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Sample records for mesiodistal root angulation

  1. Comparison of mesiodistal root angulation with posttreatment panoramic radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography.

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    Bouwens, Daniel G; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ludlow, John B; Phillips, Ceib

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontists assess mesiodistal root angulations before, during, and after orthodontic treatment as an aid in establishing proper root position. Panoramic imaging has been useful for this purpose and is a valuable screening tool in diagnosis and planning treatment of orthodontic patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for imaging of the craniofacial complex creates the opportunity to evaluate 3-dimensional images compared with traditional 2-dimensional images. The purpose of this project was to compare mesiodistal root angulations by using posttreatment panoramic radiographic images and CBCT scans. Mesiodistal root angulations from panoramic images and CBCT scans of 35 orthognathic surgery patients after orthodontic treatment were compared. The panoramic images were measured by using VixWin (Gendex Dental Systems, Des Plaines, Ill), and the CBCT scans by using InvivoDental 3D (version 4.1, Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The mesiodistal root angulation of each maxillary and mandibular tooth was measured by using the occlusal plane as the reference line. With an intercept-only linear regression for correlated data (with an unstructured covariance structure), the global test of whether the mean vector of all differences for the teeth is zero was performed separately for the 2 arches. The global test for both arches was statistically significant (P <0.001), indicating an overall difference in root angulation between measurements from panoramic and CBCT images. There was no discernible pattern in the average differences between panoramic and CBCT measurements. The assessment of mesiodistal tooth angulation with panoramic radiography should be approached with caution and reinforced by a thorough clinical examination of the dentition. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  3. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

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    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  4. Analysis of mesiodistal angulations of preadjusted brackets

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    Marcos Rogério de MENDONÇA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturers offer various prescriptions of preadjusted brackets for use in the “straight-wire” orthodontic technique. However, the need to incorporate bends in the rectangular wires during orthodontic finishing has led to concerns regarding the type of prescription chosen and the credibility of information provided by the manufacturer. The aim of this study was to compare the slot angulations of Roth prescription preadjusted metallic brackets for the maxillary left central incisor and maxillary left canine. For each tooth type, 10 brackets of three commercial brands (GAC, Forestadent and Morelli were selected. Two individual metal matrices for brackets and tooth positioning were made for each group of teeth. Captured images were obtained by standardized ortho-radial photography with a digital camera. Images were exported and analyzed with the Image J software package. One-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical analyses were performed at the 5% significance level. For brackets of the maxillary left central incisor, differences in mean angulation were observed between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Forestadent and GAC groups (p < 0.01. For brackets of the maxillary left canine, differences in mean angulation were found between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Morelli and Forestadent groups (p < 0.05. In conclusion, despite their same prescription name, the different brands exhibited significantly different angulation measurements.

  5. Mesiodistal angulation of the lateral teeth to the functional occlusal plane in normal occlusions

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    Hiroshi Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crowding is a malocclusion with irregularly positioned teeth caused by arch length discrepancy (ALD. Its incidence is high compared with the various malocclusions. In a previous study the crowns of the maxillary lateral teeth had erupted mesially in relation to the functional occlusal plane (FOP in patients with Angle Class I malocclusion and highly erupted canines, which had been uprighted by non-extraction orthodontic treatment, yet these results were based on only two cases evaluated by using plaster models. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the mesiodistal angulations of both maxillary and mandibular teeth relative to the FOP in normal occlusion by means of cephalograms and identifying the teeth axial factors contributing to the normal dentitions with the least ALD. Materials and Methods: Thirty Japanese young adult patients (6 males, 24 females with normal occlusion were selected to participate in this study; cephalograms were procured from each and the FOP was used as a reference plane for measuring the changes in the axial angulation along with other indicators of vertical growth. Results: Progressive mesial tipping of the maxillary lateral teeth was observed. First premolars tended to express this more than the second premolars but the tipping values were roughly 90° relative to the FOP on the first molars. Conclusion: The maxillary lateral teeth are more mesially angulated compared to the mandibular ones relative to the FOP. Furthermore, progressive mesial tipping of the maxillary lateral teeth was detected, of which axial angulations were significantly correlated to each other, in spite the mandibular premolars and molars being angulated in a similar fashion.

  6. Relationship of third molar movement during orthodontic treatment and root angulation

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    Morteza Oshagh

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The relation between the amount of third molar movement and its root angulation was not statistically significant. Therefore movement of third molars during orthodontic treatment should not be assumed as an etiologic factor of root angulations.

  7. Influence of X-ray beam angulations on the detection of horizontal root fractures

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    Josue Martos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of vertical angle for detection of fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five (25 single-rooted premolar teeth were divided into two groups, fractured teeth (n = 15 and non-fractured teeth (n = 10. Artificially fractured teeth were classified according to location, number of fragments, and direction of fracture line: Horizontal, oblique, or complex. The tooth fragments were juxtaposed with cyanoacrylate, and the specimens (fractured and non-fractured were placed individually in the dental alveolus of a human jaw with the aid of silicone rubber impression material and submitted to eight periapical radiographs in a digital sensor with a vertical range of 10 degrees (−40, −30, −20, −10, 0, +10, +20, +30. Three examiners evaluated the characteristics of the fractures and their correlation with the radiographic diagnosis (perceived or not by varying the vertical angle. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis was performed through the analytical comparison and Kappa test inter-examiner. Results: Among the three examiners, inter-examiner Kappa value was 0.536. The radiographic identification of root fracture in the 15 prepared samples was 60% (nine at angle 0, and at the angles of +10, −10, and −20, it was less than 50%. Conclusions: Multiple radiographs with variations of vertical angle are fundamental to facilitate the diagnosis of horizontal root fractures in premolars.

  8. Morphometrical analysis of cleaning capacity using nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation associated with irrigating solutions in mesio-distal flattened root canals Análise morfológica da capacidade de limpeza promovida pela instrumentação rotatória, associada à soluções irrigantes, com limas de níquel-titânio em canais radiculares com achatamento mesio-distal

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    Melissa Andréia Marchesan

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the internal anatomy of root canals may interfere with the success of root canal because tissue remnants may remain in the isthmus, re-entrances and ramifications of flattened root canals making instrumentation more difficult. Successful root canal treatment depends fundamentally on shaping, cleaning, disinfection and obturation. This study verified the quality of cleaning of ProFile .04 rotary technique associated with different irrigating solutions: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide + Tergentol and 2% chlorhexidine in canals with mesio-distal flattening. Twelve human mandibular central incisors were randomly divided into 3 groups and instrumented up to ProFile 0.4 #35 file after cervical preparation, and processed histologically. After optical microscopic evaluation, statistical analysis showed that the percentage of cleaning of the three irrigating solutions was statistically different. Two-by-two comparisons classified the irrigating solutions in increasing order of cleaning: calcium hydroxide + Tergentol As variações da anatomia interna de cada canal radicular podem interferir no sucesso da terapêutica endodôntica devido ao fato de que em canais radiculares achatados, pode persistir remanescentes teciduais em istmos, reentrâncias e ramificações dificultando a execução das técnicas de instrumentação. O sucesso do tratamento dos canais radiculares depende fundamentalmente do preparo da forma, limpeza, desinfecção e obturação. Poucos trabalhos avaliaram a limpeza dos canais radiculares após a instrumentação rotatória. O presente trabalho verificou a qualidade de limpeza dos canais radiculares, por meio da microscopia óptica, promovida pela técnica de instrumentação rotatória associada ao hipoclorito de sódio 0,5%, HCT20 e clorexidina, em canais achatados no sentido mésio-distal. Doze incisivos centrais inferiores humanos foram divididos aleatoriamente em três grupos para que fossem

  9. Relationship between crown-root angulation (collum angle) of maxillary central incisors in Class II, division 2 malocclusion and lower lip line.

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    Srinivasan, Bhadrinath; Kailasam, Vignesh; Chitharanjan, Arun; Ramalingam, Arthi

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the magnitude of the collum angle (crown-root angulation) of maxillary central incisors present in Class II, division 2 malocclusion and to relate the changes in its magnitude with variations in the lower lip line. A set of 120 conventional lateral cephalograms were selected and divided into three groups of 40 each based on the type of malocclusion presented: Class II, division 2 (group 1); Class II, division 1 (group 2); and Class I (group 3). The collum angle of the maxillary central incisor was measured, and the lower lip line was recorded. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the mean collum angle was statistically significantly different in the three groups. The mean collum angle was greatest in Class II, division 2 malocclusion (group 1). The mean collum angles were 3.24 ± 4.69 degrees, 0.95 ± 1.06 degrees, and 1.05 ± 1.50 degrees in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. In χ ² test comparison of the location of the lower lip line (incisal, middle, or apical third of the central incisor) among the three groups, the lower lip line was found to contact the middle third of the central incisor most frequently in Class II, division 2 malocclusion. ANOVA followed by Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) test showed that the mean collum angle is significantly increased when the lower lip is in the middle third (P lower lip line suggest a probable etiologic role of the lower lip line in the development of the collum angle.

  10. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

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    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  11. Influence of Preadjusted Bracket Shape and Positioning Reference on Angulation of Upper Central Incisor.

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    Topolski, Francielle; de O Accorsi, Mauricio A; Trevisi, Hugo J; Cuoghi, Osmar A; Moresca, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    To verify the influence of different bracket shapes and placement references according to Andrews and MBT systems on the expression of angulation in upper central incisors (UCI). Bracket positioning and mesiodistal dental movement simulations were performed and the angulations produced in the dental crown were evaluated, based on computed tomography scan images of 30 UCI and AutoCAD software analysis. Rectangular (Andrews) and rhomboid (MBT) brackets were placed according to the references recommended by Andrews and MBT systems - long axis of the clinical crown (LACC) and incisal edge (IE) respectively. Data showed that the use of LACC as reference for bracket positioning produced 5° and 4° UCI angulations in Andrews and MBT brackets respectively. The use of IE produced a 1.2° mean angulation in UCI for both brackets. When the LACC was used as reference for bracket positioning, the UCI crown angulation corresponded to the angulation built into the brackets, regardless of shape, while the use of IE resulted in natural crown angulation, regardless of bracket shape. This research contributes to guide the orthodontist in relation to the different treatment techniques based on the use of preadjusted brackets.

  12. Mesiodistal Crown Dimensions of Permanent Teeth in Bangladeshi Population

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    Saeed Hossain Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variation in tooth size is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Several studies have reported tooth size variation between and within different racial groups. In order to improve the quality of dental care available, there is a great need for data on the mesiodistal crown dimensions of the individual teeth of Bangladeshi population. Objectives: To find nominative data on the mesiodistal crown dimensions of permanent teeth in Bangladeshi population and to compare the findings with those reported in other populations. Methods: This observational study was done from January, 2008 to June, 2010 in the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University. A total of 244 Bangladeshi subjects (77 males and 167 females, aged 7 – 36 years (mean 18.3 years with no age limit who attended at the above mentioned place for treatment were included in the study. Main outcome measure was mesiodistal crown dimension of each tooth class of permanent dentition. Mesiodistal crown dimensions were measured from dental casts of the permanent teeth. Results: Males had significantly larger teeth than females for maxillary central incisors (p < 0.05 and for the mandibular second premolars (p < 0.001. In both sexes, the maxillary lateral incisors showed the greatest variability [coefficient of variation (CV 10.7%] and the maxillary canines the least (CV 6.9% in mesiodistal crown dimension. Mandibular canines displayed greater sexual dimorphism in mesiodistal crown size than in any other tooth classes. Comparisons of the mesiodistal crown dimensions between population groups showed that Bangladeshis have tooth sizes close to those of North Indians, Icelanders and Jordanians but larger than those of North American Whites. Conclusions: From this study, a standard for the mesiodistal crown dimensions of permanent dentition of Bangladeshi males and females are obtained. Key Words: Crown dimension; Mesio-Distal

  13. Evaluation of crown mesiodistal diameter of permanent teeth

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    H. Ravanmehr

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate mesiodistal diameter of permanent teeth and evaluating it's distribution in Iran. In current study, 850 plastery impressions or 16590 teeth were precisely measured by a digital coulis with 0.01 mm accuracy.The obtained measures of the permanent teeth are shown in table 1. Table (4 demonstrates the symmetry of left and right maxillary and mandibular teeth. Obtainedmeasurements in Table 1 were compared with Gran's measures (Table 2 which are shown in Table (3.Bolton analysis was done and results were found close to the BolType text or a website address or translate a document.ton measures. It was concluded that it is better to replace measurements of our society instead of Bolton's. Since we found minor difference with the measures of other researchers, especially for teeth anterior to first molar, using our measures in treatment plans would not bring about any problem.

  14. Celebrity smile esthetics assessment: Smile angulation.

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    Koidou, Vasiliki P; Rosenstiel, Stephen F; Rashid, Robert G

    2017-05-01

    Whether deviations in the angulation discrepancy between the intercanine and interpupillary line significantly affect attractiveness is unknown. The purpose of this prospective study was to quantify dental and facial esthetics to determine whether smile angulation discrepancies in individuals identified as having attractive smiles are smaller than those in the average population. An Internet search for "best smile" and "celebrity" identified 108 celebrities (Test group). Photographs showing smiles within 10 degrees of a frontal view were gathered. In mannequin testing, small head rotation (line was measured using computer software. Groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Usable photographs were obtained for 94 celebrities (62 women, 32 men) and were compared with photographs of 97 dental students (54 women, 43 men). Significant (P.05). Celebrities identified as having "best smile" had significantly smaller mean angulation discrepancies than the control group. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tooth angulation and dental arch perimeter-the effect of orthodontic bracket prescription.

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    Pontes, Luana F; Cecim, Rodolpho L; Machado, Sissy M; Normando, David

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of upper incisors and canine angulations introduced by different bracket prescriptions on dental arch perimeter. Cone beam computerized tomography scans collected using I-Cat (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) were selected conveniently from a database of routine exams of a clinical radiology center. Crown and radicular measurements of upper incisors and canines were made and exported to the Autocad 2011 software to create a virtual dental model. The virtual teeth were positioned with an angulation of zero; thereafter, a reference value for the perimeter of the arch was measured. Furthermore, teeth angulations were applied according to the standards of the Edgewise bracket system and the Straight-wire systems: MBT, Capelozza, Andrews, and Roth. The largest linear distances for tooth crown (anterior arch perimeter) and root (radicular distance) were obtained for each bracket prescription. The anterior perimeter for well-aligned incisors and canines without angulation was used as reference (crown: 47.34mm; root: 39.13mm). An increase in the arch perimeter was obtained for all bracket prescriptions evaluated, which ranged from 0.28 and 3.19mm in the Edgewise technique, for the crown and root measurements, respectively, to 1.09 and 11.28mm for the Roth prescription. Bracket prescriptions with greater angulation led to an increased use of space within the dental arch, mainly in the radicular region. The consequence of this radicular angular displacement will need to be further investigated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A prospective, split-mouth study comparing tilted implants with angulated connection versus conventional implants with angulated abutment.

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    Van Weehaeghe, Manú; De Bruyn, Hugo; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    An angulation of the implant connection could overcome the problems related to angulated abutments. This study compares conventional implants with angulated abutment to tilted implants with an angulated connection. Twenty patients were treated in the edentulous mandible. In the posterior jaw locations, one conventional tilted implant with angulated abutment and one angulated implant without abutment were placed. In the anterior jaw, two conventional implants were placed, one with and one without abutment. Implants were immediately loaded and 3 months later, the final bridge (PFM or monolithic zirconia) was placed. After a follow-up of 48 months, 17 patients were available for clinical examination. The mean overall marginal bone loss (MBL) was 1.26 mm. No significant differences in implant survival, MBL, periodontal indices, patients' satisfaction, or complications was found between implants restored on abutment or implant level, between the posteriorly located angulated implant nor angulated abutment, and between both anterior implants with or without abutment. The posterior implants demonstrated less MBL compared to the anterior implants (P abutment were replaced and four loose bridge screws connected to the angulated abutments had to be tightened. Patients were overall satisfied (4.74/5). An implant with angulated connection may results in a stronger connection but does not affect the marginal bone loss. No difference in MBL was seen between implants restored on abutment or implant level. Zirconia seems to reduce the amount of plaque. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Angulation change of the third molar tooth in orthodontic treatment

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    Ardiansyah S. Pawinru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Impaction of the third molar tooth mandibular is often found in patients with orthodontic treatment. In orthodontic treatment, extraction cases of impaction of the third molar tooth are usually performed, but the patients often refuse this extraction. Extraction of premolar has a good effect on the third molar mandibular angulation during treatment. Material and Methods : This study is a retrospective clinical study with descriptive analytic to find out the effect of the first mandibular premolar tooth extraction to angulation change of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with a standard edgewise method. Angulation change was performed by comparing the third molar mandibular angulation before and after orthodontic treatment with panoramic radiographs. Angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular was calculated from the angle formed between the long axis of the tooth with the reference line infraorbita. Results : The sample comprised 60 of impacted mandibular third molar region of the left and right regions of 30 patients who had been treated declared cured in clinic of orthodontic specialist of Dentistry Faculty Padjadjaran University. The sample was divided into three (3 groups of patients before treatment angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular under 300, 300 to 600 and above 60o, then measured change of angulation and observed whether it increased, fixed or decreased. Results were analyzed by T- test and Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in angulation of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction. Conclusion : This study is that the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction affects the angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular after orthodontic treatment.

  18. A study to evaluate the changes in 3rd molar angulation with extraction of four premolars in class II malocclusion therapy

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    Özge Uslu-Akçam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objectives of the study are to evaluate the changes in third molar angulation during orthodontic treatment with extraction of premolars in Class II malocclusions, and to evaluate the relationship between the angulation of third molars and positional changes of incisors and molars. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on lateral cephalograms and dental panoramic tomograms of 30 patients (mean age 13.48 years with skeletodental Class II malocclusion treated with four first premolar extractions. Twenty-four cases were treated with edgewise, and six were treated with Begg technique. The changes in the eruption pattern of the third molars were observed at the beginning of the treatment (T1 and at the end of the treatment (T2. The changes in the anteroposterior position of the incisors and molars, original molar space, and mesiodistal third molar angulation were tested by paired t-test. Results: The positional changes of the upper/lower incisors and first molars and original molar space were found similar in edgewise and Begg technique. Original molar space was increased in both jaws during orthodontic treatment. Long axis angle of the upper right third molar due to occlusal plane was increased nonsignificantly. Lower right third molars uprighted significantly. A positive correlation was found between the inclination of the lower right third molars and position of lower incisors and first molars. Conclusion: Treatment with extraction of premolars result in a greater space in the third molar region as a result of the mesial movement of the molars during space closure.

  19. Accuracy of impressions with different impression materials in angulated implants.

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    Reddy, S; Prasad, K; Vakil, H; Jain, A; Chowdhary, R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the dimensional accuracy of the resultant (duplicative) casts made from two different impression materials (polyvinyl siloxane and polyether) in parallel and angulated implants. Three definitive master casts (control groups) were fabricated in dental stone with three implants, placed at equi-distance. In first group (control), all three implants were placed parallel to each other and perpendicular to the plane of the cast. In the second and third group (control), all three implants were placed at 10° and 15 o angulation respectively to the long axis of the cast, tilting towards the centre. Impressions were made with polyvinyl siloxane and polyether impression materials in a special tray, using a open tray impression technique from the master casts. These impressions were poured to obtain test casts. Three reference distances were evaluated on each test cast by using a profile projector and compared with control groups to determine the effect of combined interaction of implant angulation and impression materials on the accuracy of implant resultant cast. Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference in dimensional accuracy of the resultant casts made from two different impression materials (polyvinyl siloxane and polyether) by closed tray impression technique in parallel and angulated implants. On the basis of the results of this study, the use of both the impression materials i.e., polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression is recommended for impression making in parallel as well as angulated implants.

  20. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period

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    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars.Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females of orthodontic patients between 11-25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation.Results: The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes.Conclusions: The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs.Keywords: Dentition, Mixed; Dentition, Permanent; Tooth, Unerupted

  1. Impacted Mandibular Third Molar, Associated Pathoses, and Their Relation to Angulation and Impaction Depth: A Cone Beam CT Study

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    Movahhedian N

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: prophylactic removal of the impacted lower third molar (ILTM is controversial and accompanying pathologic conditions play an important role. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of commonly found pathoses associated with ILTM in relation to angulation and impaction depth in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods: We evaluated CBCT of 500 ILTMs from 235 females (57% and 177 males (43% for the presence of caries on the second and third molars, external root resorption (ERR of the second molar, and follicular spaces (FS >5 mm in diameter in relation to angulation and impaction depth according to Pell and Gregory and Winter’s classifications, respectively. Results: We observed that 55.6% of ILTM had at least one detectible lesion. ERR was the most frequent pathologic condition (31.2%, followed by caries on the second (26% and third (13.4% molars, and FS >5 mm (2.4%. ERR was the only pathology influenced by angulation. There was significantly more ERR in mesioangular ILTMs (40.5%, P5 mm (P=0.035. There were more caries on the second molar (P=0.013 and FS >5 mm (P<0.001 in class III. Conclusions: Prophylactic removal of ILTMs (especially in mesioangular or horizontal impactions could be suggested considering the potential for pathologic changes in ILTMs and the propensity for these teeth to cause ERR in second molars.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of an MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for angulated needle placement in transperineal prostate interventions

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    Tokuda, Junichi; Song, Sang-Eun; Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Seifabadi, Reza; Cho, Bong Joon; Tuncali, Kemal; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the targeting accuracy of a small profile MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement that can angulate a needle insertion path into a large accessible target volume. Methods We extended our MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement to utilize its four degrees-of-freedom (4-DOF) mechanism with two parallel triangular structures and support transperineal prostate biopsies in a closed-bore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The robot is designed to guide a needle towards a lesion so that a radiologist can manually insert it in the bore. The robot is integrated with navigation software that allows an operator to plan angulated needle insertion by selecting a target and an entry point. The targeting error was evaluated while the angle between the needle insertion path and the static magnetic field was between −5.7° and 5.7° horizontally and between −5.7° and 4.3° vertically in the MRI scanner after sterilizing and draping the device. Results The robot positioned the needle for angulated insertion as specified on the navigation software with overall targeting error of 0.8 ± 0.5 mm along the horizontal axis and 0.8 ± 0.8 mm along the vertical axis. The two-dimensional root-mean-square targeting error on the axial slices as containing the targets was 1.4 mm. Conclusions Our preclinical evaluation demonstrated that the MRI-compatible pneumatic robot for needle placement with the capability to angulate the needle insertion path provides targeting accuracy feasible for clinical MRI-guided prostate interventions. The clinical feasibility has to be established in a clinical study. PMID:22678723

  3. Identifying position, visibility, dimensions, and angulation of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Kasim; Christian, Jayanth; Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Natarajan, Shanmuganathan; Banu, Fathima; Veeravalli, Padmanabhan T

    2014-01-01

    We selected 254 subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 yr to assess the ear position, angulations of the ear in relation to the nose, visibility from the frontal view, and dimensions of the ear by using various anthropometric points of the face. Subjects were divided into four groups based on facial form. A reference plane indicator, facial topographical measurements, metal ruler, and digital photography were used. While considering the position of the ear, in all facial forms except square tapering, the most samples showed a tendency for the subaurale being in line with subnasale. Regression analysis showed a tendency to gnathion distance is the most dependent variable with length of the ear kept as a constant predictor, while both interalar distance and exocanthion to endocanthion distance correlate highly significantly to the width of the ear. In all subjects, the visibility of the ear when viewed from the front was an average of 1.5 mm. Regardless of facial form, ear angulation was generally less than nose angulation.

  4. Angulated Dental Implants in Posterior Maxilla FEA and Experimental Verification

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    Hamed A. Hamed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different implant angulations in posterior maxilla on stress distribution by finite element analysis and verify its results experimentally. METHODS: Two simplified models were prepared for an implant placed vertically and tilted 25° piercing the maxillary sinus. Geometric models' components were prepared by Autodesk Inventor then assembled in ANSYS for finite element analysis. The results of finite element analysis were verified against experimental trials results which were statistically analysed using student t-test (level of significance p < 0.05. RESULTS: Implant - abutment complex absorbed the load energy in case of vertical implant better than the case of angulated one. That was reflected on cortical bone stress, while both cases showed stress levels within the physiological limits. Comparing results between FEA and experiment trials showed full agreement. CONCLUSION: It was found that the tilted implant by 25° can be utilised in the posterior region maxilla for replacing maxillary first molar avoiding sinus penetration. The implant-bone interface and peri-implant bones received the highest Von Mises stress. Implant - bone interface with angulated implant received about 66% more stresses than the straight one.

  5. Angulated Dental Implants in Posterior Maxilla FEA and Experimental Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Hamed A; Marzook, Hamdy A; Ghoneem, Nahed E; El-Anwar, Mohamed I

    2018-02-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different implant angulations in posterior maxilla on stress distribution by finite element analysis and verify its results experimentally. Two simplified models were prepared for an implant placed vertically and tilted 25° piercing the maxillary sinus. Geometric models' components were prepared by Autodesk Inventor then assembled in ANSYS for finite element analysis. The results of finite element analysis were verified against experimental trials results which were statistically analysed using student t-test (level of significance p < 0.05). Implant - abutment complex absorbed the load energy in case of vertical implant better than the case of angulated one. That was reflected on cortical bone stress, while both cases showed stress levels within the physiological limits. Comparing results between FEA and experiment trials showed full agreement. It was found that the tilted implant by 25° can be utilised in the posterior region maxilla for replacing maxillary first molar avoiding sinus penetration. The implant-bone interface and peri-implant bones received the highest Von Mises stress. Implant - bone interface with angulated implant received about 66% more stresses than the straight one.

  6. Analyses of anatomical relationship between mandibular third molar roots and variations in lingual undercut of mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Aktop

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The narrow angulation of the lingual balcony region and the relationship between roots and lingual soft tissues should be noted to avoid undesirable complication of displacement of a tooth or fragment into sublingual, submandibular, and pterygomandibular spaces. There was no relation in the floor of the mouth between the position of the impacted third molar roots and different lingual undercut angulation variations.

  7. How Should We Perform Rotational Atherectomy to an Angulated Calcified Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Taniguchi, Yousuke; Matsumoto, Mitsunari; Wada, Hiroshi; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Hideo

    2016-05-25

    Rotational atherectomy to an angulated calcified lesion is always challenging. The risk of catastrophic complications such as a burr becoming stuck or vessel perforation is greater when the calcified lesion is angulated. We describe the case of an 83-year-old female suffering from unstable angina. Diagnostic coronary angiography revealed an angulated calcified lesion in the proximal segment of the right coronary artery. We performed rotational atherectomy to the lesion, but intentionally did not advance the rotational atherectomy burr beyond the top of the angulation. We controlled the rotational atherectomy burr and stopped it just before the top of the angulation to avoid complications. Following rotational atherectomy, balloon dilatation with a non-compliant balloon was performed, and drug-eluting stents were successfully deployed. In this manuscript, we provide a review of the literature on this topic, and discuss how rotational atherectomy to an angulated calcified lesion should be performed.

  8. Angulated Stents-A Novel Stent Improvisation to Manage Difficult Post-tuberculosis Bronchial Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chee Kiang; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Kim, Hojoong

    2017-10-18

    Post-tuberculosis bronchostenosis (PTBS), a complication of endobronchial tuberculosis is currently treated by bronchial stenting. However, in cases of angulated bronchial stenoses, difficulty is often encountered in stent insertion and maintenance, resulting in stent migration, granulation tissue overgrowth, and restenosis. To accommodate the angulated alignment of the stenosis, we devised an "angulated stent"-a novel improvisation of the conventional stent via splicing and suturing to achieve a resultant angulated shape. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this stent. Among 283 PTBS patients who underwent interventional bronchoscopy at our center from 2004 to 2014, 21 were treated with at least one angulated stent. Clinical outcomes, including the stenting duration were investigated. After a median follow-up of 26 months, stent removal was successful in 7 (33.3%) out of 21 patients. In patients managed with angulated stents, the median duration to stent change or eventual removal was longer than those treated with straight tube stents (392 days vs. 86 days; p < 0.05). Angulated stents are a feasible treatment option in patients with angulated PTBS by reducing complications and prolonging the stent-changing interval.

  9. Bilateral intraocular lens subluxation secondary to haptic angulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Montañés, Javier; Fernández-Hortelano, Ana; Caire, Josemaría

    2008-04-01

    An 82-year-old man had uneventful phacoemulsification with bilateral implantation of a hydrophilic acrylic, single-piece intraocular lens (IOL) (ACR6D SE, Laboratoires Cornéal). Five years later, simultaneous and bilateral IOL subluxations occurred. In both eyes, the subluxation was situated on the side of one haptic that had moved forward (temporal area in the right eye and superior area in the left eye). In the right eye, the haptic-capsular bag was entrapped by the pupil and produced endothelial damage. A transscleral suture was placed over and under the subluxated haptic through the anterior and posterior capsules to capture the haptic. The haptic was then sutured to the sclera. No postoperative complications developed. We hypothesize that 10-degree angulated and broad haptic junctions can lead to zonular damage and IOL subluxation.

  10. Basilar artery angulation and vertigo due to the hemodynamic effect of dominant vertebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosar, Murat; Yaman, Mehmet; Eser, Olcay; Songur, Ahmet; Ozen, Oguz A

    2008-01-01

    Vertebral arteries form the basilar artery at the pontobulbar junction. The vertebral artery may have dominancy in one of them. The branches of basilar arteries supply blood for the vestibular nuclei and its connections. Vertigo is seen generally in the upper middle aged patients. Vertigo can be observed in dolichoectasia of basilar artery such as angulation and elongation, because of the diminished blood supply and changed hemodynamic factors of vestibular nuclei and its connections. We hypothesized that angulation or elongation of basilar artery can be estimated according to the unilateral vertebral artery dominant hypertensive patients. The basilar artery can angulate from the dominant side of vertebral artery to the recessive side. These angulation and elongation can effect the hemodynamic factors in absence of growing collateral arteries. So, the vertigo attacks may occur in these patients.

  11. What is important for continent catheterizable stomas: angulations or extension?

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    Marcelo L. Vilela

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We developed an experimental ex-vivo model to define factors that may influence continence of catheterizable channels by urinary and colonic stomas based on the principle of imbrication of the outlet tube. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 20 pigs, colon specimens with 25 cm length were obtained and a transverse flap with 3.0 cm length x 1.5 cm width in the average point of the intestine was tubulated to create an efferent tube. With the tube configured, it was embedded by 3 seromuscular stitches far 0.5 cm each other. A pressure study of both intra-luminal surface and channel was then conducted during the filling of the submerse piece with environmental air in a water container, to define the efferent channel continence. The study was repeated after the progressive release of suture stitches until only one stitch remains. RESULTS: Channel continence analyzed in each segment in three different valve length situations, making a total of 20 segments, revealed that with 3 stitches (1.5 cm valve the maximum average pressure prior to overflow was 54 cm H2O; 53.65 cm H2O with 2 stitches (1.0 cm of valve, and 55.45 cm H2O with only one stitch (0.5 cm of valve, which are the same values. The record at the segment explosion pressure was 67.87 cm H2O. CONCLUSION: The study showed that angulation of channel with colon, maintained by only one stitch (0.5 cm imbrication was more important than a larger extension of the valve, represented by 3 suture stitches (1.5 cm imbrication in order to allow continence to the efferent channel.

  12. Comparison of interpupillary distance and combined mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisor teeth in two ethnic groups of Northeast India: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Jogeswar; Serin, Sangma

    2018-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements of the face can be used as a guide in selecting proper sized anterior teeth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the interpupillary distance (IPD) and the combined mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisors (MDW of MCIs) to establish their morphometric criterion and their significance in two ethnic groups of Northeast India. A total of 120 participants consisting of 60 indigenous students each from Assam and Meghalaya in the age group of 18-25 years were selected after taking their written consent. Standardized facial frontal photographs of all the participants were taken using a digital camera in such a manner that maxillary anterior teeth were visible. The photographs were uploaded onto the computer and saved in a file. Anthropometric measurements of IPD and combined MDW of MCIs in centimeters were made using both Adobe Photoshop ® 7.0 software program and manually using a digital vernier caliper on the developed photographs to a same size of 15 cm × 10 cm. Data obtained were tabulated and analyzed using Student "t"-test and Pearson correlation test. The present study reveals a positive correlation with a high degree of statistical significance between IPD and combined mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisors among all the samples irrespective of gender and ethnicity where P < 0.01. IPD can be used as a guide in determining the suitable mesiodistal dimension of the maxillary central incisors.

  13. Roentgenographic study of two root canal incidence in mandibular first premolars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, H.F.; Simoes, S.; Niccoli Filho, W.D.; Madeira, M.C.; Oliveira, J.A. de; Martins, Ariovaldo A.

    1984-01-01

    The root canal number in 1,632 mandibular first premolars were studied by roentgenograms taken from mesiodistal direction. A second canal exists in at least 27.08 per cent of all the teeth examined. Two comprehensive tables were taken: one was prepared to summarize all the data which were classified by root morphology. The second compares the results taken by other authors. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Prevalence and features of distolingual roots in mandibular molars analyzed by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mi Ree; Moon, Young Mi; Seo, Min Seock

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of distolingual roots in mandibular molars among Koreans, the root canal system associated with distolingual roots, and the concurrent appearance of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar. Cone-beam computed tomographic images of 264 patients were screened and examined. Axial sections of 1056 mandibular molars were evaluated to determine the number of roots. The interorifice distances from the distolingual canal to the distobuccal canal were also estimated. Using an image analysis program, the root canal curvature was calculated. Pearson's chi-square test, the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and post-hoc analysis were performed. Distolingual roots were observed in 26.1% of the subjects. In cases where a distolingual root was observed in the mandibular molar, a significant difference was observed in the root canal curvature between the buccolingual and mesiodistal orientations. The maximum root canal curvature was most commonly observed in the mesiodistal orientation in the coronal portion, but in the apical portion, maximum root canal curvature was most often observed in the buccolingual orientation. The canal curvature of distolingual roots was found to be very complex, with a different direction in each portion. No correlation was found between the presence of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and the presence of a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar

  15. Assessment of crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancies in a South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Maruti Doodamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: The aim of this study was to assess crown angulations, crown inclinations, and tooth size discrepancy in a sample population from Davangere, South India. Materials and Methods: One hundred adults (50 male and 50 female of age 18-30 years, with Angle′s class I ideal occlusion and balanced profiles, were selected for the study. Study models were prepared and crown angulations and crown inclinations were measured using a customized protractor device. Bolton′s analysis was used to measure the tooth size discrepancies. Results: Maxillary and mandibular teeth had less crown angulations. Maxillary and mandibular incisors and maxillary molars showed increased crown inclinations, whereas mandibular molars and premolars had less crown inclinations than the original Andrews sample. The mean maxillary and mandibular tooth size ratios, overall and anterior, were similar to Bolton′s ratios. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that there are possible racial and ethnic factors contributing to variations in crown angulations and crown inclinations.

  16. Accuracy of 3 different impression techniques for internal connection angulated implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkalidis, George; Tortopidis, Dimitrios; Mpikos, Pavlos; Kaisarlis, George; Koidis, Petros

    2015-10-01

    Making implant impressions with different angulations requires a more precise and time-consuming impression technique. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of nonsplinted, splinted, and snap-fit impression techniques of internal connection implants with different angulations. An experimental device was used to allow a clinical simulation of impression making by means of open and closed tray techniques. Three different impression techniques (nonsplinted, acrylic-resin splinted, and indirect snap-fit) for 6 internal-connected implants at different angulations (0, 15, 25 degrees) were examined using polyether. Impression accuracy was evaluated by measuring the differences in 3-dimensional (3D) position deviations between the implant body/impression coping before the impression procedure and the coping/laboratory analog positioned within the impression, using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA. Means were compared with the least significant difference criterion at Pimpression technique exhibited a higher accuracy than the other techniques studied when increased implant angulations at 25 degrees were involved. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transverse morphology of the sacroiliac joint: effect of angulation and implications for fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac joint injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, B.C.; Lee, J.W.; Man, H.S.J.; Grace, M.G.A.; Lambert, R.G.W.; Jhangri, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    Effects of angulation of computed tomography (CT) reconstruction plane on sacroiliac (SI) joint morphology were studied, and factors influencing the approach to fluoroscopically guided SI joint injection were assessed. CT scans of pelvises were reformatted on 41 subjects, aged 51.7 (±15.1) years. Transverse images were reconstructed at the caudal 3 cm of the SI joint tilting plane of reconstruction from -30 to +30 at 15 increments. Anteroposterior diameter of joint (depth), angle from sagittal plane (orientation angle), and distance from skin were measured. Joint contour was classified, and presence of bone blocking access to the joint was recorded. Comparison between angles were analysed by t-test. Relationships between variables were assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Depth was shorter with angulation in the inferior direction (P<0.01). Orientation angle increased with superior angulation (P<0.01). Distance from skin increased (P<0.01) with angulation in either direction. Joint contour was significantly different from baseline at each angle (P<0.001) but highly variable. Inferior angulation resulted in interposition of ilium between skin and SI joint, and superior angulation caused bone block due to the lower sacrum. None of these features was identified without tilting of the reconstruction plane, and effects were more pronounced with steeper angulation

  18. Transverse morphology of the sacroiliac joint: effect of angulation and implications for fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac joint injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, B.C.; Lee, J.W.; Man, H.S.J.; Grace, M.G.A.; Lambert, R.G.W. [Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    Effects of angulation of computed tomography (CT) reconstruction plane on sacroiliac (SI) joint morphology were studied, and factors influencing the approach to fluoroscopically guided SI joint injection were assessed. CT scans of pelvises were reformatted on 41 subjects, aged 51.7 ({+-}15.1) years. Transverse images were reconstructed at the caudal 3 cm of the SI joint tilting plane of reconstruction from -30 to +30 at 15 increments. Anteroposterior diameter of joint (depth), angle from sagittal plane (orientation angle), and distance from skin were measured. Joint contour was classified, and presence of bone blocking access to the joint was recorded. Comparison between angles were analysed by t-test. Relationships between variables were assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Depth was shorter with angulation in the inferior direction (P<0.01). Orientation angle increased with superior angulation (P<0.01). Distance from skin increased (P<0.01) with angulation in either direction. Joint contour was significantly different from baseline at each angle (P<0.001) but highly variable. Inferior angulation resulted in interposition of ilium between skin and SI joint, and superior angulation caused bone block due to the lower sacrum. None of these features was identified without tilting of the reconstruction plane, and effects were more pronounced with steeper angulation.

  19. Late results after intertrochanteric varus angulation in aseptic femoral head necrosis in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, E.; Ahrendt, J.; Niethard, F.U.; Blaesius, K.

    1989-01-01

    25 patients suffering from femoral head necrosis in 30 hip joints were radiologically studied for an average of 11.6 years following intertrochanteric varus angulation osteotomy. Preoperatively only stages 2 and 3 according to Meyers were seen. The follow-up results could be distributed into 4 groups. At best the osteonecrosis was reconstructed within 6 to 9 years while the trabeculae started to become rearranged within 2 to 4 years. At worst, rapid destruction in absence of bony reaction was observed. The ability of the bone outside the osteonecrosis to react to changed circumstances following angulation osteotomy correlates with long-term results. This may indicate a general osteopathy even outside the necrotic area. (orig.) [de

  20. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment.

  1. Influence of Anatomic Angulations in Chimney and Fenestrated Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradu, Caroline; Bérard, Xavier; Midy, Dominique; Ducasse, Eric

    2017-08-01

    The lack of widespread availability of Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (F-EVAR) encouraged alternative strategies. Hence, Chimney graft (CG)-EVAR spread when costs, manufacturing delays, or anatomy preclude F-EVAR. Our objective is to evaluate CG- and F-EVAR outcomes depending on the angulation of target renal arteries and hostility of iliac accesses in order to determine the potential impact of a choice made between both techniques on the basis of preoperative anatomic criteria. Consecutive patients treated by CG-EVAR or F-EVAR, from January 2010 to January 2015, were considered for inclusion. Anatomic parameters were defined by preoperative computed tomography angiography. A subgroup analysis was performed depending on renal arteries' angulation (cut-off: -30°) and iliac arteries' hostility (cut-off: diameter renal artery was shorter in the CG group (11.7 ± 6.2 mm vs. 14.1 ± 5.9 mm, P = 0.06). Longitudinal angulation of the right renal artery was not statistically different between both groups, while the left renal artery presented with a significantly more downward angulation in the CG group (-32.0 ± 15.3 vs. -19.0 ± 19.6, P = 0.003). There were significantly more grade 3 iliac tortuosity indexes for CG-EVAR (P = 0.03) with significantly smaller external iliac diameters (7.8 ± 1.7 vs. 8.8 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.0009). There was 1 renal artery early occlusion in the renal artery angulation and diameter, iliac artery hostility, and aortic neck length among other parameters may help the surgeon make a decision toward the endovascular strategy that seems best suited for each specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiological assessment of cervical lateral mass screw angulations in Asian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariapan Sureisen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various lateral mass screw fixation methods have been described in the literature with various levels of safety in relation to the anterior neurovascular structures. This study was designed to radiologically determine the minimum lateral angulations of the screw to avoid penetration of the vertebral artery canalusing three of the most common techniques: Roy-Camille, An, and Magerl. Materials and Methods: Sixty normal cervical CT scans were reviewed. A minimum lateral angulation of a 3.5 mm lateral mass screw which was required to avoid penetration of the vertebral artery canal at each level of vertebra were measured. Results: The mean lateral angulations of the lateral mass screws (with 95% confidence interval to avoid vertebral artery canal penetration, in relation to the starting point at the midpoint (Roy-Camille, 1 mm medial (An, and 2 mm medial (Magerl to the midpoint of lateral mass were 6.8° (range, 6.3-7.4°, 10.3° (range, 9.8-10.8°, and 14.1° (range, 13.6-14.6° at C3 vertebrae; 6.8° (range, 6.2-7.5°, 10.7° (range, 10.0-11.5°, and 14.1° (range, 13.4-14.8° at C4 vertebrae; 6.6° (range, 6.0-7.2°, 10.1° (range, 9.3-10.8°, and 13.5° (range, 12.8-14.3° at C5 vertebrae and 7.6° (range, 6.9-8.3°, 10.9° (range, 10.3-11.6°, and 14.3° (range, 13.7-15.0° at C6 vertebrae. The recommended lateral angulations for Roy-Camille, Magerl, and An are 10°, 25°,and 30°, respectively. Statistically, there is a higher risk of vertebral foramen violation with the Roy-Camille technique at C3, C4 and C6 levels, P < 0.05. Conclusions: Magerl and An techniques have a wide margin of safety. Caution should be practised with Roy-Camille′s technique at C3, C4, and C6 levels to avoid vertebral vessels injury in Asian population.

  3. Directional tip control technique for optimal stent graft alignment in angulated proximal aortic landing zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Takayama, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Angulated anatomy in the aorta, such as tortuous infrarenal aortic necks or steep aortic arches, is a significant challenge for endovascular aortic repair because it often causes inadequate sealing and fixation, which may lead to treatment failure. We have developed a technique using off-the-shelf equipment to precisely control the deployment of stent grafts in challenging landing zones. The key of this technique is to create a through-and-through wire between two access sites and to use a guiding device over the wire. This technique is best used with stent grafts without nose cones. We present an endovascular aneurysm repair case and a thoracic endovascular aortic repair case with challenging proximal landing zones treated by this technique. In both cases, technical success was attained, and follow-up imaging demonstrated well-aligned stent grafts. Our directional tip control technique is easy and effective. It can be a good technical solution for endovascular aortic treatment in angulated anatomy.

  4. Implant angulation: 2-year retrospective analysis on the influence of dental implant angle insertion on marginal bone resorption in maxillary and mandibular osseous onlay grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaglia, Luca; Toti, Paolo; Sbordone, Carolina; Guidetti, Franco; Martuscelli, Ranieri; Sbordone, Ludovico

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the existence of correlations between marginal peri-implant linear bone loss and the angulation of implants in maxillary and mandibular augmented areas over the course of a 2-year survey. Dependent variables described the sample of the present retrospective chart review. By using three-dimensional radiographs, input variables, describing the implant angulation (buccal-lingual angle [φ] and mesial-distal angle [θ]) were measured; outcome variables described survival rate and marginal bone resorption (MBR) around dental implants in autogenous grafts (10 maxillae and 14 mandibles). Pairwise comparisons and linear correlation coefficient were computed. The peri-implant MBR in maxillary buccal and palatal areas appeared less intensive in the presence of an increased angulation of an implant towards the palatal side. Minor MBR was recorded around mandibular dental implants positioned at a right angle and slightly angulated towards the mesial. Resorption in buccal areas may be less intensive as the angulation of placed implants increases towards the palatal area in the maxilla, whereas for the mandible, a greater inclination towards the lingual area could be negative. In the mandibular group, when the implant was slightly angulated in the direction of the distal area, bone resorption seemed to be more marked in the buccal area. In the planning of dental implant placement in reconstructed alveolar bone with autograft, the extremely unfavourable resorption at the buccal aspect should be considered; this marginal bone loss seemed to be very sensitive to the angulation of the dental implant.

  5. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  6. Effects of impression levels and trays on the accuracy of impressions taken from angulated implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Sahebi, Majid; Davari, Maryam; Hajimahmoudi, Mohammadreza; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-09-01

    It is crucial to keep the misfit of the abutment-fixture unit at the lowest possible rate. There are a few controversial studies on the accuracy of impression making of angulated implants, and much fewer (and controversial) studies on the abutment-level impression technique, which is a convenient and clinically favorable method. Besides, there are no studies on comparison of sectional vs. full-arch trays. We aimed to assess these. A trapezoidal model with four angulated implants installed at 20° and 30° buccal tilts was fabricated. Forty impressions were taken from this model, with two groups of full-arch and sectional custom trays (n = 2 × 20), each divided into two subgroups of implant-level and abutment-level techniques (n = 2 × 2 × 10 in four subgroups). Absolute and non-absolute linear and angular impression errors were estimated by comparing the fabricated casts with the model, using a coordinate measuring machine. The effects of sectional/full-arch trays and abutment-level and fixture-level techniques on impression accuracies were analyzed using one- and two-way analyses of variance (ANOVA), Tukey, Mann-Whitney, and one-sample t-tests (α = 0.05, Mann-Whitney's α using the Bonferroni Bonferroni method). No significant differences between the absolute linear errors of the two trays (P = 0.100 [ANOVA]) and the two levels (P = 0.400 [ANOVA]) were observed. The assessment of absolute angular errors showed no significant differences (all P values ≥ 0.4 [ANOVA]). The difference between the linear errors in the full-arch vs. sectional trays was not significant in the fixture-level group (P = 0.290). However, in the abutment-level group, the linear error was significantly greater in the sectional tray compared to full-arch tray (P = 0.013, α = 0.025 [Mann-Whitney]). Using sectional trays might not be advantageous over full-arch trays. Sectional trays are not recommended for taking abutment-level impressions. The abutment

  7. Modified precision lingual bonding technique: A step-wise approach with torque angulation device-bracket positioning device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaline Tina Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Contemporary preadjusted edgewise appliance is all about the precision in bracket design, prescription and positioning in addition to the orthodontist's skill and training. However, achieving it is a bigger challenge as the anatomy of the lingual surface of a tooth is uneven, dissimilar, and moreover the tooth alignment on the lingual surface is variant. Thus, the need for an accurate method of bracket positioning with predetermined torque and angulation incorporated in the brackets according to the patients' need is of key importance. Materials and Methods: A TAD-BPD machine used to enhance the accuracy of bracket positioning and bioplast accurate tray transfer technique was used. Results: A step-wise procedures in bracket positioning and fabricating an indirect bonding tray for lingual orthodontics using the torque angulation device-bracket positioning device. Conclusions: This technique facilitated unhindered bonding even in severely crowded cases and easy rebonding during mid-treatment stages.

  8. Comparative analysis of intraoral radiographs with variation of tube angulation to detect insufficient crown margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Benjamin F; Geibel, Margrit-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Variations in angulation of the x-ray tube affect the appearance of insufficient approximal crown margins on intraoral radiographs. This study examines the impact of such angular variation on the assessment of digital radiographs using three different X-ray tubes--Heliodent DS (Sirona), Gendex Expert DC (KaVo Dental) and Focus (KaVo Dental)--as well as the Gendex Visualix eHD CCD sensor (KaVo Dental). The test specimens, crowned teeth 46 from two mandibles provided by the Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, were examined with each tube. The results indicate great differences in the angles indicative of insufficient crown margins on X-ray images. Because of beam divergence and the crown marginal gap, the length and width of which frequently varies, it is difficult to infer any optimum angle from the data. This leads to the conclusion that at present, it is not possible to establish ideal angles for visualization of insufficient approximal crown margins.

  9. Complete Remodeling After Conservative Treatment of a Severely Angulated Odontoid Fracture in a Patient With Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colo, Dino; Schlösser, Tom P C; Oostenbroek, Hubert J; Castelein, René M

    2015-09-15

    Case report. This is the first case report describing successful healing and remodeling of a traumatic odontoid fracture that was dislocated and severely angulated in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta who was treated conservatively. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a low bone mass and bone fragility, predisposing these patients to fractures that often occur at a young age. Although any bone in the body may be involved, odontoid fractures are uncommon in this population. Because of a very high fusion rate, conservative management is accepted as a safe and efficient treatment of fractures of the odontoid in children. Several authors, however, recommend surgical treatment of patients who have failure of conservative treatment and have severe angulation or displacement of the odontoid. A 5-year-old female, diagnosed with OI type I, presented with neck pain without any neurological deficits after falling out of a rocking chair backward, with her head landing first on the ground. Computed tomography confirmed a type III odontoid fracture without dislocation and she was initially treated with a rigid cervical orthosis. At 1 and 2 months of follow-up, progressive severe angulation of the odontoid was observed but conservative treatment was maintained as the space available for the spinal cord was sufficient and also considering the patient's history of OI. Eight months postinjury, she had no clinical symptoms and there was osseous healing of the fracture with remodeling of the odontoid to normal morphology. Even in patients with OI, severely angulated odontoid fractures might have the capacity for osseous healing and complete remodeling under conservative treatment. 5.

  10. Introduction of an alternative standardized radiographic measurement method to evaluate volar angulation in subcapital fractures of the 5th metacarpal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Philipp; Korn, Gundobert; Steinhauer, Felix [University of Salzburg, Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Atzwanger, Joerg [University of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria); Tauber, Mark [Shoulder and Elbow Surgery ATOS Clinic Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the intra- and interobserver reliability of two different measurement methods for volar angulation of the 5th metacarpal (MC) in an attempt to establish a new standard measurement method to reduce interobserver discrepancies for therapeutic decisions. Twenty patients with subcapital fractures of the 5th MC were radiologically investigated. Imaging consisted of a radiographs in antero-posterior and precise lateral view in addition to a CT scan of the 5th MC. Measurement of volar angulation was accomplished using the conventional and the shaft articular surface (SAS) method. The measurements of five investigators were exported to a spreadsheet for statistical analysis to evaluate the intra-and interobserver reliability. The conventional technique showed large differences among the investigators and poor interobserver reliability (W = 0.328 and 0.307) both at injury (p = 0.001) and at follow-up (p = 0.189). The intraobserver concordance of all investigators showed better results with the SAS than with the conventional technique. With the SAS technique, no statistically significant difference among the investigators could be detected at either the time of injury (p = 0.418) or at follow-up (p = 0.526) with excellent interobserver reliability (W = 0.051 and W = 0.041). Evaluation of volar angulation at follow-up using CT scans did not show any statistically significant difference between the techniques with better correlation among the observers with the SAS technique (p = 0.838). The interobserver correlation of volar angulation with lateral radiographs using the conventional technique was insufficient. Therefore, we recommend the use of the novel SAS technique as standardized measurement method which showed higher accuracy and interobserver reliability in order to facilitate the choice of adequate treatment option. (orig.)

  11. Introduction of an alternative standardized radiographic measurement method to evaluate volar angulation in subcapital fractures of the 5th metacarpal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Philipp; Korn, Gundobert; Steinhauer, Felix; Atzwanger, Joerg; Minnich, Bernd; Tauber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the intra- and interobserver reliability of two different measurement methods for volar angulation of the 5th metacarpal (MC) in an attempt to establish a new standard measurement method to reduce interobserver discrepancies for therapeutic decisions. Twenty patients with subcapital fractures of the 5th MC were radiologically investigated. Imaging consisted of a radiographs in antero-posterior and precise lateral view in addition to a CT scan of the 5th MC. Measurement of volar angulation was accomplished using the conventional and the shaft articular surface (SAS) method. The measurements of five investigators were exported to a spreadsheet for statistical analysis to evaluate the intra-and interobserver reliability. The conventional technique showed large differences among the investigators and poor interobserver reliability (W = 0.328 and 0.307) both at injury (p = 0.001) and at follow-up (p = 0.189). The intraobserver concordance of all investigators showed better results with the SAS than with the conventional technique. With the SAS technique, no statistically significant difference among the investigators could be detected at either the time of injury (p = 0.418) or at follow-up (p = 0.526) with excellent interobserver reliability (W = 0.051 and W = 0.041). Evaluation of volar angulation at follow-up using CT scans did not show any statistically significant difference between the techniques with better correlation among the observers with the SAS technique (p = 0.838). The interobserver correlation of volar angulation with lateral radiographs using the conventional technique was insufficient. Therefore, we recommend the use of the novel SAS technique as standardized measurement method which showed higher accuracy and interobserver reliability in order to facilitate the choice of adequate treatment option. (orig.)

  12. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  13. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Chaitanya Kanneganti; Dileep Nag Vinnakota; Srinivas Rao Pottem; Mahesh Pulagam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled t...

  14. Comparative effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on preloaded abutment screw using three-dimensional finite element analysis: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Krishna Chaitanya; Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Pottem, Srinivas Rao; Pulagam, Mahesh

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of implant-abutment connections, abutment angulations, and screw lengths on screw loosening (SL) of preloaded abutment using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. 3D models of implants (conical connection with hex/trilobed connections), abutments (straight/angulated), abutment screws (short/long), and crown and bone were designed using software Parametric Technology Corporation Creo and assembled to form 8 simulations. After discretization, the contact stresses developed for 150 N vertical and 100 N oblique load applications were analyzed, using ABAQUS. By assessing damage initiation and shortest fatigue load on screw threads, the SL for 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cyclic loads were estimated, using fe-safe program. The obtained values were compared for influence of connection design, abutment angulation, and screw length. In straight abutment models, conical connection showed more damage (14.3%-72.3%) when compared to trilobe (10.1%-65.73%) at 2.5, 5, and 10 lakh cycles for both vertical and oblique loads, whereas in angulated abutments, trilobe (16.1%-76.9%) demonstrated more damage compared to conical (13.5%-70%). Irrespective of the connection type and abutment angulation, short screws showed more percentage of damage compared to long screws. The present study suggests selecting appropriate implant-abutment connection based on the abutment angulation, as well as preferring long screws with more number of threads for effective preload retention by the screws.

  15. Crown-root morphology of lower incisors in patients with class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Shen, Guofang; Fang, Bing; Zhang, Li

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the crown-root morphology of lower incisors in patients with class III malocclusion using cone-beam computed tomography. Cone-beam computed tomography images were analyzed from 53 adult class I patients (group 1), 37 preadolescent class III patients (group 2), and 66 adult class III patients (group 3) comprising 3 divisions (divisions 1, 2, and 3 corresponded to mild, moderate, and severe class III malocclusions). The size and crown-root angulations of lower incisors in different groups and divisions were statistically appraised with group 1 used as the control group. No significant differences were found for the size of lower incisors among different groups and divisions (P > 0.05). Compared with group 1, the crown-root angulations of lower incisors in groups 2 and 3 were significantly larger (P lower incisors of division 3 rather than divisions 2 and 3 exhibited larger crown-root angulations (P lower incisors in class III patients during orthodontic and orthognathic treatment, especially in severe ones.

  16. Anatomical study of the relationship of impacted mandibular third molar root apex to inferior alveolar canal in Kurdistan population using orthopantomogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedil Andraws Yalda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Extraction of an impacted mandibular third lower molar tooth is one of the common surgical procedures that may lead to the damage of inferior alveolar nerve due to roots proximity to the mandibular canal. This study aimed to know the relative relationship and proximity of the mandibular third molar roots to the inferior alveolar canal in relation to gender, age, depth of impaction, relation with ramus, and type of angulation of the impacted tooth in Kurdistan population. Methods: A sample of 366 digital panoramic radiographs of patients with impacted mandibular third molar was studied. Panoramic radiographic signs images were evaluated for the presence of root contact with the superior border of the mandibular canal, darkening of the roots apex, deflected roots, narrow root, superimposition of the canal, interruption of the white line, diversion of the inferior alveolar canal, and narrowing of the inferior alveolar canal. The depths of impaction, relation with ramus, and type of angulation were also studied. Results: Significant relation of the proximity of the mandibular third molar roots to the inferior alveolar canal with the gender (P = 0.001 and age (P <0.001 were seen. A significant relation of the proximity of the mandibular third molar roots to the inferior alveolar canal with the depth of impaction (P <0.001, relation with the ramus (P =0.004, and angulation of impaction were also seen (P <0.001. Conclusion: Significant relation of the proximity of the mandibular third molar roots to the inferior alveolar canal with gender, age, depth of impaction, relation with the ramus, and angulation of impaction were seen.

  17. Radiographic evaluation of the quality of root canal obturation of single-matched cone Gutta-percha root canal filling versus hot lateral technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Suleiman Obeidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate radiographically the quality of root canal filling in mesiodistal and buccolingual view when comparing matched cone condensation and warm lateral Gutta-percha condensation using system B heating instrument in a low-heat warm lateral condensation technique in0 vitro. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 mandibular premolars with straight single canals were divided into two groups with 20 each. The root canals were shaped by hand file and Revo-S rotary files to size (25, 0.06 at the end point, then they filled by Gutta-percha cone and meta-seal sealer. In group A, a single matched cone technique was used to fill the root canals. In group B, a hot lateral condensation using system B instrument at 101°C was performed. Result: The result of this study showed no significant difference in density of Gutta-percha fill in apical and coronal two-third when comparing matched cone root canal filling and hot lateral technique (P > 0.05. The only significant difference (P < 0.05 was in matched cone between buccolingual and mesiodistal view in the coronal two-third. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, single matched cone technique has a good density in the apical one-third as that of the hot lateral technique so it may be used for filling narrow canals. In the coronal two-third of the root canal, single matched cone technique showed inferior density of root canal filling which can be improved by using accessory cones Gutta-percha in wide canal.

  18. Analysis of the root position of the maxillary incisors in the alveolar bone using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hee [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Jun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure the buccal bone thickness and angulation of the maxillary incisors and to analyze the correlation between these parameters and the root position in the alveolar bone using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of 398 maxillary central and lateral incisors from 199 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The root position in the alveolar bone was classified as buccal, middle, or palatal, and the buccal type was further classified into subtypes I, II, and III. In addition, the buccolingual inclination of the tooth and buccal bone thickness were evaluated. A majority of the maxillary incisors were positioned more buccally within the alveolar bone, and only 2 lateral incisors (0.5%) were positioned more palatally. The angulation of buccal subtype III was the greatest and that of the middle type was the lowest. Most of the maxillary incisors exhibited a thin facial bone wall, and the lateral incisors had a significantly thinner buccal bone than the central incisors. The buccal bone of buccal subtypes II and III was significantly thinner than that of buccal subtype I. A majority of the maxillary incisor roots were positioned close to the buccal cortical plate and had a thin buccal bone wall. Significant relationships were observed between the root position in the alveolar bone, the angulation of the tooth in the alveolar bone, and buccal bone thickness. CBCT analyses of the buccal bone and sagittal root position are recommended for the selection of the appropriate treatment approach.

  19. Maxillary Central Incisor with Two Roots: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Khojastehpour

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A 16 year old female was referred to an oral and maxillofacial radiologist for evaluation of a radiolucent area at mesial radicular aspect of right maxillary central incisor which was detected accidentally during pre-orthodontic treatment check ups. Clinicalexamination showed no particular signs or symptoms except for slightly tenderness to lateral percussion. Second radiograph with altered horizontal angulations showed a mesial supernumerary root which the radiolucency seemed to be associated with that. Inorder to treat the tooth, the composite filling was removed and canals were cleaned,shaped, and obturated by lateral condensation technique.

  20. [Effect of zirconia abutment angulation on stress distribution in the abutment and the bone around implant: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-zhong; Tian, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Yan-min

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of three different zirconia angular abutments on the stress distribution in bone and abutment using three-dimensional finite element analysis, and provide instruction for clinical application. Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to analyze the stress distribution of three different zirconia/titanium angular abutments and bone around implant. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in the straight abutment model. The maximum Von Minses stress that existed in abutment, bolt and bone of the 20 ° angular abutment model was significantly higher than that existed in 15 ° angular abutment model. There was no significant difference between zirconia abutment model and titanium abutment model. The abutment angulation has a significant influence on the stress distribution in the abutment, bolt and bone, and exacerbates as the angulation increases, which suggest that we should take more attention to the implant orientation and use straight abutment or little angular abutment. The zirconia abutment can be used safely, and there is no noticeable difference between zirconia abutment and titanium abutment on stress distribution.

  1. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  2. Influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capability of straight or angulated zirconia abutments in implant/tooth-supported fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Doppler, Klaus E; Erdelt, Kurt J; Knauber, Andreas W; Pospiech, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the fracture behavior of straight and angulated zirconia implant abutments used in ZirDesign (Astra Tech) implant/tooth-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in the maxilla. Four different test groups (n = 8) representing anterior implant/tooth-supported FPDs were prepared. Groups 1 and 2 simulated a clinical situation with an ideal implant position (maxillary left central incisor) from a prosthetic point of view, which allowed for the use of a straight, prefabricated zirconia abutment. Groups 3 and 4 simulated a situation with a compromised implant position that required an angulated (20-degree) abutment. OsseoSpeed implants (4.5 3 13 mm, Astra Tech) as well as metal tooth analogs (maxillary right lateral incisor) with simulated periodontal mobility were mounted in polymethyl methacrylate. The FPDs (chromium-cobalt alloy) were cemented with glass ionomer. Groups 2 and 4 were thermomechanically loaded and subjected to static loading until failure. Statistical analysis of force data at the fracture site was performed using nonparametric tests. All samples survived thermomechanical loading. Artificial aging did not lead to a significant decrease in load-bearing capacity in either the straight abutments or the angulated abutments. The restorations that used angulated abutments exhibited higher fracture loads than the restorations with straight abutments (group 1: 209.13 ± 39.11 N; group 2: 233.63 ± 30.68 N; group 3: 324.62 ± 108.07 N; group 4: 361.75 ± 73.82 N). This difference in load-bearing performance was statistically significant, both with and without artificial aging. All abutment fractures occurred below the implant shoulder. Compensation for angulated implant positions with an angulated zirconia abutment is possible without reducing the load-bearing capacity of implant/tooth-supported anterior FPDs.

  3. Accuracy of a digital impression system based on parallel confocal laser technology for implants with consideration of operator experience and implant angulation and depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Beatriz; Özcan, Mutlu; Martínez-Rus, Francisco; Pradíes, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a digital impression system based on parallel confocal red laser technology, taking into consideration clinical parameters such as operator experience and angulation and depth of implants. A maxillary master model with six implants (located bilaterally in the second molar, second premolar, and lateral incisor positions) was fitted with six polyether ether ketone scan bodies. One second premolar implant was placed with 30 degrees of mesial angulation; the opposite implant was positioned with 30 degrees of distal angulation. The lateral incisor implants were placed 2 or 4 mm subgingivally. Two experienced and two inexperienced operators performed intraoral scanning. Five different interimplant distances were then measured. The files obtained from the scans were imported with reverse-engineering software. Measurements were then made with a coordinate measurement machine, with values from the master model used as reference values. The deviations from the actual values were then calculated. The differences between experienced and inexperienced operators and the effects of different implant angulations and depths were compared statistically. Overall, operator 3 obtained significantly less accurate results. The angulated implants did not significantly influence accuracy compared to the parallel implants. Differences were found in the amount of error in the different quadrants. The second scanned quadrant had significantly worse results than the first scanned quadrant. Impressions of the implants placed at the tissue level were less accurate than implants placed 2 and 4 mm subgingivally. The operator affected the accuracy of measurements, but the performance of the operator was not necessarily dependent on experience. Angulated implants did not decrease the accuracy of the digital impression system tested. The scanned distance affected the predictability of the accuracy of the scanner, and the error increased with the increased length of the

  4. Unusual root canal morphology of mandibular second premolars: A case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Sonarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular second premolars (MSPs have varied anatomy ranging from 1 to 3 roots and 1–5 canals. Successful endodontic treatment is achieved by proper access opening, cleaning, and shaping and three-dimensional obturation. This case series describes five cases in which MSPs have been diagnosed with aberrant canal system. The Case 1 and 5 has one root with Vertucci's Type V canal configuration. The Case 2 has two roots with two canals, the Case 3 has one root with Vertucci's Type IV canal configuration, whereas the Case 4 has three roots with three canals. This case series also describes a classification for describing the root configuration. The clinical implications of this paper are first to reach at appropriate diagnosis of canal system using diagnostic aids (angulated radiographs and dental operating microscope. Second, to use advanced endodontic instruments for achieving successful endodontic therapy (NiTi rotary instruments.

  5. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  6. Micro-computed tomography study of the internal anatomy of mesial root canals of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas-Bôas, Marcelo Haas; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Marciano, Marina; Del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Duarte, Marco H; Bramante, Clovis M; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mesiodistal and buccolingual diameter, apical volume, and the presence of isthmuses at the apical level of mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Sixty extracted first and second mandibular molars were scanned by using a SkyScan 1076 micro-computed tomography system with a voxel size of 18 μm. The apical thirds of the samples were reconstructed to allow a perpendicular section of the apical third by using the multiplanar reconstruction tool of the OsiriX software. The mesiodistal and the buccolingual distances of root canals were measured between the 1- to 4-mm levels. The type of root canal isthmuses present at these levels was classified by using modified criteria of Hsu and Kim. The volume of the root canal anatomy between the 1- to 3-mm apical levels was obtained by using the CTAN-CTVOL software. The medians of the mesiodistal diameter at the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-mm levels in the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals were 0.22 and 0.23 mm, 0.27 and 0.27 mm, 0.30 and 0.30 mm, and 0.36 and 0.35 mm, respectively. The buccolingual lengths at the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-mm levels were 0.37-0.35 mm, 0.55-0.41 mm, 0.54-0.49 mm, and 0.54 and 0.60 mm, respectively. The presence of isthmuses was more prevalent at the 3- to 4-mm level. However, 27 cases presented complete or incomplete isthmuses at the 1-mm apical level. The mean of the volume of the apical third was 0.83 mm(3), with a minimum value of 0.02 and a maximum value of 2.4 mm(3). Mesial root canals of mandibular molars do not present a consistent pattern. A high variability of apical diameters exists. The presence of isthmuses at the apical third was not uncommon even at the 1-mm apical level. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Root canal preparation in endodontics: conventional versus laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Moskowitz, Emrey

    1992-06-01

    Conventional cleaning and shaping of root canal systems employs hand and/or rotary instrumentation to remove the contents of the canal and shape the canal to receive a filling material. With the advent of the Nd:YAG laser system another method of accomplishing proper cleaning and shaping is evaluated. Single rooted teeth were radiographed bucco- lingually and mesio-distally and were divided into 2 groups. The first group was accessed and the root canal systems cleaned and shaped with a step back technique utilizing hand files and gates glidden burs. At completion of the procedure the teeth were again radiographed at the same positions as those prior to the procedure. The teeth were split longitudinally and examined under scanning electron microscopy to assess cleaning. The second group of teeth were accessed, and cleaning and shaping was accomplished using the Nd:YAG laser in combination with hand files and rotary instruments. These teeth were subjected to the same analysis as those in the first group. The before and after radiographs of each group were subjected to image analysis to determine effectiveness of the two methods in shaping the canal systems. We will discuss the ability of Nd:YAG to clean and shape root canal spaces and remove smear layer and organic tissue remnants from those areas.

  8. ′An avant-garde indirect bonding technique for lingual orthodontics using the first complete digital "tad" (torque angulation device, & "BPD" (bracket positioning device′

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Hegde

    2010-01-01

    This article covers an Indirect Bonding Technique using the Torque Angulation Device (TAD and the Bracket Positioning Device (BPD which ensure great accuracy while minimizing the poten- tial for error as compared to most methods available to the orthodontist today. This technique has been developed by taking into account the advantages and pitfalls of indirect bonding.

  9. A comparative study of frictional force in self-ligating brackets according to the bracket-archwire angulation, bracket material, and wire type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Souk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the frictional force (FR) in self-ligating brackets among different bracket-archwire angles, bracket materials, and archwire types. Methods Passive and active metal self-ligating brackets and active ceramic self-ligating brackets were included as experimental groups, while conventional twin metal brackets served as a control group. All brackets were maxillary premolar brackets with 0.022 inch [in] slots and a -7° torque. The orthodontic wires used included 0.018 round and 0.019 × 0.025 in rectangular stainless steel wires. The FR was measured at 0°, 5°, and 10° angulations as the wire was drawn through the bracket slots after attaching brackets from each group to the universal testing machine. Static and kinetic FRs were also measured. Results The passive self-ligating brackets generated a lower FR than all the other brackets. Static and kinetic FRs generally increased with an increase in the bracket-archwire angulation, and the rectangular wire caused significantly higher static and kinetic FRs than the round wire (p brackets exhibited the lowest static FR at the 0° angulation and a lower increase in static and kinetic FRs with an increase in bracket-archwire angulation than the other brackets, while the conventional twin brackets showed a greater increase than all three experimental brackets. Conclusions The passive self-ligating brackets showed the lowest FR in this study. Self-ligating brackets can generate varying FRs in vitro according to the wire size, surface characteristics, and bracket-archwire angulation. PMID:25667913

  10. Diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures: an in vitro study comparing CBCT imaging with periapical radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange KOBAYASHI-VELASCO

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare periapical radiograph (PR and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures. Material and Methods Sixty incisor teeth (20 higid and 40 with root fracture from dogs were inserted in 60 anterior alveolar sockets (40 higid and 20 with alveolar fracture of 15 macerated canine maxillae. Each fractured socket had a root fractured tooth inserted in it. Afterwards, each maxilla was submitted to PR in two different vertical angulation incidences, and to CBCT imaging with a small field of view (FOV and high-definition protocol. Images were randomized and posteriorly analyzed by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists two times, with a two-week interval between observations. Results Sensitivity and specificity values were good for root fractures for PR and CBCT. For alveolar fractures, sensitivity ranged from 0.10 to 0.90 for PR and from 0.50 to 0.65 for CBCT. Specificity for alveolar fractures showed lower results than for root fractures for PR and CBCT. Areas under the ROC curve showed good results for both PR and CBCT for root fractures. However, results were fair for both PR and CBCT for alveolar fractures. When submitted to repeated measures ANOVA tests, there was a statistically significant difference between PR and CBCT for root fractures. Root fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.90 to 0.93, and alveolar fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.30 to 0.57. Interobserver agreement results were substantial for root fractures and poor/fair for alveolar fractures (0.11 for PR and 0.30 for CBCT. Conclusion Periapical radiograph with two different vertical angulations may be considered an accurate method to detect root fractures. However, PR showed poorer results than CBCT for the diagnosis of alveolar fractures. When no fractures are diagnosed in PR and the patient describes pain symptoms, the subsequent exam of choice is CBCT.

  11. Roots & Hollers

    OpenAIRE

    Kollman, Patrick L; Gorman, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Roots & Hollers, 2011 A documentary by Thomas Gorman & Patrick Kollman Master’s Project Abstract: Roots & Hollers uncovers the wild American ginseng trade, revealing a unique intersection between Asia and rural America. Legendary in Asia for its healing powers, ginseng helps sustain the livelihoods of thousands in Appalachia. A single root can sell for thousands of dollars at auction. Shot on-location in the mountains of Kentucky and West Virginia, this student doc...

  12. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  13. An in vitro comparison of the accuracy of implant impressions with coded healing abutments and different implant angulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdullah, Khaled; Zandparsa, Roya; Finkelman, Matthew; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    abutment impression group was higher than the corresponding median of the control group (OTSC) for every combination of angulation and position. Kruskal-Wallis tests indicated a statistically significant difference (Pimpressions were found to be less accurate than those fabricated from the open tray with splinted impression copings technique for restoring 2 paired (10 or 30 degrees) convergent internal connection implants with nonengaging screw-retained splinted 2-unit implant restorations. Accuracy of fit was not influenced by the implant angulation or position for either impression technique or by the Encode healing abutment height for the Encode impression technique. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The efficacy of two rotary NiTi instruments and H-files to remove gutta-percha from root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Kerem E.; Altunbaş, Demet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of R-Endo® and K3® rotary nickel-titanium instruments compared with manual instrumentation with H-files, with use of a solvent, for removal of gutta-percha during retreatment. Study design: Forty five freshly extracted human single-rooted teeth, each with one root canal, were instrumented with K-files and filled using cold lateral compaction of gutta-percha and AH 26® sealer. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each. Removal of gutta-percha was performed with the following devices and techniques: Group 1 (H-files), Group 2 (R-Endo®), and Group 3 (K3®). The specimens were rendered transparent for the evaluation of the area of remaining gutta-percha/sealer in buccolingual and mesiodistal directions. Statistical analysis as performed by using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p=0.05). Results: All retreatment techniques used in this study left some filling material inside the root canal. Images in buccolingual and mesiodistal directions showed no significant differences between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Under the experimental conditions, the remaining filling material after retreatment was similar for each group. Key words:Gutta-percha removal, K3®, NiTi, R-Endo®. PMID:22143729

  15. Successful Rotational Atherectomy for an Angulated Calcified Lesion in an Anomalous Right Coronary Artery Using the “Mother-and-Child” Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Ogita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI involving the anomalous coronary artery is challenging with respect to difficulty in achieving stable catheterization. Rotational atherectomy (RA can facilitate severely calcified lesions to improve stent delivery and stent expansion; however, its utility in tortuous and angulated coronary arteries is limited with difficulty in delivery of the RA burr. The mother-and-child technique is effective for complex PCIs with increased backup force for device delivery in such complicated cases. We report a case of successful rotational atherectomy using the “mother-and-child” technique with a Dio thrombus aspiration catheter for an angulated calcified lesion in an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery.

  16. Late results after intertrochanteric varus angulation in aseptic femoral head necrosis in adults. Spaetergebnisse nach intertrochanterer Varisierungsosteotomie bei der aseptischen Hueftkopfnekrose Erwachsener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.; Ahrendt, J.; Niethard, F.U.; Blaesius, K. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1989-04-01

    25 patients suffering from femoral head necrosis in 30 hip joints were radiologically studied for an average of 11.6 years following intertrochanteric varus angulation osteotomy. Preoperatively only stages 2 and 3 according to Meyers were seen. The follow-up results could be distributed into 4 groups. At best the osteonecrosis was reconstructed within 6 to 9 years while the trabeculae started to become rearranged within 2 to 4 years. At worst, rapid destruction in absence of bony reaction was observed. The ability of the bone outside the osteonecrosis to react to changed circumstances following angulation osteotomy correlates with long-term results. This may indicate a general osteopathy even outside the necrotic area. (orig.).

  17. A comparison of profilometer and AutoCAD software techniques in evaluation of implant angulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Gomes, Erica Alves; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Gennari-Filho, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2 different methods of assessment of implants at different inclinations (90 degrees and 65 degrees)--with a profilometer and AutoCAD software. Impressions (n = 5) of a metal matrix containing 2 implants, 1 at 90 degrees to the surface and 1 at 65 degrees to the surface, were obtained with square impression copings joined together with dental floss splinting covered with autopolymerizing acrylic resin, an open custom tray, and vinyl polysiloxane impression material. Measurement of the angles (in degrees) of the implant analogs were assessed by the same blinded operator with a profilometer and through analysis of digitized images by AutoCAD software. For each implant analog, 3 readings were performed with each method. The results were subjected to a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test, with P AutoCAD (89.95 degrees; P = .9142). In the analyses of the angled implants at 65 degrees in relation to the horizontal surface of the specimen, significant differences were observed (P = .0472) between the mean readings with the profilometer (65.73 degrees) and AutoCAD (66.25 degrees). The degrees of accuracy of implant angulation recording vary among the techniques available and may vary depending on the angle of the implant. Further investigation is needed to determine the best test conditions and the best measuring technique for determination of the angle of the implant in vitro.

  18. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper summarizes the different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots, exemplified by trauma and orthodontic treatment. The concept of the paper is to summarize and explain symptoms and signs of importance for avoiding resorption during...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost...... processes provoked by trauma and orthodontic pressure. Inflammatory reactions are followed by resorptive processes in the periroot sheet and along the root surface. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: Different morphologies in the dentition are signs of abnormal epithelium or an abnormal mesodermal layer. It has...

  19. Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christersson, Albert; Larsson, Sune [Uppsala University, Department of Orthopaedics, Uppsala (Sweden); Nysjoe, Johan; Malmberg, Filip; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Nystroem, Ingela [Uppsala University, Centre for Image Analysis, Uppsala (Sweden); Berglund, Lars [Uppsala University, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, UCR Statistics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were ± 4.4 , ± 1.9 and ± 6.8 respectively. For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested. (orig.)

  20. Comparisons of orthodontic root resorption under heavy and jiggling reciprocating forces during experimental tooth movement in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikida, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Shimizu, Mami; Kikuta, Jun; Yoshino, Tomokazu; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2016-07-01

    Root mobility due to reciprocating movement of the tooth (jiggling) may exacerbate orthodontic root resorption (ORR). "Jiggling" describes mesiodistal or buccolingual movement of the roots of the teeth during orthodontic treatment. In the present study, buccolingual movement is described as "jiggling." We aimed to investigate the relationship between ORR and jiggling and to test for positive cell expression in odontoclasts in resorbed roots during experimental tooth movement (jiggling) in vivo. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, heavy force (HF), optimal force (OF), and jiggling force (JF) groups. The expression levels of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 protein, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CINC-1; an IL-8-related protein in rodents), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin protein in the dental root were determined using immunohistochemistry. On day 21, a greater number of root resorption lacunae, which contained multinucleated odontoclasts, were observed in the palatal roots of rats in the JF group than in rats from other groups. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the numbers of cathepsin K-positive and MMP-9-positive odontoclasts in the JF group on day 21. Immunoreactivities for IL-6, CINC-1, and RANKL were stronger in resorbed roots exposed to jiggling than in the other groups on day 21. Negative reactivity was observed in the controls. These results suggest that jiggling may induce ORR via inflammatory cytokine production during orthodontic tooth movement, and that jiggling may be a risk factor for ORR.

  1. Localization of root canal orifices in mandibular second molars in relation to occlusal dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorduysus, O; Nagas, E; Cehreli, Z C; Gorduysus, M; Yilmaz, Z

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the localization and distribution of canal orifices of mandibular second molar teeth in relation to the mesio-distal and bucco-lingual dimensions of coronal tissue. Fifty extracted mandibular second molar teeth were embedded into plaster blocks with their vertical axes aligned perpendicular to the horizontal plane. The teeth were photographed digitally from the occlusal aspect under 12 x magnification. Thereafter, the occlusal halves of crowns were sectioned off to expose the root canal orifices. The teeth were than photographed under the same magnification, after which the pre- and post-sectioning images of each specimen were stacked into a single file. To plot the coordinate of each canal orifice, a 0.5-mm grid analytical plane was mounted digitally on the stack so that the x- and y-axes of the plane were superimposed on the mesiodistal and buccolingual axes (bisectors) of the tooth crowns. Localization and distribution of the coordinates of the canal orifices were evaluated using the chi-square test (P = 0.05). Only one tooth displayed a single root canal orifice, located in the mesiobuccal-distolingual 'centre' of the occlusal surface. The majority of mandibular second molars had three orifices (72%), followed by those with two (16%) and four (10%). The distal canal was located lingual to the centre of the occlusal plane. The distal canal was located lingual to the centre of the occlusal plane of mandibular second molars. The possibility of observing more divergent localizations and orifice numbers should not be overlooked in clinical practice.

  2. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  3. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  4. Location and angulation of curvatures of mesiobucal canals of mandibular molars debrided by three endodontic techniques Posição e angulação de curvaturas radiculares em canais mesiobucais de molares inferiores preparados por três técnicas endodônticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Geralda Teixeira Constante

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between the degree of angulation and the position of root curvatures and their influence on the comparative results between the performances of the Progressive, Staged and Serial Preparation Techniques. The mesiobucal canals of 70 extracted mandibular molars were filled with a radiological contrast of 100% Barium sulphate and radiographed with a direct digital radiographic system, in an apparatus that guarantees that the samples remain in the same spatial position at all times. The images were then analyzed in the Coreldraw 10 program (MicroSafe, RJ, Brasil in accordance with two criteria: the methods of Berbert, Nishiyama¹ (1994 and Schneider11 (1971 to determine the position and the angle of the root curvatures, respectively. Initially, the possibility of correlation between these two variables was studied. The teeth were then selected according to angulation (greater than 25 degrees and position of root curvatures (cervical, median and apical in order to perform the endodontic techniques. After preparation, the samples were radiographed again and the images were superimposed in order to compare the pre- and post-operative areas. The difference between them showed the percentage of widening for each technique. The results showed that there was no correlation between the angulations and the root curvature positions, and that the different positions did not interfere in the performance of the techniques. The Progressive Preparation technique produced the highest widening values for all the groups, irrespective of the root curvature position.O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a correlação entre o grau de angulação e a posição das curvaturas radiculares, e a sua influência nos resultados comparativos entre os desempenhos das técnicas do Preparo Progressivo, Escalonada e Seriada. Os canais mésio-vestibulares de 70 dentes molares inferiores extraídos foram preenchidos com um

  5. It is not just comfort: waterproof casting increases physical functioning in children with minimally angulated distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mauricio; Avoian, Tigran; Warnock, Robert Sean; Sadlik, Gal; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2017-09-01

    Waterproof casting has been reported to increase patient comfort and satisfaction, and decrease skin irritation. There are no available data on the influence of waterproof casting materials on physical function in pediatric patients. Our aim was to determine whether the use of waterproof casting would result in faster recovery of physical function while maintaining similar clinical outcomes as those obtained with nonwaterproof materials. Twenty-six children with nonangulated or minimally angulated distal radius fractures were assigned randomly to initially receive a short-arm cast made of one of two optional materials: a hybrid mesh material with a waterproof lining or fiberglass with a nonwaterproof skin protector. Two weeks later, the initial cast was removed and replaced with a short-arm cast made of the alternative option. We compared the rate of fracture displacement, physical function, pain, skin changes, itchiness, and patient satisfaction. No evidence of displacement was found in either group. The mean Activities Scale for Kids - Performance (ASK-P) (physical function) score was 10% higher during the period of time when a waterproof cast was used (P=0.04). When a waterproof cast was used during the first 2 weeks of treatment, the mean total ASK-P scores were 23% higher than that when a nonwaterproof one was used during the same period of time (P=0.003). Patients who received a waterproof cast as the initial treatment reported lower functional scores overall and in almost every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a nonwaterproof one; similarly, those who received a nonwaterproof cast as the initial treatment reported higher functional scores overall and in every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a waterproof cast. Compared with a nonwaterproof cast, the use of waterproof casting resulted in comparable levels of pain, itchiness, skin irritability, and overall patient satisfaction. The results of this randomized, cross-over trial suggest that the use of

  6. A comparative study of cone-beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography in detecting mandibular molars root perforations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghanifar, Sina; Moudi, Ehsan; Mesgarani, Abbas; Abbaszadeh, Naghi [Dental Material Research Center, Dental Faculty, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bijani, Ali [Non-Communicable Pediatric Diseases Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography in the detection of mesial root perforations of mandibular molars. In this in vitro study, 48 mandibular molars were divided into 4 groups. First, the mesial canals of all the 48 teeth were endodontically prepared. In 2 groups (24 teeth each), the roots were axially perforated in the mesiolingual canal 1-3 mm below the furcation region, penetrating the root surface ({sup r}oot perforation{sup )}. Then, in one of these 2 groups, the mesial canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. Mesial canals in one of the other 2 groups without perforation (control groups) were filled with the same materials. The CBCT and periapical radiographs with 3 different angulations were evaluated by 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity and sensitivity of the two methods were calculated, and P<0.05 was considered significant. The sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in the detection of obturated root canal perforations were 79% and 96%, respectively, and in the case of three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 92% and 100%, respectively. In non-obturated root canals, the sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in perforation detection were 92% and 100%, respectively, and for three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 50% and 96%, respectively. For perforation detection in filled-root canals, periapical radiography with three different horizontal angulations would be trustworthy, but it is recommended that CBCT be used for perforation detection before obturating root canals.

  7. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  8. Single Balloon Enteroscopy-Assisted ERCP Using Rendezvous Technique for Sharp Angulation of Roux-en-Y Limb in a Patient with Bile Duct Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Takao; Ishii, Kentaro; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Kurihara, Toshio; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Tsuji, Shujiro; Umeda, Junko; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2009-01-01

    The acute angulation of Roux-en-Y (R-Y) limb precludes endoscopic access for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) even using a balloon enteroscopy. Here, we describe a case of successful single balloon enteroscopy (SBE)-assisted ERCP using a rendezvous technique in a patient with sharply angulated R-Y limb in a 79-year-old woman who had bile duct stones. Method. At first, a guidewire was passed antegradely through the major papilla after the needle puncture using percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage technique. A hydrophilic guidewire with an ERCP catheter was antegradely advanced beyond the Roux limb. After a guidewire was firmly grasped by a snare forceps, it was pulled out of the body, resulting that the enteroscope could advance to the papilla. After papillary dilation, complete removal of bile duct stones was achieved without any procedure-related complication. In conclusion, although further study is needed, SBE-assisted ERCP using a rendezvous technique may have a potential for selected patients. PMID:20169091

  9. Single Balloon Enteroscopy-Assisted ERCP Using Rendezvous Technique for Sharp Angulation of Roux-en-Y Limb in a Patient with Bile Duct Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Itoi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute angulation of Roux-en-Y (R-Y limb precludes endoscopic access for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP even using a balloon enteroscopy. Here, we describe a case of successful single balloon enteroscopy (SBE-assisted ERCP using a rendezvous technique in a patient with sharply angulated R-Y limb in a 79-year-old woman who had bile duct stones. Method. At first, a guidewire was passed antegradely through the major papilla after the needle puncture using percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage technique. A hydrophilic guidewire with an ERCP catheter was antegradely advanced beyond the Roux limb. After a guidewire was firmly grasped by a snare forceps, it was pulled out of the body, resulting that the enteroscope could advance to the papilla. After papillary dilation, complete removal of bile duct stones was achieved without any procedure-related complication. In conclusion, although further study is needed, SBE-assisted ERCP using a rendezvous technique may have a potential for selected patients.

  10. The Effect of Using a Modified Dentoalveolar Distractor on Canine Angulation following Rapid Canine Retraction: A Split-mouth Design Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ainawi, Khaled I; Al-Mdalal, Yaser; Hajeer, Mohammad Y

    2016-01-01

    New studies have been published and aimed to retract canines by means of distraction osteogenesis to reduce treatment time. Although a great care has been given to achieve a bodily movement of the canines, a significant amount of tipping of the canines has been observed. This trial aimed to assess the effect of applying a modified distractor on canine angulation. The sample of the study consisted of 14 canines in seven patients (16-25 years). After the osteotomy procedure, two distractors were applied (one distractor on each side). After 5 days of a latency period, the two distractors were activated at a rate of 1 mm/day. There was a significant difference between the two distractors regarding the time required to retract the canines (p = 0.008) and the observed change in canine angulation following retraction (p = 0.028). The change in the overjet and the mandibular plane angle was statistically insignificant. Eight out of 14 distracted canines reacted positively to the pulp vitality tester after 3 months of completion of distraction. There was no clinical sign of discoloration or pulpal pain in any canine. Within the limits of this study, the modified distractor caused a bodily movement of the canine with a minimal tipping. Further research is required on a long-term basis on a larger group of patients to gain more insight on the observed changes.

  11. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Pecci, Raffaella; Bedini, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB) root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium). A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging) was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  12. Ex Vivo Comparison of Mtwo and RaCe Rotary File Systems in Root Canal Deviation: One File Only versus the Conventional Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Razmi, Hasan; Nozari, Solmaz

    2015-07-01

    Cleaning and shaping of the root canal system is an important step in endodontic therapy. New instruments incorporate new preparation techniques that can improve the efficacy of cleaning and shaping. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Mtwo and RaCe rotary file systems in straightening the canal curvature using only one file or the conventional method. Sixty mesial roots of extracted human mandibular molars were prepared by RaCe and Mtwo nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary files using the conventional and only one rotary file methods. The working length was 18 mm and the curvatures of the root canals were between 15-45°. By superimposing x-ray images before and after the instrumentation, deviation of the canals was assessed using Adobe Photoshop CS3 software. Preparation time was recorded. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test. There were no significant differences between RaCe and Mtwo or between the two root canal preparation methods in root canal deviation in buccolingual and mesiodistal radiographs (P>0.05). Changes of root canal curvature in >35° subgroups were significantly more than in other subgroups with smaller canal curvatures. Preparation time was shorter in one file only technique. According to the results, the two rotary systems and the two root canal preparation methods had equal efficacy in straightening the canals; but the preparation time was shorter in one file only group.

  13. Present and future in the use of micro-CT scanner 3D analysis for the study of dental and root canal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M. Grande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present article is to illustrate and analyze the applications and the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT in the analysis of tooth anatomy and root canal morphology. The authors performed a micro-CT analysis of the following different teeth: maxillary first molars with a second canal in the mesiobuccal (MB root, mandibular first molars with complex anatomy in the mesial root, premolars with single and double roots and with complicated apical anatomy. The hardware device used in this study was a desktop X-ray microfocus CT scanner (SkyScan 1072, SkyScan bvba, Aartselaar, Belgium. A specific software ResolveRT Amira (Visage Imaging was used for the 3D analysis and imaging. The authors obtained three-dimensional images from 15 teeth. It was possible to precisely visualize and analyze external and internal anatomy of teeth, showing the finest details. Among the 5 upper molars analyzed, in three cases, the MB canals joined into one canal, while in the other two molars the two mesial canals were separate. Among the lower molars two of the five samples exhibited a single canal in the mesial root, which had a broad, flat appearance in a mesiodistal dimension. In the five premolar teeth, the canals were independent; however, the apical delta and ramifications of the root canals were quite complex. Micro-CT offers a simple and reproducible technique for 3D noninvasive assessment of the anatomy of root canal systems.

  14. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  15. The relationships between the arrangement of teeth, root resorption, and dental maturity in bovine mandibular incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jin-kyu; Ono, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the eruption pattern and root resorption of the bovine anterior dentition in relation to growth-related parameters based on dental maturity. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 bovine anterior mandibles by using standard radiography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and actual measurements. We determined the relationships between the stages of dental maturity by using a modification of Demirjian's method and various growth-related parameters, such as the activity of the root-resorbing tissue and mobility of the deciduous teeth. The correlation of growth-related parameters with interdental spacing and distal unusual root resorption (DRR) of the deciduous fourth incisor was assessed. The cause of mesial unusual root resorption (MRR) of the deciduous fourth incisor was determined on the basis of the arrangement of the permanent third incisor. Results An independent t-test and chi-square test indicated significant differences in growth-related parameters associated with dental arch length discrepancy and factors related to the shedding of deciduous teeth between the low and high dental maturity groups. The samples with interdental spacing and DRR showed a larger sum of mesiodistal permanent crown widths and higher dental maturity than did the respective controls. Samples with MRR tended to show a lingually rotated distal tip of the adjacent tooth crown. Conclusions Dental maturity has relevance to the interdental spaces and unusual root resorption of mixed dentition. The position of the adjacent tooth crown on CBCT may be correlated with the occurrence of unusual root resorption of the incisor. PMID:29090124

  16. A study of root canal morphology of human primary incisors and molars using cone beam computerized tomography: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaurav, Vivek; Srivastava, Nikhil; Rana, Vivek; Adlakha, Vivek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Variations in morphology of root canals in primary teeth usually leads to complications during and after endodontic therapy. To improve the success in endodontics, a thorough knowledge of the root canal morphology is essential. The aim of this study was to assess the variation in number and morphology of the root canals of primary incisors and molars and to study the applicability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) in assessing the same. A total of 60 primary molars and incisors with full root length were collected and various parameters such as the number of roots, number of canals, diameter of root canal at cementoenamel junction and middle-third, length and angulations of roots of primary molars and incisors were studied using CBCT. The observations were put to descriptive statistics to find out the frequency, mean, standard deviation and range for all four subgroups. Further, unpaired t-test was used to compare these parameters between subgroups and analysis of variance test was implemented to evaluate the parameters within the subgroups. The CBCT showed the presence of bifurcation of root canal at middle third in 13% of mandibular incisors while 20% of mandibular molars had two canals in distal root. The diameter of distobuccal root canal of maxillary molars and mesiolingual canal of mandibular molars was found to be minimum. CBCT is a relatively new and effective technology, which provides an auxiliary imaging modality to supplement conventional radiography for assessing the variation in root canal morphology of primary teeth.

  17. ROOT Reference Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuakye, Eric Gyabeng

    2017-01-01

    A ROOT Reference Documentation has been implemented to generate all the lists of libraries needed for each ROOT class. Doxygen has no option to generate or add the lists of libraries for each ROOT class. Therefore shell scripting and a basic C++ program was employed to import the lists of libraries needed by each ROOT class.

  18. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  19. Root canal irrigants

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are...

  20. Effects of self-adjusting file, Mtwo, and ProTaper on the root canal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Ellemieke S; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul R; Shemesh, Hagay

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this ex vivo study was to observe the incidence of cracks in root dentin after root canal preparation with hand files, self-adjusting file (SAF), ProTaper, and Mtwo. One hundred extracted mandibular premolars with single canals were randomly selected. Two angulated radiographs were taken for each tooth, and the width of the canal was measured at 9 mm from the apex. Five groups of 20 teeth each were comparable in canal width. The control group was left unprepared. Four experimental groups were instrumented with hand files, ProTaper, Mtwo, and SAF. Roots were then sectioned horizontally and observed under a microscope. The presence of dentinal cracks and their location were noted. The difference between the experimental groups was analyzed with a χ(2) test. No cracks were observed in the control group. In the experimental groups, ProTaper, Mtwo, and SAF caused cracks in 35%, 25%, and 10% of teeth, respectively. The hand-file group did not show any dentinal cracks (P ProTaper and Mtwo caused more cracks than hand files (P .05). Instrumentation of root canals with SAF, Mtwo, and ProTaper could cause damage to root canal dentin. SAF has a tendency to cause less dentinal cracks as compared with ProTaper or Mtwo. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the maxillary premolar roots dissociation using radiographic holders with conventional and digital radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Ramalho da Silva Bardauil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This in vivo study evaluated the dissociation quality of maxillary premolar roots combining variations of vertical and horizontal angulations by using X-ray holders (Rinn -XCP, and made a comparison between two types of intraoral radiography systems - conventional film (Kodak Insight, Rochester, USA and digital radiography (Kodak RVG 6100, Kodak, Rochester, USA. The study sample was comprised of 20 patients with a total of 20 maxillary premolars that were radiographed, using the paralleling angle technique (GP, with a 20º variation of the horizontal angle (GM and 25º variation of the horizontal angle combined with 15º vertical angle (GMV. Each image was independently analyzed by two experienced examiners. These examiners assigned a score to the diagnostic capability of root dissociation and the measurement of the distance between the apexes. Statistical data was derived using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, Friedman and T test. The means of the measured distances between buccal and lingual root apexes were greater for the GMV, which ranged from 2.3 mm to 3.3 mm. A statistically significant difference was found between GM and GMV when compared to GP with p < 0.01. An established best diagnostic dissociation roots image was found in the GMV. These results support the use of the anterior X-ray holders which offer a better combined deviation (GMV to dissociate maxillary premolar roots in both radiography systems.

  2. Tips of the dual-lumen microcatheter-facilitated reverse wire technique in percutaneous coronary interventions for markedly angulated bifurcated lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Kikai, Masakazu; Hori, Yusuke; Yoshioka, Kenichi; Kubota, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Urata, Ryota; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Keira, Natsuya; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    In practical settings of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), we sometimes encounter difficulty in introducing a guidewire (GW) to the markedly angulated side branch (SB), and the reverse wire technique is considered as a last resort to overcome such a situation. We analyzed 12 cases that underwent PCI with dual-lumen microcatheter-facilitated reverse wire technique between January 2013 and July 2016. We retrospectively investigated the lesion's characteristics and the details of the PCI procedures, and discussed tips about the use of this technique. The SB that exhibits both a smaller take-off angle and a larger carina angle is considered to be the most suitable candidate for this technique. The first step of this technique involves the delivery of the reverse wire system to the target bifurcation. However, most cases exhibit significant stenosis proximal to the bifurcation, which often hampers the delivery of the reverse wire system. Because the sharply curved reverse wire system is easier to pass the stenosis as compared to the roundly curved system, we recommend a sharp curve should be adopted for this technique. On the other hand, it is sure that device delivery is much easier on the GW with a round curve as compared to that with a sharp curve. Therefore, it is important to modify the details of this procedure on a case-by-case basis according to the lesion's characteristics.

  3. Risk factors of avascular necrosis of the femoral head and fixation failure in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures over the age of 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyung Keun; Choi, Ho June; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to identify the risk factors for avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) and fixation failure (FF) after screw osteosynthesis in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures. We conducted a retrospective study of 308 patients (mean age, 72.5 years, range, 50-97 years), with a mean follow-up of 21.4 months (range, 12-64 months). The risk for failure in treatment (FIT) associated with patient- and fracture-related factors was evaluated by logistic regression analyses. FIT was identified in 32 cases (10.3%): 22 cases (7.1%) of AVN and 10 cases (3.2%) of FF. Initial valgus tilt>15° (p=0.023), posterior tilt>15° (p=0.012), and screw sliding distance (p=0.037) were significantly associated with FIT. FIT occurred in 7 patients (5.2%) with B1.2.1 fractures and 17 patients (48.6%) with B1.1.2 fractures (p15° (B1.1.2) compared to patients with 15° are reasonable candidates for primary arthroplasty due to high risk of FIT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Why rooting fails

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    2007-01-01

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four "tastes." The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  5. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260).

  6. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  7. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Veulemans

    Full Text Available Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA. Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far.The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT. Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A. In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD. Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients. Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml and radiation exposure (cine runs were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02 and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated.A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739.

  8. Clinical significance of prostatic-urethral angulation on the treatment outcome of patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia treated with tamsulosin hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan El-Tatawy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the impact of the prostatic-urethral angulation (PUA on the treatment efficacy of selective alpha-1A receptor blocker in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH. Materials and methods: A total of 80 patients with LUTS/BPH and with mean age 53.3 ± 6.3 (range 47-70 were included in our prospective comparative study. The patients were classified into 2 groups as a consecutive cases 40 in each one depending on the PUA either ≤ 35° (group A or > 35° (group B. PUA and different prostatic parameters were measured using transrectal ultrasound. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, the International Prostate Symptom Score and quality of life score (IPSS/QoL score, maximum flow rate (Qmax, and postvoid residual (PVR volume were compared between the groups. The clinical significance of PUA was evaluated after 8 weeks of medical treatment with tamsulosin hydrochloride 0.4 mg daily. Results: Baseline evaluation (pre-treatment for both groups were comparable to each other with no clinically significant difference regarding age, PSA, IPSS/QoL score, Qmax and PVR volume (P-value > 0.05. Comparison of parameters after 8 weeks showed that tamsulosin hydrochloride improved the total IPSS and all subscores (P < 0.001, QoL (P = 0.001, Qmax (P = 0.002, and PVR (P = 0.04 in group A (Table 1. Conclusion: Tamsulosin hydrochloride appears to be less effective in improving IPSS/Qol score, Qmax and PVR in patients with lager PUA. The PUA might be a predictor for the treatment efficacy of α-blockers and more studies are warranted in the future before the final conclusion.

  9. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ramesh R.; Reddy Anjaneya Prasanna L.; Subbaiah Chinna J.; Kumar Niranjana A.; Prasad Nagendra H.N.; Bhukya Balakishan

    2011-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes) and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant) and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and ...

  10. Endoscopic root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Michaeli, Eli; Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-10-01

    To describe an innovative endoscopic technique for root canal treatment. Root canal treatment was performed on 12 patients (15 teeth), using a newly developed endoscope (Sialotechnology), which combines an endoscope, irrigation, and a surgical microinstrument channel. Endoscopic root canal treatment of all 15 teeth was successful with complete resolution of all symptoms (6-month follow-up). The novel endoscope used in this study accurately identified all microstructures and simplified root canal treatment. The endoscope may be considered for use not only for preoperative observation and diagnosis but also for active endodontic treatment.

  11. RUNTIME DICTIONARIES FOR ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wind, David Kofoed

    2013-01-01

    ROOT is the LHC physicists' common tool for data analysis; almost all data is stored using ROOT's I/O system. This system benefits from a custom description of types (a so-called dictionary) that is optimised for the I/O. Until now, the dictionary cannot be provided at run-time; it needs to be prepared in a separate prerequisite step. This project will move the generation of the dictionary to run-time, making use of ROOT 6's new just-in-time compiler. It allows a more dynamic and natural access to ROOT's I/O features especially for user code.

  12. EFFICACY OF PROTAPER NEXT AND PROTAPER UNIVERSAL RETREATMENT SYSTEMS IN REMOVING GUTTA-PERCHA IN CURVED ROOT CANALS DURING ROOT CANAL RETREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha ÖZYÜREK

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the cleanliness of root canal walls after retreatment using ProTaper Next (PTN, ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR nickel-titanium (NiTi systems and Hedström hand files in curved mesial canals of mandibular molar teeth and the time required for gutta-percha and sealer removal. Materials and Methods: Ninety mandibular molar teeth with curved mesial roots were instrumented up to #35.04 with Mtwo NiTi rotary instruments and obturated using the continuous wave of condensation technique. Removal of gutta-percha and sealer was performed using one of the following: PTN and PTR NiTi systems and Hedström hand files. Samples were placed on the VistaScan phosphor plates in the mesio-distal direction and the radiographs were taken. The digital radiographs were analyzed using AutoCAD software. Also, the total time required for gutta-percha removal was calculated by a chronometer. Results: The total retreatment time was significantly shorter in the PTN and PTR groups compared with the manual group (p<0.05. There was a significant difference between the groups according to the total residual gutta-percha and sealer (p<0.05. The PTN and PTR groups left significantly less gutta-percha and sealer remnant than the manual group (p<0.001. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the PTN and PTR groups showed less residual gutta-percha and sealer than the manual group. The NiTi rotary systems were significantly faster than the manual group in the time required for gutta-percha and sealer removal.

  13. Efficacy of protaper next and protaper universal retreatment systems in removing gutta-percha in curved root canals during root canal retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurek, Taha; Ozsezer-Demiryurek, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cleanliness of root canal walls after retreatment using ProTaper Next (PTN), ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR) nickel-titanium (NiTi) systems and Hedström hand files in curved mesial canals of mandibular molar teeth and the time required for gutta-percha and sealer removal. Ninety mandibular molar teeth with curved mesial roots were instrumented up to #35.04 with Mtwo NiTi rotary instruments and obturated using the continuous wave of condensation technique. Removal of gutta-percha and sealer was performed using one of the following: PTN and PTR NiTi systems and Hedström hand files. Samples were placed on the VistaScan phosphor plates in the mesio-distal direction and the radiographs were taken. The digital radiographs were analyzed using AutoCAD software. Also, the total time required for gutta-percha removal was calculated by a chronometer. The total retreatment time was significantly shorter in the PTN and PTR groups compared with the manual group (p<0.05). There was a significant difference between the groups according to the total residual gutta-percha and sealer (p<0.05). The PTN and PTR groups left significantly less gutta-percha and sealer remnant than the manual group (p<0.001). Within the limitations of this study, the PTN and PTR groups showed less residual gutta-percha and sealer than the manual group. The NiTi rotary systems were significantly faster than the manual group in the time required for gutta-percha and sealer removal.

  14. Irrational Square Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  15. Chromatic roots and hamiltonian paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We present a new connection between colorings and hamiltonian paths: If the chromatic polynomial of a graph has a noninteger root less than or equal to t(n) = 2/3 + 1/3 (3)root (26 + 6 root (33)) + 1/3 (3)root (26 - 6 root (33)) = 1.29559.... then the graph has no hamiltonian path. This result...

  16. A study of root canal morphology of human primary incisors and molars using cone beam computerized tomography: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variations in morphology of root canals in primary teeth usually leads to complications during and after endodontic therapy. To improve the success in endodontics, a thorough knowledge of the root canal morphology is essential. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the variation in number and morphology of the root canals of primary incisors and molars and to study the applicability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT in assessing the same. Settings and Design: A total of 60 primary molars and incisors with full root length were collected and various parameters such as the number of roots, number of canals, diameter of root canal at cementoenamel junction and middle-third, length and angulations of roots of primary molars and incisors were studied using CBCT. Statistical analysis used: The observations were put to descriptive statistics to find out the frequency, mean, standard deviation and range for all four subgroups. Further, unpaired t-test was used to compare these parameters between subgroups and analysis of variance test was implemented to evaluate the parameters within the subgroups. Results and Conclusion: The CBCT showed the presence of bifurcation of root canal at middle third in 13% of mandibular incisors while 20% of mandibular molars had two canals in distal root. The diameter of distobuccal root canal of maxillary molars and mesiolingual canal of mandibular molars was found to be minimum. CBCT is a relatively new and effective technology, which provides an auxiliary imaging modality to supplement conventional radiography for assessing the variation in root canal morphology of primary teeth.

  17. Grass Rooting the System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  18. Rooting an Android Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    1. Overview The purpose of this document is to demonstrate how to gain administrative privileges on an Android device. The term “rooting” is...is applicable for the Samsung Galaxy S3 as well as many other Android devices, but there are several steps involved in rooting an Android device (as...root access has been granted. 4. Conclusion This document serves as a tutorial on how to grant user administrative privilege to an Android device by

  19. effects of different concentrations of auxins on rooting and root

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: The effect of auxins and their different concentrations on rooting and root ... primary root length and the longest primary root was recorded with the ... ceuticals, lubricants, foods, electrical insulators, .... stem cuttings of jojoba treated with IBA and NAA, .... increasing cell division and enlargement at each.

  20. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  1. Effect of ultrasonic agitation on push-out bond strength and adaptation of root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Murilo Priori; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Duque, Jussaro Alves; Fernandes, Samuel Lucas; Rosseto, Mariana Bailo; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ultrasonic agitation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium silicate-based cement (CSC), and Sealer 26 (S26) on adaptation at the cement/dentin interface and push-out bond strength. Sixty maxillary canines were divided into 6 groups ( n = 10): MTA, S26, and CSC, with or without ultrasonic activation (US). After obturation, the apical portions of the teeth were sectioned, and retrograde cavities were prepared and filled with cement by hand condensation. In the US groups, the cement was activated for 60 seconds: 30 seconds in the mesio-distal direction and 30 seconds in the buccal-lingual direction, using a mini Irrisonic insert coupled with the ultrasound transducer. After the materials set, 1.5-mm thick sections were obtained from the apexes. The presence of gaps and the bond between cement and dentin were analyzed using low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy. Push-out bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Ultrasonic agitation increased the interfacial adaptation of the cements. The S26 US group showed a higher adaptation value than MTA ( p < 0.05). US improved the push-out bond strength for all the cements ( p < 0.05). The US of retrograde filling cements enhanced the bond to the dentin wall of the root-end filling materials tested.

  2. "Roots": Medium and Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnamon, Keneth

    A national telephone survey indicated that audiences rated the television production of "Roots" positively in terms of the following: realistic portrayal of the people and the times; relevance for contemporary race relations; perceived emotional effect; and increased understanding of the psychology of black people. However, a comparison…

  3. Armillaria Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  4. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    m, stability, transient response, root-locus, iteration he means by which any a machine, mechanism or d or altered in accordance. Introduction of feedback has the advantages of f system performance to in system parameters, ponse and minimizing the ignals. However, feedback of components, increases ain and introduces ...

  5. (Lamiaceae) root extracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal effects of 10 solvent extracts of Mentha spicata root. Methods: Ten solvent extracts were investigated for their total flavonoid and phenolic content and screened for larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal activities. The total phenolic ...

  6. Optimal C-arm angulation during transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Accuracy of a rotational C-arm computed tomography based three dimensional heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veulemans, Verena; Mollus, Sabine; Saalbach, Axel; Pietsch, Max; Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Westenfeld, Ralf; Weese, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Balzer, Jan

    2016-10-26

    To investigate the accuracy of a rotational C-arm CT-based 3D heart model to predict an optimal C-arm configuration during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Rotational C-arm CT (RCT) under rapid ventricular pacing was performed in 57 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis as part of the pre-procedural cardiac catheterization. With prototype software each RCT data set was segmented using a 3D heart model. From that the line of perpendicularity curve was obtained that generates a perpendicular view of the aortic annulus according to the right-cusp rule. To evaluate the accuracy of a model-based overlay we compared model- and expert-derived aortic root diameters. For all 57 patients in the RCT cohort diameter measurements were obtained from two independent operators and were compared to the model-based measurements. The inter-observer variability was measured to be in the range of 0°-12.96° of angular C-arm displacement for two independent operators. The model-to-operator agreement was 0°-13.82°. The model-based and expert measurements of aortic root diameters evaluated at the aortic annulus ( r = 0.79, P optimal C-arm configuration, potentially simplifying current clinical workflows before and during TAVR.

  7. Introduction to the ROOT System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to the ROOT data handling system. ROOT is used in some for or another by all LHC experiments and will be used by all for final data analysis. The introduction gives an overview of the system. Prerequisite knowledge: C++

  8. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  9. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses to and ...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  10. Aquaporins and root water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  11. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piparo, D. [CERN; Tejedor, E. [CERN; Guiraud, E. [CERN; Ganis, G. [CERN; Mato, P. [CERN; Moneta, L. [CERN; Valls Pla, X. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab

    2017-11-22

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  12. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piparo, D.; Tejedor, E.; Guiraud, E.; Ganis, G.; Mato, P.; Moneta, L.; Valls Pla, X.; Canal, P.

    2017-10-01

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  13. Impacted maxillary canines and root resorption of adjacent teeth: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, R; Cavallini, C; Vernucci, R; Vichi, M; Leonardi, R; Barbato, E

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of impacted maxillary canine is reported to be between 1% and 3%. The lack of monitoring and the delay in the treatment of the impacted canine can cause different complications such as: displacement of adjacent teeth, loss of vitality of neighbouring teeth, shortening of the dental arch, follicular cysts, canine ankylosis, recurrent infections, recurrent pain, internal resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, external resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, combination of these factors. An appropriate diagnosis, accurate predictive analysis and early intervention are likely to prevent such undesirable effects. The objective is to evaluate, by means of a retrospective observational study, the possibility of carrying out a predictive analysis of root resorption adjacent to the impacted canines by means of orthopantomographs, so as to limit the prescription of additional 3D radiography. 120 subjects with unilateral or bilateral maxillary impacted canine were examined and 50 patients with 69 impacted maxillary canine (22 male, 28 female; mean age: 11.7 years) satisfied the inclusion criteria of the study. These patients were subjected to a basic clinical and radiographic investigation (orthopantomographs and computerized tomography). All panoramic films were viewed under standardized conditions for the evaluation of two main variables: maxillary canine angulations (a, b, g angles) and the overlapping between the impacted teeth and the lateral incisor (Analysis of Lindauer). Binary logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of resorbed lateral incisors depending on sector location and angle measurements. Results indicated that b angle has the greatest influence on the prediction of root resorption (predictive value of b angle = 76%). If β angle <18° and Lindauer = I, the probability of resorption is 0.06. Evaluation of b angle and superimposition lateral incisor/impacted canine analysed on orthopantomographs could be one of

  14. Root tips moving through soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Root elongation occurs by the generation of new cells from meristematic tissue within the apical 1–2 mm region of root tips. Therefore penetration of the soil environment is carried out by newly synthesized plant tissue, whose cells are inherently vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. This conundrum, on its face, would seem to reflect an intolerable risk to the successful establishment of root systems needed for plant life. Yet root tip regions housing the meristematic tissues repeatedly have been found to be free of microbial infection and colonization. Even when spore germination, chemotaxis, and/or growth of pathogens are stimulated by signals from the root tip, the underlying root tissue can escape invasion. Recent insights into the functions of root border cells, and the regulation of their production by transient exposure to external signals, may shed light on long-standing observations. PMID:21455030

  15. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  16. The Roots of Beowulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  17. Measurement of the percentage of root filling in oval-shaped canals obturated with Thermafil Obturators and Beefill 2in1: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faus-Llácer, Vicente; Collado-Castellanos, Nicolás; Alegre-Domingo, Teresa; Dolz-Solsona, María; Faus-Matoses, Vicente

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the percentage of root canal fillings in long oval canals obturated with thermoplasticized gutta-percha techniques, Beefill 2in1® and Thermafil Obturators®. Fifty four mandibular incisors were selected after bucco-lingual and mesio-distal radiographs showed at 5 mm from apex an internal long:short diameter ≥2. Teeth were instrumented with Protaper Universal and divided in two groups of 27. Group 1 was obturated with Thermafil Obturators® and group 2 with Beefill 2in1®. Two horizontal sections were cut at 5 and 7 mm from the apex and photographed in a stereo-microscope. The total area of the canal and filled canal in cross-sections were measured with AutoCad and the percentages of gutta-percha-sealer and voids in the canal were obtained. Both systems achieved high percentage of filled canal, Thermafil 96.8% and Beefill 2in1 98.9%. The percentages of voids in both groups were very low. No significant differences were found between the two groups . The percentage obtained at 5 and 7 mm from the apex in both groups showed no significant difference. The percentages of filled canal (gutta-percha-sealer) were high and these two thermoplasticized techniques are suitable for long oval canals obturation. Key words:Long oval canal, oval canal, thermoplasticized obturation.

  18. ROOT Tutorial for Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    ROOT is a "batteries-included" tool kit for data analysis, storage and visualization. It is widely used in High Energy Physics and other disciplines such as Biology, Finance and Astrophysics. This event is an introductory tutorial to ROOT and comprises a front lecture and hands on exercises. IMPORTANT NOTE: The tutorial is based on ROOT 6.04 and NOT on the ROOT5 series.  IMPORTANT NOTE: if you have ROOT 6.04 installed on your laptop, you will not need to install any virtual machine. The instructions showing how to install the virtual machine on which you can find ROOT 6.04 can be found under "Material" on this page.

  19. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  20. Properties of estimated characteristic roots

    OpenAIRE

    Bent Nielsen; Heino Bohn Nielsen

    2008-01-01

    Estimated characteristic roots in stationary autoregressions are shown to give rather noisy information about their population equivalents. This is remarkable given the central role of the characteristic roots in the theory of autoregressive processes. In the asymptotic analysis the problems appear when multiple roots are present as this implies a non-differentiablity so the δ-method does not apply, convergence rates are slow, and the asymptotic distribution is non-normal. In finite samples ...

  1. Proteomics of Maize Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochholdinger, Frank; Marcon, Caroline; Baldauf, Jutta A; Yu, Peng; Frey, Felix P

    2018-01-01

    Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  2. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  3. Back to the roots!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woermann, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    This article argues that one can revive the critical edge that postmodernist theory has brought to marketing, thinking without subscribing to any particular school of (critical) theory by following the principle of methodological situationalism. The roots of postmodernist critique lie in careful...... empirical observation of how social reality is being constructed in local contexts. Because knowledge, subjects, power, and value are social accomplishments, they are neither fixed nor without alternative. Many key developments in marketing theory such as assemblage theory, practice and consumer tribes...... of social order into account, hence fail to provide sensible insight. I propose the principle of methodological situationalism as a litmus test to the analytical strength of a theory or piece of research. The principle states that theoretically adequate accounts of social phenomena must be grounded...

  4. Radiographing roots and shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariffah Noor Khamseah Al Idid

    1985-01-01

    The effect of seed orientation on germination time and on shoot and root growth patterns is studied. Neutron radiography is used to observe the development of 4 types of plants, maize, greenpea, soya bean and padi. These plants were grown in varying orientations; sand sizes, sand thicknesses, and level of water content. Radiography of the seeds and plants were obtained for time exposure ranging from 3-12 hours and at reactor thermal power level, ranging from 500-750 kilowatts. Results obtained showed that seeds planted in varying orientations need different length of time for shoot emergence. Neutron radiography is now developed to other areas of non-industrial applications in Malaysia. (A.J.)

  5. Osmolarity and root canal antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, G; Guastalli, A R

    2014-04-01

    Antiseptics used in endodontics for disinfection purposes include root canal dressings and irrigants. Osmotic shock is known to cause the alteration of microbial cell viability and might have a role in the mechanism of action of root canal antiseptics. The aim of this review was to determine the role of osmolarity on the performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment. A literature search using the Medline electronic database was conducted up to 30 May 2013 using the following search terms and combinations: 'osmolarity AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmolality AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmotic AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmosis AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; sodium chloride AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm'. Publications were included if the effects of osmolarity on the clinical performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment were stated, if preparations with different osmolarities values were compared and if they were published in English. A hand search of articles published online, 'in press' and 'early view', and in the reference list of the included papers was carried out following the same criteria. A total of 3274 publications were identified using the database, and three were included in the review. The evidence available in endodontics suggests a possible role for hyperosmotic root canal medicaments as disinfectants, and that there is no influence of osmolarity on the tissue dissolution capacity of sodium hypochlorite. There are insufficient data to obtain a sound conclusion regarding the role of hypo-osmosis in root canal disinfection, or osmosis in any further desirable

  6. Root systems of chaparral shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Jochen; Krause, David; Jow, William

    1977-06-01

    Root systems of chaparral shrubs were excavated from a 70 m 2 plot of a mixed chaparral stand located on a north-facing slope in San Diego County (32°54' N; 900 m above sea level). The main shrub species present were Adenostoma fasciculatum, Arctostaphylos pungens, Ceanothus greggii, Erigonum fasciculatum, and Haplopappus pinifolius. Shrubs were wired into their positions, and the soil was washed out beneath them down to a depth of approximately 60 cm, where impenetrable granite impeded further washing and root growth was severely restricted. Spacing and interweaving of root systems were recorded by an in-scale drawing. The roots were harvested in accordance to their depths, separated into diameter size classes for each species, and their dry weights measured. Roots of shrubs were largely confined to the upper soil levels. The roots of Eriogonum fasciculatum were concentrated in the upper soil layer. Roots of Adenostoma fasciculatum tended to be more superficial than those from Ceanothus greggii. It is hypothesized that the shallow soil at the excavation site impeded a clear depth zonation of the different root systems. The average dry weight root:shoot ratio was 0.6, ranging for the individual shrubs from 0.8 to 0.4. The root area always exceeded the shoot area, with the corresponding ratios ranging from 6 for Arctostaphylos pungens to 40 for Haplopappus pinifolius. The fine root density of 64 g dry weight per m 2 under the canopy was significantly higher than in the unshaded area. However, the corresponding value of 45 g dry weight per m 2 for the open ground is still high enough to make the establishment of other shrubs difficult.

  7. [Root resorption and orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of root resorption during and at the end of orthodontic treatment and to assess its relationship with age, sex and treatment with or without extractions. Our study included 82 patients (51 women and 31 men) aged between 6 and 38 years, who received orthodontic treatment. Evaluation of root resorption was performed on panoramics at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. All the teeth were observed. The degree of root resorption was increased respectively by the standards in four ordinal levels (4). Data analysis was performed by Epi Info 6.0. Root resorption was present in all the teeth and maxillary incisors are the most affected. The correlation between age and root resorption was significant (p = 0.008). Women were more affected by resorption (P = 0.002). Patients treated with extraction showed more root resorption (p = 0.12). Our results suggest that orthodontic treatment is involved in the development of root resorption. The most often teeth resorbed are maxillary incisors. Age, sex and orthodontic extractions can be considered as risk factors for root resorption.

  8. Searching for Roots / Pierre Gervasoni

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gervasoni, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Searching for Roots. Eduard Tubin: Symphonie no 11; Arvo Pärt: Nekrolog-Symphonie no 1; Erkki-Sven Tüür: Searching for Roots - Insula deserta - Zeitraum; Orchestre philharmonique royal de Stockholm, Paavo Järvi (direction)" Virgin Classics 5 45212 2 (distribue par EMI)

  9. Avaliação da efetividade do método de Tanaka-Johnston para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos Evaluation of the effectiveness of the Tanaka-Johnston method for prediction of the mesiodistal diameter of unerupted canines and premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maria Teixeira MARCHIONNI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo, os autores avaliaram o método de predição de Tanaka-Johnston com o objetivo de verificar sua efetividade para os lados direito e esquerdo, para ambos os sexos e para as raças branca, mulato claro, mulato médio, mulato escuro e negra, na cidade de Salvador - Bahia. Com o auxílio de um paquímetro digital, mediu-se o diâmetro mésio-distal dos incisivos inferiores permanentes, caninos e pré-molares, já irrompidos na cavidade bucal, de 98 indivíduos (45 do sexo masculino e 53 do sexo feminino, com idade variando entre 13 e 29 anos. Através de testes estatísticos, compararam-se os resultados obtidos a partir da aplicação das fórmulas de Tanaka-Johnston com os valores reais. Após análise dos resultados, observou-se que a correlação entre os valores estimados pela técnica de Tanaka-Johnston e os valores reais foram maiores para o sexo feminino que para o sexo masculino. Em relação à raça, os coeficientes de correlação foram satisfatórios para todas, sendo maior no arco dentário superior para a raça mulato escuro (0,67 e no arco dentário inferior para a raça mulato claro (0,74. Considerando-se os lados, os achados revelaram um maior coeficiente de correlação para o arco dentário inferior do lado esquerdo (0,61. Pôde-se concluir, neste trabalho, que o método de Tanaka-Johnston, apesar de ter sido preconizado a partir de uma amostra de descendentes europeus, é indicado para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos para diferentes raças, sexos e lados dos arcos dentários na amostra estudada.In the present study, the authors evaluated the Tanaka-Johnston method of prediction, with the objective of verifying its effectiveness for the right and left sides, for both genders and for the white, light mulatto, medium mulatto, dark mulatto and black races in the city of Salvador, Bahia. The mesiodistal diameter of the inferior permanent incisors, canines and

  10. Cytokinin signaling during root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishopp, Anthony; Help, Hanna; Helariutta, Ykä

    2009-01-01

    The cytokinin class of phytohormones regulates division and differentiation of plant cells. They are perceived and signaled by a phosphorelay mechanism similar to those observed in prokaryotes. Research into the components of phosphorelay had previously been marred by genetic redundancy. However, recent studies have addressed this with the creation of high-order mutants. In addition, several new elements regulating cytokinin signaling have been identified. This has uncovered many roles in diverse developmental and physiological processes. In this review, we look at these processes specifically in the context of root development. We focus on the formation and maintenance of the root apical meristem, primary and secondary vascular development, lateral root emergence and development, and root nodulation. We believe that the root is an ideal organ with which to investigate cytokinin signaling in a wider context.

  11. Fungi in neotropical epiphyte roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D; Benzing, D H

    1989-01-01

    Roots of thirty-eight Ecuadoran vascular epiphytes, representing eleven angiosperm families, were examined for the presence of symbiotic microorganisms. Most orchid roots contained fungal endophytes like those that regularly infect terrestrial counterparts. Hyphae were also common in and on nonorchid roots, but assignments of these relationships to known mycorrhizal morphologies was not possible in all cases. Evidence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) existed in a number of subjects while in Ericaceae and Campanulaceae a fungal association similar to the demateaceous surface fungi (DSF) described for alpine and prarie plants was usually present. Some associations were characterized by multicellular propagules on root surfaces. The significance of these findings and the factors likely to influence occurrence and consequences of root-fungus mutualisms in tropical forest canopies are discussed. Facts and considerations that could aid future inquiry on these systems are provided.

  12. Physical root-soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legué, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-12-01

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to aerial organs, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex.

  13. RootJS: Node.js Bindings for ROOT 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffart, Theo; Früh, Maximilian; Haas, Christoph; Rajgopal, Sachin; Schwabe, Jonas; Wolff, Christoph; Szuba, Marek

    2017-10-01

    We present rootJS, an interface making it possible to seamlessly integrate ROOT 6 into applications written for Node.js, the JavaScript runtime platform increasingly commonly used to create high-performance Web applications. ROOT features can be called both directly from Node.js code and by JIT-compiling C++ macros. All rootJS methods are invoked asynchronously and support callback functions, allowing non-blocking operation of Node.js applications using them. Last but not least, our bindings have been designed to platform-independent and should therefore work on all systems supporting both ROOT 6 and Node.js. Thanks to rootJS it is now possible to create ROOT-aware Web applications taking full advantage of the high performance and extensive capabilities of Node.js. Examples include platforms for the quality assurance of acquired, reconstructed or simulated data, book-keeping and e-log systems, and even Web browser-based data visualisation and analysis.

  14. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account for the fact that root systems are comprised of multiple types of roots. We assessed whether the relationship between CSD and Vd varies as a function of root type. Additionally, we sought to identify a more accurate and time-efficient method for estimating missing root volume than is currently available. We used a database that described the 3D root architecture of Pinus pinaster root systems (5, 12, or 19 years) from a stand in southwest France. We determined the relationship between CSD and Vd for 10,000 root segments from intact root branches. Models were specified that did and did not account for root type. The relationships were then applied to the diameters of 11,000 broken root ends to estimate the volume of missing roots. CSD was nearly linearly related to the square root of Vd, but the slope of the curve varied greatly as a function of root type. Sinkers and deep roots tapered rapidly, as they were limited by available soil depth. Distal shallow roots tapered gradually, as they were less limited spatially. We estimated that younger trees lost an average of 17% of root volume when excavated, while older trees lost 4%. Missing volumes were smallest in the central parts of root systems and largest in distal shallow roots. The slopes of the curves for each root type are synthetic parameters that account for differentiation due to genetics, soil properties, or mechanical stimuli. Accounting for this differentiation is critical to estimating root loss accurately.

  15. Gravisensing in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, G.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of gravisensing in higher plants is not yet elucidated. Although, it is generally accepted that the amyloplasts (statoliths) in the root cap cells (statocytes) are responsible for susception of gravity. However, the hypothesis that the whole protoplast acts as gravisusceptor cannot be dismissed. The nature of the sensor that is able to transduce and amplify the mechanical energy into a biochemical factor is even more controversial. Several cell structures could potentially serve as gravireceptors: the endoplasmic reticulum, the actin network, the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton associated with this membrane. The nature of the gravisusceptors and gravisensors is discussed by taking into account the characteristics of the gravitropic reaction with respect to the presentation time, the threshold acceleration, the reciprocity rule, the deviation from the sine rule, the movement of the amyloplasts, the pre-inversion effect, the response of starch free and intermediate mutants and the effects of cytochalasin treatment. From this analysis, it can be concluded that both the amyloplasts and the protoplast could be the gravisusceptors, the former being more efficient than the latter since they can focus pressure on limited areas. The receptor should be located in the plasma membrane and could be a stretch-activated ion channel.

  16. Medico-legal aspects of vertical root fractures in root filled teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Tamse, A

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT).......To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT)....

  17. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength we...

  18. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  19. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Inge; Schotte, Sébastien; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR

  20. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge eVerstraeten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound-induced adventitious root (AR formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LR. In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are

  1. IAA transport in corn roots includes the root cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenstein, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    In earlier reports we concluded that auxin is the growth regulator that controls gravicurvature in roots and that the redistribution of auxin occurs within the root cap. Since other reports did not detect auxin in the root cap, we attempted to confirm the IAA does move through the cap. Agar blocks containing 3 H-IAA were applied to the cut surface of 5 mm long apical segments of primary roots of corn (mo17xB73). After 30 to 120 min radioactivity (RA) of the cap and root tissue was determined. While segments suspended in water-saturated air accumulated very little RA in the cap, application of 0.5 μ1 of dist. water to the cap (=controls) increased RA of the cap dramatically. Application to the cap of 0.5 μ1 of sorbitol or the Ca 2+ chelator EGTA reduced cap RA to 46% and 70% respectively compared to water, without affecting uptake. Control root segments gravireacted faster than non-treated or osmoticum or EGTA treated segments. The data indicate that both the degree of hydration and calcium control the amount of auxin moving through the cap

  2. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  3. (Allium cepa) root tip mitosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    their chemical composition and genotoxic effects on cell reproduction. Two petrochemicals, air ... the chromosomes of the individual cells of the root tip could be a pointer to their ..... Chromosome technique: Theory and. Practice. Butterworths ...

  4. aqueous root extract on spermatogenesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four groups were gavaged with the whole plant or root aqueous extract in low or high doses. The male ... motility and morphology as well as chromatin integrity were evaluated. Results: Serum ... Treatment of disease began long ago with the.

  5. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and climate....

  6. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and...

  7. The graphics editor in ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antcheva, Ilka; Brun, Rene; Hof, Carsten; Rademakers, Fons

    2006-01-01

    A well-designed Graphical User Interface (GUI) has critical importance in any computer application. The user interface is where the end users and the complex system intersect. An effective interface design can make a powerful and complex system, such as ROOT, easy and intuitive to learn and operate. This paper describes the main goals we defined and the design solution we found developing the graphics editor in ROOT

  8. Root hair mutants of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engvild, K.C.; Rasmussen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Barley mutants without root hairs or with short or reduced root hairs were isolated among M 2 seeds of 'Lux' barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) after acidified sodium azide mutagenesis. Root hair mutants are investigated intensively in Arabidopsis where about 40 genes are known. A few root hair mutants are known in maize, rice, barley and tomato. Many plants without root hairs grow quite well with good plant nutrition, and mutants have been used for investigations of uptake of strongly bound nutrients like phosphorus, iron, zinc and silicon. Seed of 'Lux' barley (Sejet Plant Breeding, Denmark) were soaked overnight, and then treated with 1.5-millimolarsodium azide in 0.1 molar sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3, for 2.5 hours according to the IAEA Manual on Mutation Breeding (2nd Ed.). After rinsing in tap water and air-drying, the M 2 seeds were sown in the field the same day. Spikes, 4-6 per M 1 plant, were harvested. The mutation frequency was similar to that obtained with other barley cultivars from which low-phytate mutants were isolated [5]. Seeds were germinated on black filter paper in tap water for 3 or 4 days before scoring for root hair mutants

  9. A New Anatomically Based Nomenclature for the Roots and Root Canals—Part 1: Maxillary Molars

    OpenAIRE

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequen...

  10. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    OpenAIRE

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account ...

  11. Live cell imaging of Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions from the root surface that expand by tip growth. This highly focused type of cell expansion, combined with position of root hairs on the surface of the root, makes them ideal cells for microscopic observation. This chapter describes the method that is routinely used

  12. Overgroups of root groups in classical groups

    CERN Document Server

    Aschbacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author extends results of McLaughlin and Kantor on overgroups of long root subgroups and long root elements in finite classical groups. In particular he determines the maximal subgroups of this form. He also determines the maximal overgroups of short root subgroups in finite classical groups and the maximal overgroups in finite orthogonal groups of c-root subgroups.

  13. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  14. Radiopacity of root filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Olsen, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method for measuring the radiopacity of root filling materials is described. Direct measurements were made of the optic density values of the materials in comparison with a standard curve relating optic density to the thickness of an aluminium step wedge exposed simultaneously. By proper selection of film and conditions for exposure and development, it was possible to obtain a near-linear standard curve which added to the safety and reproducibility of the method. The technique of radiographic assessment was modified from clinical procedures in evaluating the obturation in radiographs, and it was aimed at detecting slits or voids between the dental wall and the filling material. This radiographic assessment of potensial leakage was compared with actual in vitro lekage of dye (basic fuchsin) into the roots of filled teeth. The result of the investigation show that root filling materials display a very wide range of radiopacity, from less than 3 mm to more than 12 mm of aluminium. It also seem that tooth roots that appear to be well obturated by radiographic evaluation, stand a good chance of beeing resistant to leakage in vitro, and that the type of filling material rather than its radiographic appearance, determines the susceptibility of the filled tooth to leakage in vitro. As an appendix the report contains a survey of radiopaque additives in root filling materials

  15. Mechanics of integrating root causes into PRAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruske, S.Z.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Stepina, P.L.; Vesely, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of root cause importance, root cause data for selected components of a pressurized water reactor auxiliary feedwater system, an Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) auxiliary feedwater system model, and the results of root cause importance calculations. The methodology shown herein is straightforward and is easily applied to existing probabilistic risk assessments. Root cause importance can greatly benefit the areas of design, maintenance, and inspection. Root cause importance for various components and circumstances can be evaluated

  16. Effects of sodium hypochlorite associated with EDTA and etidronate on apical root transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva e Souza, P A R; das Dores, R S E; Tartari, T; Pinheiro, T P S; Tuji, F M; Silva e Souza, M H

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of sodium hypochlorite associated with EDTA and etidronate on apical root transportation. Forty-five roots of human mandibular molars with curvatures of 15-25° were embedded in acrylic resin to allow standardized angulation of the initial and final radiographs. The pre-instrumentation radiographs of the mesiobuccal canal of each root were taken using a radiograph digital sensor with a size 15 K-file in the canal. The canals were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), using one of the following irrigation regimens during the instrumentation (n = 15): G1 - irrigation with 20 mL of saline solution (control); G2 - alternating irrigation with 2.5% hypochlorite solution (NaOCl) (15 mL); and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (5 mL). During instrumentation, the canal was filled with NaOCl and then between each exchange of instrument filled with EDTA for 1 min, and G3 - irrigation with 20 mL of 5% NaOCl and 18% etidronate solution (HEBP) mixed in equal parts. The postinstrumentation radiographs were made with a F3 instrument in the canal. The images were magnified and superposed with Adobe Photoshop software (Adobe Systems, Mountain View, CA, USA). Apical transportation was determined with AutoCAD 2012 software (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA) by measuring the distance in millimetres between the tips of the instruments. The results were subjected to the nonparametric statistical Kruskal-Wallis test (α < 0.05). The median transportation and interquartile range values were 0.00 ± 0.05 for G1, 0.08 ± 0.23 for G2 and 0.13 ± 0.14 for G3. Comparison between groups showed that apical transportation in G3 was significantly greater than in G1 (P < 0.05). The use of NaOCl associated with etidronate increased apical transportation in the canals of extracted teeth. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. ROOT VEGETABLES, BREEDING TRENDS, RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fedorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of root vegetables is their unique specificity and high economic importance. The benefits and medicinal properties of root vegetables being highly demanded by the market requirements to the commodity are highlighted in the article. The main directions of breeding program for root vegetable crops, including species of Apiaceae family with carrot, parsnips; Chenopodioideae family with red beet; Brassicaceae family with radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga. Initial breeding accessions of carrot, red beet, radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga have been selected out to be used for breeding program for heterosis. The mf and ms breeding lines were developed, and with the use of them the new gene pool was created. Variety supporting breeding program and methods were also proposed. 

  18. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    of root architecture, exudation of growth stimulating substances, and biofumigation. Facilitative root interactions are most likely to be of importance in nutrient poor soils and in low-input agroecosystems due to critical interspecific competition for plant growth factors. However, studies from more...... nitrogen transfer between legumes and non-leguminous plants, exploitation of the soil via mycorrhizal fungi and soil-plant processes which alter the mobilisation of plant growth resources such as through exudation of amino acids, extra-cellular enzymes, acidification, competition-induced modification......Facilitation takes place when plants ameliorate the environment of their neighbours, and increase their growth and survival. Facilitation occurs in natural ecosystems as well as in agroecosystems. We discuss examples of facilitative root interactions in intercropped agroecosystems; including...

  19. Root justifications for ontology repair

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Moodley_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 32328 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Moodley_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Root Justi cations... the ontology, based on the no- tion of root justi cations [8, 9]. In Section 5, we discuss the implementation of a Prot eg e3 plugin which demonstrates our approach to ontology repair. In this section we also discuss some experimental results comparing...

  20. Roots of the Chromatic Polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrett, Thomas

    The chromatic polynomial of a graph G is a univariate polynomial whose evaluation at any positive integer q enumerates the proper q-colourings of G. It was introduced in connection with the famous four colour theorem but has recently found other applications in the field of statistical physics...... extend Thomassen’s technique to the Tutte polynomial and as a consequence, deduce a density result for roots of the Tutte polynomial. This partially answers a conjecture of Jackson and Sokal. Finally, we refocus our attention on the chromatic polynomial and investigate the density of chromatic roots...

  1. Nonsurgical management of horizontal root fracture associated external root resorption and internal root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraz Pasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal root fractures, which frequently affect the upper incisors, usually result from a frontal impact. As a result, combined injuries occur in dental tissues such as the pulp, dentin, cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Internal root canal inflammatory resorption involves a progressive loss of intraradicular dentin without adjunctive deposition of hard tissues adjacent to the resorptive sites. It is frequently associated with chronic pulpal inflammation, and bacteria might be identified from the granulation tissues when the lesion is progressive to the extent that it is identifiable with routine radiographs. With the advancement in technology, it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as cone beam computed tomography and radiovisuography to diagnose and confirm the presence and extent of resorptions and fractures and their exact location. This case report presents a rare case having internal root resorption and horizontal root fracture with external inflammatory root resorption both which were treated successfully following guidelines by International Association of Dental Traumatology by nonsurgical treatment with 1 year follow-up.

  2. Rhizobial infection in Adesmia bicolor (Fabaceae) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Luciana

    2014-09-01

    The native legume Adesmia bicolor shows nitrogen fixation efficiency via symbiosis with soil rhizobia. The infection mechanism by means of which rhizobia infect their roots has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify the infection mechanism in Adesmia bicolor roots. To this end, inoculated roots were processed following conventional methods as part of our root anatomy study, and the shape and distribution of root nodules were analyzed as well. Neither root hairs nor infection threads were observed in the root system, whereas infection sites-later forming nodules-were observed in the longitudinal sections. Nodules were found to form between the main root and the lateral roots. It can be concluded that in Adesmia bicolor, a bacterial crack entry infection mechanism prevails and that such mechanism could be an adaptive strategy of this species which is typical of arid environments.

  3. Topical Roots of Formal Dialectic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Erik C. W.

    Formal dialectic has its roots in ancient dialectic. We can trace this influence in Charles Hamblin's book on fallacies, in which he introduced his first formal dialectical systems. Earlier, Paul Lorenzen proposed systems of dialogical logic, which were in fact formal dialectical systems avant la

  4. The FairRoot framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Turany, M; Bertini, D; Karabowicz, R; Kresan, D; Malzacher, P; Uhlig, F; Stockmanns, T

    2012-01-01

    The FairRoot framework is an object oriented simulation, reconstruction and data analysis framework based on ROOT. It includes core services for detector simulation and offline analysis. The framework delivers base classes which enable the users to easily construct their experimental setup in a fast and convenient way. By using the Virtual Monte Carlo concept it is possible to perform the simulations using either Geant3 or Geant4 without changing the user code or the geometry description. Using and extending the task mechanism of ROOT it is possible to implement complex analysis tasks in a convenient way. Moreover, using the FairCuda interface of the framework it is possible to run some of these tasks also on GPU. Data IO, as well as parameter handling and data base connections are also handled by the framework. Since some of the experiments will not have an experimental setup with a conventional trigger system, the framework can handle also free flowing input streams of detector data. For this mode of operation the framework provides classes to create the needed time sorted input streams of detector data out of the event based simulation data. There are also tools to do radiation studies and to visualize the simulated data. A CMake-CDash based building and monitoring system is also part of the FairRoot services which helps to build and test the framework on many different platforms in an automatic way, including also Continuous Integration.

  5. Maximal Abelian sets of roots

    CERN Document Server

    Lawther, R

    2018-01-01

    In this work the author lets \\Phi be an irreducible root system, with Coxeter group W. He considers subsets of \\Phi which are abelian, meaning that no two roots in the set have sum in \\Phi \\cup \\{ 0 \\}. He classifies all maximal abelian sets (i.e., abelian sets properly contained in no other) up to the action of W: for each W-orbit of maximal abelian sets we provide an explicit representative X, identify the (setwise) stabilizer W_X of X in W, and decompose X into W_X-orbits. Abelian sets of roots are closely related to abelian unipotent subgroups of simple algebraic groups, and thus to abelian p-subgroups of finite groups of Lie type over fields of characteristic p. Parts of the work presented here have been used to confirm the p-rank of E_8(p^n), and (somewhat unexpectedly) to obtain for the first time the 2-ranks of the Monster and Baby Monster sporadic groups, together with the double cover of the latter. Root systems of classical type are dealt with quickly here; the vast majority of the present work con...

  6. Root cause - A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huey, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 3 yr, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) region V has been pursuing an initiative with region V power reactor licensees to provide improved and more consistent performance in event evaluation. The objectives of the initiative have been to encourage licensees to (a) develop improved skills within the plant organization for events evaluation, with particular emphasis on formal root-cause analysis, and (b) to increase the number of events subjected to root-cause analysis. The NRC's continuing effort now focuses on the need for more consistent quality of event evaluation by licensees. As current licensee programs continue to develop, the NRC will be paying additional attention to how well licensees maintain these programs as an effective and useful tool. Now that licensees have taken the initial steps to establish these programs, licensee management will need to provide continuing attention to ensure that the process does not become overly cumbersome. It is important that the final format for the root-cause programs be easy to use and recognized as being a valuable tool by all licensee personnel involved in the event evaluation process. This will become increasingly important as licensees expand the population of events requiring root-cause analysis and place additional responsibility on the line organization for the implementation of these programs

  7. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…

  8. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  9. Root canal treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three roots

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Josey; Devadathan, Aravindan; Syriac, Gibi; Shamini, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment needs a thorough knowledge of both internal and external anatomy of a tooth. Variations in root canal anatomy constitute an impressive challenge to the successful completion of endodontic treatment. Undetected extra roots and canals are a major reason for failed root canal treatment. Three separate roots in a maxillary first premolar have a very low incidence of 0.5?6%. Three rooted premolars are anatomically similar to molars and are sometimes called ?small mo...

  10. MAIL1 is essential for development of the primary root but not of anchor roots

    OpenAIRE

    Ühlken, Christine; Hoth, Stefan; Weingartner, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    MAIN-LIKE1 (MAIL1) is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein, which has a crucial function during root development. We have recently described loss of function mutants for MAIL1, in which the organization and function of the primary root meristem is lost soon after germination. Moreover cell differentiation is impaired resulting in primary root growth arrest soon after emergence. Here we show that mail1 mutants form several anchor roots from the hypocotyl to root junction. These anchor root...

  11. Psoralen production in hairy roots and adventitious roots cultures of Psoralea coryfolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, P; Jayabalan, N

    2009-07-01

    Psoralea corylifolia is an endangered plant producing various compounds of medical importance. Adventitious roots and hairy roots were induced in cultures prepared from hypocotyl explants. Psoralen content was evaluated in both root types grown either in suspension cultures or on agar solidified medium. Psoralen content was approximately 3 mg g(-1) DW in suspension grown hairy roots being higher than in solid grown hairy roots and in solid and suspension-grown adventitious roots.

  12. [Effects nutrients on the seedlings root hair development and root growth of Poncirus trifoliata under hydroponics condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiu; Xia, Ren-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Shu, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Ahydroponics experiment was conducted to study the effects of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn) deficiency on the length of primary root, the number of lateral roots, and the root hair density, length, and diameter on the primary root and lateral roots of Poncirus trifoliata seedlings. Under the deficiency of each test nutrient, root hair could generate, but was mainly concentrated on the root base and fewer on the root tip. The root hair density on lateral roots was significantly larger than that on primary root, but the root hair length was in adverse. The deficiency of each test nutrient had greater effects on the growth and development of root hairs, with the root hair density on primary root varied from 55.0 to 174.3 mm(-2). As compared with the control, Ca deficiency induced the significant increase of root hair density and length on primary root, P deficiency promoted the root hair density and length on the base and middle part of primary root and on the lateral roots significantly, Fe deficiency increased the root hair density but decreased the root hair length on the tip of primary root significantly, K deficiency significantly decreased the root hair density, length, and diameter on primary root and lateral roots, whereas Mg deficiency increased the root hair length of primary root significantly. In all treatments of nutrient deficiency, the primary root had the similar growth rate, but, with the exceptions of N and Mg deficiency, the lateral roots exhibited shedding and regeneration.

  13. Investigation of VEGGIE Root Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbiah, Arun M.

    2013-01-01

    VEGGIE is a plant growth facility that utilizes the phenomenon of capillary action as its primary watering system. A cloth made of Meta Aramid fiber, known as Nomex is used to wick water up from a reservoir to the bottom of the plants roots. This root mat system is intended to be low maintenance with no moving parts and requires minimal crew interface time. Unfortunately, the water wicking rates are inconsistent throughout the plant life cycle, thus causing plants to die. Over-wicking of water occurs toward the beginning of the cycle, while under-wicking occurs toward the middle. This inconsistency of wicking has become a major issue, drastically inhibiting plant growth. The primary objective is to determine the root cause of the inconsistent wicking through experimental testing. Suspect causes for the capillary water column to break include: a vacuum effect due to a negative pressure gradient in the water reservoir, contamination of material due to minerals in water and back wash from plant fertilizer, induced air bubbles while using syringe refill method, and material limitations of Nomex's ability to absorb and retain water. Experimental testing will be conducted to systematically determine the cause of under and over-wicking. Pressure gages will be used to determine pressure drop during the course of the plant life cycle and during the water refill process. A debubbler device will be connected to a root mat in order to equalize pressure inside the reservoir. Moisture and evaporation tests will simultaneously be implemented to observe moisture content and wicking rates over the course of a plant cycle. Water retention tests will be performed using strips of Nomex to determine materials wicking rates, porosity, and absorptivity. Through these experimental tests, we will have a better understanding of material properties of Nomex, as well as determine the root cause of water column breakage. With consistent test results, a forward plan can be achieved to resolve

  14. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  15. Measuring and Modeling Root Distribution and Root Reinforcement in Forested Slopes for Slope Stability Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Giadrossich, F.; Schwarz, M.; Vergani, C.

    2016-12-01

    Roots provide mechanical anchorage and reinforcement of soils on slopes. Roots also modify soil hydrological properties (soil moisture content, pore-water pressure, preferential flow paths) via subsurface flow path associated with root architecture, root density, and root-size distribution. Interactions of root-soil mechanical and hydrological processes are an important control of shallow landslide initiation during rainfall events and slope stability. Knowledge of root-distribution and root strength are key components to estimate slope stability in vegetated slopes and for the management of protection forest in steep mountainous area. We present data that show the importance of measuring root strength directly in the field and present methods for these measurements. These data indicate that the tensile force mobilized in roots depends on root elongation (a function of soil displacement), root size, and on whether roots break in tension of slip out of the soil. Measurements indicate that large lateral roots that cross tension cracks at the scarp are important for slope stability calculations owing to their large tensional resistance. These roots are often overlooked and when included, their strength is overestimated because extrapolated from measurements on small roots. We present planned field experiments that will measure directly the force held by roots of different sizes during the triggering of a shallow landslide by rainfall. These field data are then used in a model of root reinforcement based on fiber-bundle concepts that span different spacial scales, from a single root to the stand scale, and different time scales, from timber harvest to root decay. This model computes the strength of root bundles in tension and in compression and their effect on soil strength. Up-scaled to the stand the model yields the distribution of root reinforcement as a function of tree density, distance from tree, tree species and age with the objective of providing quantitative

  16. Método para mensuração das angulações e inclinações das coroas dentárias utilizando modelos de gesso Measurement method for the angulation and tipping of dental crowns using plaster models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano C. Trevisi Zanelato

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este presente estudo teve por finalidade apresentar o desenvolvimento de um dispositivo especialmente projetado para mensurar as angulações e inclinações das coroas dentárias. Tal dispositivo foi utilizado em uma amostra de 60 indivíduos, na faixa etária de 12 a 21 anos, de ambos os gêneros. Os indivíduos apresentavam oclusão normal e nunca haviam sido submetidos a qualquer tipo de intervenção ortodôntica. Sendo assim, a partir desta amostra, estabeleceram-se os valores médios das angulações e inclinações das coroas dentárias para indivíduos brasileiros.This present study aims to present the development of a device specially designed to measure the angulation and tipping of dental crowns. Such device was used in a sample containing 60 subjects, with average age between 12 and 21 yeas of age from both genders. Subjects presented with normal occlusion and had not undergone orthodontic treatment previously. Thus, from this sample, the mean values for the angulation and tipping of dental crowns were established for brazilian subjects.

  17. MAIL1 is essential for development of the primary root but not of anchor roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ühlken, Christine; Hoth, Stefan; Weingartner, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    MAIN-LIKE1 (MAIL1) is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein, which has a crucial function during root development. We have recently described loss of function mutants for MAIL1, in which the organization and function of the primary root meristem is lost soon after germination. Moreover cell differentiation is impaired resulting in primary root growth arrest soon after emergence. Here we show that mail1 mutants form several anchor roots from the hypocotyl to root junction. These anchor roots show similar defects in the organization of the stem cell niche as the primary root. In contrast, differentiation processes are not impaired and thus anchor roots seem to be able to compensate for the loss of primary root function. Our data show that MAIL1 is essential for specification of cell fate in the primary root but not in anchor roots.

  18. Light and decapitation effects on in vitro rooting in maize root segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golaz, F W; Pilet, P E

    1985-10-01

    The effects of white light and decapitation on the initiation and subsequent emergence and elongation of lateral roots of apical maize (Zea mays L. cv LG 11) root segments have been examined. The formation of lateral root primordium was inhibited by the white light. This inhibition did not depend upon the presence of the primary root tip. However, root decapitation induced a shift of the site of appearance of the most apical primordium towards the root apex, and a strong disturbance of the distribution pattern of primordium volumes along the root axis. White light had a significant effect neither on the distribution pattern of primordium volumes, nor on the period of primordium development (time interval required for the smallest detectable primordia to grow out as secondary roots). Thus, considering the rooting initiation and emergence, the light effect was restricted to the initiation phase only. Moreover, white light reduced lateral root elongation as well as primary root growth.

  19. Control of root system architecture by DEEPER ROOTING 1 increases rice yield under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, Yusaku; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Rane, Jagadish; Ishitani, Manabu; Hara, Naho; Kitomi, Yuka; Inukai, Yoshiaki; Ono, Kazuko; Kanno, Noriko; Inoue, Haruhiko; Takehisa, Hinako; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Okuno, Kazutoshi; Yano, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The genetic improvement of drought resistance is essential for stable and adequate crop production in drought-prone areas. Here we demonstrate that alteration of root system architecture improves drought avoidance through the cloning and characterization of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1), a rice quantitative trait locus controlling root growth angle. DRO1 is negatively regulated by auxin and is involved in cell elongation in the root tip that causes asymmetric root growth and downward bending of the root in response to gravity. Higher expression of DRO1 increases the root growth angle, whereby roots grow in a more downward direction. Introducing DRO1 into a shallow-rooting rice cultivar by backcrossing enabled the resulting line to avoid drought by increasing deep rooting, which maintained high yield performance under drought conditions relative to the recipient cultivar. Our experiments suggest that control of root system architecture will contribute to drought avoidance in crops.

  20. Cultivated method of short root american ginseng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guang; Yuan Yuchun; Jia Zhifa; Suo Binhua

    1998-01-01

    The distribution rate of 14 C assimilated material and root vitality of two years old American ginseng at green seed stage were measured. An exploratory research was made by cutting part of main root and spraying ABT on leaves of American ginseng. The results show that with cutting part of main root out before transplant and then sticking them in the seed bed, the plant develop and grow normally and the lateral and fibrous roots grow well. Spraying ABT on leaves of the plant at seed forming stage accelerate the transfer of assimilated material to the root and enhance the root vitality, especially the lateral root vitality. It is considered that cutting part of main root out is major method and spraying ABT on leaves is a supplementary measurement

  1. Root morphology of Ni-treated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskova, A.; Fargasova, A.; Giehl, R. F. H.; Wiren, N. von

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots are very important organs in terms of nutrient and water acquisition but they also serve as anchorages for the aboveground parts of the plants. The roots display extraordinary plasticity towards stress conditions as a result of integration of environmental cues into the developmental processes of the roots. Our aim was to investigate the root morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to a particular stress condition, excess Ni supply. We aimed to find out which cellular processes - cell division, elongation and differentiation are affected by Ni, thereby explaining the seen root phenotype. Our results reveal that a distinct sensitivity exists between roots of different order and interference with various cellular processes is responsible for the effects of Ni on roots. We also show that Ni-treated roots have several auxin-related phenotypes. (authors)

  2. The Physiology of Adventitious Roots1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Bianka; Rasmussen, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Adventitious roots are plant roots that form from any nonroot tissue and are produced both during normal development (crown roots on cereals and nodal roots on strawberry [Fragaria spp.]) and in response to stress conditions, such as flooding, nutrient deprivation, and wounding. They are important economically (for cuttings and food production), ecologically (environmental stress response), and for human existence (food production). To improve sustainable food production under environmentally extreme conditions, it is important to understand the adventitious root development of crops both in normal and stressed conditions. Therefore, understanding the regulation and physiology of adventitious root formation is critical for breeding programs. Recent work shows that different adventitious root types are regulated differently, and here, we propose clear definitions of these classes. We use three case studies to summarize the physiology of adventitious root development in response to flooding (case study 1), nutrient deficiency (case study 2), and wounding (case study 3). PMID:26697895

  3. Root anatomy, morphology, and longevity among root orders in Vaccinium corymbosum (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Estrada, Luis R; Vera-Caraballo, Vivianette; Ruth, Leah E; Eissenstat, David M

    2008-12-01

    Understanding root processes at the whole-plant or ecosystem scales requires an accounting of the range of functions within a root system. Studying root traits based on their branching order can be a powerful approach to understanding this complex system. The current study examined the highly branched root system of the ericoid plant, Vaccinium corymbosum L. (highbush blueberry) by classifying its root orders with a modified version of the morphometric approach similar to that used in hydrology for stream classification. Root anatomy provided valuable insight into variation in root function across orders. The more permanent portion of the root system occurred in 4th- and higher-order roots. Roots in these orders had radial growth; the lowest specific root length, N:C ratios, and mycorrhizal colonization; the highest tissue density and vessel number; and the coarsest root diameter. The ephemeral portion of the root system was mainly in the first three root orders. First- and 2nd-order roots were nearly anatomically identical, with similar mycorrhizal colonization and diameter, and also, despite being extremely fine, median lifespans were not very short (115-120 d; estimated with minirhizotrons). Our research underscores the value of examining root traits by root order and its implications to understanding belowground processes.

  4. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  5. Automatic schema evolution in Root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, R.; Rademakers, F.

    2001-01-01

    ROOT version 3 (spring 2001) supports automatic class schema evolution. In addition this version also produces files that are self-describing. This is achieved by storing in each file a record with the description of all the persistent classes in the file. Being self-describing guarantees that a file can always be read later, its structure browsed and objects inspected, also when the library with the compiled code of these classes is missing. The schema evolution mechanism supports the frequent case when multiple data sets generated with many different class versions must be analyzed in the same session. ROOT supports the automatic generation of C++ code describing the data objects in a file

  6. Retention of Root Canal Posts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Flury, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc...... received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement......, pretreatment with tribochemical silicate coating significantly increased retention of the posts. Increased cement film thickness resulted in decreased retention of untreated posts and of pretreated posts luted with zinc phosphate cement. Increased cement film thickness had no influence on retention...

  7. ROOT and x32-ABI

    CERN Document Server

    Rauschmayr, N

    2013-01-01

    x32-ABI is an application binary interface, which has been introduced in Linux kernel 3.4. This interface is based on the x86-64 instruction set but uses 32-bit as size for pointers and C-datatype long instead of 64-bit. Thus software can profit from lower memory footprint but also form faster system calls. Several Root-benchmarks have been evaluated in this context and results regarding memory consumption and CPU-time are shown.

  8. Applications of root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterwhite, D.G.; Meale, B.M.; Krantz, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The underlying causes for the failure of components, the root causes, can be obtained from operational data sources. This information is of value in focusing attention of the industry on the actual causes of component unavailability and, therefore, on the important contributors to plant risk. An application of this methodology to an actual plant system, and the results of this study, are presented in this paper

  9. Root finding with threshold circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 462, Nov 30 (2012), s. 59-69 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : root finding * threshold circuit * power series Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.489, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304397512008006#

  10. Rooting of microcuttings: Theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, de G.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Poor adventitious root formation is a major obstacle in micropropagation and in conventional propagation. This paper reviews recent progress in the understanding of adventitious root formation as a developmental process focusing on the role of plant hormones and on the effect of rooting conditions

  11. Early nodulins in root nodule development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.

    1990-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between bacteria of the genus Rhizobium and leguminous plants leads to the formation of root nodules, which are specific nitrogen-fixing organs on the roots of plants. Bacteria enter the root by infection threads, and concomitantly cell

  12. Printing Values In Interactive ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Perovic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This project report summarizes the work I have been performing during the past twelve weeks as a Summer Student intern working on ROOT project in the SFT group, PH department, under the supervision of Axel Naumann and Danilo Piparo. One of the widely requested features for ROOT was improved interactive shell experience as well as improved printing of object values. Solving this issue was the goal of this project. Primarily, we have enabled printing of the collections. Secondly, we have unified the printing interface, making it much more robust and extendible. Thirdly, we have implemented printing of nested collections in a flexible and user-friendly manner. Finally, we have added an interactive mode, allowing for paginated output. At the beginning of the report, ROOT is presented with examples of where it is used and how important it is. Then, the motivation behind the project is elaborated, by presenting the previous state of the software package and its potential for improvement. Further, the process in wh...

  13. Root uptake of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The uptake of elements by plant roots is one of the important pathways of entry of many elements into the food chain of man. Data are cited showing plutonium concentration ratios, plant/soil, ranging from 10 -10 to 10 -3 . Concentration ratios for americium range from 10 -7 to 10 +1 . Limited experiments with curium and neptunium indicate that root uptake of curium is similar to that of americium and that plant uptake of neptunium is substantially larger than that of curium and americium. The extreme ranges of concentration ratios cited for plutonium and americium are due to a number of causes. Experimental conditions such as very intensive cropping will lead to abnormally high concentration ratios. In some experiments, addition of chelating agents markedly increased plant root uptake of transuranic elements. Particle size and composition of the source material influenced uptake of the transuranics by plants. Translocation within the plant, and soil factors such as pH and organic matter content, all affect concentration ratios

  14. ROOT Status and Future Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, R; Canal, P; Rademakers, Fons; Goto, Masaharu; Canal, Philippe; Brun, Rene

    2003-01-01

    In this talk we will review the major additions and improvements made to the ROOT system in the last 18 months and present our plans for future developments. The additons and improvements range from modifications to the I/O sub-system to allow users to save and restore objects of classes that have not been instrumented by special ROOT macros, to the addition of a geometry package designed for building, browsing, tracking and visualizing detector geometries. Other improvements include enhancements to the quick analysis sub-system (TTree::Draw()), the addition of classes that allow inter-file object references (TRef, TRefArray), better support for templated and STL classes, amelioration of the Automatic Script Compiler and the incorporation of new fitting and mathematical tools. Efforts have also been made to increase the modularity of the ROOT system with the introduction of more abstract interfaces and the development of a plug-in manager. In the near future, we intend to continue the development of PROOF and...

  15. Evaluation of bacterial leakage of four root- end filling materials: Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarabian M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Today several materials have been used for root- end filling in endodontic surgery. Optimal properties of Pro Root MTA in in-vitro and in-vivo studies has been proven. On the other hand, based on some studies, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA and Portland cement are similar to Pro Root MTA in physical and biologic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial leakage (amount and mean leakage time of four root- end filling materials. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro study, seventy six extracted single- rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups for root-end filling with gray Pro Root MTA, white Pro Root MTA, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA, Portland Cement (type I and positive and negative control groups. Root canals were instrumented using the step- back technique. Root- end filling materials were placed in 3mm ultra sonic retro preparations. Samples and microleakage model system were sterilized in autoclave. The apical 3-4 mm of the roots were immersed in phenol red with 3% lactose broth culture medium. The coronal access of each specimen was inoculated every 24h with a suspension of Streptococcus sanguis (ATCC 10556. Culture media were observed every 24h for colour change indicating bacterial contamination for 60 days. Statistical analysis was performed using log- rank test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: At the end of study 50%, 56.25%, 56.25% and 50% of specimens filled with Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA. Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I had evidence of leakage respectively. The mean leakage time was 37.19±6.29, 36.44±5.81, 37.69±5.97 and 34.81±6.67 days respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant difference among the leakage (amount and mean leakage time of the four tested root- end filling materials (P=0.9958. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, there were no significant differences in leakage among the four

  16. Characterization of Root and Shoot Traits in Wheat Cultivars with Putative Differences in Root System Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Figueroa-Bustos

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Root system size is a key trait for improving water and nitrogen uptake efficiency in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. This study aimed (i to characterize the root system and shoot traits of five wheat cultivars with apparent differences in root system size; (ii to evaluate whether the apparent differences in root system size observed at early vegetative stages in a previous semi-hydroponic phenotyping experiment are reflected at later phenological stages in plants grown in soil using large rhizoboxes. The five wheat cultivars were grown in a glasshouse in rhizoboxes filled to 1.0 m with field soil. Phenology and shoot traits were measured and root growth and proliferation were mapped to quantify root length density (RLD, root length per plant, root biomass and specific root length (SRL. Wheat cultivars with large root systems had greater root length, more root biomass and thicker roots, particularly in the top 40 cm, than those with small root systems. Cultivars that reached anthesis later had larger root system sizes than those that reached anthesis earlier. Later anthesis allowed more time for root growth and proliferation. Cultivars with large root systems had 25% more leaf area and biomass than those with small root systems, which presumably reflects high canopy photosynthesis to supply the demand for carbon assimilates to roots. Wheat cultivars with contrasting root system sizes at the onset of tillering (Z2.1 in a semi-hydroponic phenotyping system maintained their size ranking at booting (Z4.5 when grown in soil. Phenology, particularly time to anthesis, was associated with root system size.

  17. OpenSimRoot: widening the scope and application of root architectural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Kuppe, Christian; Owen, Markus R; Mellor, Nathan; Griffiths, Marcus; Bennett, Malcolm J; Lynch, Jonathan P; Watt, Michelle

    2017-08-01

    OpenSimRoot is an open-source, functional-structural plant model and mathematical description of root growth and function. We describe OpenSimRoot and its functionality to broaden the benefits of root modeling to the plant science community. OpenSimRoot is an extended version of SimRoot, established to simulate root system architecture, nutrient acquisition and plant growth. OpenSimRoot has a plugin, modular infrastructure, coupling single plant and crop stands to soil nutrient and water transport models. It estimates the value of root traits for water and nutrient acquisition in environments and plant species. The flexible OpenSimRoot design allows upscaling from root anatomy to plant community to estimate the following: resource costs of developmental and anatomical traits; trait synergisms; and (interspecies) root competition. OpenSimRoot can model three-dimensional images from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) of roots in soil. New modules include: soil water-dependent water uptake and xylem flow; tiller formation; evapotranspiration; simultaneous simulation of mobile solutes; mesh refinement; and root growth plasticity. OpenSimRoot integrates plant phenotypic data with environmental metadata to support experimental designs and to gain a mechanistic understanding at system scales. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Root-zone temperature and water availability affect early root growth of planted longleaf pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Sword

    1995-01-01

    Longleaf pine seedlings from three seed sources were exposed to three root-zone temperatures and three levels of water availability for 28 days. Root growth declined as temperature and water availability decreased. Root growth differed by seed source. Results suggest that subtle changes in the regeneration environment may influence early root growth of longleaf pine...

  19. Using coloured roots to study root interaction and competition in intercropped legumes and non-legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosti, Giacomo; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    if a species with coloured roots can be used to examine the interaction in a legume-non-legume intercropping system; (ii) to verify the importance of initial root growth on the successive root development of mixture component plants; (iii) to test if the root interaction in the shallow layers has consequences...

  20. A New Anatomically Based Nomenclature for the Roots and Root Canals—Part 1: Maxillary Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojo Kottoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequently named based on definite sets of criteria. A new method for identification and naming of roots and root canal anatomy in maxillary molars, based on their root and canal relationship, was formulated and is presented in this paper. The nomenclature makes certain essential modifications to the traditional approach to accommodate naming of the various aberrations presented in the maxillary molars. A simple, yet extensive, nomenclature system has been proposed that appropriately names the internal and external morphology of maxillary molars.

  1. A new anatomically based nomenclature for the roots and root canals-part 1: maxillary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequently named based on definite sets of criteria. A new method for identification and naming of roots and root canal anatomy in maxillary molars, based on their root and canal relationship, was formulated and is presented in this paper. The nomenclature makes certain essential modifications to the traditional approach to accommodate naming of the various aberrations presented in the maxillary molars. A simple, yet extensive, nomenclature system has been proposed that appropriately names the internal and external morphology of maxillary molars.

  2. Light as stress factor to plant roots - case of root halotropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Ken; Fasano, Rossella; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    Despite growing underground, largely in darkness, roots emerge to be very sensitive to light. Recently, several important papers have been published which reveal that plant roots not only express all known light receptors but also that their growth, physiology and adaptive stress responses are light-sensitive. In Arabidopsis, illumination of roots speeds-up root growth via reactive oxygen species-mediated and F-actin dependent process. On the other hand, keeping Arabidopsis roots in darkness alters F-actin distribution, polar localization of PIN proteins as well as polar transport of auxin. Several signaling components activated by phytohormones are overlapping with light-related signaling cascade. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of roots to salinity is altered in the light-grown Arabidopsis roots. Particularly, light-exposed roots are less effective in their salt-avoidance behavior known as root halotropism. Here we discuss these new aspects of light-mediated root behavior from cellular, physiological and evolutionary perspectives.

  3. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Natsis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An unusual combination of median nerve’s variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve’s medial root. The latter (fourth root was united with the lateral (fifth root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications.

  4. Medicolegal aspects of iatrogenic root perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsesis, I; Rosen, E; Bjørndal, L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively analyze the medico-legal aspects of iatrogenic root perforations (IRP) that occurred during endodontic treatments. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search in a professional liability insurance database was conducted to retrospectively identify cases of IRP following root canal...... treatment (p root perforation is a complication of root canal treatment and may result in tooth extraction...... and in legal actions against the treating practitioner. Mandibular molars are more prone to medico-legal claims related to root perforations. The patient should be informed of the risks during RCT and should get information on alternative treatments and their risks and prognosis...

  5. Plant responsiveness to root-root communication of stress cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falik, Omer; Mordoch, Yonat; Ben-Natan, Daniel; Vanunu, Miriam; Goldstein, Oron; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2012-07-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is based on the organism's ability to perceive, integrate and respond to multiple signals and cues informative of environmental opportunities and perils. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that plants are able to adapt to imminent threats by perceiving cues emitted from their damaged neighbours. Here, the hypothesis was tested that unstressed plants are able to perceive and respond to stress cues emitted from their drought- and osmotically stressed neighbours and to induce stress responses in additional unstressed plants. Split-root Pisum sativum, Cynodon dactylon, Digitaria sanguinalis and Stenotaphrum secundatum plants were subjected to osmotic stress or drought while sharing one of their rooting volumes with an unstressed neighbour, which in turn shared its other rooting volume with additional unstressed neighbours. Following the kinetics of stomatal aperture allowed testing for stress responses in both the stressed plants and their unstressed neighbours. In both P. sativum plants and the three wild clonal grasses, infliction of osmotic stress or drought caused stomatal closure in both the stressed plants and in their unstressed neighbours. While both continuous osmotic stress and drought induced prolonged stomatal closure and limited acclimation in stressed plants, their unstressed neighbours habituated to the stress cues and opened their stomata 3-24 h after the beginning of stress induction. The results demonstrate a novel type of plant communication, by which plants might be able to increase their readiness to probable future osmotic and drought stresses. Further work is underway to decipher the identity and mode of operation of the involved communication vectors and to assess the potential ecological costs and benefits of emitting and perceiving drought and osmotic stress cues under various ecological scenarios.

  6. Lateral root organogenesis - from cell to organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benková, Eva; Bielach, Agnieszka

    2010-12-01

    Unlike locomotive organisms capable of actively approaching essential resources, sessile plants must efficiently exploit their habitat for water and nutrients. This involves root-mediated underground interactions allowing plants to adapt to soils of diverse qualities. The root system of plants is a dynamic structure that modulates primary root growth and root branching by continuous integration of environmental inputs, such as nutrition availability, soil aeration, humidity, or salinity. Root branching is an extremely flexible means to rapidly adjust the overall surface of the root system and plants have evolved efficient control mechanisms, including, firstly initiation, when and where to start lateral root formation; secondly lateral root primordia organogenesis, during which the development of primordia can be arrested for a certain time; and thirdly lateral root emergence. Our review will focus on the most recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lateral root initiation and organogenesis with the main focus on root system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of fine root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghu Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The study was conducted to characterize the impacts of plant roots systems (e.g., root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems. Area of study: The study was carried out in Jiufeng National Forest Park, Beijing, China. Material and methods: The flow patterns were measured by field dye tracing experiments. Different species (Sophora japonica Linn,Platycladus orientalis Franco, Quercus dentata Thunbwere quantified in two replicates, and 12 soil depth were applied. Plant roots were sampled in the sieving methods. Root length density and root biomass were measured by WinRHIZO. Dye coverage was implied in the image analysis, and maximum depth of dye infiltration by direct measurement. Main results: Root length density and root biomass decreased with the increasing distance from soil surface, and root length density was 81.6% higher in preferential pathways than in soil matrix, and 66.7% for root biomass with respect to all experimental plots. Plant roots were densely distributed in the upper soil layers. Dye coverage was almost 100% in the upper 5-10 cm, but then decreased rapidly with soil depth. Root length density and root biomass were different from species: Platycladus orientalis Franco > Quercus dentata Thunb > Sophora japonica Linn. Research highlights: The results indicated that fine roots systems had strong effects on soil preferential flow, particularly root channels enhancing nutrition transport across soil profiles in forest dynamics.

  8. A statistical approach to root system classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot eBodner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for plant functional type identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. We demonstrate that combining principal component and cluster analysis yields a meaningful classification of rooting types based on morphological traits. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. Biplot inspection is used to determine key traits and to ensure stability in cluster based grouping. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Three rooting types emerged from measured data, distinguished by diameter/weight, density and spatial distribution respectively. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement

  9. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Root canal treatment of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In endodontics, several anatomic variations occur in teeth, both externally and in the internal root morphology, which play a very significant role in the diagnosis and treatment outcome. A thorough knowledge of the root canal anatomy, careful interpretation of the angled radiographs, proper endodontic access cavity preparation, and exploration of the root canal are the prerequisites for endodontic success. In a maxillary first premolar, it is rare to find extra roots and canals, and the aim of the present article is to report a case about the successful diagnosis and clinical management of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars, with three independent root canals.

  11. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Denis; Schwarz, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel) tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope-parallel directions. Roots

  12. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope

  13. Phylogenetic rooting using minimal ancestor deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, Fernando Domingues Kümmel; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2017-06-19

    Ancestor-descendent relations play a cardinal role in evolutionary theory. Those relations are determined by rooting phylogenetic trees. Existing rooting methods are hampered by evolutionary rate heterogeneity or the unavailability of auxiliary phylogenetic information. Here we present a rooting approach, the minimal ancestor deviation (MAD) method, which accommodates heterotachy by using all pairwise topological and metric information in unrooted trees. We demonstrate the performance of the method, in comparison to existing rooting methods, by the analysis of phylogenies from eukaryotes and prokaryotes. MAD correctly recovers the known root of eukaryotes and uncovers evidence for the origin of cyanobacteria in the ocean. MAD is more robust and consistent than existing methods, provides measures of the root inference quality and is applicable to any tree with branch lengths.

  14. Systems approaches to study root architecture dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela eCuesta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant root system is essential for providing anchorage to the soil, supplying minerals and water, and synthesizing metabolites. It is a dynamic organ modulated by external cues such as environmental signals, water and nutrients availability, salinity and others. Lateral roots are initiated from the primary root post-embryonically, after which they progress through discrete developmental stages which can be independently controlled, providing a high level of plasticity during root system formation.Within this review, main contributions are presented, from the classical forward genetic screens to the more recent high-throughput approaches, combined with computer model predictions, dissecting how lateral roots and thereby root system architecture is established and developed.

  15. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  16. CT diagnosis of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, P.; Martinelli, C.; Spina, V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the observations derived from CT evaluation of 19 cases of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots; 11 of these have been confirmed by lumbar myelography and/or at surgery. They conclude that CT without intrathecal metrizamide allows the recognition in most cases the presence of conjoined nerve roots and to differentiate them from a herniated disk fragment; this is especially usefull avoid surgical damage of anomalous roots. (orig.)

  17. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-03

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (∼1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  18. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (˜1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  19. Root cause and how to find it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gano, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth discussion of the definition of root cause, the use of the cause-and-effect process to find the root cause, and the use of proper cause categorization as a means to better understand the nuances of root cause. It also provides a detailed statistical breakdown of reactor trips at boiling water reactors for 1986 as compiled from Boiling Water Reactor Owners' Group Scram Frequency Reduction Commitee (BWROGSFRC) data

  20. Characterization of Pearl Millet Root Architecture and Anatomy Reveals Three Types of Lateral Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, Sixtine; Gnacko, Fatoumata; Moukouanga, Daniel; Lucas, Mikaël; Guyomarc’h, Soazig; Ortega, Beatriz Moreno; Atkinson, Jonathan A.; Belko, Marème N.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Gantet, Pascal; Wells, Darren M.; Guédon, Yann; Vigouroux, Yves; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Muller, Bertrand; Laplaze, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Pearl millet plays an important role for food security in arid regions of Africa and India. Nevertheless, it is considered an orphan crop as it lags far behind other cereals in terms of genetic improvement efforts. Breeding pearl millet varieties with improved root traits promises to deliver benefits in water and nutrient acquisition. Here, we characterize early pearl millet root system development using several different root phenotyping approaches that include rhizotrons and microCT. We report that early stage pearl millet root system development is characterized by a fast growing primary root that quickly colonizes deeper soil horizons. We also describe root anatomical studies that revealed three distinct types of lateral roots that form on both primary roots and crown roots. Finally, we detected significant variation for two root architectural traits, primary root lenght and lateral root density, in pearl millet inbred lines. This study provides the basis for subsequent genetic experiments to identify loci associated with interesting early root development traits in this important cereal. PMID:27379124

  1. Abscisic Acid Regulates Auxin Homeostasis in Rice Root Tips to Promote Root Hair Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA plays an essential role in root hair elongation in plants, but the regulatory mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that exogenous ABA can promote rice root hair elongation. Transgenic rice overexpressing SAPK10 (Stress/ABA-activated protein kinase 10 had longer root hairs; rice plants overexpressing OsABIL2 (OsABI-Like 2 had attenuated ABA signaling and shorter root hairs, suggesting that the effect of ABA on root hair elongation depends on the conserved PYR/PP2C/SnRK2 ABA signaling module. Treatment of the DR5-GUS and OsPIN-GUS lines with ABA and an auxin efflux inhibitor showed that ABA-induced root hair elongation depends on polar auxin transport. To examine the transcriptional response to ABA, we divided rice root tips into three regions: short root hair, long root hair and root tip zones; and conducted RNA-seq analysis with or without ABA treatment. Examination of genes involved in auxin transport, biosynthesis and metabolism indicated that ABA promotes auxin biosynthesis and polar auxin transport in the root tip, which may lead to auxin accumulation in the long root hair zone. Our findings shed light on how ABA regulates root hair elongation through crosstalk with auxin biosynthesis and transport to orchestrate plant development.

  2. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  3. Designing new interfaces for ROOT data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Kalle Elmer

    2016-01-01

    ROOT is a C++ framework for data analysis provided with a Python interface (PyRoot). ROOT is used in every Large Hadron Collider experiment. This project presents a way of reading ROOT TTree by using a new class called DataFrame, which allows the usage of cache and functional chains. Reading TTrees in Python has been quite slow compared to the C++ way of doing it and for this reason we also bring the possibility to read them with just-in-time (JIT) compiled C++ code, using another new Python class called TreeReader.

  4. Root resorption after orthodontic treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatania, Archana; Shivalinga, B M; Kiran, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Root resorption that occurs in permanent teeth is an unwanted process and is considered pathologic. Although apical root resorption occurs in individuals who have never experienced orthodontic tooth movement, the incidence among treated individuals is seen to be significantly higher. Some resorption occurs in most orthodontic patients, but because of repair the changes are difficult to detect with radiographic examination and therefore are clinically insignificant. This article gives a review of the various types of root resorption, the etiological factors, the biology and the identification of root resorption.

  5. New substitution models for rooting phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tom A; Heaps, Sarah E; Cherlin, Svetlana; Nye, Tom M W; Boys, Richard J; Embley, T Martin

    2015-09-26

    The root of a phylogenetic tree is fundamental to its biological interpretation, but standard substitution models do not provide any information on its position. Here, we describe two recently developed models that relax the usual assumptions of stationarity and reversibility, thereby facilitating root inference without the need for an outgroup. We compare the performance of these models on a classic test case for phylogenetic methods, before considering two highly topical questions in evolutionary biology: the deep structure of the tree of life and the root of the archaeal radiation. We show that all three alignments contain meaningful rooting information that can be harnessed by these new models, thus complementing and extending previous work based on outgroup rooting. In particular, our analyses exclude the root of the tree of life from the eukaryotes or Archaea, placing it on the bacterial stem or within the Bacteria. They also exclude the root of the archaeal radiation from several major clades, consistent with analyses using other rooting methods. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of non-reversible and non-stationary models for rooting phylogenetic trees, and identify areas where further progress can be made. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1993-01-26

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a geotextile'' and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  7. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene; Van Voris, Peter

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a "geotextile" and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  8. ROOT HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY OF EUCALYPT CLONAL CUTTINGS WITH ROOT MALFORMATION INDUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Afonso Mazzei Moura de Assis Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509814566The gain reduction of wood biomass in trees has been assigned to root deformations even in the nursery phase. The objective of this work was the evaluation of the root system hydraulic conductivity, gas exchanges and photochemical efficiency of eucalypt clonal cuttings with and without root deformation inductions. The treatments were: 1 operational cuttings without root malformation inductions (grown according to the used methodology of Fibria Cellulose S.A.; 2 root deformation inductions. These inductions did not promote decrease in the root volume. However, the deformations brought reduction of the root system hydraulic conductivity. Lower photosynthetic rates were also observed along the day in the cuttings in the root deformed cuttings. This decreasing rate is connected to stomatal and non stomatal factors.

  9. Piriformospora indica root colonization triggers local and systemic root responses and inhibits secondary colonization of distal roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Mueller, Martin J; Waller, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Piriformosporaindica is a basidiomycete fungus colonizing roots of a wide range of higher plants, including crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies have shown that P. indica improves growth, and enhances systemic pathogen resistance in leaves of host plants. To investigate systemic effects within the root system, we established a hydroponic split-root cultivation system for Arabidopsis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that initial P. indica colonization triggers a local, transient response of several defense-related transcripts, of which some were also induced in shoots and in distal, non-colonized roots of the same plant. Systemic effects on distal roots included the inhibition of secondary P. indica colonization. Faster and stronger induction of defense-related transcripts during secondary inoculation revealed that a P. indica pretreatment triggers root-wide priming of defense responses, which could cause the observed reduction of secondary colonization levels. Secondary P. indica colonization also induced defense responses in distant, already colonized parts of the root. Endophytic fungi therefore trigger a spatially specific response in directly colonized and in systemic root tissues of host plants.

  10. Responses of grapevine rootstocks to drought through altered root system architecture and root transcriptomic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Kubilay; Yağcı, Adem; Sucu, Seda; Tunç, Sümeyye

    2018-06-01

    Roots are the major interface between the plant and various stress factors in the soil environment. Alteration of root system architecture (RSA) (root length, spread, number and length of lateral roots) in response to environmental changes is known to be an important strategy for plant adaptation and productivity. In light of ongoing climate changes and global warming predictions, the breeding of drought-tolerant grapevine cultivars is becoming a crucial factor for developing a sustainable viticulture. Root-trait modeling of grapevine rootstock for drought stress scenarios, together with high-throughput phenotyping and genotyping techniques, may provide a valuable background for breeding studies in viticulture. Here, tree grafted grapevine rootstocks (110R, 5BB and 41B) having differential RSA regulations and drought tolerance were investigated to define their drought dependent root characteristics. Root area, root length, ramification and number of root tips reduced less in 110R grafted grapevines compared to 5BB and 41B grafted ones during drought treatment. Root relative water content as well as total carbohydrate and nitrogen content were found to be much higher in the roots of 110R than it was in the roots of other rootstocks under drought. Microarray-based root transcriptome profiling was also conducted on the roots of these rootstocks to identify their gene regulation network behind drought-dependent RSA alterations. Transcriptome analysis revealed totally 2795, 1196 and 1612 differentially expressed transcripts at the severe drought for the roots of 110R, 5BB and 41B, respectively. According to this transcriptomic data, effective root elongation and enlargement performance of 110R were suggested to depend on three transcriptomic regulations. First one is the drought-dependent induction in sugar and protein transporters genes (SWEET and NRT1/PTR) in the roots of 110R to facilitate carbohydrate and nitrogen accumulation. In the roots of the same rootstock

  11. Plant root research: the past, the present and the future

    OpenAIRE

    Lux, Alexander; Rost, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to root biologists past and present who have been exploring all aspects of root structure and function with an extensive publication record going over 100 years. The content of the Special Issue on Root Biology covers a wide scale of contributions, spanning interactions of roots with microorganisms in the rhizosphere, the anatomy of root cells and tissues, the subcellular components of root cells, and aspects of metal accumulation and stresses on root function ...

  12. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsugeki, Ryuji; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of...

  13. Submergence of Roots for Alveolar Bone Preservation. I. Endodontically Treated Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-10

    With Endodontic Submerged Roots Scale 0 1 2 3 Periapical 15 0 1 0 Pericoronal 7 3 3 3 (3 cysts ) = 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = REFERENCES 1. Lam, R.: Contour...with coronal portions of the roots. These epithe lial-lined cysts prevented the formation of osteo- cementum over the coronal surface . In this study...the endodontically treated roots appeared to be primarily a response to the excess root cana l sealer that was expressed coronally and periapically

  14. Fine root production at drained peatland sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finer, L [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Laine, J [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1997-12-31

    The preliminary results of the Finnish project `Carbon balance of peatlands and climate change` show that fine roots play an important role in carbon cycling on peat soils. After drainage the roots of mire species are gradually replaced by the roots of trees and other forest species. Pine fine root biomass reaches a maximum level by the time of crown closure, some 20 years after drainage on pine mire. The aim of this study is to compare the results of the sequential coring method and the ingrowth bag method used for estimating fine root production on three drained peatland sites of different fertility. The results are preliminary and continuation to the work done in the study Pine root production on drained peatlands, which is part of the Finnish project `Carbon cycling on peatlands and climate change`. In this study the fine root biomass was greater on the poor site than on the rich sites. Pine fine root production increased with the decrease in fertility. Root turnover and the production of field layer species were greater on the rich sites than on the poor site. The results suggested that the in growth bag method measured more root activity than the magnitude of production. More than two growing seasons would have been needed to balance the root dynamics in the in growth bags with the surrounding soil. That time would probably have been longer on the poor site than on the rich ones and longer for pine and field layer consisting of dwarf shrubs than for field layer consisting of sedge like species and birch. (11 refs.)

  15. Root-soil relationships and terroir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Soil features, along with climate, are among the most important determinants of a succesful grape production in a certain area. Most of the studies, so far, investigated the above-ground vine response to differente edaphic and climate condition, but it is clearly not sufficient to explain the vine whole behaviour. In fact, roots represent an important part of the terroir system (soil-plant-atmosphere-man), and their study can provide better comprehension of vine responses to different environments. The root density and distribution, the ability of deep-rooting and regenerating new roots are good indicators of root well-being, and represents the basis for an efficient physiological activity of the root system. Root deepening and distribution are strongly dependent and sensitive on soil type and soil properties, while root density is affected mostly by canopy size, rootstock and water availability. According to root well-being, soil management strategies should alleviate soil impediments, improving aeration and microbial activity. Moreover, agronomic practices can impact root system performance and influence the above-ground growth. It is well known, for example, that the root system size is largely diminished by high planting densities. Close vine spacings stimulate a more effective utilization of the available soil, water and nutrients, but if the competition for available soil becomes too high, it can repress vine growth, and compromise vineyard longevity, productivity and reaction to growing season weather. Development of resilient rootstocks, more efficient in terms of water and nutrient uptake and capable of dealing with climate and soil extremes (drought, high salinity) are primary goals fore future research. The use of these rootstocks will benefit a more sustainable use of the soil resources and the preservation and valorisation of the terroir.

  16. Fine root production at drained peatland sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finer, L. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Laine, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    The preliminary results of the Finnish project `Carbon balance of peatlands and climate change` show that fine roots play an important role in carbon cycling on peat soils. After drainage the roots of mire species are gradually replaced by the roots of trees and other forest species. Pine fine root biomass reaches a maximum level by the time of crown closure, some 20 years after drainage on pine mire. The aim of this study is to compare the results of the sequential coring method and the ingrowth bag method used for estimating fine root production on three drained peatland sites of different fertility. The results are preliminary and continuation to the work done in the study Pine root production on drained peatlands, which is part of the Finnish project `Carbon cycling on peatlands and climate change`. In this study the fine root biomass was greater on the poor site than on the rich sites. Pine fine root production increased with the decrease in fertility. Root turnover and the production of field layer species were greater on the rich sites than on the poor site. The results suggested that the in growth bag method measured more root activity than the magnitude of production. More than two growing seasons would have been needed to balance the root dynamics in the in growth bags with the surrounding soil. That time would probably have been longer on the poor site than on the rich ones and longer for pine and field layer consisting of dwarf shrubs than for field layer consisting of sedge like species and birch. (11 refs.)

  17. Non-canonical WOX11-mediated root branching contributes to plasticity in Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lihong; Hu, Xiaomei; Du, Yujuan; Zhang, Guifang; Huang, Hai; Scheres, Ben; Xu, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Lateral roots (LRs), which originate from the growing root, and adventitious roots (ARs), which are formed from non-root organs, are the main contributors to the post-embryonic root system in Arabidopsis However, our knowledge of how formation of the root system is altered in response to diverse inductive cues is limited. Here, we show that WOX11 contributes to root system plasticity. When seedlings are grown vertically on medium, WOX11 is not expressed in LR founder cells. During AR initiation, WOX11 is expressed in AR founder cells and activates LBD16 LBD16 also functions in LR formation and is activated in that context by ARF7 / 19 and not by WOX11 This indicates that divergent initial processes that lead to ARs and LRs may converge on a similar mechanism for primordium development. Furthermore, we demonstrated that when plants are grown in soil or upon wounding on medium, the primary root is able to produce both WOX11 -mediated and non- WOX11 -mediated roots. The discovery of WOX11 -mediated root-derived roots reveals a previously uncharacterized pathway that confers plasticity during the generation of root system architecture in response to different inductive cues. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Air lateral root pruning affects longleaf pine seedling root system morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Dave Haywood

    2016-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedlings were cultured with air lateral root pruning (side-vented containers, VT) or without (solid-walled containers, SW). Seedling root system morphology and growth were assessed before planting and 8 and 14 months after planting. Although VT seedlings had greater root collar diameter than the SW before planting,...

  19. Root form and clinical radiographic estimation of the number of root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The root form of 100 extracted maxillary premolars, the pre-operative radiographic estimation and clinical radiographic determination of the number of root canals in 340 maxillary premolars of Nigerian patients attending the dental hospital for endodontic treatment were studied. The maxillary second premolars had one root ...

  20. Changes of Root Length and Root-to-Crown Ratio after Apical Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment periodontitis. Although apical surgery involves root-end resection, no morphometric data are yet available about root-end resection and its impact on the root-to-crown ratio (RCR). The present study assess...

  1. Assessment of the nonoperated root after apical surgery of the other root in mandibular molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Riccardo D; von Arx, Thomas; Gfeller, David

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: If a surgical approach is chosen to treat a multirooted tooth affected by persistent periapical pathosis, usually only the affected roots are operated on. The present study assessed the periapical status of the nonoperated root 5 years after apical surgery of the other root in mandi...

  2. Embryonic origin of the Arabidopsis primary root and root meristem initials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; Wolkenfelt, H.; Willemsen, V.; Terlouw, M.; Lawson, E.; Dean, C.; Weisbeek, P.

    1994-01-01

    The embryonic origin of the Arabidopsis root and hypocotyl region has been investigated using histological techniques and clonal analysis. Our data reveal the pattern of cell division in the embryo giving rise to the various initials within the root promeristem. A small region of the root at its

  3. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  4. Low Light Availability Alters Root Exudation and Reduces Putative Beneficial Microorganisms in Seagrass Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda C. Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass roots host a diverse microbiome that is critical for plant growth and health. Composition of microbial communities can be regulated in part by root exudates, but the specifics of these interactions in seagrass rhizospheres are still largely unknown. As light availability controls primary productivity, reduced light may impact root exudation and consequently the composition of the root microbiome. Hence, we analyzed the influence of light availability on root exudation and community structure of the root microbiome of three co-occurring seagrass species, Halophila ovalis, Halodule uninervis and Cymodocea serrulata. Plants were grown under four light treatments in mesocosms for 2 weeks; control (100% surface irradiance (SI, medium (40% SI, low (20% SI and fluctuating light (10 days 20% and 4 days 100%. 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing revealed that microbial diversity, composition and predicted function were strongly influenced by the presence of seagrass roots, such that root microbiomes were unique to each seagrass species. Reduced light availability altered seagrass root exudation, as characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, and altered the composition of seagrass root microbiomes with a reduction in abundance of potentially beneficial microorganisms. Overall, this study highlights the potential for above-ground light reduction to invoke a cascade of changes from alterations in root exudation to a reduction in putative beneficial microorganisms and, ultimately, confirms the importance of the seagrass root environment – a critical, but often overlooked space.

  5. X-ray computed tomography uncovers root-root interactions: quantifying spatial relationships between interacting root systems in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paya, Alexander M; Silverberg, Jesse L; Padgett, Jennifer; Bauerle, Taryn L

    2015-01-01

    Research in the field of plant biology has recently demonstrated that inter- and intra-specific interactions belowground can dramatically alter root growth. Our aim was to answer questions related to the effect of inter- vs. intra-specific interactions on the growth and utilization of undisturbed space by fine roots within three dimensions (3D) using micro X-ray computed tomography. To achieve this, Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen) and Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were planted into containers as either solitary individuals, or inter-/intra-specific pairs, allowed to grow for 2 months, and 3D metrics developed in order to quantify their use of belowground space. In both aspen and spruce, inter-specific root interactions produced a shift in the vertical distribution of the root system volume, and deepened the average position of root tips when compared to intra-specifically growing seedlings. Inter-specific interactions also increased the minimum distance between root tips belonging to the same root system. There was no effect of belowground interactions on the radial distribution of roots, or the directionality of lateral root growth for either species. In conclusion, we found that significant differences were observed more often when comparing controls (solitary individuals) and paired seedlings (inter- or intra-specific), than when comparing inter- and intra-specifically growing seedlings. This would indicate that competition between neighboring seedlings was more responsible for shifting fine root growth in both species than was neighbor identity. However, significant inter- vs. intra-specific differences were observed, which further emphasizes the importance of biological interactions in competition studies.

  6. Roots, plant production and nutrient use efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigen, de P.; Noordwijk, van M.

    1987-01-01

    The role of roots in obtaining high crop production levels as well as a high nutrient use efficiency is discussed. Mathematical models of diffusion and massflow of solutes towards roots are developed for a constant daily uptake requirement. Analytical solutions are given for simple and more

  7. Tree root mapping with ground penetrating radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for the mapping of near surface tree roots is demonstrated. GPR enables tree roots to be mapped in a non-destructive and cost-effective manner and is therefore a useful prospecting...

  8. An intersection test for panel unit roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanck, C.

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a new panel unit root test based on Simes' ( 1986) classical intersection test. The test is robust to general patterns of cross-sectional dependence and yet is straightforward to implement, only requiring p-values of time series unit root tests of the series in the panel, and

  9. Layers of root nouns in Germanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Simmelkjær Sandgaard

    2017-01-01

    The root-noun declension became productive in early Germanic, containing (I) inherited root nouns, (IIa) original substrate or loan words, and transitions from other declensions in (IIb) Proto-Germanic and (III) North Germanic. As ablaut was abolished, the inherited type would display ablaut grades...

  10. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  11. Unit roots, nonlinearities and structural breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Niels; Kruse, Robinson; Teräsvirta, Timo

    One of the most influential research fields in econometrics over the past decades concerns unit root testing in economic time series. In macro-economics much of the interest in the area originate from the fact that when unit roots are present, then shocks to the time series processes have...

  12. A new approach to root formation

    OpenAIRE

    Vatanpour, Mehdi; Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Shirazian, Shiva

    2008-01-01

    In endodontics, treatment of an open apex tooth with necrotic pulp is a problem. It seems that with promotion of remnants of Hertwig?s epithelial sheath or rest of malassez accompany with a good irrigation of root canal we can expect root formation. (Iranian Endodontic Journal 2008;3:42-43)

  13. Improving rooting uniformity in rose cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.; Eveleens-Clark, B.A.; Garcia Victoria, N.

    2007-01-01

    Studies to improve rooting uniformity of single node stem cuttings for rose are reported. We found that the variation in shoot growth in a young rose crop depended on the variation in root number of the cuttings, which, in turn, was related to the auxin concentration applied to the cutting before

  14. Graphing Powers and Roots of Complex Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embse, Charles Vonder

    1993-01-01

    Using De Moivre's theorem and a parametric graphing utility, examines powers and roots of complex numbers and allows students to establish connections between the visual and numerical representations of complex numbers. Provides a program to numerically verify the roots of complex numbers. (MDH)

  15. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main Street...

  16. Root cause analysis with enriched process logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suriadi, S.; Ouyang, C.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.; La Rosa, M.; Soffer, P.

    2013-01-01

    n the field of process mining, the use of event logs for the purpose of root cause analysis is increasingly studied. In such an analysis, the availability of attributes/features that may explain the root cause of some phenomena is crucial. Currently, the process of obtaining these attributes from

  17. On König's root finding algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buff, Xavier; Henriksen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we first recall the definition of a family of root-finding algorithms known as König's algorithms. We establish some local and some global properties of those algorithms. We give a characterization of rational maps which arise as König's methods of polynomials with simple roots. We...

  18. Modelling root reinforcement in shallow forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaugset, Arne E.

    1997-01-01

    A hypothesis used to explain the relationship between timber harvesting and landslides is that tree roots add mechanical support to soil, thus increasing soil strength. Upon harvest, the tree roots decay which reduces soil strength and increases the risk of management -induced landslides. The technical literature does not adequately support this hypothesis. Soil strength values attributed to root reinforcement that are in the technical literature are such that forested sites can't fail and all high risk, harvested sites must fail. Both unstable forested sites and stable harvested sites exist, in abundance, in the real world thus, the literature does not adequately describe the real world. An analytical model was developed to calculate soil strength increase due to root reinforcement. Conceptually, the model is composed of a reinforcing element with high tensile strength, i.e. a conifer root, embedded in a material with little tensile strength, i.e. a soil. As the soil fails and deforms, the reinforcing element also deforms and stretches. The lateral deformation of the reinforcing element is treated analytically as a laterally loaded pile in a flexible foundation and the axial deformation is treated as an axially loaded pile. The governing differential equations are solved using finite-difference approximation techniques. The root reinforcement model was tested by comparing the final shape of steel and aluminum rods, parachute cord, wooden dowels, and pine roots in direct shear with predicted shapes from the output of the root reinforcement model. The comparisons were generally satisfactory, were best for parachute cord and wooden dowels, and were poorest for steel and aluminum rods. A parameter study was performed on the root reinforcement model which showed reinforced soil strength increased with increasing root diameter and soil depth. Output from the root reinforcement model showed a strain incompatibility between large and small diameter roots. The peak

  19. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. Results We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis. PMID:22834569

  20. Nutrition and adventitious rooting in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bortolanza Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative propagation success of commercial genotypes via cutting techniques is related to several factors, including nutritional status of mother trees and of propagation material. The nutritional status determines the carbohydrate quantities, auxins and other compounds of plant essential metabolism for root initiation and development. Each nutrient has specific functions in plant, acting on plant structure or on plant physiology. Although the importance of mineral nutrition for success of woody plants vegetative propagation and its relation with adventitious rooting is recognized, the role of some mineral nutrients is still unknown. Due to biochemical and physiological complexity of adventitious rooting process, there are few researches to determine de role of nutrients on development of adventitious roots. This review intends to explore de state of the art about the effect of mineral nutrition on adventitious rooting of woody plants.

  1. An overview of management of root fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithviraj, D R; Bhalla, H K; Vashisht, R; Regish, K M; Suresh, P

    2014-01-01

    Crown or root fractures are the most commonly encountered emergencies in the dental clinic. Root fractures occur in fewer than eight percent of the traumatic injuries to permanent teeth. They are broadly classified as horizontal and vertical root fractures. Correct diagnosis of root fractures is essential to ensure a proper treatment plan and hence, the best possible prognosis. Indication of the type of treatment to be used depends primarily on the level of the fracture line. Therefore, a clinician must also have a thorough knowledge of the various treatment approaches to devise a treatment plan accordingly. Various treatment strategies have been proposed, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Hence, this literature review presents an overview of the various types of root fractures and their management.

  2. Long-term control of root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  3. Prevention of root caries with dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogono, A L; Mayo, J A

    1994-04-01

    This in vitro investigation determined the feasibility of using dentin adhesives to protect root surfaces against caries. The roots of 22 recently extracted human teeth were all painted with a protective lacquer leaving two unprotected small windows. On each specimen, one window (control) was left untreated and the other window (experimental) was treated using a dentin adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). The roots were then immersed in an in vitro acetate/calcium/phosphate demineralization model at pH 4.3. After 70 days, the samples were removed and sectioned through the windows. The undecalcified ground sections were examined under transmitted and polarized light. Lesions characteristic of natural root caries were seen in the untreated control windows. No such lesions were apparent in the experimental windows. The results of this preliminary study suggest that dentin adhesives may provide protection against root caries.

  4. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Zobel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to 8 different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5 of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems.

  5. Standardization of 32P activity determination method in soil-root cores for root distribution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.B.; Ghildyal, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    The root distribution of wheat variety UP 301 was obtained by determining the 32 P activity in soil-root cores by two methods, viz., ignition and triacid digestion. Root distribution obtained by these two methods was compared with that by standard root core washing procedure. The percent error in root distribution as determined by triacid digestion method was within +- 2.1 to +- 9.0 as against +- 5.5 to +- 21.2 by ignition method. Thus triacid digestion method proved better over the ignition method. (author)

  6. Effect of tree roots on shallow-seated landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazutoki Abe Abe; Robert R. Ziemer

    1991-01-01

    Forest vegetation, especially tree roots, helps stabilize hillslopes by reinforcing soil shear strength. To evaluate the effect of tree roots on slope stability, information about the amount of roots and their strength should be known. A simulation model for the root distribution of Cryptomeria japonica was proposed where the number of roots in each 0.5-cm diameter...

  7. Adsorption and absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to rice roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, X.C.; Xu, F.L.; Dawson, R.; Chen, S.H.; Tao, S.

    2007-01-01

    Rice roots and surrounding air, soil and water samples were collected for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis. The rice roots were separated into lateral roots and nodal roots, and the PAH concentration in the former was found to be higher than that in the latter. In addition, root physiological characteristics including root biotic mass, root lipid content and specific surface area are also discussed. When normalizing the total, adsorption and absorption PAH fractions on a dry root weight basis to root biomass, root lipid, and surface area bases respectively, the differences between PAHs in the two types of roots diminished by 2 to 3 times on average. Results from sequential extraction indicated that PAHs were more easily absorbed by interior rice roots than adsorbed on the surface. In addition, more than 60% of total PAHs accumulated in root tissue for both lateral and nodal roots. However, the results were highly related to the solvent used, extraction time and methodology. Correlation analysis between bioconcentration factors (root over environment) and K OA , K OW showed water to be more significant for PAH adsorption in rice roots than other environmental media. - A sequential extraction method was applied to divide the PAHs accumulated on rice roots into PAHs in root exudates, PAHs adsorbed on root surfaces, and PAHs absorbed in root tissue

  8. A review on the molecular mechanism of plants rooting modulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adventitious root formation is a key step in vegetative propagation of woody or horticul-tural species, and it is a complex process known to be affected by multiple factors. The process of roots development could be divided into three stages: root induction, root initiation, and root protrusion. Phytohormones, especially auxin ...

  9. Assessment of periapical health, quality of root canal filling, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty three teeth were found to have short root canal fillings, whereas 74 teeth had adequate root canal fillings, and the remaining 10 teeth had over extended root canal filling. A significant correlation was observed between the length of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0,023). Inadequately dense root canal filling was ...

  10. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.).

  11. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1990-01-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.)

  12. Root deformation reduces tolerance of lodgepole pine to attack by Warren root collar weevil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Jeanne A; Lindgren, B Staffan

    2010-04-01

    Surveys were conducted on regenerating stands of lodgepole pine to determine the relationship between root deformation and susceptibility to attack by the Warren root collar weevil, Hylobius warreni Wood. The total number of trees attacked by H. warreni did not differ between planted and natural trees. A matched case-control logistic regression suggested that root cross-sectional area was more important in predicting weevil attack for naturally regenerated trees than for planted trees, but weevils were associated with a larger reduction in height-to-diameter ratios for trees with planted root characteristics than for trees with natural root form. Neither the stability of attacked versus unattacked trees differed significantly and there was no significant interaction of weevil attack and tree type, but weevil-killed trees had different root characteristics than alive, attacked trees. Lateral distribution and root cross-sectional area were significant predictors of alive attacked trees versus weevil-killed trees, suggesting that trees with poor lateral spread or poor root cross-sectional area are more likely to die from weevil attack. We conclude that root deformation does not necessarily increase susceptibility to attack but may increase the likelihood of mortality. Thus, measures to facilitate good root form are needed when planting pine in areas with high risk of Warren root collar weevil attack.

  13. Resistance to compression of weakened roots subjected to different root reconstruction protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Villaça Zogheib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated, in vitro, the fracture resistance of human non-vital teeth restored with different reconstruction protocols. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty human anterior roots of similar shape and dimensions were assigned to four groups (n=10, according to the root reconstruction protocol: Group I (control: non-weakened roots with glass fiber post; Group II: roots with composite resin by incremental technique and glass fiber post; Group III: roots with accessory glass fiber posts and glass fiber post; and Group IV: roots with anatomic glass fiber post technique. Following post cementation and core reconstruction, the roots were embedded in chemically activated acrylic resin and submitted to fracture resistance testing, with a compressive load at an angle of 45º in relation to the long axis of the root at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. All data were statistically analyzed with bilateral Dunnett's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Group I presented higher mean values of fracture resistance when compared with the three experimental groups, which, in turn, presented similar resistance to fracture among each other. None of the techniques of root reconstruction with intraradicular posts improved root strength, and the incremental technique was suggested as being the most recommendable, since the type of fracture that occurred allowed the remaining dental structure to be repaired. CONCLUSION: The results of this in vitro study suggest that the healthy remaining radicular dentin is more important to increase fracture resistance than the root reconstruction protocol.

  14. Fine Mapping of QUICK ROOTING 1 and 2, Quantitative Trait Loci Increasing Root Length in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitomi, Yuka; Nakao, Emari; Kawai, Sawako; Kanno, Noriko; Ando, Tsuyu; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Irie, Kenji; Uga, Yusaku

    2018-02-02

    The volume that the root system can occupy is associated with the efficiency of water and nutrient uptake from soil. Genetic improvement of root length, which is a limiting factor for root distribution, is necessary for increasing crop production. In this report, we describe identification of two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for maximal root length, QUICK ROOTING 1 ( QRO1 ) on chromosome 2 and QRO2 on chromosome 6, in cultivated rice ( Oryza sativa L.). We measured the maximal root length in 26 lines carrying chromosome segments from the long-rooted upland rice cultivar Kinandang Patong in the genetic background of the short-rooted lowland cultivar IR64. Five lines had longer roots than IR64. By rough mapping of the target regions in BC 4 F 2 populations, we detected putative QTLs for maximal root length on chromosomes 2, 6, and 8. To fine-map these QTLs, we used BC 4 F 3 recombinant homozygous lines. QRO1 was mapped between markers RM5651 and RM6107, which delimit a 1.7-Mb interval on chromosome 2, and QRO2 was mapped between markers RM20495 and RM3430-1, which delimit an 884-kb interval on chromosome 6. Both QTLs may be promising gene resources for improving root system architecture in rice. Copyright © 2018 Kitomi et al.

  15. PHIV-RootCell: a supervised image analysis tool for rice root anatomical parameter quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eLartaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the PHIV-RootCell software to quantify anatomical traits of rice roots transverse section images. Combined with an efficient root sample processing method for image acquisition, this program permits supervised measurements of areas (those of whole root section, stele, cortex and central metaxylem vessels, number of cell layers and number of cells per cell layer. The PHIV-RootCell toolset runs under ImageJ, an independent operating system that has a license-free status. To demonstrate the usefulness of PHIV-RootCell, we conducted a genetic diversity study and an analysis of salt-stress responses of root anatomical parameters in rice (Oryza sativa L.. Using 16 cultivars, we showed that we could discriminate between some of the varieties even at the 6 day-old stage, and that tropical japonica varieties had larger root sections due to an increase in cell number. We observed, as described previously, that root sections become enlarged under salt stress. However, our results show an increase in cell number in ground tissues (endodermis and cortex but a decrease in external (peripheral tissues (sclerenchyma, exodermis and epidermis. Thus, the PHIV-RootCell program is a user-friendly tool that will be helpful for future genetic and physiological studies that investigate root anatomical trait variations.

  16. Fine Mapping of QUICK ROOTING 1 and 2, Quantitative Trait Loci Increasing Root Length in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kitomi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The volume that the root system can occupy is associated with the efficiency of water and nutrient uptake from soil. Genetic improvement of root length, which is a limiting factor for root distribution, is necessary for increasing crop production. In this report, we describe identification of two quantitative trait loci (QTLs for maximal root length, QUICK ROOTING 1 (QRO1 on chromosome 2 and QRO2 on chromosome 6, in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.. We measured the maximal root length in 26 lines carrying chromosome segments from the long-rooted upland rice cultivar Kinandang Patong in the genetic background of the short-rooted lowland cultivar IR64. Five lines had longer roots than IR64. By rough mapping of the target regions in BC4F2 populations, we detected putative QTLs for maximal root length on chromosomes 2, 6, and 8. To fine-map these QTLs, we used BC4F3 recombinant homozygous lines. QRO1 was mapped between markers RM5651 and RM6107, which delimit a 1.7-Mb interval on chromosome 2, and QRO2 was mapped between markers RM20495 and RM3430-1, which delimit an 884-kb interval on chromosome 6. Both QTLs may be promising gene resources for improving root system architecture in rice.

  17. GLO-Roots: an imaging platform enabling multidimensional characterization of soil-grown root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Lobet, Guillaume; Lindner, Heike; Pradier, Pierre-Luc; Sebastian, Jose; Yee, Muh-Ching; Geng, Yu; Trontin, Charlotte; LaRue, Therese; Schrager-Lavelle, Amanda; Haney, Cara H; Nieu, Rita; Maloof, Julin; Vogel, John P; Dinneny, José R

    2015-01-01

    Root systems develop different root types that individually sense cues from their local environment and integrate this information with systemic signals. This complex multi-dimensional amalgam of inputs enables continuous adjustment of root growth rates, direction, and metabolic activity that define a dynamic physical network. Current methods for analyzing root biology balance physiological relevance with imaging capability. To bridge this divide, we developed an integrated-imaging system called Growth and Luminescence Observatory for Roots (GLO-Roots) that uses luminescence-based reporters to enable studies of root architecture and gene expression patterns in soil-grown, light-shielded roots. We have developed image analysis algorithms that allow the spatial integration of soil properties, gene expression, and root system architecture traits. We propose GLO-Roots as a system that has great utility in presenting environmental stimuli to roots in ways that evoke natural adaptive responses and in providing tools for studying the multi-dimensional nature of such processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07597.001 PMID:26287479

  18. Anatomic investigation of the lumbosacral nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Toru; Fuse, Kenzo; Mikawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Ryo

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of the lumbosacral nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was examined by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 11 healthy male volunteers aged 20-40 years. One hundred and twenty-three nerve roots (15 at the L1 level, 22 each at the L2-L5 levels, and 20 at the S1 level) were examined in terms of the position and angle of the bifurcation of the nerve roots, length of the nerve root, and the position and width of DRG. The nerve roots at the lower levels showed more cephalad position and smaller angle of bifurcation on MRI. The distance from the bifurcation of nerve roots to the cephalad edge of DRG was significantly longer in the upper root levels and was significantly shorter in the L5 roots than the S1 roots. The positions of DRG at the S1 level tended to become cephalad. DRG that was positioned toward more caudal direction was larger and more elliptic. MRI provided useful information concerning morphology and anatomical position of nerve roots and DRG, thereby allowing accurate diagnosis and the determination of surgical indications. (N.K.)

  19. Root phenology at Harvard Forest and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, R. Z.; Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Roots are hidden from view and heterogeneously distributed making them difficult to study in situ. As a result, the causes and timing of root production are not well understood. Researchers have long assumed that above and belowground phenology is synchronous; for example, most parameterizations of belowground carbon allocation in terrestrial biosphere models are based on allometry and represent a fixed fraction of net C uptake. However, using results from metaanalysis as well as empirical data from oak and hemlock stands at Harvard Forest, we show that synchronous root and shoot growth is the exception rather than the rule. We collected root and shoot phenology measurements from studies across four biomes (boreal, temperate, Mediterranean, and subtropical). General patterns of root phenology varied widely with 1-5 production peaks in a growing season. Surprisingly, in 9 out of the 15 studies, the first root production peak was not the largest peak. In the majority of cases maximum shoot production occurred before root production (Offset>0 in 32 out of 47 plant sample means). The number of days offset between maximum root and shoot growth was negatively correlated with median annual temperature and therefore differs significantly across biomes (ANOVA, F3,43=9.47, pGrowth form (woody or herbaceous) also influenced the relative timing of root and shoot growth. Woody plants had a larger range of days between root and shoot growth peaks as well as a greater number of growth peaks. To explore the range of phenological relationships within woody plants in the temperate biome, we focused on above and belowground phenology in two common northeastern tree species, Quercus rubra and Tsuga canadensis. Greenness index, rate of stem growth, root production and nonstructural carbohydrate content were measured beginning in April 2012 through August 2013 at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA, USA. Greenness and stem growth were highest in late May and early June with one clear

  20. Root growth in corn and soybeans: effects of cadmium and lead on lateral root initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, C P; Miller, R J; Koeppe, D E

    1978-02-01

    This study examines the previously reported inhibitory effects of Cd on root growth. In hydroponic experiments, 100 ..mu..g Cd/l effected a 33% inhibition of lateral root initiation of corn. The growth of corn and soybean primary roots was not reduced at Cd concentrations of 1 mg/l, and the number of lateral root initials in soybeans was not reduced at 2 mg Cd/l. The toxic effects of Cd were ameliorated by additions of Zn or by additions of Fe citrate to nutrient growth solutions. While both Zn and Fe additions did result in increased lateral root initiation, the number of initials was significantly lower than the controls. Lead had no effect on the initiation of soybean lateral roots at a concentration of 100 ..mu..g Pb/l. However, 5 mg Pb/l did effect a 21% decrease in corn lateral root initials, but this decrease could not be demonstrated with higher Pb concentrations.

  1. Longleaf Pine Root System Development and Seedling Quality in Response to Copper Root Pruning and Cavity Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; James D. Haywood

    2011-01-01

    Cultural practices that modify root system structure in the plug of container-grown seedlings have the potential to improve root system function after planting. Our objective was to assess how copper root pruning affects the quality and root system development of longleaf pine seedlings grown in three cavity sizes in a greenhouse. Copper root pruning increased seedling...

  2. Ecology of root colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ofek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae, a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance were positively related, and peaked (up to 85% at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche.

  3. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  4. Ecology of root colonizing Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Ecologically meaningful classification of bacterial populations is essential for understanding the structure and function of bacterial communities. As in soils, the ecological strategy of the majority of root-colonizing bacteria is mostly unknown. Among those are Massilia (Oxalobacteraceae), a major group of rhizosphere and root colonizing bacteria of many plant species. The ecology of Massilia was explored in cucumber root and seed, and compared to that of Agrobacterium population, using culture-independent tools, including DNA-based pyrosequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR. Seed- and root-colonizing Massilia were primarily affiliated with other members of the genus described in soil and rhizosphere. Massilia colonized and proliferated on the seed coat, radicle, roots, and also on hyphae of phytopathogenic Pythium aphanidermatum infecting seeds. High variation in Massilia abundance was found in relation to plant developmental stage, along with sensitivity to plant growth medium modification (amendment with organic matter) and potential competitors. Massilia absolute abundance and relative abundance (dominance) were positively related, and peaked (up to 85%) at early stages of succession of the root microbiome. In comparison, variation in abundance of Agrobacterium was moderate and their dominance increased at later stages of succession. In accordance with contemporary models for microbial ecology classification, copiotrophic and competition-sensitive root colonization by Massilia is suggested. These bacteria exploit, in a transient way, a window of opportunity within the succession of communities within this niche.

  5. Root distribution of rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Carmen Silvia Vieira Janeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on citrus roots are important for genetic selection of cultivars and for management practices such as localized irrigation and fertilization. To characterize root systems of six rootstocks, taking into consideration chemical and physical characteristics of a clayey Typic Hapludox of the Northern State of Paraná, this study was performed having as scion the 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime [Citrus latifolia (Yu. Tanaka]. The rootstocks 'Rangpur' lime (C. limonia Osbeck, 'Africa Rough' lemon (C. jambhiri Lush., 'Sunki' mandarin [C. sunki (Hayata hort. ex Tan.], Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf., 'C13' citrange [C. sinensis (L. Osb. x P. trifoliata (L. Raf] and 'Catânia 2' Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. were used applying the trench profile method and the SIARCS® 3.0 software to determine root distribution. 'C-13' citrange had the largest root system. 'Volkamer' lemon and 'Africa Rough' lemon presented the smallest amount of roots. The effective depth for 80 % of roots was 31-53 cm in rows and 67-68 cm in inter-rows. The effective distance of 80 % of roots measured from the tree trunk exceeded the tree canopy for P. trifoliata, 'Sunki' mandarin, and 'Volkamer' and 'Africa Rough' lemons.

  6. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne; Duhamel, Alain; Bera-Louville, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  7. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1995-12-31

    Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus live fine roots (a lower live/dead ratio) and an increasing amount of dead medium and coarse roots. The primary objectives of the present presentation were to analyse available data on the effects of high nitrogen and sulphur deposition on mineral nutrient balance in tree fine roots and to evaluate the risk of Al interference with cation uptake by roots

  8. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1996-12-31

    Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus live fine roots (a lower live/dead ratio) and an increasing amount of dead medium and coarse roots. The primary objectives of the present presentation were to analyse available data on the effects of high nitrogen and sulphur deposition on mineral nutrient balance in tree fine roots and to evaluate the risk of Al interference with cation uptake by roots

  9. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  10. A Nonparametric Test for Seasonal Unit Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Kunst, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: We consider a nonparametric test for the null of seasonal unit roots in quarterly time series that builds on the RUR (records unit root) test by Aparicio, Escribano, and Sipols. We find that the test concept is more promising than a formalization of visual aids such as plots by quarter. In order to cope with the sensitivity of the original RUR test to autocorrelation under its null of a unit root, we suggest an augmentation step by autoregression. We present some evidence on the siz...

  11. Multiple variables data sets visualization in ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couet, O

    2008-01-01

    The ROOT graphical framework provides support for many different functions including basic graphics, high-level visualization techniques, output on files, 3D viewing etc. They use well-known world standards to render graphics on screen, to produce high-quality output files, and to generate images for Web publishing. Many techniques allow visualization of all the basic ROOT data types, but the graphical framework was still a bit weak in the visualization of multiple variables data sets. This paper presents latest developments done in the ROOT framework to visualize multiple variables (>4) data sets

  12. Floating retained root lesion mimicking apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Pang; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2009-10-01

    A case of a retained root tip simulating apical periodontitis on radiographic examination is described. The retained root tip, originating from the left lower first molar, floated under the left lower second premolar apical region mimicking apical periodontitis. It appeared as an ill-defined periapical radiolucency containing a smaller radiodense mass on radiograph. The differential diagnosis included focal sclerosing osteomyelitis (condensing osteitis) and ossifying fibroma. Upon exicisional biopsy, a retained root associated with granulation tissue was found. After 1-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and the periradicular lesion was healing. Meanwhile, the associated tooth showed a normal response to stimulation testing.

  13. Rooting depth and root depth distribution of Trifolium repens × T. uniflorum interspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S N; Hofmann, R W; Williams, W M; van Koten, C

    2016-05-20

    Traits related to root depth distribution were examined in Trifolium repens × T. uniflorum backcross 1 (BC 1 ) hybrids to determine whether root characteristics of white clover could be improved by interspecific hybridization. Two white clover cultivars, two T. uniflorum accessions and two BC 1 populations were grown in 1 -m deep tubes of sand culture. Maximum rooting depth and root mass distribution were measured at four harvests over time, and root distribution data were fitted with a regression model to provide measures of root system shape. Morphological traits were measured at two depths at harvest 3. Root system shape of the hybrids was more similar to T. uniflorum than to white clover. The hybrids and T. uniflorum had a higher rate of decrease in root mass with depth than white clover, which would result in higher proportions of root mass in the upper profile. Percentage total root mass at 100-200 mm depth was higher for T. uniflorum than white clover, and for Crusader BC 1 than 'Crusader'. Roots of the hybrids and T. uniflorum also penetrated deeper than those of white clover. T. uniflorum had thicker roots at 50-100 mm deep than the other entries, and more of its fine root mass at 400-500 mm. The hybrids and white clover had more of their fine root mass higher in the profile. Consequently, T. uniflorum had a higher root length density at 400-500 mm than most entries, and a smaller decrease in root length density with depth. These results demonstrate that rooting characteristics of white clover can be altered by hybridization with T. uniflorum, potentially improving water and nutrient acquisition and drought resistance. Root traits of T. uniflorum are likely to be adaptations to soil moisture and fertility in its natural environment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Light as stress factor to plant roots – case of root halotropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Ken; Fasano, Rossella; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2014-01-01

    Despite growing underground, largely in darkness, roots emerge to be very sensitive to light. Recently, several important papers have been published which reveal that plant roots not only express all known light receptors but also that their growth, physiology and adaptive stress responses are light-sensitive. In Arabidopsis, illumination of roots speeds-up root growth via reactive oxygen species-mediated and F-actin dependent process. On the other hand, keeping Arabidopsis roots in darkness alters F-actin distribution, polar localization of PIN proteins as well as polar transport of auxin. Several signaling components activated by phytohormones are overlapping with light-related signaling cascade. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of roots to salinity is altered in the light-grown Arabidopsis roots. Particularly, light-exposed roots are less effective in their salt-avoidance behavior known as root halotropism. Here we discuss these new aspects of light-mediated root behavior from cellular, physiological and evolutionary perspectives. PMID:25566292

  15. Effect of MET on formation and vigor of wheat roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingkui; Jin Ziyu; Zhao Miaozhen; Zhao Yanshen

    1993-01-01

    Effect of MET on the formation and vigor of roots of wheat seedlings were studied. The results showed that 50 ∼ 200 ppm MET inhibited vertical elongation of roots, increased root, shoot ratio and enhanced the formation and vigor of roots. But MET had no effect on the dry weight of roots. The activity of peroxidase was decreased and the proportion of assimilates in roots was increased by MET treatment compared with the control

  16. Composite Cucurbita pepo plants with transgenic roots as a tool to study root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Elena L; Logachov, Anton A; Laplaze, Laurent; Demchenko, Nikolay P; Pawlowski, Katharina; Demchenko, Kirill N

    2012-07-01

    In most plant species, initiation of lateral root primordia occurs above the elongation zone. However, in cucurbits and some other species, lateral root primordia initiation and development takes place in the apical meristem of the parental root. Composite transgenic plants obtained by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation are known as a suitable model to study root development. The aim of the present study was to establish this transformation technique for squash. The auxin-responsive promoter DR5 was cloned into the binary vectors pKGW-RR-MGW and pMDC162-GFP. Incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) was used to evaluate the presence of DNA-synthesizing cells in the hypocotyl of squash seedlings to find out whether they were suitable for infection. Two A. rhizogenes strains, R1000 and MSU440, were used. Roots containing the respective constructs were selected based on DsRED1 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence, and DR5::Egfp-gusA or DR5::gusA insertion, respectively, was verified by PCR. Distribution of the response to auxin was visualized by GFP fluorescence or β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity staining and confirmed by immunolocalization of GFP and GUS proteins, respectively. Based on the distribution of EdU-labelled cells, it was determined that 6-day-old squash seedlings were suited for inoculation by A. rhizogenes since their root pericycle and the adjacent layers contain enough proliferating cells. Agrobacterium rhizogenes R1000 proved to be the most virulent strain on squash seedlings. Squash roots containing the respective constructs did not exhibit the hairy root phenotype and were morphologically and structurally similar to wild-type roots. The auxin response pattern in the root apex of squash resembled that in arabidopsis roots. Composite squash plants obtained by A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation are a good tool for the investigation of root apical meristem development and root branching.

  17. Plant roots use a patterning mechanism to position lateral root branches toward available water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun; Aggarwal, Pooja; Robbins, Neil E; Sturrock, Craig J; Thompson, Mark C; Tan, Han Qi; Tham, Cliff; Duan, Lina; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Vernoux, Teva; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Dinneny, José R

    2014-06-24

    The architecture of the branched root system of plants is a major determinant of vigor. Water availability is known to impact root physiology and growth; however, the spatial scale at which this stimulus influences root architecture is poorly understood. Here we reveal that differences in the availability of water across the circumferential axis of the root create spatial cues that determine the position of lateral root branches. We show that roots of several plant species can distinguish between a wet surface and air environments and that this also impacts the patterning of root hairs, anthocyanins, and aerenchyma in a phenomenon we describe as hydropatterning. This environmental response is distinct from a touch response and requires available water to induce lateral roots along a contacted surface. X-ray microscale computed tomography and 3D reconstruction of soil-grown root systems demonstrate that such responses also occur under physiologically relevant conditions. Using early-stage lateral root markers, we show that hydropatterning acts before the initiation stage and likely determines the circumferential position at which lateral root founder cells are specified. Hydropatterning is independent of endogenous abscisic acid signaling, distinguishing it from a classic water-stress response. Higher water availability induces the biosynthesis and transport of the lateral root-inductive signal auxin through local regulation of tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 and PIN-formed 3, both of which are necessary for normal hydropatterning. Our work suggests that water availability is sensed and interpreted at the suborgan level and locally patterns a wide variety of developmental processes in the root.

  18. Injerto columelar extendido angulado. Método para prevenir la rotación cefálica y lateral de los injertos de cartílago en la punta nasal Angulated extended collumelar graft. A method to prevent the cephalic and lateral rotation of the cartilage graft in the nasal tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Castro Govea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El paciente mestizo generalmente posee una nariz pequeña, de base ancha, con fosas nasales redondas y dorso convexo. Los cartílagos alares son débiles, delgados y cortos, proporcionando un soporte estructural deficiente y pobre definición de la punta nasal. Los injertos de cartílago de la punta nasal se usan frecuentemente para corregir esta condición; sin embargo un problema común es la rotación cefálica, caudal y lateral de estos cartílagos. Empleamos un injerto columelar extendido angulado (ICEA para proporcionar elongación y soporte columelar; la extensión angulada nos brinda a su vez un mejor control y predicción de la posición de los injertos de la punta nasal al prevenir su desplazamiento cefálico y lateral. El protocolo quirúrgico empleado incluyó historia clínica completa, desarrollo de un plan quirúrgico mediante análisis de la deformidad y fotografías pre y postoperatorias para el control de los pacientes a medio y largo plazo. Tratamos 95 pacientes usando este procedimiento; 75 con rinoplastia abierta y 20 con técnica cerrada. El rango del periodo de seguimiento fue de 6 meses a 4 años. Los resultados obtenidos fueron satisfactorios, mostrando mejor control y predicción de la forma de la punta nasal. En conclusión, creemos que el injerto columelar extendido angulado proporciona un mejor control de la proyección y angularidad de los injertos colocados en la punta nasal.The mestizo patient usually has a small nose, with wide base, round nostrils and convex dorsum. The alar cartilages are weak, thin and short, providing a deficient structural support and poor definition of the nasal tip. Cartilage graft in the nasal tip are very often used to correct this condition, but a commun problem of this procedure is the cephalic or lateral rotation of these grafts. We used an angulated extended collumalar graft to give collumelar support and elongation. The angulated extension of the graft provides a better control and

  19. Primary root protophloem differentiation requires balanced phosphatidylinositol-4,5-biphosphate levels and systemically affects root branching.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Villalon, A.; Gujas, B.; van Wijk, R.; Munnik, T.; Hardtke, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    Protophloem is a specialized vascular tissue in growing plant organs, such as root meristems. In Arabidopsis mutants with impaired primary root protophloem differentiation, brevis radix (brx) and octopus (ops), meristematic activity and consequently overall root growth are strongly reduced. Second

  20. Rooting depths of plants relative to biological and environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxx, T.S.; Tierney, G.D.; Williams, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    In 1981 to 1982 an extensive bibliographic study was completed to document rooting depths of native plants in the United States. The data base presently contains 1034 citations with approximately 12,000 data elements. In this paper the data were analyzed for rooting depths as related to life form, soil type, geographical region, root type, family, root depth to shoot height ratios, and root depth to root lateral ratios. Average rooting depth and rooting frequencies were determined and related to present low-level waste site maintenance

  1. Cryptographic Protocols Based on Root Extracting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koprowski, Maciej

    In this thesis we design new cryptographic protocols, whose security is based on the hardness of root extracting or more speci cally the RSA problem. First we study the problem of root extraction in nite Abelian groups, where the group order is unknown. This is a natural generalization of the...... complexity of root extraction, even if the algorithm can choose the "public exponent'' itself. In other words, both the standard and the strong RSA assumption are provably true w.r.t. generic algorithms. The results hold for arbitrary groups, so security w.r.t. generic attacks follows for any cryptographic...... groups. In all cases, security follows from a well de ned complexity assumption (the strong root assumption), without relying on random oracles. A smooth natural number has no big prime factors. The probability, that a random natural number not greater than x has all prime factors smaller than x1/u...

  2. Unpredictable Root Canal Morphology: Expect the Unexpected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohez J Makani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A maxillary first molar with more than four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations, especially when two of these canals are detected, with separate apical foramen in the distal root. The inability to locate the unexpected canals of various anatomical configuration and subsequently treat them , may lead to therapeutic failures. Endodontic retreatment is usually the modality of choice in such cases. This report describes a case of a maxillary first molar with five canals (two mesial canals in mesial root, two distal canals in two distal roots and a palatal canal in palatal root. Additionally it shows a rare anatomic configuration and emphasizes the importance of identifying additional canals.

  3. Self-similar continued root approximants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluzman, S.; Yukalov, V.I.

    2012-01-01

    A novel method of summing asymptotic series is advanced. Such series repeatedly arise when employing perturbation theory in powers of a small parameter for complicated problems of condensed matter physics, statistical physics, and various applied problems. The method is based on the self-similar approximation theory involving self-similar root approximants. The constructed self-similar continued roots extrapolate asymptotic series to finite values of the expansion parameter. The self-similar continued roots contain, as a particular case, continued fractions and Padé approximants. A theorem on the convergence of the self-similar continued roots is proved. The method is illustrated by several examples from condensed-matter physics.

  4. Aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bekkers (Jos); L.M.A. Klieverik (Loes Maria Anne); G. Bol-Raap (Goris); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To report the results of aortic root reoperations after pulmonary autograft implantation. Methods: All consecutive patients in our prospective Ross research database were selected for analysis, and additional information for patients requiring reoperation was obtained from the

  5. Root Transcriptomic Analysis Revealing the Importance of Energy Metabolism to the Development of Deep Roots in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Qiaojun; Chen, Liang; Mei, Hanwei; Xu, Kai; Wei, Haibin; Feng, Fangjun; Li, Tiemei; Pang, Xiaomeng; Shi, Caiping; Luo, Lijun; Zhong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Drought is the most serious abiotic stress limiting rice production, and deep root is the key contributor to drought avoidance. However, the genetic mechanism regulating the development of deep roots is largely unknown. In this study, the transcriptomes of 74 root samples from 37 rice varieties, representing the extreme genotypes of shallow or deep rooting, were surveyed by RNA-seq. The 13,242 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between deep rooting and shallow rooting varieties (H vs. L) w...

  6. Seasonal unit roots in trade variables

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Alexander; Manuel Cantavella Jordá

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we examine the presence of seasonal unit roots in trade variables for Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and Italy, using the procedure developed by Hylleberg, Engle, Granger, and Yoo (1990) [HEGY]. Both quarterly and monthly data reject the presence of unit roots at most seasonal frequencies, more frequently in quarterly than in monthly data. This has important implications for econometric modeling of trade balance, exchange rates and income in European Union (EU) countries. ...

  7. Power Efficient Division and Square Root Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Although division and square root are not frequent operations, most processors implement them in hardware to not compromise the overall performance. Two classes of algorithms implement division or square root: digit-recurrence and multiplicative (e.g., Newton-Raphson) algorithms. Previous work....... The proposed unit is compared to similar solutions based on the digit-recurrence algorithm and it is compared to a unit based on the multiplicative Newton-Raphson algorithm....

  8. Alpha-root Processes for Derivatives pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishna, BS

    2010-01-01

    A class of mean reverting positive stochastic processes driven by alpha-stable distributions, referred to here as alpha-root processes in analogy to the square root process (Cox-Ingersoll-Ross process), is a subclass of affine processes, in particular continuous state branching processes with immigration (CBI processes). Being affine, they provide semi-analytical results for the implied term structures as well as for the characteristic exponents for their associated distributions. Their use h...

  9. Development of TRatioPlot in ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Gessinger-Befurt, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ROOT data analysis and visualization framework is a software package which is widely used in physics, especially in high energy physics. A common visualization which has so far been lacking a direct implementation is the ratio plot, as well as a few similar types of plots. The scope and goal of the summer student project at CERN was to implement a class in ROOT itself, that can take care of the most common types of calculations, and produces high quality visuals.

  10. Nitrogen uptake and assimilation by corn roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Akiyama, Yoko; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    The site of nitrogen uptake in the apical root zone of corn was experimentally investigated. Two experiments were performed. The one is to see the assimilation of nitrate and ammonium and the effects of low temperature on it. The 4-day-old roots were treated with 15 N-labelled inorganic nitrogen of 20 ppm N in 5 x 10 -4 M CaSO 4 solution at 30 deg. C and 0 deg. C. The other is to see the nitrogen uptake at apical root zone and the utilization of newly absorbed nitrogen at the root top. The 4-day-old roots were transferred into 5 x 10 -4 M CaSO 4 solution containing 15 N-labelled ammonium nitrate of 40 ppm N. As a result, the effect of low temperature on the nitrogen uptake appeared to be more drastic in the case of nitrate than ammonium. The 15 N content of amino acids indicates that ammonium is assimilated into amino acids even at 0 deg. C, but nitrate is not. The ammonium nitrogen seemed to be absorbed at both cell dividing and elongating zones. On the other hand, nitrate nitrogen seemed to be strongly absorbed at cell elongating zone. The nitrogen in the apical part may be supplied not only by direct absorption but also by translocation from the basal part. The clear difference was found in the utilization of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen at the root top when the root was elongating. This may be due to the difference of assimilation products of inorganic nitrogen. Newly absorbed ammonium nitrogen is more utilizable for the growth of root top than nitrate nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  11. Elliptic hypergeometric functions associated with root systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Hjalmar; Warnaar, S. Ole

    2017-01-01

    We give a survey of elliptic hypergeometric functions associated with root systems, comprised of three main parts. The first two form in essence an annotated table of the main evaluation and transformation formulas for elliptic hypergeometric integeral and series on root systems. The third and final part gives an introduction to Rains' elliptic Macdonald-Koornwinder theory (in part also developed by Coskun and Gustafson).

  12. ROOT I/O in Javascript - Reading ROOT files in a browser

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A JavaScript version of the ROOT I/O subsystem is being developed, in order to be able to browse (inspect) ROOT files in a platform independent way. This allows the content of ROOT files to be displayed in most web browsers, without having to install ROOT or any other software on the server or on the client. This gives a direct access to ROOT files from new (e.g. portable) devices in a light way. It will be possible to display simple graphical objects such as histograms and graphs (TH1, TH2, TH3, TProfile, TGraph, ...). The rendering will first be done with an external JavaScript graphic library, before investigating a way to produce graphics closer to what ROOT supports on other platforms (X11, Windows).

  13. [Root canal treatment of mandibular first premolar with 4 root canals: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-yang; Zhan, Fu-Liang

    2015-10-01

    The mandibular first premolar can be considered one of the most challenging teeth to treat, due to the complexity of its root canal morphology and increased incidence of multiple canals. A case of endodontic treatment of a mandibular first premolar exhibiting a total of 4 distinct root canals and 4 apical foramina was described. Anatomic variation of root canal morphology should be considered in endodontic treatment to ensure a favorable healing outcome, and its identification could be enhanced by careful examination using a dental operating microscope. Obturation of root canals using a warm vertical compaction technique with a highly-radiopaque root canal sealer, such as AH Plus, after careful ultrasonic activated irrigation might allow the flow of sealer into the narrowed but unprepared part of the canal, thereby facilitating optimum chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system.

  14. Adaptive significance of root grafting in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.; Jones, R.

    1988-12-31

    Root grafting has long been observed in forest trees but the adaptive significance of this trait has not been fully explained. Various authors have proposed that root grafting between trees contributes to mechanical support by linking adjacent root systems. Keeley proposes that this trait would be of greatest advantage in swamps where soils provide poor mechanical support. He provides as evidence a greenhouse study of Nyssa sylvatica Marsh in which seedlings of swamp provenance formed between-individual root grafts more frequently than upland provenance seedlings. In agreement with this within-species study, Keeley observed that arid zone species rarely exhibit grafts. Keeley also demonstrated that vines graft less commonly than trees, and herbs never do. Since the need for mechanical support coincides with this trend, these data seem to support his model. In this paper, the authors explore the mechanisms and ecological significance of root grafting, leading to predictions of root grafting incidence. Some observations support and some contradict the mechanical support hypothesis.

  15. Profiling Gene Expression in Germinating Brassica Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Wang, Yi-Hong; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously developed solid-phase gene extraction (SPGE) we examined the mRNA profile in primary roots of Brassica rapa seedlings for highly expressed genes like ACT7 (actin7), TUB (tubulin1), UBQ (ubiquitin), and low expressed GLK (glucokinase) during the first day post-germination. The assessment was based on the mRNA load of the SPGE probe of about 2.1 ng. The number of copies of the investigated genes changed spatially along the length of primary roots. The expression level of all genes differed significantly at each sample position. Among the examined genes ACT7 expression was most even along the root. UBQ was highest at the tip and root-shoot junction (RS). TUB and GLK showed a basipetal gradient. The temporal expression of UBQ was highest in the MZ 9 h after primary root emergence and higher than at any other sample position. Expressions of GLK in EZ and RS increased gradually over time. SPGE extraction is the result of oligo-dT and oligo-dA hybridization and the results illustrate that SPGE can be used for gene expression profiling at high spatial and temporal resolution. SPGE needles can be used within two weeks when stored at 4 °C. Our data indicate that gene expression studies that are based on the entire root miss important differences in gene expression that SPGE is able to resolve for example growth adjustments during gravitropism.

  16. Root caries: a survey of Queensland dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, B J; Ford, P J

    2013-08-01

    Root caries stands to be a significant burden for Australia's ageing population. The objective of this study was to describe Queensland dental practitioners' perceptions of root caries prevalence, presentation and predisposing factors as well as diagnosis and recording practices. Using the Queensland Dental Board register, all 2,515 dentists and dental specialists practising in Queensland were invited to participate in a questionnaire-based postal survey. Of the 660 responses received, 638 were included for final analysis. Use of diagnostic measures such as surface elasticity and contour were reported frequently. A majority of respondents (77%) reported not recording root caries in a way that could be distinguished from coronal caries. Dietary analysis was the most commonly reported adjunctive aid for risk assessment. Recommendations for use of remineralizing agents were frequently reported (home use 90%; in office use 71%). Salivary impairment was reported to be an important risk factor for root caries by 93% of respondents, but only 18% reported performing salivary analysis. A large proportion of respondents (32%) considered patients with diabetes to be of low or no risk of root caries. While the Queensland dental practitioners who participated in this survey demonstrated an awareness of root caries and its predisposing factors, clinical risk assessment particularly for patients with diabetes should be further examined. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Differential effects of fine root morphology on water dynamics in the root-soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, K. F.; Bilheux, H.; Warren, J.

    2017-12-01

    Soil water uptake form plants, particularly in the rhizosphere, is a poorly understood question in the plant and soil sciences. Our study analyzed the role of belowground plant morphology on soil structural and water dynamics of 5 different plant species (juniper, grape, maize, poplar, maple), grown in sandy soils. Of these, the poplar system was extended to capture drying dynamics. Neutron radiography was used to characterize in-situ dynamics of the soil-water-plant system. A joint map of root morphology and soil moisture was created for the plant systems using digital image processing, where soil pixels were connected to associated root structures via minimum distance transforms. Results show interspecies emergent behavior - a sigmoidal relationship was observed between root diameter and bulk/rhizosphere soil water content difference. Extending this as a proxy for extent of rhizosphere development with root age, we observed a logistic growth pattern for the rhizosphere: minimal development in the early stages is superceded by rapid onset of rhizosphere formation, which then stabilizes/decays with the likely root suberization. Dynamics analysis of water content differences between the root/rhizosphere, and rhizosphere/bulk soil interface highlight the persistently higher water content in the root at all water content and root size ranges. At the rhizosphere/bulk soil interface, we observe a shift in soil water dynamics by root size: in super fine roots, we observe that water content is primarily lower in the rhizosphere under wetter conditions, which then gradually increases to a relatively higher water content under drier conditions. This shifts to a persistently higher rhizosphere water content relative to bulk soil in both wet/dry conditions with increased root size, suggesting that, by size, the finest root structures may contribute the most to total soil water uptake in plants.

  18. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    OpenAIRE

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina; IMPERADOR Cristina Aparecida; SOUZA Luiz Gustavo de

    1999-01-01

    The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  19. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  20. Relationships between root respiration rate and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuxia; McLaughlin, Neil B; Gu, Jiacun; Li, Xingpeng; Wang, Zhengquan

    2013-06-01

    Tree roots are highly heterogeneous in form and function. Previous studies revealed that fine root respiration was related to root morphology, tissue nitrogen (N) concentration and temperature, and varied with both soil depth and season. The underlying mechanisms governing the relationship between root respiration and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy along the root branch order have not been addressed. Here, we examined these relationships of the first- to fifth-order roots for near surface roots (0-10 cm) of 22-year-old larch (Larix gmelinii L.) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica L.) plantations. Root respiration rate at 18 °C was measured by gas phase O2 electrodes across the first five branching order roots (the distal roots numbered as first order) at three times of the year. Root parameters of root diameter, specific root length (SRL), tissue N concentration, total non-structural carbohydrates (starch and soluble sugar) concentration (TNC), cortical thickness and stele diameter were also measured concurrently. With increasing root order, root diameter, TNC and the ratio of root TNC to tissue N concentration increased, while the SRL, tissue N concentration and cortical proportion decreased. Root respiration rate also monotonically decreased with increasing root order in both species. Cortical tissue (including exodermis, cortical parenchyma and endodermis) was present in the first three order roots, and cross sections of the cortex for the first-order root accounted for 68% (larch) and 86% (ash) of the total cross section of the root. Root respiration was closely related to root traits such as diameter, SRL, tissue N concentration, root TNC : tissue N ratio and stele-to-root diameter proportion among the first five orders, which explained up to 81-94% of variation in the rate of root respiration for larch and up to 83-93% for ash. These results suggest that the systematic variations of root respiration rate within tree fine root system are possibly due to the

  1. Cadmium translocation by contractile roots differs from that in regular, non-contractile roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Alexander; Lackovič, Andrej; Van Staden, Johannes; Lišková, Desana; Kohanová, Jana; Martinka, Michal

    2015-06-01

    Contractile roots are known and studied mainly in connection with the process of shrinkage of their basal parts, which acts to pull the shoot of the plant deeper into the ground. Previous studies have shown that the specific structure of these roots results in more intensive water uptake at the base, which is in contrast to regular root types. The purpose of this study was to find out whether the basal parts of contractile roots are also more active in translocation of cadmium to the shoot. Plants of the South African ornamental species Tritonia gladiolaris were cultivated in vitro for 2 months, at which point they possessed well-developed contractile roots. They were then transferred to Petri dishes with horizontally separated compartments of agar containing 50 µmol Cd(NO3)2 in the region of the root base or the root apex. Seedlings of 4-d-old maize (Zea mays) plants, which do not possess contractile roots, were also transferred to similar Petri dishes. The concentrations of Cd in the leaves of the plants were compared after 10 d of cultivation. Anatomical analyses of Tritonia roots were performed using appropriately stained freehand cross-sections. The process of contraction required specific anatomical adaptation of the root base in Tritonia, with less lignified and less suberized tissues in comparison with the subapical part of the root. These unusual developmental characteristics were accompanied by more intensive translocation of Cd ions from the basal part of contractile roots to the leaves than from the apical-subapical root parts. The opposite effects were seen in the non-contractile roots of maize, with higher uptake and transport by the apical parts of the root and lower uptake and transport by the basal part. The specific characteristics of contractile roots may have a significant impact on the uptake of ions, including toxic metals from the soil surface layers. This may be important for plant nutrition, for example in the uptake of nutrients from

  2. Modelling water uptake efficiency of root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Tron, Stefania; Schröder, Natalie; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake is crucial for plant productivity. Trait based breeding for more water efficient crops will enable a sustainable agricultural management under specific pedoclimatic conditions, and can increase drought resistance of plants. Mathematical modelling can be used to find suitable root system traits for better water uptake efficiency defined as amount of water taken up per unit of root biomass. This approach requires large simulation times and large number of simulation runs, since we test different root systems under different pedoclimatic conditions. In this work, we model water movement by the 1-dimensional Richards equation with the soil hydraulic properties described according to the van Genuchten model. Climatic conditions serve as the upper boundary condition. The root system grows during the simulation period and water uptake is calculated via a sink term (after Tron et al. 2015). The goal of this work is to compare different free software tools based on different numerical schemes to solve the model. We compare implementations using DUMUX (based on finite volumes), Hydrus 1D (based on finite elements), and a Matlab implementation of Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes 2000 (based on finite differences). We analyse the methods for accuracy, speed and flexibility. Using this model case study, we can clearly show the impact of various root system traits on water uptake efficiency. Furthermore, we can quantify frequent simplifications that are introduced in the modelling step like considering a static root system instead of a growing one, or considering a sink term based on root density instead of considering the full root hydraulic model (Javaux et al. 2008). References Tron, S., Bodner, G., Laio, F., Ridolfi, L., & Leitner, D. (2015). Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study. Ecological modelling, 312, 200-210. Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes, R. A. (2000). Numerical simulation of infiltration, evaporation and shallow

  3. Model Persamaan Massa Karbon Akar Pohon dan Root-Shoot Ratio Massa Karbon (Equation Models of Tree Root Carbon Mass and Root-Shoot Carbon Mass Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias .

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The case study was conducted in the area of Acacia mangium plantation at BKPH Parung Panjang, KPH Bogor. The objective of the study was to formulate equation models of tree root carbon mass and root to shoot carbon mass ratio of the plantation. It was found that carbon content in the parts of tree biomass (stems, branches, twigs, leaves, and roots was different, in which the highest and the lowest carbon content was in the main stem of the tree and in the leaves, respectively. The main stem and leaves of tree accounted for 70% of tree biomass. The root-shoot ratio of root biomass to tree biomass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root biomass to main stem biomass was 0.1443 and 0.25771, respectively, in which 75% of tree carbon mass was in the main stem and roots of tree. It was also found that the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree carbon mass above the ground and the root-shoot ratio of root carbon mass to tree main stem carbon mass was 0.1442 and 0.2034, respectively. All allometric equation models of tree root carbon mass of A. mangium have a high goodness-of-fit as indicated by its high adjusted R2.Keywords: Acacia mangium, allometric, root-shoot ratio, biomass, carbon mass

  4. TSkim: A tool for skimming ROOT trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamont, David

    2010-01-01

    Like many HEP researchers, the members of the Fermi collaboration have chosen to store their experiment data within ROOT trees. A frequent activity of such physicists is the tuning of selection criteria which define the events of interest, thus cutting and pruning the ROOT trees so to extract all the data linked to those specific physical events. It is rather straightforward to write a ROOT script to skim a single kind of data, for example the raw measurements of Fermi LAT detector. This proves to be trickier if one wants to process also some simulated or analysis data at the same time, because each kind of data is structured with its own rules for what concerns file names and sizes, tree names, identification of events, etc. TSkim has been designed to facilitate this task. Thanks to a user-defined configuration file which says where to find the run and event identifications in the different kind of trees, TSkim is able to collect all the tree elements which match a given ROOT cut. The tool will also help when loading the shared libraries which describe the experiment data, or when pruning the tree branches. Initially a pair of PERL and ROOT scripts, TSkim is today a fully compiled C++ application, enclosing our ROOT know-how and offering a panel of features going far beyond the original Fermi requirements. In this manuscript, we present TSkim concepts and key features, including a new kind of event list. Any collaboration using ROOT IO could profit from the use of this tool.

  5. Biological control of corky root in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, G; Fiume, F

    2008-01-01

    Corky root caused by Pyrenochaeta lycopersici (Schneider et Gerlach) is one of the most important soil borne fungal pathogens which develops in the soils, causing diseases in different crops. The research was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the biological control of corky root on tomato. Biological control was performed by using Trichoderma viride Pers. 18/17 SS, Streptomyces spp. AtB42 and Bacillus subtilis M51 PI. According to present and future regulations on the use of chemical fungicides and considering that treatments must avoids environmental pollution, the main object of this research was to find alternative strategies by using biocontrol agents against P. lycopersici that affect tomato plants. In laboratory, the effectiveness of T. viride 18/17 SS, Streptomyces spp. AtB42 and B. subtilis M51 PI to control P. lycopersici were studied. In greenhouse, the research was carried out comparing the following treatments: 1) untreated control; 2) T. viride 18/17 SS; 3) Streptomyces spp. AtB42; 4) B. subtilis M51 PI. Roots of plants of tomato H3028 Hazera were treated with the antagonist suspensions just prior of transplant. Treatments were repeated about 2 months after, with the same suspensions sprayed on the soil to the plant collar. In dual culture, the inhibition of P. lycopersici ranged up to 81.2% (caused from T. viride 18/17 SS), 75.6% (from Streptomyces spp. AtB42) and 66.8% (from B. subtilis M51 PI). In greenhouse trials, with regard to corky root symptoms, all treated plots showed signifycative differences compared to untreated. T. viride gave the better results followed by Streptomyces spp. and then by B. subtilis. The fungus antagonist showed good root surface competence such as demonstrated its persistence on the roots surface of the tomato plants whose roots were treated with T. viride 18/17 SS up to 2 months before.

  6. Pharmacognostic study of Lantana camara Linn. root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study was carried out to perform the pharmacognostic evaluation of Lantana camara Linn. root. Method: The pharmacognostic evaluation was done in terms of organoleptic, macro-microscopy, fluorescence analysis and physicochemical parameters. Results: The characteristic macroscopic features showed that the root consists of 25-40 cm long, 0.2-4.0 cm thick pieces which are usually branched, shallow, tough, creamish-brown externally, outer surface rough due to longitudinal wrinkles, with hard fracture, characteristic odour and pungent taste. The main microscopic characters of the root shows exfoliating cork, consisting of about 10-15 rows of tangentially elongated, thick-walled cells followed by cortex consisting of polygonal parenchymatous cells, a few containing rhomboidal shaped calcium oxalate crystals. Endodermis consists of 3-4 layers of non-lignified, thick-walled rounded parenchymatous cells followed by a single layer of non-lignified pericycle. Phloem, a wide zone of xylem consisting of lignified pitted vessels and bi-to triseriate medullary rays are also present. Proximate physicochemical analysis of the root power showed loss on drying, total ash, water soluble ash, sulphated ash values as 0.52, 4.26, 3.8 and 5.8 % w/w respectively. Successive extraction of the root powder with petroleum ether, chloroform, alcohol, water yielded 0.19, 0.35, 2.19 and 2.0 % w/w respectively. Fluorescence study imparted characteristic colors to the root powder when observed under visible, short and long wavelength light. Conclusions: Various pharmacognostic parameters evaluated in this study helps in identification and standardization of Lantana camara L. root in crude form.

  7. Root exudates from grafted-root watermelon showed a certain contribution in inhibiting Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ling

    Full Text Available Grafting watermelon onto bottle gourd rootstock is commonly used method to generate resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON, but knowledge of the effect of the root exudates of grafted watermelon on this soil-borne pathogen in rhizosphere remains limited. To investigate the root exudate profiles of the own-root bottle gourd, grafted-root watermelon and own-root watermelon, recirculating hydroponic culture system was developed to continuously trap these root exudates. Both conidial germination and growth of FON were significantly decreased in the presence of root exudates from the grafted-root watermelon compared with the own-root watermelon. HPLC analysis revealed that the composition of the root exudates released by the grafted-root watermelon differed not only from the own-root watermelon but also from the bottle gourd rootstock plants. We identified salicylic acid in all 3 root exudates, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in root exudates from own-root bottle gourd and grafted-root watermelon but not own-root watermelon, and abundant cinnamic acid only in own-root watermelon root exudates. The chlorogenic and caffeic acid were candidates for potentiating the enhanced resistance of the grafted watermelon to FON, therefore we tested the effects of the two compounds on the conidial germination and growth of FON. Both phenolic acids inhibited FON conidial germination and growth in a dose-dependent manner, and FON was much more susceptible to chlorogenic acid than to caffeic acid. In conclusion, the key factor in attaining the resistance to Fusarium wilt is grafting on the non-host root stock, however, the root exudates profile also showed some contribution in inhibiting FON. These results will help to better clarify the disease resistance mechanisms of grafted-root watermelon based on plant-microbe communication and will guide the improvement of strategies against Fusarium-mediated wilt of watermelon plants.

  8. Shoot-derived abscisic acid promotes root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Ross, John J

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in regulating root growth. Most work to date has investigated the influence of root-sourced ABA on root growth during water stress. Here, we tested whether foliage-derived ABA could be transported to the roots, and whether this foliage-derived ABA had an influence on root growth under well-watered conditions. Using both application studies of deuterium-labelled ABA and reciprocal grafting between wild-type and ABA-biosynthetic mutant plants, we show that both ABA levels in the roots and root growth in representative angiosperms are controlled by ABA synthesized in the leaves rather than sourced from the roots. Foliage-derived ABA was found to promote root growth relative to shoot growth but to inhibit the development of lateral roots. Increased root auxin (IAA) levels in plants with ABA-deficient scions suggest that foliage-derived ABA inhibits root growth through the root growth-inhibitor IAA. These results highlight the physiological and morphological importance, beyond the control of stomata, of foliage-derived ABA. The use of foliar ABA as a signal for root growth has important implications for regulating root to shoot growth under normal conditions and suggests that leaf rather than root hydration is the main signal for regulating plant responses to moisture. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Water transport through tomato roots infected with Meloidogyne incognita.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout, R.; Gommers, F.J.; Kollöffel, C.

    1991-01-01


    The effect of Meloidogyne incognita on water flow in tomato roots was investigated in rooted split-stem cuttings. Total water flow through infected root parts was significantly lower than through comparable uninfected parts. Total water uptake was correlated with total length of the root

  10. Role and significance of total phenols during rooting of Protea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high total phenol content was associated with significantly higher rooting percentage and increased the number of roots formed. Blanching reduced the time needed for the cuttings to root sufficiently to be transplanted to the field by 30 days. Analyses of different parts of cuttings throughout the entire rooting period ...

  11. Role and significance of total phenols during rooting of Protea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reviewer

    2011-10-03

    Oct 3, 2011 ... fluctuations in total phenol concentration of different parts ... Rooting percentage, mean root dry mass and mean number of roots according to root length ... differences at P ≤ 0.05 based on chi-square; 2different letters in.

  12. Lateral root formation and the multiple roles of auxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Yujuan; Scheres, Ben

    2018-01-01

    Root systems can display variable architectures that contribute to survival strategies of plants. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana possesses a tap root system, in which the primary root and lateral roots (LRs) are major architectural determinants. The phytohormone auxin fulfils multiple roles

  13. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and support...

  14. Fine root architecture of nine North American trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt S. Pregitzer; Jared L. DeForest; Andrew J. Burton; Michael F. Allen; Roger W. Ruess; Ronald L. Hendrick

    2002-01-01

    The fine roots of trees are concentrated on lateral branches that arise from perennial roots. They are important in the acquisition of water and essential nutrients, and at the ecosystem level, they make a significant contribution to biogeochemical cycling. Fine roots have often been studied according to arbitrary size classes, e.g., all roots less than 1 or 2 mm in...

  15. Aluminium localization and toxicity symptoms related to root growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We correlated root growth inhibition with aluminium (Al3+) localization and toxicity symptoms in rice roots using seedlings of two genotypes (tolerant and sensitive) that were exposed to different AlCl3 concentrations. Al3+ localization was evaluated by hematoxylin in primary roots and by morin in cross-sections of the root ...

  16. Bio-reconstruction of root canal using dentin post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the successful management of complicated crown fracture of left maxillary central incisor (#21 of 23-year-old male using dentin (biological post made from human tooth. Endodontic treatment was initiated and sectional obturation was done using ProTaper gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The coronal space was modified to receive a human dentin post. A two-step procedure comprising direct and indirect technique of post fabrication was done to achieve the accuracy of biological post. A maxillary cuspid from an institutional tooth bank was taken, sectioned mesiodistally using a diamond disc simulating the length and thickness of mock post. Dentin post was first verified on the plaster model and then cemented in tooth #21. Core build up was done with composite and porcelain fused to metal (PFM crown was luted. On the follow-up visits, patient was asymptomatic and radiographic evaluation revealed normal periradicular architecture. Biological posts may be good alternatives to conventional post systems as they preserve internal dentin walls, provide excellent adhesion, and resilience similar to natural tooth structure.

  17. Triterpene and Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Metabolic Profiling of Hairy Roots, Adventitious Roots, and Seedling Roots of Astragalus membranaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Ji; Thwe, Aye Aye; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Kim, Jae Kwang; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Sang Un

    2015-10-14

    Astragalus membranaceus is an important traditional Chinese herb with various medical applications. Astragalosides (ASTs), calycosin, and calycosin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (CG) are the primary metabolic components in A. membranaceus roots. The dried roots of A. membranaceus have various medicinal properties. The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of genes related to the biosynthetic pathways of ASTs, calycosin, and CG to investigate the differences between seedling roots (SRs), adventitious roots (ARs), and hairy roots (HRs) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). qRT-PCR study revealed that the transcription level of genes involved in the AST biosynthetic pathway was lowest in ARs and showed similar patterns in HRs and SRs. Moreover, most genes involved in the synthesis of calycosin and CG exhibited the highest expression levels in SRs. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the expression level of the genes correlated with the content of ASTs, calycosin, and CG in the three different types of roots. ASTs were the most abundant in SRs. CG accumulation was greater than calycosin accumulation in ARs and HRs, whereas the opposite was true in SRs. Additionally, 40 metabolites were identified using gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS). Principal component analysis (PCA) documented the differences among SRs, ARs, and HRs. PCA comparatively differentiated among the three samples. The results of PCA showed that HRs were distinct from ARs and SRs on the basis of the dominant amounts of sugars and clusters derived from closely similar biochemical pathways. Also, ARs had a higher concentration of phenylalanine, a precursor for the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, as well as CG. TCA cycle intermediates levels including succinic acid and citric acid indicated a higher amount in SRs than in the others.

  18. Vegetation root zone storage and rooting depth, derived from local calibration of a global hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, R.; Van Beek, R.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wang-Erlandsson, L.; Hessels, T.; Bastiaanssen, W.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    The storage and dynamics of water in the root zone control many important hydrological processes such as saturation excess overland flow, interflow, recharge, capillary rise, soil evaporation and transpiration. These processes are parameterized in hydrological models or land-surface schemes and the effect on runoff prediction can be large. Root zone parameters in global hydrological models are very uncertain as they cannot be measured directly at the scale on which these models operate. In this paper we calibrate the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB using a state-of-the-art ensemble of evaporation fields derived by solving the energy balance for satellite observations. We focus our calibration on the root zone parameters of PCR-GLOBWB and derive spatial patterns of maximum root zone storage. We find these patterns to correspond well with previous research. The parameterization of our model allows for the conversion of maximum root zone storage to root zone depth and we find that these correspond quite well to the point observations where available. We conclude that climate and soil type should be taken into account when regionalizing measured root depth for a certain vegetation type. We equally find that using evaporation rather than discharge better allows for local adjustment of root zone parameters within a basin and thus provides orthogonal data to diagnose and optimize hydrological models and land surface schemes.

  19. Analysis of gene expression in the outer cell layers of Arabidopsis roots during lateral root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth-Tello, Luz Marina

    2005-01-01

    Lateral roots are an important means for the plant to increase its absorptive area and the volume of substrate exploited. Lateral roots originate in the pericycle, the outermost layer of the vascular cylinder, and by growing penetrate the overlaying cell layers before emergence. This process is

  20. Semiconductor laser irradiation improves root canal sealing during routine root canal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingxue; Wang, Dashan; Cui, Ting; Yao, Ruyong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of semiconductor laser irradiation on root canal sealing after routine root canal therapy (RCT). Methods Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). The anatomic crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction and the remaining roots were prepared endodontically with conventional RCT methods. Groups A and B were irradiated with semiconductor laser at 1W for 20 seconds; Groups C and D were ultrasonically rinsed for 60 seconds as positive control groups; Groups E and F without treatment of root canal prior to RCT as negative control groups. Root canal sealing of Groups A, C and E were evaluated by measurements of apical microleakage. The teeth from Groups B, D and F were sectioned, and the micro-structures were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One way ANOVA and LSD-t test were used for statistical analysis (α = .05). Results The apical sealing of both the laser irradiated group and the ultrasonic irrigated group were significantly different from the control group (pirrigated group (p>0.5). SEM observation showed that most of the dentinal tubules in the laser irradiation group melted, narrowed or closed, while most of the dentinal tubules in the ultrasonic irrigation group were filled with tooth paste. Conclusion The application of semiconductor laser prior to root canal obturation increases the apical sealing of the roots treated. PMID:28957407

  1. Root morphology and growth of bare-root seedlings of Oregon white oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Gould; Constance A. Harrington

    2009-01-01

    Root morphology and stem size were evaluated as predictors of height and basal-area growth (measured at groundline) of 1-1 Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook.) seedlings planted in raised beds with or without an additional irrigation treatment. Seedlings were classified into three root classes based on a visual assessment of the...

  2. Deep rooting conferred by DEEPER ROOTING 1 enhances rice yield in paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kondo, Motohiko; Uga, Yusaku

    2014-07-03

    To clarify the effect of deep rooting on grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in an irrigated paddy field with or without fertilizer, we used the shallow-rooting IR64 and the deep-rooting Dro1-NIL (a near-isogenic line homozygous for the Kinandang Patong allele of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) in the IR64 genetic background). Although total root length was similar in both lines, more roots were distributed within the lower soil layer of the paddy field in Dro1-NIL than in IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. At maturity, Dro1-NIL showed approximately 10% higher grain yield than IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. Higher grain yield of Dro1-NIL was mainly due to the increased 1000-kernel weight and increased percentage of ripened grains, which resulted in a higher harvest index. After heading, the uptake of nitrogen from soil and leaf nitrogen concentration were higher in Dro1-NIL than in IR64. At the mid-grain-filling stage, Dro1-NIL maintained higher cytokinin fluxes from roots to shoots than IR64. These results suggest that deep rooting by DRO1 enhances nitrogen uptake and cytokinin fluxes at late stages, resulting in better grain filling in Dro1-NIL in a paddy field in this study.

  3. Root system markup language: toward a unified root architecture description language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Guillaume; Pound, Michael P; Diener, Julien; Pradal, Christophe; Draye, Xavier; Godin, Christophe; Javaux, Mathieu; Leitner, Daniel; Meunier, Félicien; Nacry, Philippe; Pridmore, Tony P; Schnepf, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased in recent years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tools is able to extract in an efficient way the growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML), which has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (1) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner, allowing seamless collaborative work; and (2) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories that will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store two- or three-dimensional image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths, and a suite of annotations at the image, plant, or root scale at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An XML schema describes the features and constraints of RSML, and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, and C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Regrowth of Cirsium arvense from intact roots and root fragments at different soil depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen, Mette Goul

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we measured the shoot rate from intact roots and from root fragments of Cirsium arvense at different digging depths and the number of leaves were used as estimate of minimum regenerative capacity. The experiments were performed on four sites with three or four repetitions of each treatment. On each site plot, the soil was removed down to a given depth within a 1 x 1 m square. All plant parts was excavated from the soil and the soil was either replaced without any root material, or roots of C. arvense was cut into 10 cm long fragments and replaced into the source hole. Shoot number, aboveground biomass and number of leaves were measured. Digging depth and time explained 50% - 60% of the variation in biomass (P<0.001. Replacement of root fragments increased the shoot number in one out of four treatments but did not affect biomass produced compared to production from undisturbed root systems. Number of leaves showed that shoots from all digging depths passed the level of minimum regenerative capacity. We conclude that the intact root system from all depths was able to regenerate within one season and it has a high contribution to the produced biomass compared with root fragments in the upper soil layers.

  5. Pea-root exudates and their effect upon root-nodule bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egeraat, van A.W.S.M.

    1972-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to study the exudation (mechanism, sites) of various compounds by roots of pea seedlings in relation to the growth of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    Chapter 1 gives a survey of the literature pertaining to plant-root

  6. Roots Withstanding their Environment: Exploiting Root System Architecture Responses to Abiotic Stress to Improve Crop Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koevoets, Iko T.; Venema, Jan Henk; Elzenga, J. Theo. M.; Testerink, Christa

    2016-01-01

    To face future challenges in crop production dictated by global climate changes, breeders and plant researchers collaborate to develop productive crops that are able to withstand a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. However, crop selection is often focused on shoot performance alone, as observation of root properties is more complex and asks for artificial and extensive phenotyping platforms. In addition, most root research focuses on development, while a direct link to the functionality of plasticity in root development for tolerance is often lacking. In this paper we review the currently known root system architecture (RSA) responses in Arabidopsis and a number of crop species to a range of abiotic stresses, including nutrient limitation, drought, salinity, flooding, and extreme temperatures. For each of these stresses, the key molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the RSA response are highlighted. To explore the relevance for crop selection, we especially review and discuss studies linking root architectural responses to stress tolerance. This will provide a first step toward understanding the relevance of adaptive root development for a plant’s response to its environment. We suggest that functional evidence on the role of root plasticity will support breeders in their efforts to include root properties in their current selection pipeline for abiotic stress tolerance, aimed to improve the robustness of crops. PMID:27630659

  7. Protein synthesis in geostimulated root caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A study is presented of the processes occurring in the root cap of corn which are requisite for the formation of root cap inhibitor and which can be triggered or modulated by both light and gravity. The results of this study indicate the importance of protein synthesis for light-induced gravitropic bending in roots. Root caps in which protein synthesis is prevented are unable to induce downward bending. This suggests that light acts by stimulating proteins which are necessary for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response (downward bending). The turnover of protein with time was also examined in order to determine whether light acts by stimulating the synthesis of unique proteins required for downward growth. It is found that auxin in combination with light allows for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response at least in part through the modification of protein synthesis. It is concluded that unique proteins are stimulated by light and are involved in promoting the downward growth in roots which are responding to gravity.

  8. New nitrogen uptake strategy: specialized snow roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onipchenko, Vladimir G; Makarov, Mikhail I; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Ivanov, Viktor B; Akhmetzhanova, Assem A; Tekeev, Dzhamal K; Ermak, Anton A; Salpagarova, Fatima S; Kozhevnikova, Anna D; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2009-08-01

    The evolution of plants has yielded a wealth of adaptations for the acquisition of key mineral nutrients. These include the structure, physiology and positioning of root systems. We report the discovery of specialized snow roots as a plant strategy to cope with the very short season for nutrient uptake and growth in alpine snow-beds, i.e. patches in the landscape that remain snow-covered well into the summer. We provide anatomical, chemical and experimental (15)N isotope tracking evidence that the Caucasian snow-bed plant Corydalis conorhiza forms extensive networks of specialized above-ground roots, which grow against gravity to acquire nitrogen directly from within snow packs. Snow roots capture nitrogen that would otherwise partly run off down-slope over a frozen surface, thereby helping to nourish these alpine ecosystems. Climate warming is changing and will change mountain snow regimes, while large-scale anthropogenic N deposition has increased snow N contents. These global changes are likely to impact on the distribution, abundance and functional significance of snow roots.

  9. Root canal treatment and special needs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, E; Parashos, P; Borromeo, G L

    2015-04-01

    To identify current trends of root canal treatment for patients with special needs. A postal questionnaire was sent to General Dentists in Victoria, Australia and Endodontists and Special Needs Dentists across Australia to determine the extent of root canal treatment performed on special needs patients. Over a four-month period, 1120 questionnaires were distributed with an overall response rate of 63.9% (n = 716). Response rates were 63.2% (n = 655), 68.5% (n = 50) and 100.0% (n = 11) amongst General Dentists, Endodontists and Special Needs Dentists, respectively. Endodontists (95.7%) and Special Needs Dentists (100.0%) performed significantly more root canal treatment on adult patients with special needs compared with 51.2% of General Dentists, (P special needs patients compared with only 29.7% of General Dentists (P special needs patients was more likely to be carried out by specialist dental practitioners who were more likely to utilize a pharmacological approach for behaviour guidance and to perform single-visit root canal treatment compared with General Dentists. A multidisciplinary approach for special needs patients who require root canal treatment provides an opportunity for these patients to retain their dentition. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Rooting of stem cuttings of ixora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline De Souza Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ixora is ornamental plant widely used in landscaping. In order to maximize the propagation of cuts, we evaluated the concentrations of auxin (indolbutiric acid and the presence of leaves on the rooting in cuts of Ixora coccinea L. The experiment was conducted in randomized block design, in factorial design 3x4, with three types of cuts (without leaf, with two or four leaves, four concentrations of indolbutiric acid (0, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg L-1, with four replications and 10 cuts in each experimental unit. After 53 days of implantation the experiment, evaluated the survival(%, rooting(%, sprouting(%, formation of callus(%, number, length and biomass of roots formed. The interaction of the type of cuts with concentrations of auxin was not significant for any of the variables analyzed. The survival of cuttings was not influenced by the treatments. Cuts with two or four leaves presented rooting and length of roots above the cuttings without leaves. The application of auxin does not substitute the presence of leaf in cuts of ixora in vegetative propagation. The vegetative propagation by cut of ixora can be made without application of auxin, and the leaves must be maintained in the cuttings.

  11. Unleashing the potential of the root hair cell as a single plant cell type model in root systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen eQiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant root is an organ composed of multiple cell types with different functions. This multicellular complexity limits our understanding of root biology because –omics studies performed at the level of the entire root reflect the average responses of all cells composing the organ. To overcome this difficulty and allow a more comprehensive understanding of root cell biology, an approach is needed that would focus on one single cell type in the plant root. Because of its biological functions (i.e. uptake of water and various nutrients; primary site of infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria in legumes, the root hair cell is an attractive single cell model to study root cell response to various stresses and treatments. To fully study their biology, we have recently optimized procedures in obtaining root hair cell samples. We culture the plants using an ultrasound aeroponic system maximizing root hair cell density on the entire root systems and allowing the homogeneous treatment of the root system. We then isolate the root hair cells in liquid nitrogen. Isolated root hair yields could be up to 800 to 1000 mg of plant cells from 60 root systems. Using soybean as a model, the purity of the root hair was assessed by comparing the expression level of genes previously identified as soybean root hair specific between preparations of isolated root hair cells and stripped roots, roots devoid in root hairs. Enlarging our tests to include other plant species, our results support the isolation of large quantities of highly purified root hair cells which is compatible with a systems biology approach.

  12. Simulating root carbon storage with a coupled carbon — Water cycle root model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, A.; Heimann, M.

    1996-12-01

    Is it possible to estimate carbon allocation to fine roots from the water demands of the vegetation? We assess this question by applying a root model which is based on optimisation principles. The model uses a new formulation of water uptake by fine roots, which is necessary to explicitly take into account the highly dynamic and non-steady process of water uptake. Its carbon dynamics are driven by maximising the water uptake while keeping maintenance costs at a minimum. We apply the model to a site in northern Germany and check averaged vertical fine root biomass distribution against measured data. The model reproduces the observed values fairly well and the approach seems promising. However, more validation is necessary, especially on the predicted dynamics of the root biomass.

  13. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Differences in U root-to-shoot translocation between plant species explained by U distribution in roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straczek, Anne; Duquene, Lise [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wegrzynek, Dariusz [IAEA, Seibersdorf Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Chinea-Cano, Ernesto [IAEA, Seibersdorf Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Wannijn, Jean [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Navez, Jacques [Royal Museum of Africa, Department of Geology, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren (Belgium); Vandenhove, Hildegarde, E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.b [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    Accumulation and distribution of uranium in roots and shoots of four plants species differing in their cation exchange capacity of roots (CECR) was investigated. After exposure in hydroponics for seven days to 100 mumol U L{sup -1}, distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots. Higher U concentrations were measured in roots of dicots which showed a higher CECR than monocot species. Chemical extractions indicated that uranium is mostly located in the apoplasm of roots of monocots but that it is predominantly located in the symplasm of roots of dicots. Translocation of U to shoot was not significantly affected by the CECR or distribution of U between symplasm and apoplasm. Distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots for all species. Additionally, longitudinal and radial distribution of U in roots of maize and Indian mustard, respectively showing the lowest and the highest translocation, was studied following X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of specific root sections. Chemical analysis and XRF analysis of roots of maize and Indian mustard clearly indicated a higher longitudinal and radial transport of uranium in roots of Indian mustard than in roots of maize, where uranium mostly accumulated in root tips. These results showed that even if CECR could partly explain U accumulation in roots, other mechanisms like radial and longitudinal transport are implied in the translocation of U to the shoot.

  15. Variations in the Root Form and Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Mandibular First Molars in a Sri Lankan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Peiris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the number of roots and morphology of the root canal system of permanent mandibular first molars (M1 in a Sri Lankan population. Sample of 529 M1 teeth was used. The number of roots was examined and the lengths of the mesial and distal roots were measured to the nearest 0.01 mm. Vacuum injection protocol was used to inject China ink into the root canal system, making it transparent. Root canal morphology was recorded using Vertucci’s classification. Presence of furcation canals, position of lateral canals, intercanal communications, level of bifurcation, and convergence of the root canal system were recorded. M1 showed three roots in 4.1% of the sample. Commonest root canal morphology of the mesial root was type IV and the distal root was type I. The level of bifurcation of the root canals was commonly observed in the cervical one-third of the root while convergence was observed in the apical one-third in both roots. Prevalence of three rooted mandibular first molars is less than 5%. Mesial root showed the most variable canal morphology. Prevalence of furcation canals was 1.5% while that of middle mesial canals was 0.2%.

  16. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  17. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  18. Avoiding transport bottlenecks in an expanding root system: xylem vessel development in fibrous and pioneer roots under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Byczyk, Julia; Eissenstat, David M; Oleksyn, Jacek; Zadworny, Marcin

    2012-09-01

    Root systems develop to effectively absorb water and nutrients and to rapidly transport these materials to the transpiring shoot. In woody plants, roots can be born with different functions: fibrous roots are primarily used for water and nutrient absorption, whereas pioneer roots have a greater role in transport. Because pioneer roots extend rapidly in the soil and typically quickly produce fibrous roots, they need to develop transport capacity rapidly so as to avoid becoming a bottleneck to the absorbed water of the developing fibrous roots and, as we hypothesized, immediately activate a specific type of autophagy at a precise time of their development. Using microscopy techniques, we monitored xylem development in Populus trichocarpa roots in the first 7 d after emergence under field conditions. Newly formed pioneer roots contained more primary xylem poles and had larger diameter tracheary elements than fibrous roots. While xylogenesis started later in pioneer roots than in fibrous, it was completed at the same time, resulting in functional vessels on the third to fourth day following root emergence. Programmed cell death was responsible for creating the water conducting capacity of xylem. Although the early xylogenesis processes were similar in fibrous and pioneer roots, secondary vascular development proceeded much more rapidly in pioneer roots. Compared to fibrous roots, rapid development of transport capacity in pioneer roots is not primarily caused by accelerated xylogenesis but by larger and more numerous tracheary elements and by rapid initiation of secondary growth.

  19. Partical replacement of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthenum merifolium cuttings by pre-rooting storage in the dark.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Part of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Pink Boston' and 'Refour' cuttings can be replaced by pre-rooting storage in the dark. Pre-rooting storage of 7 days at temperatures between 9° and 21°C was adequate. Longer periods of dark storage resulted in increase of root growth but

  20. Effects of cloning and root-tip size on observations of fungal ITS sequences from Picea glauca roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the effects of cloning on observations of fungal ITS sequences from Picea glauca (white spruce) roots two techniques were compared: (i) direct sequencing of fungal ITS regions from individual root tips without cloning and (ii) cloning and sequencing of fungal ITS regions from individual root tips. Effect of root tip size was...

  1. Differences in U root-to-shoot translocation between plant species explained by U distribution in roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straczek, Anne; Duquene, Lise; Wegrzynek, Dariusz; Chinea-Cano, Ernesto; Wannijn, Jean; Navez, Jacques; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation and distribution of uranium in roots and shoots of four plants species differing in their cation exchange capacity of roots (CECR) was investigated. After exposure in hydroponics for seven days to 100 μmol U L -1 , distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots. Higher U concentrations were measured in roots of dicots which showed a higher CECR than monocot species. Chemical extractions indicated that uranium is mostly located in the apoplasm of roots of monocots but that it is predominantly located in the symplasm of roots of dicots. Translocation of U to shoot was not significantly affected by the CECR or distribution of U between symplasm and apoplasm. Distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots for all species. Additionally, longitudinal and radial distribution of U in roots of maize and Indian mustard, respectively showing the lowest and the highest translocation, was studied following X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of specific root sections. Chemical analysis and XRF analysis of roots of maize and Indian mustard clearly indicated a higher longitudinal and radial transport of uranium in roots of Indian mustard than in roots of maize, where uranium mostly accumulated in root tips. These results showed that even if CECR could partly explain U accumulation in roots, other mechanisms like radial and longitudinal transport are implied in the translocation of U to the shoot.

  2. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna; Nielsen, Steen Lykke

    2014-01-01

    induced phenotypically normal roots which, however, showed a reduced response to cytokinin as compared with non-transgenic roots. Nevertheless, both types of roots were infected to a similar high rate with the zoospores of Spongospora subterranea, a soilborne potato pathogen. The transgenic roots...

  3. Root hair defective4 encodes a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate phosphatase required for proper root hair development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.M.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Zhang, Y.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized expansion of root hair cells in Arabidopsis thaliana is improperly controlled in root hair-defective rhd4-1 mutant plants, resulting in root hairs that are shorter and randomly form bulges along their length. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy in rhd4-1 root hairs, we analyzed

  4. Treatment of root fracture with accompanying resorption using cermet cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, J L

    1992-02-01

    A method of treating an apical root fracture with accompanying resorption at the junction of the fracture fragments using glass-cermet cement is described. Endodontically, the material had previously been used for repair of lateral resorptive root defects and retrograde root fillings. Complete bone regeneration was observed three years post-operatively following treatment of the root fracture in the conventional manner. The various advantages of glass-cermet cement as a root filling material used in the technique described are discussed.

  5. How to study deep roots - and why it matters

    OpenAIRE

    Maeght, Jean-Luc; Rewald, B.; Pierret, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The drivers underlying the development of deep root systems, whether genetic or environmental, are poorly understood but evidence has accumulated that deep rooting could be a more widespread and important trait among plants than commonly anticipated from their share of root biomass. Even though a distinct classification of "deep roots" is missing to date, deep roots provide important functions for individual plants such as nutrient and water uptake but can also shape plant communities by hydr...

  6. Synergy between root hydrotropic response and root biomass in maize (Zea mays L.) enhances drought avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Delfeena; Martínez-Guadarrama, Jesús; Hernández-Bruno, Oralia; Flores, Leonardo; Nieto-Sotelo, Jorge; Cassab, Gladys I

    2017-12-01

    Roots of higher plants change their growth direction in response to moisture, avoiding drought and gaining maximum advantage for development. This response is termed hydrotropism. There have been few studies of root hydrotropism in grasses, particularly in maize. Our goal was to test whether an enhanced hydrotropic response of maize roots correlates with a better adaptation to drought and partial/lateral irrigation in field studies. We developed a laboratory bioassay for testing hydrotropic response in primary roots of 47 maize elite DTMA (Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa) hybrids. After phenotyping these hybrids in the laboratory, selected lines were tested in the field. Three robust and three weak hybrids were evaluated employing three irrigation procedures: normal irrigation, partial lateral irrigation and drought. Hybrids with a robust hydrotropic response showed growth and developmental patterns, under drought and partial lateral irrigation, that differed from weak hydrotropic responders. A correlation between root crown biomass and grain yield in hybrids with robust hydrotropic response was detected. Hybrids with robust hydrotropic response showed earlier female flowering whereas several root system traits, such as projected root area, median width, maximum width, skeleton width, skeleton nodes, average tip diameter, rooting depth skeleton, thinner aboveground crown roots, as well as stem diameter, were considerably higher than in weak hydrotropic responders in the three irrigation procedures utilized. These results demonstrate the benefit of intensive phenotyping of hydrotropism in primary roots since maize plants that display a robust hydrotropic response grew better under drought and partial lateral irrigation, indicating that a selection for robust hydrotropism might be a promising breeding strategy to improve drought avoidance in maize. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Absorption and translocation of 32P through root feeding by root (Wilt) affected coconut palms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beena George, S.; Moossa, P.P.; Sureshkumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation was carried out during 2015-16 to study the absorption and translocation of 32 P by root (wilt) affected coconut palms through root feeding in the Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, College of Horticulture, Vellanikkara. Root (wilt) is one of the major diseases affecting coconut production in India. Etiology of the disease has been examined from several angles and it was found that nutrition imbalance in association with root (wilt) and it remains so even if integrated nutrient management practices are applied to diseased palms. Absorption and translocation of nutrients in three different types of coconut palms (healthy, apparently healthy and diseased palms) were studied using radioactive phosphorusin laterite soil. Ten morphologically uniform palms of same age were selected from each type of palms. Four active young roots were excavated from each palm and 32 P was applied by root feeding and index leaves were radio assayed for 32 P count at 24 hours, 15 and 30 days after application. The results revealed that healthy palms recorded significantly higher count rate(581 to 25158.66 cpm g -1 ) with root feeding compared to diseased palms(263 to 1068.38 cpm g - 1 ). From the present study it was clear that root (wilt) disease cannot be managed by soil application of nutrients because roots of the diseased palms are not able to translocate these nutrients. Since nutrient imbalance was one of the major problems noticed in root (wilt) affected palms, further study is required to find out proper method of nutrient application. (author)

  8. Untangling the effects of root age and tissue nitrogen on root respiration in Populus tremuloides at different nitrogen supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccon, Christian; Tagliavini, Massimo; Schmitt, Armin Otto; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-05-01

    Root respiration is a major contributor to terrestrial carbon flux. Many studies have shown root respiration to increase with an increase in root tissue nitrogen (N) concentration across species and study sites. Studies have also shown that both root respiration and root N concentration typically decrease with root age. The effects of added N may directly increase respiration of existing roots or may affect respiration by shifting the age structure of a root population by stimulating growth. To the best of our knowledge, no study has ever examined the effect of added N as a function of root age on root respiration. In this study, root respiration of 13-year-old Populus tremuloides Michx. trees grown in the field and 1-year-old P. tremuloides seedlings grown in containers was analyzed for the relative influence of root age and root N concentration independent of root age on root respiration. Field roots were first tracked using root windows and then sampled at known age. Nitrogen was either applied or not to small patches beneath the windows. In a pot experiment, each plant was grown with its root system split between two separate pots and N was applied at three different levels, either at the same or at different rates between pots. Root N concentration ranged between 1.4 and 1.7% in the field experiment and 1.8 and 2.6% in the seedling experiment. We found that addition of N increased root N concentration of only older roots in the field but of roots of all ages in the potted seedlings. In both experiments, the age-dependent decline in root respiration was largely consistent, and could be explained by a negative power function. Respiration decreased ∼50% by 3 weeks of age. Although root age was the dominant factor affecting respiration in both experiments, in the field experiment, root N also contributed to root respiration independent of root age. These results add further insight into respiratory responses of roots to N addition and mechanisms underlying the

  9. Square-root measurement for pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Siendong

    2005-01-01

    Square-root measurement is a very useful suboptimal measurement in many applications. It was shown that the square-root measurement minimizes the squared error for pure states. In this paper, the least squared error problem is reformulated and a new proof is provided. It is found that the least squared error depends only on the average density operator of the input states. The properties of the least squared error are then discussed, and it is shown that if the input pure states are uniformly distributed, the average probability of error has an upper bound depending on the least squared error, the rank of the average density operator, and the number of the input states. The aforementioned properties help explain why the square-root measurement can be effective in decoding processes

  10. Tree root systems and nutrient mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Jim; Rob, Harrison; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    sometimes stored at depth. Other recent studies on potential release of nutrients due to chemical weathering indicate the importance of root access to deep soil layers. Release profi les clearly indicate depletion in the top layers and a much higher potential in B and C horizons. Review of evaluations......Roots mobilize nutrients via deep penetration and rhizosphere processes inducing weathering of primary minerals. These contribute to C transfer to soils and to tree nutrition. Assessments of these characteristics and processes of root systems are important for understanding long-term supplies...... of nutrient elements essential for forest growth and resilience. Research and techniques have signifi cantly advanced since Olof Tamm’s 1934 base mineral index for Swedish forest soils, and basic nutrient budget estimates for whole-tree harvesting systems of the 1970s. Recent research in areas that include...

  11. Evaluation of different types of rooting stimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Salaš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the assessment of selected stimulators, especially from Rhizopon product line, which are used for rooting and root system enhancement in various ornamental woody species. Two available methods of cuttings stimulation were selected from the available range of rooting stimulators: stimulation by long-term immersion in solutions or treatment of cuttings with powder stimulators. The experiment involved stimulators with two active components, currently the most commonly used phytohormones for this purpose – IBA and NAA – that were applied in different concentrations. The experiment took place in three propagation terms with twelve coniferous and deciduous shrub varieties. The results of the experiment show the different reactions of the individual species as well as varieties on the respective term of propagation and used form of stimulator.

  12. Sparse DOA estimation with polynomial rooting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2015-01-01

    Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation involves the localization of a few sources from a limited number of observations on an array of sensors. Thus, DOA estimation can be formulated as a sparse signal reconstruction problem and solved efficiently with compressive sensing (CS) to achieve highresol......Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation involves the localization of a few sources from a limited number of observations on an array of sensors. Thus, DOA estimation can be formulated as a sparse signal reconstruction problem and solved efficiently with compressive sensing (CS) to achieve...... highresolution imaging. Utilizing the dual optimal variables of the CS optimization problem, it is shown with Monte Carlo simulations that the DOAs are accurately reconstructed through polynomial rooting (Root-CS). Polynomial rooting is known to improve the resolution in several other DOA estimation methods...

  13. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  14. Alkaloids of root barks of Zanthoxylum spp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlemwerger, Sandra Virginia Alves; Sales, Edijane Matos; Costa, Rafael dos Santos; Velozo, Eudes da Silva; Guedes, Maria Lenise da Silva

    2012-01-01

    In 1959, Gottlieb and Antonaccio published a study reporting the occurrence of lignan sesamin and triterpene lupeol in Zanthoxylum tingoassuiba. In this work we describe the phytochemical study of the root bark of the Z. tingoassuiba which allowed the identification of the lupeol, sesamin, and alkaloids dihydrochelerythrine, chelerythrine, anorttianamide, cis-N-methyl-canadin, predicentine, 2, 3-methylenedioxy-10,11-dimethoxy-tetrahydro protoberberine. The investigation of hexane and methanol extracts of the root bark of Z. rhoifolium and Z. stelligerum also investigated showed the presence of alkaloids dihydrochelerythrine, anorttianamide, cis-N-methyl-canadine, 7,9-dimethoxy-2,3- methylenedioxybenzophen anthridine and angoline. The occurrence of 2,3-methylenedioxy-10,11-dimethoxy-tetrahydro protoberberine is first described in Z. tingoassuiba and Z. stelligerum. This is also the first report of the presence of hesperidin and neohesperidin in roots of Z. stelligerum (author)

  15. Conservative management of displaced horizontal root fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kunhappan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries of teeth are the main cause of emergency treatment in dental practice. Radicular fractures in permanent teeth are uncommon, being only 0.5-7% of the cases. Horizontal root fractures are more frequently observed in the maxillary anterior region of young male patients and vary in severity from enamel fractures to avulsions. Fracture occurs often in the middle-third of the root followed by apical and coronal third. The present case report describes a clinical case of a horizontal root fracture located at the middle third of a maxillary left-central incisor treated endodontically after approximating fracture segment with the help of orthodontic appliance. After 6 months follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic with normal periodontal health.

  16. Genotypic diversity of root and shoot characteristics of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali ganjali

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Root and shoot characteristics of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. genotypes are believed to be important in drought tolerance. There is a little information about the response of genotypes root growth in hydroponics and greenhouse culture, also the relationships between root size and drought tolerance. This study was conducted to observe whether genotypes differ in root size, and to see that root size is associated with drought tolerance during early vegetative growth. We found significant differences (p0.01 in root dry weight, total root length, tap root length, root area, leaf dry weight, leaf area and shoot biomass per plant among 30 genotypes of chickpea grown in hydroponics culture for three weeks. Each of these parameters correlated with all others, positively. Among 30 genotypes, 10 genotypes with different root sizes were selected and were grown in a greenhouse in sand culture experiment under drought stress (FC %30 for three weeks. There were not linear or non-linear significant correlations between root characters in hydroponics and greenhouse environments. It seems that environmental factors are dominant on genetic factors in seedling stage and so, the expression of genotypics potential for root growth characteristics of genotypes are different in hydroponic and greenhouse conditions. In this study, the selection of genotypes with vigorous roots system in hydroponic condition did not lead to genotypes with the same root characters in greenhouse environment. The genotype×drought interactions for root characters of chickpea seedlings in 30 days were not significant (p

  17. On the road to quantitative genetic/genomic analyses of root growth and development components underlying root architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draye, X.; Dorlodot, S. de; Lavigne, T.

    2006-01-01

    The quantitative genetic and functional genomic analyses of root development, growth and plasticity will be instrumental in revealing the major regulatory pathways of root architecture. Such knowledge, combined with in-depth consideration of root physiology (e.g. uptake, exsudation), form (space-time dynamics of soil exploration) and ecology (including root environment), will settle the bases for designing root ideotypes for specific environments, for low-input agriculture or for successful agricultural production with minimal impact on the environment. This report summarizes root research initiated in our lab between 2000 and 2004 in the following areas: quantitative analysis of root branching in bananas, high throughput characterisation of root morphology, image analysis, QTL mapping of detailed features of root architecture in rice, and attempts to settle a Crop Root Research Consortium. (author)

  18. Roots Air Management System with Integrated Expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stretch, Dale [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); Wright, Brad [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); Fortini, Matt [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); Fink, Neal [Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Ramadan, Bassem [Kettering Univ., Flint, MI (United States); Eybergen, William [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States)

    2016-07-06

    PEM fuel cells remain an emerging technology in the vehicle market with several cost and reliability challenges that must be overcome in order to increase market penetration and acceptance. The DOE has identified the lack of a cost effective, reliable, and efficient air supply system that meets the operational requirements of a pressurized PEM 80kW fuel cell as one of the major technological barriers that must be overcome. This project leveraged Roots positive displacement development advancements and demonstrated an efficient and low cost fuel cell air management system. Eaton built upon its P-Series Roots positive displacement design and shifted the peak efficiency making it ideal for use on an 80kW PEM stack. Advantages to this solution include: • Lower speed of the Roots device eliminates complex air bearings present on other systems. • Broad efficiency map of Roots based systems provides an overall higher drive cycle fuel economy. • Core Roots technology has been developed and validated for other transportation applications. Eaton modified their novel R340 Twin Vortices Series (TVS) Roots-type supercharger for this application. The TVS delivers more power and better fuel economy in a smaller package as compared to other supercharger technologies. By properly matching the helix angle with the rotor’s physical aspect ratio, the supercharger’s peak efficiency can be moved to the operating range where it is most beneficial for the application. The compressor was designed to meet the 90 g/s flow at a pressure ratio of 2.5, similar in design to the P-Series 340. A net shape plastic expander housing with integrated motor and compressor was developed to significantly reduce the cost of the system. This integrated design reduced part count by incorporating an overhung expander and motor rotors into the design such that only four bearings and two shafts were utilized.

  19. Analysis of gene expression profiles for cell wall modifying proteins and ACC synthases in soybean cyst nematode colonized roots, adventitious rooting hypocotyls, root tips, flooded roots, and IBA and ACC treatment roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that soybean cyst nematode (SCN) co-opts a part or all of one or more innate developmental process in soybean to establish its feeding structure, syncytium, in soybean roots. The syncytium in soybean roots is formed in a predominantly lateral direction within the vascular bundle by ...

  20. Mandibular molar with five root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Fernando Branco; Dotto, Sidney Ricardo; Reis, Magda de Sousa; Ferreira, Ronise; Travassos, Rosana Maria Coelho

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the importance of knowledge of the internal anatomy of root canals for the success of endodontic treatment. Lack of knowledge of anatomic variations and their characteristics in different teeth has been pointed out as one of the main causes of endodontic therapy failure. In this report, the authors describe the endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar with five root canals, evaluate the rate of occurrence of this number of canals, and discuss the importance of their identification and treatment.

  1. Unit root behavior in energy futures prices

    OpenAIRE

    Serletis, Apostolos

    1992-01-01

    This paper re-examines the empirical evidence for random walk type behavior in energy futures prices. In doing so, tests for unit roots in the univariate time-series representation of the daily crude oil, heating oil, and unleaded gasoline series are performed using recent state-of-the-art methodology. The results show that the unit root hypothesis can be rejected if allowance is made for the possibility of a one-time break in the intercept and the slope of the trend function at an unknown po...

  2. Endodontic complications of root canal therapy performed by dental students with stainless-steel K-files and nickel-titanium hand files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiette, M T; Metzger, Z; Phillips, C; Trope, M

    1999-04-01

    Straightening of curved canals is one of the most common procedural errors in endodontic instrumentation. This problem is commonly encountered when dental students perform molar endodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of the type of instrument used by these students on the extent of straightening and on the incidence of other endodontic procedural errors. Nickel-titanium 0.02 taper hand files were compared with traditional stainless-steel 0.02 taper K-files. Sixty molar teeth comprised of maxillary and mandibular first and second molars were treated by senior dental students. Instrumentation was with either nickel-titanium hand files or stainless-steel K-files. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs of each tooth were taken using an XCP precision instrument with a customized bite block to ensure accurate reproduction of radiographic angulation. The radiographs were scanned and the images stored as TIFF files. By superimposing tracings from the preoperative over the postoperative radiographs, the degree of deviation of the apical third of the root canal filling from the original canal was measured. The presence of other errors, such as strip perforation and instrument breakage, was established by examining the radiographs. In curved canals instrumented by stainless-steel K-files, the average deviation of the apical third of the canals was 14.44 degrees (+/- 10.33 degrees). The deviation was significantly reduced when nickel-titanium hand files were used to an average of 4.39 degrees (+/- 4.53 degrees). The incidence of other procedural errors was also significantly reduced by the use of nickel-titanium hand files.

  3. Vertical Root Fracture initiation in curved roots after root canal preparation: A dentinal micro-crack analysis with LED transillumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéns-Vila, Ramón; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Ruíz-Piñón, Manuel; Castelo-Baz, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    One of the causative factors of root defects is the increased friction produced by rotary instrumentation. A high canal curvature may increase stress, making the tooth more susceptible to dentinal cracks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentinal micro-crack formation with the ProTaper NEXT and ProTaper Universal systems using LED transillumination, and to analyze the micro-crack generated at the point of maximum canal curvature. 60 human mandibular premolars with curvatures between 30-49° and radii between 2-4 mm were used. The root canals were instrumented using the Protaper Universal® and Protaper NEXT® systems, with the aid of the Proglider® system. The obtained samples were sectioned transversely before subsequent analysis with LED transillumination at 2 mm and 8 mm from the apex and at the point of maximum canal curvature. Defects were scored: 0 for no defects; and 1 for micro-cracks. Root defects were not observed in the control group. The ProTaper NEXT system caused fewer defects (16.7%) than the ProTaper Universal system (40%) ( P Universal system caused significantly more micro-cracks at the point of maximum canal curvature than the ProTaper NEXT system ( P Universal system. A higher prevalence of defects was found at the point of maximum curvature in the ProTaper Universal group. Key words: Curved root, Micro-crack, point of maximum canal curvature, ProTaper NEXT, ProTaper Universal, Vertical root fracture.

  4. ROOT.NET: Using ROOT from .NET languages like C# and F#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, G.

    2012-12-01

    ROOT.NET provides an interface between Microsoft's Common Language Runtime (CLR) and .NET technology and the ubiquitous particle physics analysis tool, ROOT. ROOT.NET automatically generates a series of efficient wrappers around the ROOT API. Unlike pyROOT, these wrappers are statically typed and so are highly efficient as compared to the Python wrappers. The connection to .NET means that one gains access to the full series of languages developed for the CLR including functional languages like F# (based on OCaml). Many features that make ROOT objects work well in the .NET world are added (properties, IEnumerable interface, LINQ compatibility, etc.). Dynamic languages based on the CLR can be used as well, of course (Python, for example). Additionally it is now possible to access ROOT objects that are unknown to the translation tool. This poster will describe the techniques used to effect this translation, along with performance comparisons, and examples. All described source code is posted on the open source site CodePlex.

  5. ROOT.NET: Using ROOT from .NET languages like C and F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, G

    2012-01-01

    ROOT.NET provides an interface between Microsoft's Common Language Runtime (CLR) and .NET technology and the ubiquitous particle physics analysis tool, ROOT. ROOT.NET automatically generates a series of efficient wrappers around the ROOT API. Unlike pyROOT, these wrappers are statically typed and so are highly efficient as compared to the Python wrappers. The connection to .NET means that one gains access to the full series of languages developed for the CLR including functional languages like F (based on OCaml). Many features that make ROOT objects work well in the .NET world are added (properties, IEnumerable interface, LINQ compatibility, etc.). Dynamic languages based on the CLR can be used as well, of course (Python, for example). Additionally it is now possible to access ROOT objects that are unknown to the translation tool. This poster will describe the techniques used to effect this translation, along with performance comparisons, and examples. All described source code is posted on the open source site CodePlex.

  6. Decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in root-canal exudates during root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamapun, Kassara; Handagoon, Sira; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Gutmann, James L; Pavasant, Prasit; Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai

    2017-10-01

    To determine the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) levels in root-canal exudates from teeth undergoing root-canal treatment. The root-canal exudates from six teeth with normal pulp and periradicular tissues that required intentional root canal treatment for prosthodontic reasons and from twelve teeth with pulp necrosis and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP) were sampled with paper points for bacterial culture and aspirated for the detection of proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 by gelatin zymography and the quantification of MMP-2 levels by ELISA. By gelatin zymography, both proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 were detected in the first collection of root-canal exudates from teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP, but not from teeth with normal pulp, and their levels gradually decreased and disappeared at the last collection. Consistently, ELISA demonstrated a significant decrease in MMP-2 levels in the root-canal exudates of teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP following root canal procedures (papical lesions, similar to the clinical application of MMP-8 as a biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  8. Exogenous nitrate induces root branching and inhibits primary root growth in Capsicum chinense Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-Arámburo, Teresita de Jesús; Carrillo-Pech, Mildred; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana

    2011-12-01

    The effects of nitrate (NO₃⁻) on the root system are complex and depend on several factors, such as the concentration available to the plant, endogenous nitrogen status and the sensitivity of the species. Though these effects have been widely documented on Arabidopsis and cereals, no reports are available in the Capsicum genus. In this paper, we have determined the effect of an exogenous in vitro application of this nutrient on root growth in habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Exposure to NO₃⁻ inhibited primary root growth in both, dose- and time-dependent manners. The highest inhibition was attained with 0.1 mM NO₃⁻ between the fourth and fifth days of treatment. Inhibition of primary root growth was observed by exposing the root to both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions of the nutrient; in contrast, ammonium was not able to induce similar changes. NO₃⁻-induced inhibition of primary root growth was reversed by treating the roots with IAA or NPA, a polar auxin transport inhibitor. Heterogeneous NO₃⁻ application stimulated the formation and elongation of lateral roots in the segment where the nutrient was present, and this response was influenced by exogenous phytohormones. These results demonstrate that habanero pepper responds to NO₃⁻ in a similar fashion to other species with certain particular differences. Therefore, studies in this model could help to elucidate the mechanisms by which roots respond to NO₃⁻ in fluctuating soil environments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Fertilizer application and root development analyzed by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihei, Naoto; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the development of the soybean root system under different application of fertilizer applying neutron imaging technique. When neutron beam was irradiated, the root image as well as fertilizer imbedded in a thin aluminum container was clearly projected, since water amount in roots are higher than that in soil. Through image analysis, the development of root system was studied under different application of the fertilizer. The development of a main root with lateral roots was observed without applying fertilizer. When the fertilizer was homogeneously supplied to the soil, the morphological development of the root showed the similar pattern to that grown without fertilizer, in different to the amount of the fertilizer. In the case of local application of the fertilizer, lateral position or downward to the main root, the inhibition of the root growth was observed, suggesting that the localization of the fertilizer is responsible for reduction of the soybean yield. (author)

  10. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Garcia, Ana; Motes, Christy M; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Chen, Rujin; Blancaflor, Elison B; Monteros, Maria J

    2015-06-15

    Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics) and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs.

  11. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paez-Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs.

  12. Sites and regulation of auxin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Karin; Hull, Anna K; Celenza, John; Yamada, Masashi; Estelle, Mark; Normanly, Jennifer; Sandberg, Göran

    2005-04-01

    Auxin has been shown to be important for many aspects of root development, including initiation and emergence of lateral roots, patterning of the root apical meristem, gravitropism, and root elongation. Auxin biosynthesis occurs in both aerial portions of the plant and in roots; thus, the auxin required for root development could come from either source, or both. To monitor putative internal sites of auxin synthesis in the root, a method for measuring indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis with tissue resolution was developed. We monitored IAA synthesis in 0.5- to 2-mm sections of Arabidopsis thaliana roots and were able to identify an important auxin source in the meristematic region of the primary root tip as well as in the tips of emerged lateral roots. Lower but significant synthesis capacity was observed in tissues upward from the tip, showing that the root contains multiple auxin sources. Root-localized IAA synthesis was diminished in a cyp79B2 cyp79B3 double knockout, suggesting an important role for Trp-dependent IAA synthesis pathways in the root. We present a model for how the primary root is supplied with auxin during early seedling development.

  13. Evaluation and Comparison of the Position of the Apical Constriction in Single-root and Multiple-root Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farhad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Precise knowledge of the location of the apical constriction is essential to root canal treatment and long-term prognosis. Considering the differences in the apical constriction and size of the roots in single- and multiple-root teeth in various races, examination and comparison of the location of the apical constriction in single-root and multiple-root teeth are of paramount importance. The present studies aimed to measure and compare the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex in single-root and multiple-root teeth. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 60 roots of single-rooted teeth and 60 roots of multiple-rooted teeth were collected from the patients referring to the health centers in Isfahan, Iran. After cleansing and disinfecting the surface of the roots, the surface of the teeth was washed with hypochlorite. Based on the direction of the apical foramen, a longitudinal cut was made in the same direction, and the roots were examined microscopically at the magnification of 25. Following that, the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex was measured using a digital camera. In addition, mean and standard deviation of the obtained distance values were determined. Distances in the single-root and multiple-root teeth were compared using independent t-test, at the significance level of Results: Mean distance between the apical constriction and apical foramen was 0.86±0.33 mm in the single-root teeth and 0.072±0.27 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Mean distance between the apical constriction and anatomical apex was 1.14±0.36 mm in the single-root teeth and 1.03±0.36 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Moreover, the results of independent t-test showed the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen to be significant between single-root and multiple-rooted teeth (P=0.013. However, the distance between the apical constriction

  14. Sorghum root-system classification in contrasting P environments reveals three main rooting types and root-architecture-related marker-trait associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Londono, Sebastian; Kavka, Mareike; Samans, Birgit; Snowdon, Rod; Wieckhorst, Silke; Uptmoor, Ralf

    2018-02-12

    Roots facilitate acquisition of macro- and micronutrients, which are crucial for plant productivity and anchorage in the soil. Phosphorus (P) is rapidly immobilized in the soil and hardly available for plants. Adaptation to P scarcity relies on changes in root morphology towards rooting systems well suited for topsoil foraging. Root-system architecture (RSA) defines the spatial organization of the network comprising primary, lateral and stem-derived roots and is important for adaptation to stress conditions. RSA phenotyping is a challenging task and essential for understanding root development. In this study, 19 traits describing RSA were analysed in a diversity panel comprising 194 sorghum genotypes, fingerprinted with a 90-k single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and grown under low and high P availability. Multivariate analysis was conducted and revealed three different RSA types: (1) a small root system; (2) a compact and bushy rooting type; and (3) an exploratory root system, which might benefit plant growth and development if water, nitrogen (N) or P availability is limited. While several genotypes displayed similar rooting types in different environments, others responded to P scarcity positively by developing more exploratory root systems, or negatively with root growth suppression. Genome-wide association studies revealed significant quantitative trait loci (P root-system development on chromosomes SBI-02 and SBI-03. Sorghum genotypes with a compact, bushy and shallow root system provide potential adaptation to P scarcity in the field by allowing thorough topsoil foraging, while genotypes with an exploratory root system may be advantageous if N or water is the limiting factor, although such genotypes showed highest P uptake levels under the artificial conditions of the present study. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Root Hydraulics and Root Sap Flow in a Panamanian Low-Land Tropical Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretfeld, M.; Ewers, B. E.; Hall, J. S.; Ogden, F. L.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.

    2017-12-01

    In the tropics, trees are subjected to increasingly frequent and severe droughts driven by climate change. Given the hydrological benefits associated with tropical forests, such as reduced peak runoff during high precipitation events and increased base flow during drought periods ("sponge-effect"), the underlying plant-hydrological processes at the soil-plant interface have become the focus of recent research efforts. In Panama, the 2015/16 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event ranks amongst the driest and hottest periods on record, thus providing an excellent opportunity to study the effects of drought on tropical forests. Starting in 2015, we instrumented 76 trees with heat-ratio sap flow sensors in regrowing secondary forest (8-, 25-, and 80-year old stands) in the 15 km2 Agua Salud study area, located in central Panama. Of those trees, 16 individuals were instrumented with additional sap flow sensors on three roots each. Data were logged every 30 minutes and soil moisture was measured at 10, 30, 50, and 100 cm depth. Meteorological data were taken from a nearby met-station. Rooting depth and root density were assessed in eight 2×2×2 m soil pits. In April 2017, we measured hydraulic conductance and vulnerability to cavitation of eight species using the centrifuge technique. Trees in 8-year old forest limited transpiration during the drought whereas no such limitation was evident in trees of the 80-year old forest. Root sap flow data show seasonal shifts in water uptake between individual roots of a given tree, with sap flow decreasing in some roots while simultaneously increasing in other roots during the wet-dry season transition. Roots followed a typical log distribution along the profile, with overall root densities of 46, 43, and 52 roots m-2 in the 8-, 25-, and 80-yo stand, respectively. Roots were found up to 200 cm depth in all forests, with roots >5 cm occurring at lower depths (>125 cm) only in 25- and 80-year old forests. Maximum hydraulic

  16. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because...

  17. Laminated Root Rot of Western Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.E. Nelson; N.E. Martin; R.E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Laminated root rot is caused by the native fungus Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb. It occurs throughout the Northwestern United States and in southern British Columbia, Canada. The disease has also been reported in Japan and Manchuria. In the United States, the pathogen is most destructive in pure Douglas-fir stands west of the crest of the Cascade Range in Washington...

  18. Square root approximation to the poisson channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiatmas, A.; Willems, F.M.J.; Baggen, C.P.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the Poisson model we present a channel model for optical communications, called the Square Root (SR) Channel, in which the noise is additive Gaussian with constant variance. Initially, we prove that for large peak or average power, the transmission rate of a Poisson Channel when coding

  19. Annosus Root disease of Western Conifers (FIDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig L. Schmitt; John R. Parmeter; John T. Kliejunas

    2000-01-01

    Annosus root disease is found on all western conifer species but is of most concern on true firs, hemlocks, and pines. Incense cedar, coast redwood and sequoia are sometimes infected in California. Western juniper is infected throughout its range. Annosus is common and causes extensive decay in old-growth western and mountain hemlock stands. Many mixed conifer stands...

  20. Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis F. Roth; Robert D. Jr. Harvey; John T. Kliejunas

    1987-01-01

    The most serious disease of Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murr.) Parl.) is a root disease caused by the fungus Phytophthora lateralis. Nursery stock, ornamentals, and timber trees are subject to attack. Other species of Chamaecyparis are less susceptible than Port-Orford-cedar, and trees of other genera are not affected.

  1. Some pitfalls in unit root testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.B.; Koning, Ruud H.

    1991-01-01

    Testing for unit roots is now common practice for economists. The most popular procedure is the approach developed by Dickey and Fuller (1979, 1981), which only requires running appropriately specified regressions. However, application of the Dickey-Fuller procedure requires that the disturbance

  2. Testing for Unit Roots in Market Shares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franses, P.H.B.F.; Srinivasan, S.; Boswijk, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    A unique characteristic of marketing data sets is the logical consistency requirement in market share models that market shares are bounded by 0 and 1, and they sum to unity. To take account of this logical consistency requirement, we propose to test for unit roots in individual market share series

  3. Topographic and ecologic controls on root reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.C. Hales; C.R. Ford; T. Hwang; J.M. Vose; L.E. Band

    2009-01-01

    Shallow landslides are a significant hazard in steep, soil-mantled landscapes. During intense rainfall events, the distribution of shallow landslides is controlled by variations in landscape gradient, the frictional and cohesive properties of soil and roots, and the subsurface hydrologic response. While gradients can be estimated from digital elevation models,...

  4. Topographic and ecological controls on root reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.C. Hales; C.R. Ford; T. Hwang; J.M. Vose; L.E. Band

    2009-01-01

    Shallow landslides are a significant hazard in steep, soil-mantled landscapes. During intense rainfall events, the distribution of shallow landslides is controlled by variations in landscape gradient, the frictional and cohesive properties of soil and roots, and the subsurface hydrologic response. While gradients can be estimated from digital elevation models,...

  5. Winter Wheat Root Growth and Nitrogen Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Irene Skovby

    in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Field experiments on the effect of sowing date, N fertilization and cultivars were conducted on a sandy loam soil in Taastrup, Denmark. The root studies were conducted by means of the minirhizotron method. Also, a field experiment on the effect of defoliation and N...

  6. Methane and Root Dynamics in Arctic Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Imperio, Ludovica

    on the global climate. We investigated two aspects of arctic ecosystem dynamics which are not well represented in climatic models: i) soil methane (CH4) oxidation in dry heath tundra and barren soils and ii) root dynamics in wetlands. Field measurements were carried out during the growing season in Disko Island...

  7. Nodal distances for rooted phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Gabriel; Llabrés, Mercè; Rosselló, Francesc; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-08-01

    Dissimilarity measures for (possibly weighted) phylogenetic trees based on the comparison of their vectors of path lengths between pairs of taxa, have been present in the systematics literature since the early seventies. For rooted phylogenetic trees, however, these vectors can only separate non-weighted binary trees, and therefore these dissimilarity measures are metrics only on this class of rooted phylogenetic trees. In this paper we overcome this problem, by splitting in a suitable way each path length between two taxa into two lengths. We prove that the resulting splitted path lengths matrices single out arbitrary rooted phylogenetic trees with nested taxa and arcs weighted in the set of positive real numbers. This allows the definition of metrics on this general class of rooted phylogenetic trees by comparing these matrices through metrics in spaces M(n)(R) of real-valued n x n matrices. We conclude this paper by establishing some basic facts about the metrics for non-weighted phylogenetic trees defined in this way using L(p) metrics on M(n)(R), with p [epsilon] R(>0).

  8. Root resorption after orthodontic intrusion and extrusion:.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, G.; Huang, S.; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Zeng, X.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare root resorption in the same individual after application of continuous intrusive and extrusive forces. In nine patients (mean age 15.3 years), the maxillary first premolars were randomly intruded or extruded with a continuous force of 100 cN for eight

  9. Pectate hydrolases of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodrová, Dana; Dzúrovä, Mária; Lisková, Desana; Mohand, Fairouz Ait; Mislovicová, Danica; Malovícová, Anna; Voburka, Zdenek; Omelková, Jirina; Stratilová, Eva

    2007-01-01

    The presence of various enzyme forms with terminal action pattern on pectate was evaluated in a protein mixture obtained from parsley roots. Enzymes found in the soluble fraction of roots (juice) were purified to homogeneity according to SDS-PAGE, partially separated by preparative isoelectric focusing and characterized. Three forms with pH optima 3.6, 4.2 and 4.6 clearly preferred substrates with a lower degree of polymerization (oligogalacturonates) while the form with pH optimum 5.2 was a typical exopolygalacturonase [EC 3. 2.1.67] with relatively fast cleavage of polymeric substrate. The forms with pH optima 3.6, 4.2 and 5.2 were released from the pulp, too. The form from the pulp with pH optimum 4.6 preferred higher oligogalacturonates and was not described in plants previously. The production of individual forms in roots was compared with that produced by root cells cultivated on solid medium and in liquid one.

  10. Occurrence of root parsley pathogens inhabiting seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies on root parsley pathogens inhabiting seeds were conducted during 1981-1988 and in 1993. Filter paper method with prefreezing and keeping under light was used. Each test sample comprised 500 seeds. Pathogenicity of collected fungal isolates was tested following two laboratory methods. 238 seed samples were studied. 18 fungal species were found but only 7 proved to be important pathogens of root parsley. The most common inhabitants of root parsley seeds were Alternaria spp. A.allernata occurred on 74,8% of seeds but only a few isolates showed to be slightly pathogenic while A.petroselini and A.radicina were higly pathogenic and inhabited 11,4 and 4,2% of seeds, respectively. The second group of important pathogens were species of Fusarium found on 3,9% of seeds. F.avenaceum dominated as it comprised 48% of Fusarium isolates, the next were as follow: F.culmorum - 20%, F.equiseti - 15%, F.solani - 8%, F.oxysporum - 7% and F.dimerum -2%. Some fungi like Botrytis cinerea, Septoria petroselini and Phoma spp. inhabited low number of seeds, respectively O,4; 0,5 and 0,8%, but they were highly pathogenic to root parsley. The fungi: Bipolaris sorokiniana, Drechslera biseptata, Stemphylium botryosum and Ulocludium consortiale showed slight pathogenicity. They were isolated from 3,8% of seeds.

  11. A note on root projection and labelling*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Abstract. This paper identifies a problem with a hypothesis put forward in Chomsky (2013) in relation to his labelling algorithm. Chomsky suggests that category-neutral roots do not qualify as labels and cannot project. However, I provide evidence that the derivation of particle verbs involves the projection of a ...

  12. Armillaria root disease in the western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hanna; Sara Ashiglar; Anna Case; Mary Lou Fairweather; Chris Hoffman; Mee-Sook Kim; Helen Maffei; Robert Mathiasen; Geral McDonald; Erik Nelson; Amy Ross-Davis; John Shaw; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological behaviors from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes, a causal agent of Armillaria root disease (ARD), is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range. ARD is responsible for reduced forest productivity as a result of direct tree mortality and non-lethal cryptic infections that impact growth....

  13. root nematode control and crop yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... The relationship between cost and benefit of the nematicide applications was also estimated. ... based on nematode threshold (100 nematodes per g of fresh root) which resulted in two applications; ..... France. Araya M, 2004. Situación actual del manejo de nematodos en banano (Musa AAA) y plátano.

  14. Historic and Cultural Roots of Apartheid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonco, Seshi

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the historical and cultural roots of the South African system of apartheid. Covers early Dutch settlement, the Anglo-Boer War, the Native Land Act of 1913, and the rise of the National Party. Concludes with a discussion of the different perspectives held by black and white South Africans on the "progress" made in recent years.…

  15. Damage to root dentin during retreatment procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Roeleveld, A.C.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the influence of retreatment procedures on the appearance of defects on the root canal walls. Methods: Two hundred mandibular premolars were divided into 4 groups. One group was left unprepared. The rest of the teeth were prepared with ProTaper

  16. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot disease nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BSDF cooperative CRR Eastern Evaluation Nursery Rhizoctonia crown and root rot Evaluation Nursery in 2016 was a randomized complete-block design with five replications in 15 feet long, one-row plots (20 in row spacing), at the Saginaw Valley Research and Education Center near Frankenmuth, MI. F...

  17. Bullying in nursing: roots, rationales, and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szutenbach, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    Bullying and incivility are sadly, far too common in today's healthcare workplaces. This article reviews early to current literature, identifies types of bullying, offers four root causes, and suggests responses to impact these causes using Gibbs' Reflective Cycle, biblical Scripture, and an allegory "How to Swim with Sharks."

  18. An antileishmanial chalcone from Chinese licorice roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S B; Ming, C; Andersen, L

    1994-01-01

    A bioassay guided fractionation of an extract of Chinese licorice roots led to the isolation of (E)-1-[2,4-dihydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)phenyl]-3-[4- hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl]phenyl-2-propen-1-one, which in vitro showed potent antileishmanial activity. In addition, the novel chalcone (E)-...

  19. Biochar for horticultural rooting media improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Chris; Salm, van der Caroline; Hofland-Zijlstra, Jantineke; Streminska, Marta; Eveleens-Clark, Barbara; Regelink, Inge; Fryda, Lydia; Visser, Rianne

    2017-01-01

    Peat is used as rooting medium in greenhouse horticulture. Biochar is a sustainable alternative for the use of peat, which will reduce peat derived carbon dioxide emissions. Biochar in potting soil mixtures allegedly increases water storage, nutrient supply, microbial life and disease suppression

  20. Chromatic roots and limits of dense graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csikvári, P.; Frenkel, P. E.; Hladký, Jan; Hubai, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 340, č. 5 (2017), s. 1129-1135 ISSN 0012-365X EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 628974 - PAECIDM Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : chromatic root * graph limit * holomorphic moment Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.639, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012365X16303661

  1. Proofs of certain properties of irrational roots

    OpenAIRE

    Belbas, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    We give two elementary proofs, at a level understandable by students with only pre-calculus knowledge of Algebra, of the well known fact that an irreducible irrational n-th root of a positive rational number cannot be solution of a polynomial of degree less than n with rational coefficients. We also state and prove a few simple consequences.

  2. Learning, Judgment, and the Rooted Particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by acknowledging the general worry that scholarship in the humanities lacks the rigor and objectivity of other scholarly fields. In considering the validity of that criticism, I distinguish two models of learning: the covering law model exemplified by the natural sciences, and the model of rooted particularity that…

  3. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  4. Chromatic Roots and Limits of Dense Graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csikvári, P.; Frenkel, E.; Hladký, Jan; Hubai, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 340, č. 5 (2017), s. 1129-1135 ISSN 0012-365X Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : chromatic root * graph limit * holomorphic moment Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.639, year: 2016

  5. Root diseases, climate change and biomass productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, G.R.; Cruickshank, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tree growth and yield in eastern boreal spruce fir forests are both greatly affected by root and butt rots. These pests are also prevalent in western coniferous species and boreal-sub-boreal forests. Infections are difficult to detect, but reduced growth, tree mortality, wind throw and scaled butt cull contribute to considerable forest gaps. Harvesting and stand tending practices in second growth stands are creating conditions for increased incidence. Tree stress is one of the major factors affecting the spread of root disease. It is expected that climate change will create abnormal stress conditions that will further compound the incidence of root disease. A comparison was made between natural and managed stands, including harvesting and stand practices such as commercial thinning. Studies of Douglas-fir forests in British Columbia were presented, with results indicating that managed forests contain one third to one half less carbon biomass than unmanaged forests. It was concluded that root diseases must be recognized and taken into account in order to refine and improve biomass estimates, prevent overestimation of wood supply models and avoid potential wood fibre losses. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Functional traits and root morphology of alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Mandy; Stroude, Raphaël; Buttler, Alexandre; Rixen, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Vegetation has long been recognized to protect the soil from erosion. Understanding species differences in root morphology and functional traits is an important step to assess which species and species mixtures may provide erosion control. Furthermore, extending classification of plant functional types towards root traits may be a useful procedure in understanding important root functions. In this study, pioneer data on traits of alpine plant species, i.e. plant height and shoot biomass, root depth, horizontal root spreading, root length, diameter, tensile strength, plant age and root biomass, from a disturbed site in the Swiss Alps are presented. The applicability of three classifications of plant functional types (PFTs), i.e. life form, growth form and root type, was examined for above- and below-ground plant traits. Plant traits differed considerably among species even of the same life form, e.g. in the case of total root length by more than two orders of magnitude. Within the same root diameter, species differed significantly in tensile strength: some species (Geum reptans and Luzula spicata) had roots more than twice as strong as those of other species. Species of different life forms provided different root functions (e.g. root depth and horizontal root spreading) that may be important for soil physical processes. All classifications of PFTs were helpful to categorize plant traits; however, the PFTs according to root type explained total root length far better than the other PFTs. The results of the study illustrate the remarkable differences between root traits of alpine plants, some of which cannot be assessed from simple morphological inspection, e.g. tensile strength. PFT classification based on root traits seems useful to categorize plant traits, even though some patterns are better explained at the individual species level.

  7. Distinct modes of adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, L da Rocha; Troleis, J; Mastroberti, A A; Mariath, J E A; Fett-Neto, A G

    2012-01-01

    The literature describes different rooting protocols for Arabidopsis thaliana as models to study adventitious rooting, and results are generally perceived as comparable. However, there is a lack of investigations focusing on the distinct features, advantages and limitations of each method in the study of adventitious rooting with both wild-type (WT) ecotypes and their respective mutants. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adventitious rooting process in three different experimental systems, all using A. thaliana, analysing the same rooting parameters after transient exposure to auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) and control conditions: excised leaves, de-rooted plants and etiolated seedlings. The founding tissues and sites of origin of roots differed depending on the system used, whereas all rooting patterns were of the direct type (i.e., without callus formation). None of the systems had an absolute requirement for exogenous auxin, although rooting was enhanced by this phytohormone, with the exception of de-rooted plants, which had adventitious rooting strongly inhibited by exogenous auxin. Root elongation was much favoured in isolated leaves. Auxin-overproducing mutants could not be used in the detached leaf system due to precocious senescence; in the de-rooted plant system, these mutants had a WT-like rooting response, whereas the expression of the 'rooty' phenotype was only evident in the etiolated seedling system. Adventitious rooting of etiolated WT seedlings in the presence of exogenous auxin was inhibited by exogenous flavonoids, which act as auxin transport inhibitors; surprisingly, the flavonoid-deficient mutant chs had a lower rooting response compared to WT. Although Arabidopsis is an excellent model system to study adventitious rooting, physiological and developmental responses differed significantly, underlining the importance of avoiding data generalisation on rooting responses derived from different experimental systems with this species.

  8. Root resorption following periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Literature evidence suggests that root resorption, an adverse side effect of orthodontic therapy, may be decreased under conditions of alveolar osteopenia, a condition characterized by diminished bone density and created secondary to alveolar corticotomy (Cort surgery. Purpose: To compare root resorption of the maxillary central incisors following nonextraction orthodontic therapy with and without Cort surgery. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised two groups, with and without Cort and was matched by age and gender: Cort-facilitated nonextraction orthodontics with 27 subjects, 53 central incisors of mean age 24.8 ± 10.2 years, and conventional (Conv nonextraction orthodontics with 27 subjects, 54 incisors with mean age of 19.6 ± 8.8 years. All periapical radiographs were taken with the paralleling technique; total tooth lengths of the right and left central incisors were measured by projecting and enlarging the periapical radiographs exactly 8 times. Results: t-tests revealed a significant decrease in treatment time in the Cort group (6.3 ± 8.0 vs. 17.4 ± 20.2 months, P = 0.000. Pretreatment root lengths were not significantly different (P = 0.11, but Conv had significantly shorter roots at posttreatment when compared with Cort (P = 0.03. Significant root resorption (P < 0.01 occurred in both Cort (0.3 mm and Conv (0.7 mm, but the increment of change was significantly greater in Conv (P < 0.03. The variable SNA increased significantly in the Cort (P = 0.001 group and decreased significantly in the Conv group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Based on the conditions of this study, it may be concluded that Cort-facilitated nonextraction orthodontic therapy results in less root resorption and enhanced alveolar support within a significantly reduced clinical service delivery time frame. Rapid orthodontic treatment and reduced apical root resorption are probably due to the transient osteopenia induced by the Cort surgery and inspired by

  9. Root canal filling using Resilon: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D J

    2011-07-01

    Root canal treatment is achieved by chemo-mechanical debridement of the root canal system followed by filling. The filling material \\'entombs\\' residual bacteria and acts as a barrier which prevents the entrance of oral microorganisms and reinfection of the root canal system through microleakage. However, filling with contemporary root filling materials such as gutta-percha offers limited long-term resistance to microorganisms; as a result other materials such as Resilon have been investigated as alternatives. The aim of this review was to analyse the literature to consider whether Resilon is a suitable root canal filling material. A MEDLINE and Cochrane library search including various keyword searches identified several papers which investigated or discussed Resilon or RealSeal\\/Epiphany. Analysis of the literature demonstrated that the bulk of the literature is in vitro in nature, based largely on leakage-type studies, and demonstrates a wide variety of methodologies with conflicting findings; as a result meaningful conclusions are difficult. Within the limit of these in vitro studies Resilon appears to perform adequately in comparison to gutta-percha, however, as a result of the questionable merit of such studies, it cannot presently be considered an evidence-based alternative to the current gold standard gutta-percha. It is imperative that before Resilon is considered as a replacement material, a better understanding of the physical properties of the resin sealer and the reality of the adhesive \\'monoblock\\' are elucidated. The literature also demonstrates a paucity of quality long-term clinical outcome studies which will need to be addressed before firm conclusions can be reached.

  10. EPRI root cause advisory workstation 'ERCAWS'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Chiu, C.; Hackman, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    EPRI and its contractor FPI International are developing Personal Computer (PC), Microsoft Windows based software to assist power plant engineers and maintenance personnel to diagnose and correct root causes of power plant equipment failures. The EPRI Root Cause Advisory Workstation (ERCAWS) is easy to use and able to handle knowledge bases and diagnostic tools for an unlimited number of equipment types. Knowledge base data is based on power industry experience and root cause analysis from many sources - Utilities, EPRI, US government, FPI, and International sources. The approach used in the knowledge base handling portion of the software is case-study oriented with the engineer selecting the equipment type and symptom identification using a combination of text, photographs, and animation, displaying dynamic physical phenomena involved. Root causes, means for confirmation, and corrective actions are then suggested in a simple, user friendly format. The first knowledge base being released with ERCAWS is the Valve Diagnostic Advisor module; covering six common valve types and some motor operator and air operator items. More modules are under development with Heat Exchanger, Bolt, and Piping modules currently in the beta testing stage. A wide variety of diagnostic tools are easily incorporated into ERCAWS and accessed through the main screen interface. ERCAWS is designed to fulfill the industry need for user-friendly tools to perform power plant equipment failure root cause analysis, and training for engineering, operations and maintenance personnel on how components can fail and how to reduce failure rates or prevent failure from occurring. In addition, ERCAWS serves as a vehicle to capture lessons learned from industry wide experience. (author)

  11. Microbiological examination of infected dental root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, B P F A; Pinheiro, E T; Gadê-Neto, C R; Sousa, E L R; Ferraz, C C R; Zaia, A A; Teixeira, F B; Souza-Filho, F J

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the root canal microbiota of primary and secondary root-infected canals and the association of constituent species with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Microbial samples were taken from 60 root canals, 41 with necrotic pulp tissues (primary infection) and 19 with failed endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation and identification. A total of 224 cultivable isolates were recovered belonging to 56 different bacterial species. Individual root canals yielded a maximum of 10 bacterial species. Of the bacterial isolates, 70% were either strict anaerobes or microphilic. The anaerobes most frequently isolated were: Peptostreptococcus micros (35%), Fusobacterium necrophorum (23.3%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (11.7%), Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (16.7%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (6.7%) and Porphyromonas endodontalis (5%). The root canal microflora of untreated teeth with apical periodontitis was found to be mixed, comprising gram-negative and gram-positive and mostly anaerobic microorganisms and usually containing more than 3 species per canal. On the other hand, facultative anaerobic and gram-positive bacteria predominated in canals with failed endodontic treatment, which harbored 1-2 species per canal. Suggested relationships were found between anaerobes, especially gram-negatives, and the presence or history of pain, tenderness to percussion and swelling (PEubacterium spp. (both Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp. (Pspp., P. micros, F. necrophorum (P<0.05). Our findings indicate potential complex interactions of species resulting in characteristic clinical pictures which cannot be achieved by individual species alone. They also indicate that the microbiota of primary infected canals with apical periodontitis differs in number and in species from the secondary infected canals by using the culture technique.

  12. External root resorption: Different etiologies explained from the composition of the human root-close periodontal membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper summarizes different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots. It also highlights factors important for individual susceptibility to root resorption. Furthermore, the paper focuses on idiopathic root resorption where the provoking factor is not known. The Hypothesis: The several different disturbances causing root resorption can be either orthodontically provoked or acquired by trauma, virus or congenital diseases. It is presumed that all these conditions lead to inflammatory processes in the three main tissue layers, comprising the peri-root sheet. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: This paper explains how different etiologies behind root resorption and how different phenotypic traits in root resorption can be understood from immunohistochemical studies of the human periodontal membrane close to the root and thus, gain a new understanding of the phenomenon of root resorption.

  13. Root Transcriptomic Analysis Revealing the Importance of Energy Metabolism to the Development of Deep Roots in Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaojun Lou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is the most serious abiotic stress limiting rice production, and deep root is the key contributor to drought avoidance. However, the genetic mechanism regulating the development of deep roots is largely unknown. In this study, the transcriptomes of 74 root samples from 37 rice varieties, representing the extreme genotypes of shallow or deep rooting, were surveyed by RNA-seq. The 13,242 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between deep rooting and shallow rooting varieties (H vs. L were enriched in the pathway of genetic information processing and metabolism, while the 1,052 DEGs between the deep roots and shallow roots from each of the plants (D vs. S were significantly enriched in metabolic pathways especially energy metabolism. Ten quantitative trait transcripts (QTTs were identified and some were involved in energy metabolism. Forty-nine candidate DEGs were confirmed by qRT-PCR and microarray. Through weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA, we found 18 hub genes. Surprisingly, all these hub genes expressed higher in deep roots than in shallow roots, furthermore half of them functioned in energy metabolism. We also estimated that the ATP production in the deep roots was faster than shallow roots. Our results provided a lot of reliable candidate genes to improve deep rooting, and firstly highlight the importance of energy metabolism to the development of deep roots.

  14. Root Transcriptomic Analysis Revealing the Importance of Energy Metabolism to the Development of Deep Roots in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiaojun; Chen, Liang; Mei, Hanwei; Xu, Kai; Wei, Haibin; Feng, Fangjun; Li, Tiemei; Pang, Xiaomeng; Shi, Caiping; Luo, Lijun; Zhong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Drought is the most serious abiotic stress limiting rice production, and deep root is the key contributor to drought avoidance. However, the genetic mechanism regulating the development of deep roots is largely unknown. In this study, the transcriptomes of 74 root samples from 37 rice varieties, representing the extreme genotypes of shallow or deep rooting, were surveyed by RNA-seq. The 13,242 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between deep rooting and shallow rooting varieties (H vs. L) were enriched in the pathway of genetic information processing and metabolism, while the 1,052 DEGs between the deep roots and shallow roots from each of the plants (D vs. S) were significantly enriched in metabolic pathways especially energy metabolism. Ten quantitative trait transcripts (QTTs) were identified and some were involved in energy metabolism. Forty-nine candidate DEGs were confirmed by qRT-PCR and microarray. Through weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we found 18 hub genes. Surprisingly, all these hub genes expressed higher in deep roots than in shallow roots, furthermore half of them functioned in energy metabolism. We also estimated that the ATP production in the deep roots was faster than shallow roots. Our results provided a lot of reliable candidate genes to improve deep rooting, and firstly highlight the importance of energy metabolism to the development of deep roots.

  15. Role of mungbean root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas and rhizobia in suppressing the root rotting fungi and root knot nematodes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noreen, R.; Shafique, A.; Haque, S.E.; Ali, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Three isolates each of fluorescent Pseudomonas (NAFP-19, NAFP-31 and NAFP-32) and rhizobia (NFB- 103, NFB-107 and NFB-109) which were originally isolated from root nodules of mungbean (Vigna radiata) showed significant biocontrol activity in the screen house and under field condition, against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani evaluated on chickpea. Biocontrol potential of these isolates was also evaluated against Meloidogyne incognita, the root knot nematode. Application of Pseudomonas and rhizobial isolates as a soil drench, separately or mixed significantly reduced root rot disease under screen house and field conditions. Nematode penetration in roots was also found significantly less in rhizobia or Pseudomonas treatments used separately or mixed as compared to control. Fluorescent Pseudomonas treated plants produced greater number of nodules per plant than control plants and about equal to rhizobia treated plants, indicating that root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas enhance root nodulation. (author)

  16. Periapical repair after root canal filling with different root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Tanomaru, Juliane Maria Guerreiro; Leonardo, Mario Roberto; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate periapical repair after root canal filling with different endodontic sealers. Sixty-four root canals from dog s teeth were filled, divided into 4 groups (n=16). Root canals were instrumented with K-type files and irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Root canals were filled in the same session by active lateral condensation of the cones and sealers: Intrafill, AH Plus, Roeko Seal and Resilon/Epiphany System. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized and the tissues to be evaluated were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. For histopathological analysis, the following parameters were evaluated: inflammatory process, mineralized tissue resorption, and apical mineralized tissue deposition. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that Intrafill had less favorable results in terms of apical and periapical repair, compared to the other sealers (p0.05). In conclusion, AH Plus and the materials Roeko Seal and Epiphany are good options for clinical use in Endodontics.

  17. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots, root tips, and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)-infected roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark L; Xue, Ping; Yang, Ronghui

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of plant roots by root knot and cyst nematodes requires a functional ethylene response pathway. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and whether its role in nematode colonization is direct or indirect, for example lateral root initiation or root hair growth, is not known. The temporal requirement for ethylene and localized synthesis of ethylene during the life span of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) on soybean roots was further investigated. Although a significant increase in ethylene evolution was not detected from SCN-colonized roots, the concentration of the immediate precursor to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), was higher in SCN-colonized root pieces and root tips than in other parts of the root. Moreover, expression analysis of 17 ACC synthase (ACS) genes indicated that a select set of ACS genes is expressed in SCN-colonized root pieces that is clearly different from the set of genes expressed in non-colonized roots or root tips. Semi-quantitative real-time PCR indicated that ACS transcript accumulation correlates with the high concentration of ACC in root tips. In addition, an ACS-like sequence was found in the public SCN nucleotide database. Acquisition of a full-length sequence for this mRNA (accession GQ389647) and alignment with transcripts for other well-characterized ACS proteins indicated that the nematode sequence is missing a key element required for ACS activity and therefore probably is not a functional ACS. Moreover, no significant amount of ACC was found in any growth stage of SCN that was tested.

  18. Root traits contributing to plant productivity under drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eComas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Geneticists and breeders are positioned to breed plants with root traits that improve productivity under drought. However, a better understanding of root functional traits and how traits are related to whole plant strategies to increase crop productivity under different drought conditions is needed. Root traits associated with maintaining plant productivity under drought include small fine root diameters, long specific root length (SRL, and considerable root length density, especially at depths in soil with available water. In environments with late season water deficits, small xylem diameters in targeted seminal roots save soil water deep in the soil profile for use during crop maturation and result in improved yields. Capacity for deep root growth and large xylem diameters in deep roots may also improve root acquisition of water when ample water at depth is available. Xylem pit anatomy that makes xylem less ‘leaky’ and prone to cavitation warrants further exploration holding promise that such traits may improve plant productivity in water-limited environments without negatively impacting yield under adequate water conditions. Rapid resumption of root growth following soil rewetting may improve plant productivity under episodic drought. Genetic control of many of these traits through breeding appears feasible. Several recent reviews have covered methods for screening root traits but an appreciation for the complexity of root systems (e.g. functional differences between fine and coarse roots needs to be paired with these methods to successfully identify relevant traits for crop improvement. Screening of root traits at early stages in plant development can proxy traits at mature stages but verification is needed on a case by case basis that traits are linked to increased crop productivity under drought. Examples in lesquerella (Physaria and rice (Oryza show approaches to phenotyping of root traits and current understanding of root trait

  19. In vitro comparison in a manikin model: increasing apical enlargement with K3 and K3XF rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Juan Gonzalo; Stöber, Eva; García Font, Marc; González, Jose Antonio; Bragado, Pablo; Roig, Miguel; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the K3 and K3XF systems (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA) after 1 and 2 uses by evaluating apical transportation, working length loss, and working time in a manikin model. Mesial canals of 40 extracted first mandibular molars were instrumented. Radiographs taken after instrumentation with #25, #30, #35, and #40 files were superimposed on the preoperative image in both mesiodistal and buccolingual angulations. AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc, San Rafael, CA) was used to measure working length loss and apical transportation at 0, 0.5, and 1 mm from the working length (WL). The working time was measured. Group comparison was analyzed using post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference tests (P < .05). No significant differences were found in apical transportation, working length loss between K3 and K3XF systems, or between the number of uses. Significant differences were found when canal enlargement was performed to a #35-40 (P < .05). K3 instrumentation performed significantly faster (29.6 ± 15.4) than with the K3XF system (40.2 ± 17.7) (P < .05). No differences were observed in working time when comparing the number of uses. K3 and R-phase K3XF rotary systems shaped curved root canals safely with minimal apical transportation, even up to a 40/04 file. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of Root Knot Nematode on Tomato through Grafting Root Stock of Solanum sisymbriifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Baidya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp are difficult to manage once established in the field because of their wide host range, and soil-borne nature. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the use of resistant root stock of wild brinjal (Solanum sisymbriifolium to reduce the loss caused by the nematodes on tomato. For the management of root-knot nematodes, grafted plant with resistant root stock of the wild brinjal was tested under farmers’ field conditions at Hemza of Kaski district. Grafted and non-grafted plants were produced in root-knot nematode-free soil. Around three week-old grafted and non-grafted tomato plants were transplanted in four different plastic tunnels where root-knot nematodes had been reported previously. The plants were planted in diagonal position to each other as a pair plot in 80 × 60 cm2 spacing in an average of 20 × 7 m2 plastic tunnels. Galling Index (GI was recorded three times in five randomly selected plants in each plot at 60 days intervals. The first observation was recorded two months after transplanting. Total fruit yield was recorded from same plants. In the grafted plants, the root system was totally free from gall whereas in an average of 7.5 GI in 0-10 scale was recorded in the non-grafted plants. Fruits were harvested from time to time and cumulated after final harvest to calculate the total fruit yield. It was estimated that on an average tomato fruit yield was significantly (P>0.05 increased by 37 percent in the grafted plants compared with the non-grafted plants. Grafting technology could be used effectively for cultivation of commonly grown varieties, which are susceptible to root-knot nematodes in disease prone areas. This can be used as an alternative technology for reducing the use of hazardous pesticides for enhancing commercial organic tomato production.

  1. A case of unusual root morphology: Maxillary canine with two roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagesh Bolla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The case describes a 3 months follow-up of the treatment of a maxillary canine with two roots. Clinical examination revealed a maxillary canine with a large carious lesion and an exaggerated response to cold thermal tests. Radiographic examination revealed a large distal carious lesion that appeared to invade the pulp chamber. The radiograph also revealed what appeared to be an extra root in this permanent maxillary canine.

  2. Root water uptake and lateral interactions among root systems in a temperate forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, E.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of research has highlighted the importance of root architecture and hydraulic properties to the maintenance of the transpiration stream under water limitation and drought. Detailed studies of single plant systems have shown the ability of root systems to adjust zones of uptake due to the redistribution of local water potential gradients, thereby delaying the onset of stress under drying conditions. An open question is how lateral interactions and competition among neighboring plants impact individual and community resilience to water stress. While computational complexity has previously hindered the implementation of microscopic root system structure and function in larger scale hydrological models, newer hybrid approaches allow for the resolution of these properties at the plot scale. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model root water uptake in a one-hectare temperate forest plot under natural and synthetic forcings. Two characteristic hydraulic architectures, tap roots and laterally sprawling roots, are implemented in an ensemble of simulations. Variations of root architecture, their hydraulic properties, and degree of system interactions produce variable local response to water limitation and provide insights on individual and community response to changing meteorological conditions. Results demonstrate the ability of interacting systems to shift areas of active uptake based on local gradients, allowing individuals to meet water demands despite competition from their peers. These results further illustrate how inter- and intra-species variations in root properties may influence not only individual response to water stress, but also help quantify the margins of resilience for forest ecosystems under changing climate.

  3. Living roots effect on 14C-labelled root litter decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billes, G.; Bottner, P.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was 14 C-labelled by cultivation on soil in pots, from seedling to maturity, in a chamber with constant CO 2 and 14 CO 2 levels. The 14 C-distribution was constant amongst the aerial parts, the roots and the soil in the whole pots. After cutting the plant tops, the pots were dried without disturbing the soil and root system. The pots were then incubated under controlled humidity and temperature conditions for 62 days. In the same time a second wheat cultivation was grown on one half of the pots in normal atmosphere without plant cultivation. The purpose of the work is to study the effect of living roots on decomposition of the former 14 C labelled roots litter. The CO 2 and the 14 CO 2 released from the soil were continuously measured. On incubation days 0, 18, 33 and 62, the remaining litter was separated from soil, and the organic matter was fractionated by repeated hydrolysis and NaOH extraction. Root litter disappeared faster when living roots were present than in bare soil. The accumulation and mineralization rates of humified components in soil followed two stages. While the roots of second wheat cultivation grew actively (until earing), the strong acid hydrolysable components accumulated in larger amount than in the case of bare soil. After earing, while roots activity was depressed, these components were partly mineralized and the 14 CO 2 release was then higher with plants than with bare soil. The humification and mineralization rate were related with living plant phenology stages. (orig.)

  4. Amyloplast Distribution Directs a Root Gravitropic Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth

    Immobile higher plants are oriented in the gravitational field due to gravitropim that is a physiological growth reaction and consists of three phases: reception of a gravitational signal by statocytes, its transduction to the elongation zone, and finally the organ bending. As it is known, roots are characterized with positive gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector, stems - with negative gravitropism, i. e. they grow in the direction opposite to a gravitational vector. According to the Nemec’s and Haberlandt’s starch-statolith hypothesis, amyloplasts in diameter of 1.5 - 3 μ in average, which appear to act as gravity sensors and fulfill a statolythic function in the specialized graviperceptive cells - statocytes, sediment in the direction of a gravitational vector in the distal part of a cell, while a nucleus is in the proximal one. There are reasonable data that confirm the amyloplasts-statoliths participation in gravity perception: 1) correlation between the statoliths localization and the site of gravity sensing, 2) significant redistribution (sedimentation) of amyloplasts in statocytes under gravistimulation in comparison with other cell organelles, 3) root decreased ability to react on gravity under starch removal from amyloplasts, 4) starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutants are agravitropic, 5) amyloplasts-statoliths do not sediment in the absence of the gravitational vector and are in different parts or more concentrated in the center of statocytes. Plant tropisms have been intensively studied for many decades and continue to be investigated. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which plants do so is still not clearly explained and many questions on gravisensing and graviresponse remain unanswered. Even accepted hypotheses are now being questioned and recent data are critically evaluated. Although the available data show the Ca2+ and cytoskeleton participation in graviperception and signal transduction, the clear evidence

  5. Optimized Whole-Mount In Situ Immunolocalization for Arabidopsis thaliana Root Meristems and Lateral Root Primordia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelias, Michael; Tejos, Ricardo; Friml, Jiří; Vanneste, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    Immunolocalization is a valuable tool for cell biology research that allows to rapidly determine the localization and expression levels of endogenous proteins. In plants, whole-mount in situ immunolocalization remains a challenging method, especially in tissues protected by waxy layers and complex cell wall carbohydrates. Here, we present a robust method for whole-mount in situ immunolocalization in primary root meristems and lateral root primordia in Arabidopsis thaliana. For good epitope preservation, fixation is done in an alkaline paraformaldehyde/glutaraldehyde mixture. This fixative is suitable for detecting a wide range of proteins, including integral transmembrane proteins and proteins peripherally attached to the plasma membrane. From initiation until emergence from the primary root, lateral root primordia are surrounded by several layers of differentiated tissues with a complex cell wall composition that interferes with the efficient penetration of all buffers. Therefore, immunolocalization in early lateral root primordia requires a modified method, including a strong solvent treatment for removal of hydrophobic barriers and a specific cocktail of cell wall-degrading enzymes. The presented method allows for easy, reliable, and high-quality in situ detection of the subcellular localization of endogenous proteins in primary and lateral root meristems without the need of time-consuming crosses or making translational fusions to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Root resorption: Focus on signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjaer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper summarizes the different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots, exemplified by trauma and orthodontic treatment. The concept of the paper is to summarize and explain symptoms and signs of importance for avoiding resorption during orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost - an ectodermal tissue layer (Malassez′s epithelium, a middle layer - composed by the collagen-mesodermal tissue layer, and an innermost root-close innervation layer. Abnormalities in one of these tissue layers are thought to cause inflammatory processes in the periodontal membrane comparable to inflammatory processes provoked by trauma and orthodontic pressure. Inflammatory reactions are followed by resorptive processes in the periroot sheet and along the root surface. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: Different morphologies in the dentition are signs of abnormal epithelium or an abnormal mesodermal layer. It has formerly been demonstrated how demyelinization of the myelin sheaths in the peripheral nerves close to the root provoke resorption. Accordingly, conditions affecting these tissue layers can be associated not only with different morphologies but also with general symptoms and diseases (e.g., ectodermal dysplasia and hypophosphatasia.

  7. The inflow of Cs-137 in soil with root litter and root exudates of Scots pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Olga; Popova, Evgenia

    2017-04-01

    In the model experiment on evaluation of Cs-137 inflow in the soil with litter of roots and woody plants root exudates on the example of soil and water cultures of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was shown, that through 45 days after the deposit Cs-137 solution on pine needles (specific activity of solution was 3.718*106 Bk) of the radionuclide in all components of model systems has increased significantly: needles, small branches and trunk by Cs-137 surface contamination during the experiment; roots as a result of the internal distribution of the radionuclide in the plant; soil and soil solution due to the of receipt Cs-137 in the composition of root exudates and root litter. Over 99% of the total reserve of Cs-137 accumulated in the components of the soil and water systems, accounted for bodies subjected to external pollution (needles and small branches) and soil solution, haven't been subjected to surface contamination. At the same contamination of soil and soil solution by Cs-137 in the model experiment more than a> 99.9% was due to root exudates

  8. Flavonoids modify root growth and modulate expression of SHORT-ROOT and HD-ZIP III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Danilo Miralha; Silva, Eder Marques; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Adachi, Sérgio Akira; Schley, Thayssa Rabelo; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; Dokkedal, Anne Ligia; Nogueira, Fabio Tebaldi Silveira; Rolim de Almeida, Luiz Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Flavonoids are a class of distinct compounds produced by plant secondary metabolism that inhibit or promote plant development and have a relationship with auxin transport. We showed that, in terms of root development, Copaifera langsdorffii leaf extracts has an inhibitory effect on most flavonoid components compared with the application of exogenous flavonoids (glycosides and aglycones). These compounds alter the pattern of expression of the SHORT-ROOT and HD-ZIP III transcription factor gene family and cause morpho-physiological alterations in sorghum roots. In addition, to examine the flavonoid auxin interaction in stress, we correlated the responses with the effects of exogenous application of auxin and an auxin transport inhibitor. The results show that exogenous flavonoids inhibit primary root growth and increase the development of lateral roots. Exogenous flavonoids also change the pattern of expression of specific genes associated with root tissue differentiation. These findings indicate that flavonoid glycosides can influence the polar transport of auxin, leading to stress responses that depend on auxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Nemesia root hair response to paper pulp substrate for micropropagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrousse, Pascal; Delmail, David; Decou, Raphaël; Carlué, Michel; Lhernould, Sabine; Krausz, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy. Roots developed in agar have shorter hairs, larger rhizodermal cells, and less organized root caps than those growing on paper pulp. In conclusion, it should be noted that in this study, in vitro microporous substrates such as paper pulp lead to the production of similar root hairs to those found in greenhouse peat substrates. Consequently, if agar could be used for micropropagation, rooting, and plant acclimatization, enhancement could be achieved if rooting stage was performed on micro-porous substrates such as paper pulp.

  10. Evaluation of Root Canal Morphology of Human Primary Mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Keywords: Primary teeth, root canal, Vertucci classification. Evaluation of Root .... Radiology using CBCT; Veraviewepocs 3D R100/F40. (J Morita Mfg. Corp., .... maxillofacial structures by CBCT on a high resolution, and this ...

  11. Adoption of Root and Tuber Technologies Disseminated by the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Key words: Adoption and Diffusion, Root and Tuber Crops Technologies,. National Root Crops Research ... improved agricultural technologies has been associated with: higher earnings and lower poverty ..... F –statistics. 843.942***. 684.101 ...

  12. Bessel functions for root systems via the trigonometric setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Bent; Said, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study generalized Bessel functions related to root systems and give explicit formulas in several cases.......In this paper, we study generalized Bessel functions related to root systems and give explicit formulas in several cases....

  13. Action of plant root exudates in bioremediations: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dundek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a summary of literature dealing with the use of plant root exudates in bioremediations. Bioremediation using plants (phytoremediation or rhizoremediation and associate rhizosphere to decontaminate polluted soil is a method based on the catabolic potential of root-associated microorganisms, which are supported by the organic substrates released from roots. These substrates are called “root exudates”. Root exudates support metabolism of pollutants-decomposing microorganisms in the rhizosphere, and affect sorption / desorption of pollutants. Awareness of exudation rates is necessary for testing soil decontamination. Commonly, water-soluble root exudates of different plants are studied for their qualitative composition which should be related to total carbon of exuded water-soluble compounds. This paper presents the determined rate of plant root exudation and the amount of root exudates carbon used to form artificial rhizosphere.

  14. Radiographic versus electronic root canal working length determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumnije Kqiku

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The present ex vivo study showed that electronic root canal working length determination is not superior to radiographic methods. Both methods provided a good performance in determining the root canal working length.

  15. In vitro root induction of faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Roba M; Elazab, Heba E M; Hussein, Gihan M H; Metry, Emad A

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge for regeneration of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) plants is the difficulty of in vitro root induction. In the present study, in vitro rooting and its architecture have been studied. Adventitious root formation was successfully induced from regenerated faba bean shoots of four Egyptian cultivars, i.e., Giza 461, Giza 40, Giza 834 and Giza 716 on hormone free MS medium supplemented with 5 mg/l silver nitrate. Among the four cultivars, Giza 461 and Giza 40 were recorded as the highest root formation response (75 % and 65) followed by cultivars Giza716 and Giza843 (20%, and 10%). Anatomical study proved that the produced roots are initiated as the adventitious lateral root (LR) with tri-arch xylem strands as compared with the penta-arch of the primary roots of the intact faba bean seedling. The obtained results overcome the root induction problem in faba bean.

  16. On root class residuality of HNN-extensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieudjo, D.

    2004-08-01

    A sufficient condition or root-class residuality of HNN-extensions with root-class residual base group is proven; namely if G = -1 1Ht = K, φ> is the HNN-extension with base group A, stable letter t and associated subgroups H and K via the isomorphism φ, then G is root-class residual if group A is root-class residual and there exists a homomorphism σ of group G onto some group of a root-class such that σ is one-to-one on H. For the particular case when H = K and σ is the identical map, it is shown that G is root-class residual if and only if A is root-class residual and subgroup H of A is root-class separable. These results are generalized to multiple HNN-extensions. (author)

  17. Characterization of Rhizobium strain isolated from the roots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... The Rhizobium species isolated from fenugreek roots have the potential to produce industrially important ... growth of leguminous crops (Dilworth and Parker, 1969). ..... events, such as chemotaxis and root hair colonization,.

  18. Root–Root Interactions:Towards A Rhizosphere Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, L.; Kirkegaard, John; Ruijven, van J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant scientists have made great progress in understanding molecular mechanisms controlling root responses to nutrients of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under controlled conditions. Simultaneously, ecologists and agronomists have demonstrated that root–root interactions involve more than

  19. Pathological and rhizospherical studies on root-rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-02-05

    Feb 5, 2007 ... Rhizoctonia solani root-rot aggressive pathogens to squash on media containing culture of Trichoderma ..... The bacteriology of root region of cat ... (2004): Comparison of the behavior of a transformed hygromycin resistant ...

  20. Effect of localized nitrogen availability to soybean half-root systems on photosynthate partitioning to roots and nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, P.W.; van Kessel, C.

    1987-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Davis) was grown in a split-root growth system designed to maintain control of the root atmosphere. Two experiments were conducted to examine how 80% Ar:20%, O 2 (Ar:O 2 ) and air (Air) atmospheres affected N assimilation (NH 4 NO 3 and N 2 fixation) and the partitioning of photosynthate to roots and nodules. Application of NH 4 NO 3 to nonnodulated half-root systems enhanced root growth and root respiration at the site of application. A second experiment applied Ar:O 2 or air to the two sides of nodulated soybean half-root systems for 11 days in the following combinations: (a) Air to both sides (Air/Air); (b) Air to one side, Ar:O 2 to the other (Air/Ar:O 2 ), and (c) Ar:O 2 to both sides (Ar:O 2 /Ar:O 2 ). Results indicated that dry matter and current photosynthate ( 14 C) were selectively partitioned to nodules and roots where N 2 was available. Both root and nodule growth on the Air side of Air/Ar:O 2 plants was significantly greater than the Ar:O 2 side. The relative partitioning of carbon and current photosynthate between roots and nodules on a half-root system was also affected by N 2 availability. The Ar:O 2 sides partitioned relatively more current photosynthate to roots (57%) than nodules (43%), while N 2 -fixing root systems partitioned 36 and 64% of the carbon to roots and nodules, respectively. The Ar:O 2 atmosphere decreased root and nodule respiration by 80% and nitrogenase activity by 85% compared to half-root systems in Air while specific nitrogenase activity in Ar:O 2 was 50% of nodules supplied Air. Results indicated that nitrogen assimilation, whether from N 2 fixation or inorganic sources, had a localized effect on root development

  1. Regeneration of roots from callus reveals stability of the developmental program for determinate root growth in Sonoran Desert Cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkova, Svetlana; García-Mendoza, Edith; Castillo-Díaz, Vicente; Moreno, Norma E; Arellano, Jesús; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    In some Sonoran Desert Cactaceae the primary root has a determinate root growth: the cells of the root apical meristem undergo only a few cell division cycles and then differentiate. The determinate growth of primary roots in Cactaceae was found in plants cultivated under various growth conditions, and could not be reverted by any treatment tested. The mechanisms involved in root meristem maintenance and determinate root growth in plants remain poorly understood. In this study, we have shown that roots regenerated from the callus of two Cactaceae species, Stenocereus gummosus and Ferocactus peninsulae, have a determinate growth pattern, similar to that of the primary root. To demonstrate this, a protocol for root regeneration from callus was established. The determinate growth pattern of roots regenerated from callus suggests that the program of root development is very stable in these species. These findings will permit future analysis of the role of certain Cactaceae genes in the determinate pattern of root growth via the regeneration of transgenic roots from transformed calli.

  2. Biomechanical aspects of external root resorption in orthodontic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Abuabara, Allan

    2007-01-01

    External apical root resorption is a common phenomenon associated with orthodontic treatment. The factors relevant to root resorption can be divided into biological and mechanical factors. Some mechanical and biological factors might be associated with an increased or decreased risk of root resorption during orthodontic treatment. For mechanical factors, the extensive tooth movement, root torque and intrusive forces, movement type, orthodontic force magnitude, duration and type of force a...

  3. Optimizing the chemical aspect of root canal irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    de Macedo, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Root canal treatment is aimed at the removal of inflamed and infected tissue present in the root canal system. It will prevent the entrance of new microorganisms or nutrients in order to maintain or create a healthy environment around the root. There is sufficient evidence that shows that traditional endodontic therapy cannot make the root canal system completely free of bacteria. Moreover, it may not always result in complete healing of apical periodontitis, highlighting the need of optimizi...

  4. Genomic Regions Influencing Seminal Root Traits in Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hannah; Hickey, Lee; Richard, Cecile; Mace, Emma; Kelly, Alison; Borrell, Andrew; Franckowiak, Jerome; Fox, Glen

    2016-03-01

    Water availability is a major limiting factor for crop production, making drought adaptation and its many component traits a desirable attribute of plant cultivars. Previous studies in cereal crops indicate that root traits expressed at early plant developmental stages, such as seminal root angle and root number, are associated with water extraction at different depths. Here, we conducted the first study to map seminal root traits in barley ( L.). Using a recently developed high-throughput phenotyping method, a panel of 30 barley genotypes and a doubled-haploid (DH) population (ND24260 × 'Flagship') comprising 330 lines genotyped with diversity array technology (DArT) markers were evaluated for seminal root angle (deviation from vertical) and root number under controlled environmental conditions. A high degree of phenotypic variation was observed in the panel of 30 genotypes: 13.5 to 82.2 and 3.6 to 6.9° for root angle and root number, respectively. A similar range was observed in the DH population: 16.4 to 70.5 and 3.6 to 6.5° for root angle and number, respectively. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seminal root traits (root angle, two QTL; root number, five QTL) were detected in the DH population. A major QTL influencing both root angle and root number (/) was positioned on chromosome 5HL. Across-species analysis identified 10 common genes underlying root trait QTL in barley, wheat ( L.), and sorghum [ (L.) Moench]. Here, we provide insight into seminal root phenotypes and provide a first look at the genetics controlling these traits in barley. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  5. Genomic Regions Influencing Seminal Root Traits in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Robinson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water availability is a major limiting factor for crop production, making drought adaptation and its many component traits a desirable attribute of plant cultivars. Previous studies in cereal crops indicate that root traits expressed at early plant developmental stages, such as seminal root angle and root number, are associated with water extraction at different depths. Here, we conducted the first study to map seminal root traits in barley ( L.. Using a recently developed high-throughput phenotyping method, a panel of 30 barley genotypes and a doubled-haploid (DH population (ND24260 × ‘Flagship’ comprising 330 lines genotyped with diversity array technology (DArT markers were evaluated for seminal root angle (deviation from vertical and root number under controlled environmental conditions. A high degree of phenotypic variation was observed in the panel of 30 genotypes: 13.5 to 82.2 and 3.6 to 6.9° for root angle and root number, respectively. A similar range was observed in the DH population: 16.4 to 70.5 and 3.6 to 6.5° for root angle and number, respectively. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL for seminal root traits (root angle, two QTL; root number, five QTL were detected in the DH population. A major QTL influencing both root angle and root number (/ was positioned on chromosome 5HL. Across-species analysis identified 10 common genes underlying root trait QTL in barley, wheat ( L., and sorghum [ (L. Moench]. Here, we provide insight into seminal root phenotypes and provide a first look at the genetics controlling these traits in barley.

  6. Characterizing root response phenotypes by neural network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzig, Sarah V.; Schiessl, Sarah; Stahl, Andreas; Snowdon, Rod J.

    2015-01-01

    Roots play an immediate role as the interface for water acquisition. To improve sustainability in low-water environments, breeders of major crops must therefore pay closer attention to advantageous root phenotypes; however, the complexity of root architecture in response to stress can be difficult to quantify. Here, the Sholl method, an established technique from neurobiology used for the characterization of neural network anatomy, was adapted to more adequately describe root responses to osm...

  7. Surface-based GPR underestimates below-stump root biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; Lisa J. Samuelson; Thomas A. Stokes; Kurt H. Johnsen; Peter H. Anderson; Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke

    2016-01-01

    Aims While lateral root mass is readily detectable with ground penetrating radar (GPR), the roots beneath a tree (below-stump) and overlapping lateral roots near large trees are problematic for surface-based antennas operated in reflection mode. We sought to determine if tree size (DBH) effects GPR root detection proximal to longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill) and if...

  8. Unusual anatomy of maxillary central incisor with two roots

    OpenAIRE

    T S Ashwini Shivakumar; Saleem Makandar; Ajay Kadam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for successful endodontic therapy. Failure to recognize unusual root canal anatomy may lead to unsuccessful endodontic treatment. Case Report: This case report describes the successful endodontic treatment of the maxillary central incisor with unusual anatomy of two roots and two root canals. A 23-year-old male patient was referred for dental consultation with discoloration of the maxillary right central incisor with periapical les...

  9. Root Disease, Longleaf Pine Mortality, and Prescribed Burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otrosina, W.J; C.H. Walkinshaw; S.J. Zarnoch; S-J. Sung; B.T. Sullivan

    2001-01-01

    Study to determine factors involved in decline of longleaf pine associated with prescribed burning. Trees having symptoms were recorded by crown rating system based upon symptom severity-corresponded to tree physiological status-increased in hot burn plots. Root pathogenic fungi widespread throughout the study site. Histological studies show high fine root mortality rate in the hot burn treatment. Decline syndrome is complexed by root pathogens, soil factors, root damage and dysfunction.

  10. Root-Contact/Pressure-Plate Assembly For Hydroponic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carlton E.; Loretan, Philip A.; Bonsi, Conrad K.; Hill, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    Hydroponic system includes growth channels equipped with rootcontact/pressure-plate assemblies. Pump and associated plumbing circulate nutrient liquid from reservoir, along bottom of growth channels, and back to reservoir. Root-contact/pressure-plate assembly in each growth channel stimulates growth of roots by applying mild contact pressure. Flat plate and plate connectors, together constitute pressure plate, free to move upward to accommodate growth of roots. System used for growing sweetpotatoes and possibly other tuber and root crops.

  11. Influence of temperature and rooting-promoter on the formation of root-primodia and on the rooting of chrysanthemum cuttings under storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, J.; Fukuda, M.

    1998-01-01

    In order to promote rooting for direct planting cuttings in a lighting cultivation of chrysanthemum, we clarified the effects of light, temperature and term of storage of the cuttings, and analyzed ways of using rooting promoters as a pre-treatment of cuttings for root-primodia formation and rooting. Light as a pre-treatment had little effect, so it seemed to be not necessary for the formation of root primodia. The formation of the root-primodia was most hastened at 25 degrees C; inversely, it was slowed down at low temperatures, that is, the root-primodia were formed in four days at 25 degrees C, five days at 20 degrees C, and seven days at 15 degrees C. With the use of rooting promoters as a pre-treatment for the rooting of cuttings, the root-primodia were formed faster when the whole of cuttings were dipped in 40 mg/L solution of indelebutyric acid (IBA) than when the base of cuttings were dipped or sprayed 400 mg/L solution of IBA. It was appropriate that cuttings were dipped in IBA then put in in plastic-pots (7.5cm) vertically, packed in polyethylene-bags and stored in a corrugated carton box

  12. Valve-sparing root replacement in children with aortic root aneurysm: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Badiu, Catalin C; Vogt, Manfred; Voss, Bernhard; Hörer, Jürgen; Prodan, Zsolt; Schreiber, Christian; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2013-05-01

    We aimed at evaluating the results of aortic valve-sparing root replacement (AVSRR) in children with aortic root aneurysm (ARA) due to genetic disorders in terms of mortality, reoperation and recurrent aortic valve regurgitation (AVR). Thirteen patients (mean age 9.7 ± 6.5 years, 10 months-18 years) underwent AVSRR for ARA between 2002 and 2011. Six of the 13 patients had Marfan syndrome, 3 Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), 2 bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and 2 an unspecified connective tissue disorder. AVR was graded as none/trace, mild and severe in 5, 7 and 1 patient, respectively. The mean pre-operative root diameter was 45 ± 10 mm (mean Z-score 10.3 ± 2.0). Remodelling of the aortic root was performed in 4 patients, reimplantation of the aortic valve in 9 and a concomitant cusp repair in 4. The diameter of the prostheses used for root replacement varied from 22 to 30 mm (mean Z-score = 2.3 ± 3). The follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up time of 3.7 years. There was no operative mortality. One patient with LDS died 2.5 years after the operation due to spontaneous rupture of the descending aorta. Root re-replacement with mechanical conduit was necessary in 1 patient for severe recurrent AVR 8 days after remodelling of the aortic root. At final follow-up, AVR was graded as none/trace and mild in all patients. Eleven patients presented in New York Heart Association functional Class I and 1 in Class II. In paediatric patients with ARA, valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and excellent mid-term valve durability. Hence, prosthetic valve-related morbidity may be avoided. Due to the large diameters of the aortic root and the ascending aorta, the size of the implanted root prostheses will not limit later growth of the native aorta.

  13. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE RODRIGUES DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum alone is not effective to recover plants affected by root rot. The application of potassium phosphite, combined or not with dolomitic lime or gypsum enables the partial recovery ‘Hass’ avocado plants affected by the disease.

  14. Multidimensional Scaling for Orthodontic Root Resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teodora Preoteasa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption. The multidimensional scaling (MDS visualization method is used to investigate the experimental data from patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dentistry, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, during a period of 4 years. The clusters emerging in the MDS plots reveal features and properties not easily captured by classical statistical tools. The results support the adoption of MDS for tackling the dentistry information and overcoming noise embedded into the data. The method introduced in this paper is rapid, efficient, and very useful for treating the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption.

  15. Parallelization of the ROOT Machine Learning Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Vakilipourtakalou, Pourya

    2016-01-01

    Today computation is an inseparable part of scientific research. Specially in Particle Physics when there is a classification problem like discrimination of Signals from Backgrounds originating from the collisions of particles. On the other hand, Monte Carlo simulations can be used in order to generate a known data set of Signals and Backgrounds based on theoretical physics. The aim of Machine Learning is to train some algorithms on known data set and then apply these trained algorithms to the unknown data sets. However, the most common framework for data analysis in Particle Physics is ROOT. In order to use Machine Learning methods, a Toolkit for Multivariate Data Analysis (TMVA) has been added to ROOT. The major consideration in this report is the parallelization of some TMVA methods, specially Cross-Validation and BDT.

  16. A novel root based Arabic stemmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed N. Al-Kabi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stemming algorithms are used in information retrieval systems, indexers, text mining, text classifiers etc., to extract stems or roots of different words, so that words derived from the same stem or root are grouped together. Many stemming algorithms were built in different natural languages. Khoja stemmer is one of the known and widely used Arabic stemmers. In this paper, we introduced a new light and heavy Arabic stemmer. This new stemmer is presented in this study and compared with two well-known Arabic stemmers. Results showed that accuracy of our stemmer is slightly better than the accuracy yielded by each one of those two well-known Arabic stemmers used for evaluation and comparison. Evaluation tests on our novel stemmer yield 75.03% accuracy, while the other two Arabic stemmers yield slightly lower accuracy.

  17. In vitro rootting of Dioscoreas sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Quintero

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The Universidad de Córdoba s Vegetal Tissue Culture Laboratory evaluated the effect of naphthalenacetic acid (NAA on in vitro rooting of three yam cultivars (Dioscorea sp. in 2000. The effect of four hormone levels (0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mg/1 was studied on three yam cultivars (Diamantes-22,003 and 005. A random experimental design was used employing 4x3 factorial arrangement and 20 repetitions; each experimental unit consisted of a glass receptacle containing the culture medium and the explant (one segment nodal. The variables considered were the number of roots and their thickness, culture medium oxidation and callus production. Findings showed that both the hormone and genotype had an effect on all those variables considered in the study and interaction was significant (P

  18. Onion root tip cell system for biodosimetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradiz, J; Druskovic, B.; Lovka, M.; Skrk, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methodology for radiation dose assessment based on chromosomal damage to plant cells has no yet been established, although root meristems have been the pioneer cytogenetic materials and profound analyses of irradiated meristematic cells of horse bean (Viciafaba L.) had been performed. Onion (Allium cepa L.) root tips frequently used for radiation cytogenetic studies, are recently considered to be one of the most promising plant test system for the detection of genotoxic environmental pollutants. We studied the possibility of using cytogenetic analyses of irradiated onion cells to determine the effective biological dose of ionizing radiation. The dose-effect relationships for chromosomal damages to onion meristematic cells were established after plants had been irradiated and subsequently grown in both laboratory and field conditions

  19. Tonoplast aquaporins facilitate lateral root emergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Hagen; Hachez, Charles; Bienert, Manuela Désirée

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are water channels allowing fast and passive diffusion of water across cell membranes. It was hypothesized that AQPs contribute to cell elongation processes by allowing water influx across the plasma membrane and the tonoplast to maintain adequate turgor pressure. Here, we report...... mutants showed no or minor reduction in growth of the main root. This phenotype was due to the retardation of LRP emergence. Live cell imaging revealed that tight spatiotemporal control of TIP abundance in the tonoplast of the different LRP cells is pivotal to mediating this developmental process. While...... lateral root emergence is correlated to a reduction of AtTIP1;1 and AtTIP1;2 protein levels in LRPs, expression of AtTIP2;1 is specifically needed in a restricted cell population at the base, then later at the flanks, of developing LRPs. Interestingly, the LRP emergence phenotype of the triple tip mutants...

  20. ROOT6: a Quest for Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    The sixth release cycle of ROOT is characterised by a radical modernisation in the core software technologies the too kit relies on: language standard, interpreter, hardware exploitation mechanisms. If on the one hand, the change offered the opportunity of consolidating the existing code base, in presence of such innovations, maintaining the balance between full backward compatibility and software performance was not easy. In this contribution we review the challenges and the solutions identified and implemented in the area of CPU and memory consumption as well as I/O capabilities in terms of patterns. Moreover, we present some of the new ROOT components which are offered to the users to improve the performance of third party applications.