main contributions to rule-based modelling of biochemical systems lie in the strategy language and the associated visual and interactive features offered by Porgy. These features faci...

  19. Many-body effects in the mesoscopic x-ray edge problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Martina; Roeder, Georg; Ullmo, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Many-body phenomena, a key interest in the investigation of bulk solid state systems, are studied here in the context of the x-ray edge problem for mesoscopic systems. We investigate the many-body effects associated with the sudden perturbation following the x-ray exciton of a core electron into the conduction band. For small systems with dimensions at the nanoscale we find considerable deviations from the well-understood metallic case where Anderson orthogonality catastrophe and the Mahan-Nozieres-DeDominicis response cause characteristic deviations of the photoabsorption cross section from the naive expectation. Whereas the K-edge is typically rounded in metallic systems, we find a slightly peaked K-edge in generic mesoscopic systems with chaotic-coherent electron dynamics. Thus the behavior of the photoabsorption cross section at threshold depends on the system size and is different for the metallic and the mesoscopic case. (author)

  20. Statistical physics approaches to subnetwork dynamics in biochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, B.; Sollich, P.

    2017-08-01

    We apply a Gaussian variational approximation to model reduction in large biochemical networks of unary and binary reactions. We focus on a small subset of variables (subnetwork) of interest, e.g. because they are accessible experimentally, embedded in a larger network (bulk). The key goal is to write dynamical equations reduced to the subnetwork but still retaining the effects of the bulk. As a result, the subnetwork-reduced dynamics contains a memory term and an extrinsic noise term with non-trivial temporal correlations. We first derive expressions for this memory and noise in the linearized (Gaussian) dynamics and then use a perturbative power expansion to obtain first order nonlinear corrections. For the case of vanishing intrinsic noise, our description is explicitly shown to be equivalent to projection methods up to quadratic terms, but it is applicable also in the presence of stochastic fluctuations in the original dynamics. An example from the epidermal growth factor receptor signalling pathway is provided to probe the increased prediction accuracy and computational efficiency of our method.

  1. Reachability in Biochemical Dynamical Systems by Quantitative Discrete Approximation (extended abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel computational technique for finite discrete approximation of continuous dynamical systems suitable for a significant class of biochemical dynamical systems is introduced. The method is parameterized in order to affect the imposed level of approximation provided that with increasing parameter value the approximation converges to the original continuous system. By employing this approximation technique, we present algorithms solving the reachability problem for biochemical dynamical systems. The presented method and algorithms are evaluated on several exemplary biological models and on a real case study.

  2. Vortex properties of mesoscopic superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Leonardo R.E. [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Barba-Ortega, J. [Grupo de Fi' sica de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Souza Silva, C.C. de [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J., E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.b [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we investigated theoretically the vortex properties of mesoscopic samples of different geometries, submitted to an external magnetic field. We use both London and Ginzburg-Landau theories and also solve the non-linear Time Dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to obtain vortex configurations, equilibrium states and the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density in a mesoscopic superconducting triangle and long prisms with square cross-section. For a mesoscopic triangle with the magnetic field applied perpendicularly to sample plane the vortex configurations were obtained by using Langevin dynamics simulations. In most of the configurations the vortices sit close to the corners, presenting twofold or three-fold symmetry. A study of different meta-stable configurations with same number of vortices is also presented. Next, by taking into account de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length, b, we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting square surrounded by different metallic materials and in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the square surface. It is determined the b-limit for the occurrence of a single vortex in a mesoscopic square of area d{sup 2}, for 4{xi}(0){<=}d{<=}10{xi}(0).

  3. Analogue Between Dynamic Hamiltonian-Operators of a Mesoscopic Ring Carrying Persistent Current and a Josephson Junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Hongyi; Wang Jisuo

    2006-01-01

    By making the analogy between the operator Hamiltonians of a mesoscopic ring carrying the persistent current and a Josephson junction we have introduced a phase operator and entangled state representation to establish a theoretical formalism for the ring system.

  4. Mesoscopic fluctuations and intermittency in aging dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mesoscopic aging systems are characterized by large intermittent noise fluctuations. In a record dynamics scenario (Sibani P. and Dall J., Europhys. Lett., 64 (2003) 8) these events, quakes, are treated as a Poisson process with average αln (1 + t/tw), where t is the observation time, tw is the age and α is a parameter. Assuming for simplicity that quakes constitute the only source of de-correlation, we present a model for the probability density function (PDF) of the configuration autocorrelation function. Beside α, the model has the average quake size 1/q as a parameter. The model autocorrelation PDF has a Gumbel-like shape, which approaches a Gaussian for large t/tw and becomes sharply peaked in the thermodynamic limit. Its average and variance, which are given analytically, depend on t/tw as a power law and a power law with a logarithmic correction, respectively. Most predictions are in good agreement with data from the literature and with the simulations of the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass carried out as a test.

  5. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  6. CADLIVE toolbox for MATLAB: automatic dynamic modeling of biochemical networks with comprehensive system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kentaro; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Miyabe, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Yu; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling has become a standard technique to understand the dynamics of complex biochemical systems. To promote the modeling, we had developed the CADLIVE dynamic simulator that automatically converted a biochemical map into its associated mathematical model, simulated its dynamic behaviors and analyzed its robustness. To enhance the feasibility by CADLIVE and extend its functions, we propose the CADLIVE toolbox available for MATLAB, which implements not only the existing functions of the CADLIVE dynamic simulator, but also the latest tools including global parameter search methods with robustness analysis. The seamless, bottom-up processes consisting of biochemical network construction, automatic construction of its dynamic model, simulation, optimization, and S-system analysis greatly facilitate dynamic modeling, contributing to the research of systems biology and synthetic biology. This application can be freely downloaded from http://www.cadlive.jp/CADLIVE_MATLAB/ together with an instruction.

  7. Integration of electrochemistry in micro-total analysis systems for biochemical assays: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Song; Chen, Hui; Kong, Jilie

    2009-11-15

    Micro-total analysis systems (microTAS) integrate different analytical operations like sample preparation, separation and detection into a single microfabricated device. With the outstanding advantages of low cost, satisfactory analytical efficiency and flexibility in design, highly integrated and miniaturized devices from the concept of microTAS have gained widespread applications, especially in biochemical assays. Electrochemistry is shown to be quite compatible with microanalytical systems for biochemical assays, because of its attractive merits such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, reduced power consumption, and sample/reagent economy. This review presents recent developments in the integration of electrochemistry in microdevices for biochemical assays. Ingenious microelectrode design and fabrication methods, and versatility of electrochemical techniques are involved. Practical applications of such integrated microsystem in biochemical assays are focused on in situ analysis, point-of-care testing and portable devices. Electrochemical techniques are apparently suited to microsystems, since easy microfabrication of electrochemical elements and a high degree of integration with multi-analytical functions can be achieved at low cost. Such integrated microsystems will play an increasingly important role for analysis of small volume biochemical samples. Work is in progress toward new microdevice design and applications.

  8. Graphene Foam: Uniaxial Tension Behavior and Fracture Mode Based on a Mesoscopic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Douxing; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tzu-Chiang; Yao, Yugui

    2017-09-26

    Because of the combined advantages of both porous materials and two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheets, superior mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams have received much attention from material scientists and energy engineers. Here, a 2D mesoscopic graphene model (Modell. Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 2011, 19, 054003), was expanded into a 3D bonded graphene foam system by utilizing physical cross-links and van der Waals forces acting among different mesoscopic graphene flakes by considering the debonding behavior, to evaluate the uniaxial tension behavior and fracture mode based on in situ SEM tensile testing (Carbon 2015, 85, 299). We reasonably reproduced a multipeak stress-strain relationship including its obvious yielding plateau and a ductile fracture mode near 45° plane from the tensile direction including the corresponding fracture morphology. Then, a power scaling law of tensile elastic modulus with mass density and an anisotropic strain-dependent Poisson's ratio were both deduced. The mesoscopic physical mechanism of tensile deformation was clearly revealed through the local stress state and evolution of mesostructure. The fracture feature of bonded graphene foam and its thermodynamic state were directly navigated to the tearing pattern of mesoscopic graphene flakes. This study provides an effective way to understand the mesoscopic physical nature of 3D graphene foams, and hence it may contribute to the multiscale computations of micro/meso/macromechanical performances and optimal design of advanced graphene-foam-based materials.

  9. Nonequilibrium Enhances Adaptation Efficiency of Stochastic Biochemical Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jia

    Full Text Available Adaptation is a crucial biological function possessed by many sensory systems. Early work has shown that some influential equilibrium models can achieve accurate adaptation. However, recent studies indicate that there are close relationships between adaptation and nonequilibrium. In this paper, we provide an explanation of these two seemingly contradictory results based on Markov models with relatively simple networks. We show that as the nonequilibrium driving becomes stronger, the system under consideration will undergo a phase transition along a fixed direction: from non-adaptation to simple adaptation then to oscillatory adaptation, while the transition in the opposite direction is forbidden. This indicates that although adaptation may be observed in equilibrium systems, it tends to occur in systems far away from equilibrium. In addition, we find that nonequilibrium will improve the performance of adaptation by enhancing the adaptation efficiency. All these results provide a deeper insight into the connection between adaptation and nonequilibrium. Finally, we use a more complicated network model of bacterial chemotaxis to validate the main results of this paper.

  10. Biochemical Space: A Framework for Systemic Annotation of Biological Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klement, M.; Děd, T.; Šafránek, D.; Červený, Jan; Müller, Stefan; Steuer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, JUL (2014), s. 31-44 ISSN 1571-0661 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : biological models * model annotation * systems biology * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  11. Biochemical systems approaches for the analysis of histone modification readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldi, Monica; Bremang, Michael; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2014-08-01

    Chromatin is the macromolecular nucleoprotein complex that governs the organization of genetic material in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. In chromatin, DNA is packed with histone proteins into nucleosomes. Core histones are prototypes of hyper-modified proteins, being decorated by a large number of site-specific reversible and irreversible post-translational modifications (PTMs), which contribute to the maintenance and modulation of chromatin plasticity, gene activation, and a variety of other biological processes and disease states. The observations of the variety, frequency and co-occurrence of histone modifications in distinct patterns at specific genomic loci have led to the idea that hPTMs can create a molecular barcode, read by effector proteins that translate it into a specific transcriptional state, or process, on the underlying DNA. However, despite the fact that this histone-code hypothesis was proposed more than 10 years ago, the molecular details of its working mechanisms are only partially characterized. In particular, two questions deserve specific investigation: how the different modifications associate and synergize into patterns and how these PTM configurations are read and translated by multi-protein complexes into a specific functional outcome on the genome. Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a versatile tool to investigate chromatin biology, useful for both identifying and validating hPTMs, and to dissect the molecular determinants of histone modification readout systems. We review here the MS techniques and the proteomics methods that have been developed to address these fundamental questions in epigenetics research, emphasizing approaches based on the proteomic dissection of distinct native chromatin regions, with a critical evaluation of their present challenges and future potential. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesoscopic spin Hall effect in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Liviu

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) is a name given to a collection of diverse phenomena which share two principal features: (i) longitudinal electric current flowing through a paramagnetic semiconductor or metallic sample leads to transverse spin current and spin accumulation of opposite sign at opposing lateral edges; (ii) SHE does not require externally applied magnetic field or magnetic ordering in the equilibrium state of the sample, instead it relies on the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings within the sample. This thesis elaborates on a new type of phenomenon within the SHE family, predicted in our recent studies [Phys. Rev. B 72, 075361 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 046601 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 72, 075335 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 73 , 075303 (2006); and Europhys. Lett. 77, 47004 (2007)], where pure spin current flows through the transverse electrodes attached to a clean finitesize two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) due to unpolarized charge current injected through its longitudinal leads. If transverse leads are removed, the effect manifests as nonequilibrium spin Hall accumulation at the lateral edges of 2DEG wires. The SO coupling driving this SHE effect is of the Rashba type, which arises due to structural inversion asymmetry of semiconductor heterostructure hosting the 2DEG. We term the effect "mesoscopic" because the spin Hall currents and accumulations reach optimal value in samples of the size of the spin precession length---the distance over which the spin of an electron precesses by an angle pi. In strongly SO-coupled structures this scale is of the order of ˜100 nm, and, therefore, mesoscopic in the sense of being much larger than the characteristic microscopic scales (such as the Fermi wavelength, screening length, or the mean free path in disordered systems), but still much smaller than the macroscopic ones. Although the first theoretical proposal for SHE, driven by asymmetry in SO-dependent scattering of spin-up and spin-down electrons off impurities

  13. BISEN: Biochemical simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F.; Vinnakota, K.C.; Han, Y.; Dash, R.K.; Yang, F.; Beard, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for

  14. Computing molecular fluctuations in biochemical reaction systems based on a mechanistic, statistical theory of irreversible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasiri, Don

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the quantification of molecular fluctuations in the biochemical reaction systems within the context of intracellular processes associated with gene expression. We take the molecular reactions pertaining to circadian rhythms to develop models of molecular fluctuations in this chapter. There are a significant number of studies on stochastic fluctuations in intracellular genetic regulatory networks based on single cell-level experiments. In order to understand the fluctuations associated with the gene expression in circadian rhythm networks, it is important to model the interactions of transcriptional factors with the E-boxes in the promoter regions of some of the genes. The pertinent aspects of a near-equilibrium theory that would integrate the thermodynamical and particle dynamic characteristics of intracellular molecular fluctuations would be discussed, and the theory is extended by using the theory of stochastic differential equations. We then model the fluctuations associated with the promoter regions using general mathematical settings. We implemented ubiquitous Gillespie's algorithms, which are used to simulate stochasticity in biochemical networks, for each of the motifs. Both the theory and the Gillespie's algorithms gave the same results in terms of the time evolution of means and variances of molecular numbers. As biochemical reactions occur far away from equilibrium-hence the use of the Gillespie algorithm-these results suggest that the near-equilibrium theory should be a good approximation for some of the biochemical reactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    for the spontaneous emission of mesoscopic quantum emitters is developed. The light-matter interaction is in this model modied beyond the dipole expectancy and found to both suppress and enhance the coupling to plasmonic modes in excellent agreement with our measurements. We demonstrate that this mesoscopic effect......This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... to allow for e- cient plasmon-based single-photon sources. Theoretical studies of coupling and propagation properties of plasmonic waveguides reveal that a high-refractive index of the medium surrounding the emitter, e.g. nGaAs = 3.5, limits the realizability of ecient plasmon-based single-photon sources...

  16. Entanglement in mesoscopic structures: Role of projection

    OpenAIRE

    Beenakker, C.W.J.; Lebedev, A.V.; Blatter, G.; Lesovik, G.B.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the appearance of entanglement in non-interacting mesoscopic structures. Our setup involves two oppositely polarized sources injecting electrons of opposite spin into the two incoming leads. The mixing of these polarized streams in an ideal four-channel beam splitter produces two outgoing streams with particular tunable correlations. A Bell inequality test involving cross-correlated spin-currents in opposite leads signals the presence of spin-entanglement ...

  17. Design of experiments for identification of complex biochemical systems with applications to mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Beard, Daniel A; Dash, Ranjan K

    2009-01-01

    Identification of a complex biochemical system model requires appropriate experimental data. Models constructed on the basis of data from the literature often contain parameters that are not identifiable with high sensitivity and therefore require additional experimental data to identify those parameters. Here we report the application of a local sensitivity analysis to design experiments that will improve the identifiability of previously unidentifiable model parameters in a model of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and tricaboxylic acid cycle. Experiments were designed based on measurable biochemical reactants in a dilute suspension of purified cardiac mitochondria with experimentally feasible perturbations to this system. Experimental perturbations and variables yielding the most number of parameters above a 5% sensitivity level are presented and discussed.

  18. pH measurements of FET-based (bio)chemical sensors using portable measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhivska, T; Zorgiebel, F; Suthau, E; Wolter, K-J; Bock, K; Cuniberti, G

    2015-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the sensing capabilities of a portable multiplex measurement system for FET-based (bio)chemical sensors with an integrated microfluidic interface. We therefore conducted pH measurements with Silicon Nanoribbon FET-based Sensors using different measurement procedures that are suitable for various applications. We have shown multiplexed measurements in aqueous medium for three different modes that are mutually specialized in fast data acquisition (constant drain current), calibration-less sensing (constant gate voltage) and in providing full information content (sweeping mode). Our system therefore allows surface charge sensing for a wide range of applications and is easily adaptable for multiplexed sensing with novel FET-based (bio)chemical sensors.

  19. Spontaneous and persistent currents in superconductive and mesoscopic structures (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, I. O.

    2004-07-01

    We briefly review aspects of superconductive persistent currents in Josephson junctions of the S/I/S, S/O/S and S/N/S types, focusing on the origin of jumps in the current versus phase dependences, and discuss in more detail the persistent and the "spontaneous" currents in Aharonov-Bohm mesoscopic and nanoscopic (macromolecular) structures. A fixed-number-of-electrons mesoscopic or macromolecular conducting ring is shown to be unstable against structural transformation removing spatial symmetry (in particular, azimuthal periodicity) of its electron-lattice Hamiltonian. In the case when the transformation is blocked by strong coupling to an external azimuthally symmetric environment, the system becomes bistable in its electronic configuration at a certain number of electrons. Under such a condition, the persistent current has a nonzero value even at an (almost) zero applied Aharonov-Bohm flux and results in very high magnetic susceptibility dM/dH at small nonzero fields, followed by an oscillatory dependence at larger fields. We tentatively assume that previously observed oscillatory magnetization in cyclic metallo-organic molecules by Gatteschi et al. can be attributed to persistent currents. If this proves correct, it may present an opportunity for (and, more generally, macromolecular cyclic structures may suggest the possibility of) engineering quantum computational tools based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect in ballistic nanostructures and macromolecular cyclic aggregates.

  20. Coherent current states in mesoscopic four-terminal Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareyan, M.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    A theory is offered for the ballistic 4-terminal Josephson junction. The studied system consist of a mesoscopic two-dimensional normal rectangular layer which is attached on each side to the bulk superconducting banks (terminals). A relation is obtained between the currents through the different terminals, that is valid for arbitrary temperatures and junction sizes. The nonlocal coupling of the supercurrent leads to a new effect, specific for the mesoscopic weak link between two superconducting rings; an applied magnetic flux through one of the rings produces a magnetic flux in the other ring even in the absence of an external flux through the other one. The phase dependent distributions of the local density of Andreev states, of the supercurrents and of the induced order parameter are obtained. The 'interference pattern' for the anomalous average inside the two-dimensional region cam be regulated by the applied magnetic fluxes or the transport currents. For some values of the phase differences between the terminals, the current vortex state and two-dimensional phase slip center appear

  1. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Lozano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks substrates obtained from actual relational data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that cannot be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We claim that the result can be understood at the mesoscopic scale, by studying the community structure of the networks. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. We then test our results on community-structured, specifically designed artificial networks, finding a good agreement with the observations in both real substrates. CONCLUSION: Our results support the conclusion that studies of evolutionary games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. Further, the study allows us to define new quantitative parameters that summarize the mesoscopic structure of any network. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavior.

  2. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, S.; Arenas, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks substrates obtained from actual relational data. We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that cannot be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We claim that the result can be understood at the mesoscopic scale, by studying the community structure of the networks. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. We then test our results on community-structured, specifically designed artificial networks, finding a good agreement with the observations in both real substrates. Our results support the conclusion that studies of evolutionary games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. Further, the study allows us to define new quantitative parameters that summarize the mesoscopic structure of any network. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavior.

  3. Fabrication methods for mesoscopic flying vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yih-Lin

    2001-10-01

    Small-scale flying vehicles are attractive tools for atmospheric science research. A centimeter-size mesoscopic electric helicopter, the mesicopter, has been developed at Stanford University for these applications. The mesoscopic scale implies a design with critical features between tens of microns and several millimeters. Three major parts in the mesicopter are challenging to manufacture. Rotors require smooth 3D surfaces and a blade thickness of less than 100 mum. Components in the DC micro-motor must be made of engineering materials, which is difficult on the mesoscopic scale. Airframe fabrication has to integrate complex 3D geometry into one single structure at this scale. In this research, material selection and manufacturing approaches have been investigated and implemented. In rotor fabrication, high-strength polymers manufactured by the Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) technique were the top choice. Aluminum alloys were only considered as the second choice because the fabrication process is more involved. Lift tests showed that the 4-blade polymer and aluminum rotors could deliver about 90% of the expected lift (4g). To explain the rotor performance, structural analyses of spinning rotors were performed and the fabricated geometry was investigated. The bending deflections and the torsional twists were found to be too small to degrade aerodynamic performance. The rotor geometry was verified by laser scanning and by cross-section observations. Commercially available motors are used in the prototypes but a smaller DC micro-motor was designed for future use. Components of the DC micro-motors were fabricated by the Mesoscopic Additive/Subtractive Material Processing technique, which is capable of shaping engineering materials on the mesoscopic scale. The approaches are described in this thesis. The airframe was manufactured using the SDM process, which is capable of building complex parts without assembly. Castable polymers were chosen and mixed with glass

  4. A comparison of approximation techniques for variance-based sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for the analysis of complex systems. In a recent paper, we have introduced a thermodynamically consistent variance-based sensitivity analysis approach for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems under uncertainty in the standard chemical potentials of the activated complexes of the reactions and the standard chemical potentials of the molecular species. In that approach, key sensitivity indices were estimated by Monte Carlo sampling, which is computationally very demanding and impractical for large biochemical reaction systems. Computationally efficient algorithms are needed to make variance-based sensitivity analysis applicable to realistic cellular networks, modeled by biochemical reaction systems that consist of a large number of reactions and molecular species. Results We present four techniques, derivative approximation (DA, polynomial approximation (PA, Gauss-Hermite integration (GHI, and orthonormal Hermite approximation (OHA, for analytically approximating the variance-based sensitivity indices associated with a biochemical reaction system. By using a well-known model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade as a case study, we numerically compare the approximation quality of these techniques against traditional Monte Carlo sampling. Our results indicate that, although DA is computationally the most attractive technique, special care should be exercised when using it for sensitivity analysis, since it may only be accurate at low levels of uncertainty. On the other hand, PA, GHI, and OHA are computationally more demanding than DA but can work well at high levels of uncertainty. GHI results in a slightly better accuracy than PA, but it is more difficult to implement. OHA produces the most accurate approximation results and can be implemented in a straightforward manner. It turns out that the computational cost of the

  5. Meta-stochastic simulation of biochemical models for systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanassy, Daven; Widera, Paweł; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2015-01-16

    Stochastic simulation algorithms (SSAs) are used to trace realistic trajectories of biochemical systems at low species concentrations. As the complexity of modeled biosystems increases, it is important to select the best performing SSA. Numerous improvements to SSAs have been introduced but they each only tend to apply to a certain class of models. This makes it difficult for a systems or synthetic biologist to decide which algorithm to employ when confronted with a new model that requires simulation. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to determine which algorithm is best suited to simulate a particular model and that this can be predicted a priori to algorithm execution. We present a Web based tool ssapredict that allows scientists to upload a biochemical model and obtain a prediction of the best performing SSA. Furthermore, ssapredict gives the user the option to download our high performance simulator ngss preconfigured to perform the simulation of the queried biochemical model with the predicted fastest algorithm as the simulation engine. The ssapredict Web application is available at http://ssapredict.ico2s.org. It is free software and its source code is distributed under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License.

  6. Biochemical systems identification by a random drift particle swarm optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding an efficient method to solve the parameter estimation problem (inverse problem) for nonlinear biochemical dynamical systems could help promote the functional understanding at the system level for signalling pathways. The problem is stated as a data-driven nonlinear regression problem, which is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with many nonlinear differential and algebraic constraints. Due to the typical ill conditioning and multimodality nature of the problem, it is in general difficult for gradient-based local optimization methods to obtain satisfactory solutions. To surmount this limitation, many stochastic optimization methods have been employed to find the global solution of the problem. Results This paper presents an effective search strategy for a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm that enhances the ability of the algorithm for estimating the parameters of complex dynamic biochemical pathways. The proposed algorithm is a new variant of random drift particle swarm optimization (RDPSO), which is used to solve the above mentioned inverse problem and compared with other well known stochastic optimization methods. Two case studies on estimating the parameters of two nonlinear biochemical dynamic models have been taken as benchmarks, under both the noise-free and noisy simulation data scenarios. Conclusions The experimental results show that the novel variant of RDPSO algorithm is able to successfully solve the problem and obtain solutions of better quality than other global optimization methods used for finding the solution to the inverse problems in this study. PMID:25078435

  7. Ginzburg–Landau theory of mesoscopic multi-band Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeo, F.; De Luca, R., E-mail: rdeluca@unisa.it

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We generalize, in the realm of the Ginzburg–Landau theory, the de Gennes matching-matrix method for the interface order parameters to describe the superconducting properties of multi-band mesoscopic Josephson junctions. • The results are in agreement with a microscopic treatment of nanobridge junctions. • Thermal stability of the nanobridge junction is discussed in connection with recent experiments on iron-based grain-boundary junctions. - Abstract: A Ginzburg–Landau theory for multi-band mesoscopic Josephson junctions has been developed. The theory, obtained by generalizing the de Gennes matching-matrix method for the interface order parameters, allows the study of the phase dynamics of various types of mesoscopic Josephson junctions. As a relevant application, we studied mesoscopic double-band junctions also in the presence of a superconducting nanobridge interstitial layer. The results are in agreement with a microscopic treatment of the same system. Furthermore, thermal stability of the nanobridge junction is discussed in connection with recent experiments on iron-based grain-boundary junctions.

  8. Efficient simulation of intrinsic, extrinsic and external noise in biochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischel, Dennis; Sundmacher, Kai; Flassig, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Biological cells operate in a noisy regime influenced by intrinsic, extrinsic and external noise, which leads to large differences of individual cell states. Stochastic effects must be taken into account to characterize biochemical kinetics accurately. Since the exact solution of the chemical master equation, which governs the underlying stochastic process, cannot be derived for most biochemical systems, approximate methods are used to obtain a solution. Results: In this study, a method to efficiently simulate the various sources of noise simultaneously is proposed and benchmarked on several examples. The method relies on the combination of the sigma point approach to describe extrinsic and external variability and the τ-leaping algorithm to account for the stochasticity due to probabilistic reactions. The comparison of our method to extensive Monte Carlo calculations demonstrates an immense computational advantage while losing an acceptable amount of accuracy. Additionally, the application to parameter optimization problems in stochastic biochemical reaction networks is shown, which is rarely applied due to its huge computational burden. To give further insight, a MATLAB script is provided including the proposed method applied to a simple toy example of gene expression. Availability and implementation: MATLAB code is available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: flassig@mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:28881987

  9. Specification, construction, and exact reduction of state transition system models of biochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugenhagen, Scott M; Beard, Daniel A

    2012-10-21

    Biochemical reaction systems may be viewed as discrete event processes characterized by a number of states and state transitions. These systems may be modeled as state transition systems with transitions representing individual reaction events. Since they often involve a large number of interactions, it can be difficult to construct such a model for a system, and since the resulting state-level model can involve a huge number of states, model analysis can be difficult or impossible. Here, we describe methods for the high-level specification of a system using hypergraphs, for the automated generation of a state-level model from a high-level model, and for the exact reduction of a state-level model using information from the high-level model. Exact reduction is achieved through the automated application to the high-level model of the symmetry reduction technique and reduction by decomposition by independent subsystems, allowing potentially significant reductions without the need to generate a full model. The application of the method to biochemical reaction systems is illustrated by models describing a hypothetical ion-channel at several levels of complexity. The method allows for the reduction of the otherwise intractable example models to a manageable size.

  10. Synthesizing Configurable Biochemical Implementation of Linear Systems from Their Transfer Function Specifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Yin Chiu

    Full Text Available The ability to engineer synthetic systems in the biochemical context is constantly being improved and has a profound societal impact. Linear system design is one of the most pervasive methods applied in control tasks, and its biochemical realization has been proposed by Oishi and Klavins and advanced further in recent years. However, several technical issues remain unsolved. Specifically, the design process is not fully automated from specification at the transfer function level, systems once designed often lack dynamic adaptivity to environmental changes, matching rate constants of reactions is not always possible, and implementation may be approximative and greatly deviate from the specifications. Building upon the work of Oishi and Klavins, this paper overcomes these issues by introducing a design flow that transforms a transfer-function specification of a linear system into a set of chemical reactions, whose input-output response precisely conforms to the specification. This system is implementable using the DNA strand displacement technique. The underlying configurability is embedded into primitive components and template modules, and thus the entire system is adaptive. Simulation of DNA strand displacement implementation confirmed the feasibility and superiority of the proposed synthesis flow.

  11. Soil Biochemical Changes Induced by Poultry Litter Application and Conservation Tillage under Cotton Production Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri Sajjala

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Problems arising from conventional tillage (CT systems (such as soil erosion, decrease of organic matter, environmental damage etc. have led many farmers to the adoption of no-till (NT systems that are more effective in improving soil physical, chemical and microbial properties. Results from this study clearly indicated that NT, mulch tillage (MT, and winter rye cover cropping systems increased the activity of phosphatase, β-glucosidase and arylsulfatase at a 0–10 cm soil depth but decreased the activity of these enzymes at 10–20 cm. The increase in enzyme activity was a good indicator of intensive soil microbial activity in different soil management practices. Poultry litter (PL application under NT, MT, and rye cropping system could be considered as effective management practices due to the improvement in carbon (C content and the biochemical quality at the soil surface. The activities of the studied enzymes were highly correlated with soil total nitrogen (STN soil organic carbon (SOC at the 0–10 cm soil depth, except for acid phosphatase where no correlation was observed. This study revealed that agricultural practices such as tillage, PL, and cover crop cropping system have a noticeable positive effect on soil biochemical activities under cotton production.

  12. Quantum gambling using mesoscopic ring qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakula, Ireneusz

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Game Theory provides us with new tools for practising games and some other risk related enterprices like, for example, gambling. The two party gambling protocol presented by Goldenberg et al. is one of the simplest yet still hard to implementapplications of Quantum Game Theory. We propose potential physical realisation of the quantum gambling protocol with use of three mesoscopic ring qubits. We point out problems in implementation of such game. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Quantum gambling using mesoscopic ring qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakula, Ireneusz [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    Quantum Game Theory provides us with new tools for practising games and some other risk related enterprices like, for example, gambling. The two party gambling protocol presented by Goldenberg et al. is one of the simplest yet still hard to implementapplications of Quantum Game Theory. We propose potential physical realisation of the quantum gambling protocol with use of three mesoscopic ring qubits. We point out problems in implementation of such game. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Interactions between electrons, mesoscopic Josephson effect and asymmetric current fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, B.

    2006-07-01

    This article discusses three experiments on the properties of electronic transport at the mesoscopic scale. The first one allowed to measure the energy exchange rate between electrons in a metal contaminated by a very weak concentration of magnetic impurities. The role played by magnetic impurities in the Kondo regime on those energy exchanges is quantitatively investigated, and the global measured exchange rate is larger than expected. The second experiment is a measurement of the current-phase relation in a system made of two superconductors linked through a single atom. We thus provide quantitative support for the recent description of the mesoscopic Josephson effect. The last experiment is a measurement of the asymmetry of the current fluctuations in a mesoscopic conductor, using a Josephson junction as a threshold detector. Cet ouvrage décrit trois expériences portant sur les propriétés du transport électronique à l'échelle mésoscopique. La première a permis de mesurer le taux d'échange d'énergie entre électrons dans un métal contenant une très faible concentration d'impuretés magnétiques. Nous avons validé la description quantitative du rôle des impuretés magnétiques dans le régime Kondo sur ces échanges énergétiques et aussi montré que le taux global d'échange est plus fort que prévu. La seconde expérience est une mesure de la relation courant-phase dans un système constitué de deux supraconducteurs couplés par un seul atome. Elle nous a permis de conforter quantitativement la récente description de l'effet Josephson mésoscopique. La dernière expérience est unemesure de l'asymétrie des fluctuations du courant dans un conducteur mésoscopique en utilisant une Jonction Josephson comme détecteur de seuil.

  15. Size and field effect on mesoscopic spin glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, K. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@az.appi.keio.ac.jp; Maki, H. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Taniyama, T. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sato, T. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Spin glass particles were prepared as the mesoscopic system in order to examine the space scale of spin glass domain (droplet). The peak temperature T {sub peak} in the temperature-dependent magnetization is systematically reduced with decreasing average particle size. This is due to the imitation of droplet growth to the particle diameter. The magnetic field H also decreases T {sub peak}, which is caused by the reduction of the barrier height by Zeeman energy. However, there appears different tendency in the relation between H and T {sub peak} below 100 Oe. This indicates the existence of crossover between the two regimes in which the free energy and Zeeman energy govern the droplet excitation.

  16. Manipulating mesoscopic multipartite entanglement with atom-light interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasinska, J.; Rodo, C.; Paganelli, S.; Birkl, G.; Sanpera, A.

    2009-01-01

    Entanglement between two macroscopic atomic ensembles induced by measurement on an ancillary light system has proven to be a powerful method for engineering quantum memories and quantum state transfer. Here we investigate the feasibility of such methods for generation, manipulation, and detection of genuine multipartite entanglement (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and clusterlike states) between mesoscopic atomic ensembles without the need of individual addressing of the samples. Our results extend in a nontrivial way the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between two macroscopic gas samples reported experimentally in [B. Julsgaard, A. Kozhekin, and E. Polzik, Nature (London) 413, 400 (2001)]. We find that under realistic conditions, a second orthogonal light pulse interacting with the atomic samples, can modify and even reverse the entangling action of the first one leaving the samples in a separable state.

  17. Mesoscopic scale thermal fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, C.; Fissolo, A.; Fivel, M.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand damage accumulation mechanisms in thermal fatigue, dislocation substructures forming in 316L steel during one specific test were examined and simulated. Hence, thin foils taken out of massive, tested specimens were first observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These observations help in determining one initial dislocation configuration to be implemented in a 3-D model combining 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulation (DDD) and finite element method computations (FEM). It was found that the simulated mechanical behaviour of the DDD microstructure is compatible with FEM and experimental data. The numerically generated dislocation microstructure is similar to ladder-like dislocation arrangements as found in many fatigued f.c.c. materials. Distinct mechanical behaviour for the two active slip systems was shown and deformation mechanisms were proposed. (authors)

  18. Mesoscopic scale thermal fatigue damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, C.; Fissolo, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire, DMN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Fivel, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS-GPM2, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2001-07-01

    In an attempt to better understand damage accumulation mechanisms in thermal fatigue, dislocation substructures forming in 316L steel during one specific test were examined and simulated. Hence, thin foils taken out of massive, tested specimens were first observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These observations help in determining one initial dislocation configuration to be implemented in a 3-D model combining 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulation (DDD) and finite element method computations (FEM). It was found that the simulated mechanical behaviour of the DDD microstructure is compatible with FEM and experimental data. The numerically generated dislocation microstructure is similar to ladder-like dislocation arrangements as found in many fatigued f.c.c. materials. Distinct mechanical behaviour for the two active slip systems was shown and deformation mechanisms were proposed. (authors)

  19. Influence of Fasciola Hepatica on Serum Biochemical Parameters and Vascular and Biliary System of Sheep Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hodžić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional capacity of the liver based on the activity of specific enzymes and bilirubin in serum and also to investigate the influence of mechanical and toxic effects of Fasciola hepatica on the structures of the blood vessels and biliary tract in the sheep liver.Methods: Blood samples and liver of 63 indigenous sheep of Pramenka breed, slaughtered in the period from March to December 2009 were used. Based on parasitological findings in the liver, all animals were divided into two groups: control (n=34 and infected group (n=29. For investigation and description of pathological changes in sheep liver, naturally infected with F. hepatica, corrosion cast technique was used.Results: Biochemical analysis of tested parameters showed a significant elevation (P≤0.05 of serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, total bilirubin (TBIL and direct bilirubin (DBIL in infected sheep group comparing with the control group. No significant differences were observed for activity of aspartate aminotranferase (AST between groups. Vascular and biliary systems of the liver were found to be affected.Conclusion: Results of biochemical analysis are consistent with pathological findings and measuring of tested parameters could be used in early diagnosis of sheep fasciolosis and to test the effectiveness of anthelmintic therapy. Corrosion cast technique is very useful for investigation of pathological changes and neoangiogenesis of vascular and biliary system in sheep liver, caused by mechanical and toxic effects of F. hepatica.

  20. Recent advances in sensitized mesoscopic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grätzel, Michael

    2009-11-17

    Perhaps the largest challenge for our global society is to find ways to replace the slowly but inevitably vanishing fossil fuel supplies by renewable resources and, at the same time, avoid negative effects from the current energy system on climate, environment, and health. The quality of human life to a large degree depends upon the availability of clean energy sources. The worldwide power consumption is expected to double in the next 3 decades because of the increase in world population and the rising demand of energy in the developing countries. This implies enhanced depletion of fossil fuel reserves, leading to further aggravation of the environmental pollution. As a consequence of dwindling resources, a huge power supply gap of 14 terawatts is expected to open up by year 2050 equaling today's entire consumption, thus threatening to create a planetary emergency of gigantic dimensions. Solar energy is expected to play a crucial role as a future energy source. The sun provides about 120,000 terawatts to the earth's surface, which amounts to 6000 times the present rate of the world's energy consumption. However, capturing solar energy and converting it to electricity or chemical fuels, such as hydrogen, at low cost and using abundantly available raw materials remains a huge challenge. Chemistry is expected to make pivotal contributions to identify environmentally friendly solutions to this energy problem. One area of great promise is that of solar converters generally referred to as "organic photovoltaic cells" (OPV) that employ organic constituents for light harvesting or charge carrier transport. While this field is still in its infancy, it is receiving enormous research attention, with the number of publications growing exponentially over the past decade. The advantage of this new generation of solar cells is that they can be produced at low cost, i.e., potentially less than 1 U.S. $/peak watt. Some but not all OPV embodiments can avoid the expensive and energy

  1. Signatures of topological phase transitions in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pientka, Falko; Romito, Alessandro; Duckheim, Mathias; Oppen, Felix von; Oreg, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    We investigate Josephson currents in mesoscopic rings with a weak link which are in or near a topological superconducting phase. As a paradigmatic example, we consider the Kitaev model of a spinless p-wave superconductor in one dimension, emphasizing how this model emerges from more realistic settings based on semiconductor nanowires. We show that the flux periodicity of the Josephson current provides signatures of the topological phase transition and the emergence of Majorana fermions (MF) situated on both sides of the weak link even when fermion parity is not a good quantum number. In large rings, the MF hybridize only across the weak link. In this case, the Josephson current is h/e periodic in the flux threading the loop when fermion parity is a good quantum number but reverts to the more conventional h/2e periodicity in the presence of fermion-parity changing relaxation processes. In mesoscopic rings, the MF also hybridize through their overlap in the interior of the superconducting ring. We find that in the topological superconducting phase, this gives rise to an h/e-periodic contribution even when fermion parity is not conserved and that this contribution exhibits a peak near the topological phase transition. This signature of the topological phase transition is robust to the effects of disorder. As a byproduct, we find that close to the topological phase transition, disorder drives the system deeper into the topological phase. This is in stark contrast to the known behavior far from the phase transition, where disorder tends to suppress the topological phase. (paper)

  2. Development of a system for characterizing biomass quality of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biochemical conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick Thomas

    The purpose of this research was twofold: (i) to develop a system for screening lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks for biochemical conversion to biofuels and (ii) to evaluate brown midrib corn stover as feedstock for ethanol production. In the first study (Chapter 2), we investigated the potential of corn stover from bm1-4 hybrids for increased ethanol production and reduced pretreatment intensity compared to corn stover from the isogenic normal hybrid. Corn stover from hybrid W64A X A619 and respective isogenic bm hybrids was pretreated by aqueous ammonia steeping using ammonium hydroxide concentrations from 0 to 30%, by weight, and the resulting residues underwent simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) to ethanol. Dry matter (DM) digested by SSCF increased with increasing ammonium hydroxide concentration across all genotypes (P>0.0001) from 277 g kg-1 DM in the control to 439 g kg-1 DM in the 30% ammonium hydroxide pretreatment. The bm corn stover materials averaged 373 g kg-1 DM of DM digested by SSCF compared with 335 g kg-1 DM for the normal corn stover (Pdetergent fiber (NDF) as a cell-wall isolation procedure, and (iii) elimination of the fermentation organism in the SSCF procedures used to determine biochemically available carbohydrates. The original and the HTP assay methods were compared using corn cobs, hybrid poplar, kenaf, and switchgrass. Biochemically available carbohydrates increased with the HTP methods in the corn cobs, hybrid poplar, and switchgrass, but remained the same in the kenaf. Total available carbohydrates increased and unavailable carbohydrates decreased with the HTP methods in the corn cobs and switchgrass and remained the same in the hybrid poplar and kenaf. There were no differences in total carbohydrates (CT) between the two methods. The final study evaluated the variability of biomass quality parameters in a set of corn stover samples, and developed calibration equations for determining parameter values using near

  3. Semiclassical analysis spectral correlations in mesoscopic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaman, N.; Imry, Y.; Smilansky, U.

    1991-07-01

    We consider the recently developed semiclassical analysis of the quantum mechanical spectral form factor, which may be expressed in terms of classically defiable properties. When applied to electrons whose classical behaviour is diffusive, the results of earlier quantum mechanical perturbative derivations, which were developed under a different set of assumptions, are reproduced. The comparison between the two derivations shows that the results depends not on their specific details, but to a large extent on the principle of quantum coherent superposition, and on the generality of the notion of diffusion. The connection with classical properties facilitates application to many physical situations. (author)

  4. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, F.

    2014-03-11

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, F.; Guerrero, P.; Alarcon, T.; Maini, P. K.; Byrne, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Transport properties of mesoscopic graphene rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, N.; Ding, J.W.; Wang, B.L.; Shi, D.N.; Sun, H.Q.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a recursive Green's function method, we investigate the conductance of mesoscopic graphene rings in the presence of disorder, in the limit of phase coherent transport. Two models of disorder are considered: edge disorder and surface disorder. Our simulations show that the conductance decreases exponentially with the edge disorder and the surface disorder. In the presence of flux, a clear Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillation with the period Φ 0 (Φ 0 =h/e) is observed. The edge disorder and the surface disorder have no effect on the period of AB oscillation. The amplitudes of AB oscillations vary with gate voltage and flux, which is consistent with the previous results. Additionally, ballistic rectification and negative differential resistance are observed in I-V curves, with on/off characteristic.

  7. Vortex-antivortex patterns in mesoscopic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teniers, Gerd; Moshchalkov, V.V.; Chibotaru, L.F.; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the nucleation of superconductivity in mesoscopic structures of different shape (triangle, square and rectangle). This was made possible by using an analytical gauge transformation for the vector potential A which gives A n =0 for the normal component along the boundary line of the rectangle. As a consequence the superconductor-vacuum boundary condition reduces to the Neumann boundary condition. By solving the linearized Ginzburg-Landau equation with this boundary condition we have determined the field-temperature superconducting phase boundary and the corresponding vortex patterns. The comparison of these patterns for different structures demonstrates that the critical parameters of a superconductor can be manipulated and fine-tuned through nanostructuring

  8. Mesoscopic rings with spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berche, Bertrand; Chatelain, Christophe; Medina, Ernesto, E-mail: berche@lpm.u-nancy.f [Statistical Physics Group, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS No 7198, Universite Henri Poincare, Nancy 1, B.P. 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2010-09-15

    A didactic description of charge and spin equilibrium currents on mesoscopic rings in the presence of spin-orbit interaction is presented. Emphasis is made on the non-trivial construction of the correct Hamiltonian in polar coordinates, the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions and the symmetries of the ground-state properties. Spin currents are derived following an intuitive definition, and then a more thorough derivation is built upon the canonical Lagrangian formulation that emphasizes the SU(2) gauge structure of the transport problem of spin-1/2 fermions in spin-orbit active media. The quantization conditions that follow from the constraint of single-valued Pauli spinors are also discussed. The targeted students are those of a graduate condensed matter physics course.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics in a laser field: spontaneous oscillation of mesoscopic soft matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, S; Yoshikawa, K

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies on the utilization of a laser to create a thermodynamically open system in a mesoscopic scale have been performed, where the laser has the roles to generate attractive and scattering forces on an optically trapped object. We have succeeded in the observation of various novel oscillatory phenomena under laser illumination. In this paper, we present the results of new experiments on the cyclic oscillation of a single giant molecule and periodic bursting in a cluster of micrometer sized beads.

  10. Accessible methods for the dynamic time-scale decomposition of biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovtsova, Irina; Simus, Natalia; Lorenz, Thomas; König, Artjom; Sahle, Sven; Kummer, Ursula

    2009-11-01

    The growing complexity of biochemical models asks for means to rationally dissect the networks into meaningful and rather independent subnetworks. Such foregoing should ensure an understanding of the system without any heuristics employed. Important for the success of such an approach is its accessibility and the clarity of the presentation of the results. In order to achieve this goal, we developed a method which is a modification of the classical approach of time-scale separation. This modified method as well as the more classical approach have been implemented for time-dependent application within the widely used software COPASI. The implementation includes different possibilities for the representation of the results including 3D-visualization. The methods are included in COPASI which is free for academic use and available at www.copasi.org. irina.surovtsova@bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Biochemical System Analysis of Lutein Production by Heterotrophic Chlorella pyrenoidosa in a Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yun Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella is a promising alternative source of lutein, as it can be cultivated heterotrophically with high efficiency. In this study, the carotenoids in Chlorella pyrenoidosa heterotrophically cultivated in a 19-litre fermentor have been analyzed and determined by using HPLC and HPLC-MS. A biochemical system theory (BST model was developed for understanding the regulatory features of carotenoid metabolism during the batch cultivation. Factors that influence lutein production by C. pyrenoidosa were discussed based on the model. It shows that low flux for lycopene formation is the major bottleneck for lutein production, while by-product syntheses and inhibitions affect the cellular lutein content much less. However, with further increase of the cellular lutein content, the inhibition on lycopene formation by lutein may become a limiting factor. Although speculative, these results may provide useful information for further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid biosynthesis in Chlorella and modifying its metabolic network to enhance lutein production.

  12. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  13. Genetic and biochemical changes of the serotonergic system in migraine pathobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia Francesca; Smith, Robert Anthony; Griffiths, Lyn Robyn

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is a brain disorder characterized by a piercing headache which affects one side of the head, located mainly at the temples and in the area around the eye. Migraine imparts substantial suffering to the family in addition to the sufferer, particularly as it affects three times more women than men and is most prevalent between the ages of 25 and 45, the years of child rearing. Migraine typically occurs in individuals with a genetic predisposition and is aggravated by specific environmental triggers. Attempts to study the biochemistry of migraine began as early as the 1960s and were primarily directed at serotonin metabolism after an increase of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), the main metabolite of serotonin was observed in urine of migraineurs. Genetic and biochemical studies have primarily focused on the neurotransmitter serotonin, considering receptor binding, transport and synthesis of serotonin and have investigated serotonergic mediators including enzymes, receptors as well as intermediary metabolites. These studies have been mainly assayed in blood, CSF and urine as the most accessible fluids. More recently PET imaging technology integrated with a metabolomics and a systems biology platform are being applied to study serotonergic biology. The general trend observed is that migraine patients have alterations of neurotransmitter metabolism detected in biological fluids with different biochemistry from controls, however the interpretation of the biological significance of these peripheral changes is unresolved. In this review we present the biology of the serotonergic system and metabolic routes for serotonin and discuss results of biochemical studies with regard to alterations in serotonin in brain, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, platelets, plasma and urine of migraine patients.

  14. The local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device driven out of equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a method for calculating the local temperature and chemical potential inside a mesoscopic device out of equilibrium. We show how to check the conditions of local thermal equilibrium when the whole system is out of equilibrium. In particular, we study the on-site chemical potentials inside a chain coupled to two reservoirs at a finite voltage bias. We observe in the presence of disorder a large fluctuation in on-site chemical potentials, which can be suppressed by the electron–electron interaction. By taking the average with respect to the configurations of the disorder, we recover the classical picture where the voltage drops monotonically through the resistance wire. We prove the existence of local intensive variables in a mesoscopic device which is in equilibrium or not far from equilibrium

  15. Biochemical Contributions to Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Alloy 22 in a Continual Flow System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.; Martin, S.; Masterson, B.; Lian, T.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) may decrease the functional lifetime of nuclear waste packaging materials in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. Biochemical contributions to corrosion of package materials are being determined in reactors containing crushed repository-site rock with the endogenous microbial community, and candidate waste package materials. These systems are being continually supplied with simulated ground water. Periodically, bulk chemistries are analyzed on the system outflow, and surfacial chemistries are assessed on withdrawn material coupons. Both Fe and Mn dissolved from C1020 coupons under conditions that included the presence of YM microorganisms. Insoluble corrosion products remained in a reduced state at the coupon surface, indicating at least a localized anoxic condition; soluble reduced Mn and Fe were also detected in solution, while precipitated and spalled products were oxidized. Alloy 22 surfaces showed a layer of chrome oxide, almost certainly in the Cr(III) oxidation state, on microcosm-exposed coupons, while no soluble chrome was detected in solution. The results of these studies will be compared to identical testing on systems containing sterilized rock to generate, and ultimately predict, microbial contributions to waste package corrosion chemistries

  16. Biochemical characterization of systemic bacteria in bananas, sensitivity to antibiotics and plant phytotoxicity during shoot proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janiffe Peres de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the biochemically systemic bacterial isolated from banana plants, to evaluate the bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics, and to determine the phytotoxicity of banana shoots during in vitro proliferation. Systemic bacteria belonging to the Klebsiella and Aeromonas genera were isolated from the “Maravilha” (FHIA 01 AAAB, “Preciosa” (PV 4285 AAAB and “Thap Maeo” (AAB varieties and were then characterized. Tests of shoot sensitivity to antibiotics were performed, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and phytotoxic effects of selected antibiotics to plants were determined. Among the 20 antibiotics evaluated, the strains showed sensitivity to cefaclor, cefalexin, cefalotin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, and vancomycin. However, during MIC determination, the best results were obtained with cefaclor, vancomycin or nalidixic acid alone in concentrations ranging from 512 to 1,024 mg L-1. In culture medium, cefaclor at 1,024 mg L-1 was the only antibiotic to affect the multiplication and the shoot survival in culture.

  17. A molecular fragment cheminformatics roadmap for mesoscopic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszkowski, Andreas; Daniel, Mirco; Kuhn, Hubert; Neumann, Stefan; Steinbeck, Christoph; Zielesny, Achim; Epple, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscopic simulation studies the structure, dynamics and properties of large molecular ensembles with millions of atoms: Its basic interacting units (beads) are no longer the nuclei and electrons of quantum chemical ab-initio calculations or the atom types of molecular mechanics but molecular fragments, molecules or even larger molecular entities. For its simulation setup and output a mesoscopic simulation kernel software uses abstract matrix (array) representations for bead topology and connectivity. Therefore a pure kernel-based mesoscopic simulation task is a tedious, time-consuming and error-prone venture that limits its practical use and application. A consequent cheminformatics approach tackles these problems and provides solutions for a considerably enhanced accessibility. This study aims at outlining a complete cheminformatics roadmap that frames a mesoscopic Molecular Fragment Dynamics (MFD) simulation kernel to allow its efficient use and practical application. The molecular fragment cheminformatics roadmap consists of four consecutive building blocks: An adequate fragment structure representation (1), defined operations on these fragment structures (2), the description of compartments with defined compositions and structural alignments (3), and the graphical setup and analysis of a whole simulation box (4). The basis of the cheminformatics approach (i.e. building block 1) is a SMILES-like line notation (denoted f SMILES) with connected molecular fragments to represent a molecular structure. The f SMILES notation and the following concepts and methods for building blocks 2-4 are outlined with examples and practical usage scenarios. It is shown that the requirements of the roadmap may be partly covered by already existing open-source cheminformatics software. Mesoscopic simulation techniques like MFD may be considerably alleviated and broadened for practical use with a consequent cheminformatics layer that successfully tackles its setup subtleties and

  18. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  19. Atom chips: mesoscopic physics with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Wildermuth, S.; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.; GAllego Garcia, D.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold neutral atoms can be controlled and manipulated in microscopic potentials near surfaces of atom chips. These integrated micro-devices combine the known techniques of atom optics with the capabilities of well established micro- and nanofabrication technology. In analogy to electronic microchips and integrated fiber optics, the concept of atom chips is suitable to explore the domain of mesoscopic physics with matter waves. We use current and charge carrying structures to form complex potentials with high spatial resolution only microns from the surface. In particular, atoms can be confined to an essentially one-dimensional motion. In this talk, we will give an overview of our experiments studying the manipulation of both thermal atoms and BECs on atom chips. First experiments in the quasi one-dimensional regime will be presented. These experiments profit from strongly reduced residual disorder potentials caused by imperfections of the chip fabrication with respect to previously published experiments. This is due to our purely lithographic fabrication technique that proves to be advantageous over electroplating. We have used one dimensionally confined BECs as an ultra-sensitive probe to characterize these potentials. These smooth potentials allow us to explore various aspects of the physics of degenerate quantum gases in low dimensions. (author)

  20. Differences between application of some basic principles of quantum mechanics on atomic and mesoscopic levels

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulov, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Formalism of the quantum mechanics developed for microscopic (atomic) level comes into collision with some logical difficulties on mesoscopic level. Some fundamental differences between application of its basic principles on microscopic and mesoscopic levels are accentuated.

  1. Mesoscopic approach to modeling elastic-plastic polycrystalline material behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, M.; Cizelj, L.

    2001-01-01

    Extreme loadings during severe accident conditions might cause failure or rupture of the pressure boundary of a reactor coolant system. Reliable estimation of the extreme deformations can be crucial to determine the consequences of such an accident. One of important drawbacks of classical continuum mechanics is idealization of inhomogenous microstructure of materials. This paper discusses the mesoscopic approach to modeling the elastic-plastic behavior of a polycrystalline material. The main idea is to divide the continuum (e.g., polycrystalline aggregate) into a set of sub-continua (grains). The overall properties of the polycrystalline aggregate are therefore determined by the number of grains in the aggregate and properties of randomly shaped and oriented grains. The random grain structure is modeled with Voronoi tessellation and random orientations of crystal lattices are assumed. The elastic behavior of monocrystal grains is assumed to be anisotropic. Crystal plasticity is used to describe plastic response of monocrystal grains. Finite element method is used to obtain numerical solutions of strain and stress fields. The analysis is limited to two-dimensional models.(author)

  2. Quantum Effects of Mesoscopic Inductance and Capacity Coupling Circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianxin; Yan Zhanyuan; Song Yonghua

    2006-01-01

    Using the quantum theory for a mesoscopic circuit based on the discretenes of electric charges, the finite-difference Schroedinger equation of the non-dissipative mesoscopic inductance and capacity coupling circuit is achieved. The Coulomb blockade effect, which is caused by the discreteness of electric charges, is studied. Appropriately choose the components in the circuits, the finite-difference Schroedinger equation can be divided into two Mathieu equations in p-circumflex representation. With the WKBJ method, the currents quantum fluctuations in the ground states of the two circuits are calculated. The results show that the currents quantum zero-point fluctuations of the two circuits are exist and correlated.

  3. Mesoscopic Length Scale Controls the Rheology of Dense Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnoit, Claire; Lanuza, Jose; Lindner, Anke; Clement, Eric

    2010-09-01

    From the flow properties of dense granular suspensions on an inclined plane, we identify a mesoscopic length scale strongly increasing with volume fraction. When the flowing layer height is larger than this length scale, a diverging Newtonian viscosity is determined. However, when the flowing layer height drops below this scale, we evidence a nonlocal effective viscosity, decreasing as a power law of the flow height. We establish a scaling relation between this mesoscopic length scale and the suspension viscosity. These results support recent theoretical and numerical results implying collective and clustered granular motion when the jamming point is approached from below.

  4. Magnetic response of superconducting mesoscopic-size YBCO powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deimling, C.V. [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: cesard@df.ufscar.br; Motta, M.; Lisboa-Filho, P.N. [Laboratorio de Materiais Supercondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Bauru, SP Brazil (Brazil); Ortiz, W.A. [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    In this work it is reported the magnetic behavior of submicron and mesoscopic-size superconducting YBCO powders, prepared by a modified polymeric precursors method. The grain size and microstructure were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Measurements of magnetization and AC-susceptibility as a function of temperature were performed with a quantum design SQUID magnetometer. Our results indicated significant differences on the magnetic propreties, in connection with the calcination temperature and the pressure used to pelletize the samples. This contribution is part of an effort to study vortex dynamics and magnetic properties of submicron and mesoscopic-size superconducting samples.

  5. Highly efficient and energy-saving sectional treatment of landfill leachate with a synergistic system of biochemical treatment and electrochemical oxidation on a boron-doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guohua; Pang Yaning; Liu Lei; Gao Junxia; Lv Baoying

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a synergistic combination of the biochemical treatment and electrochemical oxidation (SBEO) of landfill leachate with sectional treatment on a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode is proposed. The first stage involves the synergistic system of biochemical treatment and electrochemical oxidation. Then, the second stage is followed by individual biochemical treatment. Comparisons among the SBEO, electrochemical oxidation, biochemical treatment and biochemical treatment with the pretreatment of electrochemical oxidation are made systematically, which show that this method is both highly efficient and energy-saving. The higher TOC removal and low energy cost on the BDD electrode can be explained by the conversion of the bio-refractory pollutants to biodegradable organics in the electrochemical oxidation process, improving the current efficiency and reducing the energy cost. The treated wastewater is degraded only with biochemical treatment in the second stage, which further improves efficiency and reduced the energy cost.

  6. CHAIRMEN'S FOREWORD: The Seventh International Conference on New Phenomena in Mesoscopic Structures & The Fifth International Conference on Surfaces and Interfaces of Mesoscopic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Yoshinobu; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2006-05-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the joint Seventh International Conference on New Phenomena in Mesoscopic Structures and Fifth International Conference on Surfaces and Interfaces of Mesoscopic Devices, which was held from November 27th - December 2nd, 2005, at the Ritz Carlton Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii. The string of these conferences dates back to the first one in 1989. Of special importance is that this year's conference was dedicated to Professor Gottfried Landwehr, in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to semiconductor physics. A personal tribute to Prof Landwehr by Dr K von Klitzing leads off this issue. The scope of NPMS-7/SIMD-5 spans nano-fabrication through complex phase coherent mesoscopic systems including nano-transistors and nano-scale characterization. Topics of interest include: •Nanoscale fabrication: high-resolution electron lithography, FIB nano-patterning, scanning- force-microscopy (SFM) lithography, SFM-stimulated growth, novel patterning, nano-imprint lithography, special etching, and self-assembled monolayers •Nanocharacterization: SFM characterization, ballistic-electron emission microscopy (BEEM), optical studies of nanostructures, tunneling, properties of discrete impurities, phase coherence, noise, THz studies, and electro-luminescence in small structures •Nanodevices: ultra-scaled FETs, quantum single-electron transistors (SETS), resonant tunneling diodes, ferromagnetic and spin devices, superlattice arrays, IR detectors with quantum dots and wires, quantum point contacts, non-equilibrium transport, simulation, ballistic transport, molecular electronic devices, carbon nanotubes, spin selection devices, spin-coupled quantum dots, and nanomagnetics •Quantum-coherent transport: the quantum Hall effect, ballistic quantum systems, quantum-computing implementations and theory, and magnetic spin systemsMesoscopic structures: quantum wires and dots, quantum chaos

  7. Cultured neurons as model systems for biochemical and pharmacological studies on receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Drejer, J; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1985-01-01

    By the use of primary cultures of neurons consisting of cerebral cortex interneurons or cerebellar granule cells it is possible to study biochemical and pharmacological aspects of receptors for GABA and glutamate. Cerebellar granule cells have been shown to express both high- and low-affinity GAB...

  8. Theory and modeling of spin-transport on the microscopic and the mesoscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickler, B.

    2013-01-01

    It is the aim of this thesis to contribute to the description of spin dynamics in solid state systems. In the first part of this work we present a full quantum treatment of spin-coherent transport in halfmetal / semiconductor CrAs / GaAs heterostructures. The theoretical approach is based on the ab-initio determination of the electronic structures of the materials involved and on the calculation of the band offset. These ingredients are in the second step cast into an effective nearest-neighbor tight-binding Hamiltonian. Finally, in the third step, we investigate by means of the non-equilibrium Green's function technique the current which flows through such a heterostructure if a finite bias is applied. With the help of this strategy it is possible to identify CrAs / GaAs heterostructures as probable candidates for all-semiconductor room-temperature spin-filtering devices, which operate without externally applied magnetic fields. In the second part of this thesis we derive a linear semiclassical spinorial Boltzmann equation. For many (mesoscopic) device geometries a full quantum treatment of transport dynamics may not be necessary and may not be feasible with state-of-the-art techniques. The derivation is based on the quantum mechanical description of a composite quantum system by means of von Neumann's equation. The Born-Markov limit allows us to derive a Lindblad master equation for the reduced system plus non-Markovian corrections. Finally, we perform a Wigner transformation and take the semiclassical limit in order to obtain a spinorial Boltzmann equation, suitable for the description of spin transport on the mesoscopic scale. It has to be emphasized that the spinorial Boltzmann equation constitutes the missing link between a full quantum treatment and heuristically introduced mesoscopic models for spin transport in solid state systems. (author) [de

  9. Lattice Boltzmann model capable of mesoscopic vorticity computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that standard lattice Boltzmann (LB) models allow the strain-rate components to be computed mesoscopically (i.e., through the local particle distributions) and as such possess a second-order accuracy in strain rate. This is one of the appealing features of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) which is of only second-order accuracy in hydrodynamic velocity itself. However, no known LB model can provide the same quality for vorticity and pressure gradients. In this paper, we design a multiple-relaxation time LB model on a three-dimensional 27-discrete-velocity (D3Q27) lattice. A detailed Chapman-Enskog analysis is presented to illustrate all the necessary constraints in reproducing the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations. The remaining degrees of freedom are carefully analyzed to derive a model that accommodates mesoscopic computation of all the velocity and pressure gradients from the nonequilibrium moments. This way of vorticity calculation naturally ensures a second-order accuracy, which is also proven through an asymptotic analysis. We thus show, with enough degrees of freedom and appropriate modifications, the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be achieved in LBM. The resulting model is then validated in simulations of a three-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a uniform flow passing a fixed sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the mesoscopic vorticity computation can be realized even with single relaxation parameter.

  10. Role of mesoscopic morphology in charge transport of doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In doped polyaniline (PANI), the charge transport properties are determined by mesoscopic morphology, which in turn is controlled by the molecular recognition interactions among polymer chain, dopant and solvent. Molecular recognition plays a significant role in chain conformation and charge delocalization.

  11. A multicenter study demonstrating discordant results from electronic prostate-specific antigen biochemical failure calculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Scott G.; Pickles, Tom; Kestin, Larry; Potters, Louis; Fearn, Paul; Smith, Ryan; Pratt, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interobserver variation of four electronic biochemical failure (bF) calculators using three bF definitions. Methods and Materials: The data of 1200 men were analyzed using the electronic bF calculators of four institutions. Three bF definitions were examined for their concordance of bF identification across the centers: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (ACD), the lowest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to date plus 2 ng/mL (L2), and a threshold of 3 ng/mL (T3). Results: Unanimous agreement regarding bF status using the ACD, L2, and T3 definitions occurred in 87.3%, 96.4%, and 92.7% of cases, respectively. Using the ACD, 63% of the variation was from one institution, which allowed the bF status to be reversed if a PSA decline was seen after bF (PSA 'bounce'). A total of 270 men had an ACD bF time variation of >2 months across the calculators, and the 5-year freedom from bF rate was 49.8-60.9%. The L2 definition had a 20.5% rate of calculated bF times; which varied by >2 months (median, 6.4; range, 2.1-75.6) and a corresponding 5-year freedom from bF rate of 55.9-61.0%. The T3 definition had a 2.0% range in the 5-year freedom from bF. Fifteen definition interpretation variations were identified. Conclusion: Reported bF results vary not only because of bF definition differences, but because of variations in how those definitions are written into computer-based calculators, with multiple interpretations most prevalent for the ACD. An algorithm to avoid misinterpretations is proposed for the L2 definition. A verification system to guarantee consistent electronic bF results requires development

  12. Soil biochemical properties and microbial resilience in agroforestry systems: effects on wheat growth under controlled drought and flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, David; Lorente, Miren; Olivier, Alain; Messier, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Agroforestry is increasingly viewed as an effective means of maintaining or even increasing crop and tree productivity under climate change while promoting other ecosystem functions and services. This study focused on soil biochemical properties and resilience following disturbance within agroforestry and conventional agricultural systems and aimed to determine whether soil differences in terms of these biochemical properties and resilience would subsequently affect crop productivity under extreme soil water conditions. Two research sites that had been established on agricultural land were selected for this study. The first site included an 18-year-old windbreak, while the second site consisted in an 8-year-old tree-based intercropping system. In each site, soil samples were used for the determination of soil nutrient availability, microbial dynamics and microbial resilience to different wetting-drying perturbations and for a greenhouse pot experiment with wheat. Drying and flooding were selected as water stress treatments and compared to a control. These treatments were initiated at the beginning of the wheat anthesis period and maintained over 10 days. Trees contributed to increase soil nutrient pools, as evidenced by the higher extractable-P (both sites), and the higher total N and mineralizable N (tree-based intercropping site) found in the agroforestry compared to the conventional agricultural system. Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was lower in the agroforestry than in the conventional agricultural system, suggesting higher microbial substrate use efficiency in agroforestry systems. Microbial resilience was higher in the agroforestry soils compared to soils from the conventional agricultural system (windbreak site only). At the windbreak site, wheat growing in soils from agroforestry system exhibited higher aboveground biomass and number of grains per spike than in conventional agricultural system soils in the three water stress treatments. At the tree

  13. Mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of organic photovoltaic device characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Robin G. E.; Wright, Edward N.; O'Kane, Simon E. J.; Walker, Alison B.; Blakesley, James C.

    2012-12-01

    Measured mobility and current-voltage characteristics of single layer and photovoltaic (PV) devices composed of poly{9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis[N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)]bis(N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylene)diamine} (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) have been reproduced by a mesoscopic model employing the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) approach. Our aim is to show how to avoid the uncertainties common in electrical transport models arising from the need to fit a large number of parameters when little information is available, for example, a single current-voltage curve. Here, simulation parameters are derived from a series of measurements using a self-consistent “building-blocks” approach, starting from data on the simplest systems. We found that site energies show disorder and that correlations in the site energies and a distribution of deep traps must be included in order to reproduce measured charge mobility-field curves at low charge densities in bulk PFB and F8BT. The parameter set from the mobility-field curves reproduces the unipolar current in single layers of PFB and F8BT and allows us to deduce charge injection barriers. Finally, by combining these disorder descriptions and injection barriers with an optical model, the external quantum efficiency and current densities of blend and bilayer organic PV devices can be successfully reproduced across a voltage range encompassing reverse and forward bias, with the recombination rate the only parameter to be fitted, found to be 1×107 s-1. These findings demonstrate an approach that removes some of the arbitrariness present in transport models of organic devices, which validates the KMC as an accurate description of organic optoelectronic systems, and provides information on the microscopic origins of the device behavior.

  14. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  15. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  16. Biochemical markers of the functional disorders of the liver in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Bogmat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in the basis of the pathogenesis has generalized autoimmune inflammation, which leads to the development of a wide range of immune-inflammatory organ disorders. Among them, the liver deserves special attention, since its functional state can reflect not only the severity of the pathological process, but also the response on aggressive treatment. The purpose of the work was studying the biochemical markers of the functional state of the liver in children with initial stages of SLE. Materials and methods. Features of the lipid, carbohydrate spectrum of the blood, indicators of pigment exchange, markers of cytolysis, cholestasis, fibrosis and protein-synthetic function of the liver were studied in children and adolescents with SLE. Twenty six patients aged 7–18 years were examined. Two groups were formed: 10 patients (38.4 % with the duration of the disease of 1–3 years and 16 people (61.5 % with duration of more than 3 years. Results. The average blood lipids levels did not exceed the reference values and did not have statistical differences among the patients of the selected groups. The levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides in both groups of patients significantly exceeded the control values (p < 0.05. Indicators of low density lipoprotein cholesterol increased already in the early stages of the disease (p < 0.05 and reached the maximum values in individuals with a course of SLE over 3 years (p < 0.05. Concentration of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients of the second group decreased somewhat (p < 0.1. There was an increase in the average values of atherogenic index by 1.7 times among patients in the first group (p < 0.05 and 2.25 times in persons from the second group (p < 0.05. Studies of other metabolic links showed that the average values of glycaemia and immunoreactive insulin (IRI were consistent with the physiological norm. However, half of patients with SLE had

  17. Anticancer system created by acrolein and hydroxyl radical generated in enzymatic oxidation of spermine and other biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, R A

    2012-10-01

    A hypothesis suggesting the existence of a ubiquitous physiological anticancer system created by two highly reactive oxidative stress inducers with anticancer properties, acrolein and hydroxyl radical, is reported in this communication. Both components can originate separately or together in several biochemical interactions, among them, the enzymatic oxidation of the polyamine spermine, which appear to be their main source. The foundations of this hypothesis encompass our initial search for growth-inhibitors or anticancer compounds in biological material leading to the isolation of spermine, a polyamine that became highly cytotoxic through the generation of acrolein, when enzymatically oxidized. Findings complemented with pertinent literature data by other workers and observed anticancer activities by sources capable of producing acrolein and hydroxyl radical. This hypothesis obvious implication: spermine enzymatic oxidations or other biochemical interactions that would co-generate acrolein and hydroxyl radical, the anticancer system components, should be tried as treatments for any given cancer. The biochemical generation of acrolein observed was totally unexpected, since this aldehyde was known; as a very toxic and highly reactive xenobiotic chemical produced in the pyrolysis of fats and other organic material, found as an atmospheric pollutant, in tobacco smoke and car emissions, and mainly used as a pesticide or aquatic herbicide. Numerous studies on acrolein, considered after our work a biological product, as well, followed. In them, acrolein widespread presence, its effects on diverse cellular proteins, such as, growth factors, and its anticancer activities, were additionally reported. Regarding hydroxyl radical, the second component of the proposed anticancer system, and another cytotoxic product in normal cell metabolism, it co-generates with acrolein in several biochemical interactions, occurrences suggesting that these products might jointly fulfill some

  18. A critical appraisal of the phene-plate biochemical fingerprinting system for epidemiological subtyping of Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, S.L.W.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy and reproducibility of the Phene-Plate (PhP) system (Biosys Inova, Stockholm, Sweden) for biochemical fingerprinting of Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Duplicate and replicate assays on 40 epidemiologically related and unrelated strains were performed in two batches of PhP-48......P-types which are epidemiologically unjustified, (ii) tests currently recommended for PhP-typing S. typhimurium may be somewhat unstable and not satisfactory for fingerprinting purposes, (iii) caution must be exercised when comparing data from different batches of PhP-48 plates, and (iv) best results...

  19. Transmission gaps, trapped modes and Fano resonances in Aharonov-Bohm connected mesoscopic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabti, T.; Labdouti, Z.; El Abouti, O.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Fethi, F.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2018-03-01

    A simple mesoscopic structure consisting of a double symmetric loops coupled by a segment of length d0 in the presence of an Aharonov-Bohm flux is designed to obtain transmission band gaps and Fano resonances. A general analytical expression for the transmission coefficient and the density of states (DOS) are obtained for various systems of this kind within the framework of the Green's function method in the presence of the magnetic flux. In this work, the amplitude of the transmission and DOS are discussed as a function of the wave vector. We show that the transmission spectrum of the whole structure may exhibit a band gap and a resonance of Fano type without introducing any impurity in one arm of the loop. In particular, we show that for specific values of the magnetic flux and the lengths of the arms constituting the loops, the Fano resonance collapses giving rise to the so-called trapped states or bound in continuum (BIC) states. These states appear when the width of the Fano resonance vanishes in the transmission coefficient as well as in the density of states. Also, we show that the shape of the Fano resonances and the width of the band gaps are very sensitive to the value of the magnetic flux and the geometry of the structure. These results may have important applications for electronic transport in mesoscopic systems.

  20. Mesoscopic Fluctuations for the Thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Tomas; Duits, Maurice

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations for the thinned Circular Unitary Ensemble. The effect of thinning is that the eigenvalues start to decorrelate. The decorrelation is stronger on the larger scales than on the smaller scales. We investigate this behavior by studying mesoscopic linear statistics. There are two regimes depending on the scale parameter and the thinning parameter. In one regime we obtain a CLT of a classical type and in the other regime we retrieve the CLT for CUE. The two regimes are separated by a critical line. On the critical line the limiting fluctuations are no longer Gaussian, but described by infinitely divisible laws. We argue that this transition phenomenon is universal by showing that the same transition and their laws appear for fluctuations of the thinned sine process in a growing box. The proofs are based on a Riemann-Hilbert problem for integrable operators.

  1. Mesoscopic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Remote Spin Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianyu; Shi, Fazhan; Chen, Sanyou; Guo, Maosen; Chen, Yisheng; Zhang, Yixing; Yang, Yu; Gao, Xingyu; Kong, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Bo; Du, Jiangfeng

    2018-06-01

    Quantum sensing based on nitrogen-vacancy (N -V ) centers in diamond has been developed as a powerful tool for microscopic magnetic resonance. However, the reported sensor-to-sample distance is limited within tens of nanometers resulting from the cubic decrease of the signal of spin fluctuation with the increasing distance. Here we extend the sensing distance to tens of micrometers by detecting spin polarization rather than spin fluctuation. We detect the mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectra of polarized electrons of a pentacene-doped crystal, measure its two typical decay times, and observe the optically enhanced spin polarization. This work paves the way for the N -V -based mesoscopic magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging at ambient conditions.

  2. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  3. Biochemical and seminal parameters of lambs fed palm kernel cake under grazing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes César Mugabe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to assess the effects of palm kernel cake on semen quality and biochemical parameters of Santa Inês lambs. A total of 40 animals with 24.10±2.72 kg body weight and five months old were assigned in a completely randomized design into four groups and 10 replicates. The animals were subjected to four levels of palm kernel cake (0, 15, 30, and 45% based on dry matter. The trial lasted 90 days foregone by 15 days for adaptation. Blood samples were collected every 45 days from jugular vein using vacuum tubes without anticoagulant. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and very-low-density lipoprotein were assessed. Once the animals reached puberty at a mean age of 225 days, the semen samples were collected by electroejaculator once a week for three sequence weeks and assessed for volume, color, aspect, wave motion, motility, sperm concentration, sperm vigor, total of spermatozoa per ejaculate, viable spermatozoa per mL, and sperm morphology. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and followed by regression analysis. Non-parametric data were analysed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and very-low-density lipoprotein were linearly increased. There was no difference for low-density lipoprotein. Diets did not affect mass motility, sperm motility, vigor, total spermatozoa per ejaculate, viability sperm per mL, and minor and total sperm defects. Sperm concentration increased linearly. Negative quadratic effects were observed for major sperm defects. Supplementation of diets with palm kernel cake up to 45% on dry matter enhance biochemical parameters and do not impair the qualitative variables of lamb sperm.

  4. Current correlations in superconductor - normal metal mesoscopic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignon, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    Thanks to the experimental progress in miniaturization and cryogenics over the last twenty years, it is now possible to build sufficiently small electric circuits where the wave like nature of electron becomes significant. In such electric circuit transport properties like current and noise are modified. It corresponds to the mesoscopic scale. Moreover, connecting a mesoscopic circuit to a superconductor enhances the effects due to interference between electrons since a superconductor is a macroscopic source of coherent electrons pairs: the Cooper pairs. In this thesis, we study current correlations in mesoscopic normal metal - superconductor structures. First, the energy dependence of current noise in a normal metal - superconductor tunnel junction is analysed taking into account weak disorder and interactions. We show that if the normal metal is out of equilibrium, current and noise become independent. Next, we consider the case of a superconductor connected to two normal metals by tunnel junctions. We show that it is possible to change the sign of current crossed correlation by tuning the voltages and that it can be used to probe the size of the Cooper pairs. Lastly, using Usadel's quasi-classic theory, we study the energy dependence of noise in a normal metal - normal metal - superconductor double junction. We show that barrier's transparencies modifies significantly both current and noise. (author) [fr

  5. Spontaneous and persistent currents in superconductive and mesoscopic structures (Review Article)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, I.O.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review aspects of superconductive persistent currents in Josephson junctions of the S/I/S, S/O/S and S/N/S types, focusing on the origin of jumps in the current versus phase dependences, and discuss in more detail the persistent as well as 'spontaneous' currents in the Aharonov-Bohm mesoscopic and nanoscopic (macromolecular) structures. A fixed-number-of-electrons mesoscopic or macromolecular conducting ring is shown to be unstable against structural transformation removing spatial symmetry (in particular, azimuthal periodicity) of its electron- lattice Hamiltonian. In case when the transformation is blocked by strong coupling to an external azimuthally symmetric environment, the system becomes bistable in its electronic configuration at certain number of electrons. At such a condition, the persistent current has a nonzero value even at the (almost) zero applied Aharonov-Bohm flux, and results in very high magnetic susceptibility dM/dH at small nonzero fields, followed by an oscillatory dependence at larger fields. We tentatively assume that previously observed oscillatory magnetization in cyclic metallo-organic molecules by Gatteschi et al. can be attributed to persistent currents. If this proves correct, it may open an opportunity (and, more generally, macromolecular cyclic structures may suggest the possibility) of engineering quantum computational tools based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect in ballistic nanostructures and macromolecular cyclic aggregates

  6. The persistent current and energy spectrum on a driven mesoscopic LC-circuit with Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanias, Hassan

    2018-03-01

    The quantum theory for a mesoscopic electric circuit including a Josephson junction with charge discreteness is studied. By considering coupling energy of the mesoscopic capacitor in Josephson junction device, a Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of a quantum mesoscopic electric LC-circuit with charge discreteness is introduced. We first calculate the persistent current on a quantum driven ring including Josephson junction. Then we obtain the persistent current and energy spectrum of a quantum mesoscopic electrical circuit which includes capacitor, inductor, time-dependent external source and Josephson junction.

  7. A Mesoscopic Simulation for the Early-Age Shrinkage Cracking Process of High Performance Concrete in Bridge Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On a mesoscopic level, high performance concrete (HPC was assumed to be a heterogeneous composite material consisting of aggregates, mortar, and pores. The concrete mesoscopic structure model had been established based on CT image reconstruction. By combining this model with continuum mechanics, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics, a relatively complete system for concrete mesoscopic mechanics analysis was established to simulate the process of early-age shrinkage cracking in HPC. This process was based on the dispersion crack model. The results indicated that the interface between the aggregate and mortar was the crack point caused by shrinkage cracks in HPC. The locations of early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC were associated with the spacing and the size of the aggregate particle. However, the shrinkage deformation size of the mortar was related to the scope of concrete cracking and was independent of the crack position. Whereas lower water to cement ratios can improve the early strength of concrete, this ratio cannot control early-age shrinkage cracks in HPC.

  8. Statistical characteristics and correlations of histomorphometric, clinical and biochemical indices in systemic therapy in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Hryhorovskyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Actuality. The correlation analysis between various indices of bone tissue condition was not previously carried out in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Aim. On purpose to determine differences and index correlations before and after intake of pamidronate systemic therapy in 13 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta indices of some methods including histomorphometric were studied. Results. We found correlation parametres of biochemical indices, on one side and histomorphometric – on the other. Conclusion. After systemic therapy mean parametres of «bone volume» in iliobiopsies increase, and «osteoid surface» and «osteoclast index per surface unit» in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta of I type – decrease, that one can regard as a tendency to improvement of the bone tissue structural-functional condition.

  9. Beneficial effect of low ethanol intake on the cardiovascular system: possible biochemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Vasdev

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudesh Vasdev1, Vicki Gill1, Pawan K Singal21Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada; 2Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaAbstract: Low ethanol intake is known to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. In cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance leads to altered glucose and lipid metabolism resulting in an increased production of aldehydes, including methylglyoxal. Aldehydes react non-enzymatically with sulfhydryl and amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs, altering protein structure and function. These alterations cause endothelial dysfunction with increased cytosolic free calcium, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood pressure. AGEs produce atherogenic effects including oxidative stress, platelet adhesion, inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and modification of lipoproteins. Low ethanol intake attenuates hypertension and atherosclerosis but the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Ethanol at low concentrations is metabolized by low Km alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, both reactions resulting in the production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. This creates a reductive environment, decreasing oxidative stress and secondary production of aldehydes through lipid peroxidation. NADH may also increase the tissue levels of the antioxidants cysteine and glutathione, which bind aldehydes and stimulate methylglyoxal catabolism. Low ethanol improves insulin resistance, increases high-density lipoprotein and stimulates activity of the antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase. In conclusion, we suggest that chronic low ethanol intake confers its beneficial effect mainly through its ability to increase antioxidant capacity and lower AGEs.Keywords: low ethanol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, biochemical

  10. Fast stochastic simulation of biochemical reaction systems by alternative formulations of the chemical Langevin equation

    KAUST Repository

    Mélykúti, Bence

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Langevin Equation (CLE), which is a stochastic differential equation driven by a multidimensional Wiener process, acts as a bridge between the discrete stochastic simulation algorithm and the deterministic reaction rate equation when simulating (bio)chemical kinetics. The CLE model is valid in the regime where molecular populations are abundant enough to assume their concentrations change continuously, but stochastic fluctuations still play a major role. The contribution of this work is that we observe and explore that the CLE is not a single equation, but a parametric family of equations, all of which give the same finite-dimensional distribution of the variables. On the theoretical side, we prove that as many Wiener processes are sufficient to formulate the CLE as there are independent variables in the equation, which is just the rank of the stoichiometric matrix. On the practical side, we show that in the case where there are m1 pairs of reversible reactions and m2 irreversible reactions there is another, simple formulation of the CLE with only m1 + m2 Wiener processes, whereas the standard approach uses 2 m1 + m2. We demonstrate that there are considerable computational savings when using this latter formulation. Such transformations of the CLE do not cause a loss of accuracy and are therefore distinct from model reduction techniques. We illustrate our findings by considering alternative formulations of the CLE for a human ether a-go-go related gene ion channel model and the Goldbeter-Koshland switch. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Variable speed limit strategies analysis with mesoscopic traffic flow model based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Bin; Cao, Dan-Ni; Dang, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Lin

    As a new cross-discipline, the complexity science has penetrated into every field of economy and society. With the arrival of big data, the research of the complexity science has reached its summit again. In recent years, it offers a new perspective for traffic control by using complex networks theory. The interaction course of various kinds of information in traffic system forms a huge complex system. A new mesoscopic traffic flow model is improved with variable speed limit (VSL), and the simulation process is designed, which is based on the complex networks theory combined with the proposed model. This paper studies effect of VSL on the dynamic traffic flow, and then analyzes the optimal control strategy of VSL in different network topologies. The conclusion of this research is meaningful to put forward some reasonable transportation plan and develop effective traffic management and control measures to help the department of traffic management.

  12. Effects of Antifouling Biocides on Molecular and Biochemical Defense System in the Gill of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Seon; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Jang Kyun; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Antifouling biocides such as organotin compounds and their alternatives are potent toxicants in marine ecosystems. In this study, we employed several molecular and biochemical response systems of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to understand a potential mode of action of antifouling biocides (i.e. tributyltin (TBT), diuron and irgarol) after exposure to different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1 μg L-1) for 96 h. As a result, all the three antifouling biocides strongly induced the antioxidant defense system. TBT reduced both enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of Na+/K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lower levels of both Na+/K+-ATPase activity and AChE mRNA expression were observed in the diuron-exposed oysters compared to the control, while the irgarol treatment reduced only the transcriptional expression of AChE gene. We also analyzed transcript profile of heat shock protein (Hsp) superfamily in same experimental conditions. All antifouling biocides tested in this study significantly modulated mRNA expression of Hsp superfamily with strong induction of Hsp70 family. Taken together, overall results indicate that representative organotin TBT and alternatives have potential hazardous effects on the gill of C. gigas within relatively short time period. Our results also suggest that analyzing a series of molecular and biochemical parameters can be a way of understanding and uncovering the mode of action of emerging antifouling biocides. In particular, it was revealed that Pacific oysters have different sensitivities depend on the antifouling biocides. PMID:28006823

  13. Effects of Antifouling Biocides on Molecular and Biochemical Defense System in the Gill of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Seon; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Jang Kyun; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Antifouling biocides such as organotin compounds and their alternatives are potent toxicants in marine ecosystems. In this study, we employed several molecular and biochemical response systems of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to understand a potential mode of action of antifouling biocides (i.e. tributyltin (TBT), diuron and irgarol) after exposure to different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1 μg L-1) for 96 h. As a result, all the three antifouling biocides strongly induced the antioxidant defense system. TBT reduced both enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of Na+/K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lower levels of both Na+/K+-ATPase activity and AChE mRNA expression were observed in the diuron-exposed oysters compared to the control, while the irgarol treatment reduced only the transcriptional expression of AChE gene. We also analyzed transcript profile of heat shock protein (Hsp) superfamily in same experimental conditions. All antifouling biocides tested in this study significantly modulated mRNA expression of Hsp superfamily with strong induction of Hsp70 family. Taken together, overall results indicate that representative organotin TBT and alternatives have potential hazardous effects on the gill of C. gigas within relatively short time period. Our results also suggest that analyzing a series of molecular and biochemical parameters can be a way of understanding and uncovering the mode of action of emerging antifouling biocides. In particular, it was revealed that Pacific oysters have different sensitivities depend on the antifouling biocides.

  14. Quantum transport through mesoscopic disordered interfaces, junctions, and multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores perpendicular transport through macroscopically inhomogeneous three-dimensional disordered conductors using mesoscopic methods (the real-space Green function technique in a two-probe measuring geometry). The nanoscale samples (containing ∼ 1000 atoms) are modelled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian on a simple cubic lattice where disorder is introduced in the on-site potential energy. I compute the transport properties of: disordered metallic junctions formed by concatenating two homogeneous samples with different kinds of microscopic disorder, a single strongly disordered interface, and multilayers composed of such interfaces and homogeneous layers characterized by different strengths of the same type of microscopic disorder. This allows us to: contrast the resistor model (semiclassical) approach with a fully quantum description of dirty mesoscopic multilayers; study the transmission properties of dirty interfaces (where the Schep-Bauer distribution of transmission eigenvalues is confirmed for a single interface, as well as for a stack of such interfaces that is thinner than the localization length); and elucidate the effect of coupling to ideal leads ('measuring apparatus') on the conductance of both bulk conductors and dirty interfaces. When a multilayer contains a ballistic layer in between two interfaces, its disorder-averaged conductance oscillates as a function of the Fermi energy. I also address some fundamental issues in quantum transport theory - the relationship between the Kubo formula in the exact state representation and the 'mesoscopic Kubo formula' (which gives the exact zero-temperature conductance of a finite-size sample attached to two semi-infinite ideal leads) is thoroughly re-examined by comparing their outcomes for both the junctions and homogeneous samples. (author)

  15. Fabrication of mesoscopic floating Si wires by introducing dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohashi, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Niwa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a mesoscopic Si wire by introducing dislocations in a silicon wafer before HF anodization. The dislocations formed along the (111) crystal plane. The outline of the dislocation line was an inverted triangle. The resulting wire floated on a bridge girder and had a hybrid structure consisting of a porous layer and crystalline Si. The cross section of the wire had an inverted triangle shape. The wire formation mechanism is discussed in terms of carrier transport, crystal structure, and dislocation formation during anodization. (paper)

  16. Fabrication of mesoscopic floating Si wires by introducing dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    We fabricated a mesoscopic Si wire by introducing dislocations in a silicon wafer before HF anodization. The dislocations formed along the (111) crystal plane. The outline of the dislocation line was an inverted triangle. The resulting wire floated on a bridge girder and had a hybrid structure consisting of a porous layer and crystalline Si. The cross section of the wire had an inverted triangle shape. The wire formation mechanism is discussed in terms of carrier transport, crystal structure, and dislocation formation during anodization.

  17. Numerical simulation of lubrication mechanisms at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, C.; Bay, Niels; Christiansen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of liquid lubrication in metal forming are studied at a mesoscopic scale, adopting a 2D sequential fluid-solid weak coupling approach earlier developed in the first author's laboratory. This approach involves two computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure F...... of pyramidal indentations. The tests are performed with variable reduction and drawing speed under controlled front and back tension forces. Visual observations through a transparent die of the fluid entrapment and escape from the cavities using a CCD camera show the mechanisms of Micro......PlastoHydroDynamic Lubrication (MPHDL) as well as cavity shrinkage due to lubricant compression and escape and strip deformation....

  18. Mesoscopic Rydberg Gate Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Lesanovsky, I.; Zoller, P.; Weimer, H.; Buechler, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically a parallelized C-NOT gate which allows us to entangle a mesoscopic ensemble of atoms with a single control atom in a single step, with high fidelity and on a microsecond time scale. Our scheme relies on the strong and long-ranged interaction between Rydberg atoms triggering electromagnetically induced transparency. By this we can robustly implement a conditional transfer of all ensemble atoms between two logical states, depending on the state of the control atom. We outline a many-body interferometer which allows a comparison of two many-body quantum states by performing a measurement of the control atom.

  19. Superconducting proximity effect in mesoscopic superconductor/normal-metal junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, H; Toyoda, E

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting proximity effect is discussed in mesoscopic superconductor/normal-metal junctions. The newly-developed theory shows long-range phase-coherent effect which explaines early experimental results of giant magnetoresistance oscillations in an Andreev interferometer. The theory also shows that the proximity correction to the conductance (PCC) has a reentrant behavior as a function of energy. The reentrant behavior is systematically studied in a gated superconductor-semiconductor junction. A negative PCC is observed in the case of a weak coupling between the normal metal and the external reservoir. Phase coherent ac effect is also observed when rf is irradiated to the junction.

  20. Introduction to wave scattering, localization, and mesoscopic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Ping

    1995-01-01

    This book gives readers a coherent picture of waves in disordered media, including multiple scattered waves. The book is intended to be self-contained, with illustrated problems and solutions at the end of each chapter to serve the double purpose of filling out the technical and mathematical details and giving the students exercises if used as a course textbook.The study of wave behavior in disordered media has applications in:Condensed matter physics (semi and superconductor nanostructures and mesoscopic phenomena)Materials science/analytical chemistry (analysis of composite and crystalline structures and properties)Optics and electronics (microelectronic and optoelectronic devices)Geology (seismic exploration of Earths subsurface)

  1. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radouil Tzekov

    Full Text Available Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL, tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A, microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B, collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3 and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1, APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the

  2. Effect of humic-plant feed preparations on biochemical blood parameters of laying hens in deep litter housing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubel, F; Dobrzański, Z; Gaweł, A; Pogoda-Sewerniak, K; Grela, E R

    2015-01-01

    An influence of various humic-plant feed additives based on some herbs (nettle, chamomile, yarrow, perforatum), lucerne and humic materials on biochemical indices of Lohmann Brown (LB) layers blood plasma was estimated. Hens were housed in deep litter system, 20 birds in a group. Four groups were formed: control (C - standard feeding), and experimental, supplemented with prepara- tions: E-1 herbal-humic, E-2 humic-herbal and E-3--humic-lucerne. Hens were placed in the pens on the 16th week of life, addition of preparations with standard food mixture started at the 22nd wk and lasted until 66th wk of life. Blood for analyses was collected four times in the following periods: 27, 37, 54 and 65th wk of life. The applied humic-plant preparations to a limited degree affected the values of examined biochemical parameters in serum: total protein (TP), albumins (Albs), glucose (Glu), urea, triacylglycerols (TAG), total cholesterol (TCh), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminot- ransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). It is difficult to determine based on these study, which preparation is one the most active biologically, however is seems that humic-lucerne prepara- tion affected the examined blood parameters to the highest degree. The reference values ranges in hens blood serum LB hens were proposed for: TP (43-65 g/l), Albs (15-22 g/l), urea (0.5-1.2 mmol/l), Glu 10-15 mmol/l), TCh (2.2-4.5 mmol/l), TAG (10-24 mmol/l), AST (4-12 U/l), ALT (150-280 mmol/l) and ALP (190-350 U/l).

  3. Mesoscopic modelling and simulation of soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D; Krüger, Timm; Henrich, Oliver

    2017-12-20

    The deformability of soft condensed matter often requires modelling of hydrodynamical aspects to gain quantitative understanding. This, however, requires specialised methods that can resolve the multiscale nature of soft matter systems. We review a number of the most popular simulation methods that have emerged, such as Langevin dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, multi-particle collision dynamics, sometimes also referred to as stochastic rotation dynamics, and the lattice-Boltzmann method. We conclude this review with a short glance at current compute architectures for high-performance computing and community codes for soft matter simulation.

  4. A Floquet-Green's function approach to mesoscopic transport under ac bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, B H; Cao, J C

    2008-01-01

    The current response of a mesoscopic system under a periodic ac bias is investigated by combining the Floquet theorem and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The band structure of the lead under ac bias is fully taken into account by using appropriate self-energies in an enlarged Floquet space. Both the retarded and lesser Green's functions are obtained in the Floquet basis to account for the interference and interaction effects. In addition to the external ac bias, the time-varying Coulomb interaction, which is treated at the self-consistent Hartree-Fock level, provides another internal ac field. The numerical results show that the time-varying Coulomb field yields decoherence and reduces the ringing behavior of the current response to a harmonic bias

  5. Mesoscopic electrohydrodynamic simulations of binary colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Nicolas; Frijters, Stefan; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Harting, Jens

    2018-04-01

    A model is presented for the solution of electrokinetic phenomena of colloidal suspensions in fluid mixtures. We solve the discrete Boltzmann equation with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator using the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate binary fluid flows. Solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions are implemented using a pseudopotential model. The Nernst-Planck equation, describing the kinetics of dissolved ion species, is solved using a finite difference discretization based on the link-flux method. The colloids are resolved on the lattice and coupled to the hydrodynamics and electrokinetics through appropriate boundary conditions. We present the first full integration of these three elements. The model is validated by comparing with known analytic solutions of ionic distributions at fluid interfaces, dielectric droplet deformations, and the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal suspensions. Its possibilities are explored by considering various physical systems, such as breakup of charged and neutral droplets and colloidal dynamics at either planar or spherical fluid interfaces.

  6. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  7. A novel grid-based mesoscopic model for evacuation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meng; Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Ma, Yi

    2018-05-01

    This study presents a novel grid-based mesoscopic model for evacuation dynamics. In this model, the evacuation space is discretised into larger cells than those used in microscopic models. This approach directly computes the dynamic changes crowd densities in cells over the course of an evacuation. The density flow is driven by the density-speed correlation. The computation is faster than in traditional cellular automata evacuation models which determine density by computing the movements of each pedestrian. To demonstrate the feasibility of this model, we apply it to a series of practical scenarios and conduct a parameter sensitivity study of the effect of changes in time step δ. The simulation results show that within the valid range of δ, changing δ has only a minor impact on the simulation. The model also makes it possible to directly acquire key information such as bottleneck areas from a time-varied dynamic density map, even when a relatively large time step is adopted. We use the commercial software AnyLogic to evaluate the model. The result shows that the mesoscopic model is more efficient than the microscopic model and provides more in-situ details (e.g., pedestrian movement pattern) than the macroscopic models.

  8. Mesoscopic Iron-Oxide Nanorod Polymer Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Robert; Ohno, Kohji; Composto, Russell

    2012-02-01

    Dispersion of nanostructures in polymer matrices is required in order to take advantage of the unique properties of the nano-sized filler. This work investigates the dispersion of mesoscopic (200 nm long) iron-oxide rods (FeNRs) grafted with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes having molecular weights (MWs) of 3.7K, 32K and 160K. These rods were then dispersed in either a poly(methyl methacrylate) or poly(oxyethylene) (PEO) matrix film so that the matrix/brush interaction is either entropic (PMMA matrix) or enthalpic and entropic (PEO matrix). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the dispersion of the FeNRs in the polymer matrix. The results show that the FeNRs with the largest brush were always dispersed in the matrix, whereas the rods with the shorter brushes always aggregated in the matrix. This suggests that the brush MW is a critical parameter to achieve dispersion of these mesoscopic materials. This work can be extended to understand the dispersion of other types of mesocopic particles

  9. Flexible histone tails in a new mesoscopic oligonucleosome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Gaurav; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2006-07-01

    We describe a new mesoscopic model of oligonucleosomes that incorporates flexible histone tails. The nucleosome cores are modeled using the discrete surface-charge optimization model, which treats the nucleosome as an electrostatic surface represented by hundreds of point charges; the linker DNAs are treated using a discrete elastic chain model; and the histone tails are modeled using a bead/chain hydrodynamic approach as chains of connected beads where each bead represents five protein residues. Appropriate charges and force fields are assigned to each histone chain so as to reproduce the electrostatic potential, structure, and dynamics of the corresponding atomistic histone tails at different salt conditions. The dynamics of resulting oligonucleosomes at different sizes and varying salt concentrations are simulated by Brownian dynamics with complete hydrodynamic interactions. The analyses demonstrate that the new mesoscopic model reproduces experimental results better than its predecessors, which modeled histone tails as rigid entities. In particular, our model with flexible histone tails: correctly accounts for salt-dependent conformational changes in the histone tails; yields the experimentally obtained values of histone-tail mediated core/core attraction energies; and considers the partial shielding of electrostatic repulsion between DNA linkers as a result of the spatial distribution of histone tails. These effects are crucial for regulating chromatin structure but are absent or improperly treated in models with rigid histone tails. The development of this model of oligonucleosomes thus opens new avenues for studying the role of histone tails and their variants in mediating gene expression through modulation of chromatin structure.

  10. Environmental Effects on Quantum Reversal of Mesoscopic Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, R.; Chiorescu, I.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Barbara, B.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Caneschi, A.; Mueller, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.

    2002-10-01

    extension of these studies beyond molecular magnetism. Single-ion slow quantum relaxation is observed in rare-earth Ho3+ ions highly diluted in an insulating matrix LiYF4. This relaxation is due to the coherent tunneling of individual Ho3+ spins strongly coupled to their nuclear spins, leading to electro-nuclear entangled states at avoided level crossings. In fact tunneling of the spin system is induced by the hyperfine coupling. Together with the important role of the "spin bath", the roles of cross-spin and spin-phonon relaxations are also considered. All these results confirm the emergence of a new field of research: "mesoscopic magnetism".

  11. Fabrication of a pen-shaped portable biochemical reaction system based on magnetic bead manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Inagaki, Noriyuki; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    A pen-shaped platform that is similar to a mechanical pencil is proposed for producing a portable reaction system. A reaction unit, as the key component in the system, was produced by using a heat shrinkable tube. A mechanical pencil supplied by Mitsubishi Pencil Co. Ltd was used as the pen-shaped platform for driving the reaction cylinder. It was actuated using an inchworm motion. We confirmed that the magnetic beads were successfully manipulated in the droplet in the cylinder-shaped reaction units. (technical note)

  12. Mesoscopic fluctuations in biharmonically driven flux qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, Alejandro; Domínguez, Daniel; Sánchez, María José

    2017-01-01

    We investigate flux qubits driven by a biharmonic magnetic signal, with a phase lag that acts as an effective time reversal broken parameter. The driving induced transition rate between the ground and the excited state of the flux qubit can be thought of as an effective transmittance, profiting from a direct analogy between interference effects at avoided level crossings and scattering events in disordered electronic systems. For time scales prior to full relaxation, but large compared to the decoherence time, this characteristic rate has been accessed experimentally by Gustavsson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 016603 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.016603 and its sensitivity with both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning explored. In this way, signatures of universal conductance fluctuationslike effects have been analyzed and compared with predictions from a phenomenological model that only accounts for decoherence, as a classical noise. Here we go beyond the classical noise model and solve the full dynamics of the driven flux qubit in contact with a quantum bath employing the Floquet-Born-Markov master equation. Within this formalism, the computed relaxation and decoherence rates turn out to be strongly dependent on both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning. Consequently, the associated pattern of fluctuations in the characteristic rates display important differences with those obtained within the mentioned phenomenological model. In particular, we demonstrate the weak localizationlike effect in the average values of the relaxation rate. Our predictions can be tested for accessible but longer time scales than the current experimental times.

  13. Control mechanisms for stochastic biochemical systems via computation of reachable sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Eszter; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-08-01

    Controlling the behaviour of cells by rationally guiding molecular processes is an overarching aim of much of synthetic biology. Molecular processes, however, are notoriously noisy and frequently nonlinear. We present an approach to studying the impact of control measures on motifs of molecular interactions that addresses the problems faced in many biological systems: stochasticity, parameter uncertainty and nonlinearity. We show that our reachability analysis formalism can describe the potential behaviour of biological (naturally evolved as well as engineered) systems, and provides a set of bounds on their dynamics at the level of population statistics: for example, we can obtain the possible ranges of means and variances of mRNA and protein expression levels, even in the presence of uncertainty about model parameters.

  14. Reaction factoring and bipartite update graphs accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for large-scale biochemical systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Indurkhya

    Full Text Available ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1 a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2 a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models.

  15. Reaction Factoring and Bipartite Update Graphs Accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for Large-Scale Biochemical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indurkhya, Sagar; Beal, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1) a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2) a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models. PMID:20066048

  16. Reaction factoring and bipartite update graphs accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for large-scale biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indurkhya, Sagar; Beal, Jacob

    2010-01-06

    ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1) a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2) a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models.

  17. BIOCHEM-ORCHESTRA: A tool for evaluating chemical speciation and ecotoxicological impacts of heavy metals on river flood plain systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, J.P.M.; Meeussen, J.C.L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical speciation model BIOCHEM was extended with ecotoxicological transfer functions for uptake of metals (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by plants and soil invertebrates. It was coupled to the object-oriented framework ORCHESTRA to achieve a flexible and dynamic decision support system (DSS) to analyse natural or anthropogenic changes that occur in river systems. The DSS uses the chemical characteristics of soils and sediments as input, and calculates speciation and subsequent uptake by biota at various scenarios. Biotic transfer functions were field-validated, and actual hydrological conditions were derived from long-term monitoring data. The DSS was tested for several scenarios that occur in the Meuse catchment areas, such as flooding and sedimentation of riverine sediments on flood plains. Risks are expressed in terms of changes in chemical mobility, and uptake by flood plain key species (flora and fauna). - A diagnostic risk-assessment tool for heavy metals, based on biotic and abiotic interactions, compares risks under different environmental scenarios

  18. [Clinical, biochemical and allergological indices characterizing occupational diseases of the bronchial and pulmonary system in employees at aluminium production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudaeva, I V; Dyakovich, O A; Beygel, E A; Masnavieva, L B; Naumova, O V; Budarina, L A

    There are many harmful factors that possess a damaging impact on the body of employees at aluminum production. It leads to the development of bronchial asthma (BA), chronic nonobstructive bronchitis (CNB) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The pathogenesis of these disorders, as well as sensitizing effect offluorine in the aluminum production is not fully understood. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of laboratory indices in patients with occupational diseases of the respiratory system. In workers of aluminum production with the diagnosis of occupational diseases of respiratory system (15 patients with a diagnosis of asthma, 30 CNB cases, 20 COPD patients) we evaluated the content of total protein, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), total calcium, phosphorus, ceruloplasmin, hematological indices and performed emigration of leukocytes braking test (TTEEL). Clinical and biochemical profile ofpersons with occupational asthma was characterized by a low level of total calcium and ceruloplasmin, a high concentration of phosphorus in the blood serum and inhibition of leukocyte emigration in the test with sodium fluoride. For aluminum production CNB workers characteristic active proatherogenic process was pronounced by a decrease in the HDLC level and an increase in atherogenic index; higher hematocrit value and concentration of erythrocytes, and more than 50% of cases of sensitization to the presence of sodium fluoride. COPD cases had occupational lower average concentration of hemoglobin in the erythrocyte, total protein in serum, as well as polymorphic variant response to sodium fluoride in the form of a depression and activation of leucocytes emigration.

  19. [Age changes of immunological, morphological and biochemical indices of male reproductive system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, O V; Akhmineeva, A Kh; Gudinskaia, N I; Boĭko, V I; Kozak, D M

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzes the dependence of bactericidal activity of sperm--natural resistance factors controlling the survival of bacteria in the urogenital tract, on the age of men. These data are compared with the results of the standard (on the recommendations of the WHO) spermogram, reflecting reproductive health. Due to the fact that one of the main etiological agents of infectious disease groups in the male reproductive system in adulthood are Staphylococcus spp., we consider the level of bactericidal activity of sperm in resident and transient carriage of S. aureus and S. epidermidis.

  20. Designing a reusable system based on nanodiamonds for biochemical determination of urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzhin, N O; Baron, A V; Bondar, V S; Gitelson, I I

    2015-01-01

    A reusable system including urease covalently bound to the surface of modified nanodiamonds (MNDs) has been developed for the multiple determination of urea. The immobilized enzyme exhibits functional activity and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia. The presence of ammonia is confirmed by the formation of a colored product after the addition of chemical reagents. It was shown that the MNDs-urease complex can function in a wide range of temperatures and pH as well as in deionized water. The complex provides a linear yield of the product at low analyte concentrations and allows the multiple determination of urea in vitro.

  1. Biochemical fingerprinting of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the PhenePlate system: comparison between pandemic and non-pandemic serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mokhlasur; Bhuiyan, N A; Kuhn, I; Ramamurthy, T; Rahman, M; Mollby, R; Nair, G Balakrish

    2006-10-01

    During recent years a pandemic clone of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has emerged. Isolates of this clone are distributed among several serotypes, but are genotypically related. In the present study, a phenotyping method (biochemical fingerprinting) was used to characterize pandemic and non-pandemic isolates belonging to V. parahaemolyticus. It was found that the pandemic isolates showed a high level of phenotypic homogeneity and a majority of the pandemic isolates belonged to the same biochemical phenotype, whereas non-pandemic V. parahemolyticus isolates were more heterogeneous. In conclusion, biochemical fingerprinting of V. parahaemolyticus can be used as a first screening method to differentiate between pandemic and non-pandemic isolates of V. parahaemolyticus.

  2. Vortex patterns in a mesoscopic superconducting rod with a magnetic dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaguera, Antonio R. de C. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Doria, Mauro M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica dos Solidos; Peeters, F.M. [Universiteit Antwerpen (Belgium). Dept. Fysica

    2009-07-01

    Full text follows. Magnetism and superconductivity are competing orders and its coexistence has been the subject of intense investigation both in nano fabricated materials also in natural compounds. Together they bring new phenomena such as in case of magnetic dots on top of a superconducting film which are a source of ratchet potential.Recently we have investigated vortex patterns that originate from a magnetic domain internal to the superconductor. There vortex lines are curved in space, as their only source and sinkhole are inside the superconductor. We found that when the magnetic domain has a small magnetic moment, the vortex pattern is made of just three vortex loops, instead of one, two or any higher number of vortex loops. The presence of a magnetic moment near thin mesoscopic disks and films has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. New vortex patterns arise there due to the inhomogeneity of the applied magnetic field, although they do not display curved vortices because of the thin limit which turns the vortices into flat two-dimensional objects. In this work we report a theoretical investigation of vortex patterns into a mesoscopic superconducting rod with an external magnetic dot on top. We call it rod to characterize that its height is finite and comparable to the radius, thus larger than a disk and smaller than a wire. Inside the rod, a cylinder with height larger than the coherence length, {xi}, truly three-dimensional curved vortices are formed. We find reentrant behavior which means that the entrance and exit of a vortex is achieved by simply increasing (or decreasing) the intensity of the magnetic field generated by the dot. Thus the present system qualifies for technological applications as a logic gate to perform logical operation in digital circuits.

  3. Vortex patterns in a mesoscopic superconducting rod with a magnetic dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.; Doria, Mauro M.; Peeters, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text follows. Magnetism and superconductivity are competing orders and its coexistence has been the subject of intense investigation both in nano fabricated materials also in natural compounds. Together they bring new phenomena such as in case of magnetic dots on top of a superconducting film which are a source of ratchet potential.Recently we have investigated vortex patterns that originate from a magnetic domain internal to the superconductor. There vortex lines are curved in space, as their only source and sinkhole are inside the superconductor. We found that when the magnetic domain has a small magnetic moment, the vortex pattern is made of just three vortex loops, instead of one, two or any higher number of vortex loops. The presence of a magnetic moment near thin mesoscopic disks and films has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. New vortex patterns arise there due to the inhomogeneity of the applied magnetic field, although they do not display curved vortices because of the thin limit which turns the vortices into flat two-dimensional objects. In this work we report a theoretical investigation of vortex patterns into a mesoscopic superconducting rod with an external magnetic dot on top. We call it rod to characterize that its height is finite and comparable to the radius, thus larger than a disk and smaller than a wire. Inside the rod, a cylinder with height larger than the coherence length, ξ, truly three-dimensional curved vortices are formed. We find reentrant behavior which means that the entrance and exit of a vortex is achieved by simply increasing (or decreasing) the intensity of the magnetic field generated by the dot. Thus the present system qualifies for technological applications as a logic gate to perform logical operation in digital circuits.

  4. Production and Detection of Spin-Entangled Electrons in Mesoscopic Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Guido

    2006-03-01

    Electron spins are an extremely versatile form of quantum bits. When localized in quantum dots, they can form a register for quantum computation. Moreover, being attached to a charge in a mesoscopic conductor allows the electron spin to play the role of a mobile carrier of quantum information similarly to photons in optical quantum communication. Since entanglement is a basic resource in quantum communication, the production and detection of spin-entangled Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs of electrons are of great interest. Besides the practical importance, it is of fundamental interest to test quantum non-locality for electrons. I review the theoretical schemes for the entanglement production in superconductor-normal junctions [1] and other systems. The electron spin entanglement can be detected and quantified from measurements of the fluctuations (shot noise) of the charge current after the electrons have passed through an electronic beam splitter [2,3]. This two-particle interference effect is related to the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment and leads to a doubling of the shot noise SI=φ=0 for spin-entangled states, allowing their differentiation from unentangled pairs. I report on the role of spin-orbit coupling (Rashba and Dresselhaus) in a complete characterization of the spin entanglement [4]. Finally, I address the effects of a discrete level spectrum in the mesoscopic leads and of backscattering and decoherence.[1] P. Recher, E. V. Sukhorukov, D. Loss, Phys. Rev. B 63, 165314 (2001)[2] G. Burkard, D. Loss, E. V. Sukhorukov, Phys. Rev. B 61, R16303 (2000)[3] G. Burkard and D. Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett.91, 087903 (2003)[4] J. C. Egues, G. Burkard, D. Saraga, J. Schliemann, D. Loss, cond-mat/0509038, to appear in Phys.Rev.B (2005).

  5. Cantilever-based bio-chemical sensor integrated in a microliquid handling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jacob; Marie, Rodolphe; Boisen, Anja

    2001-01-01

    The cantilevers have integrated piezoresistive readout which, compared to optical readout, enables simple measurements on even non-transparent liquids, such as blood. First, we introduce a simple theory for using piezoresistive cantilevers as surface stress sensors. Then, the sensor fabrication...... based on conventional microfabrication is described and the sensor characterization is discussed. During the characterization we found a stress sensitivity of (ΔR/R)=4.6:10 -4 (N/m)-1 and a minimum detectable surface stress change of 2.6 mN/m. Aqua regia etch of gold on top of the cantilevers has been...... monitored, and immobilization of single-stranded thiol modified DNA-oligos has been detected by the sensor. Finally, it is demonstrated that it is possible to analyze two samples simultaneously by utilizing the laminar flow in the microliquid handling system....

  6. A system dynamics model integrating physiology and biochemical regulation predicts extent of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Nick A; Griffiths, Howard

    2013-12-01

    A system dynamics (SD) approach was taken to model crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression from measured biochemical and physiological constants. SD emphasizes state-dependent feedback interaction to describe the emergent properties of a complex system. These mechanisms maintain biological systems with homeostatic limits on a temporal basis. Previous empirical studies on CAM have correlated biological constants (e.g. enzyme kinetic parameters) with expression over the CAM diel cycle. The SD model integrates these constants within the architecture of the CAM 'system'. This allowed quantitative causal connections to be established between biological inputs and the four distinct phases of CAM delineated by gas exchange and malic acid accumulation traits. Regulation at flow junctions (e.g. stomatal and mesophyll conductance, and malic acid transport across the tonoplast) that are subject to feedback control (e.g. stomatal aperture, malic acid inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and enzyme kinetics) was simulated. Simulated expression for the leaf-succulent Kalanchoë daigremontiana and more succulent tissues of Agave tequilana showed strong correlation with measured gas exchange and malic acid accumulation (R(2)  = 0.912 and 0.937, respectively, for K. daigremontiana and R(2)  = 0.928 and 0.942, respectively, for A. tequilana). Sensitivity analyses were conducted to quantitatively identify determinants of diel CO2 uptake. The transition in CAM expression from low to high volume/area tissues (elimination of phase II-IV carbon-uptake signatures) was achieved largely by the manipulation three input parameters. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Physiological, biochemical and defense system responses of parthenium hysterophorus to vehicular exhaust pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Hussain, M.; Hameed, M.; Ahmad, R.

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by vehicular exhaust emissions detrimentally affect plants and other living beings. This investigation was carried out to evaluate the effects of vehicular exhaust pollutants on Parthenium hysterophorus at various sites along two major roads [Pindi Bhattian to Lillah (M-2) and Faisalabad to Sargodha (FSR)]in the Punjab, Pakistan. Control samples of P. hysterophorus were also collected from 100m away from the roads. Chlorophyll contents, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, substomatal CO/sub 2/ concentration, water use efficiency, total free amino acids and total antioxidant activity of P. hysterophorus were measured. The results depicted significant reductions in chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of P. hysterophorus. Likewise, reduction in stomatal conductance was also recorded which resulted in lowered photosynthetic and transpiration rates. The overall reduction in photosynthetic rate of P. hysterophorus was 30.92% and 35.38% along M-2 and FSR roads, respectively. The limited photosynthesis resulted in increased levels of sub stomatal /sub 2/ concentration and water use efficiency. The elevated levels of free amino acids and total antioxidant activity were noted and could be attributed to activation of plant's defense system to cope with the deleterious effects of vehicular air pollutants. The significant correlations between various attributes of P. hysterophorus with traffic density signifies the stress caused by vehicular emissions. (author)

  8. Nitric oxide in the nervous system: biochemical, developmental, and neurobiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossenza, Marcelo; Socodato, Renato; Portugal, Camila C; Domith, Ivan C L; Gladulich, Luis F H; Encarnação, Thaísa G; Calaza, Karin C; Mendonça, Henrique R; Campello-Costa, Paula; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very reactive molecule, and its short half-life would make it virtually invisible until its discovery. NO activates soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), increasing 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels to activate PKGs. Although NO triggers several phosphorylation cascades due to its ability to react with Fe II in heme-containing proteins such as sGC, it also promotes a selective posttranslational modification in cysteine residues by S-nitrosylation, impacting on protein function, stability, and allocation. In the central nervous system (CNS), NO synthesis usually requires a functional coupling of nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I) and proteins such as NMDA receptors or carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of NOS (CAPON), which is critical for specificity and triggering of selected pathways. NO also modulates CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), ERK, AKT, and Src, with important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Differences in the regulation of neuronal death or survival by NO may be explained by several mechanisms involving localization of NOS isoforms, amount of NO being produced or protein sets being modulated. A number of studies show that NO regulates neurotransmitter release and different aspects of synaptic dynamics, such as differentiation of synaptic specializations, microtubule dynamics, architecture of synaptic protein organization, and modulation of synaptic efficacy. NO has also been associated with synaptogenesis or synapse elimination, and it is required for long-term synaptic modifications taking place in axons or dendrites. In spite of tremendous advances in the knowledge of NO biological effects, a full description of its role in the CNS is far from being completely elucidated. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An evaluation of the Oxoid Biochemical Identification System Campy rapid screening test for Campylobacteraceae and Helicobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, N; Lastovica, A J

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the Oxoid Biochemical Identification System (OBIS) Campy test (ID0800M) against Campylobacter; Arcobacter; and other micro-organisms, with similar colonial morphology, for the detection of l-alanine aminopeptidase (l-ALA). The KOH and l-ALA (OBIS and Fluka) tests were carried out on every isolate. The procedures were followed as indicated in the OBIS and Fluka kit instructions. A total of 146 strains of 19 species of Campylobacter, seven strains of Arcobacter butzleri, four Arcobacter butzleri-like strains, 42 strains of 10 species of Helicobacter, 96 Gram-negative and 49 Gram-positive clinical isolates were tested. As expected, Campylobacter and Arcobacter strains were negative, while other Gram-negative bacteria were positive for the l-ALA test. An unexpected finding was that Helicobacter strains, although Gram-negative, were all negative for the l-ALA tests suggesting the absence of l-ALA within this genus. This is a novel finding. The absence of l-ALA was confirmed upon comparison with the available full genomic sequences of Helicobacter on the NCBI database. The OBIS Campy (ID0800M) test kit proved to be rapid and accurate for the presumptive characterization of Campylobacter and Arcobacter. A novel finding was that Helicobacter species also did not have the l-ALA enzyme. The OBIS kit will be useful in diagnostic laboratories for the presumptive diagnosis of Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter strains.

  10. An optical biosensing film for biochemical oxygen demand determination in seawater with an automatic flow sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lingling; Wang, Xudong; Guo, Guangmei; Wang, Xiaoru; Chen, Xi

    2007-09-01

    An on-line roboticized apparatus, including an optical biosensing film with an automatic flow sampling system, has been developed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination of seawater. The sensing film employed in the apparatus consisted of an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) film embedded with tri(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) perchlorate. Three species of microorganism cultivated from seawater were immobilized in an ORMOSIL-polyvinyl alcohol matrix. Possible factors affecting BOD determination were studied, including sampling frequency, temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration. Based on measurements of the linear fluctuant coefficients and the reproducibility of its response to seawater, the BOD apparatus showed the advantages of high veracity and short response time. Generally, the linear fluctuant coefficient (R2) in the BOD range 0.2-40 mg l-1 was 0.9945 when using a glucose/glutamate (GGA) BOD standard solution. A reproducible response for the BOD sensing film of within ±2.8% could be obtained in the 2 mg l-1 GGA solution. The BOD apparatus was applied to the BOD determination of seawater, and the values estimated by this biosensing apparatus correlated well with those determined by the conventional 5 day BOD (BOD5) test.

  11. Out-of-equilibrium spin transport in mesoscopic superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, C H L; Aprili, M

    2018-08-06

    The excitations in conventional superconductors, Bogoliubov quasi-particles, are spin-[Formula: see text] fermions but their charge is energy-dependent and, in fact, zero at the gap edge. Therefore, in superconductors (unlike normal metals) spin and charge degrees of freedom may be separated. In this article, we review spin injection into conventional superconductors and focus on recent experiments on mesoscopic superconductors. We show how quasi-particle spin transport and out-of-equilibrium spin-dependent superconductivity can be triggered using the Zeeman splitting of the quasi-particle density of states in thin-film superconductors with small spin-mixing scattering. Finally, we address the spin dynamics and the feedback of quasi-particle spin imbalances on the amplitude of the superconducting energy gap.This article is part of the theme issue 'Andreev bound states'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  12. Transport Characteristics of Mesoscopic Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A. H.; Kirah, K.; Aly, N. A. I.; El-Sayes, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    The transport property of a quantum dot under the influence of external time-dependent field is investigated. The mesoscopic device is modelled as semiconductor quantum dot coupled weakly to superconducting leads via asymmetric double tunnel barriers of different heights. An expression for the current is deduced by using the Landauer–Buttiker formula, taking into consideration of both the Coulomb blockade effect and the magnetic field. It is found that the periodic oscillation of the current with the magnetic field is controlled by the ratio of the frequency of the applied ac-field to the electron cyclotron frequency. Our results show that the present device operates as a radio-frequency single electron transistor

  13. Persistent currents in an ensemble of isolated mesoscopic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altland, A.; Iida, S.; Mueller-Groelling, A.; Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the authors calculate the persistent current induced at zero temperature by an external, constant, and homogeneous magnetic field in an ensemble of isolated mesoscopic rings. In each ring, the electrons are assumed to move independently under the influence of a Gaussian white noise random impurity potential. They account for the magnetic field only in terms of the flux threading each ring, without considering the field present in the body of the ring. Particular attention is paid to the constraint of integer particle number on each ring. The authors evaluate the persistent current non-perturbatively, using a generating functional involving Grassmann integration. The magnetic flux threading each ring breaks the orthogonal symmetry of the formalism; forcing us to calculate explicitly the orthogonal-unitary crossover. 24 refs., 1 fig

  14. Collective excitability in a mesoscopic neuronal model of epileptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedynak, Maciej; Pons, Antonio J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    At the mesoscopic scale, the brain can be understood as a collection of interacting neuronal oscillators, but the extent to which its sustained activity is due to coupling among brain areas is still unclear. Here we address this issue in a simplified situation by examining the effect of coupling between two cortical columns described via Jansen-Rit neural mass models. Our results show that coupling between the two neuronal populations gives rise to stochastic initiations of sustained collective activity, which can be interpreted as epileptic events. For large enough coupling strengths, termination of these events results mainly from the emergence of synchronization between the columns, and thus it is controlled by coupling instead of noise. Stochastic triggering and noise-independent durations are characteristic of excitable dynamics, and thus we interpret our results in terms of collective excitability.

  15. Coherent X-ray diffraction studies of mesoscopic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, Anatoly

    2015-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to three separate projects, which can be considered as independent. First, the dynamical scattering effects in the Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI) method are discussed. Based on the simulation results, a straightforward method for correction for the refraction and absorption artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstruction is suggested. The second part summarizes the results of an Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging experiment with a single colloidal crystal grain. A remarkable result is that positions of individual particles in the crystal lattice have been resolved in three dimensions. The third project is devoted to X-ray diffraction experimental studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystalline films upon incremental heating. Based on the results of the analysis a model of structural evolution of a colloidal crystal upon heating on nanoscopic and mesoscopic length scales is suggested.

  16. Thermodynamically consistent mesoscopic model of the ferro/paramagnetic transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benešová, Barbora; Kružík, Martin; Roubíček, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, Č. 1 (2013), s. 1-28 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GA106/09/1573; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/1397; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06052 Program:GA; LC Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : ferro-para-magnetism * evolution * thermodynamics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UT-L) Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-thermodynamically consistent mesoscopic model of the ferro-paramagnetic transition.pdf

  17. Mesoscopic approach to describe high burn-up fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, M.

    1999-01-01

    The grain sub-division and the rim structure formation are new phenomena for LWR fuel engineering. The consequence of these are now under investigation in several international programs such as HBRP (High Burnup Rim Project) of CRIEPI, NFIR of EPRI, and EdF/CEA program in France. The theoretical understanding of this phenomenon is underway. Here, the process is peculiar in the following points; (1) majority of the domain of the material are changed to a new morphology after the restructuring, (2) the final size of the new grains is around 0.1 μm which is neither atomic scale nor macroscopic scale. (3) the morphology of the restructured domain indicates fractal like feature which indicates complex process is under-taken. From the first feature, the process is similar to phase transitions or metallographic transformations. However, as the crystallographic structure has no change before and after the restructuring, it is not the phase transition nor the transformation of atomic scale instability. The focus could be put on the material transport of mesoscopic scale which create the peculiar morphology. Indeed there are flows of energy and disturbances in crystallographic structure in nuclear materials on duty. Although the fission energy is 10 4 larger than the formation energy of the defects, thanks to the stability of the selected material, most of energy is thermalized without crystallographic instability. Little remained energy creates flows of disturbances and the new structure is a consequence of ordering process driven by these flows of disturbances. Therefore this phenomenon is a good example to study cooperative ordering process in physics of materials. This paper presents some of present understandings of the rim structure formation based on the mesoscopic mechanistic theories. Possible future development is also proposed (author) (ml)

  18. A New Data Analysis System to Quantify Associations between Biochemical Parameters of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Rodriguez

    Full Text Available In hemodialysis patients, deviations from KDIGO recommended values of individual parameters, phosphate, calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH, are associated with increased mortality. However, it is widely accepted that these parameters are not regulated independently of each other and that therapy aimed to correct one parameter often modifies the others. The aim of the present study is to quantify the degree of association between parameters of chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD.Data was extracted from a cohort of 1758 adult HD patients between January 2000 and June 2013 obtaining a total of 46.141 records (10 year follow-up. We used an advanced data analysis system called Random Forest (RF which is based on self-learning procedure with similar axioms to those utilized for the development of artificial intelligence. This new approach is particularly useful when the variables analyzed are closely dependent to each other.The analysis revealed a strong association between PTH and phosphate that was superior to that of PTH and Calcium. The classical linear regression analysis between PTH and phosphate shows a correlation coefficient is 0.27, p<0.001, the possibility to predict PTH changes from phosphate modification is marginal. Alternatively, RF assumes that changes in phosphate will cause modifications in other associated variables (calcium and others that may also affect PTH values. Using RF the correlation coefficient between changes in serum PTH and phosphate is 0.77, p<0.001; thus, the power of prediction is markedly increased. The effect of therapy on biochemical variables was also analyzed using this RF.Our results suggest that the analysis of the complex interactions between mineral metabolism parameters in CKD-MBD may demand a more advanced data analysis system such as RF.

  19. Quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Fabio Alencar; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states. The protocol is described and its security against brute force and quantum cloning machine attack is analyzed

  20. Quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Fábio Alencar; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2008-02-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum bit string commitment protocol using polarization of mesoscopic coherent states. The protocol is described and its security against brute force and quantum cloning machine attack is analyzed.

  1. High Resolution Higher Energy X-ray Microscope for Mesoscopic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snigireva, I; Snigirev, A

    2013-01-01

    We developed a novel X-ray microscopy technique to study mesoscopically structured materials, employing compound refractive lenses. The easily seen advantage of lens-based methodology is the possibility to retrieve high resolution diffraction pattern and real-space images in the same experimental setup. Methodologically the proposed approach is similar to the studies of crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The proposed microscope was applied for studying of mesoscopic materials such as natural and synthetic opals, inverted photonic crystals

  2. Electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene structures: Charge confinement and control of spin and charge transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.co [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412, Moscow (Russian Federation); Giavaras, G. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bliokh, Yury P. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Freilikher, Valentin [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This brief review discusses electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene-based structures. These allow controlling the confinement and transport of charge and spin; thus, they are of interest not only for fundamental research, but also for applications. The graphene-related topics covered here are: edges, nanoribbons, quantum dots, pn-junctions, pnp-structures, and quantum barriers and waveguides. This review is partly intended as a short introduction to graphene mesoscopics.

  3. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the antioxidative system of Coffea sp. under cold conditions in genotypes with contrasting tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Ana S; Lidon, Fernando C; Batista-Santos, Paula; Leitão, António Eduardo; Pais, Isabel P; Ribeiro, Ana I; Ramalho, José Cochicho

    2010-03-15

    Low positive temperature (chilling) is frequently linked to the promotion of oxidative stress conditions, and is of particular importance in the coffee plant due to its severe impact on growth, development, photosynthesis and production. Nevertheless, some acclimation ability has been reported within the Coffea genus, and is possibly related to oxidative stress control. Using an integrated biochemical and molecular approach, the characterization of the antioxidative system of genotypes with different cold acclimation abilities was performed. Experiments were carried out using 1.5-year-old coffee seedlings of Coffea canephora cv. Apoatã, C. arabica cv. Catuaí, C. dewevrei and 2 hybrids, Icatu (C. arabicaxC. canephora) and Piatã (C. dewevreixC. arabica) subjected to a gradual cold treatment and a recovery period. Icatu showed the greatest ability to control oxidative stress, as reflected by the enhancement of several antioxidative components (Cu,Zn-SOD and APX activities; ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and chlorogenic acids (CGAs) contents) and lower reactive oxygen species contents (H(2)O(2) and OH). Gene expression studies show that GRed, DHAR and class III and IV chitinases might also be involved in the cold acclimation ability of Icatu. Catuaí showed intermediate acclimation ability through the reinforcement of some antioxidative molecules, usually to a lesser extent than that observed in Icatu. On the other hand, C. dewevrei showed the poorest response in terms of antioxidant accumulation, and also showed the greatest increase in OH values. The difference in the triggering of antioxidative traits supports the hypothesis of its importance to cold (and photoinhibition) tolerance in Coffea sp. and could provide a useful probe to identify tolerant genotypes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  5. The effect of geometric scattering on the oscillatory magnetoconductance in multiply connected disordered mesoscopic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, C.; Gu Benyuan.

    1994-12-01

    We present the quantum mechanical calculations on the conductance of a quantum waveguide consisting of multiply connected mesoscopic rings with disordered ring-circumferences and ballistic lead connections between the rings with the transfer matrix approach. The profiles of the conductance as functions of the magnetic flux and the Fermi wave number of electrons depend on the number of rings as also on the geometric configuration of the system. The conductance spectrum of this system for disordered ring circumferences, disordered ring intervals and disordered magnetic flux is examined in detail. Studying the effect of geometric scattering and the two different length scales involved in the network, namely, the ring circumference and the ballistic lead connections on the conductance profile, we find that there exist two kinds of mini-bands, one originating from the bound states of the rings, i.e. the intrinsic mini-bands, and the other associated with the connecting leads between the adjacent rings, which are the extra mini-bands. These two kinds of mini-bands respond differently to external perturbations in parameters. Unlike the system of potential scatterers, this system of geometric scatterers show complete band formations at all energies even for finite systems and there is a preferential decay of the energy states depending upon the type of disorder introduced. The conductance band structures strongly depend on the geometric configuration of the network and so by controlling the geometric parameters, the conductance band structures can be artificially tailored. (author). 18 refs, 6 figs

  6. Current status of temporomandibular joint disorders and the therapeutic system derived from a series of biomechanical, histological, and biochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tanne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article was designed to report the current status of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs and the therapeutic system on the basis of a series of clinical, biomechanical, histological and biochemical studies in our research groups. In particular, we have focused on the association of degenerative changes of articular cartilage in the mandibular condyle and the resultant progressive condylar resorption with mechanical stimuli acting on the condyle during the stomatognathic function. In a clinical aspect, the nature and prevalence of TMDs, association of malocclusion with TMDs, association of condylar position with TMDs, association of craniofacial morphology with TMDs, and influences of TMDs, TMJ-osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA in particular, were examined. In a biomechanical aspect, the nature of stress distribution in the TMJ from maximum clenching was analyzed with finite element method. In addition, the pattern of stress distribution was examined in association with varying vertical discrepancies of the craniofacial skeleton and friction between the articular disk and condyle. The results demonstrated an induction of large compressive stresses in the anterior and lateral areas on the condyle by the maximum clenching and the subsequent prominent increases in the same areas of the mandibular condyle as the vertical skeletal discrepancy became more prominent. Increase of friction at the articular surface was also indicated as a cause of larger stresses and the relevant disk displacement, which further induced an increase in stresses in the tissues posterior to the disks, indicating an important role of TMJ disks as a stress absorber. In a histological or biological aspect, increase in TMJ loading simulated by vertical skeletal discrepancy, which has already been revealed by the preceding finite element analysis or represented by excessive mouth opening, produced a decrease in the thickness of cartilage layers, an increase in the numbers of

  7. Novel Techniques for Quantum State Manipulation in Mesoscopic Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lukin, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    ...-out. We showed how realistic charge manipulation and measurement techniques, combined with the exchange interaction, allowed for the robust generation and purification of four particle spin entangled...

  8. Inverse problem studies of biochemical systems with structure identification of S-systems by embedding training functions in a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Ketan Dinkar; Kumar, V Ravi; Kulkarni, B D

    2016-05-01

    An efficient inverse problem approach for parameter estimation, state and structure identification from dynamic data by embedding training functions in a genetic algorithm methodology (ETFGA) is proposed for nonlinear dynamical biosystems using S-system canonical models. Use of multiple shooting and decomposition approach as training functions has been shown for handling of noisy datasets and computational efficiency in studying the inverse problem. The advantages of the methodology are brought out systematically by studying it for three biochemical model systems of interest. By studying a small-scale gene regulatory system described by a S-system model, the first example demonstrates the use of ETFGA for the multifold aims of the inverse problem. The estimation of a large number of parameters with simultaneous state and network identification is shown by training a generalized S-system canonical model with noisy datasets. The results of this study bring out the superior performance of ETFGA on comparison with other metaheuristic approaches. The second example studies the regulation of cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium cells now assuming limited availability of noisy data. Here, flexibility of the approach to incorporate partial system information in the identification process is shown and its effect on accuracy and predictive ability of the estimated model are studied. The third example studies the phenomenological toy model of the regulation of circadian oscillations in Drosophila that follows rate laws different from S-system power-law. For the limited noisy data, using a priori information about properties of the system, we could estimate an alternate S-system model that showed robust oscillatory behavior with predictive abilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mesoscopic Community Structure of Financial Markets Revealed by Price and Sign Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Assaf; Besamusca, Ferry; MacMahon, Mel; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The mesoscopic organization of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, is an intermediate between the microscopic dynamics of individual units (stocks or neurons, in the mentioned cases), and the macroscopic dynamics of the system as a whole. The organization is determined by "communities" of units whose dynamics, represented by time series of activity, is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. Recent studies have shown that the binary projections of various financial and neural time series exhibit nontrivial dynamical features that resemble those of the original data. This implies that a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign) of such increments. Here, we explore whether the binary signatures of multiple time series can replicate the same complex community organization of the financial market, as the original weighted time series. We adopt a method that has been specifically designed to detect communities from cross-correlation matrices of time series data. Our analysis shows that the simpler binary representation leads to a community structure that is almost identical with that obtained using the full weighted representation. These results confirm that binary projections of financial time series contain significant structural information.

  10. Growth of monodisperse mesoscopic metal-oxide colloids under constant monomer supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Koh; Delville, Marie-Hélène; Ushiki, Hideharu; Panizza, Pascal; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2005-07-01

    In closed systems, control over the size of monodisperse metal-oxide colloids is generally limited to submicrometric dimensions. To overcome this difficulty, we explore the formation and growth of silica particles under constant monomer supply. The monomer source is externally driven by the progressive addition into the system of one of the precursors. Monodisperse spherical particles are produced up to a mesoscopic size. We analyze their growth versus the monomer addition rate at different temperatures. Our results show that in the presence of a continuous monomer addition, growth is limited by diffusion over the investigated temporal window. Using the temperature variation of the growth rate, we prove that rescaling leads to a data reduction onto a single master curve. Contrary to the growth process, the final particle’s size reached after the end of the reagent supply strongly depends on the addition rate. The variation of the final particle size versus addition rate can be deduced from an analogy with crystal formation in jet precipitation. Within this framework, and using the temperature dependences of both the particle growth law and the final size, we determine the value of the molecular heat of dissolution associated to the silica solubility. These observations support the fact that classical theories of phase-ordering dynamics can be extended to the synthesis of inorganic particles. The emergence of a master behavior in the presence of continuous monomer addition also suggests the extension of these theories to open systems.

  11. Mesoscopic Community Structure of Financial Markets Revealed by Price and Sign Fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Almog

    Full Text Available The mesoscopic organization of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, is an intermediate between the microscopic dynamics of individual units (stocks or neurons, in the mentioned cases, and the macroscopic dynamics of the system as a whole. The organization is determined by "communities" of units whose dynamics, represented by time series of activity, is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. Recent studies have shown that the binary projections of various financial and neural time series exhibit nontrivial dynamical features that resemble those of the original data. This implies that a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign of such increments. Here, we explore whether the binary signatures of multiple time series can replicate the same complex community organization of the financial market, as the original weighted time series. We adopt a method that has been specifically designed to detect communities from cross-correlation matrices of time series data. Our analysis shows that the simpler binary representation leads to a community structure that is almost identical with that obtained using the full weighted representation. These results confirm that binary projections of financial time series contain significant structural information.

  12. Tungsten Oxide Nanofibers Self-assembled Mesoscopic Microspheres as High-performance Electrodes for Supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Taotao; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shuai; Chen, Changqing; Fang, Yanyan; Wu, Zhihao; Huo, Kaifu; Dai, Jiangnan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • WO 3 mesoscopic microspheres self-assembled by nanofibers. • Inorganic solvent H 2 O 2 play an integral role in the process of self-assembly. • WO 3 mesoscopic microspheres exhibit specific capacitance value of 797.05 F g −1 at a constant density of 0.5 A g −1 in 2 M H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution. • The WO 3 //AC asymmetric supercapacitor displays a maximum energy density of 97.61 Wh kg −1 and power density of 28.01 kW kg −1 . - Abstract: Mesoscopic WO 3 microspheres composed of self-assembly nanofibers were prepared by hydrothermal reaction of tungsten acid potassium and H 2 O 2 . The mesoscopic WO 3 microspheres offer desired porous properties and large effective active areas provided by intertwining nanofibers, thereby resulting in excellent supercapacitive properties due to facile electrolyte flow and fast reaction kinetics. In three electrode configuration, mesoscopic WO 3 microspheres exhibit specific capacitance value of 797.05 F g −1 at the current density of 0.5 A g −1 and excellent cycling stability without decay after 2000 cycles in 2 M H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution. These values are superior to other reported WO 3 composites. An asymmetric supercapacitor is constructed using the as-prepared WO 3 mesoscopic microspheres as the positive electrode and the activated carbon as the negative electrode, which displays excellent electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of 97.61 Wh kg −1 and power density of 28.01 kW kg −1 . These impressive performances suggest that the mesoscopic WO 3 microspheres are promising electrode materials for supercapacitor

  13. Quantum Coherence and Random Fields at Mesoscopic Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    We seek to explore and exploit model, disordered and geometrically frustrated magnets where coherent spin clusters stably detach themselves from their surroundings, leading to extreme sensitivity to finite frequency excitations and the ability to encode information. Global changes in either the spin concentration or the quantum tunneling probability via the application of an external magnetic field can tune the relative weights of quantum entanglement and random field effects on the mesoscopic scale. These same parameters can be harnessed to manipulate domain wall dynamics in the ferromagnetic state, with technological possibilities for magnetic information storage. Finally, extensions from quantum ferromagnets to antiferromagnets promise new insights into the physics of quantum fluctuations and effective dimensional reduction. A combination of ac susceptometry, dc magnetometry, noise measurements, hole burning, non-linear Fano experiments, and neutron diffraction as functions of temperature, magnetic field, frequency, excitation amplitude, dipole concentration, and disorder address issues of stability, overlap, coherence, and control. We have been especially interested in probing the evolution of the local order in the progression from spin liquid to spin glass to long-range-ordered magnet.

  14. Aggregation of Frenkel defects under irradiation: a mesoscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.; Kotomin, E.

    1993-08-01

    The radiation-induced aggregation of Frenkel defects in solids is studied in terms of a mesoscopic approach. The asymmetry in elastic interactions between mobile interstitials (I-I) and between interstitials and vacancies (I-V) plays a decisive role in the aggregation of similar defects. The conditions for defect aggregation are studied in detail for NaCl crystals. The critical dose rate for aggregation has been calculated as a function of the temperature as well as the aggregation rate as a function of temperature and dose rate. Furthermore, the role of deep traps (like impurities and di-vacancies), reducing the mobility of interstitials, and the role of dislocations serving as sinks for interstitials, are studied. The aggregation appears to reach a maximum at a distinct temperature which is in agreement both with experiment and the Jain-Lidiard theory. The model also predicts a shift of this maximum towards lower temperatures if the dose rate is decreased. The consequences of the model for the disposal of nuclear waste in rock salt formations, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  15. Quantum Coherence and Random Fields at Mesoscopic Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We seek to explore and exploit model, disordered and geometrically frustrated magnets where coherent spin clusters stably detach themselves from their surroundings, leading to extreme sensitivity to finite frequency excitations and the ability to encode information. Global changes in either the spin concentration or the quantum tunneling probability via the application of an external magnetic field can tune the relative weights of quantum entanglement and random field effects on the mesoscopic scale. These same parameters can be harnessed to manipulate domain wall dynamics in the ferromagnetic state, with technological possibilities for magnetic information storage. Finally, extensions from quantum ferromagnets to antiferromagnets promise new insights into the physics of quantum fluctuations and effective dimensional reduction. A combination of ac susceptometry, dc magnetometry, noise measurements, hole burning, non-linear Fano experiments, and neutron diffraction as functions of temperature, magnetic field, frequency, excitation amplitude, dipole concentration, and disorder address issues of stability, overlap, coherence, and control. We have been especially interested in probing the evolution of the local order in the progression from spin liquid to spin glass to long-range-ordered magnet.

  16. Insight or illusion? seeing inside the cell with mesoscopic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

     the dynamics of spatially heterogeneous membranes and the crowded cytoplasmic environment to be followed at a modest computational cost. The price for such power is that the atomic detail of the constituents is much lower than in atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. We argue that this price is worth...... by spatial resolution and the speed of molecular rearrangements. The increase in computing power of the last few decades enables the construction of computational tools for observing cellular processes in silico. As experiments yield increasing amounts of data on the protein and lipid constituents...... of the cell, computer simulations parametrized using this data are beginning to allow models of cellular processes to be interrogated in ways unavailable in the laboratory. Mesoscopic simulations retain only those molecular features that are believed to be relevant to the processes of interest. This allows...

  17. Mechanical aspects of allotropic phase change at the mesoscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valance, St.

    2007-12-01

    The prediction of the mechanical state of steel structures submit to thermo-mechanical loading must take into account consequences of allotropic phase change. Indeed, phase change induce, at least for steels, a mechanism of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) leading to irreversible deformation even for loading less than elastic yield limit. Homogenized analytical models generally fail to achieve a correct prediction for complex loading. In order to overcome these difficulties, we present a model achieving a sharper description of the phenomenon. The mesoscopic working scale we adopt here is the grain scale size. Hence, we consider that the behaviour of each phase is homogenous in the sense of continuous media mechanic, whereas the front is explicitly described. We work both experimentally and numerically. Experimentally, we designed a test facility enabling thermo mechanical loading of the sample under partial vacuum. Acquisition of sample surface while martensitic transformation is happening leads, under some hypothesis and thanks to Digital Image Correlation, to the partial identification of area affected by transformation. Numerically, the eXtended Finite Element Method is applied for weakly discontinuous displacement fields. Used of this method needs to numerically track the transformation front -discontinuity support. In that goal, based on level set method, we develop FEM numerical scheme enabling recognition and propagation of discontinuity support. Finally, this work is complete by an approach of driving forces introduced through Eshelbian mechanics which are dual of front velocity. (author)

  18. Changes in biochemical parameters of oral fluid in patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system under the action of a developed mucosal gel with probiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronkova, Anna V; Smaglyuk, Lyubov V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Many research studies involving orthodontic patients focus on changes in levels of oral microbiocenosis after bracket placement. Based upon this the objective of the current study was to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. The aim: Aim of our study is to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. Materials and methods: 45 patients at the age of 18-24, with 15 people in each group (control, main and comparison group) were examined. The main group was presented by patients who, in order to prevent dysbiosis of the oral cavity during orthodontic treatment, were prescribed local use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic. The statistical processing of the results of the study was carried out using methods of variation statistics using the EXCEL program (the standard package of Microsoft Office). Results: According to the results of biochemical studies, it was found that the use of orthodontic treatment of mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with crowded teeth contributes to the strengthening of antioxidant protection, an increase in nonspecific resistance, decrease in inflammation and normalization of microbiocenosis of the oral cavity. Conclusion: These studies indicated that the use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with maxillofacial anomalies from the first day after fixation, as indicated by the level of biochemical markers of inflammation.

  19. Short, intermediate and mesoscopic range order in sulfur-rich binary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, E.; Miloshova, M.; Price, D.L.; Benmore, C.J.; Lorriaux, A.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering, Raman spectroscopy and DSC were used to study structural changes on the short, intermediate and mesoscopic range scale for sulfur-rich AsS x (x (ge) 1.5) and GeS x (x (ge) 2) glasses. Two structural regions were found in the both systems. (1) Between stoichiometric (As 2 S 3 and GeS 2 ) and 'saturated' (AsS 2.2 and GeS 2.7 ) compositions, excessive sulfur atoms form sulfur dimers and/or short chains, replacing bridging sulfur in corner-sharing AsS 3/2 and GeS 4/2 units. (2) Above the 'saturated' compositions at (As) x system) appear in the glass network. The glasses become phase separated with the domains of 20-50 (angstrom), presumably enriched with sulfur rings. The longer chains Sn are not stable and crystallize to c-S 8 on ageing of a few days to several months, depending on composition.

  20. Mesoscopic effects in an agent-based bargaining model in regular lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza, David J; Santos, José I; Galán, José M; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-03-09

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders.

  1. Mesoscopic effects in an agent-based bargaining model in regular lattices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Poza

    Full Text Available The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders.

  2. Biochemical reactions of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of mercury, strontium chloride, GMDA, trichlorfon as well as some radionuclides ( 89 Sr, 137 Cs, 203 Hg) were studied on rats. Changes in biochemical parameters (histamine content, activity of cholinesterase and histaminase) are noted. Most noticeable changes were observed in enzymatic activity. Distortion of enzymatic systems and accumulation of intermediate exchange and decay products of tissues in excess quantities affecting other systems can be the reason for changes in the organism. The observed changes in biochemical parameters should be necessarily taken into account at hygienic regulations of harmful effects of enviroment

  3. Cavity-assisted mesoscopic transport of fermions: Coherent and dissipative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmüller, David; Schütz, Stefan; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido

    2018-05-01

    We study the interplay between charge transport and light-matter interactions in a confined geometry by considering an open, mesoscopic chain of two-orbital systems resonantly coupled to a single bosonic mode close to its vacuum state. We introduce and benchmark different methods based on self-consistent solutions of nonequilibrium Green's functions and numerical simulations of the quantum master equation, and derive both analytical and numerical results. It is shown that in the dissipative regime where the cavity photon decay rate is the largest parameter, the light-matter coupling is responsible for a steady-state current enhancement scaling with the cooperativity parameter. We further identify different regimes of interest depending on the ratio between the cavity decay rate and the electronic bandwidth. Considering the situation where the lower band has a vanishing bandwidth, we show that for a high-finesse cavity, the properties of the resonant Bloch state in the upper band are transferred to the lower one, giving rise to a delocalized state along the chain. Conversely, in the dissipative regime with low-cavity quality factors, we find that the current enhancement is due to a collective decay of populations from the upper to the lower band.

  4. Direct extraction of electron parameters from magnetoconductance analysis in mesoscopic ring array structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, A.; Faniel, S.; Mineshige, S.; Kawabata, S.; Saito, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Sekine, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Koga, T.

    2018-05-01

    We report an approach for examining electron properties using information about the shape and size of a nanostructure as a measurement reference. This approach quantifies the spin precession angles per unit length directly by considering the time-reversal interferences on chaotic return trajectories within mesoscopic ring arrays (MRAs). Experimentally, we fabricated MRAs using nanolithography in InGaAs quantum wells which had a gate-controllable spin-orbit interaction (SOI). As a result, we observed an Onsager symmetry related to relativistic magnetic fields, which provided us with indispensable information for the semiclassical billiard ball simulation. Our simulations, developed based on the real-space formalism of the weak localization/antilocalization effect including the degree of freedom for electronic spin, reproduced the experimental magnetoconductivity (MC) curves with high fidelity. The values of five distinct electron parameters (Fermi wavelength, spin precession angles per unit length for two different SOIs, impurity scattering length, and phase coherence length) were thereby extracted from a single MC curve. The methodology developed here is applicable to wide ranges of nanomaterials and devices, providing a diagnostic tool for exotic properties of two-dimensional electron systems.

  5. Four dimensional chaos and intermittency in a mesoscopic model of the electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafilis, Mathew P; Frascoli, Federico; Cadusch, Peter J; Liley, David T J

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of so-called four dimensional chaos in dynamical systems represented by coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations is rarely reported in the literature. In this paper, we present evidence that Liley's mesoscopic theory of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which has been used to describe brain activity in a variety of clinically relevant contexts, possesses a chaotic attractor with a Kaplan-Yorke dimension significantly larger than three. This accounts for simple, high order chaos for a physiologically admissible parameter set. Whilst the Lyapunov spectrum of the attractor has only one positive exponent, the contracting dimensions are such that the integer part of the Kaplan-Yorke dimension is three, thus giving rise to four dimensional chaos. A one-parameter bifurcation analysis with respect to the parameter corresponding to extracortical input is conducted, with results indicating that the origin of chaos is due to an inverse period doubling cascade. Hence, in the vicinity of the high order, strange attractor, the model is shown to display intermittent behavior, with random alternations between oscillatory and chaotic regimes. This phenomenon represents a possible dynamical justification of some of the typical features of clinically established EEG traces, which can arise in the case of burst suppression in anesthesia and epileptic encephalopathies in early infancy.

  6. Time-evolution of photon heat current through series coupled two mesoscopic Josephson junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang; Wang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Photon heat current tunneling through a series coupled two mesoscopic Josephson junction (MJJ) system biased by dc voltages has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. The time-oscillating photon heat current is contributed by the superposition of different current branches associated with the frequencies of MJJs ω j (j = 1, 2). Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited to be induced by the self-inductance, Coulomb interaction, and interference effect relating to the coherent transport of Cooper pairs in the MJJs. Time-oscillating pumping photon heat current is generated in the absence of temperature difference, while it becomes zero after time-average. The combination of ω j and Coulomb interactions in the MJJs determines the concrete heat current configuration. As the external and intrinsic frequencies ω j and ω 0 of MJJs match some specific combinations, resonant photon heat current exhibits sinusoidal behaviors with large amplitudes. Symmetric and asymmetric evolutions versus time t with respect to ω 1 t and ω 2 t are controlled by the applied dc voltages of V 1 and V 2. The dc photon heat current formula is a special case of the general time-dependent heat current formula when the bias voltages are settled to zero. The Aharonov-Bohm effect has been investigated, and versatile oscillation structures of photon heat current can be achieved by tuning the magnetic fluxes threading through separating MJJs.

  7. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale

  8. Josephson junction in the quantum mesoscopic electric circuits with charge discreteness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavani, H.

    2018-04-01

    A quantum mesoscopic electrical LC-circuit with charge discreteness including a Josephson junction is considered and a nonlinear Hamiltonian that describing the dynamic of such circuit is introduced. The quantum dynamical behavior (persistent current probability) is studied in the charge and phase regimes by numerical solution approaches. The time evolution of charge and current, number-difference and the bosonic phase and also the energy spectrum of a quantum mesoscopic electric LC-circuit with charge discreteness that coupled with a Josephson junction device are investigated. We show the role of the coupling energy and the electrostatic Coulomb energy of the Josephson junction in description of the quantum behavior and the spectral properties of a quantum mesoscopic electrical LC-circuits with charge discreteness.

  9. Tunable quasiparticle trapping in Meissner and vortex states of mesoscopic superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, M; Khaymovich, I M; Meschke, M; Mel'nikov, A S; Pekola, J P

    2016-03-16

    Nowadays, superconductors serve in numerous applications, from high-field magnets to ultrasensitive detectors of radiation. Mesoscopic superconducting devices, referring to those with nanoscale dimensions, are in a special position as they are easily driven out of equilibrium under typical operating conditions. The out-of-equilibrium superconductors are characterized by non-equilibrium quasiparticles. These extra excitations can compromise the performance of mesoscopic devices by introducing, for example, leakage currents or decreased coherence time in quantum devices. By applying an external magnetic field, one can conveniently suppress or redistribute the population of excess quasiparticles. In this article, we present an experimental demonstration and a theoretical analysis of such effective control of quasiparticles, resulting in electron cooling both in the Meissner and vortex states of a mesoscopic superconductor. We introduce a theoretical model of quasiparticle dynamics, which is in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  10. [Growth and biochemical composition of thalassiosira pseudonana (Thalassiosirales: Thalassiosiraceae) cultivated in semicontinuous system at different culture media and irradiances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Suárez, Aleikar; Guevara, Miguel; González, Mayelys; Cortez, Roraysi; Arredondo-Vega, Bertha

    2013-09-01

    Thalassiosira pseudonana is a marine Bacillariophyta commonly used as live feed in mariculture. The growth rate and biochemical composition of microalgae are highly influenced by environmental factors such as, irradiance and nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three irradiances (60, 120 and 180 microE/m2.s) and two culture media (Algal and Humus) on growth and biochemical composition of this diatom. The microalga was grown semicontinuously at a daily renewal rate of fresh media of 30%, 37 per thousand salinity, 25 +/- 1 degree C and constant aeration (200 mL/min). The cell densities (cel/mL) and contents of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, chlorophyll a, total carotenoids, and fatty acids, showed significant differences (p media, the fatty acids unsaturation degree was lower with increasing irradiance, being eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5 n-3 (EPA) most represented (6.20%) in Algal medium at 60 microE/m2.s. This strain of T. pseudonana showed multiple physiological responses to changes in culture conditions, and may be cultivated with an alternative medium, which reduced the operating costs and allowed a high nutritional biomass production value for animals under culture.

  11. Mesoscopic fluctuations in the critical current in InAs-coupled Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Hansen, J.B.; Nitta, Junsaku

    1994-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluctuations were confirmed for the critical current in a p-type InAs-coupled Josephson junction. The critical current was measured as a function of the gate voltage corresponding to the change in the Fermi energy. The critical current showed a mesoscopic fluctuation and its behavior was the same as that of the conductance measured at the same time in both the weak and strong localization regimes. The magnitude and the typical period of the fluctuation are discussed and compared to theoretical predictions. ((orig.))

  12. Recent trends in mesoscopic solar cells based on molecular and nanopigment light harvesters

    KAUST Repository

    Grä tzel, Carole; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoscopic solar cells are one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies among third generation photovoltaics due to their low cost and high efficiency. The morphology of wide-band semiconductors, sensitized with molecular or nanosized light harvesters, used as electron collectors contribute substantially to the device performance. Recent developments in the use of organic-inorganic layer structured perovskites as light absorbers and as electron or hole transport materials allows reduction in the thickness of photoanodes to the submicron level and have raised the power conversion efficiency of solid state mesoscopic solar cells above the 10% level.

  13. Analysis of the elastic behaviour of nonclassical nonlinear mesoscopic materials in quasi-static experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, E.; Scalerandi, M.

    2000-01-01

    As discovered by recent quasi-static and dynamic resonance experiments, the classical nonlinear theory fails in describing the hysteretic behaviour of nonlinear mesoscopic materials like rocks, concrete, etc. The paper applies the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) for studying such kind of nonclassical nonlinearity. To this purpose, in the LISA treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation has been included a phenomenological model, based on the PM space approach, of the local mesoscopic features of rocks and other materials with localized damages. A quantitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in quasi-static experiments is also presented

  14. Probabilistic simulation of mesoscopic “Schrödinger cat” states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opanchuk, B.; Rosales-Zárate, L.; Reid, M.D.; Drummond, P.D., E-mail: pdrummond@swin.edu.au

    2014-02-01

    We carry out probabilistic phase-space sampling of mesoscopic Schrödinger cat quantum states, demonstrating multipartite Bell violations for up to 60 qubits. We use states similar to those generated in photonic and ion-trap experiments. These results show that mesoscopic quantum superpositions are directly accessible to probabilistic sampling, and we analyze the properties of sampling errors. We also demonstrate dynamical simulation of super-decoherence in ion traps. Our computer simulations can be either exponentially faster or slower than experiment, depending on the correlations measured.

  15. Small-angle scattering study of mesoscopic structures in charged gel and their evolution on dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Annaka, Masahiko; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures, with length scales similar to10(2) Angstrom, were investigated by small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) in several N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) copolymeric hydrogels with varying [NIPA]/[SA] ratios and water contents. The SAXS experimen...

  16. Mesoscopic Numerical Computation of Compressive Strength and Damage Mechanism of Rubber Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of both macroscopic and mesoscopic strengths of materials have been the topic of a great deal of recent research. This paper presents the results of a study, based on the Walraven equation of the production of a mesoscopic random aggregate structure containing various rubber contents and aggregate sizes. On a mesoscopic scale, the damage mechanism in the rubber concrete and the effects of the rubber content and aggregate-mortar interface on the rubber concrete’s compressive resistance property were studied. The results indicate that the random aggregate structural model very closely approximates the experimental results in terms of the fracture distribution and damage characteristics under uniaxial compression. The aggregate-mortar interface mechanical properties have a substantial impact on the test sample’s strength and fracture distribution. As the rubber content increases, the compressive strength and elastic modulus of the test sample decrease proportionally. This paper presents graphics of the entire process from fracture propagation to structural failure of the test piece by means of the mesoscopic finite-element method, which provides a theoretical reference for studying the damage mechanism in rubber concrete and performing parametric calculations.

  17. Incompatibility of strains and its application to mesoscopic studies of plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gröger, Roman; Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 14 (2010), Art. No. 144104 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : incompatibility * dislocation * mesoscopic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010

  18. Biochemical composition of seston in two upwelling sites within the Humboldt Current System (21°S to 23°S): Summer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Enrique; Homs, Patricia; Sañé, Elisabet; Escribano, Rubén; Claramunt, Gabriel; Teixidó, Nuria

    2010-07-01

    The biochemical composition of seston within the Humboldt Current System (HCS) in two bays off northern Chile (21°S-23°S) was assessed to estimate its chemical quality as potential food supply for benthic communities, large zooplankton and fish larvae. As part of the CENSOR project, in the summer of 2006 physical and biochemical variables were analyzed in Chipana and Mejillones Bays during one week at four depths determined by the occurrence of the upper boundary of the oxygen minimum zone and fluorescence peaks. The depth of the oxy- and pycnoclines controlled the distribution of biochemical variables in both bays. There were significant differences in the concentration of protein (PRT), lipid (LPD) and carbohydrates (CHO) among depths in both bays. The differences were also found in the PRT and LPD contribution to the biopolymeric carbon (BPC) among bays and among depths in the case of CHO. However, the concentration of suspended particulate matter and biogenic silica (bSi) were similar in both bays. PRT, LPD and CHO showed the highest concentrations in the upper meters of the water column and small peaks close to the seabed related to sediment resuspension and/or lateral transport. In Chipana Bay, the high nutritive quality of seston occurring near the seabed suggests a rapid sinking of diatom aggregates and a reduced respiration of the particulate organic matter. PRT, LPD and CHO varied between 0.05 and 0.47 mg l - 1 , 0.06 and 0.39 mg l - 1 and 0.07 and 0.51 mg l - 1 , respectively. LPD were the most important contributors to the BPC in both bays. The seston in these bays presented a high PRT and LPD content in comparison to a number of settings of different latitudes and oceanographic characteristics. The high quantity and biochemical quality of the particulate matter in both bays may reflect the high productivity of this zone and partially explain their condition as spawning areas within the HCS.

  19. Linear constraint relations in biochemical reaction systems: I. Classification of the calculability and the balanceability of conversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, R T; Heijnen, J J; Hellinga, C; Romein, B; Luyben, K C

    1994-01-05

    Measurements provide the basis for process monitoring and control as well as for model development and validation. Systematic approaches to increase the accuracy and credibility of the empirical data set are therefore of great value. In (bio)chemical conversions, linear conservation relations such as the balance equations for charge, enthalpy, and/or chemical elements, can be employed to relate conversion rates. In a pactical situation, some of these rates will be measured (in effect, be calculated directly from primary measurements of, e.g., concentrations and flow rates), as others can or cannot be calculated from the measured ones. When certain measured rates can also be calculated from other measured rates, the set of equations, the accuracy and credibility of the measured rates can indeed be improved by, respectively, balancing and gross error diagnosis. The balanced conversion rates are more accurate, and form a consistent set of data, which is more suitable for further application (e.g., to calculate nonmeasured rates) than the raw measurements. Such an approach has drawn attention in previous studies. The current study deals mainly with the problem of mathematically classifying the conversion rates into balanceable and calculable rates, given the subset of measured rates. The significance of this problem is illustrated with some examples. It is shown that a simple matrix equation can be derived that contains the vector of measured conversion rates and the redundancy matrix R. Matrix R plays a predominant role in the classification problem. In supplementary articles, significance of the redundancy matrix R for an improved gross error diagnosis approach will be shown. In addition, efficient equations have been derived to calculate the balanceable and/or calculable rates. The method is completely based on matrix algebra (principally different from the graph-theoretical approach), and it is easily implemented into a computer program. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons

  20. [Toxicological evaluation of colloidal nano-sized silver stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone. III. Enzymological, biochemical markers, state of antioxidant defense system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmoshinsky, I V; Shipelin, V A; Vorozhko, I V; Sentsova, T B; Soto, S Kh; Avren'eva, L I; Guseva, G V; Kravchenko, L V; Khotimchenko, S A; Tutelyan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Nanosized colloidal silver (NCS) with primary nanoparticles (NPs) size in the range of 10-80 nm in aqueous suspension was administered to rats with initial weight 80±10 gfor the first 30 day intragastrically and for lasting 62 days with the diet consumed in doses of 0.1; 1.0 and 10 mg/kg of body weight b.w) per day based on silver (Ag). The control animals received deionized water and carrier of NPs - aqueous solution of stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone. Activity (Vmax) was determined in liver of microsomal mixed function monooxygenase isoforms CYP 1A1, 1A2 and 2B1 against their specific substrates, the activity of liver conjugating enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) in the microsomal fraction and a cytosol, and the overall and non-sedimentable activities of lysosomal hydrolases. In blood plasma there were evaluated malonic dialdehyde, PUFA diene conjugates, in erythrocytes - the activity of antioxidant enzymes. A set of standard biochemical indicators of blood serum was also determined. The studies revealed changes in a number of molecular markers of toxic action. Among them - the increase in the activity of key enzymes I and II stages of detoxification of xenobiotics, indicating its functional overvoltage; reducing the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GP), the total arylsulfatase A and B, β-galactosidase (in the absence of changes in their non-sedimentable activity), levels of uric acid, increased alkaline phosphatase activity. These changes occurred mainly at the dose Ag of 10 mg/kg b.w., except for the GP to which the threshold dose was 1 mg/kg b.w. No significant changes in the studied markers in a dose Ag 0,1 mg/kg b.w. were identified. Possible mechanisms of the toxic action of silver NPs are discussed.

  1. Electrodynamic soil plate oscillator: Modeling nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior and hysteresis in nonlinear acoustic landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, M. S.; Duong, D. V.; Kalsbeck, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus (SPO), designed to study flexural vibrations of a soil loaded plate, consists of a thin circular elastic clamped plate (and cylindrical wall) supporting a vertical soil column. A small magnet attached to the center of the plate is driven by a rigid AC coil (located coaxially below the plate) to complete the electrodynamic soil plate oscillator SPO design. The frequency dependent mechanical impedance Zmech (force / particle velocity, at the plate's center) is inversely proportional to the electrical motional impedance Zmot. Measurements of Zmot are made using the complex output to input response of a Wheatstone bridge that has an identical coil element in one of its legs. Near resonance, measurements of Zmot (with no soil) before and after a slight point mass loading at the center help determine effective mass, spring, damping and coupling constant parameters of the system. "Tuning curve" behavior of real{ Zmot } and imaginary{ Zmot } at successively higher vibration amplitudes of dry sifted masonry sand are measured. They exhibit a decrease "softening" in resonance frequency along with a decrease in the quality Q factor. In soil surface vibration measurements a bilinear hysteresis model predicts the tuning curve shape for this nonlinear mesoscopic elastic SPO behavior - which also models the soil vibration over an actual plastic "inert" VS 1.6 buried landmine. Experiments are performed where a buried 1m cube concrete block supports a 12 inch deep by 30 inch by 30 inch concrete soil box for burying a VS 1.6 in dry sifted masonry sand for on-the-mine and off-the-mine soil vibration experiments. The backbone curve (a plot of the peak amplitude vs. corresponding resonant frequency from a family of tuning curves) exhibits mostly linear behavior for "on target" soil surface vibration measurements of the buried VS 1.6 or drum-like mine simulants for relatively low particle velocities of the soil. Backbone curves for "on target" measurements exhibit

  2. Development of {sup 77}Ge/{sup 77}As parent-daughter system for periodic removal of {sup 77}As for environmental sanitation and biochemical purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olah, Zita; Doczi, Rita [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques; Szuecs, Zoltan [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Varga, Zoltan [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Centre for Natural Sciences

    2015-07-01

    A simple method was developed for the separation of radioactive {sup 77}As from neutron irradiated natural GeO{sub 2} samples for environmental and biochemical studies. The method is based on the volatility of GeCl{sub 4}. The GeCl{sub 4} was co-evaporated from the reaction mixture with an azeotropic mixture of HCl and water, and immediately condensed into a separate finger part of the special glass apparatus which was cooled by liquid nitrogen. By inverting the room temperature and the deep frozen parts of the glass equipment after three half-lives of the {sup 77}Ge the separation process can be repetitive, getting a special type of {sup 77}Ge/{sup 77}As parent-daughter system. The radionuclidic purity of the remaining As fraction was found to be 99.95%. Its yield, however, drastically decreased in the second and subsequent separations.

  3. Flame-Oxidized Stainless-Steel Anode as a Probe in Bioelectrochemical System-Based Biosensors to Monitor the Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaochu Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD is a widely used index of water quality in wastewater treatment; however, conventional measurement methods are time-consuming. In this study, we analyzed a novel flame-oxidized stainless steel anode (FO-SSA for use as the probe of bioelectrochemical system (BES-based biosensors to monitor the BOD of treated swine wastewater. A thinner biofilm formed on the FO-SSA compared with that on a common carbon-cloth anode (CCA. The FO-SSA was superior to the CCA in terms of rapid sensing; the response time of the FO-SSA to obtain the value of R2 > 0.8 was 1 h, whereas the CCA required 4 h. These results indicate that the FO-SSA offers better performance than traditional CCAs in BES biosensors and can be used to improve biomonitoring of wastewater.

  4. Development of 77Ge/77As parent-daughter system for periodic removal of 77As for environmental sanitation and biochemical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olah, Zita; Doczi, Rita; Szuecs, Zoltan; Varga, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    A simple method was developed for the separation of radioactive 77 As from neutron irradiated natural GeO 2 samples for environmental and biochemical studies. The method is based on the volatility of GeCl 4 . The GeCl 4 was co-evaporated from the reaction mixture with an azeotropic mixture of HCl and water, and immediately condensed into a separate finger part of the special glass apparatus which was cooled by liquid nitrogen. By inverting the room temperature and the deep frozen parts of the glass equipment after three half-lives of the 77 Ge the separation process can be repetitive, getting a special type of 77 Ge/ 77 As parent-daughter system. The radionuclidic purity of the remaining As fraction was found to be 99.95%. Its yield, however, drastically decreased in the second and subsequent separations.

  5. Morphological, physiological and biochemical studies on Pyricularia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-02-28

    Feb 28, 2014 ... compounds seem to reflect inherent biochemical and physiological differences among P. grisea isolates .... solutions for imaging and microscopy, soft image system .... characteristics among 12 P. grisea isolates from rice were.

  6. Zinc tin oxide as high-temperature stable recombination layer for mesoscopic perovskite/silicon monolithic tandem solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Jé ré mie; Walter, Arnaud; Rucavado, Esteban; Moon, Soo Jin; Sacchetto, Davide; Rienaecker, Michael; Peibst, Robby; Brendel, Rolf; Niquille, Xavier; De Wolf, Stefaan; Lö per, Philipp; Morales-Masis, Monica; Nicolay, Sylvain; Niesen, Bjoern; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    the concept, we fabricate monolithic tandem cells with mesoscopic top cell with up to 16% efficiency. We then investigate the effect of zinc tin oxide layer thickness variation, showing a strong influence on the optical interference pattern within the tandem

  7. Effects of different rearing systems on growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and serum biochemical parameters of Chaohu ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Ah Kan Razafindrabe, Richard-Hermann; Chen, Kaikai; Zhao, Xiaohui; Yang, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Xingyong; Jin, Sihua; Geng, Zhaoyu

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted using a total of 360 22-day-old Chaohu ducks to evaluate the effect of rearing system on growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and serum parameters of male and female Chaohu ducks. The birds were divided and raised in separate pens according to sex and rearing system, with three replicate pens of 30 male or 30 female ducks per pen for each rearing system. The rearing systems consisted of a floor rearing system (FRS) and a net rearing system (NRS). Results showed that ducks raised in NRS had better growth performance, whereas, ducks raised in FRS exhibited better carcass traits and meat color, and lower intramuscular fat. For the serum parameters, NRS significantly decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol content, and enhanced total protein and triacylglycerol contents. Male ducks had lower abdominal fat percentage, and higher growth performance and shear force, but there were no other significant differences between sexes. No rearing system × sex interaction was observed in the present study, revealing that rearing system had the same effect on both sexes. In conclusion, NRS was beneficial to the growth performance of Chaohu ducks, whereas this system had some negative effects on carcass traits, meat quality and serum profiles. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of solid surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities under the capillary and electromigration forces in anisotropic three-dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer

    2006-04-14

    A theory of irreversible thermodynamics of curved surfaces and interfaces with triple junction singularities is elaborated to give a full consideration of the effects of the specific surface Gibbs free energy anisotropy in addition to the diffusional anisotropy, on the morphological evolution of surfaces and interfaces in crystalline solids. To entangle this intricate problem, the internal entropy production associated with arbitrary virtual displacements of triple junction and ordinary points on the interfacial layers, embedded in a multicomponent, multiphase, anisotropic composite continuum system, is formulated by adapting a mesoscopic description of the orientation dependence of the chemical potentials in terms of the rotational degree of freedom of individual microelements. The rate of local internal entropy production resulted generalized forces and conjugated fluxes not only for the grain boundary triple junction transversal and longitudinal movements, but also for the ordinary points. The natural combination of the mesoscopic approach coupled with the rigorous theory of irreversible thermodynamics developed previously by the global entropy production hypothesis yields a well-posed, nonlinear, moving free-boundary value problem in two-dimensional (2D) space, as a unified theory. The results obtained for 2D space are generalized into the three-dimensional continuum by utilizing the invariant properties of the vector operators in connection with the descriptions of curved surfaces in differential geometry. This mathematical model after normalization and scaling procedures may be easily adapted for computer simulation studies without introducing any additional phenomenological system parameters (the generalized mobilities), other than the enlarged concept of the surface stiffness.

  9. Dose dependency and individual variability in selected clinical, haematological and blood biochemical responses after systemic lipopolysaccharide challenge in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Tølbøll, Trine; Andersen, Pia Haubro Fischer

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have notede that susceptibility to systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure seems to differ between individual cows. However, to date inter-individual variation in the existence or extent has never been backed up by statistical analyses.......Previous studies have notede that susceptibility to systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure seems to differ between individual cows. However, to date inter-individual variation in the existence or extent has never been backed up by statistical analyses....

  10. Current density waves in open mesoscopic rings driven by time-periodic magnetic fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Conghua; Wei Lianfu

    2010-01-01

    Quantum coherent transport through open mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm rings (driven by static fluxes) have been studied extensively. Here, by using quantum waveguide theory and the Floquet theorem we investigate the quantum transport of electrons along an open mesoscopic ring threaded by a time-periodic magnetic flux. We predicate that current density waves could be excited along such an open ring. As a consequence, a net current could be generated along the lead with only one reservoir, if the lead additionally connects to such a normal-metal loop driven by the time-dependent flux. These phenomena could be explained by photon-assisted processes, due to the interaction between the transported electrons and the applied oscillating external fields. We also discuss how the time-average currents (along the ring and the lead) depend on the amplitude and frequency of the applied oscillating fluxes.

  11. Mesoscopic fluctuations of the population of a qubit in a strong alternating field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisenko, M. V., E-mail: mar.denisenko@gmail.com; Satanin, A. M. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Fluctuations of the population of a Josephson qubit in an alternating field, which is a superposition of electromagnetic pulses with large amplitudes, are studied. It is shown that the relative phase of pulses is responsible for the rate of Landau–Zener transitions and, correspondingly, for the frequency of transitions between adiabatic states. The durations of pulses incident on the qubit are controlled with an accuracy of the field period, which results in strong mesoscopic fluctuations of the population of the qubit. Similar to the magnetic field in mesoscopic physics, the relative phase of pulses can destroy the interference pattern of the population of the qubit. The influence of the duration of the pulse and noise on the revealed fluctuation effects is studied.

  12. Vortex-slip transitions in superconducting a-NbGe mesoscopic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, N.; Sorop, T. G.; Besseling, R.; Kes, P. H.

    2006-06-01

    Intriguing and novel physical aspects related to the vortex flow dynamics have been recently observed in mesoscopic channel devices of a-NbGe with NbN channel edges. In this work we have systematically studied the flow properties of vortices confined in such mesoscopic channels as a function of the magnetic field history, using dc-transport and mode-locking (ML) measurements. As opposed to the field-down situation, in the field-up case a kink anomaly in the dc I-V curves is detected. The mode-locking measurements reveal that this anomaly is, in fact, a flow induced vortex slip transition: by increasing the external drive (either dc or ac) a sudden change occurs from n to n+2 moving vortex rows in the channel. The observed features can be explained in terms of an interplay between field focusing due to screening currents and a change in the predominant pinning mechanism.

  13. Understanding of mechanical properties of graphite on the basis of mesoscopic microstructure (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, M.; Shibata, T.; Takahashi, T.; Baba, S.; Hoshiya, T.

    2002-01-01

    With the aim of nuclear application of ceramics in the high-temperature engineering field, the authors have investigated the mesoscopic microstructure related to the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramics. In this paper, recent activities concerning mechanical properties, strength and Young's modulus are presented. In the strength research field, the brittle fracture model considering pore/grain mesoscopic microstructure was expanded so as to render possible an estimation of the strength under stress gradient conditions. Furthermore, the model was expanded to treat the pore/crack interaction effect. The performance of the developed model was investigated from a comparison with experimental data and the Weibull strength theory. In the field of Young's modulus research, ultrasonic wave propagation was investigated using the pore/wave interaction model. Three kinds of interaction modes are treated in the model. The model was applied to the graphite, and its applicability was investigated through comparison with experimental data. (authors)

  14. Cancer-affine radiopharmaceuticals for the study of biochemical nature of cancer and in the early diagnosis and follow-up of cancer and its systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, S.K.; Cipriani, C.; Atzei, G.

    1998-01-01

    Cancer patient needs less diagnosis but an effective therapy. The systemic nature of cancer, often right from its inception, requires systemic therapy with cancer-affine radiopharmaceuticals which contain radionuclide species recognizing both the primary and secondary cancers which have generally different biochemical properties. Cancers may be classified into two groups: I. CATIONIC COMPLEX-AFFINE TUMOURS; Lung cancer, thyroid cancer, primary breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma, bone metastases from anionic complex-affine cancers, ...; II. ANIONIC COMPLEX-AFFINE TUMOURS; Primary prostate cancer, melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, bone metastases from cationic complex-affine cancer. With cancer-affine citratogallate-67 complexes we have diagnosed and followed up, and with citratoyttrate-90 complexes we have treated advanced breast, prostate, renal cell cancer patients. The patient preparation by advising to avoid cancer risk factors and to take cancer preventing and radiopharmaceutical stabilizing diets during diagnosis and therapy have given better results. Friendliness, caring visits and telephone calls from the therapist group help to obtain better outcomes of the diagnosis, and mainly of the therapy. The complexes of these radionuclides with other chelating agents EDTA and DPTA are expected to give better images and cure of advanced cancer patients. Cancer-affine formulations of Tc-99m(V), Re-186(V) and Re-188(V)-DMSA are being studied for their future use in early diagnosis and follow-up, and for the systemic therapy of cancer which will show affinity for them. (author)

  15. Formulation of a Mesoscopic Electron Beam Splitter with Application in Semiconductor Based Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Shanker, A.; Bhowmik, D.; Bhattacharya, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    We aim to analytically arrive at a beam splitter formulation for electron waves. The electron beam splitter is an essential component of quantum logical devices. To arrive at the beam splitter structure, the electrons are treated as waves, i.e. we assume the transport to be ballistic. Ballistic electrons are electrons that travel over such short distances that their phase coherence is maintained. For mesoscopic devices with size smaller than the mean free path, the phase relaxation length and...

  16. Mesoscopic conductance fluctuations in high-T{sub c} grain boundary Josephson junctions: Coherent quasiparticle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafuri, F. [Dip. Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, 81031 Aversa (Italy); CNR-INFM Coherentia, Dip. Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: tafuri@na.infn.it; Tagliacozzo, A.; Born, D.; Stornaiuolo, D. [CNR-INFM Coherentia, Dip. Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Gambale, E.; Dalena, D. [Dip. Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, 81031 Aversa (Italy); Lombardi, F. [Department of Microelectronics and Nanoscience, MINA, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Magneto-fluctuations of the normal resistance R{sub N} have been reproducibly observed in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (HTS) biepitaxial grain boundary junctions at low temperatures. We attribute them to mesoscopic transport in narrow channels across the grain boundary line. The Thouless energy appears to be the relevant energy scale. Possible implications on the understanding of coherent transport of quasiparticles in HTS and of the dissipation mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Effect of the dielectric constant of mesoscopic particle on the exciton binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Zuyou; Gu Shiwei

    1991-09-01

    For materials with big exciton reduced mass and big dielectric constant, such as TiO 2 , the variation of dielectric constant with the radius of an ultrafine particle (UFP) is important for determining the exciton binding energy. For the first time a phenomenological formula of the dielectric constant of a UFP with its radius in mesoscopic range is put forward in order to explain the optical properties of TiO 2 UFP. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  18. Remediation Performance and Mechanism of Heavy Metals by a Bottom Up Activation and Extraction System Using Multiple Biochemical Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kemeng; Li, Yunzhen; Sun, Yang; Liu, Ruyue; Li, Junjie; Zhao, Yun; Xu, Heng

    2017-09-13

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has caused serious environmental problems and increased the risks to humans and biota. Herein, we developed an effective bottom up metals removal system based on the synergy between the activation of immobilization metal-resistant bacteria and the extraction of bioaccumulator material (Stropharia rugosoannulata). In this system, the advantages of biochar produced at 400 °C and sodium alginate were integrated to immobilize bacteria. Optimized by response surface methodology, the biochar and bacterial suspension were mixed at a ratio of 1:20 (w:v) for 12 h when 2.5% sodium alginate was added to the mixture. Results demonstrated that the system significantly increased the proportion of acid soluble Cd and Cu and improved the soil microecology (microbial counts, soil respiration, and enzyme activities). The maximum extractions of Cd and Cu were 8.79 and 77.92 mg kg -1 , respectively. Moreover, details of the possible mechanistic insight into the metal removal are discussed, which indicate positive correlation with the acetic acid extractable metals and soil microecology. Meanwhile, the "dilution effect" in S. rugosoannulata probably plays an important role in the metal removal process. Furthermore, the metal-resistant bacteria in this system were successfully colonized, and the soil bacteria community were evaluated to understand the microbial diversity in metal-contaminated soil after remediation.

  19. Biochemical Frequency Control by Synchronisation of Coupled Repressilators: An In Silico Study of Modules for Circadian Clock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Thomas; Schumann, Mathias; Bodenstein, Christian; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of chronobiological systems emerges as a growing research field within bioinformatics focusing on various applications in medicine, agriculture, and material sciences. From a systems biological perspective, the question arises whether biological control systems for regulation of oscillatory signals and their technical counterparts utilise similar mechanisms. If so, modelling approaches and parameterisation adopted from building blocks can help to identify general components for frequency control in circadian clocks along with gaining insight into mechanisms of clock synchronisation to external stimuli like the daily rhythm of sunlight and darkness. Phase-locked loops could be an interesting candidate in this context. Both, biology and engineering, can benefit from a unified view resulting from systems modularisation. In a first experimental study, we analyse a model of coupled repressilators. We demonstrate its ability to synchronise clock signals in a monofrequential manner. Several oscillators initially deviate in phase difference and frequency with respect to explicit reaction and diffusion rates. Accordingly, the duration of the synchronisation process depends on dedicated reaction and diffusion parameters whose settings still lack to be sufficiently captured analytically. PMID:22046179

  20. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction–diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.; Hellander, Stefan; Erban, Radek

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step δ. t (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered:. (i)δt→0 and h is fixed;(ii)δt→0 and h→0 such that δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  1. Vortex 'puddles' and magic vortex numbers in mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M R; Milosevic, M V; Bending, S J [Department of Physics, University of Bath - Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Clem, J R [Ames Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy - Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3160 (United States); Tamegai, T, E-mail: mrc61@cam.ac.u [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo - Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8627 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic properties of a superconducting disk change dramatically when its dimensions become mesoscopic. Unlike large disks, where the screening currents induced by an applied magnetic field are strong enough to force vortices to accumulate in a 'puddle' at the centre, in a mesoscopic disk the interaction between one of these vortices and the edge currents can be comparable to the intervortex repulsion, resulting in a destruction of the ordered triangular vortex lattice structure at the centre. Vortices instead form clusters which adopt polygonal and shell-like structures which exhibit magic number states similar to those of charged particles in a confining potential, and electrons in artificial atoms. We have fabricated mesoscopic high temperature superconducting Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+delta} disks and investigated their magnetic properties using magneto-optical imaging (MOI) and high resolution scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM). The temperature dependence of the vortex penetration field measured using MOI is in excellent agreement with models of the thermal excitation of pancake vortices over edge barriers. The growth of the central vortex puddle has been directly imaged using SHPM and magic vortex numbers showing higher stability have been correlated with abrupt jumps in the measured local magnetisation curves.

  2. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction–diffusion simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step δ. t (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered:. (i)δt→0 and h is fixed;(ii)δt→0 and h→0 such that δt/h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  3. Effect of decimeter waves on functional state of cardiovascular system, some biochemical and immunological indices of myocardium infarction patients during convalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokina, E.I.; Poshkus, N.B.; Tupitsina, Yu.Yu.; Volkova, L.P.; Shubina, A.V.; Krasnikov, V.E.

    An attempt was made to determine optimal localization for the action of decimeter waves (DMW) and its intensity, and to evaluate the action of DMW on the functions of the cardiovascular system. Clinical biochemical and immunological indices were determined in myocardium infarction patients during the early convalescent period. The study was carried out on 186 male patients 47.5 years old on the average, 4 to 10 weeks after infarction. When applied at the same location, no significant differences could be observed in reflex reactions or in therapeutic effect when a 20 or 40 Vt intensity was applied. Considerable differences were seen in relationship to the location of applied DMW. Optimal results were obtained with 40 Vt intensity and D/sub I/-D/sub IV/ localization. The effect of DMW through segmental-vegetative apparatus gave more pronounced results than through the endocrine system or through peripheral vessels. DMW applied under such conditions optimized reparatory processes in cardiac muscle and improved immunological reactivity of the organism. 9 references.

  4. A reduced-order adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model as a software sensor for rapid estimation of five-day biochemical oxygen demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Roohollah; Safavi, Salman; Nateghi Shahrokni, Seyyed Afshin

    2013-07-01

    The five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) is one of the key parameters in water quality management. In this study, a novel approach, i.e., reduced-order adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ROANFIS) model was developed for rapid estimation of BOD5. In addition, an uncertainty analysis of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and ROANFIS models was carried out based on Monte-Carlo simulation. Accuracy analysis of ANFIS and ROANFIS models based on both developed discrepancy ratio and threshold statistics revealed that the selected ROANFIS model was superior. Pearson correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error for the best fitted ROANFIS model were 0.96 and 7.12, respectively. Furthermore, uncertainty analysis of the developed models indicated that the selected ROANFIS had less uncertainty than the ANFIS model and accurately forecasted BOD5 in the Sefidrood River Basin. Besides, the uncertainty analysis also showed that bracketed predictions by 95% confidence bound and d-factor in the testing steps for the selected ROANFIS model were 94% and 0.83, respectively.

  5. Interrelation between the changes of phase functions of cardiac muscle contraction and biochemical processes as an algorithm for identifying local pathologies in cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury V. Fedosov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims The interrelation between hemodynamic changes, functions of the cardiovascular system and biochemical reactions in the cells of the heart muscle is investigated in the present paper. Materials and methods Several methods were used to influence the metabolism processes in the myocardium. The changes in the phase functions of contraction of different cardiac muscles were recorded. In order to have comprehensive influence on the metabolism processes, normalization of the acid-base balance was performed. L-carnitine and octolipen were used to affect the lipid metabolism. Results Phase blood volumes that are characteristic of hemodynamics changed in the course of treatment to reach their nornal values. The ECG shape during the heart cycle phases also changed to reach the norm. The initial ECG shape describing Brugada syndrome almost reached its normal value. Extrasystole disappeared therewith. Conclusion The method of the heart cycle phase analysis enables monitoring any changes in hemodynamics and functions of the cardiovascular system. The method can be used for identifying the original cause of pathologies and efficient monitoring of the treatment progress.

  6. The digestive system of the "stick bug" Cladomorphus phyllinus (Phasmida, Phasmatidae): a morphological, physiological and biochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Emiliano C; Tamaki, Fábio K; Terra, Walter R; Ribeiro, Alberto F

    2014-03-01

    This work presents a detailed morphofunctional study of the digestive system of a phasmid representative, Cladomorphus phyllinus. Cells from anterior midgut exhibit a merocrine secretion, whereas posterior midgut cells show a microapocrine secretion. A complex system of midgut tubules is observed in the posterior midgut which is probably related to the luminal alkalization of this region. Amaranth dye injection into the haemolymph and orally feeding insects with dye indicated that the anterior midgut is water-absorbing, whereas the Malpighian tubules are the main site of water secretion. Thus, a putative counter-current flux of fluid from posterior to anterior midgut may propel enzyme digestive recycling, confirmed by the low rate of enzyme excretion. The foregut and anterior midgut present an acidic pH (5.3 and 5.6, respectively), whereas the posterior midgut is highly alkaline (9.1) which may be related to the digestion of hemicelluloses. Most amylase, trypsin and chymotrypsin activities occur in the foregut and anterior midgut. Maltase is found along the midgut associated with the microvillar glycocalix, while aminopeptidase occurs in the middle and posterior midgut in membrane bound forms. Both amylase and trypsin are secreted mainly by the anterior midgut through an exocytic process as revealed by immunocytochemical data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical toxicology of environmental agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruin, A. de

    1976-01-01

    A thorough and up-to-date account of the molecular-biological aspects of harmful agents - both chemical and physical - is given. This current treatise is principally intended to serve as an informative reference work for researchers in various areas of the field. In the pursuit of this aim, a devision of the entire field into 42 chapters has been made. Each chapter starts with a short introductory account dealing with the biochemical essentials of the particular subject. Radiation effects are discussed briefly at the end of each treatise. In order to make the treatise useful as a source book, a substantial collection of pertinent literature references is provided which are numbered in order of citation in the text. Initial chapters are devoted to the metabolic fate of the major classes of xenobiotic compounds. Peripheral topics, closely related to metabolism and dealing with modification of xenobiotic-metabolizing ability, as well as interaction phenomena follow (chs. 5-8). Subjects that draw heavily on the practical field of occupational hygiene are dealt with in chapters 9 and 10. The systematic treatment of how chemical and physical agents interact with the various biochemical and enzymatic systems they encounter during their passage through the organism occupies quantitatively the main part of the book (chs. 11-36). Finally, radiation biochemistry is discussed from the viewpoint of its high degree of scientific advancement, and secondly because the type of biochemical changes produced in vivo by X-rays closely parallel those evoked by chemical agents

  8. Effects of feeding system on growth performance, plasma biochemical components and hormones, and carcass characteristics in Hanwoo steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Sung Chung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was conducted to compare growth performance, blood components and carcass traits by two feeding systems (concentrate with roughage separately [CON] vs total mixed ration [TMR] in Hanwoo steers, and to learn the relationship between blood components during fattening or finishing phases and carcass traits in Hanwoo steers. Methods Sixty steers aged 8 months were allotted to two feeding systems and fed similar amounts of average dry matter and total digestible nutrient throughout whole experimental period according to each feeding program. Steers were weighed monthly, taken blood at the end of growing, fattening and finishing periods, and slaughtered at 30 month of age. Results Growing performance was higher (p<0.05 in the CON group compared to the TMR group during fattening and finishing periods. The CON group was lower (p<0.05 in blood aspartic acid transaminase, blood urea nitrogen and retinol levels during growing period, but higher in triglyceride and cholesterol levels during fattening and finishing periods compared to the TMR group. The CON group was greater (p<0.05 in rib-eye area, and lighter (p<0.05 red in meat color compared to the TMR group. In the correlation coefficients between blood components of steers and carcass traits, retinol had a negative (p<0.05 correlation with marbling score and rib-eye area. Leptin had a positive (p<0.05 correlation with back fat thickness. Blood cholesterol and triglyceride were positively (p<0.05 correlated with carcass weight and rib-eye area. Conclusion Growth performance, carcass ribeye area and meat color showed a more desirable result in the CON compared to the TMR in Hanwoo steers. Assessing the accumulated data of carcass traits with blood components including hormones—particularly retinol, cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin—during the fattening or finishing phases, it may be possible to find a biomarker for determining beef quality in living animals.

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  10. Mesoscopic structure prediction of nanoparticle assembly and coassembly: Theoretical foundation

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun; Hennig, Richard G.; Escobedo, Fernando A.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    structures and interactions. We validate our approach by comparing its predictions with previous simulation results for model systems. We illustrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to hybrid systems composed of block copolymers and ligand

  11. Removal of ammonia nitrogen from leachate of Muribeca municipal solid waste landfill, Pernambuco, Brazil, using natural zeolite as part of a biochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Cecilia Maria M S; Alves, Maria Cristina M; Campos, Juacyara C; Silva, Fabrícia Maria S; Jucá, José Fernando T; Lins, Eduardo Antonio M

    2015-01-01

    The inadequate disposal of leachate is one of the key factors in the environmental impact of urban solid waste landfills in Brazil. Among the compounds present in the leachates from Brazilian landfills, ammonia nitrogen is notable for its high concentrations. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier filled with a natural zeolite, which is part of a biochemical system for the tertiary treatment of the leachate from Muribeca Municipal Solid Waste Landfill in Pernambuco, Brazil, to reduce its ammonia nitrogen concentration. This investigation initially consisted of kinetic studies and batch equilibrium tests on the natural zeolite to construct the sorption isotherms, which showed a high sorption capacity, with an average of 12.4 mg NH4+.L(-1), a value close to the sorption rates found for the aqueous ammonium chloride solution. A permeable reactive barrier consisting of natural zeolite, as simulated by the column test, was efficient in removing the ammonia nitrogen present in the leachate pretreated with calcium hydroxide. Nevertheless, the regenerated zeolite did not satisfactorily maintain the sorption properties of the natural zeolite, and an analysis of their cation-exchange properties showed a reduced capacity of 54 meq per 100 g for the regenerated zeolite compared to 150 meq per 100 g for the natural zeolite.

  12. Evaluation of biochemical parameters and local and systemic levels of osteoactive and B-cell stimulatory factors in gestational diabetes in the presence or absence of gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Pınar; Özçaka, Özgün; Ceyhan-Öztürk, Banu; Akcali, Aliye; Lappin, David F; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2015-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as varying glucose intolerance, with first onset or recognition in pregnancy. This study evaluates clinical and biochemical parameters in a possible association between GDM and gingivitis. A total of 167 pregnant females was included in the study. There were 101 females with GDM and 66 females without GDM. Subgroups were created according to the presence or absence of gingival inflammation. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, and probing depth were recorded at four sites per tooth. Serum, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (sRANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearman correlation analysis. Age and anthropometric indices were higher in the GDM than non-GDM group (P gingivitis group than non-GDM with gingivitis group (P = 0.044). Serum and GCF BAFF (P gingivitis group than GDM without gingivitis group. The inflammatory response seems to be more pronounced in females with GDM. The observed increase in both local and systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines may suggest an interaction between gingivitis and GDM.

  13. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  14. Multi-scale simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijaykumar, A.

    2017-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function

  15. Mesoscopic structure prediction of nanoparticle assembly and coassembly: Theoretical foundation

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical framework that unifies polymer field theory and density functional theory in order to efficiently predict ordered nanostructure formation of systems having considerable complexity in terms of molecular structures and interactions. We validate our approach by comparing its predictions with previous simulation results for model systems. We illustrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to hybrid systems composed of block copolymers and ligand coated nanoparticles. We expect that our approach will enable the treatment of multicomponent self-assembly with a level of molecular complexity that approaches experimental systems. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Biochemical monitoring after initiation of aldosterone antagonist therapy in users of renin-angiotensin system blockers: a UK primary care cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Sarah-Jo; Mansfield, Kathryn E; Schmidt, Morten; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Smeeth, Liam; Nitsch, Dorothea; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2017-11-16

    To determine the frequency of biochemical monitoring after initiation of aldosterone antagonists(AA) in patients also using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB). UK primary care. ACEI/ARB users who initiated AA between 2004 and 2014. We calculated the proportions with: (1) biochemical monitoring ≤2 weeks post initiation of AA, (2) adverse biochemical values ≤2 months (potassium ≥6 mmol/L, creatinine ≥220 µmol/L and ≥30% increase in creatinine from baseline) and (3) discontinuers of AA in those with an adverse biochemical value. We used logistic regression to study patient characteristics associated with monitoring and adverse biochemical values. In 10 546 initiators of AA, 3291 (31.2%) had a record of biochemical monitoring ≤2 weeks post initiation. A total of 2.0% and 2.7% of those with follow-up monitoring within 2 months of initiation experienced potassium ≥6 mmol/L and creatinine ≥220 µmol/L, respectively, whereas 13.5% had a ≥30% increase in creatinine. Baseline potassium (OR 3.59, 95% CI 2.43 to 5.32 for 5.0-5.5 mmol/L compared with monitoring within 2 weeks of initiating AAs. Higher levels of monitoring may reduce adverse biochemical events. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Radiation effects on biochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, G.M.

    2000-04-01

    Xanthine oxidase catalyses the oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine, xanthine and a wide range of carbonyl compounds. The enzyme exists as an oxidase and a dehydrogenase; both catalyze the oxidation of the same substrates. Steady state radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate oxidative and reductive free radicals. Their effects on the enzymatic activity of xanthine oxidase were determined. Initially inactivation studies were carried out to evaluate the extent to which radiolysis in aqueous solution affects the enzyme activity. Values of D 37 and G inactivation were calculated following irradiation in the presence of free radical scavengers and in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase. The kinetic constants Vmax and Km were also determined following radiolysis. The effect of ionising radiation on the iron content of xanthine oxidase was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Native gel electrophoresis and iso-electric focussing were performed in an attempt to demonstrate changes in the overall structure of the enzyme. The binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin was carried out by measuring, (1) the displacement of methylene blue (MB + ) from a heparin-MB + complex, (2) affinity chromatography and, (3) pulse radiolysis. The effect of irradiation on the binding process was investigated using techniques (1) and (2). Finally the radiation-induced conversion of xanthine oxidase to dehydrogenase was established. The results indicate that xanthine oxidase is inactivated greatest in the presence of air and irradiation causes Vmax to he reduced and Km to increase. The iron content of irradiated xanthine oxidase is unaffected. Electrophoresis shows the enzyme becomes fragmented and the isoelectric points of the fragments vary over a wide range of pH. Binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin as measured by displacement of MB + from a heparin-MB + complex suggests that irradiation increases the affinity of the enzyme for the polyanion, whereas affinity chromatography suggested binding to heparin decreases. Formate radicals successfully brought about the conversion of xanthine oxidase to dehydrogenase. (author)

  18. Comparison of the electrochemical performance of mesoscopic Cu2Sb, SnSb and Sn/SnSb alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ge; Huang Kelong; Liu Suqin; Zhang Wei; Gong Benli

    2006-01-01

    Cu 2 Sb, SnSb and Sn/SnSb mesoscopic alloy powders were prepared by chemical reduction, respectively. The crystal structures and particle morphology of Cu 2 Sb, SnSb and Sn/SnSb were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical performances of the Cu 2 Sb, SnSb and Sn/SnSb electrodes were investigated by galvanostatic charge and discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed the first charge and discharge capacities of SnSb and Sn/SnSb were higher than Cu 2 Sb, but after 15 cycles, the charge capacity fading rates of Cu 2 Sb, Sn/SnSb and Sn/SnSb were 26.16%, 55.33% and 47.39%, respectively. Cu 2 Sb had a better cycle performance, and Sn/SnSb multiphase alloy was prior to pure SnSb due to the existence of excessive Sn in Sn/SnSb system

  19. RMBNToolbox: random models for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Jari

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest to model biochemical and cell biological networks, as well as to the computational analysis of these models. The development of analysis methodologies and related software is rapid in the field. However, the number of available models is still relatively small and the model sizes remain limited. The lack of kinetic information is usually the limiting factor for the construction of detailed simulation models. Results We present a computational toolbox for generating random biochemical network models which mimic real biochemical networks. The toolbox is called Random Models for Biochemical Networks. The toolbox works in the Matlab environment, and it makes it possible to generate various network structures, stoichiometries, kinetic laws for reactions, and parameters therein. The generation can be based on statistical rules and distributions, and more detailed information of real biochemical networks can be used in situations where it is known. The toolbox can be easily extended. The resulting network models can be exported in the format of Systems Biology Markup Language. Conclusion While more information is accumulating on biochemical networks, random networks can be used as an intermediate step towards their better understanding. Random networks make it possible to study the effects of various network characteristics to the overall behavior of the network. Moreover, the construction of artificial network models provides the ground truth data needed in the validation of various computational methods in the fields of parameter estimation and data analysis.

  20. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview ... Mutual interaction of electrons dominates their kinetic energies giving rise to ... transport properties. .... Low energy spin-flip excitations of a spin chain with lattice constant 1/n ...

  1. On the Adaptive Design Rules of Biochemical Networks in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Sen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical networks are the backbones of physiological systems of organisms. Therefore, a biochemical network should be sufficiently robust (not sensitive to tolerate genetic mutations and environmental changes in the evolutionary process. In this study, based on the robustness and sensitivity criteria of biochemical networks, the adaptive design rules are developed for natural selection in the evolutionary process. This will provide insights into the robust adaptive mechanism of biochemical networks in the evolutionary process. We find that if a mutated biochemical network satisfies the robustness and sensitivity criteria of natural selection, there is a high probability for the biochemical network to prevail during natural selection in the evolutionary process. Since there are various mutated biochemical networks that can satisfy these criteria but have some differences in phenotype, the biochemical networks increase their diversities in the evolutionary process. The robustness of a biochemical network enables co-option so that new phenotypes can be generated in evolution. The proposed robust adaptive design rules of natural selection gain much insight into the evolutionary mechanism and provide a systematic robust biochemical circuit design method of biochemical networks for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes in the future.

  2. Active learning of constitutive relation from mesoscopic dynamics for macroscopic modeling of non-Newtonian flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifei; Li, Zhen; Caswell, Bruce; Ouyang, Jie; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-06-01

    We simulate complex fluids by means of an on-the-fly coupling of the bulk rheology to the underlying microstructure dynamics. In particular, a continuum model of polymeric fluids is constructed without a pre-specified constitutive relation, but instead it is actively learned from mesoscopic simulations where the dynamics of polymer chains is explicitly computed. To couple the bulk rheology of polymeric fluids and the microscale dynamics of polymer chains, the continuum approach (based on the finite volume method) provides the transient flow field as inputs for the (mesoscopic) dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and in turn DPD returns an effective constitutive relation to close the continuum equations. In this multiscale modeling procedure, we employ an active learning strategy based on Gaussian process regression (GPR) to minimize the number of expensive DPD simulations, where adaptively selected DPD simulations are performed only as necessary. Numerical experiments are carried out for flow past a circular cylinder of a non-Newtonian fluid, modeled at the mesoscopic level by bead-spring chains. The results show that only five DPD simulations are required to achieve an effective closure of the continuum equations at Reynolds number Re = 10. Furthermore, when Re is increased to 100, only one additional DPD simulation is required for constructing an extended GPR-informed model closure. Compared to traditional message-passing multiscale approaches, applying an active learning scheme to multiscale modeling of non-Newtonian fluids can significantly increase the computational efficiency. Although the method demonstrated here obtains only a local viscosity from the polymer dynamics, it can be extended to other multiscale models of complex fluids whose macro-rheology is unknown.

  3. Mesoscopic CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 /TiO 2 Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Etgar, Lioz

    2012-10-24

    We report for the first time on a hole conductor-free mesoscopic methylammonium lead iodide (CH 3NH 3PbI 3) perovskite/TiO 2 heterojunction solar cell, produced by deposition of perovskite nanoparticles from a solution of CH 3NH 3I and PbI 2 in γ-butyrolactone on a 400 nm thick film of TiO 2 (anatase) nanosheets exposing (001) facets. A gold film was evaporated on top of the CH 3NH 3PbI 3 as a back contact. Importantly, the CH 3NH 3PbI 3 nanoparticles assume here simultaneously the roles of both light harvester and hole conductor, rendering superfluous the use of an additional hole transporting material. The simple mesoscopic CH 3NH 3PbI 3/TiO 2 heterojunction solar cell shows impressive photovoltaic performance, with short-circuit photocurrent J sc= 16.1 mA/cm 2, open-circuit photovoltage V oc = 0.631 V, and a fill factor FF = 0.57, corresponding to a light to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.5% under standard AM 1.5 solar light of 1000 W/m 2 intensity. At a lower light intensity of 100W/m 2, a PCE of 7.3% was measured. The advent of such simple solution-processed mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells paves the way to realize low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Mesoscopic objects, porous layers and nanocomposites-Possibilities of sol-gel chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwonski, Ireneusz

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to prepare mesoscopic objects, thin porous films and nanocomposite coatings with the use of sol-gel technique. Silica nanotubes, titania nanoparticles, porous titania and zirconia coatings as well as titania nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by changing the type of sol-gel precursor, sol composition and applying dip-coating deposition procedure in order to obtain thin films or coatings. All materials were visualized and characterized by the Atomic Force Microcscopy (AFM) technique. Moreover, characterization of titania nanocomposites was extended to the tribological tests performed by means of microtribometer operating in normal loads range of 30-100 mN. The AFM analysis of mesoscopic objects and nanoparticles showed that the diameter of synthesized silica nanotubes was 60-70 nm and the size of titania nanoparticles was 43 nm. In case of porous layers the pore size in titania and zirconia coatings oscillated between 100 and 240 nm, however their shape and distribution were irregular. Microtribological studies of nanocomposites revealed the moderate decrease of the coefficient of friction for samples containing 5, 15 and 5 wt.% of zirconia nanoparticles in titania coatings annealed at 100, 500 and 1000 deg. C respectively. An enhancement of antiwear properties was already observed for 1 wt.% of nanophase content, except the sample annealed at 500 deg. C. It was also found that the annealing at high temperatures is a primary factor which affects the reduction of friction and wear of titania coatings while the presence of nanoparticles has secondary effect. Investigations in this study carried out with the use of the AFM technique highlighted the potential and flexibility of sol-gel approach in designing of various types of advanced materials in a form of mesoscopic objects, porous coatings and composite layers. Results collected in this study clearly demonstrated that sol-gel technique can be applied effectively in preparation of

  5. Contribution of mesoscopic modeling for flows prediction in cracked concrete buildings in condition of severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis aims at characterising and modeling the mechanical behavior of concrete at the mesoscopic scale. The more general scope of this study is the development of mesoscopic model for concrete; this model is to represent the concrete as a heterogeneous medium, taking into account the difference between aggregate and cement paste respecting the grading curve, the model parameters describe the mechanical and thermal behavior of cement paste and aggregates. We are interested in understanding the concrete behaviour, considered one structure. A program of random granular structure valid in 2D and 3D has been developed. This program is interfaced with the Finite Element code CAST3M in order to compute the numerical simulations. A method for numerical representation of the inclusions of concrete was also developed and validated by projection of the geometry on the shape functions, thus eliminating the problems of meshing that made the representation of all aggregates skeleton almost impossible, particularly in 3D. Firstly, the model is studied in two-dimensional and three-dimensional in order to optimize the geometrical model of the inner structure of concrete in terms of the meshing strategy and the smallest size of the aggregate to be taken into account. The results of the 2D and 3D model are analyzed and compared in the case of uniaxial tension and uniaxial compression. The model used is an isotropic unilateral damage model from Fichant [Fichant et al., 1999]. The model allows to simulate both the macroscopic behavior but also with the local studies of the distribution of crack and crack opening. The model shows interesting results on the transition from diffuse to localized damage and is able to reproduce dilatancy in compression. Finally, the mesoscopic model is applied to three simulations: the calculation of the permeability of cracked concrete; the simulation of the hydration of concrete at early age and finally the scale effect illustrated by bending

  6. Zinc tin oxide as high-temperature stable recombination layer for mesoscopic perovskite/silicon monolithic tandem solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Jérémie

    2016-12-05

    Perovskite/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells have the potential to reach efficiencies beyond those of silicon single-junction record devices. However, the high-temperature process of 500 °C needed for state-of-the-art mesoscopic perovskite cells has, so far, been limiting their implementation in monolithic tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of zinc tin oxide as a recombination layer and show its electrical and optical stability at temperatures up to 500 °C. To prove the concept, we fabricate monolithic tandem cells with mesoscopic top cell with up to 16% efficiency. We then investigate the effect of zinc tin oxide layer thickness variation, showing a strong influence on the optical interference pattern within the tandem device. Finally, we discuss the perspective of mesoscopic perovskite cells for high-efficiency monolithic tandem solar cells. © 2016 Author(s)

  7. Universal shape characteristics for the mesoscopic star-shaped polymer via dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, O.; Ilnytskyi, J. M.; Holovatch, Yu; von Ferber, C.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we study the shape characteristics of star-like polymers in various solvent quality using a mesoscopic level of modeling. The dissipative particle dynamics simulations are performed for the homogeneous and four different heterogeneous star polymers with the same molecular weight. We analyse the gyration radius and asphericity at the poor, good and θ-solvent regimes. Detailed explanation based on interplay between enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy and analyses on of the asphericity of individual branches are provided to explain the increase of the apsphericity in θ-solvent regime.

  8. Mesoscopic analyses of porous concrete under static compression and drop weight impact tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar Ozbek, A.S.; Pedersen, R.R.; Weerheijm, J.

    2008-01-01

    was considered as a four-phase material incorporating aggregates, bulk cement paste, interfacial transition zones and meso-size air pores. The stress-displacement relations obtained from static compression tests, the stress values, and the corresponding damage levels provided by the drop weight impact tests were......The failure process in highly porous concrete was analyzed experimentally and numerically. A triaxial visco-plastic damage model and a mesoscale representation of the material composition were considered to reproduce static compression and drop weight impact tests. In the mesoscopic model, concrete...

  9. Analysis of fluid lubrication mechanisms in metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubar, L.; Hubert, C.; Christiansen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The lubricant entrapment and escape phenomena in metal forming are studied experimentally as well as numerically. Experiments are carried out in strip reduction of aluminium sheet applying a transparent die to study the fluid flow between mesoscopic cavities. The numerical analysis involves two...... computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure Finite Element computation, where pockets in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus of asperity contacts...

  10. Andreev reflection properties in a parallel mesoscopic circuit with Majorana bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Jin-Tao; Han, Yu [Physics Department, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Gong, Wei-Jiang, E-mail: gwj@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-03-15

    We investigate the Andreev reflection in a parallel mesoscopic circuit with Majorana bound states (MBSs). It is found that in such a structure, the Andreev current can be manipulated in a highly efficient way, by the adjustment of bias voltage, dot levels, inter-MBS coupling, and the applied magnetic flux. Besides, the dot-MBS coupling manner is an important factor to modulate the Andreev current, because it influences the period of the conductance oscillation. By discussing the underlying quantum interference mechanism, the Andreev-reflection property is explained in detail. We believe that all the results can assist to understand the nontrivial role of the MBSs in driving the Andreev reflection.

  11. Magnetic response and critical current properties of mesoscopic-size YBCO superconducting samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisboa-Filho, P N; Deimling, C V; Ortiz, W A

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution superconducting specimens of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ were synthesized by a modified polymeric precursor method, yielding a ceramic powder with particles of mesoscopic-size. Samples of this powder were then pressed into pellets and sintered under different conditions. The critical current density was analyzed by isothermal AC-susceptibility measurements as a function of the excitation field, as well as with isothermal DC-magnetization runs at different values of the applied field. Relevant features of the magnetic response could be associated to the microstructure of the specimens and, in particular, to the superconducting intra- and intergranular critical current properties.

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the most significant constitutive model parameters on global and local response. Different distributions and shapes of the aggregate grains are tested. Three model parameter sets, corresponding to different moisture conditions, are employed in the analysis of two specimens in which the applied loading rate......We present a two-dimensional mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregate grains surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence...

  13. Magnetic response and critical current properties of mesoscopic-size YBCO superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisboa-Filho, P N [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Bauru (Brazil); Deimling, C V; Ortiz, W A, E-mail: plisboa@fc.unesp.b [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    In this contribution superconducting specimens of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were synthesized by a modified polymeric precursor method, yielding a ceramic powder with particles of mesoscopic-size. Samples of this powder were then pressed into pellets and sintered under different conditions. The critical current density was analyzed by isothermal AC-susceptibility measurements as a function of the excitation field, as well as with isothermal DC-magnetization runs at different values of the applied field. Relevant features of the magnetic response could be associated to the microstructure of the specimens and, in particular, to the superconducting intra- and intergranular critical current properties.

  14. Detection of discretized single-shell penetration in mesoscopic vortex matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, M I; Fasano, Y; Bolecek, N R Cejas; Pastoriza, H; Konczykowski, M; Beek, C J van der

    2014-01-01

    We investigated configurational changes in mesoscopic vortex matter with less than thousand vortices during flux penetration in freestanding 50 μm diameter disks of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ . High-resolution AC and DC local magnetometry data reveal oscillations in the transmittivity echoed in peaks in the third-harmonics magnetic signal fainting on increasing vortex density. By means of extra experimental evidence and a simple geometrical analysis we show that these features fingerprint the discretized entrance of single-shells of vortices having a shape that mimics the sample edge

  15. Mesoscopic layered structure in conducting polymer thin film fabricated by potential-programmed electropolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Nakahara, Reiko (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Iyoda, Tomokazu (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Shimidzu, Takeo (Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Tomita, Shigehisa (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Hatano, Yayoi (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Soeda, Fusami (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Ishitani, Akira (Toray Research Center Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan)); Tsuchiya, Hajime (Nitto Technical Information Center Co., Ltd., Shimohozumi Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Ohtani, Akira (Central Research Lab., Nitto Denko Co., Ltd., Shimohozumi Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Mesoscopic layered structures in conducting polymer thin films are fabricated by the potential-programmed electropolymerization method. High lateral quality in the layered structure is realized by the improvement of polymerization conditions, i.e., a mixture of pyrrole and bithiophene as monomers, a silicon single-crystal wafer as a working electrode and propylene carbonate as a solvent. SIMS depth profiling of the resulting layered films indicates a significant linear correlation between the electric charge passed and the thickness of the individual layers on a 100 A scale. (orig.)

  16. Effects of long-term administration of aspartame on biochemical indices, lipid profile and redox status of cellular system of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin A; Akanni, Olubukola O

    2016-01-01

    Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester) (ASP) is a synthetic sweetener used in foods and its safety remains controversial. The study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term administration of aspartame on redox status, lipid profile and biochemical indices in tissues of male Wistar rats. Rats were assigned into four groups and given distilled water (control), aspartame at doses of 15 mg/kg (ASP 1), 35 mg/kg (ASP 2) and 70 mg/kg (ASP 3) daily by oral gavage for consecutive 9 weeks. Administration of ASP 2 and ASP 3 significantly increased the weight of liver and brain, and relative weight of liver of rats. Lipid peroxidation products significantly increased in the kidney, liver and brain of rats at all doses of ASP with concomitant depletion of antioxidant parameters, viz. glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione. Furthermore, ASP 2 and ASP 3 significantly increased the levels of gamma glutamyl transferase by 70% and 85%; alanine aminotransferase by 66% and 117%; aspartate aminotransferase by 21% and 48%; urea by 72% and 58% and conjugated bilirubin by 63% and 64%, respectively. Also, ASP 2 and ASP 3 significantly increased the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the rats. Histological findings showed that ASP 2 and ASP 3 caused cyto-architectural changes such as degeneration, monocytes infiltration and necrotic lesions in brain, kidney and liver of rats. Aspartame may induce redox and lipid imbalance in rats via mechanism that involves oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione-dependent system.

  17. Structural and optical studies on mesoscopic defect structure in highly conductive AgI-ZnO composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, Fumito; Mochizuki, Shosuke

    2003-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of (x)AgI-(1-x)ZnO (0≤x≤1) composites at room temperature increases with increasing AgI content and reaches a maximum at about 50% AgI. The results obtained by the scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy have clarified high-ionic-conduction pathways related to mesoscopic defect structure at AgI/ZnO interfaces and mesoscopically disordered structure in AgI domain. We have observed also new optical phenomenon, which may arise from excitation energy transfer between AgI-exciton and photoinduced oxygen vacancy at the AgI/ZnO interface

  18. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a f...

  19. Tailoring of quantum dot emission efficiency by localized surface plasmon polaritons in self-organized mesoscopic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margapoti, Emanuela; Gentili, Denis; Amelia, Matteo; Credi, Alberto; Morandi, Vittorio; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2014-01-21

    We report on the tailoring of quantum dot (QD) emission efficiency by localized surface plasmon polaritons in self-organized mesoscopic rings. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with CdSe QDs embedded in a polymeric matrix are spatially organised in mesoscopic rings and coupled in a tuneable fashion by breath figure formation. The mean distance between NPs and QDs and consequently the intensity of QD photoluminescence, which is enhanced by the coupling of surface plasmons and excitons, are tuned by acting on the NP concentration.

  20. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  1. Mesoscopic model of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in aging colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple and effective description of the dynamics of dense hard sphere colloids in the aging regime deep in the glassy phase. Our description complements the many efforts to understand the onset of jamming in low density colloids, whose dynamics is still time-homogeneous. Based...... scattering function and particle mean-square displacements for jammed colloidal systems, and we predict a growth for the peak of the χ4 mobility correlation function that is logarithmic in waiting-time. At the same time, our model suggests a novel unified description for the irreversible aging dynamics...

  2. Self-organization of mesoscopic silver wires by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long, straight mesoscale silver wires have been fabricated from AgNO3 electrolyte via electrodeposition without the help of templates, additives, and surfactants. Although the wire growth speed is very fast due to growth under non-equilibrium conditions, the wire morphology is regular and uniform in diameter. Structural studies reveal that the wires are single-crystalline, with the [112] direction as the growth direction. A possible growth mechanism is suggested. Auger depth profile measurements show that the wires are stable against oxidation under ambient conditions. This unique system provides a convenient way for the study of self-organization in electrochemical environments as well as for the fabrication of highly-ordered, single-crystalline metal nanowires.

  3. Impurity bound states in mesoscopic topological superconducting loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan-Yan; Zha, Guo-Qiao; Zhou, Shi-Ping

    2018-06-01

    We study numerically the effect induced by magnetic impurities in topological s-wave superconducting loops with spin-orbit interaction based on spin-generalized Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. In the case of a single magnetic impurity, it is found that the midgap bound states can cross the Fermi level at an appropriate impurity strength and the circulating spin current jumps at the crossing point. The evolution of the zero-energy mode can be effectively tuned by the located site of a single magnetic impurity. For the effect of many magnetic impurities, two independent midway or edge impurities cannot lead to the overlap of zero modes. The multiple zero-energy modes can be effectively realized by embedding a single Josephson junction with impurity scattering into the system, and the spin current displays oscillatory feature with increasing the layer thickness.

  4. Mesoscopic Percolating Resistance Network in a Strained Manganite Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, K.; Nakamura, M.; Kundhikanjana, W.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2010-01-01

    Many unusual behaviors in complex oxides are deeply associated with the spontaneous emergence of microscopic phase separation. Depending on the underlying mechanism, the competing phases can form ordered or random patterns at vastly different length scales. By using a microwave impedance microscope, we observed an orientation-ordered percolating network in strained Nd 1/2Sr1/2MnO3 thin films with a large period of 100 nanometers. The filamentary metallic domains align preferentially along certain crystal axes of the substrate, suggesting the anisotropic elastic strain as the key interaction in this system. The local impedance maps provide microscopic electrical information of the hysteretic behavior in strained thin film manganites, suggesting close connection between the glassy order and the colossal magnetoresistance effects at low temperatures.

  5. Mesoscopic Percolating Resistance Network in a Strained Manganite Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, K.

    2010-07-08

    Many unusual behaviors in complex oxides are deeply associated with the spontaneous emergence of microscopic phase separation. Depending on the underlying mechanism, the competing phases can form ordered or random patterns at vastly different length scales. By using a microwave impedance microscope, we observed an orientation-ordered percolating network in strained Nd 1/2Sr1/2MnO3 thin films with a large period of 100 nanometers. The filamentary metallic domains align preferentially along certain crystal axes of the substrate, suggesting the anisotropic elastic strain as the key interaction in this system. The local impedance maps provide microscopic electrical information of the hysteretic behavior in strained thin film manganites, suggesting close connection between the glassy order and the colossal magnetoresistance effects at low temperatures.

  6. Mesoscopic percolating resistance network in a strained manganite thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keji; Nakamura, Masao; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Kelly, Michael A; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2010-07-09

    Many unusual behaviors in complex oxides are deeply associated with the spontaneous emergence of microscopic phase separation. Depending on the underlying mechanism, the competing phases can form ordered or random patterns at vastly different length scales. By using a microwave impedance microscope, we observed an orientation-ordered percolating network in strained Nd(1/2)Sr(1/2)MnO3 thin films with a large period of 100 nanometers. The filamentary metallic domains align preferentially along certain crystal axes of the substrate, suggesting the anisotropic elastic strain as the key interaction in this system. The local impedance maps provide microscopic electrical information of the hysteretic behavior in strained thin film manganites, suggesting close connection between the glassy order and the colossal magnetoresistance effects at low temperatures.

  7. Amyloid Fibril Polymorphism: Almost Identical on the Atomic Level, Mesoscopically Very Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuring, Carolin; Verasdonck, Joeri; Ringler, Philippe; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Stahlberg, Henning; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2017-03-02

    Amyloid polymorphism of twisted and straight β-endorphin fibrils was studied by negative-stain transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Whereas fibrils assembled in the presence of salt formed flat, striated ribbons, in the absence of salt they formed mainly twisted filaments. To get insights into their structural differences at the atomic level, 3D solid-state NMR spectra of both fibril types were acquired, allowing the detection of the differences in chemical shifts of 13 C and 15 N atoms in both preparations. The spectral fingerprints and therefore the chemical shifts are very similar for both fibril types. This indicates that the monomer structure and the molecular interfaces are almost the same but that these small differences do propagate to produce flat and twisted morphologies at the mesoscopic scale. This finding is in agreement with both experimental and theoretical considerations on the assembly of polymers (including amyloids) under different salt conditions, which attribute the mesoscopic difference of flat versus twisted fibrils to electrostatic intermolecular repulsions.

  8. Detailed Simulation of Complex Hydraulic Problems with Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Mathematical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Biscarini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation of fast-moving fronts originating from dam or levee breaches is a challenging task for small scale engineering projects. In this work, the use of fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS equations and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is proposed for testing the validity of, respectively, macroscopic and mesoscopic mathematical models. Macroscopic simulations are performed employing an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code that solves the NS combined with the volume of fluid (VOF multiphase method to represent free-surface flows. The mesoscopic model is a front-tracking experimental variant of the LBM. In the proposed LBM the air-gas interface is represented as a surface with zero thickness that handles the passage of the density field from the light to the dense phase and vice versa. A single set of LBM equations represents the liquid phase, while the free surface is characterized by an additional variable, the liquid volume fraction. Case studies show advantages and disadvantages of the proposed LBM and NS with specific regard to the computational efficiency and accuracy in dealing with the simulation of flows through complex geometries. In particular, the validation of the model application is developed by simulating the flow propagating through a synthetic urban setting and comparing results with analytical and experimental laboratory measurements.

  9. Time-dependent photon heat transport through a mesoscopic Josephson device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang, E-mail: zhaohonk@bit.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    The time-oscillating photon heat current through a dc voltage biased mesoscopic Josephson Junction (MJJ) has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. The Landauer-like formula of photon heat current has been derived in both of the Fourier space and its time-oscillating versions, where Coulomb interaction, self inductance, and magnetic flux take effective roles. Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited in the photon heat current due to the quantum nature of MJJ and applied external dc voltage. The magnitude of heat current decreases with increasing the external bias voltage, and subtle oscillation structures appear as the superposition of different photon heat branches. The overall period of heat current with respect to time is not affected by Coulomb interaction, however, the magnitude and phase of it vary considerably by changing the Coulomb interaction. - Highlights: • The time-oscillating photon heat current through a mesoscopic Josephson Junction has been investigated. • The Landauer-like formula of photon heat current has been derived by the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. • Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited in the photon heat current resulting from the self inductance and Coulomb interaction. • The oscillation structure of heat current is composed of the superposition of oscillations with different periods.

  10. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  12. Dynamics of skyrmions and edge states in the resistive regime of mesoscopic p-wave superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández Becerra, V., E-mail: VictorLeonardo.FernandezBecerra@uantwerpen.be; Milošević, M.V., E-mail: milorad.milosevic@uantwerpen.be

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Voltage–current characterization of a mesoscopic p-wave superconducting sample. • Skyrmions and edge states are stabilized with an out-of-plane applied magnetic field. • In the resistive regime, moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortices. - Abstract: In a mesoscopic sample of a chiral p-wave superconductor, novel states comprising skyrmions and edge states have been stabilized in out-of-plane applied magnetic field. Using the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equations we shed light on the dynamic response of such states to an external applied current. Three different regimes are obtained, namely, the superconducting (stationary), resistive (non-stationary) and normal regime, similarly to conventional s-wave superconductors. However, in the resistive regime and depending on the external current, we found that moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortex, thereby providing new fingerprints for identification of p-wave superconductivity.

  13. Mesoscopic segregation of excitation and inhibition in a brain network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Malagarriga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the brain are known to operate under a careful balance of excitation and inhibition, which maintains neural microcircuits within the proper operational range. How this balance is played out at the mesoscopic level of neuronal populations is, however, less clear. In order to address this issue, here we use a coupled neural mass model to study computationally the dynamics of a network of cortical macrocolumns operating in a partially synchronized, irregular regime. The topology of the network is heterogeneous, with a few of the nodes acting as connector hubs while the rest are relatively poorly connected. Our results show that in this type of mesoscopic network excitation and inhibition spontaneously segregate, with some columns acting mainly in an excitatory manner while some others have predominantly an inhibitory effect on their neighbors. We characterize the conditions under which this segregation arises, and relate the character of the different columns with their topological role within the network. In particular, we show that the connector hubs are preferentially inhibitory, the more so the larger the node's connectivity. These results suggest a potential mesoscale organization of the excitation-inhibition balance in brain networks.

  14. Functional energy nanocomposites surfaces based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S. A.; Dmitriev, A. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Makarov, P. G.; Mikhailova, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in the development and creation of new functional energy materials, including for improving the energy efficiency of power equipment and for effectively removing heat from energy devices, microelectronics and optoelectronics (power micro electronics, supercapacitors, cooling of processors, servers and Data centers). In this paper, the technology of obtaining a new nanocomposite based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes is considered. The methods of sequential production of functional materials from graphite flakes of different volumetric concentration using polymers based on epoxy resins and polyimide, as well as the addition of a mesoscopic medium in the form of monodisperse microspheres are described. The data of optical and electron microscopy of such nanocomposites are presented, the main problems in the appearance of defects in such materials are described, the possibilities of their elimination by the selection of different concentrations and sizes of the components. Data are given on the measurement of the hysteresis of the contact angle and the evaporation of droplets on similar substrates. The results of studying the mechanical, electrophysical and thermal properties of such nanocomposites are presented. Particular attention is paid to the investigation of the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites with respect to the creation of thermal interface materials for cooling devices of electronics, optoelectronics and power engineering.

  15. Time-dependent photon heat transport through a mesoscopic Josephson device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Hong-Kang

    2017-01-01

    The time-oscillating photon heat current through a dc voltage biased mesoscopic Josephson Junction (MJJ) has been investigated by employing the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. The Landauer-like formula of photon heat current has been derived in both of the Fourier space and its time-oscillating versions, where Coulomb interaction, self inductance, and magnetic flux take effective roles. Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited in the photon heat current due to the quantum nature of MJJ and applied external dc voltage. The magnitude of heat current decreases with increasing the external bias voltage, and subtle oscillation structures appear as the superposition of different photon heat branches. The overall period of heat current with respect to time is not affected by Coulomb interaction, however, the magnitude and phase of it vary considerably by changing the Coulomb interaction. - Highlights: • The time-oscillating photon heat current through a mesoscopic Josephson Junction has been investigated. • The Landauer-like formula of photon heat current has been derived by the nonequilibrium Green’s function approach. • Nonlinear behaviors are exhibited in the photon heat current resulting from the self inductance and Coulomb interaction. • The oscillation structure of heat current is composed of the superposition of oscillations with different periods.

  16. Universality of conductance in mesoscopic junctions and chiral anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxman, Luis E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R. [Universidadade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2001-03-01

    We show that the electrical conductance of one-dimensional, finite systems with chiral symmetry is not renormalized at low temperatures and depends solely on the characteristics of the electron gas at the leads. This chiral symmetry is related to the invariance under phase transformations that distinguish between left- and right-moving electrons. Alternatively to previous works in the literature, we employ a fermionic path integral formalism which does not rely on bosonization. The fundamental role played by the reservoirs and the finite size of the junctions is put into evidence. [Spanish] En este articulo mostramos que en sistemas unidimensionales finitos con simetria quiral, la conductancia electrica no se renormaliza a bajas temperaturas, y depende solamente de las caracteristicas del gas de electrones en los reservatorios. Esta simetria quiral esta relacionada a la invariancia ante transformadores de fase que distinguen entre modos derechos e izquierdos. Empleamos un formalismo de integral funcional sobre fermiones, el cual constituye una alternativa al metodo de bosonizacion utilizado previamente en la literatura. Tambien ponemos en evidencia el papel fundamental desempenado por los reservatorios y el tamano finito de la muestra.

  17. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  18. Using Models at the Mesoscopic Scale in Teaching Physics: Two Experimental Interventions in Solid Friction and Fluid Statics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Viennot, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the didactic suitability of introducing models at an intermediate (i.e. mesoscopic) scale in teaching certain subjects, at an early stage. The design and evaluation of two short sequences based on this rationale will be outlined: one bears on propulsion by solid friction, the other on fluid statics in the presence of gravity.…

  19. eQuilibrator--the biochemical thermodynamics calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like 'how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?' are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use.

  20. eQuilibrator—the biochemical thermodynamics calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like ‘how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?’ are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use. PMID:22064852

  1. Biochemical and Kinetic Characterization of Geranylgeraniol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This enzyme and its gene are an attractive target for development of plaunotol production and its detailed biochemical properties need to be understood. Recently, even though the gene (CYP97C27) coding for GGOH 18-hydroxylase has been identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli system, the enzyme activity ...

  2. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-07-30

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB.

  3. Mesoscopic Lawlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    2012-02-01

    Whether physics will contribute significantly to unraveling the secrets of life, the grandest challenge of them all, depends critically on whether proteins and other mesoscale objects exhibit emergent law. By this I mean quantitative relationships among their measured properties that are always true. The jury is still out on the matter, for there is evidence both for and against, but it is spotty, on account of the difficulty of measuring 100 nm - 1000 objects without damaging them quantum mechanically. It is therefore not clear that history will repeat itself. Physics contributed mightily to 20th century materials science through its identification and mastery of powerful macroscopic emergent laws such as crystalline rigidity, superconductivity and ferromagnetism, but it cannot do the same thing in biology, regardless of how powerful computers get, unless nature cooperates. The challenge before us as physicists is therefore not to amass more and more terabytes of data and computational output but rather to search for and, with luck, find operating principles at the scale of life greater than those of chemistry, which is to say, greater than a world ruled by nothing but miraculous accidents.

  4. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. ... The elucidation of the structure of DNA and the realization that DNA provides ... molecular recognition during DNA-protein interactions that mediate gene ...

  5. Implantable biochemical fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G; Rao, J R

    1978-01-05

    Implantable biochemical fuel cells for the operation of heart pacemakers or artificial hearts convert oxidisable body substances such as glucose on the anode side and reduce the oxygen contained in body fluids at the cathode. The anode and cathode are separated by membranes which are impermeable to albumen and blood corpuscles in body fluids. A chemical shortcircuit cannot occur in practice if, according to the invention, one or more selective oxygen electrodes with carbon as catalyst are arranged so that the mixture which diffuses into the cell from body fluids during operation reaches the fuel cell electrode through the porous oxygen electrode. The membranes used must be permeable to water. Cellulose, polymerised polyvinyl alcohol or an ion exchanger with a buffering capacity between pH5 and 8 act as permeable materials.

  6. Robust depth selectivity in mesoscopic scattering regimes using angle-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, P; Kim, A D; Moscoso, M

    2013-03-01

    We study optical imaging of tissues in the mesoscopic scattering regime in which light multiply scatters in tissues but is not fully diffusive. We use the radiative transport equation to model light propagation and an ℓ1-optimization method to solve the inverse source problem. We show that recovering the location and strength of several point-like sources that are close to each other is not possible when using angle-averaged measurements. The image reliability is limited by a spatial scale that is on the order of the transport mean-free path, even under the most ideal conditions. However, by using just a few angle-resolved measurements, the proposed method is able to overcome this limitation.

  7. p-type Mesoscopic nickel oxide/organometallic perovskite heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Chin; Jeng, Jun-Yuan; Shen, Po-Shen; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Chao, Tzu-Yang; Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2014-04-23

    In this article, we present a new paradigm for organometallic hybrid perovskite solar cell using NiO inorganic metal oxide nanocrystalline as p-type electrode material and realized the first mesoscopic NiO/perovskite/[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) heterojunction photovoltaic device. The photo-induced transient absorption spectroscopy results verified that the architecture is an effective p-type sensitized junction, which is the first inorganic p-type, metal oxide contact material for perovskite-based solar cell. Power conversion efficiency of 9.51% was achieved under AM 1.5 G illumination, which significantly surpassed the reported conventional p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. The replacement of the organic hole transport materials by a p-type metal oxide has the advantages to provide robust device architecture for further development of all-inorganic perovskite-based thin-film solar cells and tandem photovoltaics.

  8. Modeling elasto-plastic behavior of polycrystalline grain structure of steels at mesoscopic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, Marko; Cizelj, Leon

    2005-01-01

    The multiscale model is proposed to explicitly account for the inhomogeneous structure of polycrystalline materials. Grains and grain boundaries are modeled explicitly using Voronoi tessellation. The constitutive model of crystal grains utilizes anisotropic elasticity and crystal plasticity. Commercially available finite element code is applied to solve the boundary value problem defined at the macroscopic scale. No assumption regarding the distribution of the mesoscopic strain and stress fields is used, apart the finite element discretization. The proposed model is then used to estimate the minimum size of polycrystalline aggregate of selected reactor pressure vessel steel (22 NiMoCr 3 7), above which it can be considered macroscopically homogeneous. Elastic and rate-independent plastic deformation modes are considered. The results are validated by the experimental and simulation results from the literature

  9. Magnetofingerprints of superconducting films: Vortex dynamics and mesoscopic-scale disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, E.R.; Israeloff, N.E.; Goldman, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The variations of voltage and voltage noise with magnetic field in c-axis-oriented DyBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin films exhibit reproducible, microstructure-dependent ''magnetofingerprints'' (MF's). The MF's can be scrambled with the reversal of the direction of the Lorentz force on field-induced vortices. Analysis of the noise suggests a strong dependence of the local free-energy landscape on vortex density similar to global frustration effects found in periodic superconducting networks. Above fields which roughly match vortex separation with mesoscopic-scale disorder in the films the noise and the fine structure of the MF's are suppressed, suggesting a crossover to a more weakly pinned vortex-liquid regime

  10. Quasiparticle transport properties of mesoscopic wires containing normal-metal/superconductor/normal-metal proximity junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam; Kim, Kijoon; Lee, Hu Jong; Lee, Seongjae; Yuk, Jong Seol; Park, Kyoung Wan; Lee, El Hang

    1997-01-01

    We measured the differential resistance dV/dI of mesoscopic normal-metal/superconductor/normal-metal (N-S-N) junctions. At low temperatures (T PbIn /e, where Δ PbIn is the gap energy of superconducting Pb-In, and at a higher bias V c . The zero-bias dip is supposed to originate from Andreev reflections of quasiparticles and the peak near 2Δ PbIn /e from the formation of a standing-wave mode of quasiparticles inside the superconducting potential barrier. We attribute the peaks at V c to a transition of the superconducting region to the normal state as the current exceeds the critical current I c of S

  11. New nanocomposite surfaces and thermal interface materials based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Alex A.; Dmitriev, Alex S.; Makarov, Petr; Mikhailova, Inna

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in the development and creation of new functional energy mate-rials, including for improving the energy efficiency of power equipment and for effectively removing heat from energy devices, microelectronics and optoelectronics (power micro electronics, supercapacitors, cooling of processors, servers and data centers). In this paper, the technology of obtaining new nanocomposites based on mesoscopic microspheres, polymers and graphene flakes is considered. The methods of sequential production of functional materials from graphene flakes of different volumetric concentration using epoxy polymers, as well as the addition of monodisperse microspheres are described. Data are given on the measurement of the contact angle and thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites with respect to the creation of thermal interface materials for cooling devices of electronics, optoelectronics and power engineering.

  12. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew Cn; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-02-04

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps.

  13. Evaluation of calcium hydrogen carbonate mesoscopic crystals as a disinfectant for influenza A viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKASHIMA, Ryuji; KAWAMOTO, Masaomi; MIYAZAKI, Shigeru; ONISHI, Rumiko; FURUSAKI, Koichi; OSAKI, Maho; KIRISAWA, Rikio; SAKUDO, Akikazu; ONODERA, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the virucidal effect of a novel electrically charged disinfectant CAC-717 was investigated. CAC-717 is produced by applying an electric field to mineral water containing calcium hydrogen carbonate to generate mesoscopic crystals. Virus titration analysis showed a >3 log reduction of influenza A viruses after treatment with CAC-717 for 1 min in room temperature, while infectivity was undetectable after 15 min treatment. Adding bovine serum albumin to CAC-717 solution did not affect the disinfectant effect. Although CAC-717 is an alkaline solution (pH=12.39), upon contact with human tissue, its pH becomes almost physiological (pH 8.84) after accelerated electric discharge, which enables its use against influenza viruses. Therefore, CAC-717 may be used as a preventative measure against influenza A viruses and for biosecurity in the environment. PMID:28392537

  14. Modeling of electrical and mesoscopic circuits at quantum nanoscale from heat momentum operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2018-04-01

    We develop a new method to study electrical circuits at quantum nanoscale by introducing a heat momentum operator which reproduces quantum effects similar to those obtained in Suykens's nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy approach for the case of reversible motion. The series expansion of the heat momentum operator is similar to the momentum operator obtained in the framework of minimal length phenomenologies characterized by the deformation of Heisenberg algebra. The quantization of both LC and mesoscopic circuits revealed a number of motivating features like the emergence of a generalized uncertainty relation and a minimal charge similar to those obtained in the framework of minimal length theories. Additional features were obtained and discussed accordingly.

  15. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Prediction of Bridge Cables Based on Multiscaling and Mesoscopic Fracture Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiang Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue fracture of bridge stay-cables is usually a multiscale process as the crack grows from micro-scale to macro-scale. Such a process, however, is highly uncertain. In order to make a rational prediction of the residual life of bridge cables, a probabilistic fatigue approach is proposed, based on a comprehensive vehicle load model, finite element analysis and multiscaling and mesoscopic fracture mechanics. Uncertainties in both material properties and external loads are considered. The proposed method is demonstrated through the fatigue life prediction of cables of the Runyang Cable-Stayed Bridge in China, and it is found that cables along the bridge spans may have significantly different fatigue lives, and due to the variability, some of them may have shorter lives than those as expected from the design.

  16. Charge storage in mesoscopic graphitic islands fabricated using AFM bias lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurra, Narendra; Basavaraja, S; Kulkarni, G U [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on Nanoscience, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Prakash, Gyan; Fisher, Timothy S; Reifenberger, Ronald G, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: reifenbr@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Electrochemical oxidation and etching of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been achieved using biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography, allowing patterns of varying complexity to be written into the top layers of HOPG. The graphitic oxidation process and the trench geometry after writing were monitored using intermittent contact mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy reveals that the isolated mesoscopic islands formed during the AFM lithography process become positively charged, suggesting that they are laterally isolated from the surrounding HOPG substrate. The electrical transport studies of these laterally isolated finite-layer graphitic islands enable detailed characterization of electrical conduction along the c-direction and reveal an unexpected stability of the charged state. Utilizing conducting-atomic force microscopy, the measured I(V) characteristics revealed significant non-linearities. Micro-Raman studies confirm the presence of oxy functional groups formed during the lithography process.

  17. Broadband giant-refractive-index material based on mesoscopic space-filling curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Taeyong; Kim, Jong Uk; Kang, Seung Kyu; Kim, Hyowook; Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Yong-Hee; Shin, Jonghwa

    2016-08-01

    The refractive index is the fundamental property of all optical materials and dictates Snell's law, propagation speed, wavelength, diffraction, energy density, absorption and emission of light in materials. Experimentally realized broadband refractive indices remain 1,800 resulting from a mesoscopic crystal with a dielectric constant greater than three million. This gigantic enhancement effect originates from the space-filling curve concept from mathematics. The principle is inherently very broad band, the enhancement being nearly constant from zero up to the frequency of interest. This broadband giant-refractive-index medium promises not only enhanced resolution in imaging and raised fundamental absorption limits in solar energy devices, but also compact, power-efficient components for optical communication and increased performance in many other applications.

  18. Measurement of mesoscopic high-T{sub c} superconductors using Si mechanical micro-oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolz, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)]. E-mail: mdolz@cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar; Antonio, D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Pastoriza, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica and CONICET, R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2007-09-01

    In a superconducting mesoscopic sample, with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth, some properties are qualitatively different to those found in the bulk material. These properties include magnetization, vortex dynamics and ordering of the vortex lattice. In order to detect the small signals produced by this kind of samples, new instruments designed for the microscale are needed. In this work we use micromechanical oscillators to study the magnetic properties of a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} disk with a diameter of 13.5{mu}m and a thickness of 2.5{mu}m. The discussion of our results is based on the existence and contribution of inter and intra layer currents.

  19. Measurement of mesoscopic high-Tc superconductors using Si mechanical micro-oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, M.; Antonio, D.; Pastoriza, H.

    2007-01-01

    In a superconducting mesoscopic sample, with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth, some properties are qualitatively different to those found in the bulk material. These properties include magnetization, vortex dynamics and ordering of the vortex lattice. In order to detect the small signals produced by this kind of samples, new instruments designed for the microscale are needed. In this work we use micromechanical oscillators to study the magnetic properties of a Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ disk with a diameter of 13.5μm and a thickness of 2.5μm. The discussion of our results is based on the existence and contribution of inter and intra layer currents

  20. Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

    2008-10-01

    Mesoscopic effects in superconductors. Tunneling measurements of charge imbalance of non-equilibrium superconductors / R. Yagi. Influence of magnetic impurities on Josephson current in SNS junctions / T. Yokoyama. Nonlinear response and observable signatures of equilibrium entanglement / A. M. Zagoskin. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with a Cooper pair box / Giuseppe Falci. Crossed Andreev reflection-induced giant negative magnetoresistance / Francesco Giazotto -- Quantum modulation of superconducting junctions. Adiabatic pumping through a Josephson weak link / Fabio Taddei. Squeezing of superconducting qubits / Kazutomu Shiokawa. Detection of Berrys phases in flux qubits with coherent pulses / D. N. Zheng. Probing entanglement in the system of coupled Josephson qubits / A. S. Kiyko. Josephson junction with tunable damping using quasi-particle injection / Ryuta Yagi. Macroscopic quantum coherence in rf-SQUIDs / Alexey V. Ustinov. Bloch oscillations in a Josephson circuit / D. Esteve. Manipulation of magnetization in nonequilibrium superconducting nanostructures / F. Giazotto -- Superconducting qubits. Decoherence and Rabi oscillations in a qubit coupled to a quantum two-level system / Sahel Ashhab. Phase-coupled flux qubits: CNOT operation, controllable coupling and entanglement / Mun Dae Kim. Characteristics of a switchable superconducting flux transformer with a DC-SQUID / Yoshihiro Shimazu. Characterization of adiabatic noise in charge-based coherent nanodevices / E. Paladino -- Unconventional superconductors. Threshold temperatures of zero-bias conductance peak and zero-bias conductance dip in diffusive normal metal/superconductor junctions / Iduru Shigeta. Tunneling conductance in 2DEG/S junctions in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling / T. Yokoyama. Theory of charge transport in diffusive ferromagnet/p-wave superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Theory of enhanced proximity effect by the exchange field in FS bilayers / T. Yokoyama. Theory of

  1. Characterizing multistationarity regimes in biochemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Otero-Muras

    Full Text Available Switch like responses appear as common strategies in the regulation of cellular systems. Here we present a method to characterize bistable regimes in biochemical reaction networks that can be of use to both direct and reverse engineering of biological switches. In the design of a synthetic biological switch, it is important to study the capability for bistability of the underlying biochemical network structure. Chemical Reaction Network Theory (CRNT may help at this level to decide whether a given network has the capacity for multiple positive equilibria, based on their structural properties. However, in order to build a working switch, we also need to ensure that the bistability property is robust, by studying the conditions leading to the existence of two different steady states. In the reverse engineering of biological switches, knowledge collected about the bistable regimes of the underlying potential model structures can contribute at the model identification stage to a drastic reduction of the feasible region in the parameter space of search. In this work, we make use and extend previous results of the CRNT, aiming not only to discriminate whether a biochemical reaction network can exhibit multiple steady states, but also to determine the regions within the whole space of parameters capable of producing multistationarity. To that purpose we present and justify a condition on the parameters of biochemical networks for the appearance of multistationarity, and propose an efficient and reliable computational method to check its satisfaction through the parameter space.

  2. Multiscale simulations of patchy particle systems combining Molecular Dynamics, Path Sampling and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Peter

    Important reaction-diffusion processes, such as biochemical networks in living cells, or self-assembling soft matter, span many orders in length and time scales. In these systems, the reactants' spatial dynamics at mesoscopic length and time scales of microns and seconds is coupled to the reactions between the molecules at microscopic length and time scales of nanometers and milliseconds. This wide range of length and time scales makes these systems notoriously difficult to simulate. While mean-field rate equations cannot describe such processes, the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. The recently developed multiscale Molecular Dynamics Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) approach combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesocopic scale where particles are far apart, with microscopic Molecular (or Brownian) Dynamics, for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. The association and dissociation of particles are treated with rare event path sampling techniques. I will illustrate the efficiency of this method for patchy particle systems. Replacing the microscopic regime with a Markov State Model avoids the microscopic regime completely. The MSM is then pre-computed using advanced path-sampling techniques such as multistate transition interface sampling. I illustrate this approach on patchy particle systems that show multiple modes of binding. MD-GFRD is generic, and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level, including the orientational dynamics, opening up the possibility for large-scale simulations of e.g. protein signaling networks.

  3. FROM ATOMISTIC TO SYSTEMATIC COARSE-GRAINED MODELS FOR MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

    KAUST Repository

    Harmandaris, Vagelis; Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Katsoulakis, Markos; Plechac, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The development of systematic (rigorous) coarse-grained mesoscopic models for complex molecular systems is an intense research area. Here we first give an overview of methods for obtaining optimal parametrized coarse-grained models, starting from

  4. Simulation studies in biochemical signaling and enzyme reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    Biochemical pathways characterize various biochemical reaction schemes that involve a set of species and the manner in which they are connected. Determination of schematics that represent these pathways is an important task in understanding metabolism and signal transduction. Examples of these Pathways are: DNA and protein synthesis, and production of several macro-molecules essential for cell survival. A sustained feedback mechanism arises in gene expression and production of mRNA that lead to protein synthesis if the protein so synthesized serves as a transcription factor and becomes a repressor of the gene expression. The cellular regulations are carried out through biochemical networks consisting of reactions and regulatory proteins. Systems biology is a relatively new area that attempts to describe the biochemical pathways analytically and develop reliable mathematical models for the pathways. A complete understanding of chemical reaction kinetics is prohibitively hard thanks to the nonlinear and highly complex mechanisms that regulate protein formation, but attempting to numerically solve some of the governing differential equations seems to offer significant insight about their biochemical picture. To validate these models, one can perform simple experiments in the lab. This paper introduces fundamental ideas in biochemical signaling and attempts to take first steps into the understanding of biochemical oscillations. Initially, the two-pool model of calcium is used to describe the dynamics behind the oscillations. Later we present some elementary results showing biochemical oscillations arising from solving differential equations of Elowitz and Leibler using MATLAB software.

  5. A Simple Approach to Study Designs in Complex Biochemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somdatta Sinha

    Protein sequences. • Biochemical & Genetic information. REVERSE ENGINEERING. LARGE NETWORKS. FORWARD ENGINEERING. All designs that are not physically forbidden are realizable, but not all realizable designs are functionally effective. (in relation to context and constraints of the system and environment).

  6. Effect of Different Fertilization Systems (Chemical, Biological and Integrated( on Nitrogen and Phosphorus Concentration, Biochemical Attributes and Sepals Dry Weight of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    roghayeh mohammadpour vashvaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a subtropical medicinal plant belongs to the Malvaceae family. Roselle sepals are valuable due to its therapeutic properties and culinary uses. During past decades rising cost of chemical inputs and overusing them in conventional farming have caused various environmental issues such as soil and water resources contamination, reduction in food quality production, decreasing soil fertility and biological imbalance in the soil that they impose irreparable damage to ecosystems. Sustainable agriculture which is based on the use of bio-fertilizers with the aim of eliminating or considerably reducing the use of chemical inputs is the optimal solution to overcome these problems. Abo-Baker and Gehan (2011 in their study on the effect of bio-fertilizers in combination with different rates of chemical fertilizers on growth characters, yield component and chemical constituents of roselle demonstrated that the inoculation with the mixture of bio-fertilizers combined with 50 or 100% chemical fertilizers improved, in most cases, growth characters and increased sepal yield or at least did not differ significantly from the control (full recommended dose of NPK alone. These researchers stated that applying 50% of the recommended dose of NPK plus the mixture of bio-fertilizer can save half of the quantity of chemical fertilizers, decrease the production cost and obtain high quality product. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of bio-fertilizers in combination with different doses of chemical fertilizers on the element concentrations, biochemical properties and yield of roselle to find the appropriate integration of them. Material and Methods This experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete block design with three replications, at the Research Station, University of Zabol, during growing season of 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. Experimental treatments were plant nutrition with NPK (220, 130

  7. Ouroboros - Playing A Biochemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ouroboros: Playing A Biochemical RODRIGUES,D.T.1,2;GAYER, M.C.1,2; ESCOTO, D.F.1; DENARDIN, E.L.G.2, ROEHRS, R.1,2 1Interdisciplinary Research Group on Teaching Practice, Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil 2Laboratory of Physicochemical Studies and Natural Products, Post Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil Introduction: Currently, teachers seek different alternatives to enhance the teaching-learning process. Innovative teaching methodologies are increasingly common tools in educational routine. The use of games, electronic or conventional, is an effective tool to assist in learning and also to raise the social interaction between students. Objective: In this sense our work aims to evaluate the card game and "Ouroboros" board as a teaching and learning tool in biochemistry for a graduating class in Natural Sciences. Materials and methods: The class gathered 22 students of BSc in Natural Sciences. Each letter contained a question across the board that was drawn to a group to answer within the allotted time. The questions related concepts of metabolism, organic and inorganic chemical reactions, bioenergetics, etc.. Before the game application, students underwent a pre-test with four issues involving the content that was being developed. Soon after, the game was applied. Then again questions were asked. Data analysis was performed from the ratio of the number of correct pre-test and post-test answers. Results and discussion: In the pre-test 18.1% of the students knew all issues, 18.1% got 3 correct answers, 40.9% answered only 2 questions correctly and 22.7% did not hit any. In post-test 45.4% answered all the questions right, 31.8% got 3 questions and 22.7% got 2 correct answers. The results show a significant improvement of the students about the field of content taught through the game. Conclusion: Generally, traditional approaches of chemistry and biochemistry are abstract and complex. Thus, through games

  8. Lead iodide perovskite sensitized all-solid-state submicron thin film mesoscopic solar cell with efficiency exceeding 9%.

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Lee, Ki-Beom; Moehl, Thomas; Marchioro, Arianna; Moon, Soo-Jin; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Moser, Jacques E; Grä tzel, Michael; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI(2) and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO(2) film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (J(SC)) exceeding 17 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photovoltage (V(OC)) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO(2) film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) -sensitized liquid junction cells.

  9. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a function of the number of layers in the Ni inverse opal-like structure. The average lateral size of mesoscopic domains is found to be independent of the number of layers. 3D reconstruction of the reciprocal space for the inverse opal crystals with different thickness provided an indirect study of original opal templates in a depth-resolved way. The microstructure and thermal response of the framework of the porous inverse opal crystal was examined using wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction. This artificial porous structure is built from nickel crystallites possessing stacking faults and dislocations peculiar for the nickel thin films.

  10. The development of a 3D mesoscopic model of metallic foam based on an improved watershed algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinhua; Zhang, Yadong; Wang, Guikun; Fang, Qin

    2018-06-01

    The watershed algorithm has been used widely in the x-ray computed tomography (XCT) image segmentation. It provides a transformation defined on a grayscale image and finds the lines that separate adjacent images. However, distortion occurs in developing a mesoscopic model of metallic foam based on XCT image data. The cells are oversegmented at some events when the traditional watershed algorithm is used. The improved watershed algorithm presented in this paper can avoid oversegmentation and is composed of three steps. Firstly, it finds all of the connected cells and identifies the junctions of the corresponding cell walls. Secondly, the image segmentation is conducted to separate the adjacent cells. It generates the lost cell walls between the adjacent cells. Optimization is then performed on the segmentation image. Thirdly, this improved algorithm is validated when it is compared with the image of the metallic foam, which shows that it can avoid the image segmentation distortion. A mesoscopic model of metallic foam is thus formed based on the improved algorithm, and the mesoscopic characteristics of the metallic foam, such as cell size, volume and shape, are identified and analyzed.

  11. Lead iodide perovskite sensitized all-solid-state submicron thin film mesoscopic solar cell with efficiency exceeding 9%.

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hui-Seon

    2012-08-21

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI(2) and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO(2) film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (J(SC)) exceeding 17 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photovoltage (V(OC)) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO(2) film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH(3)NH(3))PbI(3) -sensitized liquid junction cells.

  12. Core–shell heterostructured metal oxide arrays enable superior light-harvesting and hysteresis-free mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    To achieve highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the structure and properties of an electron transport layer (ETL) or material (ETM) have been shown to be of supreme importance. Particularly, the core-shell heterostructured mesoscopic ETM architecture has been recognized as a successful electrode design, because of its large internal surface area, superior light-harvesting efficiency and its ability to achieve fast charge transport. Here we report the successful fabrication of a hysteresis-free, 15.3% efficient PSC using vertically aligned ZnO nanorod/TiO2 shell (ZNR/TS) core-shell heterostructured ETMs for the first time. We have also added a conjugated polyelectrolyte polymer into the growth solution to promote the growth of high aspect ratio (AR) ZNRs and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. The PSCs based on the as-synthesized core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructured ETMs exhibited excellent performance enhancement credited to the superior light harvesting capability, larger surface area, prolonged charge-transport pathways and lower recombination rate. The unique ETM design together with minimal hysteresis introduces core-shell ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures as a promising mesoscopic electrode approach for the fabrication of efficient PSCs. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Mesoscopic modeling and parameter estimation of a lithium-ion battery based on LiFePO4/graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar, Ali; Désilets, Martin; Lacroix, Marcel; Zaghib, Karim

    2018-03-01

    A novel numerical model for simulating the behavior of lithium-ion batteries based on LiFePO4(LFP)/graphite is presented. The model is based on the modified Single Particle Model (SPM) coupled to a mesoscopic approach for the LFP electrode. The model comprises one representative spherical particle as the graphite electrode, and N LFP units as the positive electrode. All the SPM equations are retained to model the negative electrode performance. The mesoscopic model rests on non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions and uses a non-monotonic open circuit potential for each unit. A parameter estimation study is also carried out to identify all the parameters needed for the model. The unknown parameters are the solid diffusion coefficient of the negative electrode (Ds,n), reaction-rate constant of the negative electrode (Kn), negative and positive electrode porosity (εn&εn), initial State-Of-Charge of the negative electrode (SOCn,0), initial partial composition of the LFP units (yk,0), minimum and maximum resistance of the LFP units (Rmin&Rmax), and solution resistance (Rcell). The results show that the mesoscopic model can simulate successfully the electrochemical behavior of lithium-ion batteries at low and high charge/discharge rates. The model also describes adequately the lithiation/delithiation of the LFP particles, however, it is computationally expensive compared to macro-based models.

  14. Lead Iodide Perovskite Sensitized All-Solid-State Submicron Thin Film Mesoscopic Solar Cell with Efficiency Exceeding 9%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Lee, Ki-Beom; Moehl, Thomas; Marchioro, Arianna; Moon, Soo-Jin; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Moser, Jacques E.; Grätzel, Michael; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    We report on solid-state mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells employing nanoparticles (NPs) of methyl ammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3)PbI3 as light harvesters. The perovskite NPs were produced by reaction of methylammonium iodide with PbI2 and deposited onto a submicron-thick mesoscopic TiO2 film, whose pores were infiltrated with the hole-conductor spiro-MeOTAD. Illumination with standard AM-1.5 sunlight generated large photocurrents (JSC) exceeding 17 mA/cm2, an open circuit photovoltage (VOC) of 0.888 V and a fill factor (FF) of 0.62 yielding a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.7%, the highest reported to date for such cells. Femto second laser studies combined with photo-induced absorption measurements showed charge separation to proceed via hole injection from the excited (CH3NH3)PbI3 NPs into the spiro-MeOTAD followed by electron transfer to the mesoscopic TiO2 film. The use of a solid hole conductor dramatically improved the device stability compared to (CH3NH3)PbI3 -sensitized liquid junction cells. PMID:22912919

  15. Enzyme and biochemical producing fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Lübeck, Mette; Nilsson, Lena

    2010-01-01

    factories for sustainable production of important molecules. For developing fungi into efficient cell factories, the project includes identification of important factors that control the flux through the pathways using metabolic flux analysis and metabolic engineering of biochemical pathways....

  16. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno...

  17. Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS: software for stochastic modeling of biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston Timothy C

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic fluctuations due to the stochastic nature of biochemical reactions can have large effects on the response of biochemical networks. This is particularly true for pathways that involve transcriptional regulation, where generally there are two copies of each gene and the number of messenger RNA (mRNA molecules can be small. Therefore, there is a need for computational tools for developing and investigating stochastic models of biochemical networks. Results We have developed the software package Biochemical Network Stochastic Simulator (BioNetS for efficientlyand accurately simulating stochastic models of biochemical networks. BioNetS has a graphical user interface that allows models to be entered in a straightforward manner, and allows the user to specify the type of random variable (discrete or continuous for each chemical species in the network. The discrete variables are simulated using an efficient implementation of the Gillespie algorithm. For the continuous random variables, BioNetS constructs and numerically solvesthe appropriate chemical Langevin equations. The software package has been developed to scale efficiently with network size, thereby allowing large systems to be studied. BioNetS runs as a BioSpice agent and can be downloaded from http://www.biospice.org. BioNetS also can be run as a stand alone package. All the required files are accessible from http://x.amath.unc.edu/BioNetS. Conclusions We have developed BioNetS to be a reliable tool for studying the stochastic dynamics of large biochemical networks. Important features of BioNetS are its ability to handle hybrid models that consist of both continuous and discrete random variables and its ability to model cell growth and division. We have verified the accuracy and efficiency of the numerical methods by considering several test systems.

  18. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-07-03

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm(2) cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional 'Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  19. Anisotropy of the Coulomb Interaction between Folded Proteins: Consequences for Mesoscopic Aggregation of Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho Yin; Lankevich, Vladimir; Vekilov, Peter G.; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2012-01-01

    Toward quantitative description of protein aggregation, we develop a computationally efficient method to evaluate the potential of mean force between two folded protein molecules that allows for complete sampling of their mutual orientation. Our model is valid at moderate ionic strengths and accounts for the actual charge distribution on the surface of the molecules, the dielectric discontinuity at the protein-solvent interface, and the possibility of protonation or deprotonation of surface residues induced by the electric field due to the other protein molecule. We apply the model to the protein lysozyme, whose solutions exhibit both mesoscopic clusters of protein-rich liquid and liquid-liquid separation; the former requires that protein form complexes with typical lifetimes of approximately milliseconds. We find the electrostatic repulsion is typically lower than the prediction of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The Coulomb interaction in the lowest-energy docking configuration is nonrepulsive, despite the high positive charge on the molecules. Typical docking configurations barely involve protonation or deprotonation of surface residues. The obtained potential of mean force between folded lysozyme molecules is consistent with the location of the liquid-liquid coexistence, but produces dimers that are too short-lived for clusters to exist, suggesting lysozyme undergoes conformational changes during cluster formation. PMID:22768950

  20. Optimizing mesoscopic two-band superconductors for observation of fractional vortex states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piña, Juan C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Núcleo de Tecnologia, CAA, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 55002-970 Caruaru, PE (Brazil); Souza Silva, Clécio C. de, E-mail: clecio@df.ufpe [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Milošević, Milorad V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Observation of fractional vortices in two-band superconductors of broad size range. • There is a minimal sample size for observing each particular fractional state. • Optimal value for stability of each fractional state is determined. • A suitable magnetic dot enhances stability even further. - Abstract: Using the two-component Ginzburg–Landau model, we investigate the effect of sample size and magnitude and homogeneity of external magnetic field on the stability of fractional vortex states in a mesoscopic two-band superconducting disk. We found that each fractional state has a preferable sample size, for which the range of applied field in which the state is stable is pronouncedly large. Vice versa, there exists an optimal magnitude of applied field for which a large range of possible sample radii will support the considered fractional state. Finally, we show that the stability of fractional states can be enhanced even further by magnetic nanostructuring of the sample, i.e. by suitably chosen geometrical parameters and magnetic moment of a ferromagnetic dot placed on top of the superconducting disk.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petković, I., E-mail: ivana.petkovic@yale.edu; Lollo, A. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Castellanos-Beltran, M. A. [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Harris, J. G. E. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 μm, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  2. Mesoscopic modeling of structural and thermodynamic properties of fluids confined by rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-Mejía, Ketzasmin A; López-Rendón, Roberto; Gama Goicochea, Armando

    2015-10-21

    The interfacial and structural properties of fluids confined by surfaces of different geometries are studied at the mesoscopic scale using dissipative particle dynamics simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. The structure of the surfaces is modeled by a simple function, which allows us to simulate readily different types of surfaces through the choice of three parameters only. The fluids we have modeled are confined either by two smooth surfaces or by symmetrically and asymmetrically structured walls. We calculate structural and thermodynamic properties such as the density, temperature and pressure profiles, as well as the interfacial tension profiles for each case and find that a structural order-disorder phase transition occurs as the degree of surface roughness increases. However, the magnitude of the interfacial tension is insensitive to the structuring of the surfaces and depends solely on the magnitude of the solid-fluid interaction. These results are important for modern nanotechnology applications, such as in the enhanced recovery of oil, and in the design of porous materials with specifically tailored properties.

  3. Dynamic and structural evidence of mesoscopic aggregation in phosphonium ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosby, T.; Vicars, Z.; Heres, M.; Tsunashima, K.; Sangoro, J.

    2018-05-01

    Mesoscopic aggregation in aprotic ionic liquids due to the microphase separation of polar and non-polar components is expected to correlate strongly with the physicochemical properties of ionic liquids and therefore their potential applications. The most commonly cited experimental evidence of such aggregation is the observation of a low-q pre-peak in the x-ray and neutron scattering profiles, attributed to the polarity alternation of polar and apolar phases. In this work, a homologous series of phosphonium ionic liquids with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion and systematically varying alkyl chain lengths on the phosphonium cation are investigated by small and wide-angle x-ray scattering, dynamic-mechanical spectroscopy, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. A comparison of the real space correlation distance corresponding to the pre-peak and the presence or absence of the slow sub-α dielectric relaxation previously associated with the motion of mesoscale aggregates reveals a disruption of mesoscale aggregates with increasing symmetry of the quaternary phosphonium cation. These findings contribute to the broader understanding of the interplay of molecular structures, mesoscale aggregation, and physicochemical properties in aprotic ionic liquids.

  4. Revisiting the mesoscopic Termonia and Smith model for deformation of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Reddy, B; Basu, Sumit; Estevez, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscopic models for polymers have the potential to link macromolecular properties with the mechanical behaviour without being too expensive computationally. An interesting, popular and rather simple model to this end was proposed by Termonia and Smith (1987 Macromolecules 20 835–8). In this model the macromolecular ensemble is viewed as a collection of two-dimensional self-avoiding random walks on a regular lattice whose lattice points represent entanglements. The load is borne by members representing van der Waals bonds as well as macromolecular strands between two entanglement points. Model polymers simulated via this model exhibited remarkable qualitative similarity with real polymers with respect to their molecular weight, entanglement spacing, strain rate and temperature dependence. In this work, we revisit this model and present a detailed reformulation within the framework of a finite deformation finite element scheme. The physical origins of each of the parameters in the model are investigated and inherent assumptions in the model which contribute to its success are critically probed

  5. Mesoscopic modeling of DNA denaturation rates: Sequence dependence and experimental comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, Oda, E-mail: oda.dahlen@ntnu.no; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-21

    Using rare event simulation techniques, we calculated DNA denaturation rate constants for a range of sequences and temperatures for the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model with two different parameter sets. We studied a larger variety of sequences compared to previous studies that only consider DNA homopolymers and DNA sequences containing an equal amount of weak AT- and strong GC-base pairs. Our results show that, contrary to previous findings, an even distribution of the strong GC-base pairs does not always result in the fastest possible denaturation. In addition, we applied an adaptation of the PBD model to study hairpin denaturation for which experimental data are available. This is the first quantitative study in which dynamical results from the mesoscopic PBD model have been compared with experiments. Our results show that present parameterized models, although giving good results regarding thermodynamic properties, overestimate denaturation rates by orders of magnitude. We believe that our dynamical approach is, therefore, an important tool for verifying DNA models and for developing next generation models that have higher predictive power than present ones.

  6. Intact skull chronic windows for mesoscopic wide-field imaging in awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Gergely; Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Craniotomy-based window implants are commonly used for microscopic imaging, in head-fixed rodents, however their field of view is typically small and incompatible with mesoscopic functional mapping of cortex. New Method We describe a reproducible and simple procedure for chronic through-bone wide-field imaging in awake head-fixed mice providing stable optical access for chronic imaging over large areas of the cortex for months. Results The preparation is produced by applying clear-drying dental cement to the intact mouse skull, followed by a glass coverslip to create a partially transparent imaging surface. Surgery time takes about 30 minutes. A single set-screw provides a stable means of attachment for mesoscale assessment without obscuring the cortical field of view. Comparison with Existing Methods We demonstrate the utility of this method by showing seed-pixel functional connectivity maps generated from spontaneous cortical activity of GCAMP6 signals in both awake and anesthetized mice. Conclusions We propose that the intact skull preparation described here may be used for most longitudinal studies that do not require micron scale resolution and where cortical neural or vascular signals are recorded with intrinsic sensors. PMID:27102043

  7. The Theory of the Reentrant Effect in Susceptibility of Cylindrical Mesoscopic Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogadze, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    A theory has been developed to explain the anomalous behavior of the magnetic susceptibility of a normal metal-superconductor (NS) structure in weak magnetic fields at milli kelvin temperatures. The effect was discovered experimentally [A. C. Mota et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1514 (1990)]. In cylindrical superconducting samples covered with a thin normal pure metal layer, the susceptibility exhibited a reentrant effect: it started to increase unexpectedly when the temperature was lowered below 100 mK. The effect was observed in mesoscopic NS structures when the N and S metals were in good electric contact. The theory proposed is essentially based on the properties of the Andreev levels in the normal metal. When the magnetic field (or temperature) changes, each of the Andreev levels coincides from time to time with the chemical potential of the metal. As a result, the state of the NS structure experiences strong degeneracy, and the quasiparticle density of states exhibits resonance spikes. This generates a large paramagnetic contribution to the susceptibility, which adds to the diamagnetic contribution, thus leading to the reentrant effect. The explanation proposed was obtained within the model of free electrons. The theory provides a good description of the experimental results

  8. Lack of Dependence of the Sizes of the Mesoscopic Protein Clusters on Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, Maria A; Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-11-03

    Protein-rich clusters of steady submicron size and narrow size distribution exist in protein solutions in apparent violation of the classical laws of phase equilibrium. Even though they contain a minor fraction of the total protein, evidence suggests that they may serve as essential precursors for the nucleation of ordered solids such as crystals, sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. The cluster formation mechanism remains elusive. We use the highly basic protein lysozyme at nearly neutral and lower pH as a model and explore the response of the cluster population to the electrostatic forces, which govern numerous biophysical phenomena, including crystallization and fibrillization. We tune the strength of intermolecular electrostatic forces by varying the solution ionic strength I and pH and find that despite the weaker repulsion at higher I and pH, the cluster size remains constant. Cluster responses to the presence of urea and ethanol demonstrate that cluster formation is controlled by hydrophobic interactions between the peptide backbones, exposed to the solvent after partial protein unfolding that may lead to transient protein oligomers. These findings reveal that the mechanism of the mesoscopic clusters is fundamentally different from those underlying the two main classes of ordered protein solid phases, crystals and amyloid fibrils, and partial unfolding of the protein chain may play a significant role. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of gamma-irradiation on thermally-induced mesoscopic gelation of degalactosylated xyloglucans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todaro, S.; Sabatino, M.A.; Walo, M.; Mangione, M.R.; Bulone, D.; Dispenza, C.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoresponsive degalactosylated xyloglucans have been already proposed as in situ gelling scaffolds for tissue engineering, due to their reversible macroscopic thermal gelation at body temperature and biodegradability. The highly branched, hydroxyl group-rich molecular structure renders xyloglucans interesting raw materials also in the form of micro/nanoparticles for application as nanoscalar drug delivery devices in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. Owing to their natural source, xyloglucans show high average molecular weight, broad molecular weight distribution and poor water solubility, as large and compact aggregates usually form via inter-molecular hydrogen bonding. 60 Co γ-irradiation has been here applied to reduce the molecular weight. The aqueous solutions of irradiated xyloglucan were characterized by dynamic light scattering measurements and gel filtration chromatography. The aggregation kinetics at 37 °C were studied by dynamic light scattering measurements to confirm the temperature-responsive behavior of this polymer even when dispersed in water at low concentration after γ-irradiation. Irradiation dose–molecular properties relationship has been sought. - Highlights: • Influence of γ-irradiation on a partially degalactosylated xyloglucan is investigated. • Molecular weight reduction is observed in the investigated dose range. • Modification of the temperature-induced mesoscopic gelation kinetics is evidenced

  10. Mesoscopic chaos mediated by Drude electron-hole plasma in silicon optomechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiagui; Huang, Shu-Wei; Huang, Yongjun; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Jinghui; Liu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Duan, Shukai; Wei Wong, Chee

    2017-01-01

    Chaos has revolutionized the field of nonlinear science and stimulated foundational studies from neural networks, extreme event statistics, to physics of electron transport. Recent studies in cavity optomechanics provide a new platform to uncover quintessential architectures of chaos generation and the underlying physics. Here, we report the generation of dynamical chaos in silicon-based monolithic optomechanical oscillators, enabled by the strong and coupled nonlinearities of two-photon absorption induced Drude electron–hole plasma. Deterministic chaotic oscillation is achieved, and statistical and entropic characterization quantifies the chaos complexity at 60 fJ intracavity energies. The correlation dimension D2 is determined at 1.67 for the chaotic attractor, along with a maximal Lyapunov exponent rate of about 2.94 times the fundamental optomechanical oscillation for fast adjacent trajectory divergence. Nonlinear dynamical maps demonstrate the subharmonics, bifurcations and stable regimes, along with distinct transitional routes into chaos. This provides a CMOS-compatible and scalable architecture for understanding complex dynamics on the mesoscopic scale. PMID:28598426

  11. Mesoscopic modeling of the response of human dental enamel to mid-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Ramos, Marta; Stoneham, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Ablation of human dental enamel, a composite biomaterial with water pores, is of significant importance in minimally invasive laser dentistry but progress in the area is hampered by the lack of optimal laser parameters. We use mesoscopic finite element models of this material to study its response to mid-infrared radiation. Our results indicate that the cost-effective, off-the-shelf CO2 laser at λ = 10.6 μm may in fact ablate enamel precisely, reproducibly and with limited unwanted side effects such as cracking or heating, provided that a pulse duration of 10 μs is used. Furthermore, our results also indicate that the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm), currently popular for laser dentistry, may in fact cause unwanted deep cracking in the enamel when regions with unusually high water content are irradiated, and also provide an explanation for the large range of ablation threshold values observed for this material. The model may be easily adapted to study the response of any composite material to infrared radiation and thus may be useful for the scientific community.

  12. Conductance of functionalized nanotubes, graphene and nanowires: from ab initio to mesoscopic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blase, X. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); LPMCN, CNRS/Universite Lyon I, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Adessi, C. [LPMCN, CNRS/Universite Lyon I, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Biel, B. [Dpto. Electronica y Tecnologia de Computadores, Universidad de Granada Facultad de Ciencias, Campus de Fuente Nueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Lopez-Bezanilla, A.; Roche, S. [CEA, Institut of Nanosciences and Cryogenics, INAC/SPSMS/GT, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Fernandez-Serra, M.V. [LPMCN, CNRS/Universite Lyon I, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Physics and Astronomy department, Stony Brooks University, NY 11794 (United States); Margine, E.R. [LPMCN, CNRS/Universite Lyon I, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Department of Materials, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Triozon, F. [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-15

    We review recent theoretical results aiming at understanding the impact of doping and functionalization on the electronic transport properties of nanotubes, nanowires and graphene ribbons. On the basis of ab initio calculations, the conductance of micrometer long tubes or ribbons randomly doped or grafted can be studied, allowing to extract quantities at mesoscopic length scales such as the elastic mean free path and localization length. While the random modification of a 1D conducting channel leads generally to a significant loss of conductance, strategies can be found to either exploit or limitate such a detrimental effect. Spin-filtering in transition metal doped nanotubes, the opening of a mobility gap in graphene ribbons, and the choice of molecules to limitate backscattering in covalently functionalized tubes are examples that will be discussed. Symbolic representation of a nanotube filled with Cobalt atoms or clusters with subsequent optimal spinvalve effect (see text). (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Biomineralization of struvite crystals by Proteus mirabilis from artificial urine and their mesoscopic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prywer, J. [Institute of Physics, Technical University of Lodz, ul. Wolczanska 219, 93-005 Lodz (Poland); Torzewska, A. [Department of Immunobiology of Bacteria, Institute of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Immunology, University of Lodz, ul. Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    In order to investigate the mineralization of struvite we performed the experiment of struvite growth process from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis, as these bacteria are mainly isolated from infectious stones. The crystallization process occurred at conditions mimicking the real urinary tract infection. Our results show that struvite exhibits polar properties. This feature of struvite crystals is potentially very important in the case of binding additives which may either enhance or inhibit crystallization process. It seems also that the differences in the polarity of opposite faces of c-axis play important role in directing the struvite mesoscopic arrangement. We also described recent developments concerning curcumin - pigment extracted from the roots of turmeric commonly known as a spice added to various food preparations. Curcumin exhibited the effect against Proteus mirabilis inhibiting the activity of urease and consequently decreasing the efficiency of struvite growth. Therefore, curcumin belongs to phytoterapheutic components, which may be the alternative with relation to the antibiotic therapy. The paper concludes with a future outlook and goals in this field of research. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H.; Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of ≅ 10μm was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 μm, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author)

  15. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)); Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N. (Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (USSR))

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of {approx equal} 10{mu}m was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 {mu}m, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author).

  16. Mesoscopic quantum effects in a bad metal, hydrogen-doped vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Will J.; Ji, Heng; Paik, Hanjong; Schlom, Darrell G.; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-05-01

    The standard treatment of quantum corrections to semiclassical electronic conduction assumes that charge carriers propagate many wavelengths between scattering events, and succeeds in explaining multiple phenomena (weak localization magnetoresistance (WLMR), universal conductance fluctuations, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations) observed in polycrystalline metals and doped semiconductors in various dimensionalities. We report apparent WLMR and conductance fluctuations in H x VO2, a poor metal (in violation of the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit) stabilized by the suppression of the VO2 metal-insulator transition through atomic hydrogen doping. Epitaxial thin films, single-crystal nanobeams, and nanosheets show similar phenomenology, though the details of the apparent WLMR seem to depend on the combined effects of the strain environment and presumed doping level. Self-consistent quantitative analysis of the WLMR is challenging given this and the high resistivity of the material, since the quantitative expressions for WLMR are derived assuming good metallicity. These observations raise the issue of how to assess and analyze mesoscopic quantum effects in poor metals.

  17. Mesoscopic surface roughness of ice crystals pervasive across a wide range of ice crystal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Miller, A.; Amaral, M.; Cumiskey, A.

    2014-11-01

    Here we show high-magnification images of hexagonal ice crystals acquired by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Most ice crystals were grown and sublimated in the water vapor environment of an FEI-Quanta-200 ESEM, but crystals grown in a laboratory diffusion chamber were also transferred intact and imaged via ESEM. All of these images display prominent mesoscopic topography including linear striations, ridges, islands, steps, peaks, pits, and crevasses; the roughness is not observed to be confined to prism facets. The observations represent the most highly magnified images of ice surfaces yet reported and expand the range of conditions in which rough surface features are known to be conspicuous. Microscale surface topography is seen to be ubiquitously present at temperatures ranging from -10 °C to -40 °C, in supersaturated and subsaturated conditions, on all crystal facets, and irrespective of substrate. Despite the constant presence of surface roughness, the patterns of roughness are observed to be dramatically different between growing and sublimating crystals, and transferred crystals also display qualitatively different patterns of roughness. Crystals are also demonstrated to sometimes exhibit inhibited growth in moderately supersaturated conditions following exposure to near-equilibrium conditions, a phenomenon interpreted as evidence of 2-D nucleation. New knowledge about the characteristics of these features could affect the fundamental understanding of ice surfaces and their physical parameterization in the context of satellite retrievals and cloud modeling. Links to supplemental videos of ice growth and sublimation are provided.

  18. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)equilibrium. Moreover, in such systems, emergence results in an increase of the energy level of the ternary EAB complex that becomes closer to the transition state of the reaction, thus leading to the enhancement of catalysis. Hence a drift from quasi-equilibrium is, to a large extent, responsible for the production of information and enhancement of catalysis. Non-equilibrium of these simple systems must be an important aspect that leads to both self-organization and evolutionary processes. These conclusions can be extended to networks of catalysed chemical reactions. Such networks are, in fact, networks of networks, viz. meta-networks. In this formal representation, nodes are chemical reactions catalysed by poorly specific proteinoids, and links can be identified to the transport of metabolites from proteinoid to proteinoid. The concepts of integration and emergence can be applied to such situations and can be used to define the identity of these networks and therefore their evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter in, and from, the system and (2) the probability of occurrence of the nodes is strictly linked to their degree of

  19. Potential Fluctuations at Low Temperatures in Mesoscopic-Scale SmTiO3/SrTiO3/SmTiO3 Quantum Well Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Will J; Isaac, Brandon; Marshall, Patrick; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhou, Panpan; Stemmer, Susanne; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-04-25

    Heterointerfaces of SrTiO 3 with other transition metal oxides make up an intriguing family of systems with a bounty of coexisting and competing physical orders. Some examples, such as LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , support a high carrier density electron gas at the interface whose electronic properties are determined by a combination of lattice distortions, spin-orbit coupling, defects, and various regimes of magnetic and charge ordering. Here, we study electronic transport in mesoscale devices made with heterostructures of SrTiO 3 sandwiched between layers of SmTiO 3 , in which the transport properties can be tuned from a regime of Fermi-liquid like resistivity (ρ ∝ T 2 ) to a non-Fermi liquid (ρ ∝ T 5/3 ) by controlling the SrTiO 3 thickness. In mesoscale devices at low temperatures, we find unexpected voltage fluctuations that grow in magnitude as T is decreased below 20 K, are suppressed with increasing contact electrode size, and are independent of the drive current and contact spacing distance. Magnetoresistance fluctuations are also observed, which are reminiscent of universal conductance fluctuations but not entirely consistent with their conventional properties. Candidate explanations are considered, and a mechanism is suggested based on mesoscopic temporal fluctuations of the Seebeck coefficient. An improved understanding of charge transport in these model systems, especially their quantum coherent properties, may lead to insights into the nature of transport in strongly correlated materials that deviate from Fermi liquid theory.

  20. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  1. Multidimensional biochemical information processing of dynamical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Cells receive signaling molecules by receptors and relay information via sensory networks so that they can respond properly depending on the type of signal. Recent studies have shown that cells can extract multidimensional information from dynamical concentration patterns of signaling molecules. We herein study how biochemical systems can process multidimensional information embedded in dynamical patterns. We model the decoding networks by linear response functions, and optimize the functions with the calculus of variations to maximize the mutual information between patterns and output. We find that, when the noise intensity is lower, decoders with different linear response functions, i.e., distinct decoders, can extract much information. However, when the noise intensity is higher, distinct decoders do not provide the maximum amount of information. This indicates that, when transmitting information by dynamical patterns, embedding information in multiple patterns is not optimal when the noise intensity is very large. Furthermore, we explore the biochemical implementations of these decoders using control theory and demonstrate that these decoders can be implemented biochemically through the modification of cascade-type networks, which are prevalent in actual signaling pathways.

  2. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection to Select Clinically Node-negative Prostate Cancer Patients for Pelvic Radiation Therapy: Effect on Biochemical Recurrence and Systemic Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grivas, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.grivas@nki.nl [Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wit, Esther [Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Jeroen de [Department of Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vegt, Erik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bex, Axel; Hendricksen, Kees; Horenblas, Simon [Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); KleinJan, Gijs [Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Rhijn, Bas van; Poel, Henk van der [Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic sentinel lymph node (SLN) dissection (SLND) to select those patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who would benefit from additional pelvic external beam radiation therapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Radioisotope-guided SLND was performed in 224 clinically node-negative patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiation therapy. Patients with histologically positive SLNs (pN1) were also offered radiation therapy to the pelvic lymph nodes, combined with 3 years of ADT. Biochemical recurrence (BCR), overall survival, and metastasis-free (including pelvic and nonregional lymph nodes) survival (MFS) rates were retrospectively calculated. The Briganti and Kattan nomogram predictions were compared with the observed pN status and BCR. Results: The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value was 15.4 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR] 8-29). A total number of 834 SLNs (median 3 per patient; IQR 2-5) were removed. Nodal metastases were diagnosed in 42% of the patients, with 150 SLNs affected (median 1; IQR 1-2). The 5-year BCR-free and MFS rates for pN0 patients were 67.9% and 87.8%, respectively. The corresponding values for pN1 patients were 43% and 66.6%. The PSA level and number of removed SLNs were independent predictors of BCR and MFS, and pN status was an additional independent predictor of BCR. The 5-year overall survival rate was 97.6% and correlated only with pN status. The predictive accuracy of the Briganti nomogram was 0.665. Patients in the higher quartiles of Kattan nomogram prediction of BCR had better than expected outcomes. The complication rate from SLND was 8.9%. Conclusions: For radioisotope-guided SLND, the high staging accuracy is accompanied by low morbidity. The better than expected outcomes observed in the lower quartiles of BCR prediction suggest a role for SLN biopsy as a potential selection tool for the addition of pelvic radiation

  3. Mesoscopic Strains Maps in Woven Composite Laminas During Off-axis Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletto G.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanics of woven carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites is influenced by the complex architecture of the reinforcement phase. Computational (i.e. finite element based approaches have been used increasingly to model not only the global laminate stiffness, but also damage evolution and laminate strength. The modeling combines the identification of the architectural unit cell (UC, the selection of suitable constitutive models of the different phases, the creation of a fine discretization of the UC in finite elements, the application of an incremental solution procedure that solves iteratively for the stresses and strains in the UC, [1]. The experimental validation of computational models is carried out mainly at the macroscopical level, i.e. simulation of the macroscopic stress-strain curve. Damage, however, is a localized, straindependent phenomenon and therefore only accurate strain distribution within the UC (at the mesolevel can identify critical conditions in terms of damage location, extension and evolution. The validation of computational damage procedures is a key task and full-field optical strain analysis methods appear the ideal instrument. However, only limited examples of direct finte element method (FEM vs experimental strain correlation are found because of the limited sensitivity and spatial resolution of some techniques and the complexity and applicative difficulty of others. The aim of the present paper is to present the application of the digital image correlation (DIC technique, [2], to the full-field strain analysis at the mesoscopic level (i.e. within the UC of a woven CFRP lamina when the direction of loading forms an angle to the material direction. The material under consideration is a woven carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite. Orthogonal yarns, each made of of several thousand fibers, are woven according the twill-weave architecture is shown in Fig. 1a. Single-ply laminas were manufactured and tested to

  4. NMR relaxometric probing of ionic liquid dynamics and diffusion under mesoscopic confinement within bacterial cellulose ionogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chip J.; Gehrke, Sascha; Hollóczki, Oldamur; Wagle, Durgesh V.; Heitz, Mark P.; Baker, Gary A.

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose ionogels (BCIGs) represent a new class of material comprising a significant content of entrapped ionic liquid (IL) within a porous network formed from crystalline cellulose microfibrils. BCIGs suggest unique opportunities in separations, optically active materials, solid electrolytes, and drug delivery due to the fact that they can contain as much as 99% of an IL phase by weight, coupled with an inherent flexibility, high optical transparency, and the ability to control ionogel cross-sectional shape and size. To allow for the tailoring of BCIGs for a multitude of applications, it is necessary to better understand the underlying principles of the mesoscopic confinement within these ionogels. Toward this, we present a study of the structural, relaxation, and diffusional properties of the ILs, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([emim][Tf2N]) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([bmpy][Tf2N]), using 1H and 19F NMR T1 relaxation times, rotational correlation times, and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) diffusion coefficients, accompanied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We observed that the cation methyl groups in both ILs were primary points of interaction with the cellulose chains and, while the pore size in cellulose is rather large, [emim]+ diffusion was slowed by ˜2-fold, whereas [Tf2N]- diffusion was unencumbered by incorporation in the ionogel. While MD simulations of [bmpy][Tf2N] confinement at the interface showed a diffusion coefficient decrease roughly 3-fold compared to the bulk liquid, DOSY measurements did not reveal any significant changes in diffusion. This suggests that the [bmpy][Tf2N] alkyl chains dominate diffusion through formation of apolar domains. This is in contrast to [emim][Tf2N] where delocalized charge appears to preclude apolar domain formation, allowing interfacial effects to be manifested at a longer range in [emim][Tf2N].

  5. Flux structures in mesoscopic Y Ba2Cu3O7-δ discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, A; Bending, S J; Pross, A; Aziz, A; Grigorenko, A N; Humphreys, R G

    2005-01-01

    Scanning Hall probe microscopy has been used to study flux structures and dynamics in 5 μm x 5 μm YBCO thin film squares, which are mesoscopic with respect to the magnetic penetration depth, λ(T), at temperatures close to T c . A number of unusual vortex phenomena are observed in these microstructures which differ qualitatively from the expected behaviour of more macroscopic pieces of film. In field-cooled (FC) experiments to ∼65K a full Meissner state is generated for cooling fields less than ∼6 Oe, reflecting the relatively small demagnetization factors in our samples. Cooling in higher fields, however, results in only a very weak diamagnetic response at low temperatures whose magnitude is almost independent of the cooling field. In contrast we observe considerable trapped flux upon field-removal whose magnitude grows monotonically with cooling field. Remarkably, all FC flux distributions exhibit almost perfect rotational symmetry, and can be nearly completely cancelled in a reversible fashion by tuning the field applied to the initially FC state. Our field-cooled and zero-field-cooled results have been analysed in terms of a Bean-like critical state model containing constant edge and bulk current densities, and most of the observed phenomena can be explained by considering the relative weight of these two components. Not all flux profiles can be described by our simple model, however, and under certain circumstances symmetry-breaking 'dipole'-like flux structures can form in several adjacent YBCO squares. We speculate that these are related to the unidirectional Ar ion milling process which was used to pattern the squares and could have broken the expected four-fold symmetry. We note that our results could have important implications for the miniaturization of thin film HTS devices

  6. Probing mesoscopic crystals with electrons: One-step simultaneous inelastic and elastic scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Vladimir U.; Silkin, Vyacheslav M.; Krasovskii, Eugene E.

    2017-12-01

    Inelastic scattering of the medium-energy (˜10 -100 eV) electrons underlies the method of the high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS), which has been successfully used for decades to characterize pure and adsorbate-covered surfaces of solids. With the emergence of graphene and other quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) crystals, HREELS could be expected to become the major experimental tool to study this class of materials. We, however, identify a critical flaw in the theoretical picture of the HREELS of Q2D crystals in the context of the inelastic scattering only ("energy-loss functions" formalism), in contrast to its justifiable use for bulk solids and surfaces. The shortcoming is the neglect of the elastic scattering, which we show is inseparable from the inelastic one, and which, affecting the spectra dramatically, must be taken into account for the meaningful interpretation of the experiment. With this motivation, using the time-dependent density functional theory for excitations, we build a theory of the simultaneous inelastic and elastic electron scattering at Q2D crystals. We apply this theory to HREELS of graphene, revealing an effect of the strongly coupled excitation of the π +σ plasmon and elastic diffraction resonances. Our results open a path to the theoretically interpretable study of the excitation processes in crystalline mesoscopic materials by means of HREELS, with its supreme resolution on the meV energy scale, which is far beyond the capacity of the now overwhelmingly used EELS in transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Macro-mesoscopic Fracture and Strength Character of Pre-cracked Granite Under Stress Relaxation Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Yang, Haiqing; Xiao, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2018-05-01

    The fracture characters are important index to study the strength and deformation behavior of rock mass in rock engineering. In order to investigate the influencing mechanism of loading conditions on the strength and macro-mesoscopic fracture character of rock material, pre-cracked granite specimens are prepared to conduct a series of uniaxial compression experiments. For parts of the experiments, stress relaxation tests of different durations are also conducted during the uniaxial loading process. Furthermore, the stereomicroscope is adopted to observe the microstructure of the crack surfaces of the specimens. The experimental results indicate that the crack surfaces show several typical fracture characters in accordance with loading conditions. In detail, some cleavage fracture can be observed under conventional uniaxial compression and the fractured surface is relatively rough, whereas as stress relaxation tests are attached, relative slip trace appears between the crack faces and some shear fracture starts to come into being. Besides, the crack faces tend to become smoother and typical terrace structures can be observed in local areas. Combining the macroscopic failure pattern of the specimens, it can be deduced that the duration time for the stress relaxation test contributes to the improvement of the elastic-plastic strain range as well as the axial peak strength for the studied material. Moreover, the derived conclusion is also consistent with the experimental and analytical solution for the pre-peak stage of the rock material. The present work may provide some primary understanding about the strength character and fracture mechanism of hard rock under different engineering environments.

  8. Capacitance and conductance of mesoscopic systems connected by quantum point contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensberg, Karsten

    1993-01-01

    We study the transport properties of quantum dots and quantum point contacts in the Coulomb blockade regime and in the limit where the quantum point contact has nearly fully transmitting channels. Using a transformation to a multichannel Tomonaga-Luttinger-type model, we find the scaling behavior...... of the junction close to pinchoff. It is shown that the junction scales to an insulating junction. We find a crossover between a low-temperature regime with Coulomb blockade to a high-temperature regime where the quantum charge fluctuations are dominant. The crossover temperature between these regimes is given...... by Tc∼U[1-G0/NGH]N/2, where U are the bare charging energy, G0 is the nominal conductance, N is the number of channels, and GH=e2/h....

  9. Thermal Fluctuations in Smooth Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of mesoscopic thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Yang, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The SDPD-DV is implemented in our work for arbitrary 3D wall bounded geometries. The particle position and momentum equations are integrated with a velocity-Verlet algorithm and the entropy equation is integrated with a Runge-Kutta algorithm. Simulations of nitrogen gas are performed to evaluate the effects of timestep and particle scale on temperature, self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The hydrodynamic fluctuations in temperature, density, pressure and velocity from the SDPD-DV simulations are evaluated and compared with theoretical predictions. Steady planar thermal Couette flows are simulated and compared with analytical solutions. Simulations cover the hydrodynamic and mesocopic regime and show thermal fluctuations and their dependence on particle size.

  10. Nucleation in mesoscopic systems under transient conditions: Peptide-induced pore formation in vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    Attachment of lytic peptides to the lipid membrane of virions or bacteria is often accompanied by their aggregation and pore formation, resulting eventually in membrane rupture and pathogen neutralization. The membrane rupture may occur gradually via formation of many pores or abruptly after the formation of the first pore. In academic studies, this process is observed during interaction of peptides with lipid vesicles. We present an analytical model and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations focused on the pore formation in such situations. Specifically, we calculate the time of the first nucleation-limited pore-formation event and show the distribution of this time in the regime when the fluctuations of the number of peptides attached to a vesicle are appreciable. The results obtained are used to clarify the mechanism of the pore formation and membrane destabilization observed recently during interaction of highly active α-helical peptide with sub-100-nm lipid vesicles that mimic enveloped viruses with nanoscale membrane curvature. The model proposed and the analysis presented are generic and may be applicable to other meso- and nanosystems.

  11. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, A.; Van der Zwaag, W.; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image

  12. Optically induced charge transport in mesoscopic semiconductor systems; Optisch induzierter Ladungstransport in mesoskopischen Halbleitersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, Klaus-Dieter

    2009-07-13

    In the framework of this thesis optoelectronic processes in a to a quantum-dot contact nanostructured heterostructure were studied. In the experiment thereby by means of a laser in a 2DES heterostructure charge carriers were optically induced in the neighbourhood of a quantum-dot contact. Thereafter their effect on the electronic transport through the quantum-dot contact in the sample is studied. In the planely etched samples the purely electronic conductivity measurements indicate with the conductivity stages a one-dimensional subband quantization. The energetic distance of the subband bottoms amounts up to 5 meV. Furthermore the measurement in the magnetic field shows a transition of the subband structure over magnetoelectric bands to the pure Landau quantization. First photoresponse measurement s show under illumination the effect of an unwanted parallel conductivity. This effect can be suppressed by changed sample design and optimized wafer material. By this photoresponse measurements on the free-sttanding bridge samples and planely etched qunatum-dot contact samples. In low-frequency photoresponse measurements in both sample types the effect of an optically induced conductivity change can be identified. A simple model of the optically induced photoconductivity is introduced, which shows in the framework of a numerical simulation a very good agreement with the measurement data and allows the identification of the experimentally determined time constant. By application of for radiofrequencies suited components the experiment can be performed also at higher-frequent modulation of the optical excitation. Thereby it was proved that the effect of the photoinduced conductivity change because of its relatively high time constant generates for excitations in the MHz range a quasi-static conductivity state and the sample conductivity experiences therefore on a fast time scale no change.

  13. Capillary self-alignment of mesoscopic foil components for sensor-systems-in-foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutinov, Gari; Smits, Edsger C P; Van Heck, Gert; Van den Brand, Jeroen; Schoo, Herman F M; Mastrangeli, Massimo; Dietzel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the effective use of capillary self-alignment for low-cost and time-efficient assembly of heterogeneous foil components into a smart electronic identification label. Particularly, we demonstrate the accurate (better than 50 µm) alignment of cm-sized functional foil dies. We investigated the role played by the assembly liquid, by the size and the weight of assembling dies and by their initial offsets in the self-alignment performance. It was shown that there is a definite range of initial offsets allowing dies to align with high accuracy and within approximately the same time window, irrespective of their initial offset. (paper)

  14. Circadian Clocks: Unexpected Biochemical Cogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Mchaourab, Hassane; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-10-05

    A circadian oscillation can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins that cycles with a period of ∼ 24 h. Two recent studies provide surprising biochemical answers to why this remarkable oscillator has such a long time constant and how it can switch effortlessly between alternating enzymatic modes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian Clocks: Unexpected Biochemical Cogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Tetsuya; Mchaourab, Hassane; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    A circadian oscillation can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins that cycles with a period of ~24 h. Two recent studies provide surprising biochemical answers to why this remarkable oscillator has such a long time constant and how it can switch effortlessly between alternating enzymatic modes.

  16. Segment-scale, force-level theory of mesoscopic dynamic localization and entropic elasticity in entangled chain polymer liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Zachary E.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2017-04-01

    We develop a segment-scale, force-based theory for the breakdown of the unentangled Rouse model and subsequent emergence of isotropic mesoscopic localization and entropic elasticity in chain polymer liquids in the absence of ergodicity-restoring anisotropic reptation or activated hopping motion. The theory is formulated in terms of a conformational N-dynamic-order-parameter generalized Langevin equation approach. It is implemented using a universal field-theoretic Gaussian thread model of polymer structure and closed at the level of the chain dynamic second moment matrix. The physical idea is that the isotropic Rouse model fails due to the dynamical emergence, with increasing chain length, of time-persistent intermolecular contacts determined by the combined influence of local uncrossability, long range polymer connectivity, and a self-consistent treatment of chain motion and the dynamic forces that hinder it. For long chain melts, the mesoscopic localization length (identified as the tube diameter) and emergent entropic elasticity predictions are in near quantitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, the onset chain length scales with the semi-dilute crossover concentration with a realistic numerical prefactor. Distinctive novel predictions are made for various off-diagonal correlation functions that quantify the full spatial structure of the dynamically localized polymer conformation. As the local excluded volume constraint and/or intrachain bonding spring are softened to allow chain crossability, the tube diameter is predicted to swell until it reaches the radius-of-gyration at which point mesoscopic localization vanishes in a discontinuous manner. A dynamic phase diagram for such a delocalization transition is constructed, which is qualitatively consistent with simulations and the classical concept of a critical entanglement degree of polymerization.

  17. Modification of the mesoscopic structure in neutron irradiated EPDM viewed through positron annihilation spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambri, O.A.; Plazaola, F.; Axpe, E.; Mocellini, R.R.; Zelada-Lambri, G.I.; Garcia, J.A.; Matteo, C.L.; Sorichetti, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the study of the mesoscopic structure in neutron irradiated EPDM both from experimental and theoretical points of view. In this work we reveal completely the modification of the mesostructure of the EPDM due to neutron irradiation, resolving volume fraction, size and distribution of the crystalline zones as a function of the irradiation dose. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis techniques are applied and the results are discussed by means of new theoretical results for describing the interaction process between the crystals and amorphous zones in EPDM.

  18. Correlation between hierarchical structure of crystal networks and macroscopic performance of mesoscopic soft materials and engineering principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Naibo; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-11-07

    This review examines how the concepts and ideas of crystallization can be extended further and applied to the field of mesoscopic soft materials. It concerns the structural characteristics vs. the macroscopic performance, and the formation mechanism of crystal networks. Although this subject can be discussed in a broad sense across the area of mesoscopic soft materials, our main focus is on supramolecular materials, spider and silkworm silks, and biominerals. First, the occurrence of a hierarchical structure, i.e. crystal network and domain network structures, will facilitate the formation kinetics of mesoscopic phases and boost up the macroscopic performance of materials in some cases (i.e. spider silk fibres). Second, the structure and performance of materials can be correlated in some way by the four factors: topology, correlation length, symmetry/ordering, and strength of association of crystal networks. Moreover, four different kinetic paths of crystal network formation are identified, namely, one-step process of assembly, two-step process of assembly, mixed mode of assembly and foreign molecule mediated assembly. Based on the basic mechanisms of crystal nucleation and growth, the formation of crystal networks, such as crystallographic mismatch (or noncrystallographic) branching (tip branching and fibre side branching) and fibre/polymeric side merging, are reviewed. This facilitates the rational design and construction of crystal networks in supramolecular materials. In this context, the (re-)construction of a hierarchical crystal network structure can be implemented by thermal, precipitate, chemical, and sonication stimuli. As another important class of soft materials, the unusual mechanical performance of spider and silkworm silk fibres are reviewed in comparison with the regenerated silk protein derivatives. It follows that the considerably larger breaking stress and unusual breaking strain of spider silk fibres vs. silkworm silk fibres can be interpreted

  19. Equilibrium finite-frequency noise of an interacting mesoscopic capacitor studied in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent equilibrium noise of a mesoscopic capacitor in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The capacitor is modeled as a single-level quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to a nearby reservoir. The noise spectra are derived from linear-response conductances via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thereby, we analyze the performance of a recently derived exchange-correlation potential with time-nonlocal density dependence in the finite-frequency linear-response regime. We compare our TDDFT noise spectra with real-time perturbation theory and find excellent agreement for noise frequencies below the reservoir temperature.

  20. Breakdown of the independent electron picture in mesoscopic samples at low temperatures: The hunt for the Unicorn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R. A.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of experiments are discussed where, at low temperatures, it appears that the non-interacting picture of electrons in a Fermi liquid description of a mesoscopic sample is breaking down. Specifically, experiments on the temperature dependence of the phase-coherence time, energy relaxation rate, spin-flip scattering time, persistent currents in normal metals and transmission through a barrier in the fractional quantum Hall regime all display low-temperature properties which can not be accounted for in the independent electron picture.

  1. The mesoscopic conductance of disordered rings, its random matrix theory and the generalized variable range hopping picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotland, Alexander; Peer, Tal; Cohen, Doron; Budoyo, Rangga; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2008-01-01

    The calculation of the conductance of disordered rings requires a theory that goes beyond the Kubo-Drude formulation. Assuming 'mesoscopic' circumstances the analysis of the electro-driven transitions shows similarities with a percolation problem in energy space. We argue that the texture and the sparsity of the perturbation matrix dictate the value of the conductance, and study its dependence on the disorder strength, ranging from the ballistic to the Anderson localization regime. An improved sparse random matrix model is introduced to capture the essential ingredients of the problem, and leads to a generalized variable range hopping picture. (fast track communication)

  2. Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiedje, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites

  3. Biochemical Process Development and Integration | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochemical Process Development and Integration Biochemical Process Development and Integration Our conversion and separation processes to pilot-scale integrated process development and scale up. We also Publications Accounting for all sugar produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic

  4. Positive Side Effects in the Treatment of SIB Using the Self-Injurious Behavior Inhibiting System (SIBIS): Implications for Operant and Biochemical Explanations of SIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Thomas R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The rate of self-injurious head hitting in an eight-year old with severe/profound mental retardation was reduced using contingent electric shock delivered via the Self Injurious Behavior Inhibiting System. An improved affective state and increased interaction with the environment were documented. Treatment gains were maintained at one-year…

  5. Symmetry structure in discrete models of biochemical systems: natural subsystems and the weak control hierarchy in a new model of computation driven by interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Rhodes, John; Egri-Nagy, Attila; Dini, Paolo; Morris, Eric Rothstein; Horváth, Gábor; Karimi, Fariba; Schreckling, Daniel; Schilstra, Maria J

    2015-07-28

    Interaction computing is inspired by the observation that cell metabolic/regulatory systems construct order dynamically, through constrained interactions between their components and based on a wide range of possible inputs and environmental conditions. The goals of this work are to (i) identify and understand mathematically the natural subsystems and hierarchical relations in natural systems enabling this and (ii) use the resulting insights to define a new model of computation based on interactions that is useful for both biology and computation. The dynamical characteristics of the cellular pathways studied in systems biology relate, mathematically, to the computational characteristics of automata derived from them, and their internal symmetry structures to computational power. Finite discrete automata models of biological systems such as the lac operon, the Krebs cycle and p53-mdm2 genetic regulation constructed from systems biology models have canonically associated algebraic structures (their transformation semigroups). These contain permutation groups (local substructures exhibiting symmetry) that correspond to 'pools of reversibility'. These natural subsystems are related to one another in a hierarchical manner by the notion of 'weak control'. We present natural subsystems arising from several biological examples and their weak control hierarchies in detail. Finite simple non-Abelian groups are found in biological examples and can be harnessed to realize finitary universal computation. This allows ensembles of cells to achieve any desired finitary computational transformation, depending on external inputs, via suitably constrained interactions. Based on this, interaction machines that grow and change their structure recursively are introduced and applied, providing a natural model of computation driven by interactions.

  6. Digestive system development and study of acid and alkaline protease digestive capacities using biochemical and molecular approaches in totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaviz, Mario A; López, Lus M; García Gasca, Alejandra; Álvarez González, Carlos Alfonso; True, Conal D; Gisbert, Enric

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to describe and understand the development of the digestive system in totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi) larvae from hatching to 40 days post-hatch (dph) from morphological and functional perspectives. At hatch, the digestive system of totoaba was undifferentiated. The anus and the mouth opened at 4 and 5 dph, respectively. During exogenous feeding, development of the esophagus, pancreas, liver and intestine was observed with a complete differentiation of all digestive organs. Expression and activity of trypsin and chymotrypsin were observed as early as at 1 dph, and increments in their expression and activity coincided with changes in food items (live and compound diets) and morpho-physiological development of the accessory digestive glands. In contrast, pepsin was detected later during development, which includes the appearance of the gastric glands between 24 and 28 dph. One peak in gene expression was detected at 16 dph, few days before the initial development of the stomach at 20 dph. A second peak of pepsin expression was detected at day 35, followed by a peak of activity at day 40, coinciding with the change from live to artificial food. Totoaba larvae showed a fully morphologically developed digestive system between 24 and 28 dph, as demonstrated by histological observations. However, gene expression and activity of alkaline and acid proteases were detected earlier, indicating the functionality of the exocrine pancreas and stomach before the complete morphological development of the digestive organs. These results showed that integrative studies are needed to fully understand the development of the digestive system from a morphological and functional point of views, since the histological organization of digestive structures does not reflect their real functionality. These results indicate that the digestive system of totoaba develops rapidly during the first days post-hatch, especially for alkaline proteases, and the stomach

  7. Thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosives using a mesoscopic reactive model under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XinJie; Wu, YanQing; Huang, FengLei

    2017-01-05

    A mesoscopic framework is developed to quantify the thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) samples under impact loading. A mesoscopic reactive model is developed for the cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) crystal, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity, crystal plasticity, and temperature-dependent chemical reaction. The proposed model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS by the user subroutine VUMAT. A series of three-dimensional mesoscale models were constructed and calculated under low-strength impact loading scenarios from 100m/s to 600m/s where only the first wave transit is studied. Crystal anisotropy and microstructural heterogeneity are responsible for the nonuniform stress field and fluctuations of the stress wave front. At a critical impact velocity (≥300m/s), a chemical reaction is triggered because the temperature contributed by the volumetric and plastic works is sufficiently high. Physical quantities, including stress, temperature, and extent of reaction, are homogenized from those across the microstructure at the mesoscale to compare with macroscale measurements, which will advance the continuum-level models. The framework presented in this study has important implications in understanding hot spot ignition processes and improving predictive capabilities in energetic materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interface Engineering Based on Liquid Metal for Compact-Layer-free, Fully Printable Mesoscopic Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhao, Jianhong; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Xixi; Zhu, Zhongqi; Liu, Qingju

    2018-05-09

    A printing process for the fabrication of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) exhibits promising future application in the photovoltaic industry due to its low-cost and eco-friendly preparation. In mesoscopic carbon-based PSCs, however, compared to conventional ones, the hole-transport-layer-free PSCs often lead to inefficient hole extraction. Here, we used liquid metal (LM, Galinstan) as an interface modifier material in combination with a carbon electrode. Considering the high conductivity and room-temperature fluidity, it is found that LMs are superior in improving hole extraction and, more importantly, LMs tend to be reserved at the interface between ZrO 2 and carbon for enhancing the contact property. Correspondingly, the carrier transfer resistance was decreased at the carbon/perovskite interface. As optimized content, the triple mesoscopic PSCs based on mixed-cation perovskite with a power conversion efficiency of 13.51% was achieved, involving a 26% increase compared to those without LMs. This work opens new techniques for LMs in optoelectronics and printing.

  9. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deog Yoon

    1999-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  10. Mesoscopic Oxide Double Layer as Electron Specific Contact for Highly Efficient and UV Stable Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Giordano, Fabrizio; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Grätzel, Michael

    2018-04-11

    The solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has recently reached 22.7%, exceeding that of competing thin film photovoltaics and the market leader polycrystalline silicon. Further augmentation of the PCE toward the Shockley-Queisser limit of 33.5% warrants suppression of radiationless carrier recombination by judicious engineering of the interface between the light harvesting perovskite and the charge carrier extraction layers. Here, we introduce a mesoscopic oxide double layer as electron selective contact consisting of a scaffold of TiO 2 nanoparticles covered by a thin film of SnO 2 , either in amorphous (a-SnO 2 ), crystalline (c-SnO 2 ), or nanocrystalline (quantum dot) form (SnO 2 -NC). We find that the band gap of a-SnO 2 is larger than that of the crystalline (tetragonal) polymorph leading to a corresponding lift in its conduction band edge energy which aligns it perfectly with the conduction band edge of both the triple cation perovskite and the TiO 2 scaffold. This enables very fast electron extraction from the light perovskite, suppressing the notorious hysteresis in the current-voltage ( J-V) curves and retarding nonradiative charge carrier recombination. As a result, we gain a remarkable 170 mV in open circuit photovoltage ( V oc ) by replacing the crystalline SnO 2 by an amorphous phase. Because of the quantum size effect, the band gap of our SnO 2 -NC particles is larger than that of bulk SnO 2 causing their conduction band edge to shift also to a higher energy thereby increasing the V oc . However, for SnO 2 -NC there remains a barrier for electron injection into the TiO 2 scaffold decreasing the fill factor of the device and lowering the PCE. Introducing the a-SnO 2 coated mp-TiO 2 scaffold as electron extraction layer not only increases the V oc and PEC of the solar cells but also render them resistant to UV light which forebodes well for outdoor deployment of these new PSC architectures.

  11. Egg quality parameters and blood biochemical profile of six strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six different poultry strains (Indigenous chicken, Broiler, Turkey, Geese, Duck and Guinea fowl) were studied under extensive system of management to investigate the effect of rearing system on their egg quality and the blood biochemical profile, respectively. Birds used for the study were obtained from four different ...

  12. Biochemical oxygen demand and nutrient processing in a novel multi-stage raw municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage passive co-treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosnider, W H; Winfrey, B K; Nairn, R W

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale, four-stage continuous flow reactor system was constructed to test the viability of high-strength acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) passive co-treatment. The synthetic AMD had pH 2.60 and 1860 mg/L acidity as CaCO(3) equivalent with 46, 0.25, 2, 290, 55, 1.2 and 390 mg/L of Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, respectively. The AMD was introduced to the system at a 1:2 ratio with raw MWW from the City of Norman, Oklahoma USA containing 265 ± 94 mg/L BOD(5), 11.5 ± 5.3 mg/L PO(4)(-3), and 20.8 ± 1.8 mg/L NH(4)(+)-N. During the 135 d experiment, PO(4)(-3) and NH(4)(+)-N were decreased to treatment is a viable ecological engineering approach for the developed and developing world that can be optimized and applied to improve water quality with minimal use of fossil fuels and refined materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Principi E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Principi,1,* Rossana Girardello,2,* Antonino Bruno,1,* Isabella Manni,3 Elisabetta Gini,2 Arianna Pagani,1 Annalisa Grimaldi,2 Federico Ivaldi,4 Terenzio Congiu,5 Daniela De Stefano,1 Giulia Piaggio,3 Magda de Eguileor,2 Douglas M Noonan,1,2 Adriana Albini1 1Vascular Biology and Angiogenesis, Scientific and Technology Pole, IRCCS MultiMedica, Milano, 2Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, 3Department of Research, Advanced Diagnosis and Innovation, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, 4Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Genoa, Genoa, 5Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs, administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections, functional (serum enzymes, and morphological (organs and tissues alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron

  14. DYNAMICS OF CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE HEPATITIS B WITH CHRONIC ALCOHOL USE IN HEPATOTOXIC DOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Furyk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of hepatitis B due to the high incidence complexity of pathogenesis, ineffective treatment, severe consequences of the disease. Among combined lesions of the liver, special attention is paid to viral-alcoholic type. One of the mechanisms of chronic hepatitis of different etiology is violation of the functional activity of the autonomic nervous system. The aim of this work- to determine the dynamics of spectral indices of heart rate variability in patients with acute hepatitis B from chronic use of alcohol in hepatotoxic doses. Materials and methods. 133 patients with acute hepatitis B were under observation. Patients were divided into groups taking account the presence or absence of chronic use of alcohol in hepatotoxic doses and using the classification of alcohol consumption based on the frequency and dose of consumed alcohol. I group comprised 52 patients with chronic use of alcohol in the hepatotoxic doses, II group consisted of 81 patient without this factor. Heart rate variability was diagnosed using computer cardiointervalometry performed by electrocardiographic diagnostic system CardioLab-2000. 20 healthy individuals were in the control group. Results and discussion. Prodromal period in patients of the I group was longer (p0,05. However, only patients in group I had marked hemorrhagic manifestations (5,8 % and itching (7.7%. Average serum total bilirubin level was higher (p<0,05 in patients from the I group than in patients from II group. Functional state of autonomic nervous system in patients of both groups were decreased in acute period (vagotonia. Period of convalescence in patients from the I group was accompanied by more severe autonomic dysfunction in 33,6 % (p<0,05. Conclusions. 1. Acute hepatitis B in patients with chronic alcohol use in hepatotoxic doses is characterized by longer (p<0,05 prodrome, cholestatic (7,7% and hemorrhagic manifestations (5,8%, higher levels of hyperbilirubinemia (p<0,05, and during

  15. Interplay between mesoscopic phase separation and bulk magnetism in the layered Na.sub.x./sub.CoO.sub.2./sub

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zorkovská, A.; Orendáč, M.; Šebek, Josef; Šantavá, Eva; Svoboda, P.; Bradaric, I.; Savič, I.; Feher, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 13 (2005), 132412/1-132412/4 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Na x CoO 2 * mesoscopic phase separation * bulk magnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2005

  16. Anti-stress and nootropic activity of drugs affecting the renin-angiotensin system in rats based on indirect biochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, K V; Nagwar, Shrasti; Thyloor, Rama; Satyanarayana, Sreemantula

    2015-12-01

    Various stress hormones are responsible for bringing out stress-related changes and are implicated in learning and memory processes. The extensive clinical experience of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and direct renin inhibitor as antihypertensive agents provides anecdotal evidence of improvements in cognition. The neurochemical basis underlying the anti-stress and nootropic effects are unclear. This study was aimed to determine the effects of aliskiren, valsartan and their combination on the neuromediators of the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery as well as on cognitive function. Groups of rats were subjected to a forced swim stress for one hour after daily treatment with aliskiren, valsartan and their combination. The 24 h urinary excretion of vanillylmandellic acid (VMA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 6-β-hydroxycortisol (6-β-OH) cortisol and homovanillic acid (HVA) was determined in all groups under normal and stressed conditions. Nootropic activity was studied using cook's pole climbing apparatus and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity by Ellman's method. Administration of aliskiren (10 mg/kg), valsartan (20 mg/kg) and their combination at a dose of 5 and 10 mg/kg respectively reduced the urinary metabolite levels. Further, all drugs showed significant improvement in scopolamine-impaired performance and produced inhibition of the AChE enzyme. The present study provides scientific support for the anti-stress and nootropic activities of aliskiren, valsartan and their combination. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Synthesis and Biochemical effects of magnetite nanoparticle by surfactant-free electrochemical method in an aqueous system:the current density effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Aliahmad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obejective(s: In this research, magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 23-36 nm were successfully synthesized via surfactant-free electrochemical method using iron as the anode and water as the electrolyte in a closed aqueous system in the presence of NaOH at room temperature. Methods: The effect of the current density on product formation and particle size was investigated. Particle size was controlled by adjusting the current density. It was found that particle size decreases by decreasing the current density. In addition, the effect of current density  on the structural and optical properties of nanostructures were studied by X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques.  Results: The results obtained from the magnetization property study of samples at room temperature showed coactivity and saturation manetization of 0-100 Oe and 27.2- 40.5 emu. g-1, respectively. Finally, the results of biological activity study of nanoparticles on liver and kidney function in male wistar rats demonstrated that oral administration of NPs caused significant alterations to the levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase in serum. Conclusions: No significant changes were detected in the groups treated with 10 and 100 ppm/ day nanostructure (P>0.05. There was a significant increase in the serum level of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level (p

  18. Flooding of the root system in soybean: biochemical and molecular aspects of N metabolism in the nodule during stress and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Sarah C R; Mazzafera, Paulo; Sodek, Ladaslav

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen fixation of the nodule of soybean is highly sensitive to oxygen deficiency such as provoked by waterlogging of the root system. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of flooding on N metabolism in nodules of soybean. Flooding resulted in a marked decrease of asparagine (the most abundant amino acid) and a concomitant accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Flooding also resulted in a strong reduction of the incorporation of (15)N2 in amino acids. Nodule amino acids labelled before flooding rapidly lost (15)N during flooding, except for GABA, which initially increased and declined slowly thereafter. Both nitrogenase activity and the expression of nifH and nifD genes were strongly decreased on flooding. Expression of the asparagine synthetase genes SAS1 and SAS2 was reduced, especially the former. Expression of genes encoding the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD1, GAD4, GAD5) was also strongly suppressed except for GAD2 which increased. Almost all changes observed during flooding were reversible after draining. Possible changes in asparagine and GABA metabolism that may explain the marked fluctuations of these amino acids during flooding are discussed. It is suggested that the accumulation of GABA has a storage role during flooding stress.

  19. An Integrated Qualitative and Quantitative Biochemical Model Learning Framework Using Evolutionary Strategy and Simulated Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zujian; Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    2015-01-01

    Both qualitative and quantitative model learning frameworks for biochemical systems have been studied in computational systems biology. In this research, after introducing two forms of pre-defined component patterns to represent biochemical models, we propose an integrative qualitative and quantitative modelling framework for inferring biochemical systems. In the proposed framework, interactions between reactants in the candidate models for a target biochemical system are evolved and eventually identified by the application of a qualitative model learning approach with an evolution strategy. Kinetic rates of the models generated from qualitative model learning are then further optimised by employing a quantitative approach with simulated annealing. Experimental results indicate that our proposed integrative framework is feasible to learn the relationships between biochemical reactants qualitatively and to make the model replicate the behaviours of the target system by optimising the kinetic rates quantitatively. Moreover, potential reactants of a target biochemical system can be discovered by hypothesising complex reactants in the synthetic models. Based on the biochemical models learned from the proposed framework, biologists can further perform experimental study in wet laboratory. In this way, natural biochemical systems can be better understood.

  20. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigation: assessment of edivoxetine and atomoxetine on systemic and central 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, a biochemical marker for norepinephrine transporter inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbasa, William; Pan, Alan; Pereira, Alvaro

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of norepinephrine (NE) reuptake into noradrenergic nerves is a common therapeutic target in the central nervous system (CNS). In noradrenergic nerves, NE is oxidized by monoamine oxidase to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG). In this study, 40 healthy male subjects received the NE transporter (NET) inhibitor edivoxetine (EDX) or atomoxetine (ATX), or placebo. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of these drugs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was assessed. In Part A, subjects received EDX once daily (QD) for 14 or 15 days at targeted doses of 6mg or 9mg. In Part B, subjects received 80mg ATX QD for 14 or 15 days. Each subject received a lumbar puncture before receiving drug and after 14 or 15 days of dosing. Plasma and urine were collected at baseline and after 14 days of dosing. Edivoxetine plasma and CSF concentrations increased dose dependently. The time to maximum plasma concentration of EDX was 2h, and the half-life was 9h. At the highest EDX dose of 9mg, DHPG concentrations were reduced from baseline by 51% at 8h postdose in CSF, and steady-state plasma and urine DHPG concentrations decreased by 38% and 26%, respectively. For 80mg ATX, the decrease of plasma, CSF, or urine DHPG was similar to EDX. Herein we provide clinical evidence that EDX and ATX decrease DHPG concentrations in the periphery and CNS, presumably via NET inhibition. EDX and ATX concentrations measured in the CSF confirmed the availability of those drugs in the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Spa47 Provides Mechanistic Insight into Type III Secretion System ATPase Activation and Shigella Virulence Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jamie L; Burgess, R Alan; Morales, Yalemi; Bouvang, Jenna M; Johnson, Sean J; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2016-12-09

    Like many Gram-negative pathogens, Shigella rely on a complex type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into host cells, take over host functions, and ultimately establish infection. Despite these critical roles, the energetics and regulatory mechanisms controlling the T3SS and pathogen virulence remain largely unclear. In this study, we present a series of high resolution crystal structures of Spa47 and use the structures to model an activated Spa47 oligomer, finding that ATP hydrolysis may be supported by specific side chain contributions from adjacent protomers within the complex. Follow-up mutagenesis experiments targeting the predicted active site residues validate the oligomeric model and determined that each of the tested residues are essential for Spa47 ATPase activity, although they are not directly responsible for stable oligomer formation. Although N-terminal domain truncation was necessary for crystal formation, it resulted in strictly monomeric Spa47 that is unable to hydrolyze ATP, despite maintaining the canonical ATPase core structure and active site residues. Coupled with studies of ATPase inactive full-length Spa47 point mutants, we find that Spa47 oligomerization and ATP hydrolysis are needed for complete T3SS apparatus formation, a proper translocator secretion profile, and Shigella virulence. This work represents the first structure-function characterization of Spa47, uniquely complementing the multitude of included Shigella T3SS phenotype assays and providing a more complete understanding of T3SS ATPase-mediated pathogen virulence. Additionally, these findings provide a strong platform for follow-up studies evaluating regulation of Spa47 oligomerization in vivo as a much needed means of treating and perhaps preventing shigellosis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Spa47 Provides Mechanistic Insight into Type III Secretion System ATPase Activation and Shigella Virulence Regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jamie L.; Burgess, R. Alan; Morales, Yalemi; Bouvang, Jenna M.; Johnson, Sean J.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Like many Gram-negative pathogens, Shigella rely on a complex type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into host cells, take over host functions, and ultimately establish infection. Despite these critical roles, the energetics and regulatory mechanisms controlling the T3SS and pathogen virulence remain largely unclear. In this study, we present a series of high resolution crystal structures of Spa47 and use the structures to model an activated Spa47 oligomer, finding that ATP hydrolysis may be supported by specific side chain contributions from adjacent protomers within the complex. Follow-up mutagenesis experiments targeting the predicted active site residues validate the oligomeric model and determined that each of the tested residues are essential for Spa47 ATPase activity, although they are not directly responsible for stable oligomer formation. Although N-terminal domain truncation was necessary for crystal formation, it resulted in strictly monomeric Spa47 that is unable to hydrolyze ATP, despite maintaining the canonical ATPase core structure and active site residues. Coupled with studies of ATPase inactive full-length Spa47 point mutants, we find that Spa47 oligomerization and ATP hydrolysis are needed for complete T3SS apparatus formation, a proper translocator secretion profile, and Shigella virulence. This work represents the first structure-function characterization of Spa47, uniquely complementing the multitude of included Shigella T3SS phenotype assays and providing a more complete understanding of T3SS ATPase-mediated pathogen virulence. Additionally, these findings provide a strong platform for follow-up studies evaluating regulation of Spa47 oligomerization in vivo as a much needed means of treating and perhaps preventing shigellosis. PMID:27770024

  3. Prions: the danger of biochemical weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Almeida Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of biotechnology increases the risk of using biochemical weapons for mass destruction. Prions are unprecedented infectious pathogens that cause a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases by a novel mechanism. They are transmissible particles that are devoid of nucleic acid. Due to their singular characteristics, Prions emerge as potential danger since they can be used in the development of such weapons. Prions cause fatal infectious diseases, and to date there is no therapeutic or prophylactic approach against these diseases. Furthermore, Prions are resistant to food-preparation treatments such as high heat and can find their way from the digestive system into the nervous system; recombinant Prions are infectious either bound to soil particles or in aerosols. Therefore, lethal Prions can be developed by malicious researchers who could use it to attack political enemies since such weapons cause diseases that could be above suspicion.

  4. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    techniques, we study systematically the effects of intermediate, or transient, species in biochemical systems and provide a simple, yet rigorous mathematical classification of all models obtained from a core model by including intermediates. Main examples include enzymatic and post-translational modification...... systems, where intermediates often are considered insignificant and neglected in a model, or they are not included because we are unaware of their existence. All possible models obtained from the core model are classified into a finite number of classes. Each class is defined by a mathematically simple...... canonical model that characterizes crucial dynamical properties, such as mono- and multistationarity and stability of steady states, of all models in the class. We show that if the core model does not have conservation laws, then the introduction of intermediates does not change the steady...

  5. Treatment of landfill leachate biochemical effluent using the nano-Fe3O4/Na2S2O8 system: Oxidation performance, wastewater spectral analysis, and activator characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanmeng; Li, Xian; Rao, Zhiwei; Hu, Fengping

    2018-02-15

    Nano-Fe 3 O 4 was used as heterogeneous catalyst to activate Na 2 S 2 O 8 for the generation of the sulfate radicals (SO 4 - ) to oxidize the residual pollutants in landfill leachate biochemical effluent. The oxidation performance, wastewater spectral analysis and activator characterization were discussed. Oxidation experimental result shows that nano-Fe 3 O 4 has obvious catalytic effect on Na 2 S 2 O 8 and can significantly enhance the oxidation efficiencies of Na 2 S 2 O 8 on landfill leachate biochemical effluent, with COD and color removals above 63% and 95%, respectively. Based on the analyses of three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectrum (3DEEM), ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis), and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of wastewater samples before and after treatment, it can be concluded that the pollution level of dissolved organic matter (DOM) declined and that the humic acid (HA) fractions were efficiently degraded into small molecules of fulvic acid (FA) fractions with less weight and stable structure. Compared to the raw wastewater sample, the aromaticity and substituent groups of the DOM were lessened in the treated wastewater sample. Moreover, the main structure of the organics and functional groups were changed by the Fe 3 O 4 /Na 2 S 2 O 8 system, with substantial decrease of conjugated double bonds. The micro morphology of nano-Fe 3 O 4 was characterized before and after reaction by the methods of scanning electron microscope spectra (SEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XRD pattern analysis showed that nano-Fe 3 O 4 was oxidized into r-Fe 2 O 3 and that the particle size of it also became smaller after reaction. XPS was employed to analyze the content and iron valence on the nano-Fe 3 O 4 surface, and it can be found that the ratio of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ decreased from 1.8 before reaction to 0.8 after reaction. From the SEM analysis after the treatment, it was

  6. Biochemical Abnormalities in Batten's Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jytte Lene; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov

    1978-01-01

    The present data indicate that a group of ten patients with Batten's syndrome showed reduced activity of erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (Px) (glutathione: H2O2 oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.9.) using H2O2 as peroxide donor. Assay of erythrocyte GSHPx using H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide and t......-butyl hydroperoxide as donors also makes it possible biochemically to divide Batten's syndrome into two types: (1) one type with decreased values when H2O2 and cumene hydroperoxide are used, and (2) one type with increased values when t-butyl hydroperoxide is used. Furthermore an increased content of palmitic, oleic...

  7. Slot-waveguide biochemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Carlos A; Gylfason, Kristinn B; Sánchez, Benito; Griol, Amadeu; Sohlström, H; Holgado, M; Casquel, R

    2007-11-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of an integrated biochemical sensor based on a slot-waveguide microring resonator. The microresonator is fabricated on a Si3N4-SiO2 platform and operates at a wavelength of 1.3 microm. The transmission spectrum of the sensor is measured with different ambient refractive indices ranging from n=1.33 to 1.42. A linear shift of the resonant wavelength with increasing ambient refractive index of 212 nm/refractive index units (RIU) is observed. The sensor detects a minimal refractive index variation of 2x10(-4) RIU.

  8. Longitudinal left ventricular function for prediction of survival in systemic light-chain amyloidosis: incremental value compared with clinical and biochemical markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Sebastian J; Emami, Mostafa; Mereles, Derliz; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Kristen, Arnt V; Voss, Andreas; Schellberg, Dieter; Zugck, Christian; Galuschky, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Katus, Hugo A; Schonland, Stefan O; Hardt, Stefan E

    2012-09-18

    The aim of the study was to determine whether longitudinal left ventricular (LV) function provides prognostic information in a large cohort of patients with systemic light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is associated with a high incidence of cardiovascular events. Reduced myocardial longitudinal function is one of the hallmarks of myocardial involvement in this rare disease. Two hundred six consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AL amyloidosis were investigated in this prospective observational study. Echocardiographic imaging parameters, mean tissue Doppler-derived longitudinal strain (LS), and two-dimensional global longitudinal strain (2D-GLS) of the LV, cardiac serological biomarkers, and comprehensive clinical disease characteristics were assessed. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality or heart transplantation. After a median follow-up of 1207 days, LS and 2D-GLS were significant predictors of survival in AL amyloidosis. The cutoff values discriminating survivors from nonsurvivors were -10.65% for LS and -11.78% for 2D-GLS. In a multivariable echocardiographic Cox model, only diastolic dysfunction and 2D-GLS remained as independent predictors of survival. In comprehensive clinical models, 2D-GLS (p < 0.0001), diastolic dysfunction (p < 0.01), the pathologic free light chains (p < 0.05), cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) (p < 0.01), and the Karnofsky index (p < 0.001) remained as independent predictors. 2D-GLS delineated a superior prognostic value compared with that derived from pathologic free light chains or cTnT in patients evaluated before firstline chemotherapy (n = 113; p < 0.0001), and remained the only independent predictor besides the Karnofsky index in subjects with preserved LV ejection fraction (≥50%; n = 127; p < 0.01). LS and 2D-GLS both offered significant incremental information (p < 0.001) for the assessment of outcome compared with clinical variables (age, Karnofsky index, and New York Heart Association functional class) and

  9. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  10. A Stochastic mesoscopic model for predicting the globular grain structure and solute redistribution in cast alloys at low superheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu; El Kaddah, Nagy

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that casting at low superheat has a strong influence on the solidification morphology and macro- and microstructures of the cast alloy. This paper describes a stochastic mesoscopic solidification model for predicting the grain structure and segregation in cast alloy at low superheat. This model was applied to predict the globular solidification morphology and size as well as solute redistribution of Al in cast Mg AZ31B alloy at superheat of 5°C produced by the Magnetic Suspension Melting (MSM) process, which is an integrated containerless induction melting and casting process. The castings produced at this low superheat have fine globular grain structure, with an average grain size of 80 μm, which is about 3 times smaller than that obtained by conventional casting techniques. The stochastic model was found to reasonably predict the observed grain structure and Al microsegregation. This makes the model a useful tool for controlling the structure of cast magnesium alloys.

  11. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, quantum decoherence and amplitude modulation in mesoscopic InGaAs/InAlAs rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S L; Heremans, J J; Gaspe, C K; Vijeyaragunathan, S; Mishima, T D; Santos, M B

    2013-10-30

    Low-temperature Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the magnetoresistance of mesoscopic interferometric rings patterned on an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure are investigated for their dependence on excitation current and temperature. The rings have an average radius of 650 nm, and a lithographic arm width of 300 nm, yielding pronounced interference oscillations over a wide range of magnetic fields. Apart from a current and temperature dependence, the oscillation amplitude also shows a quasi-periodic modulation with applied magnetic field. The phase coherence length is extracted by analysis of the fundamental and higher Fourier components of the oscillations, and by direct analysis of the amplitude and its dependence on parameters. It is concluded that the Thouless energy forms the measure of excitation energies for quantum decoherence. The amplitude modulation finds an explanation in the effect of the magnetic flux threading the finite width of the interferometer arms.

  12. A Mesoscopic Analytical Model to Predict the Onset of Wrinkling in Plain Woven Preforms under Bias Extension Shear Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hosseini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscopic analytical model of wrinkling of Plain-Woven Composite Preforms (PWCPs under the bias extension test is presented, based on a new instability analysis. The analysis is aimed to facilitate a better understanding of the nature of wrinkle formation in woven fabrics caused by large in-plane shear, while it accounts for the effect of fabric and process parameters on the onset of wrinkling. To this end, the mechanism of wrinkle formation in PWCPs in mesoscale is simplified and an equivalent structure composed of bars and different types of springs is proposed, mimicking the behavior of a representative PWCP element at the post-locking state. The parameters of this equivalent structure are derived based on geometric and mechanical characteristics of the PWCP. The principle of minimum total potential energy is employed to formluate the model, and experimental validation is carried out to reveal the effectiveness of the derived wrinkling prediction equation.

  13. A proposal for a coordinated effort for the determination of brainwide neuroanatomical connectivity in model organisms at a mesoscopic scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Bohland

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this era of complete genomes, our knowledge of neuroanatomical circuitry remains surprisingly sparse. Such knowledge is critical, however, for both basic and clinical research into brain function. Here we advocate for a concerted effort to fill this gap, through systematic, experimental mapping of neural circuits at a mesoscopic scale of resolution suitable for comprehensive, brainwide coverage, using injections of tracers or viral vectors. We detail the scientific and medical rationale and briefly review existing knowledge and experimental techniques. We define a set of desiderata, including brainwide coverage; validated and extensible experimental techniques suitable for standardization and automation; centralized, open-access data repository; compatibility with existing resources; and tractability with current informatics technology. We discuss a hypothetical but tractable plan for mouse, additional efforts for the macaque, and technique development for human. We estimate that the mouse connectivity project could be completed within five years with a comparatively modest budget.

  14. studies on blood and plasma biochemical characteristics of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A study to determine the blood parameters and plasma biochemical values of ... highest in animals at the 4th month state (9.75g/dl) and lowest at the 12th ... study is indicative of satisfactory physiological, nutritional and pathological ... domestication and integration into the micro-livestock farming system is ..... Principles and.

  15. MATLAB-Based Teaching Modules in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilho; Comolli, Noelle K.; Kelly, William J.; Huang, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in biochemical engineering. For example, the models developed in the field of systems biology have been used to identify drug targets to treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms. In addition, competitive binding models for chromatography processes have been developed to predict expanded…

  16. Behaviour of concrete under high confinement: study in triaxial compression and in triaxial extension at the mesoscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupray, F.

    2008-12-01

    This Ph.D. thesis aims at characterising and modeling the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confinement at the mesoscopic scale. This scale corresponds to that of the large aggregates and the cementitious matrix. The more general scope of this study is the understanding of concrete behaviour under dynamic loading. A dynamic impact can generate mean pressures around 1 GPa. But the characterisation of a material response, in an homogeneous state of stress, can only be achieved through quasi-static tests. The experimentations led in 3S-R Laboratory have underlined the importance of the aggregates in the triaxial response of concrete. Modeling concrete at the mesoscopic level, as a composite of an aggregates phase and a mortar phase, permits a representation of the aggregates effect. An experimental study of the behaviour of mortar phase is performed. Usual tests and hydrostatic and triaxial high confinement tests are realised. The parameters of a constitutive model that couples plasticity with a damage law are identified from these tests. This model is able to reproduce the nonlinear compaction of mortar, the damage behaviour under uniaxial tension or compression, and plasticity under high confinement. The biphasic model uses the finite element method with a cubic and regular mesh. A Monte-Carlo method is used to place quasi-spherical aggregates that respect the given particle size of a reference concrete. Each element is identified by belonging either to the mortar or to the aggregate phase. Numerical simulations are compared with the experimental tests on this concrete. The parameters for these simulations are only identified on the mortar. The simulations reproduce the different phases observed in hydrostatic compression. The evolution of axial moduli under growing confinement is shown, as is the good reproduction of the limit-states experimentally observed under high confinement. The fracture aspect of numerical simulations is comparable with that of

  17. Biochemical and genetic improvement of Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, L O; Carey, V C; Dombek, K M; Holt, A S; Holt, W A; Osman, Y A; Walia, S K

    1984-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis offers many advantages for alcohol production including three- to five-fold higher rates of substrate conversion. Current progress and approaches are discussed for the biochemical and genetic improvement of this organism. These include the isolation of salt-resistant mutants and low pH-tolerant mutants. Gene banks of Lactobacillus heterohiochi are being screened for genes encoding alcohol resistance which can be subsequently introduced into Zymomonas mobilis. In addition, an enteric lactose operon has been inserted into Zymomonas mobilis and is expressed. These new strains are being further modified to increase the substrate range of Zymomonas mobilis to include lactose. This lactose operon serves as a model system to investigate the expression of foreign genes in Zymomonas mobilis. 25 references.

  18. The biochemical anatomy of cortical inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Heller

    Full Text Available Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain.

  19. Biochemical Markers in Neurocritical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidvar Rezae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, a variety of serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers in daily clinical practice have been recommended to diagnose and monitor diverse diseases or pathologic situations. It will be essential to develop a panel of biomarkers, to be suitable for evaluation of treatment efficacy, representing distinct phases of injury and recovery and consider the temporal profile of those. Among the possible and different biochemical markers, S100b appeared to fulfill many of optimized criteria of an ideal marker. S100b, a cytosolic low molecular weight dimeric calciumbinding protein from chromosome 21, synthesized in glial cells throughout the CNS, an homodimeric diffusible, belongs to a family of closely related protein, predominantly expressed by astrocytes and Schwann cells and a classic immunohistochemical marker for these cells, is implicated in brain development and neurophysiology. Of the 3 isoforms of S-100, the BB subunit (S100B is present in high concentrations in central and peripheral glial and Schwann cells, Langerhans and anterior pituitary cells, fat, muscle, and bone marrow tissues. The biomarker has shown to be a sensitive marker of clinical and subclinical cerebral damage, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Increasing evidence suggests that the biomarker plays a double function as an intracellular regulator and an extracellular signal of the CNS. S100b is found in the cytoplasm in a soluble form and also is associated with intracellular membranes, centrosomes, microtubules, and type III intermediate filaments. Their genomic organization now is known, and many of their target proteins have been identified, although the mechanisms of regulating S100b secretion are not completely understood and appear to be related to many factors, such as the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-1b, and metabolic stress. 

  20. Effect of Modifying Factors on Radiosensitive Biochemical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romantsev, E. F.; Filippovich, I. V.; Zhulanova, Z. I.; Blokhina, V. D.; Trebenok, Z. A.; Kolesnikov, E. E.; Sheremetyevskaya, T. N.; Nikolsky, A. V.; Zymaleva, O. G. [Institute of Biophysics, USSR Ministry of Health, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1971-03-15

    Some of the radioprotective aminothiols are now routine pharmacopoeial drugs and are used in clinics to decrease the radiation reaction which appears as a side effect during the radiotherapy of cancer. The action of effective modifying agents on radiosensitive biochemical reactions in the organisms of mammals, in principle, cannot be different from the same effects of the protectors on biochemical systems of the human organism. The effect of modifying agents is mediated by biochemical systems. The administration of radioprotective doses of MEA to rats before irradiation results in a significant normalization of the excretion in urine of degradation products of nucleic acids (so-called Dische-positive compounds), the excretion of which sharply rises after irradiation. The curve of the radioprotective effect of MEA (survival rate after administration of radioprotectors at different intervals of time) completely corresponds to curves of the accumulation of MEA which is bound (by mixed disulphide links) to the proteins of liver mitochondria, to proteins of the nuclear-sap, to the hyaloplasm of rat thymus and to the nuclear ribosomes of the spleen. After MEA administration the curve of the biosynthesis of deoxycytidine represents a mirror reflection of the curve of MEA bound to proteins of the thymus hyaloplasm by means of mixed disulphide links. The mechanism of action of such modifying factors as MEA in experiments on mammals is mediated to a great degree through the temporary formation of mixed disulphide links between the aminothiol and the protein component of enzymes in different biochemical systems. (author)

  1. Modeling of uncertainties in biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišković, Ljubiša; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2011-02-01

    Mathematical modeling is an indispensable tool for research and development in biotechnology and bioengineering. The formulation of kinetic models of biochemical networks depends on knowledge of the kinetic properties of the enzymes of the individual reactions. However, kinetic data acquired from experimental observations bring along uncertainties due to various experimental conditions and measurement methods. In this contribution, we propose a novel way to model the uncertainty in the enzyme kinetics and to predict quantitatively the responses of metabolic reactions to the changes in enzyme activities under uncertainty. The proposed methodology accounts explicitly for mechanistic properties of enzymes and physico-chemical and thermodynamic constraints, and is based on formalism from systems theory and metabolic control analysis. We achieve this by observing that kinetic responses of metabolic reactions depend: (i) on the distribution of the enzymes among their free form and all reactive states; (ii) on the equilibrium displacements of the overall reaction and that of the individual enzymatic steps; and (iii) on the net fluxes through the enzyme. Relying on this observation, we develop a novel, efficient Monte Carlo sampling procedure to generate all states within a metabolic reaction that satisfy imposed constrains. Thus, we derive the statistics of the expected responses of the metabolic reactions to changes in enzyme levels and activities, in the levels of metabolites, and in the values of the kinetic parameters. We present aspects of the proposed framework through an example of the fundamental three-step reversible enzymatic reaction mechanism. We demonstrate that the equilibrium displacements of the individual enzymatic steps have an important influence on kinetic responses of the enzyme. Furthermore, we derive the conditions that must be satisfied by a reversible three-step enzymatic reaction operating far away from the equilibrium in order to respond to

  2. Prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39,7%), raised serum ...

  3. From polycrystal to multi-crystal: ''numerical meso-scope'' development for a local analysis in the elasto-viscoplastic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heraud, St.

    2000-01-01

    The knowledge of the local mechanical fields over several adjacent grains is needed for a better understanding of damage initiation and intergranular. failure in metallic polycrystals. This thesis aimed at the derivation of such fields through a 'numerical meso-scope': this simulation tool relies on the finite element analysis of a multi-crystalline pattern embedded in a large matrix whose mechanical behaviour is derived experimentally from classical tests performed on the studied metal. First, we derived macroscopic elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations from tensile and creep tests on a AIS1316 stainless steel and we inferred from them the general form of similar, but crystallographic equations to be used for the single crystals; the corresponding parameters were determined by fitting the computed overall response of an aggregate made of 1000 grains with the macroscopic experimental one. We then investigated a creep-damaged area of the same steel and we simulated the same grain ensemble in the 'numerical meso-scope' so as to compare the computed normal stress on all grain boundaries with the observed de-bonded boundaries: this showed the most damaged boundaries to sustain the largest normal stress. Another application was concerned with the understanding of the origin of intergranular damage of aged AIS321 stainless steel. A similar approach was adopted with help of the meso-scope: it showed that observations could not be explained by a sole intragranular hardening as it is currently proposed in the literature. Thus the pertinence of the 'numerical meso-scope' concept can now be demonstrated, which opens on a number of new interesting perspectives. (author)

  4. Organic and biochemical synthesis group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Stable isotopes, because of their unique properties and non-radioactive nature, have great potential for many fields of science and technology. In particular, isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur (the basic building blocks of all biological molecules) would be widely used in biomedical and environmental research if they were economically available in sufficient quantities and in the required chemical forms. The major objective of our program continues to be stimulation of the widespread utilization of stable isotopes and commercial involvement through development and demonstration of applications which have potential requirements for large quantities of isotopes. Thus, demand will be created which is necessary for large-scale production of stable isotopes and labeled compounds and concomitant low unit costs. The program continues to produce a variety of labeled materials needed for clinical, biomedical, chemical, and environmental applications which serve as effective demonstrations of unique and advantageous utilization of stable isotopes. Future commercial involvement should benefit, and is a consideration in our research and development, from the technology transfer that can readily be made as a result of our organic and biochemical syntheses and also of various techniques involved in applications

  5. Development of a new first-aid biochemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingfei; Liao, Haiyang; Su, Shilin; Ding, Hao; Liu, Suquan

    2016-10-01

    The traditional biochemical detector exhibits poor adaptability, inconvenient carrying and slow detection, which can't meet the needs of first-aid under field condition like natural or man-made disasters etc. Therefore a scheme of first-aid biochemical detector based on MOMES Micro Spectrometer, UV LED and Photodiode was proposed. An optical detection structure combined continuous spectrum sweep with fixed wavelength measurement was designed, which adopted mobile detection optical path consisting of Micro Spectrometer and Halogen Lamp to detect Chloride (Cl-), Creatinine (Cre), Glucose (Glu), Hemoglobin (Hb). The UV LED and Photodiode were designed to detect Potassium (K-), Carbon dioxide (CO2), Sodium (Na+). According to the field diagnosis and treatment requirements, we designed the embedded control hardware circuit and software system, the prototype of first-aid biochemical detector was developed and the clinical trials were conducted. Experimental results show that the sample's absorbance repeatability is less than 2%, the max coefficient of variation (CV) in the batch repeatability test of all 7 biochemical parameters in blood samples is 4.68%, less than the clinical requirements 10%, the correlation coefficient (R2) in the clinical contrast test with AU5800 is almost greater than 0.97. To sum up, the prototype meets the requirements of clinical application.

  6. Interactions of Cannabinoids With Biochemical Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have seen much progress in the identification and characterization of cannabinoid receptors and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which derivatives of the Cannabis sativa plant bind to receptors and produce their physiological and psychological effects. The information generated in this process has enabled better understanding of the fundamental physiological and psychological processes controlled by the central and peripheral nervous systems and has fostered the development of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. A negative aspect of this decades-long effort is the proliferation of clandestinely synthesized analogs as recreational street drugs with dangerous effects. Currently, the interactions of cannabinoids with their biochemical substrates are extensively but inadequately understood, and the clinical application of derived and synthetic receptor ligands remains quite limited. The wide anatomical distribution and functional complexity of the cannabinoid system continue to indicate potential for both therapeutic and side effects, which offers challenges and opportunities for medicinal chemists involved in drug discovery and development.

  7. SABIO-RK: A data warehouse for biochemical reactions and their kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebs Olga

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology is an emerging field that aims at obtaining a system-level understanding of biological processes. The modelling and simulation of networks of biochemical reactions have great and promising application potential but require reliable kinetic data. In order to support the systems biology community with such data we have developed SABIO-RK (System for the Analysis of Biochemical Pathways - Reaction Kinetics, a curated database with information about biochemical reactions and their kinetic properties, which allows researchers to obtain and compare kinetic data and to integrate them into models of biochemical networks. SABIO-RK is freely available for academic use at http://sabio.villa-bosch.de/SABIORK/.

  8. Mesoscopic simulation of dendritic growth observed in x-ray video microscopy during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaleau, Pierre; Beckermann, Christoph; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.; Arnberg, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A mesoscopic model is developed to simulate microstructures observed in situ by X-ray video microscopy during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys in a Hele-Shaw cell. In the model, a volume-averaged species conservation equation is solved to obtain the solute concentration and solid fraction fields, and an analytical stagnant film model is used to predict the motion of the dendrite envelopes. The model is carefully validated in several test cases. Then, the model is applied to simulate the columnar dendritic microstructures observed in the X-ray video microscopy experiments for two different alloy compositions. Reasonable agreement is found between the measured and predicted dendrite envelope shapes, solid fractions, and solute concentration fields. The predicted size of the mushy zone and the extent of the undercooled melt region ahead of the columnar front agree well with the in situ experimental observations. The simulation results show quantitative agreement with the internal solid fraction variations measured from the radiographs. The present model is also able to realistically simulate a primary dendrite trunk spacing adjustment that was observed in one of the experiments. Overall, the present study represents the first successful validation of a solidification model using real time, in situ data from an experiment with a metallic alloy. Considerable additional research is needed to account in the model for the effect of gravity driven melt convection. (author)

  9. Regular and irregular dynamics of spin-polarized wavepackets in a mesoscopic quantum dot at the edge of topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomitsky, D. V., E-mail: khomitsky@phys.unn.ru; Chubanov, A. A.; Konakov, A. A. [Lobachevsky National Research State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Department of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The dynamics of Dirac–Weyl spin-polarized wavepackets driven by a periodic electric field is considered for the electrons in a mesoscopic quantum dot formed at the edge of the two-dimensional HgTe/CdTe topological insulator with Dirac–Weyl massless energy spectra, where the motion of carriers is less sensitive to disorder and impurity potentials. It is observed that the interplay of strongly coupled spin and charge degrees of freedom creates the regimes of irregular dynamics in both coordinate and spin channels. The border between the regular and irregular regimes determined by the strength and frequency of the driving field is found analytically within the quasiclassical approach by means of the Ince–Strutt diagram for the Mathieu equation, and is supported by full quantum-mechanical simulations of the driven dynamics. The investigation of quasienergy spectrum by Floquet approach reveals the presence of non-Poissonian level statistics, which indicates the possibility of chaotic quantum dynamics and corresponds to the areas of parameters for irregular regimes within the quasiclassical approach. We find that the influence of weak disorder leads to partial suppression of the dynamical chaos. Our findings are of interest both for progress in the fundamental field of quantum chaotic dynamics and for further experimental and technological applications of spindependent phenomena in nanostructures based on topological insulators.

  10. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  11. Biochemical thermodynamics: applications of Mathematica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberty, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    reactants. Thus loading this package makes available 774 mathematical functions for these properties. These functions can be added and subtracted to obtain changes in these properties in biochemical reactions and apparent equilibrium constants.

  12. Biochemical changes in blood caused by radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapol'skaya, N.A.; Fedorova, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The changes were studied occurring in some biochemical indicators in blood at chronic peroral administration of strontium-90, cesium-137 and iodine-131 in amounts resulting in accumulation of commensurable doses in critical organs corresponding to each isotope

  13. Biochemical and kinetic characterization of geranylgeraniol 18 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suchart

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... biochemical characterization of GGOH 18-hydroxylase activity in the microsomal fraction from C. .... method as previously described (Chanama et al., 2009). Briefly, 30 g of frozen ..... Catalytic properties of the plant cytochrome.

  14. Short Report Biochemical derangements prior to emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MMJ VOL 29 (1): March 2017. Biochemical derangements prior to emergency laparotomy at QECH 55. Malawi Medical Journal 29 (1): March 2017 ... Venepuncture was performed preoperatively for urgent cases, defined as those requiring.

  15. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  16. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  17. Time-dependent transport in interacting and noninteracting resonant-tunneling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Wingreen, Ned S.; Meir, Yigal

    1994-01-01

    noninteracting resonant-tunneling system are presented. Due to the coherence between the leads and the resonant site, the current does not follow the driving signal adiabatically: a ''ringing'' current is found as a response to a voltage pulse, and a complex time dependence results in the case of harmonic......We consider a mesoscopic region coupled to two leads under the influence of external time-dependent voltages. The time dependence is coupled to source and drain contacts, the gates controlling the tunnel-barrier heights, or to the gates that define the mesoscopic region. We derive, with the Keldysh...... nonequilibrium-Green-function technique, a formal expression for the fully nonlinear, time-dependent current through the system. The analysis admits arbitrary interactions in the mesoscopic region, but the leads are treated as noninteracting. For proportionate coupling to the leads, the time-averaged current...

  18. [Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papyshev, I P; Astashkina, O G; Tuchik, E S; Nikolaev, B S; Cherniaev, A L

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication remains a topical problem in forensic medical science and practice. We investigated materials obtained in the course of forensic medical expertise of the cases of fatal opium intoxication. The study revealed significant differences between myoglobin levels in blood, urine, myocardium, and skeletal muscles. The proposed approach to biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication enhances the accuracy and the level of evidence of expert conclusions.

  19. Improving Marine Ecosystem Models with Biochemical Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Choy, C. Anela; Polovina, Jeffrey J.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Empirical data on food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions underpin ecosystem models, which are increasingly used to support strategic management of marine resources. These data have traditionally derived from stomach content analysis, but new and complementary forms of ecological data are increasingly available from biochemical tracer techniques. Extensive opportunities exist to improve the empirical robustness of ecosystem models through the incorporation of biochemical tracer data and derived indices, an area that is rapidly expanding because of advances in analytical developments and sophisticated statistical techniques. Here, we explore the trophic information required by ecosystem model frameworks (species, individual, and size based) and match them to the most commonly used biochemical tracers (bulk tissue and compound-specific stable isotopes, fatty acids, and trace elements). Key quantitative parameters derived from biochemical tracers include estimates of diet composition, niche width, and trophic position. Biochemical tracers also provide powerful insight into the spatial and temporal variability of food web structure and the characterization of dominant basal and microbial food web groups. A major challenge in incorporating biochemical tracer data into ecosystem models is scale and data type mismatches, which can be overcome with greater knowledge exchange and numerical approaches that transform, integrate, and visualize data.

  20. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöckel Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL. Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL. BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued.